1937-05-14 - Northern New York Historical Newspapers

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1937-05-14 - Northern New York Historical Newspapers

Umuster "BREWSTER,THE HUBJ)F1THE HARLEAV VALLEY"

P0U6HKEEPSIEV J PAWLING

PEEKSKILL BREWSTER DANBURY

YONKERS f X WHITE PLAINS tanfrarfr

VOL. LXVIII, No. 3 Brewster, Putnam County, N. Y., Friday, May 14, 1937 Established 68 Years $2.00 per year

State Income Tax

Tops Estimate

Public Hearing On

Dog Racing Bill

Private Enterprise

To Speak June 3

25th Anniversary Of

Public Health Nursing

Cardinal Hayjk Will

Ordain Rev. Kilcoyne

St. Lawrence A. C.

Joins Twi-Light League

Milk Producers Meet

Mon., May 17,8 p. m.

Commissioner Mark Graves States

At Mass in St. Patrick's Cathedral,

Total Collections from Personal In­

May 22, Father Kilcoyne will Celecome

Tax May Total $100,000,000 Unbrate

His First Solemn Mass at the

less Corporation Tax Proves Disap­

Church of St. Lawrence O'Toolc,

pointing.

Brewster, Sunday, May 23.

"The State's share of the personal

income tax for the current fiscal year

will exceed Governor Lehman's $92,-

000,000 estimate by about $8,000-

000. To date, the State's share of actual

collections is $89,900,000 and June

installment payments should bring this

total to $100,000,000.

"The gain of $8,000,000 in the personal

income tax will be largely cancelled

by losses of $1,500,000, due to the

failure of the Legislature to enact the

one cent per gallon gas tax as of April

1, $3,500,000 due to the delay in amending

the unworkable driver's license

law of 1936 so that licenses might be

renewed in this fiscal year, and to

smaller losses of $500,000 each in the

mortgage tax and the beverage tax.

"Unless the unexpected happens

and the corporation tax, due on May

15, proves disappointing, Governor

Lehman's revenue estimate for the

current fiscal year will be fully realized

and may be slightly exceeded.

Comparing 1936 returns received

to the corresponding date in 1936, we

find that collections on 599,500 returns

for 1936 disclosed an actual yield, including

installment payments yet to

be collected, of $118,400,000 compared

with $91,000,000 on 513,800 1935 returns

received to a corresponding date last

year. This increase of 16.6 per cent in

the number of tax paid returns and

30 per cent in the yield of the tax is

intensely gratifying. It proves a sharp

increase in social incomes, denotes

greatly increased purchasing power

and indicates great progress toward.

recovery. ,,

Governor Lehman announced May

There will be an Institute on "Nurs­

The St. Lawrence A. C. diamond

1 that he will give a public hearing 3,000 Men and Women Representatives ing and Affiliated Services as they

representlves of Brewster, joined the Milk Producers of Dutchess, Putnam,

Monday, May 17, on the Hall bill leg­ of Private Enterprise will Meet in concern the Public," under the aus­

Harlem Valley Twi-Light League at Northern Westchester and Fairfield

alizing dog racing. After a public hear­ Carnegie Hall, June 3, for All Day pices of the New York State Nurses

its meeting Wednesday night when Counties will Meet in Town Hall,

ing last year, he vetoed a similar bill. Congress.

Association, District No. 12, Dutchess

they elected Rev. Simpson, of Carmel, Brewster, at 8 p. m. May 17, at Call

Proponents of the legislation which

and Putnam counties and the Dutchess

President and Romaine Lenz, of Cro­ of William A. Shcppard, President of

was sponsored by Assemblyman Leon­ Merwln K. Hart, president of the County Health Association Thursday,

ton Falls, Secretary and Treasurer. the Harlem Valley Milk Producers

ard Hall, Nassau Republican, believe, New York State Economic Council, has May 20, 1937, at Blodgett Hall and Rev. Mr. Bartholomew E. Kilcoyne This will be the fourth year of the

Association.

however, they have overcome in the announced the formation of the Com­ Alumnae House, Vassar College, Po'- of Brewster will be ordained to the League's existence and will comprise

new bill (some ob)ections previously mittee for American Private Enterkeepsle, N. Y.

priesthood of the Roman Catholic the Northern Westchester A. O, of As a result of conferences of milk

raised by the Governor.

prise, whose purpose will be to unite Miss Emily Hicks, R. N., Executive Church at the eight o'clock Mass on Purdys, Carmel A. C, Croton Falls A. producers of the Harlem Valley, there

Mayor Henry H Wells, of Brewster, for self-preservation the various Secretary of the New York State Saturday, May 22, at St. Patrick's Ca­ C, and the Brewster Club. The games will be a meeting for the discussion

and others are planning to attend the groups, industries and individuals com­ Nurses' Association, and Mrs. Vanderthedral, New York. Ordination will be will be played in four rounds during of milk legislation awaiting the action

"hearing.

posing private enterprise in New York bilt Webb, of Garrison, N. Y., will conferred by His Eminence Patrick the summer, all games commencing of Governor Lehman in Town Hall,

Some like betting in the open in the State.

speak.

Cardinal Hayes, Archbishop of New at 6:30.

Monday evening. Hon. William F.

good old English fashion and some An all-day "Congress of American For luncheon reservations kindly York. On Sunday, May 23, Father Brewster plays Its first game next Bleakley will assist Mr. Sheppard and

like the hole and corner fashion al­ Private Enterprise" will be held June notify Miss Dorothy G. Theall, R. N., Kilcoyne will celebrate his First Sal- Wednesday at the Electrozone Field the other milk producers in their conready

greedily intrenched.

3 at Carnegie Hall, Mr. Hart announc­ Public Health Nurse, Carmel, N. Y. emn Mass in the Church of St. Law­ against Carmel. Purdys will play Croferences.ed. About 3,000 men and women from

rence OToole, at eleven o'clock. ton Falls at Croton Falls Thursday Notices of the meeting arranged

all fields of private activity and from

evening.

Wednesday are carried in newspapers

Kennel Club Show

all sections of New York State will be Holy Name Society

at the request of Mr. Sheppard.

given an opportunity to organize a

A reporter requesting a "story" on

Set For June 12 solid front against pressure of organ­

Holds Breakfast

Young Republicans

Judge Bleakley called to mind the

ized minorities.

query of a child gazing at Judge

Harry McTavey Announces Show will Morning and afternoon sessions will Hon. William F. Bleakley, Rev. Francis

To Form Clubs Bleakley and Charlie Millard as they

be Held on New Grounds Overlook­ be held. Names of speakers will be an­ X. Shea and Rev. Peter C. McKay

rode in an open car together, "Which

ing Cross River Reservoir on Route nounced later. They will include some Address Members of St. Joseph's

Mrs. Walter Timmc Announces Young one is he?"

123.

of the "foremost men and women of Parish at The Evergreen.

People of Putnam will Organize Re­

the country," Mr. Hart said.

publican Clubs. Miss Couch Speaks

Maybe Westchester has the answer

A change in the location of the Mr. Hart said he believed the aver­ The Holy Name Society of St. Jos­

at Meeting of Women in Cold Spring.

or better yet the Judge himself.

annual North Westchester Kennel age legislator and Congressman waneph's Parish held its second annual

Club dog show was announced this ted to do what Is fair and right, but Communion breakfast at The Ever­

At the spring meeting of the Wo­ Alumni to Play

week by Harry McTavey, president the trouble is, as far as private entergreen, Tilly Foster, Sunday morning

men's Republican Club of Putnam

of the organization who reported that prise is concerned, that his constitu­ with more than 100 Catholic men of

County at Town Hall, Cold Spring on Varsity Next Friday

the 1937 exhibit will be held on new ents, who engaged in private enter­ Croton Falls, North Salem, Purdys,

Saturday Mrs. Tlmme, president, an­

grounds on route 123 between Katonprise, have not made the necessary ef­ Goldens Bridge, Lincolndale and Somers

nounced the membership totaled 1100 The Brewster Varsity have two

ah and Cross River. In past years the forts to make him understand what In attendance. The men received com­

enrolled Republican women. She ex­ games scheduled for next week. Tues­

Kennel Club has exhibited at Lawrence their needs are.

munion in the parish churches before

pressed confidence that the total day, May 18, they travel to Bethel

Farms.

"Private enterprise of all kinds is the breakfast. The program was open­

would soon be 2000 and expressed her and Friday, May 21, they tangle with

The date of this year's show is June threatened by the growing menace of ed with the invocation, delivered by

pleasure in tibe enthusiasm of young former Brewster High stars at Wells

12. Plans are already being made for public waste—by laws that Washing­ the Rev. Peter C. McKay. The menu

people to organize clubs. So the year Field. The alumni game is a tough as­

the exhibit and among those serving ton and Albany heap upon it," he said. consisted of grapefruit with minted

1937 will mark progress in this counsignment if all the ex-star ball wallop-

on the committee are Mrs. Richard "There has been substantially no let­ cherry, steak and sausages, baked poty.

The meeting >(pted In favor of pers can be rounded up for next Fri­

C. Bondy, Mrs. E. B. King, Mrs. T. up. The New York Legislature has this tatoes, water cress, sliced tomatoes,

holding the annualNneetlng In May, day but as yet no definite team has

Whitney Blake, Mrs. Sherman R. year adopted a budget more than 20 rolls and coffee.

and at the conclusion of. this business been selected so the Bears, playing

Hoyt and Mrs. Whitehouse Walker. per cent larger than that of last year Speakers were William F. Bleak­ Rev. Kilcoyne is well known in Miss Natalie Couch, Journal Clerk of every day, might turn the trick on the

The new exhibition grounds are four and is already talking about huge adley, of Ycnkers and Lake Mahopac. Brewster as the son of the late Bar­ the Assembly, arrived to address the rusty grads.

miles east of Katonah and about a ditional expenditures. Washington, too, and the Rev. Francis X. Shea, spiritual tholomew E. and Mary Gallagher Kil­ meeting.

The Junior Varsity will play the

o

mile west of Cross River on a broad, continues to yield to the spenders. Both director at St. Joseph's Seminary, coyne. He received his elementary

level hill-top overlooking Cross River

Republican Luncheon

the Federal Congress and the State Dunwoodle. Mr. Bleakley spoke con­ training and High School education in There are persons who toll or carry

Lincolndale Jayvees at Lincolndale,

Saturday, May 22.

reservoir. In commenting on the lo­ Legislature are building a growing cerning Mother's Day and its mean­ Brewster Public School, from which on without sleep for hours on end, but

May be Set June 5

cation, Mrs. Hoyt, chairman of the bureaucracy that is fast getting us ing to Catholic men. Father Shea's he graduated in 1929, and continued in New York State the Assemblymen

bench show committee, declared: down and will soon have its foot ir- topic was "Building Character." Mes­ his studies in Cathedral College, New who turn back the clock before ad­ Bruey Boy Dies

(Mrs. Harry Reynolds, chairman of "The new location offeres ample removably on our necks. The lot of sages of greetings were read from the York, and in St. Joseph's Seminary, journment win the sympathy of all

the annual luncheon of the Republi­ space for the Show to spread to those (Continued on Page 4) Rev. Edward V. Dargln, pastor of St. Yonkers.

who attend political meetings. Miss By Drowning

can Women's Club of Putnam County, generous dimensions so necessary for

Joseph's parish, who is in El Paso,

Couch told Of the work of Jane Todd

announces the date of the luncheon the exhibitors' convenience and the

Tex.; the Rev. B. J. Rourke and the His First Solemn Mass on May 23 and Billy Groat and described the ap­ Norman Bruey, 6 year old son of

will probably be Saturday, June 5, at judges ability to really move the dogs Emory Odells Celebrate Rt. Rev. Msgr. Arthur Scanlon. will be the first ever celebrated in purtenances of the Assembly Cham­ Mr. and Mrs. Francis Bruey, met ac­

Lake Mahopac Hotel, Mahopac, New in the ring, and also provides adequate 50th Anniversary

"America" was sung by the entire

Brewster, as Rev. Kilcoyne will be the ber as ably as Lowell Thomas did the cidental death by drowning at the

York.

parking space. There will also be an

gathering. Other vocal selections in­

first member of the parish ever to be Coronation. At Albany the journal school pond yesterday afternoon. He

Mrs. Reynolds will announce further unusually large ring used only for the Mr. and Mrs. Emory Odell celebratcluded "Why Don't My Dreams Come

elevated to the priesthood. In view of clerks crowned themselves with tin

fell In while attempting to right a

details after hearing from Hon. Ham­ Obedience Trials which are always ed their 50th wedding anniversary True?" and "My Gal Sal," by a Brew­

that fact, the whole parish is planning hats to deflect the splinters from Mr.

paper boat. Playmates caught his

ilton Fish who is expected to^address such an attraction."

with a reception at their home on ster" trio, George En right, Richard

to commemorate the event in a man­

pants with a fish hook and after the

Hack's gavel. Giving comfort to those

line broke ran for William Makenny

the assemblage.

A sterlng silver trophy and $5 in Brewster avenue Saturday evening. Cunningham and Joseph Hughes, with

ner worthy of its importance. of her sex, Miss Couch indicated no

who dove in and brought the body

The committee hope that Emerson cash will be offered for best in every Music was enjoyed, and greetings were Thomas L. Brennan as piano accom­

Rev. Thomas G. Philbln, pastor of woman should worry over jury duty, ashore.

Clark, veteran Republican leader of breed with $3 for best in opposite sex. extended by Rev. H. Pierce Simpson, panist; "Wonderful Mother of Mine,"

the Church of St. Lawrence OToole, heralded as a forward step in the Em­

Putnam County, now in his 90th year.^j Increased cash prizes will be awarded of Carmel, and Rev. Thomas Ellis, of Mr. Enrlght; "Rainbow on the River,"

will preach the sermon at the First pire State.

will also be present. Mr. Clark, form­ in all breed classes.

Brewster. Miss Dorothy Seeley, of Red Mr. Hughes, and "Where the River

Mass. Father Kilcoyne will be assisterly

owner and proprietor of the his­

o-

Bank, N .J., gave a recitation. Refresh­ Shannon Flows" and "JBlue Hawaii,"

ed at the altar by priest and seminar­ Miss Couch had to leave before tea, Fenimore Scouts

toric inn, was long chairman of the

ments, including a wedding cake, were by Mr. Cunningham.

ian friends:

but others enjoyed the hospitality of Hold Annual Dinner

Supervisors Vote

the ladies of Philipstown and the

County Committee. Recently he has

served.

ReV. John J. Hannafin, Deacon.

Arthur Rice, chairman of the break­

musical program rendered by a duet The first annual dinner of the

been 111 and by June 5 he will probably $80,000 Bond Issue

Mr. and Mrs. Odell were married at fast committee, welcomed the gather­ Rev. Cajetan J. Troy, Sub-deacon. of high school girls.

Fourth District of the Fenimore Coop­

be able to leave his hill top for the inn

the Methodist parsonage in Putnam ing. The meaning of Mother's Day Mr. John J. Gordon, Master of Cere­ Violets dotted the lawn near the er Council, Boy Scouts of America,

by the lake shore.

The county board of supervisors Valley. Four children, Mrs. L. Snlffen was discussed by Father Didicus. The monies.

hall and deer gamboled over the high­ was opened by an invocation from the

Assemblyman Stephens, Judge Bai­ voted at a meeting Monday afternoon of Brewster, and George, Chester and breakfast was an enjoyable affair to Mr. John P. Fleming, Acolyte. way near Squire Sutherland's home, Rev. Lee. During the supper old fireside

ley, Judge Nolan and last but not to float an $80,000 bond issue at six Blrdsall Odell, attended the celebra­ all attending and the committee In 'Mr. Joseph W. Joy, Thurlfer. so it appears that nature in Putnam songs were sung between courses.

least Judge Bleakley are all advised per cent interest to finance relief tion Saturday. Those present were: charge was accorded much praise. As­ Mr. Francis J. Murtha, Acolyte. County is still in close harmony with The after dinner speakers were Mr.

of the meeting.

costs of $40,000 for the current year Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Odell, Mr. and sisting Mr. Rice were Father McKay, Ushers at the Mass will be the broth­ the spirits of "76.

A. T. Baldwin who gave a short re­

There are 1100 members of the Club and to retire two certificates of in­ Mrs. Walter Gilbert, Rev. and Mrs. director of the society; Philip Doyle, ers of the newly ordained priest, Wil­

o

port In the work of the Troops in

and all who desire tickets should apdebtedness totaling $40,000. The reliel Thomas E. Ellis, Mrs. Lillian Dykeman, Harold Bittner and Edson Blttner. liam G. Kilcoyne and Robert J. Kil­

District Pour and the need of Troops

ply to Mrs. Harry Reynolds, Brewster, fund is in addition to $60,000 Included W. C. Jewell, Mr., and Mrs. Edward

coyne, assisted by Messrs. Francis Short Term Bond Issues in a number of towns nearby. Dr.

N. Y., at an early date.

In the county budget. Two democratic Ganong, Evelyn Beacom, Jean Barrett,

O'Brien, Gerard Mergardt, Bernard

» o

members of the board. Supervisors Mr. and /Mrs. Frank Knapp, Bernlce

Hope and Eugene O'Connor. For Home Relief

Sowerby gave an address about the

faciliites that Camp Curtis S. Read

Whiton and Selleck, voted against the Dtvkeman, Mrs. Sarah D. Granger,

WEDDED

Ossining Choir To

Special music has been prepared by

bond issue stating that relief costs Dorothy Seeley, Mrs. Antoinette D.

the choir .for the Mass, including Rose- At the meeting of the Board of offered the boys.

should be financed with tax levies. Townsend, Thomas Townsend, William Sing at Brewster

wig's -Ave Maria" and the "Panls Supervisors of Putnam County, held Awards were given to the men who

Agor-Borcherdmg.

The board voted to re-convey to Nor- D. Hill, Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Nichols,

Angelicus." During the distribution of May 10, 1937, the gentlemen by a four had helped scouting along: Everett

The marriage of Miss Dorothy A. borne P. Gatllng a section of aban­ Mr. and Mrs. J. Q. Nichols, Clara The Baptist Choir of Ossining, N. the First Blessings after the Mass, to two vote adopted a resolution to Burbank for 1934, C. B. White for 1935,

Borcherding, daughter of Mrs. Marie doned road land on Route 22 in South­ Stevens, Gloria O. Odell, Dorothy Y., will give the following program the "Juravit Dominus" of Cardinal refund the two $20,000 certificates of Win. Hall for 1936, Messrs Graham

Borcherding, of 056 Riverside Drive, east. Certain recommendations for Odell, Ethel M. Ferguson, Mr. and at the Brewster Baptist church Sun­ OY/onnel will be sung, a selection indebtedness, the amounts having and Orr for 1937.

New York City, and the late Fred changes at the county jail were re­ Mrs. Howard Hart well, Mrs. Charles day night at 8 o'clock:

traditional with and particularly ap­ been raised last November and De­ Following this the Eagle Patrol of

Borcherding, to Theron Kelsey Agor, ceived from the state department of P. Cole, Olive Cole, Mr. and Mrs. Prelude, Procession Du St. Facrepropriate for the celebration of a cember at the instigation of Welfare Mt. Kisco gave a demonstration of

of Lake Mahopac, took place Satur­ correction. Request was made in a re­ Percy G. Snelllng, Mrs. Ethel Beament, Crauvet.

First Solemn Mass.

Commissioner Eliza W. Dean, for pay­ scout work under the direction of Mr.

day in Trinity Lutheran Church, 168 solution for return of office equipment com, Gordon Chrlstensen, Mrs. Hen­ Processional, 309.

At present Rev. Kilcoyne is at the ment of home relief obligations of the Orr, their Scoutmaster.

West 10th Street, New York City, the to the county which was loaned to the rietta Stevens Chrlstensen, Fred Invocation

Seminary at Yonkers preparing /or Welfare Department. On April 30, 1937, Mr. Jules Dresback entertained the

Rev. Ernest Brennecke, D. D., pastor WPA.

Schloile, Mrs. Lorenzo B. Adams, Mrs. Anthem, "Thus Said the Lord of ordination. He will return to Brewster Welfare Commissioner Ralph Palmer group by a number of slight of hand

of the church, officiating.

Wall air maps of the county on dis­ Oscar Barrett, Oscar Barrett, Mrs. Hosts."

on May 23, for the First Mass. asked that the Board of Supervisors tricks.

The bride was given in marriage by

play were duly admired. Each person Charles Tuttle, John M. Adams, Mr. Scripture Reading.

Invitations have been Issued to all appropriate $40,000 for the payment The sadder part of the evening came

her uncle, George Ruschmeyer. Her

gazed intently at his own back yard. and Mrs. Elmer J. Lee, Mr. and Mrs. Prayer, Response.

the members of the parish to attend of home relief obligations of his de­ when Mr. Workum gave an account

sister, Mrs. Hans A. Melgard, was ma­

Anyone who likes maps should see Milton Barrett an dchildren, Daphane Sextet, "Lift Thine Eyes to the the Mass, and a record number Is expartment and accordingly the Board of the District Finances which are in

tron of honor and Miss M. Berbille

these.

Ann and Dean Barrett, Mr. and Mrs. Mountains," from Elijah—Mendelssohn. pected to be present,

of Supervisors granted Mr. Palmer bad shape because the spring drive

Tierney was maid of honor. Jesse C.

- o

Orlando Barrett, Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Anthem, "Radiant Morn Hath Pass­

o

that amount.

has not been given.

Knapp, H. B. Barrett, Mr. and Mr*,.

Mr. Win. Heray, the president of

Agor, brother of the bridegroom, was

ed Away," Woodward.

Poppies for Remembrance. The majority of the members of

People to Vote On

George Belts, Howard Odell, Mr. and

the Fenimore Cooper Council gave a

best man. The ushers were Dr. Irvin

Offertory, Largo—New World Sym­ The annual sale of the American the Board were of the opinion that it

L. Hunt, Hans A. Melgard, Lloyd $40,000,000 Bond Issue Mrs. Bert Odell, George Odell, Jr.,

speech on "Why Men Need Scouting."

phony—"Dvorak.

Legion Auxiliary poppies will be held was for the best interests of the tax­

Hope E. Odell, Mr. and Mrs. L. Snif-

Hartman and C. Cornell Shirts.

Baritone Solo, "A Friend of Mine," during the week of May 22 and 31 inpayers of the County that the pay­

Mr. Eiden Bishel also gave an in­

A reception was held after the cere­ Governor Lehman's revised proposal

fen, Mr. and Mrs. Chester Odell, Da­ Towner John Miller.

clusive.ment

of the obligations Incurred for

teresting talk on howe he a man of 70

mony for the immediate families and for a $40,000,000 bond issue to finance

vid Odell, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bea­ Soprano Solo, "The Publican," Van- The poppies this year are being Home Relief be spread over a period

had found scouting at the late age

bridal party at the Hotel Astor. permanent state improvements will go

com, Richard Beacom, Mr. and Mrs. der Water. made by non-compensated disabled of ten years. In that manner it is of 67.

before the November electorate as the

Orlando Barrett, Roy A. Bennett, Mr.

Dorothy Weeks

World War veterans who are being believed that upon the improvement The waiters were composed of two

The bride is a graduate of Columbia result of final legislative approval to­

and Mrs. Henry Caraway, Thomas P. Anthem, "God Hath Appointed a Day," paid for this work. We will receive our of financial conditions throughout scouts from each troop. Those from

University School of Oral Hygiene. day.

McKenna. Ward A. McKenna, Maude Tourf.

supply from the U. S. Veterans Hos­ the County, most of those who receive Brewster were Scouts Donley and So-

Mr. Agor graduated from Syracuse The Assembly approved its sub­

A. McKenna, Mrs. Cora M. Adams. Recessional 15.

pital at Northport, L. I. The poppy is home relief will in a short time be contlUl. University and is associated with P. F. mission, 80 to 61,. It previously passed

Benediction. Response.

the only flower by which the Americon tributing towards the payment of these

Beal and Sons, of Brewster. After a the Senate.

St. Joseph fc Parish, Croton Falls, Postlude, "Prelude Response and Legion and Its Auxiliary remember obligations incurred by the County The evening ended with the benedic­

motor trip through New England, they

will hold the last card party and dance Fugue in F, Bach.

the World War heroes who lie in

for their benefit. During the course

tion.

will reside on Peaceable Hill, Brew­ Governor Lehman, in a message to of the season Thursday evening, May Director, Dorothy Weeks.

Flanders Field. Our workers, Auxiliary

of the arguments, the two members

ster, N .Y.

the Legislature Wednesday, recom­

of the Board who voted against the

20. The committee has planned to

Organist, Charles Brieant.

members and juniors will be equipped

bond issue admitted that they had

mended reduction of his original $60.- make the occasion memorable with in­

wtttft official containers, anm bands

Guests from Mahopac who attend­

voted for the state bond issue for re­ All Join in Raising

000,000 proposition by 20 million and teresting prises for winners, donated

and identification cards. The next lief.ed

the wedding were Mr. and Mrs. that expenditures be confined to\oon- by funds of the Parish, good music A large meeting of the Y. T. C. was proceeds from the poppy sale shall be

$325,000 for Hospital j

Jesse C. Agor, Mr. and Mrs. Harold structdon of buildings to house wards and refreshments.

held on Wednesday evening with Re- used only for general welfare, rehabi­ Putnam County is one of the few

Stock, Dr. and Mrs. George H. Steacy, of the state.

ginla Patterson. Six new members litation and relief.

Counties in the State of New York

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel B. Crane and

Parking Notice.

joined the club. Lawn games were the Remember a Buddy by wearing a that has not issued bonds to raise Even as Burma is part of the Em­

Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Archer,

Contributions" for the Girls' Day The Village Board have directed special feature of the social hour. De­ Poppy.

money for Home Relief or Work Repire and the Empire part of Burma,

o

Camp at Peach Lake should be sent to Chief of Police Schaefer to start enlicious refreshments were served by

o

lief.

Brewster is part of Danbury and

Clean Up Day.

Miss Anna Crane, treasurer of the forcing the 2 hour parking ordinance Mrs. Patterson and her daughters. Af­ Rents in Kent, Carmel, Mahopac

Danbury part of Brewster. Danbury

The Village Board have designated Parent-Teacher Association at an ear­ for automobiles on Main street, in the ter a very happy evening the young and Brewster are rising rapidly as

parks in Brewster and Brewster is

Monday and Tuesday, May 17 and 18. ly date to help complete the plans. Village of Brewster, commencing on people adjourned giving Mr. and Mrs. families of men employed in the city Mrs. H. H. Wells entertained the healed at Danbury Hospital. Both lo­

as Clean Up Day& in the Village of The fee of $6.00 per child covers part Monday, May 17, 1937. Parking space Patiterson three cfcperk. The next aqueduct job seek homes. So the next Contract Club at luncheon on Wedcalities are cooperating in raising

Brewster, and the residents axe ask­ of the transportation cost. All other during the summer ^orit.hp ^ limited event is the song service in the Pres­ decade will bring building and renonesday.

There were tliree tables in

$320,000 for an addition to the hosptaL

ed to place any rubbish in front of expenses are covered. If anyone wishes and violators of the 2 hour parking byterian church May 20. May 26. Y. vating to many properties. There is

play and high scores were made by

All funds will be in hand before Dan­

their homes and Louis Hobby will to pay the expenses of a particular ordinance will be fined.

P. C. has a sunset supper meeting and opportunity for skilled labor in the

Mrs. Robert 8. Cleaver and Mrs. Myra

carry it away.

child, please notify Miss Crane. By order of the Village Board. election in Carmel.

S. Tuttle.

bury Fair when old home weeks

heavy industries.

unites thousands at the race track.


PAGE TWO THE BREWSTER STANDARD — ESTABLISHED 1869 FRIDAY, MAY 14,11937

Brewster in Second

Place Tie at Relays

The Brewster track team winning

21 medals and scoring 19 points, tied

Hendrick Hudson for second place in

Class C in the Westchester Relays, Sat­

urday. The squad or 13 made an ex-}

rollout showing and scored a single

tally in the final event of the day to

share place position honors with the

Half Moon boys.

Bargain Hours

for Telephone Calls

EVERY NIGHT after 7 and

all day Sunday you can

save money with reduced

rates on Long Distance telephone

calls:

Typical rates from:

BREWSTER

Albany, N. Y .35

Baltimore, Md. .55

Boston, Mass. 45

Buffalo, N. Y. .75

Hartford, Conn. .35

Philadelphia, Pa. AQ

Portland, Me .55

Providence, K.I. 46

Syracuse, N. Y. ..55

Washington, D. C .60

Thobc typical Station-U>-Station

. rate* are tor a/I initial 3-minute

talking period Subject to Flit ml

tax where the charge it 50c or more.

New York Telephone

Company

Brewster Wins, 6-1

From Pawling

Brewster High trounced the Pawling

nine by a 6-1 score on the Pawling

diamond last Tuesday afternoon in

one of the best played games of the

season.

Spec Mackey was on the mound for

the Bears and almost achieved what

is every pitchers dream—a no hit

game. There were two out in the sixth

before a Pawling bater connected for

a safe blow, this being their only hit

of the game.

23 1 1 20 8 3

Brady out for bunting on last strike.

The score by innings:

Brewster ;'.. 0 10 2 3 0 0—6

Pawling 100000 0—1

Three base hit Mackey. Struck out

by Mackey 6, by Smith 2, by Utter 1.

Bases on balls off Mackey 2, off Van

Kuren 2 ,off Smith 1. Hit by pitched

ball by Mackey, Moore, VanKuren,

Utter, by VanKuren, Heinen and

Genovese.

Brewster Trackmen

Defeat Ridgefield

Brewster opened their 11937 track

season with a 28-17 victory over Ridgefield

at Ridgefield last Thursday afternoon.

Before the meet was finished

a hard rain came which caused the

cancellation of the last three events,

the high jump, 440 and relay.

100 yard dash won by Steyn of Brewster;

2nd, Hilton (R); 3rd Murtha (B).

Time 10.3 seconds.

220 yard dash won by Hilton of

Ridgefield; 2d Steyn (B)- 3rd Buck

CB). Time 24.6.

880 yard run won by Smyth of Brewster;

2d Pierce (R); 3rd Moore (B).

Time 2.173.

Broad jump won by Hilton of Ridgefield;

2d Steyn (B); 3rd Piazza (B).

Distance 19 feet 10 inches.

Shot put won by Ledley of Brewster;

2d Buck (B); 3rd Duncan (R).

Distance 37 feet 5 1-2 Inches.

ASK FOR PROOF OF

g#l* A phone call will bring you

the interesting facts to

prove the extra value of any CMC truck that fit* your

needs. Or better still, come in and see them, inspect

them thoroughly and compare them critically. Tens of

thousands of truck buyers have already proved that an

investment in a CMC is assurance of extra value.

lime poymenlt through our own Y. M A. C Won ot lowed available iuiei

Brewster Loses

To Lincoln Aggies

Brewster went down to defeat at the

hands of Lincoln Agricultural School

nine for the fourth straight year last

Friday afternoon on Wells Field by

a 7-2 score.

Bob Pearson after turning in a three

hit performance against Danbury

Trade last Tuesday was again pressed

into service when pitcher Fredette and

outfielder Smith were suspended from

school on the morning of the game.

Had the two boys played the game off

the diamond as they do on the diamond,

Coach Geesman and his boys

would have undoubtedly won the game

and broken the four year Jinx that has

been hanging over their heads. Pearson,

despite overwork, pitched beauti­

Junior Varsity Downs

Lincoln dale, 10-5

The Brewster Junior Varsity defeated

the Lincoln Aggies second team 10-

5 on Wells Field last Monday afternoon.

Bill Murtha went on the mound for

the Jayvees and struck out 9 in five

innings, giving up three hits. Heinen,

Brady and Palmer led the Brewster

hitters, each getting two safe blows.

The box score follows:

Brewster Jayvees (10)

ab r h po a e

Heinen, 2b 3 2 2 1 1 0

Pinckney, c 2 0 0 12 1 0

Burdlck, cf 3 10 0 0 0

Murtha, p 3 0 0 1 1 0

Adams 1 0 0 0 0 1

Williams, lb 3 1 1 6 0 3

Brady, If 3 1 2 0 0 0

Palmer, ss 3 3 2 1 1 0

O'Brien, 3b 3 2 10 10

HAPPENINGS

1917—TWENTY YEARS AGO

Recruits are needed for the Putnam

Fife and Drum Corps.

Mr. and Mrs. William Bruen announce

the birth of a son.

Mrs. W. L. Sconeld will entertain

the Carmel Bridge Club on Saturday.

1907—THIRTY YEARS AGO

James Murty is enjoying his annual

vacation.

Conductor Trobridge, of Pawling, is

laid up with a sprained ankle.

James Leary has accepted a position

as freight agent at Croton Falls.

Dr. John J. Reed and family will

be welcomed on May 28 by members

of the Methodist church with a reception

at the parsonage.

Piatt to Address

Historical Society

Edmund Piatt, author of "History of

Poughkeepsie" will be the speaker at

the annual meeting of the Dutchess

County Historical Society Friday, May,

21 at the Nelson House. The business

meeting at 11 a. m. will be followed

by luncheon.

One of the Leading

Hair Dressing

Salons

m of —

JSeia Cnslattfi

Ward D. Hopkins is the first Brew­

Mr. Piatt will discuss the history of

The mile relay team composed of

ster boy to enlist in the regular army. Patrick J. Ryan is able to be out on Poughkeepsie In connection with the

Is the

Prank Piazza, Vincent Chirasello, Ern­

He joined the Infantry at Fort Slo- crutches and is directing improvements coming 250th anniversary celebration.

est Williams and Prank Richardson

cum on Monday.

at the Drewcliffe farm.

Helen Wilkinson Reynolds, trustee of

Pawling got their only run in the

won the race with Hendrick Hudson

the society, and author of its year Corjjal Mm

first inning when Murtha fumbled a

The iHome Guard will give a dance •Letters from Messrs. Reynolds and

second and Croton-T"


Fireworks Signal

Playland Opening

Three Amendments

Will Go on Ballot

Dpring is the season

of overflowing milk pails.

Every pound of this huge

aupply has to find an outlet.

Months of planning must

precede high production

and months of selling must

follow so that cash for the

spring milk crop can flow

back to the producer in an uninterrupted stream.

To help this along, Borden advertising and selling effort

are aggressively pushing every opportunity to find and develop

new markets for milk and milk products. Borden

research is dedicated to increasing the usefulness of the

nation's basio food.

In flush season and out, salesmanship and research are the

twin forces that keep milk moving from farm to household.

ASSOCIATED COMPANIES

PURCHASERS OF MIIK

MANUFACTURERS OF MIIK PRODUCTS

DISTRIBUTORS THROUGHOUT THE WORID

AUXILIARY NOTES

Our Poppy sale will start on May 22

and continue through Decoration Day.

This year we hope to sell more Poppies

for our boys than ever before.

Flowers will be arranged for the

soldieds' graves and also a wreath

for the monument.

The 40 and 8 will sponsor a joint

Memorial service to be held at Carmel

May 29. Memorial services will be held

at Brewster in the Town Hall on May

30. The Memorial Day parade will start

at 2 o'clock in the afternoon of May 31.

MADELINE D. KLINO,

Publicity Chairman.

——o

Track Meet, June 5

In Tallman Mountain

School athletes of Rockland and

Orange Counties, New York, and Bergen,

Hudson, Passaic and other nothern

counties of New Jersey will compete

in P.S.A.L. track and field championship

events, in the Tallman Mountain

Section of the Palisades Interstate

Park, near Sparkill, N. Y., on

Saturday, June 5, at 2 p. m. The

Princeton Alumni Association of

Northern New }Je«sey is sponsoring

this meet and donating the medals.

The events will be as follows: 100

yard dash, 220 yard dash, 440 yard

dash, 880 yard dash, one mle run and

880 yard relay, shot put, discus throw,

pole vault, high jumps and broad

Jumps.

Gild, silver and bronze medals will

Judge Nolan Backed

By New Castle Club

"NOW BE IT RESOLVED, that the

Hon. Gerald A. Nolan, hereby has the

preference and unqualified endorsement

of the - New Castle Republican

Club as the Republican candidate for

the office of Justice of the Supreme

Court of the State of New York, Ninth

Judicial District;

"AND BE IT FURTHER RESOLV­

ED, that a copy of this resolution be

forwarded to the Republican County

Committee of the County of Westchester,

to the Republican Town Commit­

tee of the Town of New Castle."

Mahopac Central High School to be Dedicated May 21st

Poppy month finds Argonne Unit diligently

occupied with the Auxiliary

With the formal opening of its gates Three proposed constitutional a-

The New Castle 'Republican Club

program as always. At the meeting

to the public next Saturday, May 15, mendments will be submitted to New

in its regular meeting held Wednesday

Thursday evening. May 6, monthly re­

Playland will observe its tenth anni­ York's electorate next November as

night unanimously endorsed the canports

were excellent revealing a total

versary as an amusement center own­ a result of action in the 1937 state

didacy of County Judge Gerald Nolan

of $31.34 for Child Welfare. Commued

by Westchester County and operat­ Legitfaiture.

for Justice of the Supreme Court of

nity Service and Rehabilitation. Famied

by the Park Commission. Special They would:

the ninth judicial district.

lies and children assisted 7, coupons

events and thrilling attractions are Provide for election of assemblymen

The office of Supreme Court Jus­

collected 374.

planned for the season as part of a for two years, instead of one as at

tice which will be open for election

Many members attended "Sons of

Decennial Celebration. The regular bi­ present.

in November was formerly held by

the Legion Day" on Sunday. May 9,

weekly display of Fireworks will be in­ Provide a four-year term for gov­

William F. Bleakley who resigned

when it was estimated that over 1,000

augurated this Saturday and will be ernor, attorney general and compt­

to run for governor last Fall. Sid­

cars were included in the motorcade

presented every Tuesday and Friday roller, instead of two as present.

ney Syme is now Justice of the Su­

that visited Carmel and West Point

evening throughout the summer. Permit sheriffs to succeed thempreme

Court, having succeeded Judge

under special police escort. This gath­

Playland offers eight new amuseselves, now prohibited by state law.

Bleakley by appointment of Governor

ering was representative of the entire

ment devices this year including a

Lehman.

Ninth District.

sensational ride called "The Octopus,"

Our Poppy Poster contest is pro­ Proposed by (Ralph Terhune, of

a modernistic ferris wheel, new autos dren.

gressing successfully. This year we will Ohappaqua. and seconded by Hogarth

for the speedway, electric boats, a new The bathing beach and swimming

also have a Poppy window display to Sweet, the resolution follows:

walk thru called "Bamboo" and "Sports- pool will be opened May 29 and for the

be set up In the office of Daniel B.

ville," the hall of hilarity, excitement first time male sun worshippers may

Brandon. This will be one of four

"WHEREAS, the electors of the

Photo of The Putnam County Courier

and nonsense. Complete with revolving swim or bask in the sand without don­

similar displays In (Putnam County to

Ninth Judicial District will on the 2d

The new Central school building on

barrel, shaking floors, a huge roulette ning the tops to their suits. And since

be judged for a prize and will be com­

day of November, 1937, vote to fill the

tion proper ornamentation in respect Kelsle Agor, President.

wheel and a gigantic slide, "Sports- the park commission's ban on expospleted

May 21.

office of Justice of the Supreme Court

the Lake Ridge at Lake Mahopac, to sunlight, prevailing winds, apville"

offers fun for all and dignity ed male chests was lifted not a bath­

of the State of New Yok In this said which is ncaring completion, will unproaches to and from athletic field M. Campbell Lorini, Vice-president.

for more.

ing suit top has been worn by the

Judicial District, and,

doubtedly be the finest example of etc.

Leslie P. Dodge, Clerk.

Playland's most popular feature is many pro-season bathers who have

Colonial architecture in this part of

still Klddyland, the miniature amuse­ thronged the beach during the recent

"WHEREAS, the members of this,

Entering the vestibule from the

the country and one of the most com­

Louis S. Brown.

ment park for youngsters. And thous­ warm weather.

The New Castle Republican Club, re­

front of the building between the

pletely equipped school plants'In the

ands of free tickets to various devices Free attractions will be presented

cognize the need of an independent,

huge columns of the portica, one Rocco Falllace.

East.

In this section are now being distri­ twice daily beginning May 30, with a

unbiased and qualified judiciary, and,

passes into the lobby.

Edward E. Dwyer, Supervising Prinbuted

to all Westchester school chil- change of bill every other week.

The dedication will take place on

"WHEREAS, the Hon. Gerald A.

Inscription on Plaque. cipal.

Friday everimg, May 21.

Nolan, County Judge of Westchester

The Inscription on the large bronze Harold F. Jung, Treasurer.

County, has well and faithfully serv­ The board of education at the out­ plaque on the south wall In the ened

the people of the County of Westset determined on the Colonial style trance to the lobby reads as follows: James H. Brooks, District Superin­

Overflowing milk pails

ohester as their County Judge, and as as being typically American In design,

tendent.

Acting City Judge of the City of simple In detail, and Inspired to home

Mahopac School

Yonkers, and has thus demlnstrated builders throughout the Mahopacs and

G. Wesley Clark, Clerk of the Works.

his fitness and ability, and has dis­ vicinity.

Erected 1936

Edgar A. B. Spencer, Attorney.

charged his judclal duties fairly and

Federal Emergenqy Administration Knappe and Morris, Architects.

Impartially with true judicial tempera­ After the site was chosen, the plans

Chapman Krug Engineering Comment

and knowledge In a manner that for the structure took into considera­ Public Works Project No. 6223 pany, General Contractor.

has brought honor to himself and to

his courts;

LOOK AT

CAOJUAC

MOTOR

Many find it hard to believe that a Cadillacbuilt

La Salle V-8 is now actually within

reach of the average family.

Yet the facts are perfectly plain. La Salle

is priced as low as $1095*. And this is the

DELIVERED price at Detroit, including all

standard accessories. Only transportation,

state and local sales taxes need be added.

Furthermore, La Salle is iuexj>en8ive to

driveauduiaiutain. Itis

remarkably economical

in its use of gasoline and

oil—and La Salle's service

costs will prove a

deligbtful surprise.

ALLE

AT A PRICE WITHIN

REACH OF THE AVERAGE

FAMILY

Remember, too, that La Salle is Cadillacbuilt

throughout. This means long life and

exceptional freedom from repairs.

If you buy anything above the very lowestpriced

cars, it will pay you to go on up to

La Salle. Why not come in today?

• • •

'Deliveredprice at Detroit, Mich., $1095 and up, subject

to change without notice. Model illustrated 5-Passenger

Touring Sedan $1260. These

price* include all standard

accessories. Transportation,

State and Local Sales Taxes,

Optional Accessories and

Equipment—Extra.

AND UP «

BRADY & STANNARD

87 No. Main St. Brewster, N. Y.

be given to the winners. Entries close

on June 1 with E. W. Bedford, chairman,

route 9-W, corner of High avenue,

Nyack, N. Y.

"••',•••

DOG FOOD c-4

TEXSUN

GRAPEFRUIT JUICE 3-28'

GRAND UNION FANCY

APPLESAUCE

FREE RUNNING

IVORY SALT

CONFECTIONER'S

SUGAR xxxx

NS ju,

shopping

i&GRAND UNION waif

WEEK END SPECIALS

PURE REFINED

LARD

BERMA

COFFEE

SMOOTH, FULL-BODIED

2:i b .47<

frj cans ^Pi ^0 r

Mim boxes | ^M r

3&19'

UNEEDA BISCUIT 3^13/

COLONIAL MOLASSES *. * .. i Q?

FORCE WHOLE WHEAT FLAKES 2P k fl« 23/

CLAPPS BABY FOODS 3««25/

SUPER SUDS

SUPER SUDS CONCENTRATEDPks20f

OCTAGON LAUNDRY SOAP 6 b *"25/

Qarden Fresh Fruits & Vegetables

BANANAS

GOLDEN

RIPE

lb. 5

GCEBERC LETTUCE 2 •».. fa**25/ I PINEAPPLES LARCE PORTO R.CAN ... 10/

TOMATOES EXTRA SELECTED lb. 15/ APPLES WESTERN WINES APS 3«>«-25/

Best Buys in Better Meats

FANCY YOUNG TENDER

LEGS of LAMB

BEST LOIN LAMB CHOPS

GRAND UNION'S BETTER PRIME BEEF

TOP SIRLOIN ROAST ib 3 3 ^

A DELICIOUS BONELESS ROAST

BETTER PRIME BEEF

CHUCK ROAST 23

Fresh Fish Specials

FRESH MACKEREL »12/

FRESH CAPE SCALLOPS . * 29/

HUDSON RIVER 3UCK SHAD u> 8/

FILLET OF HADDOCK • * 17/

lb. 27

ib. 39*

GRAND UNION'S FAMOUS

VERMONT CURE

SMOKED

SHOULDERS

lb. 21

igfiKuc

GRAND UNION

\


.

PAGE POUR THE BREWSTER STANDARD — ESTABLISHED 1869 FRIDAY, MAY 1W, 1937

TOE BREWSTER STANDARD

Brewster, New York

E. W. Addis Estate, Publisher

Friday, May 14, 1937

Published Weekly at Brewster, Putnam

County, N. Y.

Entered at the Post Office at Brewster

as second class mail.

Justices and Milk.

(People of Orange County tell as an

after dinner story the tale of a cow

that would permit no one but her owner,

Hon A. H. P. Seeger, former Justice

of the Supreme Court to milk her.

Now the story is true and a child can

imagine how the Seeger family would

have fared if the Judge failed to produce

the milk. Necessity might have

forced the family to borrow from the

neighbors or if the occurrence had

been in recent years to let some governmental

agency send in powdered

milk. At any rate the milk problem

lies in every home.

William P. Bleakley, former Justice

of the Supreme Court, some months

ago disclaimed such knowledge of

cows as Judge Seeger may have acquired.

Xt is probable that today he

has in hand valuable verifiable facts

about them, and certainly he must

know sources of reliable information.

In addition to that he has undoubtedly

an understanding of human nature.

It is possible he could milk a cow. But

if friends and circumstances force him

to depend on William A. Sheppard,

Arthur H. Vail, Floyd Y. Keeler or the

Borden Company for milk, he must

establish credit wibh them for the delivery

of his daily bottle while he

sleeps. His milk problem may be more

ticklish than Judge Seeger's.

Judge Bleakley expects to attend a

milk meeting in Brewster on Monday,

but whether he does or not the "milk

situation" will continue. Thirty years

ago General Ketcham spoke of conferring

with Speaker James W. Wadsworth

about cows. Last summer Hamilton

Pish sent on a letter Emerson

W. Addis wrote Hamilton Pish forty

years ago in which milk was the main

topic and General Ketcham was coming

to Brewster to confer with John

S. Eno of the Borden Company.

Milk may seem a mild topic for an

editorial .But babies cry for it, stars

bathe in it, Anne Morgan and Elizabeth

Marbury held prize fights for it

and we that were raised on Eagle

Brand dote on the subject, for one

reason because it has no political

bias and takes no account of state or

national boundaries. So babes may

come and grow, and the complexities

of milk problems grow with them,

o

Financing Home Relief.

The Board of Supervisors of Putnam

County has just passed an act to

bond the County of Putnam for $80,-

000 for home relief incurred last year

and to be incurred this year. It is a

ten year or short term issue.

Because of the natural trend of

business cycles, business conditions

have improved to a great extent

throughout the Country and throughout

the World. If we are to believe

the report given out by the administration

at Washington, D. C, the country

!s now in a prosperous condition

and the depression is nearly a thing of

the past, however, relief work must

be continued for those in need. It

therefore appears only just and fair

that obligations of municipalities such

as Putnam County should raise money

to pay for home relief by a short term

bond issue maturing within the earning

period of those who receive such

aid. By so doing the entire burden

does not fall upon the home owning

taxpayers during the year of expenditure

but is spread over a period not

exceeding ten years. Within a few

years the incomes of many of those

who are now receiving aid will be increased

to a point where they will be

paying back a portion of what they

received during the depression period.

A .short term bond issue should not

be confused with the long term issues

extending far beyond the life of

the project or benefit received. Such

long term issues are nothing more

than a shortage on our children's

children who. may be so burdened that

repudiation may follow.

o

The best time to pick flowers is early

in the morning while they are still

full of moisture. If picked during the

heat of the day. put them in deep, cool

water in a cool room so that they are

fully swollen with water before they

are arranged.

40 COWS AND HEIFERS

AT AUCTION

Many blood tested fresh cows, spring -

era and bred heifers and a few guaranteed

work horses will be sold on

Thursday, May 20fch, at 1 p. m. sharp

for the high cash dollar. Rain or shine

at the E. u. Van Horn farm better

known as the Owen farm on Route

208 l\i miles south of Washingtonville,

14 miics southwest of Newbury and 1U

miles southeast of Goshen. The heart

of Orange County sale starts sharp at

1 p. in. This sale will be absoluU-ly a

cash sale and tiie lugh dollar will set

the price. All animals to be paid for on

day of sale. This herd will consist of

about 40 head of good young cows and

heifers. Many blood tested Uojstein*

and colored om-.s. The fresh cows are

strictly fresh, balance close up springers,

heavy producers and high testers.

Also one pure bred registered fancy

Guernsey service bull.

W. H. AUSTIN,

Walton, N. Y.

E. B. VAN HORN,

Washington viUx.

COL. HENRY DONNE1XY, Auctioneer.

A Slice of Life

By RICHARD H. WILKINSON

© Associated Newspapers.

WNU Service.

JULIAN SHORE opened the envelu

ope and stared at the check that

fell out on his desk. Five hundred

dollars! It was hard to believe,

hard to grasp. He wet his lips and

ran a finger around the inside of

his collar. Five hundred dollars! He

scrutinized the figures closely. They

didn't say five or fifty, but five hundred.

There it was as plain as day,

with his name written after: "Pay

to the order of."

Julian sighed. He produced a

handkerchief and dabbed at his forehead.

The reaction was a little annoying.

He wondered why he didn't

jump up and yell and throw things

around and rush to the telephone

and call his wife. That's the way

he|d more or less pictured himself

doing. Instead he sat quietly at his

desk and projected his mind into

the past. Five years. Five years ago

Julian had set out to realize his

ambition of becoming a commercial

artist. His only requisites were an

undeveloped flare for drawing, a

vivid imagination and a fiery ambition.

The first ten months had

netted him a total of twenty-five

dollars. But he had improved, had

learned by experience. The next

year had brought in $1,000, in driblets

of five, ten and fifty-dollar

checks.

It was then he'd married Jinie.

Jinie knew what she was stepping

into. She had faith in him. She

wanted to sacrifice so he could keep

on developing himself. She'd been

darn decent about it, too, even

though the first twelve months had

netted them a hundred less than

the year before. It hadn't made any

difference. She'd kept behind him,

kept encouraging and buoying up his

spirits. And so he had hung on. He'd

kept at it for three years. There

were times when the future looked

pretty hopeless and pretty black.

Without Jinie he might have quit.

And now this. His first real check.

His first big success. After three

years of plugging, a thing like that

does something to a man.

Julian stared at the check, and

was suddenly possessed of an irresistible

and overpowering impulse.

He wanted to take that check

and go on a spree. He wanted one

wild, reckless fling. He wanted to

unleash all the pent up desires of

three years of saving and scrimping

and plugging, and—to hell with the

consequences.

He thought of Jinie. The idea was

crazy, mad. It wouldn't be fair to

Jinie. Jinie was practical. She had

sense. A check for five hundred dollars

wouldn't affect her that way.

She'd be able to think rationally.

He glanced at his watch. It was

9:45 a. m. He got his hat, went out,

called a taxi, gave his home

address.

Jinie was finishing up the breakfast

dishes when he came in. She

looked at him and guessed that

something had happened. She said:

"What is it, sweet?"

Julian wet his lips. He handed her

the check, conscious of the pounding

of his heart. She looked at it and

then lookeel up at him and her eyes

were shining. "Julian!Five hundred!

Oh, Jul—"

"Jinie," said Julian, "I've got an

idea. Let's convert tins check into

cash. Let's take two hundred of it

and buy ourselves some clothes.

Let's look up a cruise and go whooping

for a week or two!"

Jinie sat down abruptly. "Julian!"

"Let's reserve the most expensive

suite on the most expensive boat.

Let's act and talk and feel and look

as though we hadn't a care in the

world for as long as the remaining

three hundred will last."

A furrow appeared in Jinie's forehead.

"Julian if we do that—we

owe so many bills."

"We've spent three years," Julian

Cl|t in savagely, "waiting. Waiting

for something to happen. Just waiting

and hoping and working and

saving and trying tc get along. If

we do this we'll ) ave something to

look back on. Hi.vtory, for us, will

date from the moment we decide to

go. And next year we'll do it again.

What if we don't build up a bank

account? When we get old we'll have

something that those who have a

bank account won't have. A man in

my business has got to have a

change of viewpoint, a change of atmosphere,

a new outlook. I'm getting

stale. We're both going to

seed."

"Julian! Julian! What if—"

"What if—" Julian exploded.

"Never mind the 'ifs!' Never mind

anything! Let's go! Let's live! Let's

be happy! Let's cut ourselves a

slice of life and eat it while our

stomachs are young enough to

digest it."

At which point Jinie leaped at her

husband and flung her arms around

his neck. "Let's!" she cried. "Oh,

my darling, let's! It's what I've

always wanted to do only I—I'm so

practical I—I didn't have the courage."

"Practical?" Julian bellowed.

"You! Wow! Yippee! Hand me that

telephone, old girl! And start packing

right this minute. From now on

our motto is to—"

'To the dickens with everything!"

Jinie finished joyfully.

Near Enough

"He'd asked me a thousand

times to marry him."

"A thousand times?"

"Well, twice before, anyway."—

vStrey Stories Magazine.

VILLAGE OF BREWSTER N. Y

NOTICE OF SPECAL ELECTION

FOR SUBMISSION OF

PROPOSITIONS.

NOTICE.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That

special election will be held in the

Village of Brewster, New York, at the

Town Hall in said Village on the 27th

day of May, 1937, and that the polls

thereof will be open at 2 o'clock in

the afternoon and close at 8 o'clock

in the evening (Daylight Saving Time)

on said day, and that at such special

election the following propositions

will be submitted to the electors of

such Village qualified to vote on said

propositions:

PROPOSITION NO. 1

Proposition for Incinerator plant

and bond issue;

Shall the resolution adopted by the

Board of Trustees of the Village of

Brewster, New York, on the 12th day

of May, 1937, be approved, namely—

A resolution an abstract of which

is as follows:

A resolution providing for the construction

of a plant for the disposal

of garbage, ashes and rubbish for said

Village and acquiring the necessary

lands and appurtenances therefor;

appropriating the sum of $18,000 for

such purpose, said amount to be borrowed

upon bonds of the Village to be

issued for such purpose in the amtfunt

of $18,000.; providing for raising annually

by tax a sum sufficient to pay

the principal and interest of said |

bonds; providing that the period of

probable usefulness of such improvement

is 15 years?

PROPOSITION NO. 2

Proposition for new fire house and

bond issue;

Shall the resolution adopted by the

Board of Trustees of the Village of

Brewster, New York, on the 12th day

of May. 1937, be approved, namely—

A resolution an abstract of which

is as follows;

A resolution providing for the construction

of a new fire house for the

use of the fire department on property

owned by the Village at corner of

East Main Street and Peaceable Hill

Road; appropriating the sum of $28,-

000 for such purpose; providing for

applying the sum of $6,000 cash on

hand available therefor to meet such

appropriation; providing for l^lsfng

the balance of such appropriation

by the issuance of bonds of

the Village of Brewster in the

amount of $22,000.; providing for

raising annually by tax a sum sufficient

to pay the principal and interest

of said bonds, and providing that the

period of probable usefulness of such

improvement is 20 years?

PROPOSITION NO. 3.

Proposition for fire apparatus and

bond issue;

Shall the resolution adopted by the

Board of Trustees of the Village of

Brewster, New York, on the 12th day

of May ,1937, be approved, namely—

A resolution an abstract of which is

as follows:

A resolution providing for purchasing

for the use of the fire department

one "City Service Hook and Ladder

Truck" and one 600-gallon Triple

Combination Pumping Engine; appropriating

the sum of $14,000 for such

purpose; providing for the issuance of

bonds of the Village in the amount

of $14,000 to meet said appropriation;

providing for raising annually by tax

a sum sufficient to pay the principal

and interest of said bonds, and providing

that the period of probably usefulness

of said improvement is 5 years?

Dated: Brewster, New York,

May 12, 1937.

W. BOYNTON TOWNER,

Village Clerk.

o

One of the shortcomings of old age

is that it is a lot easier to act young

than it is to look that way.

o

Blessed are the poor. They are the

only ones who have any political influence.

Now is the time of year when the

old folks begin to regret the fact that

they bought Junior a live rabbit for

Easter.

o

Over in Madrid and Toledo they

seem to take great delight in dropping

bombs on one another. No doubt it is

just an old Spanish custom.

Danbury Hardware Co.

SPRING

is on the way

Miss Strout to Talk

On Temperance Work

PRrVATE ENTERPRISE

town; John David, president, Lyons Pursuant to an Order of the \l Hon.

TO SPEAK JUNE 3 Realty Securities Co., Lyons; Mary E. James W. Bailey. Surrogate of the

(Continued from Page 1)

Dunham, secretary, Shepard, Niles County of Putnam, notice is here by giv­

Crane & Hoist Co., Montour Falls; en to all persons having claims against

the person in private life is constantly Sidney Detmers, secretary and treas­ the estate of Oscar Bailey, late of the

made harder.

urer, Buffalo Bureau of Municipal Re­ Town of Southeast, in said County,

"There seems to be a well-defined search, Buffalo; Dr. Clarence D. Fos­ deceased, to present the same with the

ter, Southampton; |Dr. Frederick C.

recognition among Legislators and

vouchers thereof to the undersigned,

Ferry, president, Hamilton College, Daniel H. Bloomer, as executor at his

Congressmen that the so-called pres­ Clinton; Norman J. Gould, president, reslijencfc and place of transacting

sure groups are organized, whereas Gould Pump Co., Seneca Falls; Wil­ business in the Town of Southeast,

American private enterprises, as an liam H. Howell, president, Merchants Putnam County, New York, on or be­

institution, is not. Each industry, of National Bank, Plattsburg; Mrs. Wilfore the 24th day of November, 1937.

course, speaks for itself, and. to a liam T. Hanson, Jr., Schenectady; L. Dated Brewster, N. Y., May 14, 1937.

certain extent, ,grcn|ps of industries D. Hokork, Utica; John E. Johnston,

speak for themselves. But all private

DANIEL H. BLOOMER,

Port Leyden; W H. Loom is. Gouver-

Industry has certain fundamental,

Executor.

neur; P. B. McCaghey, Littel Falls;

common needs. Unless these needs are

F. LEON SHELP,

Mrs. Victor Macomber, New Hartford;

met it cannot succeed—is bound ulti­

Attorney for Executor,

Mrs. Kenneth B .Norton, Bronxvllle;

mately to fall. These needs include

Brewster, N. Y.

A. L. O'Connor, Hobart; Harry B. Pat­

the need for reasonable, and not unten, New Rochelle; George B Ray, Livreasonable

taxation—the need for the Ingstonvllle; F. H. Ryder, vice presi­ The Italian American

greater possible freedom of action dent, Harder Manufacturing Co., Coble-

consistent with the public Interest, so

Ladies Club of Brewster

skill; Mrs. J. M. Sampson, Schenec­

that each industry, each separate contady; Walter B. Sanders, Nunda; Earl Italian Spaghetti

cern and each individual, no matter Sharzer, Utice; J. R. Shoemaker, pre­

what his field of private enterprise, sident, Hygeia Refrigeration Company, Dinner

may have a fair chance to succeed. Elmlra; F. M. Smalley, Glens Falls,

Private enterprise needs an end of such Dr. E. MacD. Stanton, Schenectady; DANCE

reckless spending and such unthink­ W. W. Smith, president, Smith Bros.,

On Thursday, May 20, the County ing heaping of burdens upon it as has

Institute of the W. C. T. U. will be

Inc. Poughkeepsie; Mrs John L. Train, Saturday, May 22

been seen especially the last year or

held at the Presbyterian church be­

Utica; T. M. Weems, Norwich; Charles In Building Formerly

more.

ginning at 1 o'clock. At 6 o'clock there

C. Wldkwflre, Cortland; Chalmers AL'S RESTAURANT

"Government it not wholly to blame

will be a covered dish supper and at

Wood, Syosset; Judge Jonthan M.

for what private enterprise complains

Aldo Tulatani's Orchestra

7:30 Miss Strout will speak. The pub­

Sherwood, Spring Valley.

of. (Private enterprise itself is largely

Tickets for each event 50c

lic is cordially invited to attend both

sessions and the supper. •

at fault, for it has not taken the trobule

to offset the pressure of the pressure

Miss Flora E. Strout, of Baltimore, groups—ihas not spoken out plainly

has served for more than twenty years

Tel. 644 Brewster

and told what it must have if it is to

Tel. 47 Croton Falls

as a representative of the World's continue to exist.

W. C. T. U. She was stationed in Ja­ "Men and women engaged in private

pan, India, Burma and Strait's Settle­ enterprise will come to the Congress on

ment. The last seven years she has

June 3 from every legislative district

been in Brazil where she has had

Purdy & Penny

marvelous support from the govern­

in the State. They will thus feel the

ment in introducing temperance work

community of interest they now have

in the public schools. Miss Strout's

in the action taken by their Assem­

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS

work was closely woven with that of blymen, State Senators or Congress­

the missionaries. In every field Miss men.

Estimates Cheerfully Given

Strout found liquor one of the out­ "The keynote of the Congress will

standing hindrances to the mission be that every Legislator must be made Opposite Depot Brewster, N. Y.

work.

to understand the needs of private enterprise

in his district."

Mr. Hart is chairman of the com­

Because housewives object to momittee. Harold Braddock, economist

lasses cans that are sticky after open­ and editor, has been appointed secing,

one manufacturer puts molasses retary. The membership comprises a

in a can with a screw cap and a cross section of leaders in all lines Specials For Saturday

washable, lithographed label. of private enterprise from various legislative

districts throughout the State. Leg of Genuine Grade A Spring Lamb

lb

Members from New York City include:

35<

SUPPLEMENTAL CTTATION Percy O. Magnus, Prdsident, New

lb c

The People of the State of New York, York Board of Trade; Mason H. Blge-

33

By the Grace of God Free and Indelow, attorney; William C. Breed, Breed,

pendent:

Abbott & Morgan; James Bruce, vice Pork Loin

lb c

35

To JOHN W. KELLEY, JOHN president, National Dairy Products

O'NEILL, ROSE E. KELLEY, GLADYS Corporation; San ford Brown, vice pre­ Fresh Hams

lb

E. KELLEY and CHARLES E. KEL­ sident, Bakelite Corporation; Louis K.

35<

LEY,

Comstock, president, Merchants Asso­ Rump of Veal —.

lb c

SEND GREETING: ciation; George D. Graves, vice presi­

35

You and each of you are hereby dent, Chase National Bank; M or win Sirloin Steaks

Ib c

cited and required personally to be K. Hart, president, New York State

55

and appear before our Surrogate of Economic Council; R. G. Knowland,

the County of Putnam at hs office in vice president, Blgelow-Sanford Com­ Blade Roast _ _ Ib Qjjc

the Town of Carmel, the 6th day of pany; A. R. Latson, Jr., attorney; Ad­

July, 1937, D. S. T. to show cause why am K. Luke, treasurer, West Virginia Bacon ]/2 lb pkg 91

the petition of Elizabeth M. Kelley Pulp & Paper Company; Mrs. Lee Mcfiled

herein on March 29th, 1937, Canliss; Thomas M. Peters; James

should not be granted and why Let­ Rand, Jr., president, Remington Rand

ters of Administration of the goods, Company; Mrs. Kenneth M. Reed;

chattels and credits of ANNA T. Walter Robbins, General Cable Corp-

O'NEILL, deceased, should not be oratiin and Henry A. Stickney.

granted to the petitioner ELIZABETH Upstate members include Edwin M.

M. KELLEY.

Allen, president, Mathieson Alkali

In Testimony Whereof, We have Works; Westchester; John F. Andrews,

caused the seal of office of the said Olean; Paul S. Andrews, dean, Syra­

Surrogate to be hereunto affixed. cuse University Law School, Syracuse;

Witness, Hon. James W. Bailey, Sur­ Frank A. Bell, Waverly; George W.

rogate of said County, at the Boyle, Little Falls; Owen C. Becke,

Town of Carmel the 10th day of Oneonta; S. M. Moore, treasurer, Mo­

(L.S) May in the year of our Lord hawk Carpet Mills, Amsterdam; John

one thousand nine hundred and B. Burnham, Essex; Arthur T. Burch,

thirty-seven.

president, Troy Cooperative Savings &

JAMES W. BAILEY. Loan Co., Troy; Mrs. Nellls M. Crouse,

Surrogate. Ithaca; Charles C. Chappell, Middle-

c

Premier qt bottle Grape Juices QQc

Mergardt's Coffee — lb OJJc

Princess Peas 9 f° r ^1 c

Premium Golden Bantam Corn 9 f° r ^1 c

All Brands of Bottled and Canned Beer on Ice

Mergardt's Progress Market

Telephone 110 Brewster, N. Y.

"^N

And with Its coming you will find

Danbury's Greatest Store can be of

real service

— TO YOU —

Buckeye Oil and Coal Burning

— BROODERS —

Pruning & Spraying Tools and Materials

of every kind. A full line of

all that new and good in Poultry

Supplies. No matter what your

needs for Farm or Home try us

first.

'm \ DAN0URY- _. -

HARDWARE CO.

M9-261 Main St- Danbury. Conn.

Telephone 158

D&ubury, Conn.

DAIIfBIfdr JAfFPMs FM&r

fl

EXTRA ladim of teat

width, providing

elbow room for all.

OA'IY

15* A MY

MORE TO BUY - AND IT SAVES ME

MORE THAN THAT ON GAS ANP OIL"

Sor« ,.

KJORMAN

FLITTERS

• I ••


FRIDAY, MAY 14, 1937 THE BREWSTER STANDARD — ESTABLISHED 1869 PAGE FIVE

HAPPENINGS

Mrs. Harry Reynolds motored to

Buffalo with Commissioner Ralph

Palmer to spend the week end.

——o

Mrs. Harold Knapp will be hostess

for the meeting o fthe Cecillan Society

on Monday afternoon, May 17.

——o

The opening dance at Kishawana

Country Club is set for Saturday.

May 29.

Notice advertising special election to

be held on May 27. for bond issue for

Incinerator, Fire House and New Fire

Equipment will be found on page 4.

o

Plans have been completed for the

annual dinner of the Young Men's

Republican Club at Ryan's Albany

Post Lodge Wednesday, May. 19. Gerald

Oram is chairman.

Monday, May 3, Marguerite Bruns

was awarded the "Grand Central

School of Art" medal, in the specialized

section of the Commercial and

General Design Class, New York City.

o

The Parish card party given by the

United Societies of the Church of St.

Lawrence OToole will be held Tuesday,

May 25, at 8:30 p. m. in the Town

Hall, Brewster.

Miss Hazel Sniffen has been confined

to her home the past week with

a severe attack of tonsilitis. She expects

to return to her duties as teacher

in the Yorktown High School on

next Monday.

o

The St. Lawrence Club of Brewster

lost to the Croton Falls nine at Croton

Falls last Sunday 11-6. Box score

under Croton Falls news on Westchester

page.

o

Tator's Garage and Service Station

on the site of the Borden factory, East

Main street, Is catching and holding

Fredericks Speaks

At Game Meeting

Last Friday evening, May 7, Mr. Karl

T. Fredericks, President of the New

York State Conservation Council, paid

an official visit to the Putnam County

Fish and Game Association which is

a member of the State Council. He addressed

the local group on the subject

of fish and game organizations. He

told of the growing interest in conservation

generally throughout the country

and pointed out the need for all

groups interested in the subject to expand

themselves and to familiarize

their members with the developments

in order that their organizations can

McEnelly's Band Opens

Pietsch's Gardens

One of the best attractions in New

England has been booked to appear at

Pletsch's Garden, Peach Lake, North

Salem, N. Y., this Saturday, May 15,

for the grand optning of the 1937 season.

Edwin J. McEnelly is well known

both for his recording and radio work

as well as for personal appearance of

his orchestra. The orchestra has played

to millions of people in the many

years of Mr. McEnelly's long career.

He has appeared in all the big time

vaudeville theatres when vaudeville

was at its best. McEnelly has promised

the management at Pletsch's that

take an intelligent and active part in he will appear In person with his band

the programs being undertaken by the I which is better than ever. The band

Federal government and States along I consists of eleven men and a young

conservation lines. I lady vocalist. Joseph Barry of Dan-

Activity in conservation has brought f bury who is to manage Pletsch's feels

out movements and programs that are! fortunate in securing this attraction

detrimental to true conservation and to

the interests of fish and game clubs.

Some of the legislation proposed wouK

take from the sportsmen liberties thai

they now have and to which they art

entitled, not only because they have

worked to develop fish and game resources,

but also because they have

paid for such development through

license fees and private contribution.

Representatives were present from

the three neighboring Associations,

namely: The Southern Dutchess and

Putnam, the Northern Westchester

and Putnam and the Southern New

York.

The Mayor of Brewster, H. H. Wells,

was present and on the behalf of the

Humane Society of America presented

medals to two Kent Cliffs boys, Messrs.

Heady and Williams, for their act in

rescuing a deer. The deer broke

through the thin ice on Boyd's Reservoir

last winter and would have

drowned had not these boys gone to

its aid and taken it to shore.

A large shipment of pheasant eggs

was distributed to the members at

this meeting. These eggs will be

the eye with a new coat of paint. The,,

attendants in new uniforms of blue Notched and raised by members of the

trimmed with red, the Socony colors, Association. When the birds have be­

are on their toes 24 hours a day.

o

Don't forget to attend the B. H. S.

Junior Prom Friday evening, May 21,

come partly grown they will be released

in our covers.

Monday evening at the Christian

School gym. "TheVm lEnd ? vo r meeting Judge Bailey will

will be transformed into a beautiful j s P eak - Meeting called at 7:30 p. m.

rose garden with rose arbor, picket] °

fence, garlands of rose, etc. This dance st - Andrew's Auxiliary will hold a

will surpass any dance of the season, ! card P art - V at 2:30 P- m - Thursday,

so you can't affaord to miss it. You| Mfl y 27> ln theParish Hall.

may dance from 9-1 to the music of | °

Emmett Conniff and his orchestra.

The Brewster Lodge of Odd Fellows

o

will hold the last card party of the

People of Patterson and Lake Car-lseason at their Home tomorrow ev_

mel are delighted that Assemblyman i e nj n g

Stephens Is building in their midst

and real estate operators in Putnam

tell with more telling effect on home

seekers of the views that are available Boyd Hatch spent a night with

to the foot hills of the Berkshires. Alex Addis and reports Essex County

Sunday is real estate day in Putnam carrys on in good form. He will reand

even the strongest hearted broker | turn for the opening of Kishawana.

sighs for the passing of Pliny Williamson's

bill to make Mondays holidays.

Harold Utter has accepted a posi­

Pupils in the first and second

grades at the school presented a threeact

playlet, "The Spring Court," in

the school assembly on Wednesday.

Mrs. Howard Truran and Mrs. Gilbert

Barnes directing. The children

were costumed as daffodils, birds, fireflies,

rainbow fairies, butterflies and

other symbols of spring. An artistic

setting had been designed and constructed

by pupils of the fifth grade

under Mrs. Sadie Nagle's supervision

and instruction.

tion at the United Cigar Store. He

will have charge of the new soda

fountain recently installed.

St. Andrew's Episcopal Church

Rev. Frederick A Coleman, Rector

Whitsunday Services.

8 a. m. Holy Communion.

10. Church School.

11. Holy Communion and sermon.

"The Power of the Living Christ in

Lllvng Men."

4 p. m. Confirmation service. The

Rt. Rev. Charles Gilbert, Suffragan

Work on the tennis courts and the j Bishop of the Diocese of New York

trail thereto on Kishawana hilltop is j Will Confirm and preach. The offertory

progressing rapidly. All will be ready | anthem will be sung by Mrs. A. M.

for players before schools release the Barnum of Danbury, a former memleaders

and followers of the youth I Der 0f st. Andrew's choir,

movement. The old guard is carrying! Thursday, 7:30 p. m. Choir rehearsal,

on as usual. Somebody asked "Why! Saturday. The annual Presentation

did the old timers put the Club on' service at the Cathedral of St. John

a hill?" The answer is look around \ Divine. New York City, will take place,

you. There are three' large reservoirs; The representatives of St. Andrew's

nearby, Joes Hills, Federal Hill and J church School will be the Boy of Sir

not an advertising sign in sight. No ! Galahad Club who will attend with

accident ever occurred on the hill or the Rector.

the trail leading to it.

Confirmation at St. Andrew's Church

The Rt. Rev. Charles K. Gilbert, V.

D., Suffragan Bishop of the Diocese

of New York will visit St. Andrew's

Episcopal church Sunday afternoon at

4 o'clock to administer the Apostolic

Rite of Confirmation. Each spring the

Bishop visits St. Andrew's to put his

hands on the heads of those to be

Confirmed, this he does after the custlm

of the Apostles to strengthen

and confirm them for God and His

Church. The public is cordially invited

to attend this service.

Bob Owens, rounding up the soft

ball players, calls for a meeting at

the school house on Monday evening.

Bob's idea is to have the organization

intact before Lowell Thomas returns

from the Coronation. Whether the boys

will crown L. T. or President Roosevelt

remains to be seen. Casey Hogate and

Hi Carroll are handling the line up

for Dutohess County and the New

Milford team is expected to enter the

field in good form. If they sign Big

Bill Edwards, the odds will be worth

watching.

The present officers of the Junior

American Legion Auxiliary are as follows:

President, Janet O'Neil. 1st Vice

President, Gladys Jackson. Secretary

and Treasurer, Mary Perlini. Chaplain,

Dolores Beal. Sergeant at Arms,

Marian Brandon. Publicity Chairman,

Joan Beal. Americanism, Lucille Mc­

Donald. Music and Entertainment,

Lucille McDonald, chairman, Dolores

Beal, Gabriel Blockley and Betty

Cleaver. Membership, Mary Perlini

and Helen Hobby. Color Bearers, Dorothy

Purst, Margaret Perlini, Barbara

Schaefer, Gertrude Foley, Marian

Brandon. Finance Committee, Janet

MpNctl. president of junior orders.

Mrs. Louise Smith, president, Auxiliary

and Mrs. P. Wolfe. Secretary Auxiliary

and junior advisor. Historian,

Phyllis Wolfe. The girls will sell poppies

on the mornings of May 22 and

29. They will assist in arranging flowers

for Mk-monad Day, attend Memorial

Day services and parade with

the American Legion and its Auxiliary.

NATIONAL BABY

WEEK . . .

May we remind you

that we have everything

needed for Baby's

health and comfort—

fresh, dependable

foods, nipples, bottles,

brushes, etc., soaps,

talcs, oils, syringes,

vaccines, all medicinal

and surgical supplies.

And, when Baby gets

sick, and your Doctor

prescribes, bring the

Prescription to us with

the comforting assurance

that it will be

tilled exactly as

ordered.

Hopes Drug Store

Brewster, N. Y.

for Saturday night. Mr. Barry states

that Mr. Clarence Pletsch who is an

artist in his work has done a wonderful

job on the ball room. The colors

are in silver and black.

It looks like a record crowd will attend

this great attraction. The management

has many famous attractions

booked to appear in the near future,

o

South Manitou Island Is

a "Graveyard" of Sailors

Any number of points and shoals

about the Great Lakes are referred

to as "graveyards" of ships, but

South Manitou island is the "graveyard"

of sailors, according to old

residents, notes a Glen Haven,

Mich., correspondent in the Detroit

Free Press.

Between 30, and 100 unknown sailors,

it is estimated, have been buried

on the island when their bodies

were washed ashore from wreckage.

All of this happened many

years ago when the island's southwest

coast made tragedy the last

entry in the log of many a sailing

vessel.

Something about wind currents at

this point in Lake Michigan made it

difficult for a windjammer in a

storm to avoid the unfriendly

stretch of barren coast.

One man, who was born arid

reared along this coast, estimates

that there are 50 known sailor

graves on the island. When' members

of the crew survived, they attended

to the rough sailor burial

service. When the entire crew perished,

the last rites were taken in

hand by the few residents.

Many graves were marked with

rough crosses of driftwood, but

these have rotted away.

Bamboo Trees

Bamboo trees are mild - climate

plants. None is found native in the

colder temperate regions. The United

States has only two native species.

These occur in the Southern

states south of Virginia and westward

to Southern Missouri. They

constitute our so-called cane-brakes,

once more or less common, but becoming

rare. Central America and

South America are much richer in

these beautiful plants, of which

nearly 150 native species have been

reported, mostly from the tropical

regions. Asia, and especially China,

is the richest of all regions in bamboo

species. In fact, Asia may be

regarded as the home of most of

the valuable economic species now

scattered over the earth. Nearly 500

species of bamboos have been described,

and more than two-thirds

of these are from Asia and adjacent

islands.

Yachtsmen Annex Isle

in Name of King Edward

Sydney, N. S. W.—The first new

territory to be added to the British

Empire under King Edward VIII

has been formally annexed by four

Sydney yachtsmen. The new land

is a tiny island in the southern Pacific,

near Elizabeth reef and 500

miles northeast of Sydney. This island,

formed on a coral reef, is now

ten feet above sea level, and it had

never been charted before.

Jr. Varsity Swamps

Pcckskill Cadets, 13-0

The Brewster Junior Varsity scored

an easy victory last Wednesday

when they shut out the Peekskill

Academy Junior Varsity by a 13-0

score ln a game that was called in the

fifth inning.

Adams was on the mound for Brewster

and had things well in control,

allowing only one hit. He was replaced

by Bob Scolpino ln the fifth who

also gave up one hit.

Heinen and Williams led the Brewster

batters, Heinen getting four safe

blows in five trips to the plate; Williams

getting three in four trips, one

Of them going for a homer. Bob Palmer

scored the only other extra base

hit of the game when he rapped out

a triple in the first inning.

The box score follows:

Brewster (13)

ab r h po a a

Heinen, 2b 5 2 4 0 2 0

Sheridan, ss 5 0 1 2 0 1

Brady, If 2 1 0 1 0 0

Donley, If 2 0 0 0 0 0

Williams, cf 4 3 3 2 0 0

Palmer, lb, 3 2 1 4 0 0

Scolpino. p 1 0 0 0 0 0

Genovese, 3b 4 0 0 1 0 0

Burdlck, rf 2 2 0 0 0 0

Barrett, c 2 1 0 4 0 0

Adams, p 4 2 2 1 2 1

34 13 11 15

Peekskill Military Academy (0)

ab r h po

Riley, 2b 2 0 1 0

Schwartz, rf 3 0 0 0

Angelo, c 1 0 0 6

Wilson, eg 3 0 0 0

Mikeljohn, If, cf .... 3 0 1 1

Reade, ss 1 0 0 1

Fitzgerald, lb 0 0 0 2

Corduroy, lb 2 0 0 4

Wright, If 1 0 0 0

Walsh, 3b 0 0 0 1

Bissell, p 2 0 0 0

Sybrlt, p 0 0 0 0

18 0 2 15 7 3

The score by Innings:

Brewster 5 1 2 4 1—13

Peekskill 0 0 0 0 0—0

Three base hits Palmer. Home runs

Williams. Struck outu b yAdams 4, by

Bissell 3, by Sybrlt 2. Base on balls

off Adams 4, ofT Scolpino 1, off Bissell

3, off Sybrlt 2. Hit by pitcher

Brady (by Bissell), Angelo (by Adams).

o

Pell Endorses

Taconic Grant

Herbert Claiborne Pell of Pellbridge,

town of East Fishkill, recently appointed

minister to Portugal by President

Roosevelt, has sent an appeal to

Governor Lehman, requesting his approval

of the pending legislative bill

appropriating $690,000 for four-stripping

the Taconic parkway in Dutchess

and Putnam counties. The bill

provides funds for four-stripping the

existing two-strip sections of the

parkway from Peekskill Hollow northward

through Putnam and Dutchess

counties to the Mid County highway

at Arthursburg.

Pointing out that he uses the parkway

frequently, and that he gave to

the state about a mile of right-of-way

through his estate In the town of East

Fishkill, Mr. Pell observed that approval

of this bill "would be a good

thing for the people of the State and

particularly for those of Dutchess

county."

o

Three Amendments

Will Go on Ballot

Three proposed constitutional amendments

will be submitted to New

York's electorate next November as

a result of action in the 1937 state

Legislature.

They would:

Provide for election of assemblymen

for two years, Instead of one as at

present.

Provide a four-year term for governor,

attorney general and comptroller,

instead of two as present.

Permit sheriffs to succeed themselves,

now prohibited by state law.

The Sport Center of Brewster

We carry a complete line of

Sporting Goods, Sporting Wears and Luggage

United Cigar Store

The most up-to-date Store in Town

Main Street Brewster, N. Y.

PIETSCH'S GARDEN

Peach Lake. North Salem. N .Y.

Grand Opening Tomorrow Nite

A FAMOUS ATTRACTION

Edwin J. McEnelly in person

12 — Artists — 12

Featuring Miss Gloria Campbell, Radios Best

Don't Miss this Dance Treat

The Band that has Played to Millions

Follow the Crowd. JOSEPH H. BARRY.

APARTMENT FOR RENT—four

rooms and bath, all modern improvements.

Garage. Near Hemlock Dam.

Vincent Mazza, Croton Falls, N. Y. 3tf

FOR RENT—One half of two family

house. Moderate rental. Apply Elizabeth

li. Lent, 23 Cottage Place, While

Plains, N. Y. 3tf

Uncle Ab says that now a dollar

doesn't seem to go farther, but it goes

a lot faster.

Women's skirts are getting shorter

but that doesn't mean they will be

any cheaper.

Four states that served the largest

number of new farms with electricity

in 1936 were, in order: California,

Michigan, Pennsylvania and New York.

The reason they Increase the horse

power of automobile engines each year

is because it is necessary to pull

against taxes as well as gravity.

To be a good radio crooner you don't

require a high-class musical education—you

need adenoids.

A federal reliefer's Idea of heaven is

a place where they bring you the cash!

money instead of sending you a check. |

o

Common and unusual reasons why

sheets wear out are explained in Cornell

bulletin E-333. Single copies are

sent free from the Office of Publication,

Roberts Hall, Ithaca, N. Y.

COLLIE DOG. young, stray, light

color, is in charge of Officer Schaefer,

Brewster. Has spent a week at north

end of Prospect street. Is fine tempered.

Has been fed and watered. Owner

notify Mr. Schaefer soon.

TWO BUILDING LOTS FOR SALE

—Each 75x150 in P. F. Deal's new Evergreen

Heights Development, Peaceable

Hill. Foundation 24x36 2-3 completed

on one lot. Water, electricity,

telephone and gorgeous view. Will sell

reasonable. II. E. Hazzard. PPhone'

Brewster 86. 3ol

^iMiNiiiiiiiiiiiitjiiiiiiiiiiiif]iiiHiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiit3iiiii:iiini[:iiiiiiiiiiii[3iiii:iiiinu3iii

I ANDERSON'S DRUG STORE 1

"Always Reliable"

Main Street Brewster, N. Y.

NEW

Vanilla

Reid's Ice Cream

ICE TRAY PACKAGE

Fits in ice cube tray of your refrigerator

Seven different combination flavors

Butter, Pecan and Chocolate

Vanilla, Chocolate, Strawberry

Vanilla and Chocolate

Wild Cherry, Lemon Custard

Vanilla, Orange-ice, Strawberry

Vanilla, Chocolate and Raspberry Sherbcrt

SPECIAL 23c a pint

One week only 2 for 45c

• Still in stock Sherbcrt Glasses lc each with each tray package

VricaiiiiiiiiiiiicaiiiiiiiiiiiicsiiiiiiiiiiiicaiiiiiiiiiiiicautiiiiiiiiicaiiiiiHiiiiiraiiiiiiiiiiiicaiiiHiiiiiiicaiiiiiiiiiiiicaHiiiiiiiiiicaiiiiiiiiiiiicaiiiiijiiiiiicaiiniii

• i*. I'uiafivinww*

Hydrox Ice Cream

In Brick or Bulk

SCOLPINO'S

News and Stationery Store

Main Street Opp. First National Bank

•.:•:•


PAGE SIX THE BREWSTER STANDARD — ESTABLISHED 1869 FRIDAY. MAY 14. 1937

N O R T H S A L E M P U R D Y S C R O T O N FALLS

THIS PAGE IS DEVOTED TO OUR NORTHERN WESTCHESTER READERS • •*•»*-•*» HAPPENINGS GATHERED BY OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENTS EVERY WEEK

PEACH LAKE PURDYS STATION CROTON FALLS

Again the summery weather attracted

a large crowd to the lake, some

for the week end. Everywhere you

looked you saw some one painting or

mowing lawns or making garden.

Even at the picnic grounds we had

a number of cars and it looked like

mid summer to see the tables decorated

with lunches. Even the lake was

dotted with row boats, some just out

for pleasure and some fishing. The

white perch are starting to bite so we

can soon expect to see the gang out

after them in numbers.

We see Fred Purdy out on the campus

dock these fine evenings getting

his mess of perch. Dan Juengst has

his boat, the "Deacon," warboard and

is also after them.

Among our week enders we had Mr.

and Mrs. I. Day of Pleasantville. Ike

spent most of his time mowing the

fine crop of hay the rain and warm

weather had brought out on his lawn.

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Herbert of Jackson

Heights, spent the week end at

their cottage. We met Ed and his pal

Ben over in Brewster and they were

dissapating to the rxtent of having

strawberry sodas.

Mr. and Mrs. Ben Koch with daughters

Kay and Dot spent their first week

end at the lake since the closing of

the season. Ben was busy in his garden.

Mr. and Mrs. James Hampton of

Jackson Heights, with daughters, Virginia

and Joan were over and spent

most of their time on the golf course.

Saw Buddie Goodsell, our famous

orchestra leader taking a sun bath in

the hammock.

That razzing we gave Ed Lyon surely

brought results. The "Lyon's Den" now

has a new coat of paint. Ed took time

out Sunday afternoon to take the boys

up on the ball field for a work out.

A number of the boys showed up including

Earl Tompkins, our famous

pitcher. Earl is still a holdout as he

has not definitely made up his mind

whether he is going to play ball at

Elmira this season or not. Let us hope

not.

We have heard rumors that Jack

and Mary Leyden are contemplating

Joining the Esquimo Colony. They are

now up for the season at Pa Jones'

cottage.

See George Stumpf has bought himseld

a new Ford V-8 sport roadster. He

needs a fast car to make those dashes

down to Mt. Kisco.

There was great activity among the

"Hill Billies" over the week end. Everyone

was out the garden getting their

share of the wonderful sunshine while

mowing lawns and planting shrubs.

• Arthur McCutcheon has about completed

his Job on his semi-bungalow

tent in the orchard.

Saw the entire family assembled on

the lawn at the Wheatley cottage on

Received word from Bert Frawley

that Mrs. Frawley who is at the St.

Frjinces Hospital, 142d St. and St.

Anns Avenue in the Bronx where she

underwent an operation is doing very

nicely but the operation proved more

serious than expected and she will be

confined for about three weeks.

Clarence Heath sends word that

daughter Bert is slowly improving and

is now allowed to sit up a half hour

each day. Bert has been confined to

bed at New York Hospital. 68th St.

and York Avenue for the past twenty

weeks.

With the deepest regrets we announce

the death of Mrs. Ann Goller.

wife of Mr. Walter C. Goller. which

occurred at her cottage on Lake Shore

Drive last Saturday morning. Our

heartfelt sympathy goes out to the

family and we dedicate the following:

"Treasured thoughts of one so dear,

Often bring a silent tear;

Thoughts return to scenes long past,

Tears roll on, but memories last."

The funeral services were held at the

Zion Lutheran church on Philadelphia

Avenue. Egg Harbor. N. J., on Tuesday

morning and burial was in the

family plot at that place. Mrs. Goller

leaves three children, a daughter, Mrs.

Gladys Eisenberger and two sons, Walter

and Charles.

Harry Payne, our Peach Lake nurseryman,

has just bought a new station

wagon. Harry was in need of a

conveyance to carry the many plants

and flowers he takes to New York. He

recenUy had Joe Vassak bring a truck

load of daphnes down from somewhere

in Massachusetts and sold a number

of them for Mother's Day.

(Renting of cottages kept the boys

busy over the week end and if the

weather keeps up its good behavior

we can expect the rush to continue.

The annual card party given by the

Ladies Guild of St. James church of

North Salem will be held at Bloomer's

pavilion. Peach Lake, on Friday, May

28. at 8:30 p. m. There will be tables

of contract and aucton bridge and

pinochle. Admission will be 50 cents

Mr .and Mrs. Albert F. Shepard announce

the marriage of their son, Walter

,to Miss Alice Oberg, of Bristol,

Conn. The happy couple were secretly

married at Armonk, N. Y., and kept

their marriage as a pleasant surprise

to friends and relatives. They are now

oocujiving an apartment in Bristol.

Conn., where Mr. Shepard is employed.

Cental High School Notes

The reedption of Prof. N! e wm an ' s

dancing class held in our gym last Friday

evening was a very enjoyable affair.

Prof. Newman donated one-third

of the proceeds to our Athletic Association.

Central boys defeated Carmel last

Friday by a score of 10-5. Eddie Shay

pitched the entire game and allowed

4 hits. This week's games included

Central at Shrub Oak on Tuesday and

Yorktlwn here on Friday.

The Croton Falls school provided

our assembly program on Wednesday.

It consisted of dramatic numbers and

songs under the direction of Mr. Caulfield.

The pupils of the Croton Falls and

North Salem grade school were thrilled

last Friday when motion pictures

of "The Pied Piper of Hamelin" were

shown in their schools.

The Juniors will hold their last card

party of the season in the High School

corridors on Wednesday evening. May

26, for their Washington trip fund.

The Seniors have engaged Vails pavilion

for their annual prom on Saturday

evening, June 5.

Members of our faculty report that

the testimonial dinner given to former

Superintendent Knapp at the Forbush

Hotel in (Peekskill on Monday

evening was a delightful affair. A beautiful

Hamilton watch suitably engraved

was presented to Mr. Knapp by the

teachers of his district. Mr. Warner

made the presentation address. A

parchment scroll designed and prepared

by Mr. Drinkwine was also presented

to Mr. Knapp by the men

teachers of his district as Knapp's

Men.

Our best wishes are extended to Mrs.

Flewwellin, Clerk of the Board of

Education for an early and complete

recovery from the operation which she

recently underwent at the Mt. Kisco

HospitAl. ',*«

On Friday afternoon the Yorktown

High School baseball team will play

the Central High school team here and

on Tuesday afternoon. May 18, Central

team will go to Katonah to play

St .Mary's team. On Friday afternoon,

May 21, Mahopac will play at Central.

The funeral of Miss Georgia Gregory,

daughter of the late Mr. and

Mrs. Charles Gregory, was held from

the home of her brother, Lcander C.

Gregory, on Sunday afternoon. Miss

Gregory became ill about a month ago

and was taken to Northern Westchester

Hospital about two weeks ago suffering

from rheumatic fever and a

cardiac condition. She had been for

the past few years in business here

which she conducted up to the time

of her illness. Besides her brother she

is survived by two sisters. Mrs. C. J.

F. Decker and Mrs. E. C. Outhouse,

both of Croton Falls

Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Keough entertained

Mr. and Mrs. Ferdinand Guss

and daughter Patty Jean for a few

days last week. Mr. Guss may be

heard on the radio every Sunday afternoon.

There were special sermons in the

churches here last Sunday in honor of

Mother's Day. In St. Joseph's church

the new altars were in place and were

adorned with beautiful bouquets of

flowers. The entire sanctuary has been

paneled in oak, new floors have been

laid and also a new lighting effect,

making it very beautiful. The new altar

rail now extends across the entire

width of the church.

There was a very good attendance

at the baseball game on Sunday afternoon

between the newly organized

Northern Westchester Athletic Association

and the Terrors of Guldens

Bridge.

N. W. A. C.

ab r h po a

Totten, If 5 0 1 0 0

Ganong, 2b 4 1 2 0 3

Durkin, lb 5

H. Smith, ss 5

R. Smith, p 5

Castegner, c 4

Daros, 3b 4

Haight, cf ..." 4

Baker, rf 3

Chub Hughes, rf 1

0 8

1 1

1 1

1 13

3 I

2 3

1 0

0 0 0 0

40 9 12 27

Goldens Bridge Terrors

ab r h po

The Ladies Aid Society of the Pur- Quinn, ss 5 1 1 2

dys M. E. church will hold a dessert I Fergeson, c 4 0 0 8

bridge May 26. 1937, at 1:30 p. m. Ad-1McArahtur, cf, p .... 4 0 0 1

8 1

NORTH SALEM

The members of the Methodist

church had a reception for their new

pastor, the Rev. and Mrs. Kenneth E.

Hoover, at the church hall last Wednesday

evening. Music and games were

enjoyed by all those present. Refreshments

were served. Rev. and Mrs.

Hoover and their little son are living

at the parsonage in Goldens Bridge.

The Ladies Aid of the Methodist

church will hold a food sale at the

church hall on Friday, May 21 from

2 until 5 o'clock. Come and supply

your week end needs from an attractive

assortment of home cooked food

at moderate prices.

The annual District Nursing Association

meeting was held on Tuesday

afternoon at the school. Although the

attendance was small a considerable

amount of work was reported for the

past year and interesting matters were

discussed. Mrs. Gilbert M. Lobdell resigned

as recording secretary but the

following officers were reelected:

Chairman, Mrs. A. T. Nelson, 1st vicechairman,

Mrs. E. Q. Bailey. 2nd vice

chairman, Mrs. Leonard Morey, treasurer,

Mrs. P. P. Carroll, coresponding

and recording secretary, Mrs. R. M.

Jackson. The annual drive will be started

shortly and everyone will be approached

for membership subscriptions

for this worthy cause.

The 154th annual convention of the

Protestant Episcopal Diocese of New

York opened on Tuesday for a two

day session in Synod Hall adjoining

the Cathedral of St. John the Divine.

Bishop William T. Manning presided

at the sessions which began after holy

communion service at 11 a. m. in the

Cathedral. About 500 clerical and lay

delegates attended the convention. Beside

the usual business of the session

greetings were sent to King George

VI by way of cablegram to the Archbishop

of Canterbury. A special feature

of the convention this year was

the presentation of Bach's "St. Matthew

Passion" in the Nave of the Cathedral.

There were about 100 musicians,

500 voices and 5000 in the audienija.

TJhe performance had unique

impressiveness by reason of its setting.

The tone of the choral singing

acquired a peculiar resonance and richness

and depth of beauty not observed

in other exhibitions of the Oratorio

Society's choirs In different surroundings.

The appropriations of this setting

for the concert was doubtless recognized

by those attending for the

vast gathering paid closest attention

mission 50 cents. Prizes have been paber, lb, p 3

and sandwiches and coffee served.

donated.

Salvis, 3b 4

Prizes will be awarded to those hold­

J. Miggins, 2b 3

ing high scores. Admission 50 cents.

McEnelly's Band Opens Williams, rf 4

The St. Joseph's Guild of North

Warflelds, If, lb 3

Salem will hold their annual card par­

Pietsch's Gardens

T. Miggins, p 1

ty in Bloomerside, Peach Lake, on

Washburn, If 2

Friday evening, May 28, at 8:30. The

prizes will be awarded and" refresh­

Sunday. Jack is still keeping bachelor Qne attractions in New

33 8 8 24 7 4 ments served. Admission 50 cents.

quarters and working wih Ralph Out- En hRS been ^ ^ tQ at Struck out by R. Smith 13, T. Mig­ Federated Church Notes

house and his gang on the cottage 0fJS2La,«- Pietsch's Garden, n . ^ Peach paDnh T.oi Lake, North vnrth gins 3, McArthur 3, Faber 1. Bases N. Vance Johnston, inister.

Walter Schaefer.

Salem, N. Y., this Saturday, May 15, on balls by R. Smith 3, Faber 1. Um­ Sunday, May 16, 1937.

Mr. and Mrs. Bob Shays and family for the grand optning of the 1937 seapires Davidson and Gallagher.

10 a. m. Bible School.

spent Sunday at their cottage or should I Edwin j_ McEnelly Is weU known The Northern Westchester A. C. will 11 a. m. Morning worship.

we say on the golf course.

both for his recording and radio work play the Circle A. C. of Buchanan, on The church is now conducting its

Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Shays and daugh­ as well as for personal appearance of Sunday, May 16, at the Purdys field. annual Financial Campaign for the

ter Jean drove over from Queens Vil­ his orchestra. The orchestra has play­ Croton Falls A. C. went over the top support of the church program. Sunlage

Friday evening. Roland is glad ed to millions of people in the many again on Sunday by a score of 11-6 day is designated as "Pledge Day."

that his painting job is finished, giv­ years of Mr. McEnelly's long career. against the Brewster team.

Th° sermon topic will be "Financing

ing him time to get in on some of his He has appeared in all the big time Croton Falls

the Kingdom In our Community." All

favorite pastime, golf.

vaudeville theatres when vaudeville

ab r h church members are especially urged

Bob and Sally Sherman and the was at its best. McEnelly has promis­ Paro, 2b 4 2 2 to be present at this time. Members

family pulled in for the week end and ed the management at Pietsch's that Wolflnger, lb 4 2 1 of the Finance Committee of the

they stayed over till Monday evening he will appear in person with his band Green, c 4 1 2 church will visit the homes of the

as Sally wanted Bob to finish his job which is better than ever. The band Antinucci, 3b 5 0 1 church members and frienis next

painting the cottage.

consists of eleven men and a young Meris, ss 5 0 0 Sunday afternoon to receive pledges

lady vocalist. Joseph Barry of Dan- Walker, p, cf 3 1 1 to the support of the church for this

bury who is to manage Pietsch's feels W. Brearton, If 3 3 1 year.

fortunate in securing this attraction

Anderson, rf 4 0 1

5 p. m. Christian Endeavor Society

for Saturday night. Mr. Barry states

that Mr. Clarence Pletsch who is an

Scott, p 0 0 0

outdoor meeting.

Members of this society will meet

artist in his work has done a wond­

L. Brearton, cf 4 2 3

at the church at 5 o'clock and drive

erful job on the ball room. The colors

36 11 12 to a nearby hill for a picnic supper

are in silver and black.

Brewster

meeting. All members are asked to be

It looks like a record crowd will at­

ab r h pretent on time.

tend this great attraction. The man­ Waters, 3b 5 2 1 The annual business meeting of the

agement has many famous attractions Murtha, 2b 5 2 3 Federated church will be held Thurs­

booked to appear in the near future. Barber, ss 5 0 1 day evening, May 20, at 8 o'clock in

Blanco, c 5 1 1 the church parlors of the Baptist

Bennett, If 3 1 1

building. Reports will be heard from

various committees and officers for

Johnson, rf 4 0 0

the coming year will be elected. A

Grassen, lb 4 0 1 good attendance is desired.

Jones, cf 4 0 2 The Junior Christian Endeavor So­

Light, p 3 0 0 ciety meeting is held each Monday

M. Brady, p 1 0 0 afternoon after school. They are con­

36 9 10 ducting an "Airplane flight around

Central A C. played Croton Falls the world" contest as a novel way of

. C. Wednesday evening.

studying the missionary program of

A card party will be held in the the Christian church. This contest will

Parish Hall of St. Joseph's church on close on June 14, and a party will be

Thursday evening, May 20, at 8:30. given on that date for the members

Tables will be arranged for all games of the society.

including prizes and refreshments.

A good crowd from the lake attended

the card party given by the P. T. A

of North Salem school last Wednesday

evening. Among those attending were

Mrs. H. Ludwig, Mrs. W. Longley, Mrs.

R. Callard, Mr. and Mrs. Scott Fithian,

Mrs. W. Oswald, Mrs. J. Leyden,

Mr. and Mrs. A. Vail. Jr., Mrs. W.

Polye and daughter Helen, Mrs. Madeline

Kling, Mrs. Ed Kling and Mr. and

Mrs. E. Hickey. Among the gang only

two won prizes, Mrs. Longley took first

prize and Scott Fithian took second.

Ralph Outhouse and his gang are

now giving the "Wee Too" cottage a

new coat of canary yellow.

News of Vails Golf Course

The fine weather again brought out

a large crowd on the course over the

week end. Our new golf pro was still

on the injured list but Freddy Grey.

our assistant pro, was right on the Job

and handled the crowd without a

hitch. The greens and fairways have

now taken on that beautiful hue of

green that you only see in the spring.

Brewster Goksip

Main street is Just another Main

.street these days and things are so

quiet the boys are all grumbling but

no one seems to be able to account for

the slump.

About the only one we din't hear

growling is Bill Duffy. Every one seems

to be making garden these days and

(Coninued on Page 9)

/

J. B. Sissons Sous, Auctioneers

Important Auction

A herd of 39 Pure Bred Hoi- w n Cattle. Houseful of Furniture.

For the estate of Oscar Bailey and Kenneth O. Bailey at the Bailey Farm.

Bailey Road three miles east of Brewster, N. Y.

Thursday, May 20th, at 10 A. M.

commencing with household furniUire of all kinds. !P4ano, M T tables, chests,

overstuffed parlor suite, radio, rugs and carpets, pictures, tables, chairs, bedroom

furniture, dressers, mattresses, kitchen cabinet, oil burner range, drop leaf

table, antique blanket chest, snuffer and tray, candlesticks, O O mirror, trundle

bed, old cradle, period parlor suite, 2 brass kettles, blue spreads and many other

household articles. At 1 P. M. 37 Pure Bred Cows, heifer, three bulls

accredited blood tested official K A records. This is a high testing dairy of unusual

production and contains 14 daughters and two bulls of Harwood Sir Aggie

Walker, son of Nutmeg Walker, Walker from a daughter of Wyoma Canary

Pontiac M Champion to be sold with two others. This is a large producing herd

with high butter fat tests, under official R A supervision and raised at the farm

by the seller, Kenneth Bailey, also mowing machine, hay rake, milk tester, electric

cooler, for catalogues apply to Kenneth Bailey, Brewster, N. Y. Real estate

also will be offered same day the well known Bailey Farm, a productive farm

on cement highway with Colonial house with electricity, water, oil burning furnace,

etc, barns. Terms on cattle and furniture CASH. Terms on Farm day of

sale. Sale under the management of J. B. Sissons Sons.

CHUR01HJ3J,, Caterer. DANIEL U BLOOMER, Executor.

to the performance. Albert Stoessel

was the director. Delegates attending

the convention and concert were Rev.

Turner, Charles Keeler and Reginald

Jackson.

The card party at the school for the

benefit of the P. T. A. Tuesday evening

was a most enjoyable one. The

prizes were unusually attractive. Delicious

refreshments were served and

after expenses were paid the association

realized that over $40 had been

earned. The members of the committee

are grateful to those who helped

to make this such a success.

Miss Edna Angelman and Mr. Geo.

Hoyt are guests of Mr. and Mrs. Julius

Wheeler of Derbyville, Vermont, former

residents here.

Mr. and Mrs. Percy P. Carrlll were

at their home here over the week

end.

Mrs. George Jacldson of Yonk^rs,

and daughter Mrs. B. W. Gale of Mamaroneck,

were recent guests of Mrs.

Jackson's son and daughter-in-law,

Mr. and Mrs. Reginald Jackson.

Mrs. Ruth Quick has been quite ill

at the home of her daughter, Mrs.

David P. Vail, during the past week.

The Guild of St. James church will

hold their annual card party at

Bloomerside Friday evening, May 28.

Prizes and refreshments. Admission

50 cents.

A short memorial service was held

at June cemetery on Sunday for Miss

Caroline Atlee. A bronze tablet was

placed on the Atlee plot by the Women's

Overseas Service League of

New York City and a poem of tribute

was read. Among those attending the

service were Mr. and Mrs. Porter Atlee,

their son and daughter, of White

Plains, and Mr. and Mrs. Frederic T.

Nelson.

Miss Georgia Gregory of Croton

Falls, passed away at the Northern

Westchester Hospital last Friday. She

was well known in this vicinity. The

funeral was held on Sunday at the

home of her brother and sister-inlaw,

Mr. and Mrs. Leander Gregory.

Woodworking, Repair

and Cabinet Shop

Screen doors and windows made.

Orders taken for stock sash, doors

and windows, putty, glass and

screen wire.

NO JOB TOO SMALL

Alfred D. Vores, Jr.

29 Prospect St. Tel. 8-J Brewster

Several from here attended the ser-1 Fred C. Warner, Mrs. L. Drinkwine,

vice. She leaves beside her brother, two Mrs. A. Cree. Pinochle: Martin Lun-

sisters, Mrs. C. J. F. Decker and Mrs.

Mrs. Jesse Outhouse, both of Croton ry, Thomas McNeil, Mrs. D. Luce, Miss

Falls.

F. Estes, Mrs. J. Reimer, Howard Con­

Winners at Parent-Teacher Associaner, Mrs. F. Furter. Nine tables of

tion card party on May 11 at North

bridge and 7 tables of pinochle were

Salem school: Bridge: Mrs. K. Longley,

Scott Fithian, Mrs. G. Smith, Mrs. H. in play. Door prize was won by Mrs.

Juengst, David Vail, Mrs. F. Warner, Flood.

DeLKeRCox^e^i^

BREWSTERj

THOSE MOST

CONCERNED

...with meeting your wishes in costs

and arrangements serve you here. Mr.

Oelker and Mr. Cox personally perform

every professional duty.

16 PROSPECT ST.


AY, MAY 1/4, 1937 THE BREWSTER STANDARD — ESTABLISHED 1869 PAGE SEVEN

REE MEALS A DAY

copyright by SIDNEY SNOW UM

Fasting Becomes Feasting

A Friday Dish Which Men Will Relish

i*Y SIDNEY SNOW*

OMES FRIDAY—and the fish problem. But here is a

dish which will bring the men folk home on the dot.

iple—but most men prefer the simple dishes all provid-

[g they taste good.

Here is Salmon Casserole

Over which Father will Purr

To serve four, take a mixing bowl and in it put a cup

canned salmon, flaked and picked over. Add to the

ion one cup of celery cut into bits, one small onion.

?ped fine, two tablespoons quick cooking tapioca, a pinch!

salt, a dash of pepper, one cup of milk and a tablespoon

melted butter.

Mix these ingredients and place in a greased casserole

deep baking dish. Bake in a hot ovein (425 degrees)

ten minutes. Then, on top of the mixture, lay eight

jaked baking powder biscuits. Put back into oven and

ce twelve to fifteen minutes longer.

Cottage fried or hashed brown potatoes and a cole slaw

green vegetable salad round out the main course. A tart

or an ice is a good dessert A white wine a pale beer

ither strong tea for the beverage. And coffee with;

'dessert. - I

Menu Of The Week

MONDAY | grpakfa8(__Chilicd melon, ready to eat cereal,

clet with bacon, hot rolls, jelly or jam, coffee or cocoa. Lunch—

|m of celery soup, toasted crackers, crab meat salad, ice cream

,-..., tea or milk. Dinner—Navarin of lamb, potato croquettes, butered

asparagus, romaine salad with French Dressing, strawberry

phortcake, coffee or beer.

TUESDAY | jfrgM&Bt—Orange juice, hot wheat cereal,

.ieat cakes, maple syrup, little sausages, coffee or cocoa. Lunch—

iicken consomme, cold cuts, potato salad, frosted cup cakes, tea or

lilk. Dinner—Braised sweetbreads, julienne potatoes, new peas, ensalad,

cocoanut custard pie, coffee.

WEDNESDAY Breakfast—Baked apples with cream, ready to

it cereal, broiled bacon, coddled eggs, raisin-nut toast, coffee or milk.

i Frozen fruit salad, chopped chicken sandwiches, tapioca pud-

„."tea or milk. Dinner—Stuffed breast of veal, puffed potatoes,

ireamed spinach, Waldorf salad, pineapple upsidedown cake, coffee.

I Breakfast—Strawberries and cream, cereal,

[plain waffles, frizzled ham. syrup or honey, coffee or cocoa. Lunch

I—Creamed chipped beef on baked potatoes, broiled tomatoes, cole slaw,

lemon water ice, cookies tea or miEc Dinner—Broiled tripe with chili

! sauce, hashed browned potatoes, buttered beets, grapefruit and orange

, salad, fruit compote, assorted cakes, coffee or beer.

L FRIDAY

Breakfast—Stewed pears, ready to eat cereal,

creamed finnan haddie on toast, coffee or cocoa. Lunch — Corn

chowder, Maryland crab cakes cole slaw, orange meringue pie, tea or

,»ilk. Dinner—Split pea soup, broiled fillet of mackerel, new boiled

potatoes, string beans, dressed lettuce, apple strudel, coffee.

SATURDAY

[ •a*»»^«w*« ! Breakfast—Fruit juice, cereal, crisp bacon, apple

fritters, toast, coffee or cocoa. Lunch—Creamed mushrooms in

stuffing ring, asparagus tips salad, peach melba, little cakes, tea or

TiHlk, Dinner—Fried chicken, mashed potatoes, country gravy, lima

beans, water cress salad, hot biscuits, honey, chocolate eclairs, coffee.

SUNDAY

J ~ w "~"" I Breakfast—Grapefruit, ready to eat cereal,

fried chicken livers and bacon, scrambled eggs, pop-overs, jelly or jam.

coffee or cocoa. Dinner—-Shrimp cocktail, baked corned pork, candied

sweet potatoes, buttered peas, jelled pineapple and carrot salad, savarin

Mirubelle, coffee. Supper—Hot club sandwiches, assorted pickles and

Ishes, fruit cup, assorted cakes, coffee, tea or milk.

Sidney Snow will be pleased to supply any of these recipes.

Juwt write care of this paper. 48

I'M A NEW WOMAN

THANKS TO PURSANO

J Yes,

Pursangcontains,in properly

balanced proportions, 6uch proven

ek-uieuts as organic copper and iron.

Quickly stimulates appetite and aids

nature in building rich, red blood

even in cases of simple anemia. When

this happens, energy and strength

usually return. You feel like new.

Get Pursang from your druggist.

Meeting Daily Needs

EVERYONE has dally needs, and

In many cases they are numerous.

Thus, everywhere people

are engaged In devising ways and

means of meeting theBe needs.

Food, clothing, and shelter are

generally considered to be the most

Important dally necessaries. Throughout

the ages, humanity has worked

to cultivate the soil for crops, to

weave material for clothing, to build

homes for shelter and repose and

ships for transportation. These and

other methods of supplying the needs

of mankind are constantly being Increased

In scope. In their turn the

world's busy workers receive payment

with which to buy these necessaries,

so that the so-called law of

demand and supply may be carried

out.

But sometimes this so-called law

does not seem to be working properly.

On the one hand there appears

to be unemployment, stagnation of

trade, poverty; and on the other,

such a surplus of food that there Is

no longer any demand and little return

for It. Then, too, a sudden decrease

in value of stocks and shares,

or rents from houses or lands, may

bring a sense of Insecurity and even,

at times, lack to the one who has relied

on a settled Income for the supply

with which to meet his needs.

In this maelstrom of material living

everyone needs to find a reliable

source of supply, one which cannot

possibly fail, because its basis Is

neither material nor limited. . . .

In that most wonderful of all sermons,

the Sermon on the Mount, our

Way-shower, Christ Jesus, said (Matthew

G:24), "No man can serve two

masters," clearly showing that we

cannot put our reliance on matter

and material methods and still avail

ourselves of the true and enduring

substance which does not fall. Illustrating

the need for simple trust In

God, he said (Matthew 6:26): "Behold

the fowls of the air: for they

sow not, neither do they reap, nor

gather into barns; yet your heavenly

Father feedeth them." Evidently the

Master discerned humanity's fear of

limitation and the consequent anxious

hoarding of material things. He

continued, "Seek ye first the kingdom

of God, and his righteousness;

The best think that the average legislature

ever does is to adjourn sine

die.

Will Rogers'

Humorous Story

By WILL ROGERS

\fR. G. M. ALEXANDER of

iT * Fairmond, Va. told a joke what

happened to one of the girls in his

c mpapv. The girl had read an

ad in the paper, "How to whiten,

and soften the hands for 60 cents."

She fell for it and sent on the 50.

She received the following recipe,

''Soak the hands three times a day

in dish water while mother rests."

Now that is one of the best recipes

I ever heard. If that is followed

it is certainly worth 60 cents,

not only to the daughter, but it's

worth more than that to the

mother. I bet you would have to

bulldog some flappers to get their

bunds into a dish pan.

(American News Features, Inc.)

and all these things shall be added

unto you."

The kingdom of heaven, the reign

of harmony for each one, Is ever at

hand, because our Father-Mother,

God, the only source of real supply,

In omnipotent and omnipresent. No

longer, then, need anxiety or fear

assail us regarding the necessity of

meeting today's or tomorrow's needs.

When we turn wholeheartedly to

God, and realize man's inseparable

oneness with Him, with all good, we

can be certain that our need will be

supplied. We shall begin to see that

our real need Is to know and demonstrate

more and more of our Godgiven

freedom, health, and happiness.

Encouraging us along this

pathway of right think:ng, Mary

Baker Eddy says in "The First

Church of Christ, Scientist, and Miscellany"

(p. 186), "Rest assured

that He in whom dwelleth all life,

health, and holiness, will supply all

your needs according to His riches

in glory."

What unspeakable comfort, what

a loosening of heavy burdens, for all

those whose family, business, or

career needs daily caret When one

seeks first the constant supply of

spiritual Ideas, of wisdom, Intelligence,

loving-kindness, co-operation,

and purity, through quiet, unselfed

contemplation of the spiritual nature

of man as the child of God, every

right endeavor will bo abundantly

blessed for the benefit of all. To such

a one there is no insurmountable barrier

of lack, unemployment, or stagnation;

for he Is proving the truth

that each Idea of divine Mind is ever

engaged in true activity, where the

enduring qualities of Mind are being

Joyously expressed.

Then . let us array our whole

thought on the side of good, of

abundance, and not waste time

thinking or talking of evil, since It

has neither place nor opportunity for

expression In God's harmonious plan

for each of His children. No one Is

left out of the Father's loving care.

With joy and gratitude we can prove

the truth of Mrs. Eddy's tender words

on page 307 of "Miscellaneous Writings":

"God gives you His spiritual

Ideas, and in turn, they give you daily

supplies. Never ask for to-morrow:

It Is enough that divine Love is an

ever-present help; and If you wait,

never doubting, you will have all you

need every moment."—The Christian

Science Monitor.

The ever increasing use of the lie

detector has raised the fear that a

household unit will be perfected and

put on the market.—New York Sun.

A youth asks annulment on a plea

that he was wed while in a trance.

His progress will be watched by reminiscent,

millions.—Jacksonville Journal.

-o—

Speakjing of sit-down suffices, the

fellow who has the hardest time pulling

one is the tightrope walker in the

circus.

John L. Lewis may not believe in

rugged individualism for the other

fellow, but personally he isn't in favor

of letting even the Constitution tell

him what he shall do.—Detroit Free

Press.

As time goes on it becomes more

difficult to escape the suspicion that

the administration would rather not

know the facts than risk the possibility

that they will deflate its constant

campaign to enlarge the powers of

government at the expense of private

enterprise. Very inconvenient to its

purpose that the volume of unemployment

was comparatively negligible. Or

do we do it an injustice? If so, let it

proceed forthwith to count the unemployed

and set the suspicion at rest.—

New York Herald-Tribune.

Artesian Wells & Supplies

Gomplete Pump Installation

Deming and Myers Line

FULL STOCK—of Shallow and Deep-Well Pumps, Tanks

tad Accessories, Cylinders, Parts, Hand Pumps, Motors.

Agents for

Permutit Water Conditioning

Ask Us About Service Insurance

P. F. Beal and Sons

Tel. 314 Est. 1891 BREWSTER, N. Y.

Female Cats Better Rat

Catchers Than the Toma

Only a few cats are good at catchlng

rats, and small female cats are

more efficient ratters than are large

torn cats.

Many dogs are without peer at

the art. The smaller breeds, such

as terriers, are especially efficient,

but airdales have likewise been

proved in battle. A single terrier

has been credited with slaying more

than 1,000 rats in a year. Another

killed 80 of the pests in a warehouse

in a single night.

Unlike the cat, dogs waste no

time in torturing their prey, but,

with a savage shake, throw down

the dead rat and proceed to destroy

all that remain.

It is on unusual cat that will

tackle a full-grown rat. The rat's

ferocity and vigor in defense is so

great that most house cats, though

glad to catch the young, pause to

reckon before attacking a full-grown

rat.

While many persons think of the

cat as a rat catcher, their opinions

are based largely on the premise

that if the cat catches and kills a

half dozen rats a year that they

see, then the actual number

slaughtered must be much larger.

Meaning of "Feet of Clay"

"Feet of clay" comes from Biblical

usage. Figuratively it is applied

to the more earthly and baser side

of human nature. "He has learned

that his idol has feet of clay" is

said of a person who is disappointed

or disillusioned. Daniel II, 32,

33 and 34, says: "This image's head

was of fine gold, his breast and

his arms of silver, his belly and his

thighs of brass, his legs of iron,

his feet part of iron and part of

clay. Thou sawest till that a stone

was cut out without hands, which

smote the image upon his feet that

were of iron and clay, and brake

them to pieces." In the holy city

of Benares, India, there is a god

whose "feet of clay" are washed

each year by the priests after being

washed away by the Ganges.

Faucets Make Two-Way Tub

Faucets for the laundry tubs today

are as modern as the new

round-cornered tubs of white or buff

porcelain. Instead of protruding

from the tub three or four inches

below the edge, the new faucet is

on the wall. It is just in the center

of the two-in-one tub, with a

swinging attachment that makes it

possible to fill first one side, then

the other, with the one faucet. This

arrangement also prevents contamination

of the fresh water supply

through back-siphonage, when the

tubs are full of soapy or soiled

water.

JUST HUMANS By GENE CARR

"Will Ya Keep An Eye on This Bus While I Go (o th' Bank an-1

Swing Them for a Loan on'It?'*

Women own 70 per cent of the nation's

wealth and will soon get nil of

it, figures a statistician. This looks

suspiciously flike pjessintfjsm born of

an early marriage.—Ashvllle Times.

DHi) house is /

WARM /•

and why not" she uses

A big bull down in New Mexico the

other day charged headlong into a

Santa Fe railway engine. He evidently

didn't have any more sense than a lot

of automobile drivers.

Leahy's Cities Service

PHONE BREWSTER 379

WHAT TOU SAY GOES

»«"•

IV

THIS year, good thing9 come in eights

—get into this bellwether Buick and

the other fellow will know who's leadoff

man in your neck of the woods!

You're boss of the bunch when you

ease in gas to the great valve-in-head

straight eight, ablest engine of its size

anywhere in the world. It's soft of voice

but it packs authority—there isn't any

fooling when it has work to do!

You're the envy of all eyes, garbed in

Buick's princely style — handling these

ready controls is the softest job in the

whole wide world.

You stream down the straightaway —

soar over the tallest hills — you sweep

around the corners and curves erect as

a dowager making her entrance —why

even the back seat's chatterproof, so

LOWEST PRICES EVER

ON A BUICK

4-DOOR SEDAN I

GENERAL MOTORS TERMS

TO SUIT YOUR UKINC

sweetly, smoothly, serenely does this

road-wise car conduct itself!

You can't hurt it—it's built rugged and

stout as Buick always has been—but still

we say, handle with care! For so instantquick

is its lift to your toe-touch, so

quietly easy will it outwing the birds,

that you never have to force it to make

your distance safely with time to spare.

This year say Buick—and whatever you

say on the open road will go with the

whole parade. Its purchase is as easily

managed as its feather-light controls —

for today Buick is priced at the lowest

figure in history.

Your cue now is to see us. Do that without

delay and you'll hold the center of

the stage all summer long!

DANBURY BUICK CO., INC.

125 Main St. Danbury, Conn.

v


PAGE BIGHT THE BREWSTER STANDARD — ESTABLISHED 1869 FRIDA

The Sheriff Gets

a Tip

By VIC YARDMAN

© AltOdated Nevipapers.

WNU Service.

A3 the sheriff's posse neared the

** crossroad's saloon it spread out,

fan shape, gradually widening into

a circle, until the lone building was

'completely surrounded. When within

fifty yards all but Sheriff Steve

(Osmund and Mose Anthony came

• to a halt. Steve and Mose rode

'boldly up to the saloon door and

dismounted.

The barkeep was seated on a high

stool at one end of the bar, a paper

covered magazine in his lap.

"Sit still, barkeep." Sheriff Osi

mund strode into the room, his eyes

• darting around in quick scrutiny.

"This ain't a stickup. I'm Sheriff

Osmund. You alone?"

The barkeep swallowed and his

Adam's apple bobbed ludicrously.

"Ain't seen a soul since last night,"

he gulped.

"I'll look, anyway," said Mose.

And he strode past the bar toward

the back room. Sheriff Osmund went

to the door and called to his men.

They galloped up, tethering their

horses in the rear of the building,

stomping inside a moment later.

The barkeep blinked. "What's the

idea, Sheruff?"

Osmund posted men at the windows,

consulted with Mose Anthony

who had returned from the back

room, and cpproached the man on

the stool. "Listen, sin-imp, sit tight

and keep your trap shut. Maybe

you'll see some excitement. Nick

Bacchelli's due here any minute.

We got a tip he's headin' for the

border, see? He's meeting his moll

here before he makes the dash. This

time he ain't gettin' away from us."

The sheriff crossed to a window.

Mose Anthony took out his gun

and spun the cylinder. The barkeep

stared, roundeyed, pale. Spasmodically

his Adam's apple bobbed and

rebobbed.

Minutes passed. Outside, the desert

baked and shimmered beneath

ithe broiling Arizona sun. Presently

the stillness was broken by a faint

humming sound. It grew louder,

flashed over the peak of a low rise,

developed into a roar. A motor car

bore down on the saloon, stopped

outside. A girl alighted. Inside the

room the tenseness electrified the

atmosphere.

The girl approached the door,

opened it, stepped inside. No one

moved. Her eyes flitted about,

rested first on one face and then on

another, flicked to the barkeep, sitting

statuelike on his stool, nothing

about him moving but his Adam's

apple.

Osmund said: "Well, sister, you

arrived in time for the party. Take

, a chair. Your boy friend ought to be

.here any moment."

The girl laughed, raucously. She

placed a hand on either hip and

looked at Sheriff Osmund scornfully.

"Just like he said it would be,"

she said. "Sheriff, I didn't believe

him. I had to come up and see for

myself."

"Didn't believe who?" Osmund

snapped, color showing beneath his

tan.

"Nick, you fool! Nick said he

fixed it so's you'd congregate here.

He wanted it that way to give him a

clear run for the border. Nick's

' smart, but by the lord, I didn't think

he'd pull one as good as this!"

Mose Anthony laughed gratingly.

The officer swore. He told the girl

[to sit down. Contemptuously she

! complied. Five minutes passed. The

J sheriff stared from the window, but

I his face worked. Presently the girl

'spoke again.

"You're O. K. You do things right.

[By now, Nick's hit the border and is

(safely over."

Mose Anthony laughed again, to

himself. "Listen, Steve, the girl's

giving it straight. You can tell that.

We're wastin* time. Stick your pride

in your pocket and let's call it a

tough break."

The sheriff glowered. The posse

members had risen and were flexing

their muscles. "All right. Blast

it—I got half a mind to take the

dame along just to satisfy—"

"But you can't," said the girl

sweetly. "You haven't anything on

me."

Ten minutes later the posse faded

slowly against the northern horizon.

The barkeep moved his hands, and

the paper covered magazine fell to

the floor, revealing a brace of automatics

clutched in his lists. He went

to the door. The automobile containing

the girl had turned and was

racing back. It stopped and the girl

said:

"Hop in, Nick. We'll have to step

i on it. That crazy sheriff might get

i ideas and come back. Where's the

barkeep?"

"Tied up under the bar. The dumb

cluck of a deputy didn't have sense

enough to look." He smiled at the

girl fondly. "Say, for quick thinking,

' you've got me stopped forty ways."

The Mocking Uiid FainUy

In raising their family, the mole

and female mocking birds show

commendable co - operation. She

builds the nest, while he brings

things to help her. About the third

, week after the baby birds are born,

they are ready to go out with their

parents, and then for several weeks

they follow the father and mother

• about. Gradually the young ones

lose their soft and fuzzy looking

feathers and the tiny speckles on

• their throats, until by fall they are

I very sleek, trim and "tailor made"

in appearance.

j Uncommon

Americans

By Elmo Scott Watson

"Hot Water War" Leader

"CHAY'S REBELLION" and the

° "Whiskey Rebellion" are the

outstanding examples of minor

"wars" which somehow manage to

get into our school histories. But

most of them overlook the "Hot

Water War" and its leader, John

Fries. Yet he was a very important

figure back in 1798 when we were

about to go to war with France.

In order to raise money for an

army to fight this war, if it came,

congress enacted a direct tax law.

known as the "house tax,"—20 cents

per $100 on houses valued at $200

to $500 and 30 cents on houses valued

at $500 to $1,000 The value of

the houses was determined by

counting the number of windows

and measuring them.

In Pennsylvania especially was

there resentment against this tax.

When assessors went around to

measure the windows on houses,

the women threw open these windows

and poured scalding water on

the officials, hence the name "Hot

Water War."

It was also called "Fries Rebellion"

because the leader of resistance

to collection of the tax was

John Fries, a veteran of the Revolution

(who had also helped suppress

the Whiskey Rebellion in

Pennsylvania!) He was a traveling

auctioneer and this occupation gave

him a good opportunity to harangue

the people and urge them to resist

collection of the house tax. More

than that, he raised a force of

armed men who chased assessors

from township to township, forcibly

released prisoners, who had been

put in jail for resisting the tax collectors,

and in general kept the

state in an uproar.

Finally President Adams called

on the governor of Pennsylvania to

call out militia to suppress the rioters.

Fries was captured and taken

to Philadelphia to be tried for treason.

His attorneys insisted that he

was answerable only to a charge of

rioting, but a federal jury found him

guilty of treason and he was sentenced

to be hanged. Then Benjamin

Franklin Bache, editor of the

Aurora, a Republican (Democratic)

paper, and bitter critic of the administration,

took up Fries' case.

He raised such a fearful row about

it that it became a national issue.

At last, President Adams was led

to pardon Fries and after that the

leader of the short-lived "Hot Water

War" dropped out of sight and

is lost to history.

© Western Newspaper Union.

Uncommon

Americans

By Elmo Scott Watson

The First "Muckraker"

U*ARLY one morning in the late

*-' 1820s a comedy was enacted on

the banks of the Potomac river near

Washington which is without parallel

in American history. Enter the

first character: a swimmer, sans

bathing suit or any other raiment.

He is no less a person than the

President of the United States, for

it was the custom of John Quincy

Adams to go for an early-morning

swim in that historic stream.

Enter now the second character:

an old woman, poorly dressed, carrying

a huge umbrella, an inkhorn

and quill pen and some paper. She

marches out to where the swimmer's

clothes lie on the bank and

sits down beside them. The swimmer

sees her, hastily sits down in

the water until only his head is visible.

"Go away! Go awayl" he

shouts.

"Not until you answer some questions,

sir!" the woman replies.

John Quincy Adams rages. He

threatens. He pleads. But it's no

use. The woman not only refuses

to budge but she makes him come

closer to the bank so that she

can hear more plainly what he has

to say. And thus Anne Royull, editor

of the Huntress (appropriate

name, that!) and "Grandma of the

Muckrakers" forced Adams to explain

to her his national bank policy,

then the most important public

question of the day. It was one

of the first Presidential interviews

and undoubtedly the most unusual

one ever given.

But that was characteristic of

Anne Royall. Left a poor widow

when her husband, a Revolutionary

war veteran died, Anne Royall

went to Washington to claim a widow's

pension. While waiting to collect

it, she bought an old printing

press, hired a printer and began

publishing a small weekly newspaper

which she called the Paul Pry

Journal. In it she fearlessly printed

everything that she considered

news, regardless of how much it

embarrassed public ofiicials.

They tried to liit back at her by

having her tried as a common

scold, but John Eaton, President

Jackson's secretary of war, furnished

bond for her (mainly because

she had been an ardent defender

of Peggy Eaton in the social

war then raging). She changed

the name of her paper to the Huntress

but she didn't change its character

and to the end of her days in

1854 she was a crusading journalist—the

"first muckraker."

& Wi-blcra Newspaper Union.

Laughing Around the World

With IRVIN S. COBB

The Language of the Cradle

By IRVIN S. COBB

gOOTH TARKINGTON has immortalized the young lady who talked

baby talk. His characterization of her is one of the enduring

creations of our native fiction. In real life, though, there sometimes

bobs up an instance of this failing on the part of a fond parent.

Here is a case in point: According to Mantague Glass, a tired

business man of the New York variety returned from lunch looking

more tired than usual. To an associate in his office he said wearily:

"Ferguson's getting mean—getting worse and worse?" inquired the

partner. "Is he still telling stories to prove that new baby of his is

the most wonderful child that ever was born in the world?"

"No, he's reached the secondary stage now," said the first speaked.

"I judge from something that happened just now over at the restaurant

that the infant must have arrived at the conversational age,"

"What happened?"

"Here's what happened: I heard Ferguson say to the waitress,

who came to take bis order: 'Poor Da-da thirsty! Please give Da-da a

jinky water!"

(American Neva Features, Inc.)

Bleakley Addresses

|Peekskill Cadets

Hon. William F. Bleakley Urges Cadets

to Uphold Constitution and the

U. S. Supreme Court.

Assailing the attempt to change the

character of the United States Supreme

Court as a dangerous experiment

which threatens to rob the

people of their rights to free speech,

free press and absolute religious liberty,

William F. Bleakley, brought

applause from 300 cadets of the Peekskill

Military Academy and 400 guests,

during the Vesper services, Sunday, in

the Ford Auditorium, in lauding the

high character, courage and efficiency

of the learned Justices of the highest

tribunal.

Justice Bleakley made his dramatic

plea against meddling with the Supreme

Court in any way in an impressive

setting. He spoke with evident

feeling. He was serious as he drove

home his objections to any changes

not apporved by the people.

Just prior to the vesper services

Justice Bleakley reviewed the cadet

corps with Major Raymond Moniz and

officials of the institution. The services

which started at 4 p. m. were

conducted by the Rev. Thomas C.

Straus. On the platform in addition

to Major Moniz and Dr. Straus with

Mr. Bleakley were Charles H. Robinson

and John Calvin Bucher, coprincipals

of the institution.

The cadets were in full dress uniform

with blue coats, white ducks,

white cross bands and white gloves.

They provided a picturesque and impressive

setting for the voicing of the

former jurist's protest against the

court packing plan of the Washington

administration. Frequently during

the address the audience spoke

their approval of the utterances of the

speaker.

Branding any attempt to rob the

Supreme Court of the power to properly

function as dangerous to the nation

and the people, Justice Bleakley

declared with feeling that, "What we

need in the United States most today,

is a little more patriotism and considerably

less politics." The cadet

corps and their guests cheered this

declaration.

Justice Bleakley said in part:

"Constitution of the United States

is not the law of the President—the

Constitution of the United States is

not the Law of Congress it is the Law

of the People." Any change in the

HE DELIVER

AMY WHERE

Constitution should be made through

an amendment voted upon by the

people.

"From time immemorial the Supreme

Court has ruled on the basis of

law and if the Court is to be amended

the people have reserved that right to

themselves. Because of economic conditions

the President sought the passage

of certain laws. These laws were

adopted by Congress and the Supreme

Court, through their duly executed

power, decreed those laws unconstitutional."

"Failing in having these Acts made

constitutional the President then proposed

Increasing the Supreme Court

from nine to fifteen men, for the purpose

of obtaining control of the Court

that would be favorable to his plans.

"We have the freedom of the press,

the freedom of speech and the right

to worship assured us by the Constitution.

If the Court is changed, basic inherent

rights can be taken from us by

acts of Congress supported by the

President.

The men appointed to the Court are

required to be mentally alert by the

character of their work. Age did not

interfere with their efficiency nor with

their courage, and examination of

their records showed that they were

abreast of their work.

"The Constitution is the finest instrument

of Government ever created

and will see us safely through this depression.

I am opposed to subverting

it by any changes. Presidents come

and Presidents go, but the United

States with its Constitution and Supreme

Court will go on forever.

"What we need in the United States

today is a little more patriotism and

considerably less politics.

"It is your duty to uphold the Constitution.

When you permit any individual

or group of individuals to obtain

control you are an agent to the

destruction of the Constitution of the

United States."

Asserting that the Constitution is

the finest instrumetn of govenrment

ever created by man, Justice Bleakley

told that the real purpose of adding

six jurists to the Supreme Court* was

not to pass upon laws under the Constitution

but a deliberate attempt to

win apporval of the plans of the President

regardless of whether they conflict

and violate the spirit and intent

of the Constitution or not.

'He continued:

"Whether a law is Constitutional is

a matter of law, not fact. A court

must decide legality.

"The very purpose of the President

is to obtain a court that will be favorable

to his plans."

WHEREVER y° u ^ ve our excellent delivery

system will reach you. We deliver anywhere-any

amount-and we get it to you

when you want it. That's why we have

friends everywhere.

"Where a Promise Is Kept"

Danbury-Brewster Lumber Co.

Phone 450

East Main Sum Brewster. N. Y.

Father of American Navy

Claimed by Jones, Barry

By some, John Paul Jones is

called the father of the American

navy, by reason of the prominent

work he took in the naval part of

the revolution, relates a writer in

the Indianapolis News. He was born

in Scotland in 1747, and at twelve

was apprenticed to a merchant engaged

in the American trade. On

being sent to sea he evinced a

marked aptitude for the life. He

migrated to Virginia in 1773, on inheriting

an estate from his brother,

and was commissioned in the revolutionary

army. His first command

was the Alfred from which he broke

out the first American flag ever displayed

on a man-of-war. For the

first time in modern naval history

an inferior ship captured a vessel

rated as superior, the victory

being credited to him when he defeated

the Drake. He served until

1781. From 1788 to 1791 he was an

admiral in the Russian navy. He

died in Paris in 1792, and is buried

at Annapolis, Md.

The distinction of being father

of the navy also is claimed for

John Barry, who was born in Ireland

in 1745, and emigrated to

Philadelphia in 1760. He commanded

the Lexington, the Effingham

and the Raleigh in the revolution.

The last ship was captured, but

he escaped, and took command of

the Alliance. He became commodore

in 1794, and brought about the

basic organization and contributed

essential service to its development.

Most Ancient Corn That

of Pre-Incas of Peru

How, when and where corn was

domesticated are three questions

often asked but never answered, asserts

an authority. Though there is

corn of primitive people, there is

no such thing as primitive corn.

The oldest ears known are as highly

developed botanically and as completely

divorced from wild plants

as the best of our commercial varieties.

The most ancient corn known is

that of the pre-Incas of Peru. Well

preserved ears in the graves of

these people duplicate the varieties

grown in the same region today. A

thousand or more generations have

made no changes. Charred corn

from the Mound Builders of the

Ohio valley resembles corn grown

by Indians in the Middle West.

The nearest relative to Indian

corn known to botanists is the grass

generally known by its Aztec name

of teosinte. But if corn developed

from teosinte, the manner of development

can only be surmised. It

is believed, however, that the advance

of genetic knowledge may unravel

the mystery of maize.

If the boys of Valley Forge were alive

now and ran into a tough winter they

could all go on relief.

•o

Facts on potato growing In New

York, how to plant, cultivate, protect

and harvest the crop, are given in

Cornell bulletin E-239. For a copy,

write to the New York State College

of Agriculture at Ithaca, N. Y.

Dr. William A. Sunderland, of Danbury,

is one of the delegates from Fairfield

county to the 145th annual meeting

of the Connecticut State Medical

Society, which will be held in the

Stratfleld Hotel, Bridgeport, May 19

and 20. Dr. S. F. Mull ins is a member

of the committee on public policy and

legislation and Dr. D. C. Brown is

chairman of the committee on medical

ethics and deportment.

Special consideration is givfl

farmers with only a few acres

Agricultural Ooaiervation

for 1937. Details may be had fror

county agricultural agent's officii

kT &r~y-

Carriage Lam]

Antique Fixtures

Suitable for

Lighting Doorways

Purdy 8L Penir

Tel. 644 Brewster

Tel. 47 Croton Falls

Main St. Brewst

I5^&^d«*^^B5 Ford

V-8 Cur from any Ford

dealer m the I . S. —

through Authorised

Ford Finance Flan* of

Uuivcr»ul Credit Co.


FRIDA'Vf, MAY 14, 1937 THE BREWSTER STANDARD ESTABLISHED 1869

CHURCH NOTICES

•»"•• PAGE NINE

When a blonde stenographer starts a

PEACH LAKE

sit-down strike she wants to be careful

I

Before The Surrogate where she sits.

(Continued from Page 6)

— o

Putnam County, New York

When you wonder where all of last

Bill and his right hand man are kept JAMES W. BAILEY, Surrogate year's wages have gone Just take a look

busy handing out garden seeds and

at the nearest automobile Junk yard.

garden tools. Last week he took over GLADYS SWANSON, Secretary

Bob Oelker for one of those "Silent

Yardman" mowers and Bob's neighbor,

John Pugsley, got Jealous and had to Estates of:

have one too. Sort of keeping up with Lorenzo Mollo, also known as Lor-

the Jones'. Bill is hoping all the neighenso Mello and Lorenzo Mello, Philbors

get Jealous.

ipsttown: Order for citation entered.

Ken Newcomb, our handsome con­ Emma B. Koster, Putnam Valley:

tractor, who is doing a Job over in Consent to substitution, objections to

North Salem has been checking up on probate by special guardian, notice of

Uncle Willie on his daily trips over examination, affidavits, affidavits and

the Peach Lake road, but to date has notice of motion to vacate, notice of

been unable to dig up any dirt. taking testimony, memorandum on be-

Joe Hughes, the victim of a pancake j half of infant by special guardian on

landing at the dance over in Ridge- motion to vacate nitices of examlnafleld

recently has decided to go in for tlon before trial and notice of issue

the "Minuets" instead of the square filed.

sets.

Amy Crosby, Southeast: Petition,

The "Junior Prom" of Brewster High

consent and oath filed, order entered

School will be held at the school au­

and letters of trusteeship Issued to

ditorium on Friday evening, May 21,

County Trust Company and Henry H.

under the direction of Miss Kay Hub­

Wells.

bard. The auditorium will be decorated

to represent a rose garden. Mu­ Ell B. Crosby, Patterson: Will, prosic

will be furnished by Emmett Conbate petition, oath, designation, waivniff

and his popular orchestra. Ader and notice of probate to legatees

mission will be $1.25 a couple. filed, proof of will taken, decree en­

The young St. Lawrence baseball tered and letters testamentary issued

team will play the strong Mt. Kisco to Albert N. Towner.

team on the local field next Sunday.

Joe Brennan, the big handsome

Gilbert B. St. John, Patterson: Re­

clerk at Ray Millar's, spends his off

port of transfer tax filed.

time sleeping in the sun on the rocks Mila A. Perry, Carmel: Temporary

of Marvin Mountain up In back of estate tax receipt filed.

his home. Joe is a nature lover but not

a nudist.

Reed Perry: Temporary estate tax

Charlie Ganong, our genial Dodge receipt filed.

dealer still has a gang at work at his

garage and gas station. The work is

Joseph H. Newman, Philipstown: De­

nearing completion and certainly imsignation,

oath and affidavit filed,

proves the looks of the corners. There

Surety Bond approved and filed, de­

is to be a larger space for the display

cree entered and letters of administra­

of used cars and it is expected to have

tion with the will annexed granted to

provisions for a trailer camp.

Elizabeth Newman Tracy. •

Don't forget "Town Hall tonight" last Juliet R. Kent, Patterson: Report

chance to see the show, 'Captain Ap­ of appraiser filed and order exempting

plejack" and there will be dancing af­ estate tax entered.

ter the show.

Charlie Anderson is peeved now Mary J. Vandemark, Philipstown:

that they have extended the time for Report of appraiser filed and order

renewing chauffeurs licenses as he has exempting estate tax entered.

his studio all fixed up for the expected

Anna T. O'Neill, Southeast: Cita­

rush for identification pictures.

tion and proof of service filed and sup­

News of Croton River Rifle Club plemental citation order entered.

The regular match on Sunday, May

9, was held on the outdoor range at

Tilly Poster. The number of members

who attended was a disappointment

to those who contributed so much of

their time and efforts in the construction

of the outdoor range. Those who

did turn out surely had a very enjoyable

time as the weather but for a

strong wind was ideal for an outdoor

event.

The site of the range overlooking

the lake makes a wonderful place to

spend a day in the outdoors and should

prove very popular with the members.

The match was fired in relay teams

of five members as been the custom in

the indoor range, though there are

provisions for ten shooters on the firing

line at one time. The targets can

be placed at either 50 or 100 yards,

while at the indoor range it was only

possible to shoot at 50 foot targets.

In looking over the individual scores

it is surprising how little change of the,

distance effected the scores, some ev- of J? and P ro ° f of codici j, taken PUTNAM COUNTY

SUPREME COURT

Much of the world's population is

CLERK'S OFFICE

Putnam County.

poorly fed or underfed, especally as

Pursuant to Section 514, Article 16,

of the Consolidated Laws of 1909 No*

Christian Science Serrioes.

to foods rich in minerals and vitamins,

WESTCHESTER COUNTY

recent international studies show.

tlce is hereby given that a panel of Services of First Church of Christ NATIONAL BANK,

Grand and Trial Jurors will be drawn Scientist, Katonah, N. Y., are held In

Plaintiff.

Monday, May 17, 1937, at ten o'clock church home, The Terrace, off Bedford

—against— Notice

in the forenoon to serve as such at a Road, Katonah.

LaMONTE AUSTIN, indi­ of Sale

MATTER OP PUBLIC HEARING FOR term of the County Court to be held Sunday service at 11:00 o'clock:. vidually and as Executor of

ESTABLISHMENT OP FERE PRO­ at the Court House in the Village of Sunday school at 9:80 o'clock. the last Will and Testament

TECTION DISTRICT IN THE TOWN Carmel, In said County on Tuesday, Testimonial meeting every Wednes­ of S. Hetty (Hettie) Austin

OF SOUTHEAST, PUTNAM COUN­ June 1, 1937, at ten o'clock in the day evening at 8 o'clock.

deceased, FRANK GEORGE,

TY, NEW YORK, IN PURSUANCE forenoon.

Reading Room open on Tuesday and EDWARD ARCHER and

TO ARTICLE H OF THE TOWN Dated. May 5, 1937.

Friday afternoons from 2:00 to 6:00 THE PEOPLE OF THE

LAW.

HARRY M. BARRETT, except holidays.

STATE OF NEW YORK,

County Clerk.

Defendants.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

public hearing will be held at the

School House of School District No. CHERIFF'S COURT PROCLAMA­

12 at Doanesburg, in the Town of TION.—State of New York, Putnam "Mortals and Immortals" is the sub­

Southeast, Putnam County, New York, County, ss.:

ject of the Lesson-Sermon in all

on the 16th day of May, 1037, at 4 The undersigned Sheriff of the said Churches of Christ, Scientist, on Sun­

o'clock In the afternoon, D. S. T, for County of Putnam in conformity to a day, May 16.

the purpose of considering the estab­ precept to him in the behalf directed The Golden Text is: "They that are

lishment of a fire protection district and delivered by this, his proclama­ in the flesh cannot please God. But ye

within the Town of Southeast, and tion, requires all persons bound to ap­ are not in the flesh, hut in the Spirit,

hearing all persons Interested In the pear at the

if so be that the Spirit of God dwell

subject concerning the same. The ter­

COUNTY COURT

in you." (Romans 8:8, 9). ,

ritory embraced within the proposed to be held at the Court House in the

Among the citations which comprise

fire protection district is contained Town of Carmel, in the County of

Hie Lesson-Sermon is the following

within the following boundaries, to Putnam, commencing: on Tuesday,

from the Bible: "There was a man of

wit:

June 1, 1037, at ten o'clock in the

the Pharisees, named Nicodemus, a

forenoon of that day, by recognizance

ruler of the Jews. The same came to

The proposed fire protection district

or otherwise, to appear thereat the

Jesus by night and said unto him, Rab­

of the Town of Southeast, Putnam

undersigned hereby requires all Jusbi,

we know that thou art a teacher

County, New York, shall comprise and

tices of the Peace and other officers

come from God; for no man can do

include the entire Town of Southeast,

who have taken any recognizance for

these miracles that thou doest, except

Putnam County, New York, excepting

the appearance of any person at the

God be with him. Jesus answered and

and excluding therefrom, however, all

Court or having taken any inquisition

said unto him, Verily, verily, I say un­

that portion of said Town which lies

of examination of any prisoner or witto

thee, Except a man be born again,

and is included within the corporate

ness to return such recognizance, in­

he cannot see the kingdom of God.

limits of the incorporated Village of

quisitions and examinations to the

That which is born of the flesh is

Brewster, Putnam County, New York,

said Court at the opening thereof, at

flesh: and that which is born of the

and also excepting and excluding

the first day of its sitting.

Spirit is Spirit." (ohn 3:1-3, 6).

therefrom all that portion of said

Signed at the Sheriff's Office in Car­ The Lesson-Sermon also includes the

Town of Southeast which is included

mel, May 5, 1937.

following correlative selection from

in the proposed Croton Falls fire dis­

ALLEN G. N. GILBERT, the textbook of Christian Science,

trict lying in the southwesterly corner

Sheriff "Science and Health with Key to the

of said Town.

Scrptures," by Mary Baker Eddy: "Human

birth, growth, maturity, and de­

(L S.) H. M. REYNOLDS,

cay are as the grass springing from the

Town Clerk of the Town of Southeast. JOSEPH C. GENOVESE soil with beautiful green blades, after­

Counsellor at Law

wards to wither and return to its

native nothingness. This mortal seem­

•iwniiiBiwnfflmu * m •

4 No. Main Street

ing is temporal; it never merges into

BREWSTER, N. Y.

immortal being, but finally disappears,

FLOWERS

TeL Brewster 617

and immortal man, spiritual and eter­

REAL ESTATE

For All Occasions

nal, is found to be the real man."

(page 190).

CUT FLOWERS

M.

o

POTTED PLANTS

Church of St. Lawrence OT-oole

FLORAL DESIGNS N. CIOCCOLANTI 36 Prospect Street, Brewster. N. Y.

Bev. Thomas O. Philbin, Rector

The Best of Quality and Service*

Sunday Masses 7 a. m., 8 a. m., 11

F. C. Bevin, Carmel: Assignment

with power of attorney filed and re­ Brewster Nursery General Contractor a. m.

Weekday Mass 7 a. m.

corded.

II. P. HOWELL, Mgr.

*

Communion Sundays. 1st Sunday,

Phone 39-W Peaceable Hill

(Reuben B. Gilbert, Putnam Valley:

Rosary Society, 7 o'clock Mass. Chil­

Waivers and notice of probate to Le­ 1 •.•::• r. ra^B „•.•...•:•;

Builder

dren 9 o'clock Mass Altar Society.

gatees filed and proof of will taken.

2d Sunday, Holy Name society, 7

Phone 742

3d Sunday, Children of Mary 7

Carrie Mansfield Weir, Philipstown:

o'clock Mass.

Special guardan's report filed, decree

60 Marvin Ave. Brewster, N. Y.

entered and letters testamentary is­ HERMAN FOLB

1st Friday, Masses at 5:30 and 7

o'clock. Communion also at 6 a. m.

sued to Helen Rutgers Sturgis, Jr., and

6:30 a. m. and 8 a. m.

Bankers Trust Company.

Confessions Saturday afternoon and

Cattle Dealer

evening. 4:30 to 6, 7:30 to 9.

Christopher C. Bumford, Carmel:

Petition filed and order appointing

NEED A SIGN ? Thursday before the 1st Friday, 4

transfer tax appraiser entered.

Cattle Bought and Sold

to 6. 7:30 to 9.

Call

Towners

Oscar Bailey, Southeast: Petition

North of

Sunday Mass 10 a. m.

filed and notice to creditors order en­ Hill and Dale Club House BREWSTER 582

tered.

Carmel, N. V. Phone 294

-Neon-Billboard-

William J. Rutledge, Patterson: Petition

filed and order to sell or transfer

stocks entered.

Electric

Emma Louise Senior, Carmel: Proof Tony Cioccolanti Martin's Shop

-

en Improved on their indoor scores.

special guardian's consent filed and

54J4 Main St.

The team scores were as follows:

order entered, special guardian's re­

Team No. 3, W. Alexander, Captain,

port filed, decree entered and letters General Contractor a-

won with a score of 1564. Team No. 2,

testamentary issued to Ida Adele Bell

C. Eastwood, Captain .was second with

and Emma A. Jacobus.

and Mason

B 1480. Team No. 4, R .Olnio, Captain, David O'Meara, New Jersey: Petition

was third with 1465. Team No. 1, N. filed, order entered and exemplified Telephone 371

Light, Captain, was fourth with 1387. copy of will and probate proceedings

These scores were made on 50 yard filed and recorded.

targets.

Brewster, N. Y.

The individual scores were as follows:

R. Genovese 356, C. Eastwood

334, P. Light 332, W. Alexander 330, J.

Genovese 329, Madeline Nichols 326, COAL PRICES The Putnam County

N. Light 326. W. Duffy 313, W. Durkin

310, R Lincoln 309, G. Strand 308, H.

National Bank

E. Seaman 307, R. Unto 300, L. Cole DOWN

300, A. Hansen 280,


PATTERSON

A daughter who will be called Mary

Margaret was born to Mr. and Mrs.

Lester Pfahl at the Twin Dams Nursing

Home this week.

Mr. IJOUIS Blcroe, former manager

of the Grand Union store, has been

transferred to Armonk and fixtures,

signs and remaining stock of the store

here have: been removed.

At the annual meeting of School

District No. 2 Mrs. W. ,E. Oerow was

reelected trustee, V^ilbur E. Gerow,

clerk and Paul W. Townsend, collector.

Mr. and Mrs. *Peroy Hall of Belleville,

N. J., were guests for the week

end of Mrs. J. Johnston and daughter.

Deep sympathy is felt for Mrs. Henry

Ballard in the death of her mother,

Mrs. J. Richard Turner on Tuesday

If mowing a shock. She I was

81 years old and held in high esteem

and affection being a kind neighbor

and friend and a devoted.home maker.

She leavw, herNhuBband and* one

daughter, Mrs. Ballard. Funeral services

will be held at her late home at

Holmes on Friday at 2 p. m. with interment

in Maple Avenue Cemetery.

Joseph E. Carey, tax collector, is

now receiving taxes at 1 per sent up

to May 22 and 2 per cent will be

charged from then until June 21. Under

the new law every taxpayer has

been sent a bill showing amount due

so that there should be no mistake.

Rev. W. H. Meldrum and Paul W.

Townsend attended the annual Diocesian

convention in New York on

Tuesday.

Where To Go ? ? Saturday May 15th.

Enjoy Yourself at the

Elm Rest Tavern

Route 52 Carmel,. N. Y

Dining Dancing Entertainment

Delicious Foods Choice Wines & Liquors]

6 hrs. of Fun, Frolic ft Amusement

Dance to the Music of 'The RHYTHM BOYS'

Never a Cover Charge

what music! what dancing! what fun!

rr

A new hard wood floor is being laid

in the living room of the Scpelken

home and a shower bath installed in

the apartment rented.

Miss Jean Hampe has been a recent

victim of scarletlna. .

Mrs. J. F. Smith is improving from

her recent illness and is now able to

sit up.

Mrs. John Wlgg of Stamford. Conn.,

greeted old friends in town last Friday.

Master Karl Walter Moberg, aged 16

months, has been welcomed to the

home of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Moberg

where he will become a permanent

member of the family as soon as certain

legal formalities are completed.

He has already made many friends

and admirers in the community.

Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Bloch have

started the building of a new home on

North street in the Newcomb developments.

Several plots in Maple Avenue Cemetery

have been newly graded and seeded

and caretaker James E. Smith Is

rapidly getting the place in fine shape

for Decoration Day.

Mr. James T. H. Gerow is spending

some time with his parents, Mr. and

Mrs. W. E. Gerow.

Assessors E. F. Hayt, C. F. Segelken

and C. A. Mollne are looking over

property for valuation the coming

year and are now at work in the Putnam

Lake Development.

All who attended the Presbyttrian

church last Sunday were given a sprig

of apple blossoms to pin on their coaf

In celebration of Mothers' Day and

during the service special honor was

given to all mothers and grandmothers

and to those having three or more

children present with them.

Coal is now being delivered by Eaton

and Kelley Co. and many bins uro

being filled for next winters use.

IMESHE3JMIESEGH

Sensationally Low Priced!

Plumbing and

Water System

Complete — Nothing EUe to Bity/

$

192-00

To Pay

HE Yo., S WHAT

Y o « GBTI

Co«I

T

*«* Heater f 1

"•culesSep^,.

AH n~ ^ ^

^ftpe. and Fittings f

Beat the price rise! Modernize your borne NOW! Know the convenience of

modern equipment! Install this complete water supply and plumbing system

in your home. You will note that the materials include everything you need

for a COMPLETE installation. Noth­

~"uIlL THIS COUPOH!

SEAB6. ROEBUCK .nd CO.

NAME

" I

AOORES«

ing else to buy! Just imagine having

running water — both hot and cold

— right in your own home . . . and

at such a low price! You'll find the

convenience worth many times the

moderate investment. Take early advantage

of this offer. Come in now

and investigate ... or clip and mail

the coupon.

Act NOW! Don't Delay!

SEARS. ROEBUCK AND CO

12* Mam bUeei DANBURY, CONN.

A Kentucky Judge fined a man for Q if • p jj C wj n f f

riding iff a bicycle blcvcle while intoxicated. We ^>vii ill run owing

don't believe he could do it.

Gelatin is made from the skin and

trimmings from cows and other animals

butchered for meat. These are

soaked in lime water fo rseveral weeks,

then washed and boiled with water.

Stone Mason Work

GRADING AND DRIVEWAYS

E. G. MOORE

Tol. 183-W Brewster

&/>e RITZ

Brewster, N. T. Phone 688

TIME SCHEDULE

Evening Continuous from 7 P. M.

!• 11 P. M.

MiMlii Wednesday at 3:00 P. M.

Saturday Continuous Performance

from 2 p. m. to 11 p. ni.

Sunday and Holidays Continuous

Performance from 2:30 to 11 P. M.

Fri. Sat. May 14 and 15

"NIGHT MUST FALL"

—with—

Robert Montgomery

Rosalind Russell

News Interesting Short Subjects

Saturday Matinee Only

"Secret Valley"

with Richard Arlen

Sun. Mon. May 16 and 17

"CAFE METROPOLE"

—with—

Loretta Young, Tyrone Power

Adolphe Menjou

News Interesting Short Subjects

Sunday Only—Episode 3 of

"Dick Tracy"

Tues. Wed. May 18 and 19

"SOLDIER AND Till: LADY"

—with—•

Elizabeth Allan, Anton Walbrook

News Interesting Short Subjects

Thursday, May 20—One Day Only

Double Feature

••WOMAN WISE"

—with—

RoclioUe Hudson, Michael Whalen

—also—

"FIND THE WITNESS"

—with—

Charles Quigley

News Interesting: Short Subjects

Fri. Sat May 21 and 22

INTERNES CAN'T TAKE MONEY

—with—

Barbara Stanwyck, Joel McCrea

News Interesting: Short Subjects

Latest Issue "March of Time"

Saturday Matinee Only—

"Penrod and Sam"

with Billy Mauch

H0^*^

m.

At Carmel Country Club

Carmel Country Club members were

out in full force for the golf events

on Penguin Hill witti handicap against

par as the principal feature. The

events proved very interesting with the

golfers vielng for record performances.

The fishing for trout in China Lake

continued with unabated interest, men

and women participating. Mrs. Jerome

Hilborn caught a 17 inch rainbow

weighing 1 1-2 pounds, her daughter

Joyce caught a 15 1-2 inch rainbow

weighing 1 3-8 pounds and the following

catches by gentlemen, Jerome Hilborn

17 Inches weight 1 1-2 pounds,

George P. Cranberry, 21 inches, weight

2 7-8 pounds, Alexander Murray, 19

inches, weight 2 5-8 pounds, Fred Carley

20 inches, weight 2 3-8 pounds and

John Schumacher one 15 inches, weigljt

1 5-8 pounds and 1 19 inches, weight

2 5-8 pounds, all beautiful specimens

of rainbow trout.

Among the many present at the club

over the week end were the following

from New York: Mr. and Mrs. Wallace

E. Burke, Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton K.

Smith, Mr. Simeon Wells Sells, Mr.

John F. Young, Mr. and Mrs. Albert

B. Hlnes, Mr. and Mrs. William Travis

Miller, Mr. and Mrs. William S.

Patjen, Mr. Frank Sheridan, Mr. and

Mrs. George Kinderman, Mr. and

Mrs. Asa B. Kellogg, Mr .and Mrs.

Matthew Hohner and guests, Mr. William

L. Less, 2nd, Mr. Jack Less, Mr.

and Mrs. E. C. Gibney and Mr. and

Mrs. Frederick S. Willert.

From Brooklyn: Mr. John Schumacher

and Mr. Robert Byrne.

Mahopac. Miss Page Schwaelder and

6 guests.

Croton Falls: Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton

C. Hoyt.

Hastings: Mr. Reginald H. Eagles,

Mr. D. Theodore Kelly and 4 guests,

Mr. William Carnegie Ewen.

Yonkers: Mr. and Mrs. Charles

Warren Reynolds,, Miss Chadlotte

Ewen, Mr. Ambrose Ryder.

Scarsdale: Mrs. Warner Kent,

daughter Audrey and guest, Mr. and

Mrs. Charles Benzel, Mrs. Flora Bass,

Mr. and Mrs. Cyril H. Burdette, Mr.

George A. Marsh.

Carmel: Mr. and Mrs. H. Carl

Northrop, Mr. and Mrs. Stephen

Wood Cornell, 2nd.

Mt. Vernon: Mr. and Mrs. Robert

E. Safford, Mr. Corlies Brinckerhoff.

Pelham: Miss Margaret Picker.

New Rochelle: Mr. and Mrs. George

P. Cranbery, Mr. Jack Sheeran.

Mt. Kisco: Hon. Elbert H Gallagher.

White Plains: Mr. Lewis S. Ayars,

Jr., Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Clark, Mr.

and Mrs. Leslie Magee, Mr. and Mrs.

Frank Sowers, Dr. Leslie B. Klngery,

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Hunt, daughter

Katherine, son Charles and guest,

Mr. Charles Bennett.

Bronxville: Mr. and Mrs. Clement

M. BlddleV Mr. and Mrs. Jerome H.

Hilborn, Mr. and Mrs. Horace R. Mccormick,

Jr., Horane R. McCormlck,

3rd, Mr. Wlllard Fee. .

Danbury: Mr. Fred Carley and three

guests.

The boathouse took on the atmosphere

of mid-season with large crowds

on the lower and upper decks and

some braved the waters of the lake

and took their first plunge of the season.

The recreation program for children

6 to 16 years of age under the leadership

of three well-equipped Councellors.

goes into effect June 27 and will

continue to September 7; the children

will be coached in swimming, diving,

boating and other acquatic sports,

horseback riding, tennis, golf, hiking,

camping and craft classes. The camp

will conduct various competitive activities

during the summer, such as

swimming meets, athletic meets, hobby

fairs, etc.

Generally if the fellow who likes to

speak his mind would only stop with

that he wouldn't have much to say.

It doesn't pay to show your new engagement

ring fco your girl friend.

Maybe she wore it first.

ELECTRIC & GAS

Welding

About 600,000 paper contatters for

milk, In quarts or smaller sizes, are

used daily in New York City.

pTenth Season

OPENING'

SATURDAY

MAY 15

Sensational New Attractions

EXTRA!

Fireworks Saturday Night

at 9 o'clock

H. L. Jacksons Garage

Dean's Corner

Brewster, N. Y.

TeL 123 and 390

AT WARNC* MOlflANBUtY THEATRES

nSSS

4 Days Beg SUN. MAY 16

Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers in

Their Gayest Show

"SHALL WE DANCE"

with Edward Everett Horton

3 Days Beg Eric THU. Blore MAY 20

Madge Evans, Henry Daniell in

"THE 13th CHAIR"

—plus—

James Dunn, Patricia Ellis in

"VENUS MAKES TROUBLE"

Mat Dally at 2P.M.

Eve at 7 P. M.

Sun. Cont from 5 P. M.

Mat all seats 25c

Children 10c

Eve Orch 40c Bal 30c ChU 15o

\e\

* » * !

say* MOMC,

Hero are fust

a few of the amazing

values we are offering this week

\

1934

Olds Coach


1934

Chev. Spt. Sed.


1935

Pontiac 8 Sed.


1931

Chev. Coach

1935

Chrysler 4 dr Sed

Imp. Airflow

1934

Stude. Sedan


1936

Ford Tudor


1932

Chev. Panel Truck

CY.eV*>"" .tt

ALL POPULAR MAKES

ALL DEPENDABLE VALUES

1932

Olds Spt. Cpe. 8


1934

Dodge Bus Cpe.


1937

Ford Dlx. Sed.


1936

Olds 8 Tour. Sed.

^USED CARS AND TRUCKS

ALL MAKES • ALL MODELS

1

in.'•I.I.II.II.I.I.I.IJL.I.II.II.I.II.

BUY WHERE MILLIONS ARE BUYING

MM

1,160,231

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:iaH»Ualto« State*

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1999

1,425,209

1936

2,019,839

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Brewster, Putnam County, N. Y., Friday, May 14, 1937

SALE OF LAND IN PUTNAM COUNTY

FOR UNPAID TAXES FOB THE

TEAR 1934

sesscd, Daniel Walsh. Tax, 1934, $4.1G.

Amount due, $15.87. Supposed owner,

Daniel Walsh.

PIIILIPSTOWN

In accordance with Chapter 180 of the

Laws of 1900, as amended, NOTICE IS

HEREBY GIVEN that at the Putnam

County Court House in Carmel, N. Y.,

on the 23rd day of June, 1937, at eleven

o'clock A.M. (D.S.T.), and from day to

day thereafter until the sale is com­

pleted, the undersigned will sell each of

the parcels of land hereinafter described

at Public Auction to discharge the tax,

penalty and interest and expenses of sale

which shall be due thereon at the time

of sale.

The following list and statement shows

as to each parcel to be sold, the town

in which located, the estimated quan­

tity, location and description and the

present owner, as reported by the Town

Supervisor, the amount of each tax re­

maining unpaid thereon with the year

in which it was assessed (or returned)

and added to the town tax list and to

whom assessed and the amount includ­

ing expenses, which will be due at the

time of sale.

SOUTHEAST

1. A house and a tract of land located

at Milltown, in the easterly part of the

town of Southeast, Putnam County, New

York, containing about one acre, bound­

ed north by lands of City of New York,

east by lands of City of New York, south

by the Highway, west by the Highway.

Assessed, Walter Ashby. Tax, 1934, $18.-

74. Amount due, $31.18. Supposed owner,

Walter Ashby.

2. A tract of land situate at Peace­

able Hill, Brewster, in the town of South­

east, Putnam County, New York, known

as Plots Nos. 10, 11 and 12 on a map of

lands of Curtis and Hazzard filed in Put­

nam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 141. Assessed, Thomas M. Butler.

Tax, 1934, $14.57. Reassessed School

Taxes, 1933, $6.23. Amount due, $33.35.

Supposed owner, Thomas M. Butler.

4. A house and lot located at Garden

Street, Brewster, in the central part of

the town of Southeast, Putnam County,

New York, bounded north by lands of

I. M Cole, east by lands of W. E. Maher,

south by lands of W. E. Maher, west by

Garden Street. Assessed, Alice M. Bell.

Tax, 1934, $58.20. Amount due, $72.67.

Supposed owner, Alice M. Bell.

5. A dining car located at Main Street,

Brewster, in the central part of the town

of Southeast, Putnam County, New York,

bounded north ty Main Street, east by

Main Street, south by lands of City of

New York, west by Highway. Assessed,

Bruen Brothers. Tax, 1934, $29.13. Re­

turned School Tax, 1933, $13.35. Amount

due, $56.10. Supposed owners, Bruen'

Brothers.

8. A house and a tract of land located

at Peaceable Hill, Brewster, in the cen­

tral part of the town of Southeast, Put­

nam County, New York, containing about

three acres, bounded north by lands of

F. Wells Estate, east by Highway, south

by lands of M. Larkin, west by lands of

F. Wells Estate. Assessed, R. O. Cooley.

Tax, 1934, $135.33. Returned School Tax,

1933, $57.88. Amount due, $217.37. Sup­

posed owner, R. O. Cooley.

9. A tract of land and unfinished house,

situate at Lake Tonetta, in the town of

Southeast, Putnam County, New York,

known as Plots Nos. 14 and 24 on a map

of lands of Tonetta Lake Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office

under File No. 75B. Assessed, Harry and

Mary Coaker. Tax, 1934, $16.66. Amount

due, $28.99. Supposed owners, Harry and

Mary Coaker.

11. A business building located at Main

Street, Brewster, in the central part of

the town of Southeast, Putnam County,

New York, bounded north by lands of

E. Dickinson, east by lands of A. P.

Budd, south by Main Street, west by

lands of Susnitzky Brothers. Assessed,

Jennie Curry. Tax, 1934, $106.81. Re­

turned School Tax, 1933. $48.96. Amount

due, $178.05. Supposed owner, Jennie

Curry.

12. A tract of land located at Guinea,

in the southerly part of the town of

Southeast, Putnam County, New York,

containing about twenty-five acres,

bounded north by lands of S. P. Field,

south by lands of A. Coulton, west by

east by lands of S. P. Field, south by

lands of A. Coulton, west by lands of

S. P. Field. Assessed. Liverpool Realty

Corporation. Tax, 1934, $41.64. Returned

School Tax, 1934, $16.16. Amount due,

$75.19. Supposed owner, Liverpool Real­

ty Corporation.

13. A tract of land situate at Lake

Tonetta, in the town of Southeast. Put­

nam County, New York, known as Right

of Way. Assessed, Mrs. Sophie Moren.

Tax, 1934, $6.25. Amount due. $18.06.

Supposed owner, Mrs. Sophie Moren.

14. A house and lot located at Putnam

Terrace, Brewster, in the central part of

the town of Southeast, Putnam County,

New York, bounded north by lands of

T. Ward, east by lands of F. L. Burdge,

south by lands of P. F. Beal, west by

lands of P. F. Beal. Assessed. Irving

Paddock. Tax. 1934. $23.30. Returned

School Tax. 1933, $11.57. Amount due,

$48.11. Supposed owner, Irving Paddock.

15. A driveway located at Putnam

Terrace. Brewster, in the central part of

the town of Southeast. Putnam County,

New York. Assessed, Mrs. Irving Pad­

dock. Tax. 1934. $1.94. Amount due.

$13.53. Supposed owner, Mrs. Irving

Paddock.

16. A building and a tract of land

located at Main Street, Brewster, in the

central part of the town of Southeast,

Putnam County, New York, bounded

north by Main Street, east by lands of

P. Salvia, south by Marvin Avenue, west

by lands of M. Carlone. Assessed,

Charles and Daniel Ticknor. Tax. 1934.

$58.26. Returned School Tax, 1933. $26.71.

Amount due, $103.71. Supposed owners,

Charles and Daniel Ticknor.

17. A tract of land situate at Lake

Tonetta. in the town of Southeast, Put­

nam County. New York, known as Plot

No. 51 on a map of lands of Tonetta Lake

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 75B. As-

1. A building lot located at Cold

Spring, in the western part of the town

of Philipstown, Putnam County, New

York, bounded north by Railroad Ave­

nue, east by lands of Friesenda, south

by lands of Giachinta, west by lands of

Giachinta. Assessed, James Ahem. Tax,

1934. $6.25. Returned School Tax, 1933,

$2.41. Amount due, $20.59. Supposed

owner, James Ahern.

2. A house and lot located at Cold

Spring, in the western part of the town

of Philipstown, Putnam County, New

York, bounded east by Gouveneer Brook,

south by lands of Landolfi, west by lands

of Garden Street. Assessed, Albert

Amoto. Tax, 1934, $70.79. Amount due,

$85.83. Supposed owner, Albert Amoto.

3. Six building lots, located at Garri­

son, in the western part of the town of

Philipstown, Putnam County, New York,

on the Bear Mountain Highway, shown

on map and located in Grassi Villa, Gar­

rison. Assessed, Albert Amoto. Tax, 1934,

$14.15. Amount due, $26.36. Supposed

owner, Albert Amoto.

4. A manufacturing plant located at

Cold Spring, in the western part of the

town of Philipstown, Putnam County,

New York, bounded north by lands of

Kimble. Taylor, Highway, east by lands

of Astoria Silk Works, south by lands of

Ruppert & Patterson, west by Hudson

River. Assessed, Astoria Silk Works.

Tax, 1934, $520.50. Returned School Tax,

1933, $203.03. Amount due, $776.20. Sup­

posed owner, Astoria Silk Works.

5. A tract of land located at Cold

Spring, in the western part of the town

of Philipstown, Putnam County, New

York, bounded north by Bank Street,

east by lands of Astoria Silk Works,

south by lands of Rundell, west by lands

of Astoria Silk Works. Assessed, Astoria

Silk Works. Tax, 1934, $27.07. Returned

School Tax, 1933, $10.41. Amount due,

$50.85. Supposed owner, Astoria Silk

Works.

6. A tract of vacant land and pond,

located at Cold Spring, in the western

part of the town of Philipstown, Putnam

County, New York, bounded north by

Bank Street, east by lands of Logan,

south by lands of Logan, west by lands

of Astoria Silk Works. Assessed, Astoria

Silk Works. Tax, 1934, $20.82. Returned

School Tax, 1933, $8.03. Amount due.

$41.79. Supposed owner, Astoria Silk

Works.

7. A tract of land located at East

Mountain, in the central part of the town

of Philipstown, Putnam County, New

York, containing about forty-one acres,

bounded east by lands of Becker, south

by lands of Boy Scouts of America, west

by lands of Hubbard. Assessed, Arthur

B. Becker. Tax, 1934, $18.87. Amount

due, $31.31. Supposed owner, Arthur B.

Becker.

8. A tract of land located near Mekeels

Corners, in the central part of the town

of Philipstown, Putnam County, New

York, containing about six-tenths acre,

bounded north by lands of Hubbard, east

by lands of Hubbard, south by lands of

Carmel Road Highway, west by lands of

Pavitt. Assessed, Vera Bodean. Tax,

1934. $16.51. Returned School Tax. 1933,

$5.62. Amount due, $34.73. Supposed

owner, Vera Boudin Cohen.

9. A house and lot located at North

Highlands, East Mountain Road, in the

western part of the town of Philipstown,

Putnam County, New York, known as

part of Charles Warren place. Assessed,

Elizabeth Bryant. Tax. 1934, $18.87. Re­

turned School Tax, 1933, $6.42. Amount

due, $38.05. Supposed owner, Elizabeth

Bryant.

10. Four lots located in Graymoor Vil­

lage Development, Graymoor, in the

southern part of the town of Philips-

town, Putnam County, New York. As­

sessed, Joseph and Josephine Burger.

Tax, 1934, $7.08. Amount due, $18.93.

Supposed owners, Joseph and Josephine

Burger.

11. A tract of land located at Garrison,

in the southern part of the town of

Philipstown, Putnam County, New York,

containing about fourteen acres, known

as Newell Lot. Assessed, Rebecca Newell

and Sarah Young and Electra Covert.

Tax, 1934, $21.23. Amount due. $33.79.

Supposed owners, Rebecca Newell, Sarah

Young and Electra Covert.

12. A tract of vacant land, located at

North Highlands, in the western part

of the town of Philipstown, Putnam

County, New York, bounded north by

the Highway, east by the Highway, south

by lands of Hustis. west by Highway.

Assessed, Annie Colello. Tax, 1934,

$11.80. Returned School Tax, 1933.

$4.01. Amount due, $28.10. Supposed

owner, Annie Colello.

13. A house and lot located at Nelson-

ville, in the western part of the town of

Philipstown, Putnam County, New York,

bounded east by lands of Mekeel, south

by Main Street, west by lands of Smith.

Assessed, Harriett Wood Crocker. Tax,

1934, $22.90. Returned School Tax, 1933,

$8.83. Amount due, $44.81. Supposed

owner, Harriett Wood Crocker.

14. A tract of land located at Cold

Spring, in the western part of the town

of Philipstown, Putnam County, New

York, being a building lot, bounded

north by lands of Rusk, east by Morris

Avenue, south by lands of Arnot, west

by lands of Philipstown Highlands, Inc.

Assessed, Wilfred J. Denna. Tax. 1934.

$8.33. Amount due, $20.24. Supposed

owner, Wilfred J. Denna.

15. A tract of land located at East

Mountain, in the central part of the town

of Philipstown, Putnam County, New

York, containing about seventy-six

acres, bounded north by lands of Ma-

heady, east by lands of Cargill. Assessed,

James De Giviso. Tax. 1934. $47.18. Re­

turned School Tax, 1933. $16.05. Amount

due. $80.89. Supposed owner, James De

Geviso.

16. A tract of land located at East

Mountain, in the northeastern part of

the town of Philipstown, Putnam County,

New York, containing about two hun­

dred acres, bounded north by lands of

Morgenthau. south by lands of Becker,

west by Dutchess County. Assessed, Mrs.

K. Fondermayer. Tax. 1934, $117.95. Re­

turned School Tax, 1933, $84.26. Amount

due, $228.82. Supposed owner, Mrs. K.

Fondermayer.

17. A tract of land with store and

dwelling thereon, located at Cold

Spring, in the western part of the town

of Philipstown, Putnam County, New

York, bounded north by lands of Gia-

chenta, east by lands of Frisenda, south

by Main Street, west by Depot Square.

Assessed, Joseph Friesenda. Returned

Sohool Tax, 1933, $16.05. Amount due;

$28.35. Supposed owner, Joseph Frie­

senda.

18. A tract of vacant land located at

Cold Spring, in the western part of the

town of Philipstown, Putnam County,

New York, bounded north by lands of

Cosgrove, east by Stone Street, south by

lands of Farrell. Assessed, Joseph Frie­

senda. Returned School Tax, 1933, $5.62.

Amount due, $17.40. Supposed owner,

Joseph Friesenda.

19. Two building lots located at Gray­

moor on Albany Post Road, in the south­

ern part of the town of Philipstown, Put­

nam County, New York, located on Map

as Block 3 and 4 in the Union Nothing

Be Lost Development. Assessed, Joseph

Gallagher. Tax, 1933, $2.09. Returned

School Tax, 1932, $0.58. Tax, 1934. $2.36.

Returned School Tax, 1933, $.57. Amount

due. $17.38. Supposed owner, Joseph

Gallagher,

20. A tract of land located at Gray­

moor (Albany Post Road), in the south­

ern part of the town of Philipstown, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Lots

Nos. 76-77 Rear D in the Graymoor De­

velopment. Assessed, L. F. G. Gibson.

Tax, 1934, $4.72. Returned School Tax,

1933, $1.13. Amount due, $17.64. Supposed

owner, L. F. G. Gibson.

21. A house and lot in Valhalla High­

lands Development, located at North

Highlands, in the western part of the

town of Philipstown, Putnam County,

New York. Assessed, Samuel Hardon.

Tax, 1934, $35.39. Amount due, $48.65.

Supposed owner, Samuel Hardon.

22. A tract of land located at Garri­

son (South Highlands), in the south­

eastern part of the town of Philipstown,

Putnam County, New York, containing

about two acres, bounded north by High­

way, east by lands of Horton, south by

lands of Jaycox, west by Albany P°st

Road. Assessed, Hill Country House In­

corporated. Tax, 1934, $7.08. Amount

due, $18.93. Supposed owner, Hill Coun­

try House Incorporated.

23. A tract of vacant land, located at

East Mountain, in the northeastern part

of the town of Philipstown, Putnam

County, New York, bounded north by

Dutchess County, west by lands of

Greenfield. Assessed, Bennett Hickman.

Tax. 1934, $9.44. Amount due, $21.41.

Supposed owner, Bennett Hickman.

24. A tract of land located at South

Highlands, in the southern part of the

town of Philipstown, Putnam County,

New York, bounded north by Highway,

east by Highway, west by lands of Hor­

ton. Assessed, Henry Kastin. Tax, 1932,

$3.57. Tax, 1934, $4.72. Returned School

Tax. 1933, $1.13. Amount due, $21.39.

Supposed owner, Henry Kastin.

25. A tract of land located at Gray­

moor, in the southern part of the town

of Philipstown, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lots 18-19A. Assessed,

W. W. Kenney. Tax, 1933, $2.09. Tax,

1934, $2.36. Amount due, $16.17. Supposed

owner, W. W. Kenney.

26. A tract of land located at Manitou,

in the southern part of the town of

Philipstown, Putnam County, New York,

containing about one hundred and forty-

two acres and buildings thereon, bound­

ed north by lands of Ferguson, east by

lands of Colt and Beacon Bear Moun­

tain State Highway, south by lands of

Polhemus, west by Hudson River. As­

sessed, Edward Livingston. Tax, 1934,

$1,245.55. Returned School Tax, 1934,

$225.98. Amount due, $1,561.60. Supposed

owner, Edward Livingston Estate.

27. A building lot, located at Nelson-

ville, in the western part of the town

of Philipstown, Putnam County, New

York, bounded north by lands of Chris­

tian, south by Pine Street, west by Pearl

Street. Assessed, Nathan Lyons. Tax,

1934, $6.25. Amount due, $18.06. Supposed

owner, Nathan Lyons.

28. A tract of land located at Gray­

moor, in the southern part of the town

of Philipstown, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lots 1-2 and 3D in Gray­

moor Development. Assessed, Catherine

McArdle. Tax. 1934. $4.72. Returned

School Tax, 1933, $0.84. Amount due,

$17.33. Supposed owner, Catherine Mc­

Ardle.

29. A tract of land located at East

Mountain, in the eastern part of the town

of Philipstown, Putnam County, New

York, containing about one hundred and

twenty acres, bounded east by lands of

Hubbard, west by lands of Hubbard.

Assessed, William Mat-son. Tax, 1934,

$70.77. Returned School Tax, 1933, $24.-

05. Amount due, $114.06. Supposed own­

er. William Matson.

30. A tract of land located at Cold

Spring, in the western part of the town

of Philipstown, Putnam County, New

York, bounded east by lands of Craig-

side Estate, west by Morris Avenue. As­

sessed. Wesley and Jane Markle. Tax,

1934. $8.33. Amount due. $20.24. Supposed

owners. Wesley and Jane Markle.

31. A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Cold Spring, in the western

part of the town of Philipstown, Put­

nam County, New York, bounded

north by lands of Fisher, east by Gouve­

neer Brook, south by lands of Hamilton,

west by Garden Street Assessed, Roe

Meranti. Tax. 1934. $18.74. Amount due,

$31.17. Supposed owner, Estate of Roe

Meranti.

32. A tract of land located at Gray­

moor, in the southern part of the town

of Philipstown, .Putnam County, New

York, known as Lots 16 and 17B in Gray­

moor Development. Assessed, Joseph B.

Mensung. Tax, 1934. $2.36. Returned

School Tax, 1933. $0.57. Amount due.

$14.57. Supposed owner, Joseph B. Men-

sung.

33. A tract of land located at North

Highlands, in the northwestern part of

tlie town of Philipstown, Putnam County,

New York, containing about sixty acres,

bounded north by Dutchess County, east

by lands of Haight, south by lands of

Valhalla Highlands Incorporated, west

by lands of Mt. Beacon Hudson Associa­

tion. Assessed, Mt. Beacon Hudson Asso­

ciation. Tax, 1934, $30.67. Returned

School Tax, 1933, $10.43. Amount due,

$54.65. Supposed owner, Mt. Beacon Hud­

son Association.

34. A tract of land located at North

Highlands, in the northwestern part of

the town of Philipstown, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, containing about one hun­

dred and eighty-seven acres, bounded

north by Dutchess County, east by lands

of Mt. Beacon Hudson Association, south

by lands of Valhalla Highlands Incor­

porated, west by lands of Valhalla High­

lands Incorporated. Assessed, Mt. Bea­

con Hudson Association. Tax, 1934, $87.-

28. Returned School Tax, 1933, $29.69.

Amount due, $137.31. Supposed owner,

Mt. Beacon Hudson Association.

35. A tract of land and blacksmith

shop, located at Garrison, in the west­

ern part of the town of Philipstown,

Putnam County, New York, bounded

north by lands of Yannitella, east by

lands of Grassi, south by lands of Bel­

cher, west by lands of Belcher. Assessed,

Daniel Mooney. Tax, 1934, $42.46. Amount

due, $56.08. Supposed owner, Estate of

Daniel Mooney.

36. A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Cold Spring, in the western

part of the town of Philipstown, Putnam

County, New York, bounded north by

lands of Hill, east by lands of Brown,

south by lands of Constantino, west by

"B" Street. Assessed, Elizabeth Monti-

fiori. Tax, 1934, $24.98. Amount due,

$37.72. Supposed owner, Elizabeth Mon-

tifiori.

37. A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Cold Spring, in the western

part of the town of Philipstown, Putnam

County, New York, bounded north by

lands of Pepario. east by Fair Street,

south by lands of Mooney, west by lands

of Montrestello. Assessed, Mary G. Mul­

len. Tax, 1933, $27.06. Tax, 1934. $41.64.

Amount due. $86.63. Supposed owner,

Mary G. Mullen.

38. A tract of land located at Gray­

moor, in the southern part of the town

of Philipstown, Putnam County, New

York, known as Plots Nos. 58-59-60 and

61. Block T, in the Graymoor Develop­

ment. Assessed. Madeline Murphy. Tax,

1934. $9.44. Returned School Tax. 1933.

$2.27. Amount due, $23.79. Supposed

owner, Madeline Murphy.

39. A tract of land with house thereon,

located in the Schaeffer Development,

Manitou, in the southern part of the

town of Philipstown, Putnam County,

New York. Assessed, John Maringo. Tax,

1934. $23.59. Amount due, $36.26. Sup­

posed owner, John Maringo.

40. A tract of land with house thereon,

located at North Highlands, in the north­

ern part of the town of Philipstown,

Putnam County, New York, bounded

north by Dutchess County, west by

Highway. Assessed, J. Michael Mohr and

Wife. Tax, 1934, $18.87. Amount due.

$31.31. Supposed owner, J. Michael Mohr.

41. A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Cold Spring, in the western

part of the town of Philipstown, Putnam

County, New York, bounded north by

lands of Munson, east by lands of Pond,

south by lands of Pond, west by Church

Street. Assessed, Emily Noble. Tax, 1934,

$39.56. Returned School Tax, 1933. $15.24.

Amount due, $72.04. Supposed owner,

Emily Noble.

42. A tract of land with store and

apartments thereon, located at Cold

Spring, in the western part of the town

of Philipstown, Putnam County, New

York, bounded north by Main Street,

east by lands of Nania, south by lands

of Filebrown, west by lands of Mosher.

Assessed, Frank Nania. Tax. 1934, $41.64.

Amount due, $55.22. Supposed owner,

Frank Nania.

43. A tract of land located at Gray­

moor, in the southern part of the town

of Philipstown, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lots 18 and 19B in

Graymoor Development. Assessed. Jane

O-Hare. Tax. 1934, $2.36. Returned

School Tax, 1933, $0.57. Amount due,

$14.58. Supposed owner, Jane O-Hare.

44. A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Cold Spring, in the western

part of the town of Philipstown, Putnam

County, New York, bounded north by

Cherry Street, east by lands of Hugh

Smith Estate, south by lands of Clark,

west by lands of Clark. Assessed, Alvin

D. Pond. Tax, 1934, $33.31. Returned

School Tax, 1933. $12.84. Amount due,

$59.95. Supposed owner, Alvin Pond.

45. A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Cold Spring, in the western

part of the town of Philipstown, Putnam

County, New York, bounded north by

the Highway, east by lands of New York

Central Railroad, south by lands of Frie­

senda, west by Market Street. Assessed,

Alvin Pond. Tax, 1934, $33.31. Returned

School Tax, 1933, $12.84. Amount due,

$59.95. Supposed owner. Alvin Pond.

46. A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Cold Spring, in the western

part of the town of Philipstown, Putnam

County, New York, bounded north by

lands of Groves, east by High Street,

south by lands of Grace, west by Church

Street. Assessed, Alvin Pond. Tax. 1934,

$44.76. Returned School Tax, 1933, $17.26.

Amount due, $76.62. Supposed owner,

Alvin Pond.

47. A tract of land with store thereon,

located at Cold Spring, in the western

part of the town of Philipstown. Putnam

County. New York, bounded -north by

lands of Chrilley. east by lands of Lutz,

south by Main Street. Assessed. Rogers

& McKinstry Drug Company. Tax. 1934.

$52.05. Amount due. $66.15. Supposed

owner. Rogers & McKinstry Company.

48. A tract of land located at Gray­

moor, in the southern part of the town

of Philipstown. Putnam County, New

York, known as Lots 1 and 2-Rear F,

Graymoor Development. Assessed. Lo-

retta Ryan. Tax, 1933. $2.09. Returned

School Tax. 1932. $0.58. Tax. 1934. $2.36.

Amount due. $16.78. Supposed owner,

Loretta Ryan.

49. A tract of land located at North

Highlands, in the northern part of the

town of Philipstown, Putnam County.

New York, containing about titty-four

and three-tenths acres, bounded north

by lands of Forman, south by lands of

Hustis, west by the Highway. Assessed,

Louise I?if 1(.Hi. Tax, 1934, $113.23. Amount

due, $133.39. Supposed owner, Louise

Ridolfi.

50. A tract of land with house thereon,

located at North Highlands, in the

northern part of the town of Philips-

town, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about four acres, bounded north

by lands of Forman, east by Highway,

south by lands of Uhl, west by Highway.

Assessed, Louise Ridolfi. Tax, 1934,

$47.18. Amount due, $61.03. Supposed

owner, Louise Ridolfi.

52. A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Manitou, in the southern part

of the town of Philipstown, Putnam

County, New York, bounded north by

lands of Shaffer, east by lands of Shaffer.

Assessed, Catherine Seaman. Tax, 1934,

$28,31. Amount due, $41.22. Supposed

owner, Catherine Seaman.

53. A tract of land located at Manitou,

in the southern part of the town of Phil­

ipstown, Putnam County, New York,

containing about ninety acres, bounded

north by the Highway, east by lands of

King and Highway, south by Westches­

ter County Line, west by lands of New

York Central Railroad. Assessed, Ida

Shaffer. Tax, 1934, $235.90. Amount due,

$262.19. Supposed owner, Estate of Ida

Schaffer.

54. A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Manitou, in the southern part

of the town of Philipstown, Putnam

County, Now York, bounded north by

lands of Shaffer, east by lands of Shaffer.

Assessed, Catherine Seaman. Tax, 1934,

$23.59. Returned School Tax, 1934, $5.14.

Amount due, $41.66. Supposed owner,

Catherine Seaman.

55. A tract of land with house thereon,

located at North Highlands, in the cen­

tral part of the town of Philipstown,

Putnam County, New York, bounded

north by lands of Hustis, east by the

Highway, south by lands of Hollister.

Assessed, Frank Smith. Tax, 1934, $7.08.

Amount due, $18.93. Supposed owner,

Frank Smith.

56. A tract of land located in the west­

ern part of the town of Philipstown,

Putnam County, New York, containing

about thirty acres, bounded north by

Dutchess County, west by lands of Wise.

Assessed, Grace Stern. Tax, 1934, $14.15.

Amount due, $26.35. Supposed owner,

Grace Stern.

57. A tract of land with house thereon,

located at North Highlands, in the west­

ern part of the town of Philipstown,

Putnam County, New York, bounded

north by lands of Travis, east by Albany

Post Road, south by lands of Heyman,

west by lands of Travis. Assessed, Hattie

Travis. Tax, 1934. $14.15. Returned School

Tax, 1933, $4.82. Amount due, $31.41.

Supposed owner, Hattie Travis.

58. A tract of land located at Cold

Spring, in the western part of the town

of Philipstown, Putnam County, New

York, containing about two lots, bounded

north by lands of Leska, south by lands

of Van Tassell Assessed, Ernest Tomp­

kins. Tax, 1934, $6.25. Amount due, $18.06.

Supposed owner, Ernest Tompkins.

59. A tract of land with garage thereon,

located at North Highlands, in the west­

ern part of the town of Philipstown, Put­

nam County, New York containing about

one acre bounded north by lands of

Ridolfi, east by Albany Post Road, south

by Highway, west by Highway. Assessed,

Uhl Brothers. Tax, 1934. $21.23. Amount

due, $33.79. Supposed owners, Uhl

Brothers.

60. A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Cold Spring, in the western

part of the town of Philipstown, Putnam

County, New York, bounded north by

lands of Post, east by lands of Glick,

south by lands of Reilley, west by Pauld­

ing Avenue. Assessed, Charles Ward.

Tax, 1934, $124.92. Amount due, $145.66.

Supposed owner, Charles Ward.

61. A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Garrison, in the southern

part of the town of Philipstown, Putnam

County, New York, bounded north by

lands of Vandermark, east by Highway,

south by lands of Avery, west by High­

way. Assessed, Fannie Webb. Tax, 1934,

$14.15. Amount due, $26.35. Supposed

owner, Fannie Webb.

62. A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Cold Spring, in the western

part of the town of Philipstown, Putnam

County, New York, bounded north by

lands of Cold Spring Lumber Company,

east by Market Street, south by lands ol

Associated Gas & Electric Company,

west by lands of Cold Spring Lumber

Company. Assessed, Estate of James

Weyant. Tax, 1934. $14.57. Returned

School Tax, 1933, $5.62. Amount due,

$32.69. Supposed owner, Samuel Nolfo.

63. A tract of land located at Gray­

moor, in the southern part of the town

of Philipstown, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lots 25-26-27, Block B.

Graymoor Development. Assessed, Annie

& Elsie White. Tax, 1934, $4.72. Returned

School Tax. 1933. $0.84. Amount due,

$17.33. Supposed owners, Anna & Elsie

White.

64. A tract of land located at East

Mountain, in the northeastern part of

the town of Philipstown, Putnam County,

New York, containing about fifty acres,

bounded south by lands of Perkins, west

by lands of Becker. Assessed, William

Wright. Tax. 1934. $30.67. Amount due.

$43.70. Supposed owner, William Wright.

65. A tract of land located at Manitou,

in the southern part of the town of

Philipstown. Putnam County. New York,

known as Cornell Lot, No. 33 Mountain

Park. Assessed. J. W. Tumbridge. Tax,

1934. $4.72. Returned School Tax. 1934,

$0.86. Amount due. $17.35. Supposed

owner. J. W. Tumbridge.

66. A tract of land located at Manitou,

in the southern part of the town of

Philipstown. Putnam County, New York,

known as Mountain Park Lot No. 4

(Daisy Mills lot). Assessed, J. W. Tum­

bridge. Tax, 1933. $3.14. Returned School

Tax, 1933. $0.51. Tax. 1934. $4.72. Re­

turned School Tax. 1934. $0.86. Amount

due. $21.19. Supposed owner, J. W. Tum­

bridge.

67. A tract of land located at Manitou,

in the southern part of the town of

Philipstown, Putnam County, New York,

known as Mountain Park Lot No. 8 (Med-

hurst Lot). Assessed, J. W. Tumbridge.

Tax, 1933, $3.14. Returned School Tax,

1932, $0.64. Returned School Tax, 1933,

$0.51. Tax, 1934, $4.72. Returned School

Tax, 1934, $0.80. Amount due, $21.86.

Supposed owner, J. W. Tumbridge.

CARMEL

2. A tract of land located at Mahopac

Falls, in the southern part of the town

of Carmel, Putnam County, New York,

containing about one-half acre, known

as Plot No. 58, Map 116A,. Mahopac Falls

Park. Assessed, H. D. and L. S. Nurick.

Tax, 1933, $2.74. Returned School Tax,

1933, $0.40. Tax, 1934, $2.64. Amount due,

$17.56. Supposed owners, H. D. and L. S.

Nurick.

3. A tract of land located at Mahopac,

in the southern part of the town of Car­

mel, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about 101 x 236 feet, known as

Plots 4, 5, Block J, Map 54. Mahopac

Hills. Assessed George A. Price. Re­

turned School Tax, 1932. $3.00. Returned

School Tax, 1933, $3.22. Amount due,

$18.03. Supposed owner, George A. Price.

4. A tract of land located at Mahopac

Falls, in the southern part of the town

of Carmel, Putnam County, New York,

containing about seven acres, bounded

north by lands of Barrett, east by Street,

south by Street, west by lands of Bar­

rett. Assessed. J. C. and LaMonte Aus­

tin. Tax, 1934, $105.92. Amount due,

$122.72. Supposed owners, J. C. and La-

Monte Austin.

5. A diner, located at Carmel, in the

northern part of the town of Carmel,

Putnam County, New York, on Goehry

property by lease. Assessed, Dudley

Adams. Tax, 1934, $92.68. Carmel Fire

Tax, $4.17. Carmel Lighting Tax, $11.83.

Amount due, $128.61. Supposed owner,

Dudley Adams.

6. A tract of land located at Mahopac,

in the southern part of the town of Car­

mel, Putnam County, New York, known

as Plot No. 110, Map 57, Mahopac Point.

Assessed, Elmer Ball Estate. Tax, 1934,

$190.66. Mahopac Light Tax, $18.75.

Amount due, $234.38. Supposed owner.

Elmer Ball Estate.

7. A tract of land located at Carmel,

in the northern part of the town of Car­

mel, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about 104 x 121 feet, known as

Plot No. 12, Map 109A. Raymond Hill

Park. Assessed, Horace Barrett. Tax,

1934, $52.96. Amount due, $67.10. Sup­

posed owner, Horace Barrett.

8. A tract of land located at Carmel,

in the northern part of the town of Car­

mel, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about one-half acre, bounded

north by lands of Ryder, east by lands

of McDonald, south by Street, west by

lands of Ryder. Assessed, Robert Ben­

nett. Tax, 1934, $21.18. Amount due,

$33.73. Supposed owner, Robert Ben­

nett.

9. A tract of land located at Mahopac,

in the southern part of the town of Car­

mel, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about 24,000 feet, known as Plots

24. 26, 27, Block E, Map 54, Mahopac

Hills. Assessed, Bruce Cassinoe. Tax,

1934. $185.36. Mahopac Lighting Tax.

$18.27. Amount due, $228.31. Supposed

owner, Bruce Cassanoe.

10. A tract of land located at Mahopac

Falls, in the southern part of the town

of Carmel, Putnam County, New York,

containing about 40 x 100 feet, known

as Plots 11, 12, Block 37, Map 151, Lake

Secor. Assessed, Samuel Chernitz. Tax,

1934, $13.24. Amount due, $25.41. Sup­

posed owner, Samuel Chernitz.

11. A tract of land located at Carmel,

in the northern part of the town of Car­

mel, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about one-half acre, bounded

north by lands of Cornish, east by Street,

south by Street, west by lands of Cara­

way. Assessed, Stanley D. Cornish. Tax,

1934, $92.68. Carmel Fire Tax, $4.17. Car­

mel Light Tax, $11.83. Amount due,

$125.61. Supposed owner, Stanley D.

Cornish.

12. A tract of land located at Mahopac

Falls, in the southern part of the town

of Carmel, Putnam County, New York,

containing about two acres, bounded

north by lands of New York City, east

by lands of New York City, south by

Street, west by lands of Hoog. Assessed,

Jennie H. Curry. Tax. 1934. $39.72.

Amount due, $53.20. Supposed owner,

Jennie H. Curry.

13. A tract of land located at Mahopac

Falls, in the southern part of the town

of Carmel, Putnam County, New York,

containing about forty acres, bounded

north by lands of Curry, east by lands of

Forni, south by lands of A. R. H. Co.,

west by Town Line. Assessed, Jennie H.

Curry. Tax, 1934. $79.44. Returned

School Tax, 1934. $34.99. Amount due,

$134.65. Supposed owner, Jennie H.

Curry.

14. A tract of land located at Maho­

pac Falls, in the southern part of the

town of Carmel. Putnam County, New

York, containing about forty by one-

hundred feet, known as Plots Nos. 30, 31,

Block 35. Map 151. Lake Secor. Assessed,

George F. Dall. Tax. 1934, $5.30. Amount

due, $17.06. Supposed owner, George F.

Dall.

15. A tract of land located at Mahopac.

in the southern part of the town of Car­

mel, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about one acre, bounded north

by lands of Sullivan, east by lands of

Farley, south by Street, west by lands

of Sullivan. Assessed, Mattie Dayton.

Tax. 1934. $13.24. Returned School Tax.

1933. $0.82. Amount due, $26.26. Sup­

posed owner, Mattie Dayton.

16. A tract of land located at Maho­

pac. in the southern part of the town of

Carmel, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about eighteen acres, bounded

north by lands of Ryder, east by lands

of Ryder, south by lands of Clark, west

by lands of Ryder. Assessed, Flora W.

Dean. Tax. 1934. $13.24. Amount due.

$25.40. Supposed owner, Flora W. Dean.

17. A tract of land located at Mahopac

Falls, in the southern part of the town

of Carmel. Putnam County, New York,

containing about one and one-quarter

acres, known as Plots 9, 10. one-half of

8. Map 116A, Mahopac Falls Park. As­

sessed. Herman Dincin. Tax. 1934, $5.30.

Amount due, $17.06. Supposed owner,

Herman Dincin.

18. A tract of land located at Mahopac,

in the southern part of the town of Car­

mel, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about 76 x 116 feet, bounded

north by lands of Abele, east by Street,

south by Street, west by lands of Abele.

Assessed, Ed. G. Durstein. Tax, 1934,

$92.68. Mahopac Light Tax, $9.14. Re­

turned School Tax, 1933, $16.10. Amount

due, $138.31. Supposed owner, Ed. G.

Durstein.

20. A tract of land located at Maho­

pac, in the southern part of the town of

Carmel, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about 145 x 425 feet, bounded

north by lands of Tribbe. east by lands

of Dean, south by lands of Dean, west by

lands of Dean. Assessed, Frank and Har­

riet Ford. Tax. 1934, $84.74. Amount due.

$103.47. Supposed owners, Frank and

Harriet Ford.

21. A tract of land located at Maho­

pac, in the southern part of the town of

Carmel, Putnam County, New York,

containing about seventy-five acres,

bounded north by lands of Enoch, east

by lands of Merriam, south by lands of

Bade, west by Street. Assessed, Harriett

Ford. Tax, 1934, $158.88. Amount due,

$181.32. Supposed owner, Harriett Ford.

22. A tract of land located at Maho­

pac, in the southern part of the town of

Carmel, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about one acre, bounded north

by lands of Barrett, east by lands of

Scott, south by Street, west by lands of

McCollum. Assessed, Wallace O. Ga-

nong. Tax, 1934, $34.42. Amount due.

$47.64. Supposed owner, Wallace O. Ga-

nong.

23. A tract of land located at Mahopac

Falls, in the southern part of the town

of Carmel, Putnam County, New York,

containing about 40 x 100 feet, known as

Plots 40, 41, Block 23, Map 151, Lake

Secor. Assessed, Mary E. Gaines. Tax,

1934, $2.65. Amount due, $14.28. Sup­

posed owner, Mary E. Gaines.

24. A tract of land located at Mahopac

Falls, in the southern part of the town

of Carmel, Putnam County, New York,

containing about 40 x 100 feet, known

as Plots 23, 24, Block 33, Map 151, Lake

Secor. Assessed, Mary E. Gaines. Tax,

1934. $2.65. Amount due, $14.28 Sup­

posed owner, Mary E. Gaines.

25. A tract of land located at Carme*.

in the southern part of the town of Car­

mel, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about two hundred and seven

acres, bounded north by lands of Hill &

Dale, east by lands of Simpson, south by

lands of Dineen, west by lands of Tomp­

kins. Assessed, Hefferman Development

Company. Tax. 1934, $238.32. Amount

due, $264.78. Supposed owner, Heffer­

man Development Company.

26. A tract of land located at Maho­

pac, in the southern part of the town of

Carmel, Putnam County, New York,

containing about 80 x 120 feet, known as

Plot No. 125. Map 57, Mahopac Point.

Assessed, Elmer Hornig. Tax, 1934,

$39.72. Mahopac Lighting Tax, $3.91. Re­

turned School Tax, 1933, $2.46. Amount

due, $59.89. Supposed owner, Elmer Hor­

nig.

27. A tract of land located at Putnam

Valley, in the western part of the town

of Carmel, Putnam County, New York,

containing about fifteen acres, bounded

north by lands of Rogers, east by lands

of C. C. C, south by lands of Mayo, west

by Town Line. Assessed, Mary E. Hunt.

Tax, 1934, $6.62. Returned School Tax,

1934, $2.92. Amount due, $21.51. Sup­

posed owner, Mary E. Hunt.

28. A tract of land located at Carmel,

in the northern part of the town of Car­

mel, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about twenty acres, bounded

north by lands of Horton, east by lands

of Wald, south by lands of New York

City, west by lands of New York City.

Assessed, Henry Jaffey. Tax, 1934, $52.96.

Amount due, $67.09. Supposed owner,

Henry Jaffey.

29. —A tract of land located at Maho­

pac Falls, in the southern part of the

town of Carmel, Putnam County, New

York, containing about one and one-

quarter acres, known as Plots 6, 7, one-

half of 8. Map 116A, Mahopac Falls Park.

Tax, 1934, $31.78. Amount due, $44.86.

Supposed owner, Joseph Kastanholz.

30. A tract of land located at Mahopac

Falls, in the southern part of the town

of Carmel, Putnam County, New York,

containing about forty acres, bounded

north by lands of Gibson, east by lands

of Houseman, south by Street, west by

lands of Pinckney. Assessed, John J.

Keeler. Tax. 1934. $39.72. Amount due,

$53.20. Supposed owner, John J. Keeler.

31. A tract of land located at Mahopac,

in the southern part of the town of Car­

mel, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining 80 x 90 square feet, known as

Plot 12, Block G. Map 54, Mahopac Hills.

Assessed, Lake Mahopac Holding Com­

pany, Incorporated. Tax. 1934, $7.95. Ma­

hopac Lighting Tax, $0.78. Amount due,

$20.66. Supposed owner, Lake Mahopac

Holding Company, Incorporated.

32. A tract of land located at Mahopac

Falls, in the southern part of the town

of Carmel. Putnam County. New York,

containing about 40 x 100 feet, known

as Plots 27. 28, Block 19, Map 151. Lake

Secor. Assessed, Hjordis Lawrensen.

Tax. 1934, $10.60. Amount due, $22.60.

Supposed owner, Hjordis Lawrensen.

33. A tract of land located at Mahopac,

in the southern part of the town of Car­

mel. Putnam County. New York, con­

taining about 120 x 100 feet, known as

Plots 4, 5, Block 0, Lake Mahopac Ridge.

Assessed. William Leavie. Jr. Tax, 1934.

$26.48. Mahopac Lighting Tax, $2.61.

Amount due. $42.04. Supposed owner.

William Leavie, Jr.

34. A tract of land located at Mahopac

Falls, in the southern part of the town

of Carmel. Putnam County. New York.

containing about 40 x 100 feet, known

as Plots 3. 4. Block 1. Map 151. Lake Se­

cor. Assessed. Ethel Lebos. Tax. 1934.

$6.62. Amount due, $18.45. Supposed

owner. Ethel Lebos.

35. A tract of land located at Mahopac,

in the southern part of the town of Car-

mul, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about one acre, bounded north

[ by lands of Lincolndale Heights, east by


PAGE TWO THE BREWSTER STANDARD — ESTABLISHED 1869 FRIDAY, MAY HI 1937

Street, south by lands of Lincolndale

Heights, west by lands of Lincolndale

Heights. Assessed, L. S. Langreich. Tax,

1934, $26.48. Returned School Tax, 1933,

$2.46. Amount due, $41.88. Supposed

owner, L. S. Langreich.

37. A tract of land located at Mahopac,

in the southern part of the town of Car-

mel, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about 100 x 100 feet, bounded

north by lands of Moore, east by lands

of Chambers, south by lands of Hydride

Estate, west by Street Assessed, Edward

Lunning. Tax, 1934, $92.68. Mahopac

Lighting Tax, $9.14. Amount due, $121.41.

Supposed owner, Edward Lunning.

38. A tract of land located at Mahopac

Falls, in the southern part of the town of

Carmel, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about five acres, bounded north

by lands of Quick, east by lands of Rail­

road, south by Street, west by lands of

Agor. Assessed, Mahopac Holding Cor­

poration. Tax, 1934, $145.64. Returned

School Tax, 1933, $25.31. Amount due,

$193.99. Supposed owner, Mapac Holding

Corporation.

39. A tract of land located at Mahopac,

in the southern part of the town of Car­

mel, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about 178 x 78 feet, known as

Plots 101, 102, Map 57, Mahopac Point.

Assessed, Mahopac Point Corporation.

Tax, 1934, $26.48. Mahopac Lighting Tax,

$2.61. Returned School Tax, 1933, $1.64.

Amount due, $43.76. Supposed owner,

Mahopac Point Corporation.

40. A tract of land located at Mahopac,

in the southern part of the town of Car­

mel, Putnam County, New York, contain­

ing about 80 x 89 feet, known as Plot 11,

Block K, Map 54. Assessed, C. E. Mathew-

son. Tax, 1934, $6.62. Mahopac Lighting

Tax, $0.65. Returned School Tax, 1933,

$1.16. Amount due, $20.35. Supposed

owner, C. E. Mathewson.

41. A tract of land located at Peeks-

kill Hollow, in the western part of the

town of Carmel, Putnam County, New

York, containing about twenty acres,

bounded north by lands of Hunt, east by

lands of C.C.C., south by lands of Glanz,

west by Town Line. Assessed, Charles

Milo. Tax, 1934, $9.26. Returned School

Tax, 1934, $4.09. Amount due, $25.51.

Supposed owner, Charles Milo.

42. A tract of land located at Mahopac

Falls, in the southern part of the town

of Carmel, Putnam County, New York,

containing about 80 x 100 feet, known as

Plots 1 to 4, Block 2, Map 151, Lake Secor.

Assessed, Fred Messinger. Tax, 1934,

$19.86. Amount due, $32.35. Supposed

owner, Fred Messinger.

43. A tract of land located at Mahopac

Falls, in the southern part of the town of

Carmel, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about 100 x 100 feet, bounded

north by lands of Vreeland, east by

Street, south by lands of Pierce, west by

lands of Pierce. Assessed, Ralph Moore.

Tax, 1934, $5.30. Returned School Tax,

1933, $0.92. Amount due, $18.03. Sup­

posed owner, Ralph Moore.

44. A tract of land located at Mahopac,

in the southern part of the town of Car­

mel, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about three-quarters acre, known

as Plots 1-2-3, Block A, Map 54, Mahopac

Hills. Assessed, Dr. Walter McGhee. Tax,

1934, $105.92. Mahopac Lighting Tax,

$10.44. Returned School Tax, 1933, $18.40.

Amount due, $155.99. Supposed owner,

Dr. Walter McGhee.

45. A tract of land located at Mahopac,

in the southern part of the town of Car­

mel, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about 76 x 89 feet, known as Plot

32, Block K, Map 54, Mahopac Hills.

Assessed, J. S. McGovern. Tax, 1934,

$2.64. Mahopac Lighting Tax, $0.26. Re­

turned School Tax, 1933, $0.46. Amount

due, $15.02. Supposed owner, J. S. Mc­

Govern.

46. A tract of land located at Croton

Falls, in the eastern part of the town of

Carmel, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about one acre, bounded north

by lands of Noblock, east by Street, south

by lands of Peirano, west by lands of

New York City. Assessed, Lawrence Mc­

Millan. Tax, 1934, $52.96. Croton Falls

Lighting Tax, $0.68. Returned School

Tax, 1934, $15.42. Amount due, $87.01.

Supposed owner, Lawrence McMillan.

47. A tract of land located at Mahopac,

in the southern part of the town of Car­

mel, Putnam County, New York, known

as Plot 19, Block K, Map 54. Assessed,

Thomas C. McPherson. Tax, 1934, $5.30.

Mahopac Lighting Tax, $0.52. Amount

due, $17.61. Supposed owner, Thomas C.

McPherson.

48. A tract of land located at Mahopac,

in the southern part of the town of Car­

mel, Putnam County, New York, known

as Plot 25, Block K, Map 54, Mahopac

Hills. Assessed, Thomas C. McPherson.

Tax, 1934, $5.30. Mahopac Lighting Tax,

$0.52. Amount due, $17.61. Supposed

owner, Thomas C. McPherson.

49. A tract of land located at Mahopac,

in the southern part of the town of Car­

mel, Putnam County, New York, known

as Plot 4 and westerly 20 feet of 5, Block

E, Map 163A, Mahopac Ridge. Assessed,

George L. Parker. Tax, 1934, $13.24

Mahopac Lighting Tax, $1.31. Amount

due, $26.78. Supposed owner, George L.

Parker.

50. A tract of land located at Mahopac,

in the southern part of the town of Car­

mel, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about three and one-half acres,

bounded north by lands of Kolter, east

by lands of Crane, south by lands of

Crane, west by Street. Assessed, Stephen

W. Pinckney. Tax, 1934, $52.96. Amount

due, $67.10. Supposed owner, Stephen W.

Pinckney.

53. A tract of land located at Mahopac

Falls, in the southern part of the town of

Carmel, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about 40 x 100 feet, known as

Plots 51. 52, Block 20, Map 151. Lake

Secor. Assessed, Robert J. Rode. Tax,

1934, $2.65. Amount due. $1428. Sup­

posed owner, Robert J. Rode.

54. A tract of land located at Peekskill

Hollow, in the western part of the town

of Carmel, Putnam County, New York,

containing about twenty acres, bounded

north by Town Line, east by lands of

C. C. C, south by lands of Hunt, west by

Town Line. Assessed, N. W. Rogers. Tax,

1934, $26.48. Returned School Tax, 1933,

$5.89. Amount due. $45.48. Supposed

owner, N. W. Rogers.

55. A tract of land located at Mahopac,

in the southern part of the town of Car­

mel. Putnam County. New York, known

as Plots 32, 34, 36, Block K, Map 54. Ma­

hopac Hills. Assessed, George C. Rudin.

Tax. 1934, $10.60. Mahopac Lighting Tax,

$1.04. Returned School Tax. 1933. $1.84.

Amount due. $25.65. Supposed owner,

George C. Rudin.

56. A tract of land located at Mahopac,

in the southern part of the town of Car­

mel, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about three-quarters acre, known

as Plot 28, Map 57, Mahopac Point. As­

sessed, Raymond Ruge. Tax, 1934,

$254.21. Mahopac Lighting Tax, $25.06.

Amount due, $307.73. Supposed owner,

Raymond Ruge.

57. A tract of land located at Mahopac

Falls, in the southern part of Lie town

of Carmel, Putnam County, New York,

known as one-half of Plot 3, all of 4, 5,

Block 33, Map 151, Lake Secor. Assessed,

Edmond G. Schultz. Tax, 1934, $3.26.

Amount due. $14.92. Supposed owner,

Edmond G. Schultz.

60. A tract of land located at Mahopac

Falls, in the southern part of the town of

Carmel, Putnam County, New York,

containing about one-half acre, known

as Plot 96, Map 116C,' Mahopac Falls

Park. Assessed, Matilda L. Solomon.

Tax, 1934, $2.64. Returned School Tax,

1934, $0.32. Amount due. $14.60. Sup­

posed owner, Matilda L. Solomon.

61. A tract of land located at Maho­

pac, in the southern part of the town of

Carmel, Putnam County, New York,

known as Lot 4, Block 8, Map 163A, Lake

Mahopac Ridge. Assessed, Ora B. Tomp­

kins. Tax. 1934. $13.24. Mahopac Light­

ing Tax, $1.31. Amount due, $26.77. Sup­

posed owner, Ora B. Tompkins.

62. A tract of land located at Mahopac

Falls, in the southern part of the town

of Carmel. Putnam County, New York,

containing about 60 x 100 feet, known

as Plots 73. 74, 75. Block 21, Map 151,

Lake Secor. Assessed, Bertha and Fred

Uberacher. Tax, 1934, $7.94. Amount due,

$19.83. Supposed owners, Bertha and

Fred Uberacher.

63. A tract of land located at Maho­

pac Falls, in the southern part of the

town of Carmel. Putnam County, New

York, known as Plots 24 to 28, Block 16,

Map 151, Lake Secor. Assessed, Eric Wal­

ters. Tax, 1934. $29.13. Returned School

Tax. 1933, $7.22. Amount due, $49.66.

Supposed owner, Eric Walters.

64. A tract of land located at Baldwin

Place, in the southern part of the town

of Carmel, Putnam County, New York,

containing about one-quarter acre,

bounded north by lands of W. B. Dairy,

east by lands of W. B. Dairy, south by

lands of Railroad.-west by lands of B. P.

F. P. Co. Assessed, George C. Ware. Tax,

1934, $26.48. Amount due. $39.30. Sup­

posed owner, George C. Ware.

65. A tract of land located at Mahopac

Falls, in the southern part of the town

of Carmel. Putnam County, New York,

known as Plots 1, 2, Block 14. Map 151,

Lake Secor. Assessed, John P. Wiegers.

Tax. 1934, $5.30. Amount due, $17.06.

Supposed owner, John P. Wiegers.

66. A tract of land located at Maho­

pac. in the southern part of the town

of Carmel, Putnam County, New York,

known as Plot 2, Block E, Map 54, Ma­

hopac Hills. Assessed, Ruth Williams.

Tax. 1934, balance $12.15. Amount due,

$24.25. Supposed owner, Ruth Williams.

67. A tract of land located at Maho­

pac, in the southern part of the town

of Carmel. Putnam County, New York,

containing about one acre, known as

Plot 128. Map 57, Mahopac Point. As­

sessed, Anna G. Wright. Tax, 1934,

$211.84. Mahopac Lighting Tax. $20.88.

Amount due, $258.85. Supposed owner,

Anna G. Wright.

68. A tract of land located at Maho­

pac Falls, in the southern part of the

town of Carmel, Putnam County, New

York, known as Plots 23, 24, Block 23,

Map 151, Lake Secor. Assessed, Albert

Yates. Tax. 1934, $15.89. Amount due,

$28.18. Supposed owner, Albert Yates.

69. A tract of land located at Maho­

pac Falls, in the southern part of the

town of Carmel, Putnam County, New

York, bounded north by lands of Fisher,

east by lands of Purdy, south by Street,

west by Street. Assessed, Patrick Comer.

Tax. 1934, $238.32. Amount due, $264.73.

Supposed owner, Patrick Comer.

PATTERSON

1. A tract of land located at High

School District, in the northern part of

the town of Patterson, Putnam County,

New York, containing about one-half

acre, bounded north by lands of Branda,

east by lands of Renak. south by the

Street, west by lands of Smith. Assessed,

Hans Baumeyer. Tax, 1934, $24.36. Light­

ing District Tax. $3.28. Returned School

Tax, 1933, $11.11. Amount due, $55.18.

Supposed owner, Hans Baumeyer.

2. A tract of land located at High

School District, in the northerly part of

the town of Patterson, Putnam County,

New York, containing about two-fifths

acre, bounded north by lands of Branda,

east by the Street, south by lands of

Gaydos, west by lands of Smith. As­

sessed, Hans Baumeyer. Tax, 1934, $6.09.

Lighting District Tax. $0.82. Returned

School Tax, 1933, $2.78. Amount due,

$21.67. Supposed owner, Hans Baumeyer.

3. A tract of land located at Towners,

in the southern part of the town of Pat­

terson, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about ten and one-half acres,

bounded north by lands of Fratticelli,

east by lands of Railroad, south by lands

of Nichold, west by Highway. Assessed,

Antonio Bellucia. Tax, 1934. $26.39.

Amount due, $39.20. Supposed owner,

Antonio Bellucia.

4. A tract of land located at Towners,

in the southern part of the town of Pat­

terson, Putnam County, New York, con­

sisting of garage and lot, bounded north

by lands of Coombs, east by the High­

way, south by the Street, west by lands

of Brady. Assessed, Antonio Bellucia.

Tax, 1934, $2.03. Amount due. $13.63.

Supposed owner, Antonio Bellucia.

5. A tract of land located at Towners,

in the southern part of the town of Pat­

terson, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about two acres, bounded north

by the Street, east by lands of Merrick,

south by lands of Mt. View, west by

lands of Towner. Assessed, Antonio Bel­

lucia. Tax, 1934, $81.20. Amount due,

$99.76. Supposed owner, Antonio Bellu­

cia.

6. A tract of land located at High

School District, in the northern part of

the town of Patterson, Putnam County,

New York, containing about one-half

acre, bounded north by Highway, east

by lands of Bloch, south by lands of

Austin, west by lands of Mat-key. As­

sessed, Elizabeth S. Carey. Tax, 1934,

$83.23. Lighting District Tax. $11.19.

Amount due, $110.64. Supposed owner,

Elizabeth S. Carey.

7. A tract of land located at Adams

District, in the northeastern part of the

town of Patterson, Putnam County, New

York, containing about six acres, bound­

ed north by lands of Clinedenst, east by

lands of Clinedenst, south by lands of

Feeley, west by lands of Jennings. As­

sessed. B. West Clinedenst Estate. Tax,

1934, $2.03. Amount due, $13.63. Sup­

posed owner, B. West Clinedenst Estate.

8. A tract of land located at Holmes

District, in the northwestern part of the

town of Patterson, Putnam County, New

York, containing about three acres,

bounded north by Dutchess County

Line, east by lands of Ludington, south

by lands of Sacco, west by Highway. As­

sessed, William R. and Grace Casey.

Tax, 1934, $14.21. Amount due, $26.42.

Supposed owners, William R. and Grace

Casey.

9. A tract of land located at Dyke-

mans, in the southern part of the town

of Patterson, Putnam County, New

York, containing about sixteen acres,

bounded north by lands of Kalaway, east

by lands of Kalaway, south by lands of

Clough, west by Highway. Assessed,

Mrs. J. H. Curry. Tax, 1934, $6.09.

Amount due, $17.89. Supposed owner,

Mrs. J. H. Curry.

10. A tract of land located at Adams

District, in the northeastern part of the

town of Patterson. Putnam County, New

York, containing about seven acres,

bounded north by Road, east by Road,

south by lands of Kline, west by lands

of Brady. Assessed, Roger T. Mahon.

Tax, 1934, $6.08. Amount due, $17.88.

Supposed owner, Alphonsea Pehrson.

11. A tract of land located at Holmes

District, in the northwestern part of the

town of Patterson, Putnam County, New

York, containing about four acres,

bounded north by lands of Baker, east

by the Street, south by lands of Sacco,

west by lands of Ballard. Assessed, Miss

Roxanna Naff. Tax, 1934, $2.54. Amount

due, $14.16. Supposed owner, Miss Rox­

anna Naff.

12. A dance hall, 30 by 70, located at

Well Curb District, in the southeastern

part of the town of Patterson, Putnam

County, New York. Assessed, Putnam

Lake Property Owners Association. Tax,

1934, $14.21. Amount due, $26.42. Sup­

posed owner, Putnam Lake Property

Owners Association.

13. A tract of land located at Elm Tree

District, in the southern part of the town

of Patterson, Putnam County, New

York, bounded north by lands of Raylor,

east by Croton River, south by lands of

Seymore, west by lands of O'Hara. As­

sessed, R. H. D. Holding Corporation.

Tax, 1934, $233.45. Returned School Tax,

1934, $79.98. Amount due, $343.60. Sup­

posed owner, R. H. D. Holding Corpora­

tion.

14. A tract of land located at Elm

Tree District, in the southern part of the

town of Patterson, Putnam County, New

York, containing about one hundred and

thirty-seven acres, bounded north by

lands of Brandon, east by lands of

Brady, south by lands of Steinbeck, west

by lands of Byron. Assessed, Mrs. Ida

R. Stein. Tax, 1934. $115.71. Returned

School Tax, 1934. $40.34. Amount due,

$175.35. Supposed owner, Mrs. Ida R.

Stein.

15. A tract of land located at Well

Curb District, in the southeastern part

of the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, containing about fourteen

acres, bounded north by lands of Snei-

der, east by the Street, south by lands

of Putnam Lake, west by lands of Put­

nam Lake. Assessed, Margaret A. Hance.

Tax, 1934, $101.50. Amount due, $121.07.

Supposed owner, Margaret A. Hance.

16. A tract of land located at High

School District, in the northern part of

the town of Patterson, Putnam County,

New York, containing about one-eighth

acre, bounded north by lands of Chase,

east by Street, south by lands of Pendle­

ton and Townsend, west by lands of

Watkins. Tax. 1934, $36.54. Lighting Dis­

trict Tax, $4.91. Returned School Tax,

1933, $13.42. Amount due, $69.11. Sup­

posed owner, Walter Knapp Estate.

17. A tract of land located at Town­

ers, in the southern part of the town of

Patterson, Putnam County, New York,

containing about one acre, bounded

north by the Street, east by lands of

Bellucia, south by lands of Mt. View,

west by lands of Brewer. Assessed, Har­

old A. Lowen. Tax, 1$34, $71.05. Amount

due, $89.10. Supposed owner, Harold A.

Lowen.

18. A tract of land located at Town­

ers, in the southern part of the town of

Patterson, Putnam County, New York,

containing about nine hundred and

nineteen-one thousandths acre, bounded

north by lands of Towners Realty Cor­

poration, east by lands of Towners Real­

ty Corporation, south by lands of Town­

ers Realty Corporation, west by lands of

Towners Realty Corporation'. Assessed,

Isabel M. LeMaistre. Tax, 1934, $16.24.

Amount due. $28.55. Supposed owner,

Isabel M. LeMaistre.

19. A tract of land situate at Towners.

in the central part of the town of Patter­

son. Putnam County, New York, known

as Plot 19. Section D, on a map of lands

of Mountain View Development filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under

File No. 186A. Assessed. Morris A. Haas.

Tax. 1932. $1.34. Returned School Tax.

1932, $0.62. Tax, 1933, $1.56. Returned

School Tax. 1933. $0.44. Tax. 1934. $1.42.

Amount due, $17.14. Supposed owner,

Morris A. Hass.

20. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson, Putnam

County, New York, known as Club

House, garage, small lake and park, on

a map of lands of Mirror Holding Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office. Assessed. Putnam Lake Property

Owners' Association. Tax, 1934. $142.10.

Amount due, $163.70. Supposed owners,

Putnam Lake Property Owners' Asso­

ciation.

21. A tract of land with bungalow

thereon, situate at Towners. in the cen­

tral part of the town of Patterson. Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plot

No. 7, Section D, on a map of lands of

Mountain View Development filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office. Assessed,

Carleton S. Quimby. Tax, 1934, $13.60.

Amount due. $25.78. Supposed owner,

Carleton S. Quimby.

22. A tract of land containing about

four acres, situate at Putnam Lake, in

the town of Patterson, Putnam County,

New York, known as a park. Assessed,

State Line Golf and Country Club. Tax,

1932, $1.91. Tax. 1933. $2.22. Returned

School Tax, 1933. $0.40. Tax. 1934. $2.03.

Amount due, $18.38. Supposed owner,

State Line Golf and Country Club.

23. A tract of land and bungalow, situ­

ate at Towners, in the town of Patterson,

Putnam County. New York, known as

Plots Nos. 38 and 39. Section C, on a map

of lands of Mountain View Development

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office

under File No. 186A. Assessed, Mrs. M.

Vivian. Tax. 1934. $12.99. Amount due.

$25.13. Supposed owner, Mrs. M. Vivian.

24. A tract of land located at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson, Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots 220,

221 and well on a map of Mirror Holding

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office. Assessed, 1932, State Line

Golf and Country Club. Assessed, 1933

and 1934, Putnam Lake Property Own­

ers' Association. Tax, 1932, Lot No. 220,

$1.91. Tax, 1933, $2.23 Tax, 1934, $2.23.

Amount due, $18.18. Supposed owner,

Putnam Lake Property Owners' Asso­

ciation.

25. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson, Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

1045 to 1047, inclusive, and bungalow, on

a map of lands of Mirror Holding Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office. Assessed, T. Conforti. Tax, 1934,

$19.29. Amount due, $31.75. Supposed

owner, T. Conforti.

26. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson, Putnam

County, New York, known as. Plots Nos.

1452 to 1454, inclusive, on a map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office. Assessed,

Minnie Collins. Tax, 1933, $2.67. Tax,

1934, $2.44. Amount due, $16.86. Sup­

posed owner, Minnie Collins.

27. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson, Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

1485 to 1487, inclusive, on a map of Mir­

ror Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office. Assessed, Albert

Dwyer. Tax, 1933, $3.00. Returned School

Tax, 1933, $0.54. Tax, 1934, $2.44. Amount

due, $17.77. Supposed owner, Albert

Dwyer.

28. A tract of land situate.at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson, Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

1627 to 1629, inclusive, on a map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office. Assessed.

1933, John Kesper. Assessed, 1934,

Charles Kaiser. Tax, 1933, $2.67. Returned

School Tax, 1933, $0.47. Tax, 1934, $2.44.

Amount due, $17.35. Supposed owner,

John Kesper or Charles Kaiser.

29. A tract of land with bungalow

thereon, situate at Putnam Lake, in the

town of Patterson, Putnam County, New

York, known as Plots Nos. 1817 to 1822,

inclusive, on a map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporatin filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office. Assessed, John P.

Gurn and E. Fata. Tax, 1934, $18.27.

Amount due, $30.68. Supposed owners,

John P. Gurn and E. Fata.

30. A tract of land with bungalow

thereon, situate at Putnam Lake, in the

town of Patterson, Putnam County, New

York, known as Plots Nos. 2245 to 2247,

inclusive, on a map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office. Assessed, E. I.

Amateau. Tax, 1934, $14.20. Amount due,

$26.41. Supposed owner, E. I. Amateau.

31. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson, Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

2318 to 2320, inclusive, on a map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corpration filed in

Putnam Cunty Clerk's Office. Assessed,

Howard J. Boomer. Tax, 1933, $2.67. Tax,

1934, $2.44. Amount due, $16.86. Supposed

owner, Howard J. Boomer.

32. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson, Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

2660 and 2661 on a map of lands of Mir­

ror Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office. Assessed, William

Kunzuman. Tax, 1932. $1.72. Tax, 1933,

$2.00. Returned School Tax, 1933, $0.35.

Tax, 1934, $1.83. Amount due, $17.69.

Supposed owner, William Kunzuman.

33. A tract of land with bungalow

thereon, located at Towners Realty Cor­

poration, in the town of Patterson, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Lot

No. Zero, bounded north by lands of

Cady, east by lands of Towners Realty

Corporation, south by lands of McCusker,

west by lands of Towners Realty Cor­

poration. Assessed, Joseph E. Davenport.

Tax, 1934, $20.30. Amount due, $32.81.

Supposed owner, Joseph E. Davenport.

34. A tract of land with bungalow

thereon, located at Towners Realty Cor­

poration, in the town of Patterson, Put­

nam County, New York, bounded north

by lands of Davenport, east, south and

west by lands of Towners Realty Corpo­

ration. Assessed, Elsie P. McCusker. Tax,

1934, $40.60. Amount due, $57.13. Sup­

posed owner, Elsie P. McCusker.

35. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson. Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

3546 to 3548, inclusive, on a map of Mir­

ror Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office. Assessed, Dorothy

Martin. Tax, 1933. $2.34. Returned School

Tax, 1933, $0.42. Tax, 1934, $2.44. Amount

due. $16.96. Supposed owner, Dorothy

Martin.

36. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson. Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

3815 to 3819 and bungalow, on a map of

lands of Mirror Holding Corporation filed

in Putnam County Clerk's Office. As­

sessed, Catherine O'Neill. Tax. 1934.

$8.12. Amount due, $20.02. Supposed

owner, Catherine O'Neill.

37. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson. Putnam

County, New York, know nas Plots Nos.

3952 to 3954, inclusive, store and dwell­

ing, on a map of lands of Mirror Holding

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office. Assessed, H. Shendon.

Tax. 1934, $23.35. Amount due, $36.01.

Supposed owner, H. Shendon.

38. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson. Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

5435 to 5442, inclusive, on a map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office. Assessed,

Bert Rooney. Tax. 1934. $0.50. Amount

due, $18.32. Supposed owner, Bert

Rooney.

39. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson, Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

5466 to 5470, inclusive, on a map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office. Assessed.

1933, Anna Jacobsen. Tax, 1933, $3.34. As­

sessed, 1934, Hanna Jacobsen and Martha

Asch. Tax. 1934. $3.05. Amount due.

$18.20. Supposed owners, Anna Jacobsen

or Hanna Jacobsen and Martha Asch.

40. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson, Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

5733 to 5738. inclusive, on a map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office. Assessed.

Vincent Perino. Tax, 1933. $4.67. Tax.

1934. $4.26. Amount due, $20.87. Supposed

owner, Vincent Perino.

41. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson, Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

5975 to 5977, inclusive, on a map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office. Assessed,

Francis D. Donlon or Frances D. Done]in.

Tax, 1933, $2.34. Returned School Tax,

1933, $0.42. Tax, 1934, $2.13. Amount due,

$16.63. Supposed owner, Francis D. Don­

lon or Frances D. Donelin.

42. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson, Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

5978 and 5979 and bungalow, on a map

of lands of Mirror Holding Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Assessed, Martha Rush. Tax, 1934, $12.18.

Amount due, $24.28. Supposed owner,

Martha Rush.

43. .A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson, Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

6203 and 6204 and bungalow, on a map

of lands of Mirror Holding Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Assessed, John Cosentino. Tax, 1934,

$5.08. Amount due. $16.83. Supposed

owner, John Cosentino.

44. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson, Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

6205 to 6207. inclusive, on a map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office. Assessed,

1933, Putnam Lake Property Owners As­

sociation. Tax, 1933, $2.34. Assessed,

1934, Prospect Owners' Association. Tax,

1934. $2.13. Amount due, $16.19. Sup­

posed owners. Putnam Lake Property

Owners Association or Prospect Own­

ers' Association.

45. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson, Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

6325 to 6328. inclusive, and bungalow,

on a map of lands of Mirror Holding

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office. Assessed. Ethel M. Rey­

nolds. Tax, 1934, $12.18. Amount due,

$24.28. Supposed owner, Ethel M. Rey­

nolds.

46. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson. Putnam

County. New York, known as Plots Nos.

6390 to 6392. inclusive, on a map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office. Assessed,

1933, Putnam Lake Property Owners

Association. Tax, 1933, $2.34. Assessed,

1934, Property Owners' Association.

Tax, 1934. $2.13. Amount due. $16.19.

Supposed owner, Putnam Lake Prop­

erty Owners Association.

47. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson. Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

6520 to 6524, inclusive, and bungalow, on

a map of lands of Mirror Holding Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office. Assessed, Mabel Lynch. Tax,

1934. $8.12. Amount due. $20.02. Sup­

posed owner, Mabel Lynch.

48. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson. Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

6624 to 6626. inclusive, on a map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office. Assessed,

1933. D. J. Metcalf. Tax. 1933, $2.34. As­

sessed, 1934, G. J. Metcalf. Tax. 1934.

$2.13. Amount due, $16.19. Supposed

owner, D. J. Metcalf or G. J. Metcalf.

49. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson. Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

9890 and 9891. on a map of lands of Mir­

ror Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office. Assessed, Sproul

and Burdick. Tax, 1934. $12.18. Amount

due. $24.28. Supposed owners, Sproul

and Burdick.

50. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson. Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

10053 to 10067. inclusive, on a map of

lands of Mirror Holding Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Assessed. Elsie Froeschl. Tax. 1934.

$10.66. Amount due. $22.69. Supposed

owner, Elsie Froeschl.

51. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson. Putnam

County. New York, known as Plots Nos.

205 to 207, inclusive. Map A. on a map

of lands of Mirror Holding Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Assessed, B. Pearcp. Tax, 1933, $2.67.

Tax, 1934, $2.44. Amount due, $16.86.

Supposed owner, B. Pearce.

52. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson. Putnam

County. New York, known as Plots Nos.

405 to 409, inclusive, and bungalow. Map

A. on a map of lands of Mirror Holding

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office. Assessed. J. Barcia. Tax,

1934, $16.24. Amount due, $28.55. Sup­

posed owner. J. Barcia.

53. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson. Putnam

County. New York, known as Plots Nos.

429 and 430 and bungalow. Map A. on

a map of lands of Mirror Holding Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office. Assessed. C. A. Bzold. Tax. 1934.

$10.66. Amount due. $22.69. Supposed

owner. C. A. Bzold.

54. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson. Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

643 to 645, inclusive, Map A. on a map

of lands of Mirror Holding Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Assessed, Emma Batman. Tax, 1933,

$2.34. Returned School Tax, 1933, $0.42.

Tax, 1934. $2.13. Amount due. $16.63.

Supposed owner, Emma Batman.

55. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson. Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

2054 to 2056, inclusive, Map B. on a map

of lands of Mirror Holding Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Assessed. J. Joyce. Tax, 1933. $2.34. Re­

turned School Tax, 1933. $0.42. Tax, 1934,

$2.13. Amount due, $16.63. Supposed

owner. J. Joyce.

56. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson. Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

2308 to 2310, inclusive, and bungalow,

Map B. on a map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office. Assessed, Mrs.

Barbara E. Tyman. Tax, 1934. $16.24.

Amount due, $28.55. Supposed owner,

Mrs. Barbara E. Tyman.

57. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson, Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

2311 to 2313. inclusive. Map B, on a map

of lands of Mirror Holding Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Assessed, Mrs. E. Zimmerman. Tax, 1933,

$2.34. Returned School Tax. 1933. $0.42.

Tax. 1934. $2.13. Amount due, $16.63.

Supposed owner, Mrs. E. Zimmerman.

58. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson, Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

2332 to 2334. inclusive, and galvanized

bungalow, Map B. on a map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation filed in Put­

nam County Clerk's Office. Assessed, S.

Lakebody. Tax, 1934, $8.12. Amount due,

$20.02. Supposed owner, S. Lakebody.

59. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson, Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

2483 to 2485, inclusive, Map B, on a map

of lands of Mirror Holding Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Assessed, Joseph Huber. Tax, 1933, $2.34.

Tax, 1934, $2.13. Amount due, $16.19.

Supposed owner, Joseph Huber.

60. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson, Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

2522 to 2524, inclusive. Map B, on a map

of lands of Mirror Holding Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Assessed, 1932, James Boggi. Tax, 1932,

$2.00. Assessed, 1934, James Roggi. Tax,

1934, $2.13. Amount due, $15.83. Sup­

posed owner, James Boggi or James

Roggi.

61. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson, Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

2525 to 2527. inclusive, Map B, on a map

of lands of Mirror Holding Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Assessed, Thomas F. Haugh. Tax, 1933,

$2.34. Returned School Tax, 1933, $0.42.

Tax, 1934, $2.13. Amount due, $16.63.

Supposed owner, Thomas F. Haugh.

62. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson. Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

2537 to 2539, inclusive, Map B, on a map

of lands of Mirror Holding Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Assessed, K. B. Ehlcrs. Tax, 1932, $2.00.

Tax, 1933, $2.34. Returned School Tax.

1933. $0.42. Tax, 1934, $2.13. Amount due,

$18.73. Supposed owner, K. B. Ehlers.

63. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town "of Patterson, Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

2727 and 2728 and bungalow, Map C, on

a map of lands of Mirror Holding Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office. Assessed, 1932, C. Abbstecola and

Lena Soderland. Tax, 1932, $1.53. As­

sessed, 1933, Lena Soderland and C. Ab-

boticola. Tax, 1933, $1.78. Returned

School Tax, 1933, $0.32. Assessed, 1934,

Lena and Abboticole C. Soderland. Tax,

1934, $10.15. Amount due, $25.96. Sup­

posed owners, C. Abbstecola and Lena

Soderland, Lena Soderland and C. Ab-

boticola or Lena and Abboticole C. So­

derland.

64. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson, Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

2801 to 2803, inclusive, Map C, on a map

of lands of Mirror Holding Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Assessed, 1933, C. V. Brunner. Tax, 1933,

$2.34. Returned School Tax, 1933. $0.42.

Assessed, 1934, E. V. Brunner. Tax, 1934.

$2.13. Amount due, $16.63. Supposed

owner, C. V. Brunner or E. V. Brunner.

65. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson. Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

2918 to 2923, inclusive, and bungalow,

Map C, on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office. Assessed, I. Landon. Tax,

1934, $6.30. Amount due, $18.11. Sup­

posed owner, I. Landon.

66. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson, Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

2929 to 2942, inclusive, Map C, on a map

of lands of Mirror Holding Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Assessed, Minnie Zimmerman. Tax, 1934,

$9.95. Amount due, $21.94. Supposed own­

er, Minnie Zimmerman.

67. A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson, Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

3007 to 3009, inclusive. Map C, on a map

of lands of Mirror Holding Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Assessed, John Gearity. Tax, 1932. $2.00.

Tax, 1933, $2.34. Returned School Tax,

1933, $0.42. Tax. 1934, $2.13. Amount due,

$8.73. Supposed owner, John Gearity.

PUTNAM VALLEY

1. A tract of land with house thereon

located at Oscawana Lake Road, in the

town of Putnam Valley, Putnam County,

New York, bounded north by lands of

Samler, east by lands of Pierce, south

by lands of Pierce, west by Highway.

Assessed, James E. Odell. Tax, 1934,

$27.09. Fire Tax. $0.42. Returned School

Tax, 1934, $7.90. Amount due, $48.68.

Supposed owner, Heirs of James E. Odell

or Martha B. Gillen.

2. A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Oscawana Lake North, in the

town of Putnam Valley, Putnam County.

New York, bounded north by lands of

Post, east by lands of South Slip Realty

Corporation, south by Oscawana Lake,

west by lands of Moshier. Assessed,

Charles A. Mitchell. Tax, 1934, $41.68.

Returned School Tax, 1934. $12.14.

Amount due. $68.01. Supposed owner,

Charles A. Mitchell.

3. A tract of land located at Wickopee,

in the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, containing about

eighty-five acres, bounded north by

lands of Kittridge, east by the Parkway,

south by lands of Johnson, west by High­

way. Assessed, Charles Seifert. Tax,

1934, $79.19. Returned School Tax, 1934.

$23.08. Amount due, $121.88. Supposed

owner, Charles Seifert.

4. A tract of land situate at Peekskill

Hollow, in the town of Putnam Valley.

Putnam County, New York, containing

about one hundred and thirty-eight

acres, bounded north by lands of Milo.

east by Town Line, south by lands of

Mathews, west by lands of New York

Power & Light Corporation. Assessed.

Herman Steifert. Tax. 1934. $6.25. Re­

turned School Tax. 1934. $0.89. Amount

due. $18.99. Supposed owner. Herman

Steifert.

5. A tract of land with house thereon,

situate in the town of Putnam Valley.

Putnam County, New York, bounded

north and east by lands of Fathers of

Mercy, south by lands of Van Tassel,

west by the Highway. Assessed. Edward

Van Tassel. Tax. 1934. $25.01. Fire Tax.

$0.38. Returned School Tax. 1934, $7.29.

Amount due, $45.81. Supposed owner,

Edward Van Tassel.

6. A tract of land located at Oscawana

Lake Road, in the town of Putnam Val­

ley. Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about seven acres, bounded

north by lands of Travis, east by lands

of Weintraub. 6outh by lands of Pierce,

west by Highway. Assessed, James E.

Odell. Tax. 1934. $14.58. Fire Tax. $0.22.

Returned School Tax. 1934. $4.25. Amount

due. $31.50. Supposed owner. Heirs of

James E. Odell.

7. A tract of land located at Oscawana

Lake North, in the town of Putnam Val­

ley, Putnam County, New York, consis­

ting of house and lot, known as lot No.

15, Map 6A, filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office December, 1922. Assessed,

Joseph O'Grady. Tax, 1932, $34.77. Tax,

1934, $33.34. Returned School Tax, 1934,

$9.72. Amount due, $96.22. Supposed

owner, Joseph O'Grady.

8. A lot of land 50 feet by 100 feet, lo­

cated at Barger Street, in the town of

Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, bounded north by lands of Larks-

burg Development Corporation, east by

lands of Barger, south and west by lands

of Larksburg Development Corporation.

Assessed, Albert Nixon and E. Byrd.

Tax, 1934, $2.09. Fire Tax, $0.03. Amount

due, $13.72. Supposed owners, Albert

Nixon and E. Byrd.

9. A tract of land located at Oscawana

Lake Road, in the town of Putnam Val­

ley, Putnam County, New York, contain­

ing about sixty-two acres, bounded

north by lands of Cummins, east by High­

way, south by lands of Wagner, west by

lands of Henderson. Assessed, James E.

Odell. Tax, 1934, $66.69. Fire Tax. $1.02.

Returned School Tax, 1934, $19.43.

Amount due, $105.99. Supposed owners.

Heirs of James E. Odell.

10. A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Wood Street, in the eastern

part of the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, bounded north

by lands of Fagnani, east by lands of

Gilbert, south by lands of Gilbert, west

by Highway. Assessed, Theresa Marchi-

ano. Tax, 1934, $29.17. Fire Tax, $0.45.

Amount due, $42.60. Supposed owner,

Theresa Marchiano.

11. A tract of land located at Wicko­

pee. in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, containing about

eleven acres, bounded north by lands

of Parkway, east by Highway, south and

west by lands of Johnson. Assessed,

Belle Lichterman. Tax, 1934. $50.02. Re­

turned School Tax, 1934, $14.57. Amount

due. $82.32. Supposed owner, Belle

Lichterman.

12. A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Larksburg Avenue, in the

eastern part of the town of Putnam Val­

ley, Putnam County, New York, bound­

ed north by lands of Bruhl, east, south

and west by lands of Larksburg Devel­

opment. Assessed, Felix Johnke. Tax,

1934. $16.67. Fire Tax, $0.26. Amount due,

$29.27. Supposed owner, Felix Johnke.

13. A tract of land located at Peeks-

kill Hollow, in the town of Putnam Val­

ley, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about sixty acres, bounded north

by lands of Roger, east by Town Line,

south by lands of Milo, west by lands of

New York Power and Light Corpora­

tion. Assessed, Heirs of Mary Hunt. Tax,

1934. $29.18. Returned School Tax, 1933,

$4.12. Returned School Tax, 1934, $4.94.

Amount due, $51.65. Supposed owners,

Heirs of Mary Hunt.

14. A tract of land located at Peekskill

Hollow, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, containing

about nineteen acres, bounded north by

lands of Jenkins, south by lands of

Curry, west by Highway. Assessed, So­

phie R. Gagne. Tax, 1934, $33.34. Fire

Tax. $0.51. Returned School Tax, 1934.

$9.72. Amount due, $57.24. Supposed

owner, Sophie R. Gagne.

15. A tract of land located at Barger

Street, in the eastern part of the town

of Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, containing about two and three-

quarters acres, bounded north by lands

of Bruhl, east by Highway, south by

lands of Gilbert, west by land of West.

Assessed, Alfred Endries. Tax, 1934, $25.-

01. Fire Tax, $0.38. Amount due, $38.15.

Supposed owner, Alfred Endries.

16. A tract of land located at Peekskill

Hollow, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, containing

about one and one-half acres, bounded

north by lands of Tompkins, east by

Town Line, south and west by lands of

New York Power and Light Corpora­

tion. Assessed, J. H. Curry. Tax, 1934,

$5.22. Returned School Tax, 1934, $1.52.

Amount due, $18.57. Supposed owner, J.

H. Curry.

17. A tract of land located at Turn­

pike, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County. New York, bounded north

by lands of Turnpike, east by Town Line,

south by lands of Azzimonti, west by

lands of Richmond. Assessed, George

Bennett. Tax, 1934, $10.42. Amount due,

$22.44. Supposed owner, George Ben­

nett.

18. A tract of land located at Osca­

wana Heights, in the town of Putnam

Valley, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about one hundred acres, bound­

ed north by lands of Alsberg, east by

lands of Croft, south by lands of Osca­

wana Lake Realty Corporation, west by

lands of Couch. Assessed. Heirs of Phebe

Barger. Tax. 1934. $41.68. Returned

School Tax. 1934. $12.14. Amount due.

$68.01. Supposed owners, Heirs of Phebe

Barger.

19. A tract of land located at Barger

Street, in the eastern part of the town

of Putnam Valley. Putnam County, New

York, bounded north by lands of Larks­

burg, east by Summer Street, south by

lands of Drayton, west by lands of Kru-

ger. Assessed. Mary J. Mizell. Tax. 1932,

$4.34. Tax, 1933. $4.84. Fire District Tax

$0.04. Tax. 1934. $4.17. Fire Tax. $0.06.

Amount due. $25.62. Supposed owner,

Mary J. Mizell.

20. A tract of land located near

Adams Corners, in the town of Putnam

Valley, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about five acres, bounded north

by lands of Pierce, east by lands of

Perry, south by lands of Mead, west by

lands of Pierce. Assessed, Chester

Adams. Tax. 1933. $2.42. Fire District

Tax. $0.02. Tax. 1934. $2.08. Fire Tax.

$0.03. Returned School Tax. 1934. $0.64.

Amount due. $16.94. Supposed owner.

Chester Adams.

21. A tract of land located near Wood

Street, in the eastern part of the town

of Putnam Valley. Putnam County, New

York, containing about three acres,

bounded north by glands of Gilbert, cast

by lands of New York Power and Light

Corporation, south by lands of Conklin,

west by lands of Wood. Assessed. Ran­

som Tompkins. Tax. 1932. $1.52. Tax

1933. $1.69. Fire District Tax. $0.01. Tax,

1934. $1.46. Fire Tax. $0.03. Amount due.

$16.44. Supposed owner. Ransom Tomp­

kins.

22. A tract of land located at Old

Landing, in the town of Putnam Valley.

Putnam County. New York, containing

about five acres, bounded north by lands

of Dickler, east by lands of Pierce, south

by lands of Johnson, west by lands of

Kramers. Assessed. Theodore and Louise

M. Smith. Tax. 1932. $2.17. Tax. 1933.

$2.42. Fire District Tax. $0.02. Returned

School Tax. 1933. $0.66. Tax. 1934. $2.08.

Fire Tax. $0.04. Returned School Tax,

1934. $0.64. Amount due. $19.93. Sup­

posed owners, Theodore and Louise M.

Smith.


FRIDAY, MAY 14, 1937 THE BREWSTER STANDARD — ESTABLISHED 1869 PAGE THREE

23. A traot of land located at Osca­

wana Lake East, in the town of Putnam

Valley. Putnam County, New York,

known as Lot No. 38 on a map of lands

of Wanagru Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office. Assessed,

James A. Ahearns. Tax, 1932, $4.35. Tax,

1934. $4.17. Returned School Tax, 1934,

$1.22. Amount due, $21.72. Supposed

owner, James A. Ahearns.

24. A tract of land located at Oscawana

Lake East, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lot No. 40 on a map of lands of Wanagru

Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office. Assessed, James

A. Ahearns. Tax, 1932, $4.35. Tax, 1934,

$4.17. Returned School Tax, 1934, $1.22.

Amount due, $21.72. Supposed owner,

James A. Ahearns.

25. A tract of land located at Oscawana

Lake East, in the town of Putnam Val­

ley, Putnam County, New York, known

as Lot No. 43 on a map of lands of Wana­

gru Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office. Assessed, James

A. Ahearns. Tax, 1932, $4.35. Tax, 1934,

$4.17. Returned School Tax, 1934, $1.22.

Amount due, $21.72. Supposed owner,

James A. Ahearns.

26. A tract of land located at Oscawana

Lake East, in the town of Putnam Val­

ley, Putnam County, New York, known

as Lot No. 44 on a map of lands of Wana­

gru Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office. Assessed, James A.

Ahearns. Tax, 1932, $4.35. Tax, 1934,

$4.17. Returned School Tax, 1934, $1.22.

Amount due. $21.72. Supposed owner,

James A. Ahearns.

27. A tract of land located at Osca­

wana Lake East, in the town of Putnam

Valley, Putnam County, New York,

known as Lot No. 46 on a map of lands

of Wanagru Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office. Assessed,

James A. Ahearns. Tax, 1932, $4.35. Tax,

1934, $4.17. Returned School Tax, 1934,

$1.22. Amount due, $21.72. Supposed

owner, James A. Ahearns.

28. A tract of land located at Osca­

wana Lake East, in the town of Putnam

Valley, Putnam County, New York,

known as Lot No. 47 on a map of lands

of Wanagru Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office. Assessed,

James A. Ahearns. Tax, 1932, $4.35. Tax,

1934. $4.17. Returned School Tax, 1934.

$1.22. Amount due, $21.72. Supposed

owner, James A. Ahearns.

29. A tract of land located at Oscawana

Lake East, in the town of Putnam Val­

ley, Putnam County, New York, known

as Lot No. 48 on a map of lands of Wana­

gru Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office. Assessed. James

A. Ahearns. Tax, 1932. $4.35. Tax, 1934,

$4.17. Returned School Tax, 1934, $1.22.

Amount due, $21.72. Supposed owner,

James A. Ahearns.

30. A tract of land located at Osca­

wana Lake East, in the town of Putnam

Valley, Putnam County, New York,

known as Lot No. 49 on a map of lands

of Wanagru Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office. Assessed,

James A. Ahearns. Tax, 1932. $4.34. Tax,

1934, $4.17. Returned School Tax, 1934.

$1.22. Amount due, $21.72. Supposed

owner, James A. Ahearns.

31. A tract of land located at Oscawana

Lake East, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lot No. 50 on a map of lands of Wanagru

Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office. Assessed, James

A. Ahearns. Tax. 1932. $4.34. Tax, 1934.

$4.17. Returned School Tax. 1934, $1.22.

Amount due, $21.72. Supposed owner,

James A. Ahearns.

32. A tract of land located at Oscawana

Lake East, in the town of Putnam Val­

ley, Putnam County, New York, known

as Lot No. 51 on a map of lands of Wana­

gru Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office. Assessed, James

A. Ahearns. Tax, 1932, $4.34. Tax, 1934,

$4.17. Returned School Tax, 1934, $1.22.

Amount due, $21.72. Supposed owner,

James A. Ahearns.

33. A tract of land located at Osca­

wana Lake East, in the town of Putnam

Valley, Putnam County, New York,

known as Lot No. 52 on a map of lands

of Wanagru Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office. Assessed.

James A. Ahearns. Tax, 1932. $4.34. Tax,

1934. $4.17. Returned School Tax. 1934.

$1.22. Amount due. $21.72. Supposed

owner, James A. Ahearns.

34. A tract of land located at Osca­

wana Lake East, in the town of Putnam

Valley, Putnam County, New York,

known as Lot No. 54 on a map of lands

of Wanagru Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office. Assessed.

James A. Ahearn. Tax. 1932. $4.34. Tax.

1934. $4.17. Returned School Tax. 1934.

$1.22. Amount due, $21.72. Supposed

owner, James A. Ahearns.

35. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lots 53 to 56, inclusive, Block 1, Section

A. on a map of McGolrick Realty Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office. Assessed, Alberto Amato. Tax,

1934, $6.66. Fire Tax, $0.10. Returned

School Tax. 1934, $1.94. Amount due,

$20.63. Supposed owner. Alberto Amato.

36. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill. in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

house and Lots Nos. 87 to 91, inclusive,

Block 1, Section A, on a map of McGol­

rick Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office. Assessed, Alberto

Amato. Tax. 1934. $33.34. Fire Tax. $0.52.

Returned School Tax, 1934, $9.72. Amount

due, $57.26. Supposed owner, Alberto

Amato.

37. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill. in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County. New York, known as

Lot No. 110. Block 1, Section A. on a map

of McGolrick Realty Corporation filed

in Putnam County Clerk's Office. As­

sessed. Alberto Amato. Tax. 1934. $2.08.

Fire Tax. $0.03. Returned School Tax.

1934. $0.48. Amount due, $14.22. Supposed

owner, Alberto Amato.

3b. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill, in the town of Putnam Val­

ley. Putnam County. New York, known

as Lot No. 132. Block 5, Section A, on a

map of McGolrick Realty Corporation

lilc-d in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Assessed. Alberto Amato. Tax, 1934,

$4.17. Fire Tax. $0.06. Returned School

Tax. 1934. $1.22. Amount due. $1752.

Supposed owner, Alberto Amato.

39. A tract of land with house thereon,

situate at Lake Peekskill, in the town oi

Putnam Valley, Putnam County. New

York, known as Lot No. 133, Block 5.

Section A, on a map of lands of McGol­

rick Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office. Assessed. Alberto

Amato. Tax, 1934, $25.01. Fire Tax, $0.38.

Returned School Tax, 1934, $7.29. Amount

due, $45.81. Supposed owner, Alberto

Amato.

40. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lot No. 134, Block 5, Section A, on a

map of lands of McGolrick Realty Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office. Assessed, Alberto Amato. Tax,

1934, $6.25. Fire Tax, $0.10. Returned

School Tax, 1934, $1.82. Amount due,

$20.07. Supposed owner, Alberto Amato.

41. A tract of land with house thereon,

situate at Lake Peekskill, in the town of

Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lots Nos. 271 to 273, in­

clusive, FB53, Section G, on a map of

lands of McGolrick Realty Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Asessed, Fanny Abrams. Tax, 1934, $25.01.

Fire Tax, $0.38. Returned School Tax.

1934, $7.29. Amount due, $45.81. Supposed

owner, Fanny Abrams.

42. A tract of land with house thereon,

situate at Lake Peekskill, in the town of

Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lots Nos. 334 and 335.

FB53, Section G, on a map of lands of

McGolrick Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County County Clerk's Office.

Assessed, John and Elizabeth Ashman.

Tax, 1934, $20.84. Fire Tax, $0.32. Re­

turned School Tax, 1934, $6.08. Amount

due, $40.10. Supposed owners, John and

Elizabeth Ashman.

43. A tract of land with house thereon,

situate at Lake Peekskill, in the town of

Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lots Nos. 42 to 44, in­

clusive, EB57, Section F, on a map of

McGolrick Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office. Assessed.

Alberto Amato. Tax, 1934. $20.84. Fire

Tax, $0.32. Returned School Tax. 1934.

$6.08. Amount due, $40.10. Supposed own­

er. Alberto Amato.

44. A tract of land with house thereon,

situate at Lake Peekskill, in the town of

Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lots Nos. 63 to 66, in­

clusive, EB64, Section F, on a map of

lands of McGolrick Realty Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Assessed, Fred K. Albrano. Tax; 1934.

$25.01. Fire Tax, $0.39. Returned School

Tax, 1934, $7.29. Amount due, $45.82

Supposed owner, Fred K. Albrano.

45. A tract of land situate at Oscawana

Gardens, in the town of Putnam Valley.

Putnam County, New lork, known as

Lots Nos. 15, 16, 17, on map of Hudson

Heights Development Corporation filed

in Putnam County Clerk's Office. As­

sessed, Samuel Bender. Tax, 1934. $5.00.

Fire Tax, $0.08. Returned • School Tax.

1934. $1.46. Amount due, $18.37. Sup­

posed owner, Samuel Bender.

46. A tract of land situate at Oscawana

Gardens, in the town of Putnam Valley.

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lots 18, 19, 20, on a map of lands of

Hudson Heights Development Corpora­

tion filed in Putnam County Clerk's Of­

fice. Assessed, Samuel Bender. Tax, 1934.

$5.00. Fire Tax, $0.08. Returned School

Tax, 1934, $1.48. Amount due, $18.37.

Supposed owner, Samuel Bender.

47. A tract of land with house thereon,

situate at Camp Lookout, in the town of

Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lot No. 91, on a map

of lands of Walter Clifford Company filed

in Putnam County Clerk's Office. As­

sessed, J. J. Butterly. Tax, 1934, $41.68.

Fire Tax, $0.64. Returned School Tax.

1934, $12.14. Amount due, $71.68. Sup­

posed owner, J. J. Butterly.

48. A tract of land situate at Camp

Lookout, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lot No. 141, on a map of Walter Clifford

Company filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office. Assessed, Harry K. Briggs. Tax,

1932. $4.35. Tax. 1933, $4.84. Fire Dis­

trict Tax, $0.04. Tax, 1934. $4.17. Fire Tax.

$0.06. Returned School Tax, 1934, $1.22.

Amount due, $26.91. Supposed owner,

Harry K. Briggs.

49. A tract of land with house thereon,

situate at Lake Peekskill, in the town of

Putnam Valley, Putnam County. New

York, known as Lots 45 to 47. inclusive.

BB23, Section C, on a map of lands of

McGolrick Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clem's Office. Assessed

Harold and Johanna Beers. Tax. 1934.

$25.01. Fire Tax, $0.39. Returned School

Tax. 1934, $7.29. Amount due, $45.82.

Supposed owners, Harold and Johanna

Beers.

50. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill. in the town of Putnam Valley.

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lots Nos. 208 to 210, inclusive. FB53.

Section G. on a map of McGolrick Realty

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office. Assessed, Catherine

Buyes. Tax, 1934. $5.00. Fire Tax. $0.07.

Amount due, $16.82. Supposed owner.

Catherine Buyes.

51. A tract of land with house thereon,

situate at Lake Peekskill, in the town of

Putnam Valley. Putnam County, New

York, known as part of Plots 7 and 8.

Section J, on amended map of McGolrick

Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office. Assessed, Hyman

and Frances Buc. Tax. 1934. $31.26. Fire

Tax. $0.48. Returned School Tax.. 1934.

$9.11. Amount due. $54.39. Supposed own­

ers, Hyman and Frances Buc.

52. A tract of land with house thereon,

located in the town of Putnam Valley.

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lot No. 3, on map of Oscawana Lake

Park Estate Map No. 59. filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office. Assessed, Chest­

nut Point Realty Company. Tax, 1934.

$50.02. Returned School Tax, 1934.

$14.57. Amount due, $82.31. Supposed

owner, Chestnut Point Realty Company.

53. A tract of land located in the town

of Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lot No. 5 on map of

Hilltop Estate Map No. 115, filed in Put­

nam County Clerk's Office. Assessed.

Joseph J. Collins. Tax. 1932. $3.26. Tax.

1933. $3.63. Returned School Tax. 1933.

$0.86. Tax. 1934. $3.12. Returned School

Tax. 1934, $0.91. Amount due. $23.86

Supposed owner. Joseph J. Collins.

54. A tract of land located in the town

of Putnam Valley. Putnam County, New

York, known as Lot No. 94, Abele Park.

on map of Wanagru Realty Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Assessed, William F. Cunningham. Tax.

1934. $8.34. Fire Tax. $0.13. Lighting Tax,

$1.79. Amount due. $22.27. Supposed

owner, William F. Cunningham.

55. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill, in the town of Putnam Val­

ley. Putnam County, New York, known

as Lots Nos. 75 and 76, Block 1. Section

A. on map of McGolrick Realty Cor­

poration filed ixi Putnam County Clerk's

Office. Assessed. Castomar Realty Cor­

poration. Tax, 1934. $5.21. Fire Tax. $0.08.

Returned School Tax, 1934, $1.52. Amount

due, $18.65. Supposed owner, Castomar

Realty Corporation.

56. A tract of land with house thereon,

situate at Lake Peekskill, in the town

of Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lots Nos. 158 and 159,

AB17, Section B, on map of McGolrick

Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office. Assessed, Hyman

Chulsky. Tax, 1934, $25.02. Fire Tax,

$0.38. Returned School Tax, 1934, $7.29.

Amount due, $45.82. Supposed owner,

Hyman Chulsky.

57. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lots Nos. 53 to 55, inclusive, BB28, Sec­

tion C. on map of McGolrick Realty Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office. Assessed, Francis S. Carrier. Tax,

1934. $5.00. Fire Tax. $0.08. Returned

School Tax, 1934, $1.46. Amount due,

$18.36. Supposed owner, Frances S. Car­

rier.

58. A tract of land with house there­

on, situate at Lake Peekskill, in the town

of Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lots Nos. 243 and 244,

FB53, Section G, on map of McGolrick

Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office. Assessed, Mary

Cronin. Tax, 1934. $22.93. Fire tax. $0.35.

Returned School Tax, 1934, $6.68. Amount

due, $42.95. Supposed owner, Mary Cro­

nin. •

59. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lots Nos. 112 to 114. EB60, Section F, on

map of McGolrick Realty Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Assessed, Joseph and Josephine Catta-

neo. Tax, 1933. $4.84. Fire Tax, $0.04. Tax,

1934, $4.17. Fire Tax, $0.07. Returned

School Tax. 1934, $1.22. Amount due.

$22.35. Supposed owners, Joseph and

Josephine Cattaneo.

60. A tract of land with house there­

on, situate at Lake Peekskill, in the

town of Putnam Valley, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots 13 to 15,

inclusive, FB72, Section G on map of

McGolrick Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office. Assessed,

James F. Connors. Tax. 1934, $14.59. Fire

Tax, $0.22. Returned School Tax, 1934,

$4.25. Amount due, $31.51. Supposed

owner, James F. Connors.

61. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lots Nos. 34 and 35, EB62, Section F, on

map of McGolrick Realty Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Assessed, John R. Curtin. Tax, 1933, $3.87.

Fire District Tax, $0.03. Tax, 1934. $3.33.

Fire Tax. $0.05. Returned School Tax,

1934, $0.97. Amount due, $20.16. Sup­

posed owner, John R. Curtin.

62. A tract of land with house there­

on, situate in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lot No. 21, bounded north by lands of

Parkway, east by lands of Ladd, south

by lands of Couch, west by Church lots.

Assessed, Julian Diez. Tax, 1934, $29.18.

Returned School Tax. 1934, $8.51.

Amount due, $51.07. Supposed owner,

Julian Diez.

64. A tract of land with house there­

on, situate at Abele Park, in the town

of Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lot No. 138 on a map

of Wanagru Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office. Asessed,

Paul G. Dennis. Tax, 1934, $25.01. Fire

Tax. $0.38. Lighting Tax, $5.36. Returned

School Tax, 1934, $7.29. Amount due,

$51.44. Supposed owner, Paul G. Dennis.

65. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lots Nos. 46 and 47, BB28. Section C. on

map of McGolrick Realty Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Assessed, Michael J. and Nora Doulon.

Tax, 1934. $6.67. Fire Tax. $0.10. Re­

turned School Tax. 1934, $1.94. Amount

due, $20.64. Supposed owners, Michael

J. and Nora Doulon.

66. A tract of land with house there­

on, situate at Lake Peekskill, in the town

of Putnam Valley. Putnam County. New

York, known as Lots Nos. 34 to 38, in­

clusive, BB27, Section C, on map of lands

of McGolrick Realty Corporation filed

in Putnam County Clerk's Office. As­

sessed, Domah Realty Corporation. Tax,

1934, $25.01. Fire Tax. $0.38. Returned

School Tax. 1934. $7.29. Amount due,

$45.81. Supposed owner, Domah Realty

Corporation.

67. A tract of land with house there­

on, situate at Lake Peekskill, in the town

of Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lots 3 and 4. BB27, Sec­

tion C, on map of lands of McGolrick

Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office. Assessed, Inga

Egnebretson and Sigrid Cameron. Tax,

1934. $20.84. Fire Tax. $0.32. Returned

School Tax, 1934, $6.08. Amount due,

$40.10. Supposed owners, Inga Egnebret­

son and Sigrid Cameron.

68. A tract of land situate at Abele

Park, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Lot

No. 102, on map of lands of Wanagru

Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office. Assessed. Harriet

E. Fenn. Tax, 1934, $6.25. Fire Tax. $0.10.

Lighting Tax. $1.34. Returned School

Tax. 1934. $1.82. Amount due. $21.48.

Supposed owner, Harriet E. Fenn.

69. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lots Nos. 25 to 27 inclusive. BB26. Sec­

tion C, on map of lands of McGolrick

Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office. Assessed, Charles

and Anna Farrell. Tax, 1933, $4.84. Fire

District Tax. $0.04. Tax. 1934. $5.00. Fire

Tax. $0.07. Returned School Tax. 1934,

$1.46. Amount due. $23.48. Supposed

owners, Charles and Anna Farrell.

70. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill, in the town of Putnam Val­

ley, Putnam County. New York, known

as Lots Nos. 117 and 118, EB. Section

F, on map of lands of McGolrick Realty

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office. Assessed. Charles E. Fish­

er. Jr. Tax. 1932, $3.48. Tax. 1934, $3.33.

Fire Tax. $0.05. Returned School Tax,

1934. $0.97. Amount due. $19.72. Sup­

posed owner. Charles E. Fisher. Jr.

71. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill. in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plot B. DB56. Section E, on map of lands

of McGolrick Realty Corporation filed

in Putnam County Clerk's Office. As­

sessed. Charles F. and Bayard Gardi-

nier. Tax. 1934. $12.50. Fire Tax. $0.19.

Amount due, $24.82. Supposed owners,

Charles F. and Bayard Gardinier.

72. A traot of land situate at Lake

Peekskill, in the town of Putnam Valley.

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lots Nos. 214 to 216, FB53, Section G, on

map of lands of McGolrick Realty Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office. Assessed, Lawrence F. Garry.

Tax, 1934, $5.00. Fire Tax, $0.08. Re­

turned School Tax, 1934, $1.46. Amount

due, $18.36. Supposed owner, Lawrence

F. Garry.

73. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lots 110 to 112, inclusive, AB17, Section

B, on map of lands of McGolrick Realty

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office. Assessed, Samuel Gold­

man. Tax, 1934, $5.00. Fire Tax, $0.08.

Returned School Tax. 1934. $1.46. Amount

due, $18.36. Supposed owner, Samuel

Goldman.

74. A tract of land situate at Camp

Lookout, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lot No. 188 on map of Walter Clifford

Company filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office. Assessed, T. L. Hallett. Tax, 1934,

$5.22. Fire Tax, $0.08. Returned School

Tax, 1934, $1.52. Amount due, $18.66.

Supposed owner, T. L. Hallett.

75. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill. in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lots Nos. 249 to 251, inclusive, and Lot

No. 253, FB53, Section G, on map of

lands of McGolrick Realty Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Assessed, Elizabeth Hart. Tax, 1934,

$8.34. Fire Tax, $0.13. Returned School

Tax, 1934, $2.43. Amount due, $22.94.

Supposed owner, Elizabeth Hart.

76. A tract of land with house thereon,

situate at Lake Peakskill, in the town

of Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lots 230A, 230B, 230C,

230D and 230E. Amended FB55, Section

G. on map of McGolrick Realty Corpo­

ration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office. Assessed, Elizabeth Hart. Tax.

1934, $83.36. Fire Tax, $1.28. Returned

School Tax, 1934, $24.30. Amount due,

$128.88. Supposed owner, Elizabeth Hart.

77. A tract of land with house thereon,

situate at Lake Peekskill, in the town of

Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lots Nos. 95 to 97, in­

clusive, BB13, Section C, on map of lands

of McGolrick Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office. Assessed,

Hyman Hemeyle. Tax, 1934, $27.09. Fire

Tax. $0.42. Returned School Tax, 1934.

$7.89. Amount due, $48.67. Supposed

owner, Hyman Hemeyle.

78. A tract of land with house thereon,

situate in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lot No. 25 on map of lands of Camp

Sunnybrook, Map No. 139C, Section 2,

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Assessed, Hollow Brook Realty Corpo­

ration. Tax, 1934, $20.84. Amount due,

$33.38. Supposed owner, Hollow Brook

Realty Corporation.

79. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lots Nos. 83 to 86, inclusive, B 52, on map

of lands of McGolrick Realty Corpora­

tion filed in Putnam County Clerk's Of­

fice. Assessed, Frank Iario. Tax, 1934,

$6.66. Fire Tax, $0.10. Returned School

Tax, 1934, $1.95. Amount due, $20.64.

Supposed owner, Frank Iario.

80. A tract of land with house thereon,

situate in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lot No. 3, on map of Hilltop Estate, filed

in Putnam County Clerk's Office. As­

sessed, Howard James. Tax, 1934, $37.51.

Returned School Tax, 1934, $10.94.

Amount due, $62.37. Supposed owner,

Howard James.

81. A tract of land situate in the town

of Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lots Nos. 96 and 97 on

map of lands of Breezy Point Park filed

in Putnam County Clerk's Office. As­

sessed, Louise Johnson. Tax, 1934. $4.17.

Fire Tax, $0.06. Returned School Tax,

1934, $1.22. Amount due, $17.22. Sup­

posed owner, Louse Johnson.

82. A tract of land situate in the town

of Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lots Nos. 98 and 99 on

map of lands of Breezy Point Park filed

in Putnam County Clerk's Office. As­

sessed, Louise Johnson. Tax, 1934, $4.17.

Fire Tax, $0.06. Returned School Tax,

1934. $1.22. Amount due, $17*.22. Sup­

posed owner, Louise Johnson.

83. A tract of land situate in the town

of Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lots 122 and 123 on

map of lands of Breezy Point Park filed

in Putnam County Clerk's Office. As­

sessed, Louise Johnson. Tax, 1934, $4.17.

Fire Tax. $0.06. Returned School Tax,

1934. $1.22. Amount due, $17.22. Supposed

owner. Louise Johnson.

84. A tract of land situate in the town

of Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lots 124 and 125 on map

of lands of Breezy Point Park filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office. Assessed,

Louise Johnson. Tax. 1934. $4.17. Fire

Tax. $0.07. Returned School Tax. 1934.

$1.22. Amount due, $17.23. Supposed

owner, Louise Johnson.

85. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County. New York, known as

Lots Nos. 119 to 121. inclusive, DB56, Sec­

tion E, on map of lands of McGolrick

Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office. Assessed, Henry

Jagles. Tax. 1934. $12.50. Fire Tax. $0.19.

Returned School Tax. 1934, $3.65. Amount

due. $28.65. Supposed owner, Henry

Jagles.

86. A tract of land situate at Osca­

wana Gardens, in the town of Putnam

Valley, Putnam County, New York,

known as Lots Nos. 15. 16. 17 and 18,

Block 4, on map of lands of Hudson

Heights Development Corporation filed

in Putnam County Clerk's Office. As­

sessed, Irving and Harry Katz. Tax, 1934,

$8.34. Fire Tax. $0.13. Returned School

Tax. 1934, $2.43. Amount due. $22.94.

Supposed owners. Irving and Harry

Katz.

87. A tract of land situate at Oscawana

Gardens, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County. New York, known as

Lots Nos. 15 and 17. Block 7. on map of

lands of Hudson Heights Development

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk"s Office. Assessed. Irving and

Harry Katz. Tax. 1934. $4.17. Fire Tax.

$0.07. Returned School Tax, 1934, $1.22.

Amount due. $17.23. Supposed owners.

Irving and Harry Katz.

88. A tract of land situate at Oscawana

Gardens, in the town of Putnam Valley.

Putnam County. New York, known as

Lots 16 and 18. Block 7, on map of lands

of Hudson Heights Development Corpo­

ration filled in Putnam County Clerk's

Office. Assessed. Irving and Harry Katz.

Tax. 1934. $4.17. Fire Tax. $0.06. Re­

turned School Tax. 1934, $122. Amount

due $17.22. Supposed owners, Irving and

Harry Katz.

89. A tract of land situate at Osca­

wana Gardens, in the town of Putnam

Valley, Putnam County, New York,

known as Lots 10, 12 and 14, Block 10,

on map of lands of Hudson Heights De­

velopment Corporation filed In Putnam

County Clerk's Office. Assessed, Irving

and Harry Katz. Tax, 1934, $6.25. Fire

Tax. $0.10. Returned School Tax, 1934,

$1.82. Amount due, $20.08. Supposed

owners, Irving and Harry Katz.

90. A tract of land situate at Oscawana

Gardens, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lots 11, 13 and 15, Block 10, on map of

lands of Hudson Heights Development

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office. Assessed. Irving and

Harry Katz. Tax. 1934. $6.25. Fire Tax,

$0.10. Returned School Tax, 1934. $1.82.

Amount due. $20.08. Supposed owners,

Irving and Harry Katz.

91. A tract of land with house thereon,

situate in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lot No. 9, on map of lands of Wildwood

Knolls filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office. Assessed. Anthony Kalliche. Tax,

1934. $33.34. Fire Tax. $0.51. Returned

School Tax. 1934, $9.72. Amount due,

$57.24. Supposed owner, Anthony Kal­

liche.

92. A tract of land with house there­

on, situate at Oscawana Lake East, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lot No.

123 on map of lands of Wanagru Realty

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office. Assessed, Edna Kretzer.

Tax. 1934. $33.34. Returned School Tax,

1934, $9.72. Amount due, $56.71. Sup­

posed owner, Edna Kretzer.

93. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill, in the town of Putnam Val­

ley, Putnam County. New York, known

as Lots 23 and 24. BB25. Section C. on

map of lands of McGolrick Realty Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office. Assessed, Frank and Augusta

Keller. Tax, 1933, $3.63. Fire District

Tax. $0.03. Tax, 1934, $3.33. Fire Tax,

$0.05. Returned School Tax, 1934. $0.97.

Amount due, $19.91. Supposed owners,

Frank and Augusta Keller.

94. A tract of land situate in the town

of Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lot No. 22, bounded

north by Cold Spring Road, east by

lands of Zipfel, south by lands of Couch,

west by lands of Diez. Assessed, Heirs

of N. W. Ladd. Tax, 1934. $4.17. Returned

School Tax, 1934, $1.22. Amount due.

$17.15. Supposed owners, Heirs of N. W.

Ladd.

95. A tract of land situate in the town

of Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lot No. 27, bounded

north by lands of Ladd, east by lands

of Ahearns, south by Cold Spring Road,

west by Parkway. Assessed, Heirs of N.

W. Ladd. Tax, 1934, $8.34. Returned

School Tax. 1934. $2.43. Amount due.

$22.80. Supposed owners, Heirs of N. W.

Ladd. .

96. A tract of land situate in the town

of Putnam Valley. Putnam County, New

York, known as Lot No. 31, bounded

north by lands of Cox, east by lands of

Stahl, south by lands of Pearse, west by

Parkway. Assessed. Heirs of N. W. Ladd.

Tax. 1934. $4.17. Returned School Tax.

1934. $1.22. Amount due. $17.15. Sup­

posed owners, Heirs of N. W. Ladd.

97. A tract of land situate in the

town of Putnam Valley, Putnam County,

New York, known as Lot No. 28, bound­

ed north by lands of Cox, east by lands

of Ahearns, south by lands of Ladd, west

by Parkway. Assessed, Heirs of N. W.

Ladd. Tax, 1934. $4.17. Returned School

Tax, 1934. $1.22. Amount due, $17.15.

Supposed owners, Heirs of N. W. Ladd.

98. A tract of land situate in the town

of Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lot No. 1 on map of

lands of Hilltop Estate filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office. Assessed. Wilbur

D. Lockwood. Tax, 1934, $12.50. Fire Tax,

$0.19. Returned School Tax, 1934, $3.65.

Amount due, $28.65. Supposed owner,

Wilbur D. Lockwood.

99. A tract of land situate in the town

of Putnam Valley. Putnam County, New

York, known as Lot No. 23 on map of

lands of Hilltop Estate filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office. Assessed. Samuel

Lewis. Tax. 1934, $6.25. Fire Tax, $0.10.

Returned Sehool Tax, 1934. $1.82.

Amount due. $20.07. Supposed owner,

Samuel Lewis.

100. A tract of land with house there­

on, situate at Lake Peekskill. in the

town of Putnam Valley, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lot No. 233,

FB55, Section G, on map of lands of

McGolrick Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office. Assessed,

Marguerite L. Lavois. Tax, 1934, $22.93.

Fire Tax. $0.35. Returned School Tax.

1934, $6.69. Amount due. $42.96. Supposed

owner, Marguerite L. Lavois.

101. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County. New York, known as

Lots Nos. 153 to 160. inclusive. EB60,

Section F. on map of lands of McGolrick

Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office. Assessed. Leonard

Larson. Tax. 1934. $10.42. Fire Tax. $0.16.

Returned School Tax. 1934. $3.04.

Amount due. $25.80. Supposed owner.

Leonard Larson.

105. A track of land with shack there­

on, situate at Oscawana Lake East, in

the town of Putnam Valley. Putnam

County. New York, known as Lot No.

92, on map of lands of Wanagru Realty

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office. Assessed. John F. and

Anna E. McCormack. Tax, 1934, $12.50.

Returned School Tax, 1934, $3.65.

Amount due. $28.46. Supposed owners,

John F. and Anna E. McCormack.

106. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill. in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County. New York, known as

Lots Nos. 59 to 62. Bl. Section A. on map

of lands of McGolrick Realty Corpora­

tion filed in Putnam County Clerk's Of­

fice. Assessed. Anthony Mairone. Tax,

1934. $6.67. Fire Tax, $0.10. Amount due.

$18.60. Supposed owner, Anthony Mai­

rone.

107. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County. New York, known as

Lots Nos. 4 to 6, inclusive, B2, Section A.

on map of lands of McGolrick Realty

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office. Assessed. Angeline Mag-

gio. Tax. 1934. $5.00. Fire Tax. $0.07.

Amount due. $16.82. Supposed owner.

Angeline Maggio.

108. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill, in the town of Putnam Valley.

Putnam County. New York, known as

Lots No*. 139 and 140, B2. Section A.

on map of lands of McGolrick Realty

Corporation. Assessed, Massapequa Real­

ty Corporation. Tax, 1933, $3.87. Fire Tax,

$0.03. Tax, 1934, $3.33. Fire Tax, $0.05.

Returned School Tax, 1934, $0.97. Amount

due, $20.16. Supposed owner, Massapequa

Realty Corporation.

109. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill, in the town of Putnam Val­

ley, Putnam County, New York, known

as Lots Nos. 1 to 5, DB55, Section E.

on map of lands of McGolrick Realty

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office. Assessed, Anita McGuin-

ness. Tax, 1933, $9.68. Fire Tax, $0.09.

Tax, 1934, $8.34. Fire Tax, $0.13. Returned

School Tax, 1934, $2.43. Amount due.

$25.00. Supposed owner, Anita McGuin-

ness.

110. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill, in the town of Putnam Valley.

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lots Nos. 1 and 2, FB72, Section G, on

map of lands of McGolrick Realty Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office. Assessed, Massapequa Reauy

Corporation. Tax, 1933, $3.87. Fire Tax.

$0.03. Tax, 1934, $3.33. Fire Tax. $0.05.

Returned School Tax, 1934, $0.97.

Amount due, $20.16. Supposed owner,

Massapequa Realty Corporation.

111. A tract of land with house there­

on, situate at Lake Peekskill, in the

town of Putnam Valley, Putnam County,

New York, known as Lots Nos. 107 to 109.

AB17, Section B, on map of lands of Mc­

Golrick Realty Corporation. Assessed, I.

Melnick. Tax, 1934, $25.01. Fire Tax.

$0.38. Returned School Tax, 1934, $7.29.

Amount due, $45.81. Supposed owner, I.

Melnick.

112. A tract of land with shack there­

on, situate in the town of Putnam Val­

ley, Putnam County, New York, known

as Lot No. 5, on map of Hilltop Estate

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Assessed, Henry Naybor. Tax, 1934.

$12.50. Amount due. $24.63. Supposed

owner, Henry Naybor.

1!3. A tract of land situate at Camp

Lookout, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lots Nos. 198 and 199 on map of lands

of Walter Clifford Company filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office. Assessed,

Mrs. F. N. Norris. Tax. 1933, $7.26. Fire

Tax, $0.06. Returned School Tax, 1933,

$1.72. Tax, 1934, $7.50. Fire Tax, $0.11.

Returned School Tax, 1934, $2.18.

Amount due, $31.


PAG1 FOUR THE BREWSTER STANDARD — ESTABLISHED 1869 FRIDAY, MAY 14J 1937

141. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lots Nos. 303 to 306, inclusive, FB53, Sec­

tion G, on a map of lands of McGolrick

Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office. Assessed, Mildred

Vaccaro. Tax, 1934, $6.67. Fire Tax, $0.10.

Returned School Tax, 1934, $1.95. Amount

due, $20.65. Supposed owner, Mildred

Vaccaro.

142. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

three-quarters of Lot 244, FB55, Section

G, on map of lands of McGolrick Realty

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office. Assessed, Bernard Volk-

ery. Tax. 1934, $6.25. Fire Tax, $0.10. Re­

turned School Tax, 1934, $1.82. Amount

due. $20.08. Supposed owner, Bernard

Volkery.

143. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lots 35 and 36, EB60, Section F, on map

of lands of McGolrick Realty Corpora­

tion filed in Putnam County Clerk's Of­

fice. Assessed, John Vargo. Tax, 1933, $3.-

87. Fire Tax. $0.03. Tax. 1934, $3.33. Fire

Tax, $0.05. Returned School Tax, 1934,

$0.97. Amount due, $20.16. Supposed

owner, John Vargo.

144. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill. in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lots Nos. 43 and 44, EB73. Section F, on

map of lands of McGolrick Realty Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office. Assessed, Harold Valentine. Tax,

1933, $3.87. Fire Tax, $0.03. Tax, 1934,

$3.34. Fire Tax. $0.05. Returned School

Tax, 1934, $0.97. Amount due, $20.17.

Supposed owner, Harold Valentine.

145. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lot No. 88, EB62, Section F, on map of

lands of McGolrick Realty Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Assessed, Harold Valentine. Tax. 1933,

$1.94. Fire Tax, $0.02. Tax, 1934, $1.67.

Fire Tax, $0.02. Returned School Tax,

1934. $0.48. Amount due, $15.83. Supposed

owner, Harold Valentine.

146. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lots 1 and 2, CB59, Section D, on map of

lands of McGolrick Realty Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Assessed, Harold Valentine. Tax, 1933,

$2.90. Fire Tax, $0.03. Tax, 1934, $2.50.

Fire Tax, $0.04. Returned School Tax,

1934, $0.73. Amount due, $18.01. Supposed

owner, Harold Valentine.

147. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lots Nos. 109 and 110, CB59, Section D,

on map of lands of McGolrick Realty

Corporation filed in» Putnam County

Clerk's office. Assessed, Harold Valen­

tine. Tax, 1933, $2.90. Fire Tax. $0.03.

Tax, 1934. $2.50. Fire Tax, $0.04. Re­

turned School Tax, 1934, $0.72. Amount

due, $17.99. Supposed owner, Harold

Valentine.

148. A tract of land situate at Osca-

wana Lake East, in the town of Putnam

Valley, Putnam County, New York,

known as Lot No. 59, on map of Wanagru

Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office. Assessed, John B.

Walsh or J. Gillette. Tax. 1934. $6.25.

Returned School Tax, 1934, $1.82. Amount

due, $19.97. Supposed owners, John B.

Walsh or J. Gillette.

149. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill. in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lots Nos. 88 and 89, AB7, Section B, on

map of lands of McGolrick Realty Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office. Assessed, Boris Werman. Tax,

1933, $4.84. Fire Tax, $0.04. Tax, 1934,

$4.17. Fire Tax. $0.06. Returned School

Tax, 1934, $1.22. Amount due, $22.34.

Supposed owner, Boris Werman.

150. A tract of land with house there­

on, situate at Lake Peekskill, in the town

of Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lots Nos. 30 and 31,

DB52, Section E, on map of lands of

McGolrick Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office. Assessed,

S. Wangerein. Tax, 1934, $20.84. Fire Tax,

$0.32. Returned School Tax, 1934, $6.08.

Amount due, $40.10. Supposed owner, S.

Wangereki.

151. A tract of land situate at Osca-

wana Lake East, in the town of Putnam

Valley, Putnam County, New York,

known as house and Lot No. 51, on map

of lands of Wanagru Realty Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Assessed, Danagru Realty Corporation.

Tax, 1932, $30.42. Returned School Tax,

1932, $7.49. Tax, 1933, $33.88. Returned

School Tax, 1932, $10.11. Returned SclTool

Tax, 1933, $5.24. Tax, 1934, $29.18. Re­

turned School Tax, 1934, $8.51. Amount

due, $145.57. Supposed owner, Wanagru

Realty Corporation.

152. A tract of land with house there­

on, situate at Abele Park, in the town of

Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lot No. 97, on map of

lands of Wanagru 'Realty Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Assessed, Wanagru Realty Corporation.

Tax, 1932, $32.60. Returned School Tax,

1931. $6.61. Tax, 1934, $29.18. Fire Tax.

$0.45. Lighting Tax. $6.25. Returned

School Tax. 1934. $8.51. Amount due,

$102.28. Supposed owner, Wanagru

Realty Corporation.

153. A tract of land with house there­

on, situate at Abele Park, in the town of

Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lot No. 148. on map of

lands of Wanagru Realty Corporation

hied in Putnam County Clerk's Oflice.

Assessed, Wanagru Realty Corporation.

Tax. 1933. $48.40. Lighting District Tax.

$8.98. Fire District Tax, $0.42. Returned

School Tux. 1932. $0.03. Returned School

Tax. 1933. $11.45. Tax. 1934. $41.08. Fire

Tax, $0.64. Lighting Tax, $8.93. Returned

School Tax, 1934, $12.14. Amount due.

$160.73. Supposed owner, Wanagru

Realty Corporation.

154. A tract of land with house there­

on, situate at Lake Peekskill. in the town

of Putnam Valley. Putnam County. New

York, known as Lots No. 203 and 204.

DB56. Section E. on map of lands of

McGolrick Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office. Assessed,

Joseph G. Zeig. Tax, 1933. $33.88. Fire

Tax. $0.29. Returned School Tax. 1933,

$3.47. Amount due, $54.02. Supposed

owner. Joseph G. Zeig.

155. A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lots No6. 5 to 7, inclusive, FB56, Section

G. on map of lands of McGolrick Realty

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office. Assessed, Joseph Zeig.

Tax, 1934. $5.00. Fire Tax, $0.08. Re­

turned School Tax, 1934, $1.46. Amount

due. $18.36. Supposed owner. Joseph

Zeig.

156. A tract of land situate at Osca-

wana Lake East, in the town of Putnam

Valley, Putnam County, New York,

known as Lot No. 12, bounded north by

lands of R. C. Church, south by lands of

Tompkins, east by lands of Tompkins,

west by Oscawana Lake Association.

Assessed, Carrie L. Tompkins. Tax, 1934,

$6.25. Fire Tax, $0.10. Amount due, $18.16.

Supposed owner, Carrie L. Tompkins.

157. Lots located at Camp Lookout, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

60. 61, 62, 63, 64, 75. 76. 77, 78, 100, 101,

102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108. 109, 110.

Ill, 112, 113, 114. 115, 202, 204, 205. 206.

207, 208, 265, 266, 269, 277, 278, 279, 280, on

map of Walter Clifford Company filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 121A. Assessed, Walter Clifford Com­

pany. Tax, 1933, $135.76. Fire District

Tax. $1.17. Returned School Tax, 1932.

$18.60. Amount due. $177.80. Supposed

owner. Walter Clifford Company.

158. Lots located at Camp Lookout, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

4. 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19,

20, 21, 22. 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, on map of

Walter Clifford Company filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

121D. Assessed, Walter Clifford Com­

pany. Tax, 1933,182.71. Fire District Tax.

$1.60. Returned School Tax, 1932, $27.12.

Amount due, $236.50. Supposed owner,

Walter Clifford Company.

159. Lots located at Camp Lookout,

in the town of Putnam Valley. Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

5, 6. 7, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21,

26,27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33,34,35, 36, 37, 38,

39, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52,

53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64.

65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 80.

81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92.

93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103,

104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 114,

115, Dock & 9, on map of Walter Clifford

Company filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 121E. Assessed.

Walter Clifford Company, Tax, 1933,

$158.52. Fire District Tax, $1.28. Returned

School Tax, 1932, $21.29. Amount due.

$204.64. Supposed owner, Walter Clifford

Company.

160. Lots located at Camp Lookout, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 27, 28, 29, 30, 40.

41, 42, 43, 44, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55,

56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 75, 76, 77,

78, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 100, 107,

108. 109, 110. Ill, !12, 113, 114, 115. 202,

204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 265, 266, 269, 277,

278. 279, 280, on map of Walter Clifford

Company filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 121A. Assessed,

Walter Clifford Company. Tax, 1934,

$183.93. Fire District Tax, $2.81. Re­

turned School Tax, 1933, $47.95. Re­

turned School Tax, 1934, $52.91. Amount

due, $316.48. Supposed owner, Walter

Clifford Company.

161. Lots located at Camp Lookout, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

4. 5. 6, 8. 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19.

20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, on map of

lands of Walter Clifford Company filed

in Putnam County Clerk's Office under

File No. 121D. Assessed, Walter Clifford

Company. Tax, 1934, $163.43. Fire Dis­

trict Tax, $2.54. Returned School Tax.

1933. $30.98. Returned School Tax. 1934.

$46.39. Amount due, $270.00. Supposed

owner, Walter Clifford Company.

162. Lots located at Camp Lookout, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21,

28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39,

40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51,

52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63.

64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75,

80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91,

92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102.

103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111.

114. 115, on map of lands of Walter Clif­

ford Company filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 121. As­

sessed, Walter Clifford Company. Tax.

1934, $118.93. Fire District Tax, $1.86. Re­

turned School Tax, 1933, $31.73. Returned

School Tax, 1934, $34.47. Amount due,

$210.83. Supposed owner, Walter Clifford

Company.

163. Lot located at Camp Lookout, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as PIo: B

on map of Walter Clifford Company

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office

under Map No. 121A. Assessed, Walter

Clifford Company. Tax, 1934, $6.25. Fire

District Tax, $0.09. Returned S-.-hool Tax.

1933. $1.14. Returned School Tax. 1934.

$1.82. Amount due, $21.26. Supposed own­

er, Walter Clifford Company.

164. Dock and Lot No. 9. at Camp

Lookout, in the town of Putnam Val­

ley, Putnam County, New York, on map

of Walter Clifford Company filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 121A. Assessed, Walter Clifford Com­

pany. Tax, 1934, $20.84. Fire District Tax.

$0.32. Returned School Tax. 1933. $5.72

Returned School Tax. 1934. $6.08. Amount

due. $46.10. Supposed owner, Walter Clif­

ford Company.

165. Lot of land and pump house, at

Camp Lookout, in the town of Putnam

Valley, Putnam County, New York, on

map of Walter Clifford Company filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 121 A. Assessed. Walter Clifford Com­

pany. Tax. 1934. $4.17. Fire District Tax.

$0.06. Returned School Tax. 1933. $1.22.

Amount due, $17.22. Supposed owner.

Walter Clifford Company.

100. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County. New York, known as Lots Nos.

53 and 54. Block 23. Section C. on map

of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 185. Assessed, Os­

car and Margaret Aanonsea. Tax. 1932.

$3.48. Amount due, $15.15. Supposed own­

ers, Oscar and Margaret Aanon.sea.

167. Lot situate at Camp Lookout, m

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County. New York, known as Lot No.

189, on map of Walter Clifford Company

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office

under File No. 121 A. Assessed. Abbey

Forbes Chapin. Tax. 1932. $4.34. Amount

due. $16.05. Supposed owner, Abbey

Forbes Chapin.

168. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill.

in the town of Putnam Valley. Putnam

County. New York, known as Lots Nos.

7. 8. 9 and *& of 10. Block 13, Section B

on map of lands of Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No. 185.

Assessed. Lake Peekskill Country Homes,

Incorporated. Tax, 1932, $3.26. Tax, 1933.

$4.36. Fire District Tax, $0.04. Returned

School Tax, 1932, $0.39. Returned School

Tax, 1933, $0.40. Tax, 1934, $3.75. Fire

District Tax, $0.07. Returned School Tax.

1934, $1.08. Amount due, $25.52. Supposed

owner. Lake Peekskih Country Homes,

Incorporated.

169. Lots of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Lots

Nos. 104, 105, 106, 107, 114, 115, 116, Block

No. 15, Section B, on map of lands of

Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation filed

in Putnam County Clerk's Office under

File No. 185. Assessed, Lake Peekskill

Country Homes, Incorporated. Tax, 1932,

$9.13. Amount due, $21.08. Supposed own­

er. Lake Peekskill Country Homes, In­

corporated.

170. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

104, 105, 106, 107, 114, 115, 116, 123, 124.

125. 126, 127, 128, 129, 130. 131, Block 15,

Section B, on map of lands of Lake

Peekskill Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under

File No. 185. Assessed, Lake Peekskill

Country Homes, Incorporated. Tax, 1933,

$18.88. Fire Tax, $0.16. Returned School

Tax, 1932, $1.84. Returned School Tax,

1933, $2.13. Amount due, $35.66. Supposed

owner, Lake Peekskill Country Homes,

Incorporated.

171. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

123, 124, 125, Block 15, Section B, on map

of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 185. Assessed, Lake

Peekskill Country Homes, Incorporated.

Tax, 1934, $2.50. Fire Tax, $0.03. Returned

School Tax, 1934, $0.75. Amount due,

$14.94. Supposed owner, Lake Peekskill

Country Homes, Incorporated.

172. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

48, 49 and part of 50, Block 20, Section C,

on map of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 185. As­

sessed, Lake Peekskill Country Homes,

Incorporated. Tax, 1934, $1.81. Fire Tax,

$0.03. Returned School Tax, 1934, $0.54.

Amount due, $14.08. Supposed owner,

Lake Peekskill Country Homes, Incor­

porated.

173. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15. 16.

17. 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28,

29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34. 35, 36. 37, 38, 39, 40,

41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47. 48, 49, 50. 51, 52,

53. 54. 55, 56, 57, 58, 100, Block 19. Sec­

tion C, on map of lands of Lake Peeks-

kill Realty Corporation filed.in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No. 185.

Assessed, Lake Peekskill Country Homes,

Incorporated. Tax, 1934. $35.09. Fire Tax,

$0.56. Returned School Tax, 1934, $10.10.

Amount due, $59.53. Supposed owner,

Lake Peekskill Country Homes, Incor­

porated.

174. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

16, 17, 18, 19. 31, 32. 33. 34. 35, 36, 37. 38.

39, 44, 45, 46. 1, 2. 3, Block No. 14, Sec­

tion B, on map of lands of Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No. 185.

Assessed, McGolrick Realty Corporation.

Tax, 1932, $21.27. Amount due. $33.83.

Supposed owner, Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation.

175. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40. 41, 42, 69, 70,

73, 74, 86. 87, 88, 89, Block 15. Section B,

on map of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 185. As­

sessed, McGolrick Realty Corporation.

Tax, 1932, $18.64. Amount due. $31.13.

Supposed owner, Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation.

176. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

139, 140, 141, 158, 159, 160, 161, 184, 185,

180, Block 17, Section B, on map of lands

of Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office

under File No. 185. Assessed McGolrick

Realty Corporation. Tax, 1932, $6.50.

Amount due, $18.32. Supposed owner.

Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation.

177. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

60, 61, 67, 68. 69, 70. Block 23. Section C.

on map of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 185. As­

sessed. McGolrick Realty Corporation.

Tax, 1932, $3.48. Amount due, $15.15. Sup­

posed owner. Lake Peekskill Realty Cor­

poration.

178. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill. in

the town of Putnam Valley. Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

1. 2. and 20, Block 24. Section C. on map

of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 185. Assessed. Mc­

Golrick Realty Corporation. Tax. 1932.

$1.29. Amount due, $12.85. Supposed own-,

er. Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation.

179. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill. in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

1. 2, 3. 4. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 31. 32. 45. 46.

50. 51. 52. 53. 54. Block 25. Section C. on

map of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerks Office under File No. 185. As­

sessed. McGolrick Realty Corporation.

Tax. 1932. $8.65. Amount due. $20.58. Sup­

posed owner, Lake Peekskill Realty Cor­

poration.

180. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill. in

the town of Putnam Valley. Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

4. 5. 6, 7. 8. 9, 10. 11. 12, 25. 26, 27. 50.

51. 52. 53. Block 26. Section C, on map

of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 185. Assessed. Mc­

Golrick Realty Corporation. Tax. 1932.

$7.01. Amount due. $18.86. Supposed own­

er, Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation.

181. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

22. 23. 24. 25. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32, 33. 34.

35. 30. 37. 38, 42. 43. 44. 45. 49. 50. 51. 52.

59. 60. 70. 71. 72. Block 27. Section C. on

map of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 185. As­

sessed. McGolrick Realty Corporation.

Tax. 1932. $16.04. Amount due. $28.34.

Supposed owner. Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation.

182. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

5, 6, 7, 8, 18, 19. 20, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29,

30. 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55,

59, 60, 61. 62. 81. 82, 83, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96,

97. 98. 124. 126. 126, 127. 128. 129, 130, 131,

132, 133, Block 28, Section C, on map of

lands of Lake Peakskill Realty Corpora­

tion filed in Putnam County Clerk's Of­

fice under File No. 185. Assessed, Mc­

Golrick Realty Corporation. Tax. 1932,

$32.82. Amount due, $45.96. Supposed

owner, Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion.

183. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

town of Putnam Valley, Putnam County,

New York, known as Lots Nos. 9, 10, 11,

18, 19, 20, Block 29, Section C, on map

of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 185. Assessed, Mc­

Golrick Realty Corporation. Tax, 1932,

$3.24. Amount due, $14.90. Supposed

owner, Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion. .

184. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

9, 10, Block 30, Section C, on map of

lands of Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 185. Assessed, Mc­

Golrick Realty Corporation. Tax, 1932,

$1.30. Amount due, $12.86. Supposed

owner, Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion.

185. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61,

62, 63, Block 32, Section C, on map of

lands of Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 185. Assessed, Mc­

Golrick Realty Corporation. Tax, 1932,

$10.86. Amount due, $22.90. Supposed

owner, Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion.

186. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

1 and 2, Block 59, Section D, on map of

lands of Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 185. Assessed, Mc­

Golrick Realty Corporation. Tax, 1932,

$0.88. Amount due, $12.42. Supposed

owner, Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion.

187. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

213 and 214, Block 60, Section D, on map

of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 185. Assessed, Mc­

Golrick Realty Corporation. Tax, 1932,

$0.86. Amount due, $12.40. Supposed

owner, Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion.

188. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

102, 103, 137, 138. Block 1, Section A,

on map of lands of Lake Peeksill Realty

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office, under File No. 185. As­

sessed, McGolrick Realty Corporation.

Tax. 1932. $9.13. Amount due, $21.13.

.Supposed owner, Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation.

189. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

7. 8, 26, 27, 49, 50, 60. 61, 99, 100, 101, 102,

103, 104, 121, 122, 123, Block 2. Section

A, on map of lands of Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

185. Assessed, McGolrick Realty Cor­

poration. Tax, 1932, $19.57. Amount due,

$32.04. Supposed owner, Lake Peekskiil

Realty Corporation.

190. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

39. 40. 98, 99, 100, 118, 119, 160, 161,

162, 163, 164, 167, 168 169, 174, 175, 176,

177, 178, Block 3, Section A, on map of

lands of Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 185. Assessed, Mc­

Golrick Realty Corporation. Tax, 1932,

$33.90. Amount due, $47.09. Supposed

owner, Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion.

191. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

1, 2, 48, 49, Block 4, Section A, on map

of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 185. Assessed, Mc­

Golrick Realty Corporation. Tax, 1932,

$6.08. Amount due. $17.88. Supposed

owner, Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion.

192. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

12. 13. 78. 33. 34, 35, 36. 37, 38, 79, 98,

99, 100, 101, 146, 147, 151, 152, Block 5,

Section A. on map of lands of Lake

Peekskill Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 185. Assessed. McGolrick Realty Cor­

poration. Tax. 1932, $34.32. Amount due,

$47.53. Supposed owner. Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation.

193. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley. Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

9. 10. 55. 56. 88. 89. Block 7. Section

B. on map of lands of Lake Peeks-

kill Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

185. Assessed. McGolrick Realty Corpo­

ration. Tax. 1932. $9.50. Amount due.

$21.53. Supposed owner, Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation.

194. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

08 and 69. Block 8. Section B. on map

of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Oflice under File No. 185. Assessed, Mc­

Golrick Realty Corporation. Tax. 1932.

$2.01. Amount due. $14.24. Supposed

owner. Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion.

195. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill. in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

24. 25. 26, Block 12, Section B, on map

of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 185. Assessed, Mc­

Golrick Realty Corporation. Tax, 1932,

$3.27. Amount due. $14.97. Supposed

owner, Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion.

196. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley. Putnam

County. New York, known as Lots Nos.

37, 38. 39. Block 51. Section E. on map

of lands of McGolrick Realty Corpora­

tion filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 185. Assessed, Mc­

Golrick Realty Corporation. Tax, 1932,

$2.18. Amount due, $13.78. Supposed

owner, Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion.

197. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

40, 41, 64, 65, 66, 83, 84, 85, 86, 110, 111,

142, 143, 144, Block 52, Section E, on

map of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 185. As­

sessed. McGolrick Realty Corporation.

Tax, 1932, $9.56. Amount due, $21.53.

Supposed owner. Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation.

198. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

64, 65, 133, 134. 135. 136, 351, 352, 353, 361,

362. 408, 409, 410, 441, 442, 461, 462, 463,

Block 53, Section E. on map of lands of

Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation filed

in Putnam County Clerk's Office under

File No. 185. Assessed, McGolrick Realty

Corporation. Tax, 1932, $15.43. Amount

due. $27.79. Supposed owner. Lake Peeks-

kill Realty Corporation.

199. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

185, 186, 208, 209, 210, 217, 218, 219, 220,

221, 222, Block 53, Section G, on map of

lands of Lake Peekskill Realty Corpor­

ation filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 185. Assessed, Mc­

Golrick Realty Corporation. Tax, 1932,

$10.63. Amount due. $22.66. Supposed

owner. Lake Peeksill Realty Corpora­

tion.

200. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill. in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

3, 4, 23, 24, 30, 31, 38. 37, 50, 51, 108,

111, 112. 113. 114. Block 54, Section

E, on map of lands of Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No. 185.

Assessed, McGolrick Realty Corpora­

tion. Tax. 1932, $13.71. Amount due.

$25.89. Supposed owner. Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation.

201. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill. in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

118, 119, 120, 121, 135, 136, Block 55, Sec­

tion E, on map of lands of Lake Peeks-

kill Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No. 185.

Assessed, McGolrick Realty Corporation.

Tax, 1932, $4.78. Amount due. $16.51. Sup­

posed owner. Lake Peekskill Realty Cor­

poration.

202. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

216 and 248. House & Lot No. 233. Block

55, Section G, on map of lands of Lake

Peekskill Realty Corporation filed in Put­

nam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 185. Assessed, McGolrick Realty Cor­

poration. Tax, 1932, $39.33. Amount due.

$52.79. Supposed owner, Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation.

203. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

16, 17, 18.19, 20, 21, 37, 38, 46, 47. 48. Block

56, Section G, on map of lands of Lake

Peekskill Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 185. Assessed, McGolrick Realty

Corporation. Tax, 1932, $10.65. Amount

due, $22.68. Supposed owner, Lake Peeks-

kill Realty Corporation.

204. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

66 and 67, Block 58, Section F, on map

of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 185. Assessed, Mc­

Golrick Really Corporation. Tax. 1932.

$1.30. Amount due, $12.80. Supposed own­

er, Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation.

205. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

112. 113. 114. 115. 110. 29. 30, 31. Block

60. Section F, on map of lands of Lake

Peekskill Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Oflice under File

No. 185. Assessed, McGolrick Realty Cor­

poration. Tax, 1932. $4.99. Amount due,

$16.73. Supposed owner, Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation.

206. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

23, 24, 25, 26, Block 61. Section F, on

map of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 185. As­

sessed, McGolrick Realty Corporation.

Tax, 1932. $3.26. Amount due. $14.88. Sup­

posed owner, Lake Peekskill Realty Cor­

poration.

207. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill. in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

19. 20. 21. 22. 61. 62. 63, 64. 65. 88, Block

62, Section F. on map of lands of Lake

Peekskill Realty Corporation filed in Put­

nam County Clerk's Oflice under File

No. 185. Assessed. McGolrick Realty Cor­

poration. Tax. 1932, $7.38. Amount due.

$19.34. Supposed owner. Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation.

208. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill. in

the town of Putnam Valley. Putnam

County. New York, known as Lots Nos.

145 and 146. Block 62. Section G. on map

of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 185. Assessed. Mc­

Golrick Realty Corporation. Tax. 1932.

$1.74. Amount due. $13.32. Supposed own­

er. Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation.

209. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill. in

the town of Putnam Valley. Putnam

County. New York, known as Lots Nos.

23. 24. 81. 82. 131. 132. 138. Block 63.

Section F. on map of lands of Lake

Pcck.^kill Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under

File No. 185. Assessed. McGolrick Realty

Corporation. Tax. 1932. $6.90. Amount

due, $18.80. Supposed owner. Lake Peaks*

kill Realty Corporation.

210. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill. in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County. New York, known as Lots Nos.

4 and 5. Block 64. Section F. on map of

lands of Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion filed m Putnam County Clerk's Of­

fice under File No. 185. Assessed. Mc­

Golrick Realty Corporation. Tax. 1932,

$1.30. Amount due. $12.80. Supposed own­

er. Lake Pc-ekskill Realty Corporation.

211. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

27, 28. 29. 30, 31. 32, 33, 34, Block 05,

Section G. on map of lands of Lake

Peekskill Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 185. Assessed, McGolrick Realty

Corporation. Tax, 1932, $5.64. Amount

due, $17.42. Supposed owner, Lake

Peekskill Realty Corporation.

212. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

43 and 44, Block 73, Section F, on map

of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 185. Assessed, Mc­

Golrick Realty Corporation. Tax, 1932,

$1.74. Amount due. $13.32. Supposed

owner. Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion.

213. Lots situate at Lake Peekskill, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

100, 165, 166, Block 57, Section F, on

map of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 185. As­

sessed, McGolrick Realty Corporation.

Tax, 1932, $3.70. Amount due, $14.02.

Supposed owner, Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation.

215. Lots situate at Oscawana Lake, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

82 and 83, on map of lands of Wanagru

Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

94A, Oscawana Lake East No. 1. As­

sessed, Wanagru Realty Corporation.

Tax, 1932, $6.09. Returned School Tax,

1931, $1.50. Amount due, $19.40. Supposed

owner, Wanagru Realty Corporation.

216. Lot situate at Oscawana Lake, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lot No.

71, on map of lands of Wanagru Realty

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 34A, Osca­

wana Lake East No. 2. Tax, 1933, $9.68.

Returned School Tax, 1932, $2.89. Re­

turned School Tax, 1933, $1.50. Amount

due, $20.27. Supposed owner, Wanagru

Realty Corporation.

217. Lot situate at Oscawana Lake, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lot No.

2, on map of lands of Wanagru Realty

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under Modified Map No.

6E, Abele Park. Assessed, Wanagru

Realty Corporation. Tax, 1933, $9.68.

Lighting District Tax, $1.79. Fire District

Tax, $0.08. Returned School Tax, 1932,

$1.33. Returned School Tax, 1933, $2.29.

Amount due, $27.42. Supposed owner,

Wanagru Realty Corporation.

218. A tract of land with house thereon,

situate at Oscawana Lake, in the town

of Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lot No. 41, on map of

lands of Wanagru Realty Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office

under File No. Modified Map No. 6E,

Abele Park. Assessed, Wanagru Realty

Corporation. Tax, 1933, $31.46. Lighting

District Tax, $5.84. Fire District Tax,

$0.27. Returned School Tax. 1932, $4.31.

Returned School Tax, 1933, $7.45.

Amount due, $63.29. Supposed owner,

Wanagru Realty Corporation.

219. Lot situate at Oscawana Lake, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lot No.

147, on map of lands of Wanagru Realty

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under Modified Map No.

6E, Abele Park. Assessed. Wanagru

Realty Corporation. Tax, 1933, $19.36.

Lighting District Tax. $3.59. Fire Dis­

trict Tax, $0.17. Returned School Tax,

1932, $2.65. Returned School Tax, 1933,

$4.58. Tax, 1934, $16.67. Lighting District

Tax, $3.57. Fire District Tax, $0.20. Re­

turned School Tax, 1934, $3.05. Amount

due, $68.72. Supposed owner, Wanagru

Realty Corporation.

220. Lot situate at Oscawana Lake, in

the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as northern

section of Plot A, on map of lands of

Wanagru Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Oflice under

Modified Map No. 6E, Abele Park. As­

sessed, Wanagru Realty Corporation.

Tax. 1933, $48.40. Lighting District Tax,

$8.98. Fire District Tax. $0.42. Returned

School Tax. 1933, $11.45. Amount due,

$84.21. Supposed owner, Wanagru Realty

Corporation.

KENT

1. A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Richardville, in the western

part of the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, containing about two

acres, bounded north by lands of Seifert,

east and south by lands of Hyde, west

by Highway. Assessed, Daniel Barrett.

Tax, 1934, $14.39. Returned School Tax,

1934, $8.03. Amount due. $35.04. Sup­

posed owner, Daniel Barrett.

2. A tract of land located at Barrett

Hill, in the western part of the town

of Kent, Putnam County, New York,

containing about one hundred and sixty-

five thousand square feet, bounded north

by lands of City, east, south and west

by lands of China Lake Corporation.

Assessed. George H. Canfield. Tax, 1934,

$100.73. Amount due, $120.20. Supposed

owner, George H. Canfield.

3. A tract of land located at Barrett

Hill, in the western part of the town

of Kent, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about one acre, bounded north,

east and south by lands of China Lake

Corporation, west by Highway. As­

sessed, James Chatman. Tax. 1934. $25.90.

Returned School Tax. 1934. $0.36. Amount

due, $45.37. Supposed owner, James

Chatman.

4. A private estate located near Kents

Cliffs, in the western part of the town

of Kenl. Putnam County, New York,

containing about four acres, bounded

north and east by lands of Clear Pool

Camp, south by lands of Weispeil Estate,

west by Highway. Addressed, John E.

Hayes. Tax, 1934. $115.12. Amount due,

$135.37. Supposed owner, John E. Hayes.

5. A bungalow located on Plot No.

80 at Gipsy Trail, in the central part

of the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York. Assessed. Irving McCauley.

Tax, 1934. $63.32. Amount due. $80.98.

Supposed owner. Irving McCauley.

0. A tract of land with bungalow

thereon, located near Kent Cliffs, in tin-

wes-tern part of the town of Kent, Put­

nam County, New York, containing

about forty acres, bounded north by the

Highway, east by lands of Stevens, south

by lands of Heady, west by the High­

way. Assessed. Wallace Kirke. Tax,

1934, $57.50. Amount due. $74.93. Sup­

posed owner, Wallace Kirke.

7. A tract of land located at Foshay

Coiners, in the northern part of the

town of Kent. Putnam County. New

York, containing about one hundred

acres, bounded north by lands of Smith,

east by lands of Lester, south by lands

of Redding, west by lands of Noble. As-

M.id, Mahopac Realty Estate. Tax,

1934, $43.17. Returned School T*x, 1934,

$24.08. Amount due, $85.11. Supposed

owner, Mahopac Realty Estate.

8. A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Ludingtonvile, in the north­

eastern part of the town of Kent, Put­

nam County, New York, containing

about two acres, bounded north by lands

of Wheeler, cast by lands of Turner,

south by lands of Kent, west by lands of

Curtis. Assessed, Charles Mead. Tax,

1934, $48.93. Amount due, $65.87. Sup­

posed owner, Charles Mead.

9. A private estate, located near Kent

Cliffs, in the western part of the town

of Kent, Putnam County, New York,

containing about one hundred and fifty-

five acres, bounded north by lands of

Sutta, east and south by lands of Ford,

west by lands of Seifert. Assessed, Dor­

othy Richardson. Tax, 1934, $57.56. Re­

turned School Tax, 1933, $11.77. Amount

due, $87.29. Supposed owner, Dorothy

Richardson.

10. A tract of land with two bunga­

lows thereon, located at Gipsy Trail

Road, in the central part of the town of

Kent, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about one acre, bounded north

by lands of Northrup, east by lands of

Northrup, south by lands of Minark,

west by the Highway. Assessed, Milton

Ross. Tax, 1934, $23.02. Amount due,

$35.07. Supposed owner, Milton Ross.

11. A tract of land located near Lud-

ingtonville, in the town of Kent, Put­

nam County, New York, containing

about two acres, bounded north by the

Highway, east and south by lands of

Turner, west by lands of Fuller. As­

sessed, Charles Rieley. Tax, 1934, $5.76.

Amount due, $17.54. Supposed owner,

Charles Rieley.

12. A tract of land located near Kent

Cliffs, in the western part of the town of

Kent, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about five acres, bounded north

and east by lands of Ryder, south by

lands of City, west by lands of Erskine.

Assessed, H. A. Stahl Estate. Tax, 1933,

$3.00. Tax, 1934, $2.88. Amount due,

$17.07. Supposed owner, H. A. Stahl Es­

tate.

13. A tract of land located near Farm­

ers Mills, in the northern part of the

town of Kent, Putnam County, New

York, containing about forty-two acres,

bounded north by lands of Carbone, east

by lands of York, south by lands of

Knox, west by lands of Hollander. As­

sessed, Edith M. Stone. Tax, 1934, $40.29.

Amount due, $50.80. Supposed owner,

Edith M. Stone.

14. A tract of land with house thereon,

located near Kent Cliffs, in the western

part of the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, containing about

sixty acres, bounded north by lands of

Booth, east and south by lands of Kitt-

ridge, west by the Highway. Assessed,

Mina Seifert. Tax. 1934. $18.71. Re­

turned School Tax, 1934, $10.43. Amount

due, $42.09. Supposed owner, Mina Sei­

fert.

15. A tract of land located at Farmers

Mills, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, containing about

two acres, bounded north by lands of

Rheinholtz, east by lands of Dean, south

by lands of City, west by lands of Booth.

Assessed. Freeman Smalley and Others.

Tax. 1932. $2.79. Returned School Tax.

1931, $0.91. Tax, 1933, $3.00. Returned

School Tax, 1932. $0.78. Tax. 1934, $2.88.

Returned School Tax, 1933, $0.59. Amount

due, $22.99. Supposed owners, Freeman

Smalley and Others.

10. A tract of land with bungalow

thereon, located near Kent Cliffs, in the

western part of the town of Kent, Put­

nam County, New York, containing

about one-half acre, bounded north and

east by lands of Ryder, south by lands

of City, west by the Highway. Assessed,

Louis Trilch. Tax, 1934, $51.80. Returned

School Tax, 1934, $12.71. Amount due,

$82.23. Supposed owner, Louis Trilch.

17. A tract of land located at Horton-

town, in the northwestern part of the

town of Kent, Putnam County, New

York, containing about six acres, bound­

ed north by lands of Horton, east by

lands of Horton, south by lands of Mc-

Lain, west by lands of the Parkway. As­

sessed, Bertha Van Tassell. Tax, 1934,

$8.04. Amount due, $20.57. Supposed

owner. Bertha Van Tassell.

18. A tract of land located near Kent

Cliffs, in the western part of the town

of Kent, Putnam County, New York,

containing about seven acres, bounded

north by lands of Hayes, east by lands

of Hines, south by lands of Townsend,

west by lands of City. Assessed, Louis

Welspiel Estate. Tax, 1934, $8.63. Amount

due, $20.56. Supposed owner, Louis Wel­

spiel Estate.

19. A tract of land with bungalow

thereon, located near Farmers Mills, in

the town of Kent, Putnam County, New

York, located in the White Pond Col­

ony at the south end of White Pond. As­

sessed, Howard R. Stevens. Tax, 1934.

$14.39. Amount due. $26.60. Supposed

owner, Howard R. Stevens.

20. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

91 to 96, inclusive, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under

Map No. 130-1. Assessed, Harold G.

Thompson. Tax. 1934, $4.32. Garbage

Tax, $0.53. Police Tax. $0.96. Amount

due. $17.60. Supposed owner, Harold G.

Thompson.

21. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel. in the town of Kent. Putnam

County. New York, known as Lots Nos.

142 to 144, inclusive, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation filed in Put­

nam County Clerk's Oflice under File

No. 130-1. Assessed. Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Tax. 1933. $2.25. Garbage Dis­

trict Tax, $0.35. Police District Tax,

$0.52. Returned School Tax. 1933. $0.88.

Tax. 1934, $2.15. Garbage Tax. $0.27. Po­

lice Tax. $0.48. Amount due. $18.74. Sup­

posed owner. Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion.

22. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent. Putnam

County. New York, known as Lots Nos.

145 to 147. inclusive, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation filed in Put­

nam County Clerk's Oflice under Map

No. 130-1. Assessed, Ernest and Antoi­

nette Bennett. Tax, 1933, $2.25. Garbage

District Tax, $0.35. Police District Tax.

$0.52. Tax. 1934. $2.15. Garbage Tax.

$0.20. Police Tax. $0.47. Amount due.

$17.80. Supposed owners, Ernest and An­

toinette Bennett.

23. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent. Putnam

County. New York, known as Lots Nos.

180 and 187 on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Oflice under File No.

130-1. Assessed, Louis Becker. Tax. 1933.

I $1.50. Garbage District Tax, $0.23. Police


FRIDAY, MAY 14, 1937 THE BREWSTER STANDARD — ESTABLISHED 1869 PAGE FIVE

District Tax, $0.35. Returned School Tax,

1932, $0.59. Returned School Tax, 1933,

$0.66. Tax, 1934, $1.44. Garbage Tax,

$0.18. Police Tax, $0.32. Amount due,

$17.03. Supposed owner, Louis Becker.

24. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

309 to 313, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under

File No. 130-1. Assessed, Louis Michels.

Tax, 1932, $3.49. Garbage District Tax,

$0.65. Tax, 1934, $3.60. Garbage Tax,

$0.44. Police Tax, $0.80. Amount due,

$20.92. Supposed owner, Louis Michels.

25. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent. Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

331 to 335, inclusive, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under

File No. 130-1. Assessed, Louis Michels.

Tax. 1932. $3.49. Garbage District Tax,

$0.65. Tax, 1934, $3.60. Garbage Tax,

$0.44. Police Tax, $0.80. Amount due,

$20.92. Supposed owner, Louis Michels.

26. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

405 to 407, inclusive, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation filed in Put­

nam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 130-1. Assessed, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Tax. 1933. $2.25. Garbage Dis­

trict Tax, $0.35. Police District Tax,

$0.52. Tax, 1934, $2.15. Garbage Tax,

$0.26. Police Tax, $0.48. Amount due,

$17.81. Supposed owner, Mirror Holding

Corporation.

27. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

560 and 561 and bungalow, on map of

lands of Mirror Holding Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office

under File No. 130-1. Assessed, Samuel

Avins. Tax, 1934, 7.20. Garbage Tax,

$0.89. Police Tax, $1.60. Amount due,

$21.67. Supposed owner, Samuel Avins.

28. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

617 to 619, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 130-1. Assessed, Adelaide Cooper.

Tax. 1932, $2.09. Garbage District Tax,

$0.39. Tax, 1934, $2.16. Garbage Tax,

$0.27. Police Tax, $0.48. Amount due,

$17.15. Supposed owner, Adelaide Coo­

per.

29. A tract of land with bungalow

theron, situate at Lake Carmel, in the

town of Kent, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lots Nos. 631 to 634. on

map of lands of Mirror Holding Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 130-1. Assessed,

1932, Mirror Holding Corporation. Tax,

1932, $2.79. Garbage District Tax. $0.52.

Assessed, 1934, John A. Bell. Tax, 1934,

$7.20. Garbage Tax, $0.89. Police Tax,

$1.60. Amount due, $25.15. Supposed

owner. Mirror Holding Corporation or

John A. Bell.

30. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots 6G9,

670 and tent, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

130-1. Assessed, Paul Fisher. Tax, 1933,

$1.50. Garbage District Tax. $0.23. Police

District Tax, $0.35. Returned School Tax,

1932, $0.59. Returned School Tax, 1933,

$0.66. Tax, 1934, $4.32. Garbage Tax. $0.53.

Police Tax, $0.96. Amount due, $21.09.

Supposed owner, Paul Fisher.

31. A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Lots 761 and 762

on map of lands of Mirror Holding Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 130-1. Assessed,

Mary A. Mason. Tax, 1933, $1.50. Gar­

bage District Tax, $0.23. Police District

Tax. $0.35. Returned School Tax, 1932,

$0.59. Returned School Tax, 1933, $0.66.

Tax, 1934, $1.44. Garbage Tax, $0.18. Po­

lice Tax, $0.32. Amount due, $17.03. Sup­

posed owner, Mary A. Mason.

32. A tract of land with bungalow

thereon, situate at Lake Carmel,' in the

town of Kent, Putnam County, New York,

known as Lots 824 and 825, on map of

lands of Mirror Holding Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office

under File No. 130-1. Assessed, Elizabeth

I. Shaw. Tax, 1934, $8.63. Garbage Tax,

$1.06. Police Tax, $1.91. Amount due.

$23.68. Supposed owner, Elizabeth I.

Shaw.

33. A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel. in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Lots Nos. 1105 to

1109. inclusive, on map of lands of Mir­

ror Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

130-1. Assessed, 1932, Anna Spadro. Tax,

1932. $3.49. Garbage District Tax, $0.65.

Assessed, 1934, Anna Spaden. Tax, 1934,

$3.60. Garbage Tax. $0.44. Police Tax,

$0.80. Amount due, $20.92. Supposed own­

er, Anna Spadro or Anna Spaden..

34. A tract of land with bungalow

thereon, situate at Lake Carmel, in the

town of Kent. Putnam County, New

York, known as Lots Nos. 1148 to 1150.

inclusive, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation Hied in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

130-1. Assessed, John J. Mason. Tax, 1934.

$36.70. Garbage Tax. $4.53. Police Tax.

$8.13. Amount due. $66412. Supposed own­

er, John J. Mason.

36. A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel. in the town of Kent, Putnam County.

New York, known as Lots Nos. 1502 to

1508. inclusive, on map of lands of Mir­

ror Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

130AA. Assessed. Elinor Scliger. Tax.

1934, $5.03. Garbage Tax. $0.02. Police

Tax. $1.12. Amount due. $18.60. Supposed

owner. Elinor Seliger.

37. A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel. in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Lots Nos. 1528 to

1535. Inclusive, on map of lands of Mir­

ror Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

130AA. Assessed, Marie Seller. Tax,

1934, $5.70. Garbage Tax. $0.71. Police

Tax. $1.27. Amount due. $19.62. Sup­

posed owner. Marie Seliger.

38. A tract of land situate at Lake Cur-

nif], La the town oi Kent. Putnam County.

New York, known as Lot No. 1003. on

map of lands ol Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion filed m Putnam County Clerk's Of­

fice under File No. 130AA. Assessed.

1932. Sarah J. Wood and Margaret A.

Moullet. Tax. 1932, $0.70. Garbage Dis­

trict Tax. $0.13. Assessed. 1933 and 1934.

Frank H. Wood. Tax. 1933. $0.75. Garbage

District Tax. $0.11. Polio* District Tax,

$0.17. Returned School Tax. 1932. $0.30.

Returned School Tax. 1933. $0.33. Tax,

1934. $0.72. Garbage District Tax. $0.09.

Police Tax, $0.16. Amount due. $15.13.

Supposed owner. Sarah J. Wood and

Margaret A. Moullet or Frank H. Wood.

39. A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel. in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Lots Nos. 1759 to

1761. inclusive, on map of lands of Mir­

ror Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

130AA. Assessed. Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Tax, 1932. $2.09. Garbage Dis­

trict Tax. $0.39. Tax. 1933, $0.54. Garbage

District Tax, $0.08. Police District Tax,

$0.12. Returned School Tax, 1932. $0.88.

Returned School Tax. 1933. $0.24. Tax,

1934. $0.52. Garbage Tax. $0.06. Police

Tax, $0.11. Amount due, $16.78. Supposed

owner. Mirror Holding Corporation.

40. A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel. in the town of Kent, Putnam County.

New York, known as Lots Nos. 1764 and

1765 on map of lands of Mirror Holding

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's. Office under File No. 130AA.

Assessed. Mirror Holding Corporation.

Tax. 1933. $0.36. Garbage District Tax.

$0.06. Police District Tax. $0.08. Returned

School Tax. 1932. $0.59. Returned School

Tax. 1933, $0.15. Tax. 1932. $1.40. Gar­

bage District Tax, $0.26. Tax, 1934. $0.35.

Garbage Tax, $0.04. Police Tax, $0.08.

Amount due. $15.03. Supposed owner.

Mirror Holding Corporation.

41. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lota Nos.

1819 to 1821, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 130AA. Assessed, Mary Connolly.

Tax. 1933, $2.25. Garbage District Tax,

$0.35. Police District Tax, $0.51. Returned

School Tax, 1933. $1.00. Tax, 1934, $2.16.

Garbage Tax, $0.27. Police Tax, $0.48.

Amount due, $18.87. Supposed owner,

Mary Connolly.

42. A tract of land with bungalow

thereon, situate at Lake Carmel, in the

town of Kent, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lots Nos. 1836 and 1837,

on map of lands of Mirror Holding Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 130AA. Assessed,

Catherine Carroll. Tax, 1934, $21.58.

Garbage Tax, $2.66. Police Tax, $4.79.

Amount due, $41.98. Supposed owner,

Catherine Carroll.

43. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

1880 to 1883, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under

File No. 130AA. Assessed, 1932, W. F.

Lyden, Tax, 1932, $2.80. Garbage District

Tax, $0.52. Assessed, 1934, William F.

Lyden. Tax, 1934, $2.88. Garbage Tax,

$0.36. Police Tax, $0.64. Amount due,

$19.06. Supposed owner, W. F. Lyden or

William F. Lyden.

44. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

1932 and 1933, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

130AA. Assessed, Virginia Campbell.

Tax, 1933, $1.50. Garbage District Tax,

$0.23. Police District Tax, $0.35. Returned

School Tax, 1932, $0.59. Returned

School Tax, 1933, $0.66. Tax, 1934, $1.44.

Garbage Tax, $0.18. Police Tax, $0.31.

Amount due, $17.02. Supposed owner,

Virginia Campbell.

45. A tract of land with bungalow

thereon, situate at Lake Carmel, in the

town of Kent, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lots. Nos. 1934 to 1947,

inclusive, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

130AA. Assessed, Florence Ryan. Tax,

1934, $27.33. Garbage Tax, $3.37. Police

Tax. $6.06. Amount due, $50.09. Supposed

owner, Florence Ryan.

46. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

2053 and 2054, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

130AA. Assessed, Michael Nash. Tax,

1932, $1.40. Garbage District Tax, $0.26.

Tax, 1933, $1.50. Garbage District Tax,

$0.23. Police District Tax, $0.35. Re­

turned School Tax, 1933, $0.66. Tax,

1934, $1.44. Garbage Tax, $0.18. Police

Tax, $0.32. Amount due, $18.15. Sup­

posed owner, Michael Nash.

47. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots 2259

to 2261. inclusive, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation filed in Put­

nam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 130AA. Assessed, Helen Searles.

Tax, 1932, $2.09. Garbage District Tax,

$0.39. Tax, 1934. $2.16. Garbage Tax.

$0.27. Police Tax, $0.48. Amount due,

$17.15. Supposed owner, Helen Searles.

48. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

2624 and 2625, on map of lands of Mir­

ror Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

130BB. Assessed, Mary Mclnerney. Tax,

1933, $1.50. Garbage District Tax, $0.23.

Police District Tax. $0.35. Returned

School Tax. 1932, $0.59. Returned School

Tax. 1933. $0.66. Tax. 1934, $1.44. Garbage

Tax. $0.17. Police Tax, $0.32. Amount

due, $17.02. Supposed owner, Mary Mc­

lnerney.

49. A tract of land with bungalow

thereon, situate at Lake Carmel, in the

town of Kent, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lots Nos. 2643 to 2647,

on map of lands of Mirror Holding

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Celrk's Office under File No. 130BB. As­

sessed, Oscar Protz. Tax. 1934, $12.22.

Garbage Tax, $1.51. Police Tax. $2.70.

Amount due, $28.75. Supposed owner,

Oscar Protz.

50. A tract of land situate at Lake

CarmeJL in the town of Kent. Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

2966 and 2907 on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

130BB. Assessed, Walter Lorenz. Tax,

1933. $1.50. Garbage District Tax. $0.23.

Police District Tax. $0.35. Returned

School Tax. 1932. $0.59. Returned School

Tax. 1933. $0.66. Tax. 1934, $1.44. Gar­

bage Tax, $0.18. Police Tux, $0.31.

Amount due, $17.02. Supposed owner,

Walter Lurenz.

51. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent. Putnam

County. New York, known as Lots Nos.

3112 and 3113, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

130BB. Assessed. 1933. Anthony Kiss. Jr.

Tax. 1933. $1.50. Garbage District Tax,

$0.23. Police District Tax. $0.34. Re­

turned School Tax, 1932, $0.59. Returned

School Tax, 1933, $0.66. Assessed, 1934,

Anthony Kiss. Tax, 1934, $1.44. Garbage

Tax, $0.18. Police Tax, $0.31. Amount due,

$17.01. Supposed owner, Anthony Kiss,

Jr. or Anthony Kiss.

52. A tract of land with bungalow

thereon, situate at Lake Carmel, in the

town of Kent, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lots Nos. 3182 to 3184,

inclusive, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

130BB. Assessed. Murphy and Rogers.

Tax, 1934, $16.55. Garbage Tax, $2.04.

Police Tax, $3.67. Amount due, $34.87.

Supposed owners, Murphy and Rogers.

53. A tract of land with garage there­

on, situate at Lake Carmel, in the town

of Kent, Putnam County. New York,

known as Lots Nos. 3203 to 3208, inclu­

sive, on map of lands of Mirror Holding

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130BB. As­

sessed, Mikka Muntter. Tax, 1934, $7.19.

Garbage Tax, $0.88. Police Tax, $1.59.

Amount due, $21.64. Supposed owner,

Mikka Muntter.

54. A tract of land situat at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

3422 to 3425, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 130BB. Assessed, Mirror Holding

Corporation. Tax, 1932, $2.79. Garbage

District Tax, $0.52. Tax. 1933. $0.72. Gar­

bage District Tax, $0.11. Police District

Tax, $0.17. Returned School Tax, 1933,

$0.31. Tax, 1934, $0.69. Garbage Tax,

$0.08. Police Tax, $0.15. Amount due,

$17.32. Supposed owner, Mirror Holding

Corporation.

55. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

3529 and 3530, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

130BB. Assessed, 1933, George Paul Beal.

Tax. 1933, $1.50. Garbage District Tax,

$0.23. Police District Tax. $0.35. Returned

School Tax, 1932. $0.59. Returned School

Tax, 1933, $0.66. Assessed, 1934, Paul

and George Beales. Tax, 1934. $1.44. Gar­

bage Tax, $0.18. Police Tax, $0.31.

Amount due, $17.02. Supposed owner,

George Paul Beal or Paul and George

Beales.

56. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

3563 and 3564. on map of lands of Mir­

ror Holding Corporation filed in Put­

nam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 130BB. Assessed, 1932, Joseph P.

Nolan. Tax, 1932, $1.40. Garbage Dis­

trict Tax, $0.26. Assessed, 1933 and 1934,

John P. Nolan. Tax, 1933. $1.50. Gar­

bage District Tax. $0.23. Police District

Tax. $0.35. Returned School Tax. 1933.

$0.66. Tax. 1934, $1.44. Garbage Tax,

$0.18. Police Tax, $0.32. Amount due,

$18.16. Supposed owner, Joseph P. No­

lan or John P. Nolan.

57. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

3620 and 3621, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

130BB. Assessed, 1933, L. Cuetia. Tax,

1933, $1.50. Garbage District Tax, $0.23.

Police District Tax, $0.35. Returned

School Tax, 1932, $0.59. Returned

School Tax, 1933, $0.66. Assessed, 1934,

L. Cuccia. Tax, 1934, $1.44. Garbage

Tax, $0.18. Police Tax, $0.32. Amount

due. $17.03. Supposed owner, L. Cuetia

or L. Cuccia.

58. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

3700 and 3701 on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Oifice under File No.

130BB. Assessed, William Houghtaling.

Tax, 1932, $1.40. Garbage District Tax,

$0.26. Tax. 1934, $1.44. Garbage Tax,

$0.18. Police Tax, $0.32. Amount due,

$15.28. Supposed owner, William Hough­

taling.

59. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

3732 and 3733, on map of lands of Mir­

ror Holding Corporation filed in Put­

nam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 130BB. Assessed, Myron and Fran­

cis Baulle. Tax, 1932. $1.40. Garbage

District Tax, $0.26. Tax. 1933. $1.50.

Garbage District Tax, $0.23. Police Dis­

trict Tax, $0.35. Returned School Tax,

1933, $0.66. Tax, 1934, $1.44. Garbage

Tax, $0.18. Police Tax, $0.32. Amount

due, $18.15. Supposed owners, Myron

and Francis Baulle.

60. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent. Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

3881 to 3883. inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under

File No. 130CC. Assessed. Theresa

Quinby. Tax, 1932. $2.08. Garbage Tax,

$0.39. Tax. 1934. $2.10. Garbage Tax.

$0.27. Police Tax. $0.48. Amount due,

$17.14. Supposed owner, Theresa Quin­

by.

61. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel. in the town of Kent. Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots 3980,

3981 and bungalow, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under

File No. 130CC. Assessed. Frieary and

Others. Tax. 1934. $4.32. Garbage Tax.

$0.53. Police Tax, $0.96. Amount due.

$17.60. Supposed owners, Frieary and

Others.

62. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel. in the town of Kent. Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

3992 to 4001. inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under

File No. 130CC. Assessed. Mamie Si­

rocco. Tax. 1934. $7.20. Garbage Tax,

$0.89. Police Tax. $1.59. Amount due.

$21.06. Supposed owner. Mamie Sirocco.

63. A tract of land with bungalow

thereon, situate at Lake Carmel. in the

town of Kent, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lots Nos. 4184 to 4180,

on map of lands of Mirror Holding Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County

Clerk'.-. Office under File No. 130CC.

Assessed, Laura Mattel. Tax. 1934,

$9.35. Garbage Tax. $1.15. Police Tax,

$2.07. Amount due, $24.69. Supposed

owner. Laura Martel.

64. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent. Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

•i2)(i and 4217 on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

130CC. Assessed. 1932. Kenneth L

Hunn. Tax. 1932. $1.40. Garbage District

Tax, $0.20. Assessed. 1934. Dorcas Hunn.

Tax, 1934, $1.44. Garbage Tax, $0.18.

Police Tax, $0.32. Amount due, $15.28.

Supposed owner, Kenneth L. Hunn or

Dorcas Hunn.

65. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

4372 and 4373, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

130CC. Assessed, Charles Temple. Tax,

1933, $1.50. Garbage District Tax. $0.23.

Police District Tax, $0.35. Returned

School Tax, 1932, $0.59. Returned

School Tax, 1933, $0.66. Tax, 1934, $1.44.

Garbage Tax, $0.17. Police Tax, $0.32.

Amount due, $17.02. Supposed owner,

Charles Temple.

66. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

4392 and 4393, on map of lands of Mir­

ror olding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

130CC. Assessed, Thomas Guiliano. Tax,

1933, $1.50. Garbage District Tax, $0.23.

Police District Tax, $0.35. Returned

School Tax, 1932, $0.59. Returned School

Tax, 1933, $0.66. Tax. 1934, $1.44. Gar­

bage District Tax, $0.18. Police Tax,

$0.32. Amount due, $17.03. Supposed

owner. Thomas Guiliano.

67. A tract of land with bungalow

thereon, situate at Lake Carmel, in the

town of Kent, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lots Nos. 4431 and

4432, on map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam Coun­

ty Clerk's Office under File No. 130CC.

Assessed, Herman Leben. Tax. 1934,

$17.28. Garbage Tax, $2.13. Police Tax,

$3.83. Amount due, $35.90. Supposed

owner, George Younger.

68. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

4449 to 4451, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

130CC. Assessed, William Profko. Tax,

1933, $2.25. Garbage District Tax. $0.35.

Police District Tax, $0.52. Returned

School Tax, 1933, $1.00. Tax, 1934, $2.15.

Garbage Tax, $0.27. Police Tax, $0.48.

Amount due. $18.87. Supposed owner,

William Protke.

69. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

4487 to 4489. inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under

File No. 130CC. Assessed, Frank Bris­

coe. Tax. 1932, $2.09. Garbage District

Tax, $0.39. Tax, 1934, $2.16. Garbage

Tax, $0.27. Police Tax, $0.48. Amount

due, $17.15. Supposed owner, Frank

Briscoe.

70. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

4490 and 4491 on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

130CC. Assessed, Beryl Briscoe. Tax,

1932, $1.40. Garbage District Tax, $0.26.

Tax, 1934, $1.44. Garbage Tax, $0.18. Po­

lice Tax, $0.31. Amount due, $15.26.

Supposed owner, Beryl Briscoe.

71. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

4511 and 4512, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

130CC. Assessed, Joseph Trentino. Tax,

1932, $1.40. Garbage District Tax, $0.20.

Tax, 1933, $1.50. Garbage District Tax,

$0.23. Police District Tax, $0.35. Re­

turned School Tax, 1933, $0.66. Tax, 1934,

$1.44. Garbage Tax, $0.18. Police Tax,

$0.31. Amount due, $18.15. Supposed

owner, Joseph Trentino.

72. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

4559 and 4560 on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

130CC. Assessed, George Bleckendorfer.

Tax, 1933, $1.50. Garbage District Tax,

$0.23. Police District Tax, $0.35. Returned

School Tax, 1932, $0.59. Returned School

Tax, 1933, $0.66. Tax, 1934, $1.44. Gar­

bage Tax, $0.18. Police Tax, $0.32.

Amount due, $17.03. Supposed owner,

George Bleckendorfer.

73. A tract of land with bungalow

thereon, situate at Lake Carmel, in the

town of Kent, Putnam County, New

York, known as Plots Nos. 4739 to 4742,

on map of lands of Mirror Holding Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 130CC. Assessed,

Marie G. Feron. Tax, 1934, $17.27. Gar­

bage Tax, $2.13. Police Tax, $3.83.

Amount due, $35.89. Supposed owner,

Marie G. Feron.

74. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

4896 to 4898, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

130CC. Assessed, Frank and Mildred

Ward. Tax, 1933, $2.25. Garbage Dis­

trict Tax, $0.34. Police District Tax,

$0.52. Returned School Tax, 1933, $1.00.

Tax. 1934, $2.16. Garbage Tax, $0.27. Po­

lice Tax, $0.48. Amount due. $18.87. Sup­

posed owners, Frank and Mildred Ward.

75. A tract of land situate at Lake

Carmel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

4990 to 4992, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 130CC. Assessed. Raymond J. Gar-

rick. Tax. 1932, $2.09. Garbage District