Conservation Plan Addington Cemetery - Christchurch City Libraries

christchurchcitylibraries.com

Conservation Plan Addington Cemetery - Christchurch City Libraries

Conservation Plan for Addington Cemetery

Where monuments have been shattered or are damaged beyond repair, they should be

retained within the Cemetery

and, if possible carefully set in concrete. Where they are

becoming

severely degraded, a plaque in front of or on the grave to indicate who was

buried there and when. Where resources are limited, priority

should be given to placing

plaques on graves that are significant.

Wh ere the original locations of parts cannot be found, individual

monuments/parts should

be placed in a section of the cemetery solely containing such

monuments. These should be

fixed i n the new position but in such a way that such fixing is reversible, if subsequent

discovery

means they can be reinstated in their original location.

General

Policy 4

Required

Skills

People with the appropriate skill levels should be involved

in various aspects of works at

the Cemetery

Specialist conservators are required to evaluate and analyse individual monuments and

specify repairs (notably, stone conservators for most of the memorials, and metal

conservators for the railings). Masons and metalworkers will be needed to carry out repair

of broken headstones, provide temporary support to dislodged elements and repoint failed

joints. A qualified arboriculturalist should provide advice on and guide tree removals and

major pruning of historic vegetation. Christchurch City Council staff and volunteers can

carry out the bulk of the cyclical work, including the production

and regular updating of

condition

assessment reports, inventory, grass cutting, control of vegetation, and basic

cleaning (following

accepted best practice, and after appropriate training).

The New Zealand Standard for Headstones and Cemetery Monuments is NZS 4242:

1995

and

its amendments.

General Policy 5

Permission

It appears that the ownership of individual graves remains with the family

of the person(s)

interred

and therefore efforts should be made to seek permission from the family prior to

repair or restoration work being undertaken.

56

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines