E Teachers' resource kit - Office of Fair Trading

fairtrading.qld.gov.au

E Teachers' resource kit - Office of Fair Trading

Open to all Queensland students in Years 4 to 12

Shop

online

Entries close Friday 20 September 2013

A E

S L

Buy Buy

Smart

50%

Teachers’ resource kit

Great state. Great opportunity.

off

Competition 2013

WIN$11 WIN$11 00

Department of Justice and Attorney-General

a a share share of of over over

Office of Fair Trading | www.fairtrading.qld.gov.au | www.getoutthere.qld.gov.au

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Contents

Buy Smart Competition—a guide for teachers 3

How to integrate the Buy Smart Competition into the classroom 3

How teachers can use the Buy Smart Competition 4

To enter 4

Consumer topics 5

Presentation ideas 5

General competition-related activities (adaptable to a variety

of year levels) 6

Introductory activities—Primary level 6

Introductory activities—Secondary level 6

Enhancing activities 6

Synthesising activities 7

Reflecting activities 7

Credit and budgeting related activities 7

Useful websites and other resources available online 7

Mapping against Queensland and Australian Curriculum 8

Buy Smart Competition 2013—Teachers’ resource kit 2


Buy Smart Competition—a guide for teachers

Welcome to the Buy Smart Competition, the hands-on learning competition designed to teach

Queensland’s youth lifelong skills and awareness on consumer issues.

Did you know?

• More than 10 per cent of Queenslanders

declaring bankruptcy each year are under the

age of 25.

• The average age people begin using mobile

phones is 13 years old.

• More than 20 per cent of people under the

age of 18 report that mobile phone debt has

caused them major problems.

• According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics

(2012), 41.2 per cent of Australians were

exposed to a scam by telephone, fax or SMS.

• Cyber crime is growing rapidly and represents

the greatest challenge to police.

• Australia is a key target for industrialised and

internationally networked cyber criminals.

Students, like other groups in society, are consumers. When they hop on the school bus, line up at the tuckshop,

buy a mobile phone, lay-by the latest computer game or buy a new outfit, they are consumers. But are they

‘smart’ consumers—able to make informed choices, ask the right questions and seek help when they don’t get

what they paid for or when the service is not what they were expecting?

Spending money wisely is something we all have to learn. We all need good consumer and financial skills to

navigate through the wide range of choices we have when buying products today. Providing young people with

these skills helps to establish good habits and responsible attitudes from an early age.

The Buy Smart Competition is run annually by the Office of Fair Trading and is designed to increase students’

knowledge and understanding of financial and consumer issues, such as saving, budgeting, credit, buying a

mobile phone and spending wisely.

Young people are becoming more active in the marketplace and increasingly exposed to consumer issues.

Learning these skills from an early age will help your students develop smart financial and consumer habits that

will benefit them throughout their lives.

The Buy Smart Competition also has the added bonus of prize money for the winning schools and students!

How to integrate the Buy Smart Competition into

the classroom

Buy Smart can be broadly applied to many curriculum areas including:

Years 4–9:

• Mathematics

• Studies of Society and Environment

• Information and Communication Technology

• Technology.

Year 10:

• Business

• Legal Studies.

The Office of Fair Trading understands Queensland is transitioning to the Australian Curriculum

based on a staged implementation. During the transition period, schools should make informed

decisions by applying auditing processes to their current curriculum programs in conjunction

with planning to include the future Australian Curriculum expectations.

Buy Smart Competition 2013—Teachers’ resource kit 3


How teachers can use the Buy Smart Competition

As an assessment piece

Buy Smart Competition entries are ideal as a student’s final assessment piece for many different subjects. School

curriculums are packed! Using the competition as an assessment piece alleviates the need to try and squeeze in

yet another activity in an already overflowing schedule.

As a reinforcement tool for unit/subject work

Buy Smart Competition entries can reinforce work taught in a way that directly reflects the curriculum or your

school’s subject plans. As the competition encourages self-learning and creativity, it can be a fun and expansive

way for students to encapsulate what they have formally learnt in the class room.

The competition may also be useful in the development of communication skills through writing letters of

complaint, exploring the role of marketing and advertising, presentation techniques and community education.

As a framework for unit/subject work

While the Buy Smart Competition is aligned to units and subject work where consumerism is the primary focus

of learning, it can easily be applied to other subject areas. The competition is versatile in terms of what entries

are composed of. As long as content is based on a consumer or financial literacy issue, how it is delivered can be

entirely driven by teachers.

As extra-curricular for extension students or learning support

The Buy Smart Competition provides an excellent opportunity for extension students to expand the scope of

their studies. It is the perfect showcase for innovation, creative thinking and resourcefulness. Students are

encouraged to ‘think big’ or ‘outside the box’ in developing new ways to communicate a message to others.

Likewise, learning support students can also benefit from entering the competition as Buy Smart can give context

to learning, in a fun way. For example, in 2012 a learning support student won a Commendation prize for a simple

yet effective PowerPoint presentation on consumer rights.

As ‘life skills’ education

Students not working towards an OP or participating in Vocational Education and Training (VET) can also

benefit from entering the Buy Smart Competition. The competition can teach important financial and consumer

skills and encourage critical thinking necessary for future independent living. Students can explore areas that

specifically interest them, including buying a car, mobile phone contracts, online shopping and the rights and

responsibilities of businesses and consumers.

Culturally and linguistically diverse students can also use the competition to explore Standard Australian English,

as well as gain valuable knowledge of the Australian market and their rights and responsibilities within it.

To enter

To enter the competition, students must:

• research a consumer issue

• choose a target audience

• create an innovative way to present the consumer issue to their target audience

• submit their entry to the Office of Fair Trading.

Please refer to the entry kit available on the Office of Fair Trading website www.fairtrading.qld.gov.au, email

buysmart@qld.gov.au or call 13 QGOV (13 74 68) for more information.

Buy Smart Competition 2013—Teachers’ resource kit 4


Consumer topics

Topics students may like to explore include:

• budgeting

• green shopping

• online shopping

• getting what you paid for

• buying a car

• scams

• lay-by

• credit cards

• computers

• mobile phones

• iPods and MP3 players

• schoolies

• making a complaint

• getting a refund

• buying second-hand goods

• door-to-door sellers

• banking and saving

• sustainable consumerism.

Note: This list is not exhaustive. Students are encouraged to explore topics of interest to their particular age group.

Presentation ideas

Students are encouraged to develop a unique approach to presenting their consumer message. They should try

and think of what methods appeal to their chosen target audience as a guide to what might be most effective.

Some ideas include:

• cartoon character/comic strip

• advertisement

• storyboard/booklet

• wallet card

• CD cover

• board game

• song

• postcard

• fridge magnet

• PowerPoint presentation

• play

• animation

• video clip

• brochure

• poster

• website

• speech

• short story

• brochure

• newspaper article.

Shop

online

Buy Smart Competition 2013—Teachers’ resource kit 5


General competition-related activities

(adaptable to a variety of year levels)

The activities described below are available as PDF documents on the Office of Fair Trading’s website at

www.fairtrading.qld.gov.au

Introductory activities—Primary level

The snail in the ginger beer: a case study

The beginning of consumer law. Students could use this as the basis for a role play, discussion or news report to

identify the origins of consumer law and explore the role of the individual, the need for protection of consumer

rights or the role of government. A number of key terms will need to be defined with students.

Introduction to consumerism

Students are encouraged to identify themselves as consumers through these simple activities. They are also

introduced to basic world consumer rights.

Introductory activities—Secondary level

Introduction to consumer law and fundamental consumer rights

Students are encouraged to develop their own definitions of key terms and concepts.

Protecting consumers in Australia

Using the case study of the snail in the ginger beer, this activity covers some key legal aspects of consumer

protection in simple language with comprehension questions.

Enhancing activities

These activities are designed to increase students’ knowledge of consumer issues as well as helping them to

develop useful skills in decision-making, judgement, conflict resolution and communication. The issues covered

also provide stimuli for possible competition entries.

The activities described below are available as PDF documents on the Office of Fair Trading’s website at

www.fairtrading.qld.gov.au

Making a complaint

Practical tips and activities for students on how to make a complaint when the product or service they pay for

does not meet their expectations.

Second-hand cars: how to avoid the pitfalls

Students are encouraged to search for a car that fits their budget. Select a realistic figure for their first car (around

$5000). Extra material from the RACQ is included.

Marketing to consumers

Students are introduced to marketing concepts used by retailers to attract the almighty dollar. A range of

activities is suggested, from comparing cereal box designs to assessing the merits of prime time television

advertising.

Using credit

Information about credit and a case study to discuss in class.

Online shopping: is it safe?

Students are encouraged to evaluate an online shopping experience based on the Office of Fair Trading’s 10-point

checklist.

Buy Smart Competition 2013—Teachers’ resource kit 6


Synthesising activities

This activity is available as a PDF document on the Office of Fair Trading’s website at www.fairtrading.qld.gov.au

Sample survey: consumer education research

The focus here is on the Buy Smart Competition. Students are encouraged to create media-friendly education

materials to promote their particular consumer issue to their target audience. Developing surveys of their target

audience such as classmates, schoolmates or specific year levels may help students develop more targeted

campaigns. Students should refer to the competition entry form for a guide as to how to plan their presentations.

Reflecting activities

This activity is available as a PDF document on the Office of Fair Trading’s website at www.fairtrading.qld.gov.au

Class feedback sheet

Students should be encouraged to evaluate their own and others’ entries in terms of a simple set of criteria.

The emphasis here is on the importance of seeking feedback on creative ideas. It would be useful for students

to evaluate each other’s ideas for entries as a final stage to enable students to incorporate feedback into their

presentations.

Credit and budgeting related activities

Credit and budgeting related activities are also available to download at www.fairtrading.qld.gov.au

Useful websites and other resources available online

Office of Fair Trading—www.fairtrading.qld.gov.au

• Read detailed information on a range of consumer issues such as buying second-hand goods, door-to-door

sellers, refunds, lay-bys and scams.

• Access legislation such as the Competition and Consumer Act 2010 and Fair Trading Act 1989 (sections of this

document may be useful for students— the wording is quite easy to understand).

• ‘Real-life stories’ are available to download to help students understand the need for consumer education.

Get Out There—www.getoutthere.gov.au

• Get out there is the Office of Fair Trading’s interactive website for youth. It features a diverse range of

information such as keeping your money under control, buying your first car, starting university, smart

shopping, moving out of home and buying a mobile phone.

SCAMWatch—www.scamwatch.gov.au

• SCAMWatch is an online information source on all aspects of

scams—what they are and how to protect yourself.

Buy Smart Competition 2013—Teachers’ resource kit 7


Mapping against Queensland and Australian Curriculum

The following general competition-related activities have been mapped against the Queensland Curriculum—

Year 1–9 Essential Learnings, Year 10 Guidelines—Business and Australian Curriculum—Mathematics. The

learning activities are working towards demonstrating the Essential Learnings, Year 10 Guidelines and Australian

Curriculum. The activities could be used as a basis for developing assessment, which aligns with the identified

Queensland and Australian Curriculum.

General competition-related activities Possible Queensland and Australian Curriculum

Introductory

activities—

Primary level

A:

The snail in the

ginger beer: a

case study

B:

Introduction to

consumerism

Essential learnings: Studies of Society and Environment—by the end of Year 7:

Ways of working

Students are able to:

• identify issues and use common and own focus questions

• draw conclusions and make decisions based on information and evidence by

identifying patterns and connections

• communicate descriptions, decisions and conclusions, using different text

types for specific purposes and the conventions of research-based texts

• respond to investigation findings and conclusions by planning and

implementing actions.

Knowledge and understanding

Political and economic systems

Societies and economies have systems and institutions based on principles and

values.

• Australia’s legal system is founded on laws that reflect community values,

including fairness and impartiality, and the courts to uphold the laws and

protect rights and freedoms.

• Economic systems involve primary, secondary, service and knowledge

industries that use resources and develop products and services for sale to

consumers.

Essential learnings: Studies of Society and Environment—by the end of Year 7:

Ways of working

Students are able to:

• identify issues and use common and own focus questions

• collect and analyse information and evidence from primary and secondary

sources

• draw conclusions and make decisions based on information and evidence by

identifying patterns and connections

• communicate descriptions, decisions and conclusions, using different text

types for specific purposes and the conventions of research-based texts.

Knowledge and understanding

Political and economic systems

Societies and economies have systems and institutions based on principles and

values.

• Australia’s legal system is founded on laws that reflect community values,

including fairness and impartiality, and the courts to uphold the laws and

protect rights and freedoms.

• Australia is connected to other nations through international agreements, the

responsibilities of global citizenship, and shared commitments to security and

environmental issues.

• Economic systems involve primary, secondary, service and knowledge

industries that use resources and develop products and services for sale to

consumers.

Buy Smart Competition 2013—Teachers’ resource kit 8


General competition-related activities Possible Queensland and Australian Curriculum

Introductory

activities—

Secondary level

A:

Introduction to

consumer law

and fundamental

consumer rights

B:

Protecting

consumers in

Australia

Year 10 guidelines: Business

Ways of working

Students are able to:

• analyse and interpret business data, financial information and evidence to

solve problems

• devise and justify recommendations and decisions to business issues and

problems at local, national and global levels

• select and apply procedures, business technology and communication tools to

present information to a business standard that suits the context and audience.

Knowledge and understanding

Business, economic and legal systems

Business environments are shaped by stakeholder expectations, economic

activity, regulatory systems, legal structures and different types of business

organisations.

• Consumers and government expect businesses to act responsibly by making

informed decisions and using business practices that are socially, ethically,

economically and environmentally responsible and sustainable.

Work environments

Australian workplaces are dynamic environments and operate through an

interconnection of stakeholders, external forces and processes.

• Effective communication and organisational skills are essential for quality staff

and customer relations.

Essential Learnings: Studies of Society and the Environment—by the end of Year 9:

Ways of working

Students are able to:

• research and analyse data, information and evidence from primary and

secondary sources

• communicate descriptions, decisions and conclusions, using text types specific

to the context and purpose and the conventions of research-based texts.

Knowledge and understanding

Political and economic systems

Societies consist of interconnected decision-making systems, institutions and

processes based on principles and values.

Australia’s economic system is shaped by a range of economic activities, including

production and consumption, and government regulation.

Year 10 guidelines: Business

Ways of working

Students are able to:

• Conduct investigations of past, present and future business, economic and

legal activities, using valid business strategies, procedures and processes

• gather and validate evidence and data from a range of relevant sources using a

planned approach

• analyse and interpret business data, financial information and evidence to

solve problems

• apply concepts, processes and principles to unfamiliar business issues and

problems at local, national and global levels.

Knowledge and understanding

Business, economic and legal systems

Business environments are shaped by stakeholder expectations, economic

activity, regulatory systems, legal structures and different types of business

organisations.

• Consumers and government expect businesses to act responsibly by making

informed decisions and using business practices that are socially, ethically,

economically and environmentally responsible and sustainable.

• The principles and features of democracy in Australia include the common

good, separation of powers, government accountability, Australian

Constitution and parliamentary elections.

Buy Smart Competition 2013—Teachers’ resource kit 9


General competition-related activities Possible Queensland and Australian Curriculum

Introductory

activities—

Secondary level

continued

B:

Protecting

consumers in

Australia

continued

Essential Learnings: Studies of Society and the Environment—by the end of Year 9:

Ways of working

Students are able to:

• research and analyse data, information and evidence from primary and

secondary sources

• communicate descriptions, decisions and conclusions, using text types specific

to the context and purpose and the conventions of research-based texts.

Knowledge and understanding

Political and economic systems

Societies consist of interconnected decision-making systems, institutions and

processes based on principles and values.

• Australia’s government systems are based on liberal democratic principles,

including the ‘common good’ and parliamentary elections, perform functions,

including developing policy and formulating legislation, and have institutions

and instruments, including the High Court and Acts of Parliament.

• Australia’s legal and justice systems are based on principles, including an

independent judiciary, perform functions, including the protection of rights,

and use different types of law and courts.

General competition-related activities Possible Queensland and Australian Curriculum

Enhancing

activities

A:

Making a

complaint

Year 10 Guidelines: Business

Ways of working

Students are able to:

• gather and validate evidence and data from a range of relevant sources using a

planned approach

• analyse and interpret business data, financial information and evidence to

solve problems

• devise and justify recommendations and decisions to business issues and

problems at local, national and global levels

• select and apply procedures, business technology and communication tools to

present information to a business standard that suits the context and audience.

Knowledge and understanding

Business, economic and legal systems

Business environments are shaped by stakeholder expectations, economic activity,

regulatory systems, legal structures and different types of business organisations.

• Consumers and government expect businesses to act responsibly by making

informed decisions and using business practices that are socially, ethically,

economically and environmentally responsible and sustainable.

Work environments

Australian workplaces are dynamic environments and operate through an

interconnection of stakeholders, external forces and processes.

• Effective communication and organisational skills are essential for quality staff

and customer relations.

Essential Learnings: Studies of Society and Environment—by the end of Year 7:

Ways of working

Students are able to:

• identify issues and use common and own focus questions

• draw conclusions and make decisions based on information and evidence by

identifying patterns and connections

• communicate descriptions, decisions and conclusions, using different text

types for specific purposes and the conventions of research-based texts

• respond to investigation findings and conclusions by planning and

implementing actions.

Knowledge and understanding

Political and economic systems

Societies and economies have systems and institutions based on principles and

values.

• Economic systems involve primary, secondary, service and knowledge industries

that use resources and develop products and services for sale to consumers.

Buy Smart Competition 2013—Teachers’ resource kit 10


General competition-related activities Possible Queensland and Australian Curriculum

Enhancing

activities

continued

A:

Making a

complaint

continued

B:

Second-hand cars:

how to avoid the

pitfalls

Year 5:

Ways of working

Students will be able to:

• pose and refine questions for investigations

• draw and justify conclusions based on information and evidence

• communicate descriptions, decisions and conclusions, using text types

selected to match audience and purpose

• share opinions, identify possibilities and propose actions to respond to

findings.

Knowledge and understanding

Political and economic systems

Communities have developed decision-making systems that include principles and

values formed over time.

• Australia’s legal system has laws to protect personal rights and responsibilities

of young people, consequences for breaking laws and key personnel who

ensure the functioning of the system.

• Economic systems allocate resources, and are based on the principle that while

resources are limited, needs and wants are unlimited.

Year 10 Guidelines: Business

Ways of working

Students are able to:

• gather and validate evidence and data from a range of relevant sources using a

planned approach

• analyse and interpret business data, financial information and evidence to

solve problems.

Knowledge and understanding

Business, economic and legal systems

Business environments are shaped by stakeholder expectations, economic

activity, regulatory systems, legal structures and different types of business

organisations.

• Consumers and government expect businesses to act responsibly by making

informed decisions and using business practices that are socially, ethically,

economically and environmentally responsible and sustainable.

Buy Smart Competition 2013—Teachers’ resource kit 11


General competition-related activities Possible Queensland and Australian Curriculum

Enhancing

activities

continued

C:

Marketing to

consumers

Year 10 Guidelines: Business

Ways of working

Students are able to:

• conduct investigations of past, present and future business, economic and

legal activities, using valid business strategies, procedures and processes

• gather and validate evidence and data from a range of relevant sources using a

planned approach.

Knowledge and understanding

Enterprise and ventures

Successful enterprises and ventures are run by managers who are responsive to

stakeholder needs and wants and are able to predict the possible and probable

directions of the market.

• Entrepreneurial behaviour, skills and activities can impact positively and

negatively on a variety of stakeholders.

• Management of an enterprise or venture is a complex process involving the

generation of enterprising ideas, the development of business proposals and

plans, the undertaking of ventures and the evaluation of the outcomes.

Essential Learnings: Technology—by the end of Year 9:

Ways of working

Students are able to:

• investigate and analyse specifications, standards and constraints in the

development of design ideas

• evaluate the suitability of products and processes against criteria and

recommend improvements.

Knowledge and understanding

Technology as a human endeavour

Technology influences and impacts on people, their communities and

environments in local and global contexts.

• Product design and production decisions are influenced by aspects of

appropriateness and by detailed specifications, constraints and standards of

production.

Essential Learnings: Technology—by the end of Year 7:

Ways of working

Students are able to:

• investigate and analyse the purpose, context, specifications and constraints for

design ideas

• evaluate the suitability of products and processes for the purpose and context,

and recommend improvements.

Knowledge and understanding

Technology as a human endeavour

Technology influences and impacts on people, their communities and

environments.

• Product design and production decisions are influenced by specifications,

constraints and aspects of appropriateness including functions, aesthetics,

ethics, culture, available finances and resources, and sustainability.

Buy Smart Competition 2013—Teachers’ resource kit 12


General competition-related activities Possible Queensland and Australian Curriculum

Enhancing

activities

continued

D:

Using credit

E:

Online shopping:

is it safe?

Year 10 Guidelines: Business

Ways of working

Students are able to:

• conduct investigations of past, present and future business, economic and

legal activities, using valid business strategies, procedures and processes

• gather and validate evidence and data from a range of relevant sources using a

planned approach

• analyse and interpret business data, financial information and evidence to

solve problems

• devise and justify recommendations and decisions to business issues and

problems at local, national and global levels.

Knowledge and understanding

Business, economic and legal systems

Business environments are shaped by stakeholder expectations, economic

activity, regulatory systems, legal structures and different types of business

organisations.

• Systems that influence and regulate business and economic activity assist

with the allocation of scarce resources and protect parties who are directly and

indirectly affected by this activity.

• Consumers and government expect businesses to act responsibly by making

informed decisions and using business practices that are socially, ethically,

economically and environmentally responsible and sustainable.

The Australian Curriculum: Mathematics–Year 7:

Number and Algebra–Money and financial mathematics:

• Investigate and calculate ‘best buys’, with and without digital technologies

(ACMNA174).

The Australian Curriculum: Information Communication and Technology (ICT)

capability

Applying social and ethical protocols and practices when using ICT

This element involves students in developing an understanding of:

• digital information security, including the responsibility to:

- protect the rights, identity, privacy and emotional safety of online

audiences

- avoid and prevent cyber bullying

- ensure security of self and/or others.

• the benefits and consequences of ICT for individuals, groups and communities

in society, such as:

- becoming drivers of ICT, seeing themselves as creators as well as

consumers of ICT

- recognising its capacity to enhance participation and inclusion

- analysing how changes in technology impact on and relate to changes in

society.

Buy Smart Competition 2013—Teachers’ resource kit 13


General competition-related activities Possible Queensland and Australian Curriculum

Synthesising

activities

A:

Sample survey:

consumer

education

research

Essential Learnings: Technology—by the end of Year 7:

Ways of working

Students are able to:

• investigate and analyse the purpose, context, specifications and constraints for

design ideas

• communicate the details of designs showing relative proportion, using labelled

drawings, models and/or plans.

Knowledge and understanding

Information, materials and systems (resources)

The characteristics of resources are matched with tools and techniques to make

products to meet design challenges.

• Resources are selected according to their characteristics, to match

requirements of design challenges and suit the user.

General competition-related activities Possible Queensland and Australian Curriculum

Reflecting

activities

A:

Class feedback

sheet

This activity does not directly align with any specific Queensland or Australian

Curriculum. However, this activity could be used in conjunction with other

activities to assess specific essential learnings. The ‘Reflect’ ways of working and

assessable element could be targeted using this activity.

General competition-related activities Possible Queensland and Australian Curriculum

Credit and

budgeting related

activities

A:

Budget planning

Year 10 Guidelines: Business

Ways of working

Students are able to:

• gather and validate evidence and data from a range of relevant sources using a

planned approach

• select and apply procedures, business technology and communication tools to

present information to a business standard that suits the context and audience.

Knowledge and understanding

Information procedures

Information procedures and ICTs are used to ensure accountability and to manage

records effectively for personal, workplace, community and business purposes.

• Financial records management involves recording, reporting, analysing and

interpreting financial information in personal, business and social contexts.

The Australian Curriculum: Mathematics–Year 5:

Number and Algebra–Money and financial mathematics:

• Create simple financial plans (ACMNA106).

Buy Smart Competition 2013—Teachers’ resource kit 14


General competition-related activities Possible Queensland and Australian Curriculum

Credit and

budgeting

related activities

continued

B:

Managing your

money

C:

Money in the real

world

Year 10 Guidelines: Business

Ways of working

Students are able to:

• gather and validate evidence and data from a range of relevant sources using a

planned approach

• apply concepts, processes and principles to unfamiliar business issues,

problems and situations

• record, report, design and create business information, financial records and

products for personal and professional purposes.

Knowledge and understanding

Information procedures

Information procedures and ICTs are used to ensure accountability and to manage

records effectively for personal, workplace, community and business purposes.

• Financial records management involves recording, reporting, analysing and

interpreting financial information in personal, business and social contexts.

The Australian Curriculum: Mathematics–Year 5:

Number and Algebra–Money and financial mathematics:

• Create simple financial plans (ACMNA106).

Number and Algebra–Number and place value:

• Use efficient mental and written strategies and apply appropriate digital

technologies to solve problems (ACMNA291).

Year 10 Guidelines: Business

Ways of working

Students are able to:

• gather and validate evidence and data from a range of relevant sources using a

planned approach

• analyse and interpret business data, financial information and evidence to

solve problems

• apply concepts, processes and principles to unfamiliar business issues,

problems and situations

• devise and justify recommendations and decisions to business issues and

problems at local, national and global levels

• record, report, design and create business information, financial records and

products for personal and professional purposes.

Knowledge and understanding

Information procedures

Information procedures and ICTs are used to ensure accountability and to manage

records effectively for personal, workplace, community and business purposes.

• Financial records management involves recording, reporting, analysing and

interpreting financial information in personal, business and social contexts.

Work environments

Australian workplaces are dynamic environments and operate through an

interconnection of stakeholders, external forces and processes.

• Work environments are influenced by the various roles and responsibilities

of employees, employers, industrial organisations, state, territory and

Commonwealth governments, and the community.

Buy Smart Competition 2013—Teachers’ resource kit 15


General competition-related activities Possible Queensland and Australian Curriculum

Credit and

budgeting

related activities

continued

D:

Types of credit

E:

Credit cards

Year 10 Guidelines: Business

Ways of working

Students are able to:

• gather and validate evidence and data from a range of relevant sources using a

planned approach

• analyse and interpret business data, financial information and evidence to

solve problems.

Knowledge and understanding

Business, economic and legal systems

Business environments are shaped by stakeholder expectations, economic

activity, regulatory systems, legal structures and different types of business

organisations.

• Systems that influence and regulate business and economic activity assist

with the allocation of scarce resources and protect parties who are directly and

indirectly affected by this activity.

Year 10 Guidelines: Business

Ways of working

Students are able to:

• gather and validate evidence and data from a range of relevant sources using a

planned approach

• select and apply procedures, business technology and communication tools to

present information to a business standard that suits the context and audience.

Knowledge and understanding

Information procedures

Information procedures and ICTs are used to ensure accountability and to manage

records effectively for personal, workplace, community and business purposes.

• Financial records management involves recording, reporting, analysing and

interpreting financial information in personal, business and social contexts.

The Australian Curriculum: Mathematics–Year 7:

Number and Algebra–Real numbers:

• Find percentages of quantities and express one quantity as a percentage of

another, with and without digital technologies (ACMNA158).

Buy Smart Competition 2013—Teachers’ resource kit 16


For more information contact:

Office of Fair Trading

GPO Box 3111

Brisbane Qld 4001

Open to all Queensland students in Years 4 to 12

Shop

online

Entries close Friday 20 September 2013

A E

S L

Buy Buy

Smart

50%

off

Competition 2013

WIN$11 WIN$11 000 000

a a share share of of over over

www.fairtrading.qld.gov.au

13 QGOV (13 74 68)

buysmart@qld.gov.au

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