1937-10-01 - Northern New York Historical Newspapers

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1937-10-01 - Northern New York Historical Newspapers

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POUGHKEEPSIE\ Jpt PAWLING

PEEKSKILL BREWSTER DANBURY

YONKERS / \ WHITE PLAINS

"BREWSTER,THE HUBZPFTHE HARLEAV VALLEY

VOL. LXVIII, No. 23 Brewster, Putnam County, N. Y., Friday, Oct. 1, 1937 Established 68 Years $2,00 per year

John S. Addis

Dies Suddenly

John S. Addis, Beloved Citizen of New

Milford, Conn., Town Clerk of New

Mllford, Judge of Probate and

Treasurer of the State of Connecticut,

Dies of Heart Attack.

John Stanley Addis, State Treasurer

of Connecticut, died of a heart attacK

Wednesday night, September 29, 1937,

in the Town Hall office he had occupied

for twenty-four years as New

Milford Town Clerk.

Mr. Addis, who was forty-eight years

old, had suffered a previous heart attack

September 18. His physician, Dr.

Rupert S. Day, said that the attack

might have been induced by a hurried

motor trip which Mr. Addis made that

afternoon to Hartford, where his wife,

the former Dorothy L. Crowell, of

Metuchen, N. J., is ill in a hospital.

Mr. Addis was elected State Treasurer

on the Democratic ticket in 1934.

He also continued in his post as Town

Clerk and as Probate Judge, an office

he had held for seven years.

A native of New Milford, Mr. Addis

attended Yale Law School from which

he was graduated in 1910. He opened

a law practice in New Milford and

made his entrance into politics in 1911,

when he was elected to the General

Assembly. He served three terms in

the Assembly, but was defeated in

1918 when he ran for State Senate.

During the World Whr Mr. Addis

was a member of the local draft board.

He was a trustee of New Milford

Hospital, a director of the firm of H.

H. Taylor & Son, of New Milford; a

member of the Connecticut Board of

Pardons and of the State Board of

Parks.

He was a member of the Litchfield

County University Club, the University

Club of Bridgeport, the Litchfield

County Bar Association and the

Masons, Shriners and Odd Fellows.

- Surviving, beside his wife, are three

eons, John S. Addis, Jr., Malcolm u

Addis and Leonard Nickerson Addis;

a daughter, Miss Dorothy Crowell

Addis; his mother, Mrs. John F. Addis,

of New Milford, and a sister, Mrs.

Arthur Warwick, of New York.

Judge Addis was at his office at the

state Capitol in Hartford Wednesday

noon, and on two previous days this

week. When Governor Cross was informed

of his death, during the first

meeting of the governor's new cabinet

at the Hartford club, he paid the

following tribute:

"It is impossible for me to express

my sorrow at hearing of the sudden

death of John 8. Addis. John was one

of the ablest and most conscientious

public officials I have ever known. As

treasurer of the state he served Connecticut

well, seeking no personal

glory, but always having in mind his

duty and obligations to the people of

the state. Quiet, unassuming, always

cheerful even in the face of deepest

worry for those close to him, he was

ever a pleasant companion and most

loyal friend. I deeply regret his passing."

Thomas H. Judd, deputy state

treasurer, decared Judge Addis "one

of the finest men who ever set foot in

the treasurer's office."

Deputy Judd said that under the

statutes the governor is empowered to

name a successor to Judge Addis.

Funeral services will be held at the

First Congregational church, New

Milford, Saturday afternoon at 2

o'clock with Rev. George H. Johnson,

pastor, officiating, assisted by Rev.

William R. Simmons, of Cornwall.

Interment will be in the family plot

In Center Cemetery.

o

Ritz Presents

Tale of Daniel Drew

The Ritx Theatre presents on its

next weeks program for Friday and

SaUirday, October 8 and 9, "The Toast

of New York," a picture which should

be of particular interest to the people

of Carmel and vicinity. One of the

main characters in this tale of financial

struggle and intrigue is Daniel

Drew, who we are told, was the founder

of Drew Seminary.

Drawing its material'-from "Robber

Barons" and "Book of Daniel'Drew/'

a story of ruthless exploitation and

rivalry between 'money-mad men has

been written, with the tragic Black

Friday of September 24, 1869, as its

climax. While lacking complete authenticity,

the spirit of the period and

the colorful careers of the men who

dominated it is well presented. The

cast and direction are excellent.

The "Toast of New York" was produced

by RKO Radio Pictures'and directed

by Rowland V. Lee. The cast

includes Edward Arnold, Gary Grant.

Frances Farmer, Jack Oakle, Donald

Meek.

Football Tomorrow

At Wells Field

The Brewster High School football

team opens their home season tomorrow

afternoon when they meet the

Lincoln Agricultural School team on

Wells Field. The Aggies have never

beaten the Bears but they are reported

as having their strongest team in

history this year and It should be a

good game. The kick off Is scheduled

for 2:30.

200 Attend

Real Estate Dinner

Edward Joyce, Founder of the Board,

Introduces Judge Shea and Judge

Mack to Large Dinner Party in Hotel

Mahopac Music and Dancing

Maintain Lively Atmosphere.

The annual dinner of the Putnam

County Real Estate Board really begins

with the kind personal touch in

the letters sent forth by Edward Joyce

that it is time to make up tables, and

this year's was no exception. Almost

every member responded and with

their guests accounted for two hundred

persons who were agreeably accommodated

in the Hotel Mahopac,

long famous as the Thompson House.

On this occasion Hans Melgard, proprietor,

had the pleasure of welcoming

his neighbor, Emerson Clark, who

for fifty years managed the hotel and

at the same time kept harmony in the

Republican party.

One of the pleasant features of a

dinner with the Real Estate Board as

host to friends in (Putnam County, is

the opportunity for all persons, regardless

of party, to realise their

fundamental interest in each other

and in the lands on which they pay

taxes. On Tuesday night politics was

uppermost in many minds as both

parties made town nominations in

Carmel before coming in to the dinner.

Hon. Joseph P. Shea, Democratic leader,

arrived only a few minutes before

Representative Fish" and the Hon.

John P. Donohoe to take their places

at the speakers table with the Hon.

John E. Mack, Campbell Lorinl, Bruce

Adams, the new president of the

Board, Mrs. Ethel V. B. Covert, vice

president, J. Ralph Truran, secretarytreasurer,

and Edward Joyce and Leslie

P. Dodge, directors.

After the singing of the Star

Spangled Banner and the benediction

by Rev. Wright, Mr. Joyce, as master

of ceremonies, introduced Joseph P.

Shea, toastmaster, who in turn presented

the newly elected officers of

the Board and finally the speaker,

Judge Mack. Somewhere before the

toastmaster reached his climax the

orchestra played "The Sidewalks of

(Continued on Page 8)

C. E. to Convene

At Bedford Hills

Another year of Christian Endeavor

in Northern Westchester is drawing

to a close. On Oct. 12, Columbus Day,

Christian Endeavorer's will meet at

Bedford Villege for the Annual Fall

Convention.

The convention will open at 3:30

and after a brief song service discussion

groups will be held.

At the close of the afternoon session

the convention banquet will be

served and there will be a charge of

only 25 cents for this. Pep-singing, fun

and fellowship are promised.

The evening session will be at 7 with

hymn singing. The new officers for the

year 1937 and 1938 will then be installed

by the Rev. Kenneth Hoover

of Guldens Bridge. Mr. Howard G.

Launsbach, President of the New York

State Christian Endeavor Union, will

be the speaker of the evening. Mr.

Launsbach is well known throughout

the State and his message for the

evening should be of interest to all.

Turkey Shoot

Sunday, Oct. 3

Turkey shoot

Italian-American

Brewster, N. Y.,

Oct. "3, 1837, on

Cabin.

sponsored by the

Social Club of

to be held Sunday,

Route 22 at Love's

Shooting starts at 10 a. m. Turkeys,

chickens, pigs, ducks and squab to be

given away as prizes to the best

shooters of clay pigeons and still

targets.

Only 12 and 16 guage guns to be

used. Be on hand for some fun.

A shooting contest will toe held

among the Brewster, Lake Mahopac

and Cold Spring ItaUan -American

Clubs. A silver cup wi$be swarded

to the winners. Refreshments,

o * • ' '

Mr. and Mrs. Irving Ginsberg announce

the birth of a daughter, Gloria,

at Northern Westchester Hospital on

September 15th.

Morgan To Head

Kishawana Board

N. P. Gatllng, Jr., made Vice President,

Scott, Lobdell and Bijur Elected to

Board of Governors. Winter Sports

Program May be Arranged.

At the annual meeting of Kishawana

Country Club held last Saturday night

J. Bowling Bruns, Dr. E. Roberts

Richie and Theodore K. Schaefer were

reelected to the Board of Governors

and they in turn reelected Ralph C.

Morgan, president. The other officers

are Norborne P. Gatllng, Jr., vice

president, Clifford Tuttle, treasurer,

Bernard Hope, secretary. Dr. E. R.

Richie was reelected chairman of

greens committee, Kenneth T. Newcomb

heads the house committee;

Sherman Bijur, tennis, and Maxwell

Scott, entertainment. Vacancies in the

Board of Governors were filled by the

election of Maxwell Scott, Alexander

F. Lobdell, Jr., and Sherman Bijur.

In addition to a large number of

proxies the persons attending the

meeting were Mr. Morgan, Clifford

Tuttle, Norborne P. Gatllng, Joseph

M. Adrian, J. Bowling Bruns, Theodore

K. Schaefer, Bernard Hope, Arthur J.

Ridley, Mrs. E. R. Richie, Dr. Richie,

Mrs. Bijur, Sherman Bijur, Mrs. Ridley,

Mrs. Budd, Arthur P. Budd, Miss

Marjorle Addis and John Dunford.

Later there appeared Mr. and Mrs.

Kenneth Newcomb and Alexander L.

Addis. There was considerable discussion

about ways and means reducing

the deficit of $1400 which covers obligations

maturing in the next two

months. Another dance may be a

factor and so may winter sports program

provided there is a real winter

fit to accommodate skils.

Mr. and Mrs. Larman Hamblin,

caretakers, will probably continue to

occupy the stone cottage on the hill

top all winter.

Prenatal Consultations

Open to the People

Prenatal consultations are to be held

from 1-4 p. m. at Carmel High School.

Every month the foregoing item

from the New York State Department

of Health comes along for publication

and it always appears. Lets hope It

does some good. Wouldn't it be a help

if in preparations for other important

undertakings there were "prenatal

consultations.' The idea of using foresight

is not new but the practical application

of it is so rare that people

of all walks of life are continually offering

alibis for not taking thought in

preparation for important events..

It is possible that in time the state

will offer pre conception consultations.

For twenty years or more private

agencies have served the women of the

country in this capacity in spite of the

threats and whatnot visited upon

them by political and religious groups

prejudiced against the popular use of

this important service. Stranger things

have happened. Scientific knowledge is

apt to break out in any clime and at

any time and the forces tending to

improve human life are apt to appear

as well as those that tend to destroy

it or merely to retard it.

White Plains Bears

Will Visit Danbury

The Danbury Trojans will be gunning

for their third straight victory

over an American Professional Football

association foe tonight, Friday,

Oct. 1, when the White Plains

Bears invade Lee Stadium at 8:30

o'clock.

A win over the Bears on Friday and

another over the Brooklyn Bushwicks

on Wednesday night of Fair week, will

give the Danbury eleven full possession

of the division title, which means

a play-off game with the other divison

champion.

Coach Jack Thompson today announced

the signing of Bo Hughes, a

240-pound fullback from the University

of Oklahoma. Hughes won All Big

Six rating last year. He was signed

this fall by the New York Yankees,

but played only one game with that

club.

Seaman Heads

Argonne Post No. 71

At a meeting of Argonne Post, No.

71, American Legion, held Tuesday

evening at Headquarters in the Avery

Building, Harvey Seaman was elected

Commander.

Others who will serve in official

capacity for the coming year are Daniel

B. Brandon, 1st Vice Commander;

Wm. J. Foley. 2d Vice Commander;

Wm. Bienenstein, 3d Vice Commander;

Louis Hobby. Adjutant; Daniel B.

Brandon, Treasurer; Harold Beal,

IPhaplajui; Fred Kjhnj|. Sergeanjt. at

Arms; Dr. Robert 8. Cleaver, Historian.

Charles Hatch Heads

Nash-Danbury, Inc.

Charles M. Hatch, president of the

former Anderson Nash Corp., of Danbury,

is carrying on the business under

the new firm name, Nash-Danbury,

Inc. Charles Rogers is treasurer. They

will carry the same line of cars, Nash-

LaFayette and International Trucks.

o »

Census Of Jobless

To Start On Nov. 16

Postofflce Department to Distribute

Blanks I louse -to- House to Unemployed

and Partially Employed. Plan

Approved by Leaders of Labor, Agriculture

and Industry.

Plans for the census of unemployed

and partially employed persons in the

United States got definitely under

way Monday when representatives of

industry, labor, agriculture and the

government gave their full approval

to the program submitted to

them by John D. Biggers, the Administrator,

of the Census. Mr.

Biggers announced that questionnaires

would be distributed to about

31,000,000 families iby the Postofflce

Department on Nov. 16 and 17.

The conference was held In the

Cabinet room of the White House. It

lasted more than four hours, during

which each question to be asked those

who are unemployed or partially so

was discussed and finally approved,

sometimes in an amended form. There

will not be more than fourteen questions

asked in the opinion of Mr.

Biggers.

John L. Lewis, head of the Committee

for Industrial Organization,

was one of those present and after

the conference he declared that he

was convinced the census would be

a success and that It would make

easier the solution of the unemployment

problem. Boris Shiskin, who

attended as the representative of

President Green of the American

Federation of Labor, also endorsed

the program, as did George H.

(Continued on Page 8)

ENGAGED

Wilson-Banfield.

Mr. and Mrs. Brownlee W. Wilson,

of Cold Spring, announce the engagement

of their daughter, Miss Marian

Wilson, to H. Loring Banfleld, of Austin,

Minnesota.

Miss Wilson Is a graduate of Oneonta

State Normal and has taken extension

work at Columbia University.

She is now teaching in Mt. Vernon,

New York.

Miss Wilson's great grandfather was

Marvin Wilson, who wrote a History

of Putnam County, and is descended

from the Hall and Sears families of

the Town of Southeast through her

great grandfather. She is a member

of one of the oldest Putnam County

families, and her father for a number

of years was very active In the Democratic

party, having on one occasion

been a candidate for Member of the

Assembly on the Democratic ticket.

Mr. Banfleld is a graduate of Dartmouth

College. He is a member of the

Kappa Kappa Kappa Fraternity. At

present he is connected with the Firestone

Tire and Rubber Company,

working in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, district.

The weddng will take place in June.

Bolam Begins Last

Year at Naval Academy

Midshipman Cecil Austen Bolam has

returned to the U. S. Naval Academy,

Annapolis, Md., to take up his studies

for his final year at the Academy. As

a first class man he will also have

considerable added responsibility including

the duties of regimental officer

for which position he has been selected

out of a class of 466 men all of whom

expect to graduate next June.

He is also captain of the Navy Cross

Country team and spent part of his

vacation visiting with the teams of

Columbia and N. Y. U. in New York.

The great intercollegiate cross country

meet at Van Cortlandt Park wlhch

takes place the last week in November

will bring together representatives of

most of the eastern colleges and is

expected to produce several new records.

In his workouts during this visit

he was fortunate to have the advice

and company of Glenn Cuningham,

famous mile and cross country record

holder who may also be a competition

Cecil who is ace cross country man of

the Navy and holder of the team record

for 4 miles, expects to have a hard

fight on his hands but is confident

that Navy will be able to put into the

field one of the best cross country

learns of recent years.

Mrs. Vail Drives

Red Dewey To Win

Spectators at Carmel Track Saturday

Enjoyed Mrs. Lloyd Vall's Skillful

Handling of Red Dewey. Floyd Barger

Made History with Napoleon

Sunrise. Kara Star also Shone.

The Class B Trot premiere event of

the Carmel matinee program last Saturday

was won by Lee White's Red

Dewey driven by Mrs. Lloyd Vail. Mrs.

Vail drove a clever race and has now

definitely established a reputation as

a top reinsman. Her boldness in fighting

her way out of a difficult pocket

In the second heat was much admired

toy the horsemen present. E. A. Nolan's

Agnes McGregor, Willis Ryder's Victoria

and Dr. W. F. Vail's Cecil Hanover

took turns furnishing competition,

each of them accounting for second

place in one heat.

Willis Ryder's Napoleon Sunrise,

with Floyd Barger driving, took all

three heats In the Class D Trot and

Pace, Mrs. Wm. D. Kraft's Bishop

Hanover furnishing the bulk of the

competition.

The fireworks of the afternoon's program

was furnished by Joseph Garvin

driving Bob Worthy and Fred Smith

driving Mr. Wittenberg's Kara Star.

(Continued on Page 4) ^»

Miss Foster Explains

Name, "Tilly Foster"

MISS M. C. FOSTER

Carmel, New York

Sept. 27. 1937.

Editor of Brewster Standard:

A friend called my attention to a letter

on the front page of the Brewster

Standard of Sept. 24, headed "What's

in the Name of Tilly Foster,' by F. W.

Saward and I wish to correct some

false statements in that letter. Tilly

Foster was my great uncle and he

owned the farm on which iron ore was

found. Tilly was a man and he had no

son William. My fathers name was

William and his father was Thomas,

a brother of Tilly. Thomas lived on a

farm in Carmel and Tilly on the farm

now occupied by the Tilly Foster R. R.

station on the Putnam R. R. Will you

please print this.

M. C. FOSTER.

To the Editor of The Sun:

To the Editor of The Brewster Standard:

Articles and letters have recently

appeared in your papers as to the Tilly

Foster Mine and the origin of the

name.

The History of Putnam County by

William S. Pelletreau published in 1886

in describing the property states in

part:

"Herman King sold 60 acres of his

farm to George Beale in May, 1815,

and he in turn sold this with other

land to the extent of 128 acres, to

Tilly Foster, April 1, 1830. It is upon

this tract that the works of the mine

are situated. Upon this farm Tilly

Foster lived till the time of his death

which occurred April 4, 1842, at the

age of 40.»"

The first man who ever attempted

to get iron from this mine was James

Townsend.*" This was in 1810. From

that time till 1853, scarcely any attempt

was made to develop its resources.

,# *

In 1879 the mine was yielding ore

to the extent of 7,000 tons per month,

and employed 300 men. At the present

time (1886) the mine has reached a

depth of 650 feet. The output Is about

2,000 tons per month and 150 hands

are employed."

RALPH C. MORGAN.

September 30, 1037.

Marie Daly Graduates

At St. Vincents

Miss Marie E Daly of Tilly Foster,

was graduated from the School of

Nursing of St. Vincent's Hospital in

exercises held in the aditorlum of the

nurses' residence Sunday evening.

The class, consisting of 42 women,

was addressed toy Rt. Rev. Mgr.

Michael J. Lavelle, of St. Patrick's

Cathedral, who spoke of the work of

nurses as a blessed mission, and urged

them to love the high ideals of their

profession. The chief address was delivered

by Justice James T. Hajlinan.

Dr. William M. Ford, president of

the medical board, awarded diplomas

and Miss Katberine A. Sanborn,

former suderint/endjent of (nurses,

presented pins. A reception followed

the exercises.

o

Star of Brewster Circle, Companion*.

of the Forest, will hold a covered dish

supper on Monday evening, October

11, at the home of Mrs. Frank Thomas.

Games will be played in the evening.

All are welcome.

Charles D. Millard

Resigns from Congress

Charles D. Millard of Tarrytown

has resigned as Representative in the

Twenty-fifth Congressional District.

He is the Republican candidate for

Surrogate of Westchester County In

the November election.

Next Monday the Republican committeemen

of the district, which includes

sections of Westchester and

Rockland Counties, probably will

nominate Assemblyman Ralph A.

Gamble of Larchmont for Representative.

Request Liquor

Sales Close At 12

Grand Jury Hands in Presentment

Requesting ABC Board To Set

Liquor Closing Hour at Midnight.

On September 23, District Attorney

John P. Donohoe made public with

the consent of Justice Syme the presentment

handed in by the grand Jury,

Monday.

The presentment requests the Putnam

County Alcolohic Beverage Control

Board and the state Liquor Authority

to change the closing hour of all

licensed places in Putnam County

from 3 a. m. to midnight. District

Attorney Donohoe sent certified copies

of this presentment to the state

and county ABC boards.

It is interesting to recall in connection

with this presentment that at a

meeting of the liquor dealers of the

county called by the Putnam ABC

Board at their office in Carmel a few

weeks, ago, William A. Halliday, president

of the Putnam County board,

addressed the liquor dealers on the

subject of conduct of their places so

as not to become a nuisance and at

that time explained to them that it

might become necessary for the Putnam

County ABC Board to advance

the closing hour to midnight or 1 a. m.

The presentment follows:

i "WE, the grand Jury of County of

Putnam, attached to the September,

1037, term of the Supreme Court, do

hereby present the following set of

resolutions to the court and pray that

the court transmit a copy of the same

to the New York State Liquor Authority

and the Putnam County Alcoholic

Beverage Control Board:

"WHEREAS, many complaints have

been made to the peace officers of this

county, that between the hours of

midnight and 3 a. m., public disturbances

detrimental to the health and

peace of various communities occur

frequently at places of business licensed

to sell liquor; and

"WHEREAS, on this 13th day of

September, 1937, reputable citizens of

the Town of Patterson presented evidence

of such disturbances to this

grand Jury; and

"WHEREAS, to the present knowledge

of many of these Jurors, such disturbances

occur at other places in

Putnam County, while in neighboring

counties the closing hour of such places

is earlier than 3 a. m., now therefore,

be it

"RESOLVED, that this grand Jury

hereby publicly request the Alcoholic

Beverage Control Board of Putnam

County to change the closing hour of

such places of business from 3 a. m.,

to midnight, and to exercise its power

to enforce such closing hour."

Appeal in Howes Estate

Opens Oct. 5 in Hartford

Among the fourteen Fairfield county

appeals scheduled for argument

during the October term of the Connecticut

Supreme court which opens

in Hartford on October 5 is that of

Bradford Klock, Carmel, N. Y, administrator

of the estate of Ada C.

Howes, late of Southeast. N. Y.. who

sought to recover $3,500 on a promlsory

note executed in favor of the deceased,

before her death, by Edward

C. and Edna R. Plerson, husband and

wife, of Danbury.

Judge Kenneth Wynne of the Superior

court .in a decision for the defendants,

ruled that the deceased gave

the Piersons $2,600 in exchange for

their note with interest at five per cent

and a promise that they would provide

a home for her if this became necessary.

The money. Judge Wynne held.

was in the nature of a gift. Klock appealed

from this decision.

The plaintiff was represented by

Tammany and Connery and the defendants

by Attorney Leonard Mc-

Mahpn, . '.,:,,

Persons | | > 4 wj^. acquainted!

with Mrs., .Howe*, flnanplitf circumstances

realise that the money was

npt a gift. The note in question was

f^fi object of long search, and did not

turn up until the state examiner appeared.

Fish Sees Danger

In Ruinous Taxation

Declares the Country Needs Mature

Judgment to Save the Masses from

Ruinous Taxation. Expresses Pride

in Loyalty of Republicans of Putnam

County.

Representative Hamilton Fish, addressing

the meeting of the Republican

County Committee, Tuesday evening

spoke in part as follows:

"The Great American issue," he said,

"is the preservation of our Conshtitutional

rights. The integrity and supremacy

fo the law must be maintained—and

this issue is beyond either

party. That is why one-third of the

Democrats north of Mason & Dixon

line are opposed to the Court Plan.

It is for the people to decide and we

must carry this issue to the American

people."

Mr. Fish then recited the fallacy of

the arguments of the President against

the present status of the Supreme

Court and told how the Republican

wing of the House had sensed the roar

of opposition that would arise in the

majority Democratic wing against the

President's plan for packing the Court

and had sat back to watch the fight

within the President's own party.

"The Court Plan was defeated, as

everybody knows," he declared, "but it

is not yet dead."

Continuing Mr. Fish said: "Whom

the Gods would destroy they first

make mad. The President is mad. He

is like a small boy who has been

spanked and his favorite rattle taken

away from him. He will not listen to

the saner Judgments in his own Party

and the Court Plan will be brought

up again. It is ridiculous. All the arguments

for changing the Court are

specious. All our greatest Judges on

the Supreme Court bench were well

oner 70 before they retired.

"Our country is in need of mature

judgment, of experienced, well-trained,

unbiased minds to interpret our Constitution

as written. So the time has

arrived for our party to take up the

fight in etrnest and carry the issue to

the American people. These repeated

attacks, reprisals and confusions set

in motion by the present Administration

are undermining our Government

—destroying the confidence of the

people. Business is entitled to a

chance.

"This has brought a great change in

the national viewpoint and this viewpoint

significantly embraces the Republica

Party as the one agency that

will vouchsafe a safer and saner government

In the future if the Republican

Party adheres to the sound principles

of its great and far-sighted

founders of the Middle-West who gave

Abraham Lincoln to the nation when

the nation most needed him.

"One will readily understand now

why the tide has turned—why the

people are coming back to the Republican^Party

which, contrary to the

belief of some that it is dead, Is very

much alive.

"And who are the people? They are

the masses—the masses of ramrers,

the masses—the masses of farmers,

big and little bulness men fighting for

their salvation, a way toward relief

from ruinous taxation, for profitable

markets for agriculture, for more

activity for industry, more jobs for all

willing and anxious to work for wages

vouchsafing a higher standard of living.

f

"If the Republican Party undertakes

to render to farmers, to workers and

busiess men elsewhere in the country

the same faithful and efficient brand

of service Republican officials are

rendering to the farmers, workers and

business men of Putnam County, its

come-back will be swift and the nation

as a whole will soon reap the benefits

of the change.

"I take great pride," Mr. Fish concluded

"in saying that Putnam County

has a splendid record for Party loyalty

and constructive work even

through the bad years. The candidates

Just nominated by our party will carry

on the good work, I am sure."

——-o

Methodists Invite All

To Rally Day Service

H y#u do. not attend the church

schoo|. but once in a year you should

do so on Rally Day. You will enjoy

the service and encourage the regular

school workers. This is visitors' day

and will be given over to special features

with the omission of a regular

study period. The music will be in

charge of the choir leader, Mrs. D. H.

Bloomer, and several special numbers

have been arranged including a quartette

number, a solo by Mr. Richard

Michel], a selection by the choir, etc.

Mrs. Eddy will accompany with a vio-

Un. Please be on hand promptly at 10

a. m. so that an uninterrupted full

hour can be enjoyed toy everybody.


PAGE TWO THE BREWSTER STANDARD — ESTABLISHED 1869 FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1937

« * WEEKLY

CONSTITUTIONAL

fry MAX BEPNS

Laws and Amendments

\ How does the time required to

pass a law compare with the time

required to adopt an amendment to

our Constitution? *

In every session ot Congress

| thousands of laws are suggested.

'hundreds are submitted, scores are

, debated and only a few are passed.

Many are held over, some for a year.

some for several years and others

for many years. The quantity and

•the confusion are too great to re

duce to mathematical precision.

Many amendments to our Constitution

also have been submitted to

Congress, only a few of which have

been adopted by Congress and sub

, mltted to the people. Most of the latter

have been adopted In periods

{varying from nine months to 46

; monthB.

( The first few amendments, known

as the .Bill of Rights, were adopted

las a group 27 months after being

submitted by Congress. To ratify

the 16th or income tax amendment

Ira Vail to Race

At Danbury Fair

The auto races at the Danbury Fair

are always a strong drawing card. Past

machines with well known drivers offer

exciting sport. This year Is no exception.

The events are conducted under personal

direction of Ira Vail of Manhasset.

N. Y., and under A. A. A. rules*,

urday in October.

October Oth, meet unfavorable weather,

the races will be called off entirely.

Among the entrants is Bob Sail,

Southern A. A. A. Champion of 1937,

and many others with records that

have given them top notch places on

the lists of skilled and daring performers

in automobile contests.

Cars seen on famous tracks and

men at the wheels who have won plaudits

of thousands will thrill the crowds

at the Danbury Fair the second Saturday

in October.

•o

An Inch of topsoil may be lost from

a slope under cultivation in one year,

whereas it took nature 400 years to

develop that same inch of soil. Conservation

measures help to prevent

this Ion.

One of the Leading

Hair Dressing

Salons

m. Of —

Jleto Cnglanb

Is the

Corgal SMjop

We Aim To Please the

Most Fastidious.

248 Main St.

Tel 183

W. F. CORGAL, Prop.

Corgals Est 1900

took 43 montbs. The people were,

ready for repeal of prohibition and'

took only nine months to adopt the;

21 si or repeal amendment

The uveruge lilliu luijuued for all:

21 amendments, counting the first'

tew as oiu- group, was 19 V4 months.

It takes as long or longer for Congress

to pass some laws

Copyright 1U37 by Max Berns

Two Bands and Soloist

To Appear at Fair

It seems as if music was a necessary

part of a Pair and the officials of the

Danbury Pair try to leave nothing undone,

so far as possible, to give enjoyment

to patrons. John R. Bacon,

who has charge of this feature, has

engaged the Lampham Band, of New

York City, and the New Departure

Band, of New Britain, to play at the

Danbury Fair grounds from Oct. 2 to

0. Miss Mildred ODoone, soprano singer,

will be heard with the Lampham

musicians.

Both organizations have reputations

won by their splendid performances

and earned by their long and efficient

practice together. They will be heard

in the big tent and in front of the

grandstand.

Programs arranged include airs that

put punch into the occasion; put new

vigor into folks, rhythms that give

swing to one's stride and cadences that

soothe and comfort.

The tang in October air and the lilt

of the band music are strong features

in the popularity of the Pair.

Steel Pier at Atlantic City, Coney

Island and other well known resorts

have enjoyed the playing of .these

same musicians.

Cheney Cow Makes

New Official Records

Two Guernsey cows owned by O. H.

Cheney of Patterson, New York, have

just finished new official records for

production which entitles them to

entry in the Advanced Register of

the American Guernsey Cattle Club.

These animals include five year old

Payroyal's Hemmadine 324154 producing

11502.1 pounds of milk and 474.8

pounds of butter fat In class AAA and

two year old Cornwall Hill Orange

401000 producing 6853.7 pounds of milk

and 380.6 pounds of butter fat in class

GGG.

It's Easy To Be Mistaken About

STOMACH TROUBLE

« Stomach Suffer* «houId laura bow ffiTBf*

BOA TABLET? curb U» dlatrcM and

pain of ULCERS, GAS ACID INDIGESTION,

belching, hoortburn. constipation etc.. doe to

Mceoaacid. Thii CONVINCING C D IT 17

PBEB Trial may prove your T If tab

Ant step to happy «toniach comfort. No coat

No obligation ArkfnrFREESamplaof Udsaat

ANDERSON'S DKUG STOKE

Mi\NY kinds of lumber go into a houseand

it's our job to belp you select the wood

tbat fits best. Our experts will be glad to advise

you and to give you really excellent lumber.

'Whan a

Danbury-Brewster Lumber Co.

Phone 450

East Main Stsett Brewster. N. Y.

PATTERSON

Miss Ruth Johnston of Ridgefleld,

N. J., spent the week end with her

mother who returned with her and remained

until Tuesday.

Mrs. George Ackley of New Mllford,

called on friends here Monday*.

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Levi recently

of Bavaria have rented the David

Kent house for the winter.

Mrs. Towner Kent entertained two

tables of bridge at her home Monday

evening.

Mr. Hudson Rich and daughter Norma

of Katonah, were callers of Mr.

and Mrs. A. L. Newcomb Sunday.

The annual World Wide Communion

Sunday will be celebrated at the Presbyterian

church next Sunday and all

members have received a special appeal

to be present and join in this

world-wide fellowship.

Miss Louise Austin spent the week

end at her home here and motored

back Sunday morning accompanied by

her mother who spent the day in

Preeport, L X

Mr. and Mrs. William Buchanan

have closed their restaurant on Route

22 and with his father, Mr. John

Buchanan, have returned to their

home on South street for the winter.

Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Whittemore and

Mr. VanDuzer and Master David Newcomb

were dinner guests of Mr. and

Mrs. A. L Newcomb Sunday.

Mr. Henry Ludington fell down the

cellar stairs at his home one day last

week and it was feared at first that

he was badly injured. The Brewster

ambulance conveyed him to the White

Plains Hospital where X-ray showed

that no bones were broken although

he was badly shocked and bruised and

it was thought best for him to remain

at least a week.

Mr. and Mrs. E. 6. Sloat returned

Sunday evening from a month spent

in Rochester.

Rev. H. E. HUlery and E. S./Sloat

attended a medting |ctf 'Westchester

Presbytery in New Rochelle Tuesday.

Rutledge and Sloat are drilling an

artesian well for Mr. Ward Tolbert at

Green Chimney Farm near Barnum's

Corners.

Mr. Semon Richmond Is taking a

course at Cornell University, Ithaca.

Advocate Change

In the Jury Law

A change in the jury law which

would "modernize" the qualifications

of jurors and make eligible for jury

duty those persons who own personal

property as well as real estate owners,

was recommended by City Judge

Thomas F. Fasso of New Rochelle.

In a letter to State Senator Pliny

W. Williamson, of ScarsdaQe, Judge

Fasso scored -the present regulations

as archaic. The law now provides

that a person who does not own real

estate may serve on juries if he is assessed

for personal property in the

amount of $250. The law assessing

personal property has been repealed,

however, he said.

Every war works like a hair-trigger

on the Interrogation: Why Is the

League of Nations?—Toledo Blade.

Foods that make up an adequate

low-cost diet, given in order of their

importance, are listed in Cornell Bulletin

E-236 on low cost foods for

health.

STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP,

MANAGEMENT, CIRCULATION,

ETC., REQUIRED BY THE ACT OF

CONGRESS OF AUGUST 24, 1912,

Of The Brewster Standard published

weekly *t Brewster, New York, for

October 1, 1987.

State of New York,

County of Putnam, as.

Before me, a Notary Public in and

for the State and county aforesaid, personally

appeared E. W. Addis Estate,

who, having been duly sworn according

to law, deposes and says that he is

the owner of toe Brewster Standard

and that the following is, to the best of

his knowledge and belief, a true statement

of the ownership, management

(and if a dally paper, the circulation),

etc., of the aforesaid publication for

the date shown in the above caption,

required by the Act of August 24, 1912,

embodied in section 411, Postal Laws

and regulations, printed on the reverse

of this form, to wit:

L That the names and addresses of

the publisher, editor, managing editor,

and business managers are:

Publisher, E. W. Addis Estate, Brewster,

N. Y.

Editor, E. W. Addis Estate, Brewster,

N. Y.

Managing Editor, E. W. Addis Estate,

Brewster. N. Y.

Business Managers, E. W. Addis

Estate, Brewster, N. Y.

2. That the owner is: (If owned by a

corporation, its name and address

must be stated and also immediately

thereunder the names and addresses

of stockholders owning or holding one

per cent or more of total amount of

stock. If not owned by a corporation,

the names and addresses of the individual

owners must be given. If owned

by a firm, company, or other unincorporated

concern, its name and address,

as well as those of each individual

member, must be given.)

E. W. Addis Estate. Brewster, N. Y.

8. Tha£ the known bondholders,

mortgages, and other security holders

owning or holding 1 per cent or more

of total amount of bonds, mortgages,

or other securities are: (If there are

none, so state.)

None.

ESTHER L. ADDIS.

Executrix.

Sworn to and subscribed before me

this 2Mb day of September, 1987.

MAROAKET L. MACKEY.

Notary Public.

(My commission expires March 80,

1938).

Uncommon

Americans

-By Bmo Scott Watson-

Early-Day Dictator

T ONG before Mussolini or Hitler

JL - / were born, an American gave

a demonstration of "how dictators

get that way." His name was Adolphus

Frederick Hubbard and he was

lieutenant-governor of the state of,

Illinois at the time.

In 1825 Gov. Edward Coles notified

the lieutenant - governor that he

would leave the state the next month

and that Hubbard would be responsible

for the executive duties during

his absence which would not exceed

three months. Eut Coles came back

sooner than he had expected.

The lieutenant-governor, however,

was so well pleased with the job that

he decided he would like to go on

governing. So he announced that

Coles, by his absence, had "abdicated"

and that as lieutenant-governor,

the legal successor to the

governor, he, Hubbard, was now

the governor. Coles paid no attention

to this but returned to his duties

and was recognized by all the executive

officers as governor.

Undiscouraged by this fact, Hubbard

issued a commission as paymaster

general to W. L. D. Ewing

and when the secretary of state

refused to sign it, Ewing, prompted

thereto by Hubbard, appealed to the

Supreme court to issue a mandamus

forcing the secretary to sign the

commission. The court refused so

Hubbard next appealed to the legislature

to support him in his claim to

the governorship.

When it came to a vote, only two

legislators came out openly for

the "pretender" and after a while

Hubbard decided to abandon his

plan of becoming "governor by

usurpation."

Later he decided to win that honor

by more legal methods and during

the campaign he made a speech

which has become a classic in American

political history. He said:

"Fellow-citizens, I offer myself as a

candidate before you for the office

of governor. I do not pretend to be

a man of extraordinary talents; nor

do I claim to be equal to Julius

Caesar or Napoleon Bonaparte, nor

yet to be as great a man as my

opponent, Governor Edwards. Nevertheless

I think I can govern you

pretty well. I do not think it will

require a very extraordinarily smart

man to govern you; for to tell the

truth, fellow-citizens, I do not think

you will be very hard to govern,

nohow 1"

P. S. He wasn't elected.

© Western Newspaper Union.

Uncommon

Americans

-By DM* Scott Watson-

Yankee Saint

'TE' hundred years ago they

O looked upon John Humphrey

Noyes as a madman, a crank, a

heretic and an immoralist. But today

the historians speak of him

as "a Yankee saint," a "true

genius" and "one of the noblest

pioneers America has ever produced."

Born in Vermont, Noyes was educated

at Dartmouth and prepared

himself for a career in law. But

the religious fervor which swept the

country in the early 1830's seized

him and he entered Andover theological

seminary to prepare himself

for the ministry. However, after obtaining

his license to preach, Noyes

began to rebel against dogmatic and

professional religion. Becoming

known for his heresies, his license

was taken away from him. Then

he announced he was going to establish

a kingdom of God on earth

and he founded the Putney community

in Vermont.

There he put into practice his philosophy

of Christian Communism

which included the most intimate

relationships of living. Because of

these daring experiments, Noyes

was repeatedly persecuted by

groups of reformers and more than

once he narrowly escaped imprisonment.

Finally, he moved his colony

to Oneida, N. Y., where it became

famous for the successful industries

it started.

In 1869 Noyes inaugurated another

experiment which brought down

upon him a fresh storm of protest

from the exponents of traditional

morality. He called it "stirpiculture"

which was nothing more than

a program of scientific breeding for

the human race long before the

word "eugenics" had been coined.

The results of these experiments

are said by actuarial experts to

be unparalleled in the records of

modern vital statistics.

In 1831 his Oneida community was

changed to a corporation and by

the time of his death five years

later there was little left of the

original idea of the community but

its name. During the next ho if century

the name of John Humphrey

Noyes sank into obscurity. Then his

biography was written by a modern

scholar who has declared: "However

obvious his defects remain,

John Noyes possessed the attributes

of genius . Such a life has

seemed far more worthy of commemoration

than many of those more

celebrated, more honored by the

nation and the world, yet who never

dared, as Noyes did, to translate

ideals into the reality of living."

HAPPENINGS

1917—TWENTY YEARS AGO

Mrs. Juengst and Mrs. Burgess will

entertain at Kishawana on Saturday.

Seth Crosby, who was injured in a

runaway accident recently left Danbury

Hospital on Wednesday with his

customary military step.

Dr. F. L. Gamage, headmaster of

Pawling school, will address a union

service at the Methodist church on

the excise question next Sunday evening.

William A. Sheppard of the 165th Infantry

now ranks as Sergeant.

Dr. M. McG. Gardner, of Watertown,

spent Sunday in Brewster. He expects

to go to Prance any day now.

Pvt. William A. Towner who enlisted

recently in the 23rd Regiment arrived

in Spartanburg this week. Boynton

Towner is receiving training at

Sandy Hook.

Mrs. Prank Emerson, formerly Miss

Kimberly, of Brewster School, is a

guest of Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Crane.

Mr. and Mrs. Emerson are now (Presbyterian

Missionaries in Africa.

Capt. H. H. Vreeland has been notified

that he will soon embark for

Prance where he will be schooled in

Modern Warfare after which he will

return to this country and train drafted

men.

Mrs. A. P. Budd, chairman of Surgical

Dressings, has just completed a

course at the teaching center, 451

Madison Avenue and will demonstrate

the recent changes in surgical dressings

to all the Instructors in the Brewster

Branch on Tuesday and Friday

mornings next week.

At the Men's Club bowling alleys

on Tuesday the Old Warriors beat the

Trained Seals. The Old Warriors were

Dr. Boynton, Dr. Scofleld, Wiltse, Tuttle

and W„ Mackey. The Trained Seals

were Pugsley, Merritt, Dr. Marshall,

Sheridan and F. Mackey. Some

matches with out-of-town teams are

being arranged.

Claud Horton, father of Mrs. Albro

Travis, died at Albany on Tuesday. His

widow and three daughters survive.

The funeral was held at Albany. Interment

was at Port Ewan, N. Y.

1907—THIRTY TEARS AGO

Mr. and Mrs. John 6. Eno are visiting

relatives in Elgin, HI.

Henry Clay Reed, formerly employed

at Borden's factory, has accepted a

position as watchman at Rest-a-Whlle.

Fred W. Storm with A. F. Lobdeil,

Philip Diehl and A. P. Budd as guests

in his Maxwell oar attended the Dutchess

County Fair at Poughkeepsie.

Miss Edith Dlehl and Mrs. Andrew

Ferris will entertain at the last regular

Saturday at Kishawana Country

Club. Volunteers will provide for golfers

until snow covers the ground.

Ronan, owned by Major Frank Wells

now in training at Ryanogue Farm is

entered in two races at the Danbury

Fair.

fo/otteSc/t

WHEN IT

COSTS SO LITTLE

TO TELEPHONE

Even if some friend you enjoy calking

with does live a hundred miles or so

away, it's just a matter of moments to

talk back and forth by telephone... to

share the thrill of hearing each other's

voices as dearly as if you paid a visit

in person.

You really have to talk with someone

out-of-town by telephone to appreciate

it. People talk about the experience for

days. It's a thoughtful way of expressing

friendship... offering congratulations...

extending sympathy.. .giving words of

cheer...adding zest to news.

And so inexpensive all may participate

...especially during bargain hours.

Reduced rates on Long Distance to

most places are in effect every evening

after 7—and all day Sunday.

NEW YORK TELEPHONE COMPANY

®

Lakeside Hal who won at Poughkeepsie

will be driven at Danbury on Wednesday

by Alex McMillan.

Fred W. Storm will exhibit his pacer

Teddy, a pair of black horses, a

road horse, four year old gelding

and a pair of mules.

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Towner entertained

Hon. and. Mrs. Samuel Mc­

Millan in their attendance at the Baptist

Association yearly meeting at

Towners Baptist church.

Land is being acquired for additional

tracks on the Harlem above Putnam

Junction. The present owners are Eli

Griffin, Mortimer Bloomer and A. F.

Lobdeil.

Edward Pcrcival died at his home on

Tuesday. He was born in New York

City and was in the 69th year of his

age. His widow and three children,

James, Margaret and Edward survive.

Funeral service conducted by Rev. J. J.

Reed were held at his residence. Interment

was in Drewcliffe cemetery.

J. Crawford Hodge died in Danbury

on Tuesday, aged 60 years. He was

born In Mllltown. Mr. Hodge was an

all-year-round employee of Barnum

and Bailey. His surviving relatives are

sisters, Mrs. Truman Banks, Mrs.

Charles H. Lent and Mrs. Frank G.

Eno; and his brothers, Henry B. Hodge

and Edward F. Hodge. Funeral service

was on Thursday. Interment was at

Bridgeport. fr-

DANBURY

UPHOLSTERING CO.

16 Montgomery St.

Danbury, Conn.

We are In a position to gf*e ytm

competent service In the largest

and most modern upholstering

shop In this vicinity.

Our prices are the lowest anywhere.

We specialize In the following

lines: Upholstering, PoUshlng,

Slipcovers, Curtains, Drapery

work, Window Shades made to

order.

Restoring of Antique Furniture a

specialty.

We have a large line of .he newest

designs of covering from

which yon may choose.

Estimates cheerfuly famished.

Tel. Danbury 2518

r *OOQOOC»OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQQO<

J. DIAMOND

Ladies and Gents Tailoring

Pressing 50c Cleaning $1.00 Also Repairing

Main Street Brewster, N. Y.

Have you tried the new

Tydol GAS OIL INE

— Distributor —

George W. Hall Sales Corp.

F. O'BRIEN 8 SONS

Tel. 364 and 2-J Brewster, N. Y.

^fH*

io

^SSJi

****»£'£ L •.::• t

*«**n. o. c. . 46

%»SS^^iae^*'* *

SAVE AFTER SEVEN-SAVE EVERY SUNDAY-ON LONG DISTANCE CALLS


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1937 THE BREWSTER STANDARD — ESTABLISHED 1869 PAGE THREE

MENU OF THE WEEK

Co ^« ht by SIDNEY SNOW ""

.Ty »«»«»»»»tr.rxxxxxxxxxixxxxnTTTrnxxTXXXXxixx.i^

Looking For A «Deferent"

fridge Cake?

gxxxxxxxxxxxiJLiJLBy SIDNEY SNOV/xxxirzixiiixxxxi

W HILE

CAKE may be cake, thank goodness there need never

be any hesitancy in hunting up a new and different one. And;

here is n fudge cake so mcltingly delicious that it brings to

the table a highly definite touch of the fine French pastry chef. It ia

BALTIMORE FUDGE CAKE

In one form or another it has been a Maryland favorite for generations.

Here is the most modern recipe for it.

1-1/3 cups sifted cake flour

1 3 A . teaspoons double - acting

baking powder

Vi teaspoon salt

1 cup sugar

2 eggs, well beaten

tablespoons softened butter

or other shortening

Vi cup milk

Vi teaspoon vanilla

2 squares unsweetened

chocolate, melted

Sift flour once, measure, add baking powder, salt, and sugar, and

alft together three times. Add butter. Combine eggs, milk, and vs.nilla,

and add to flour mixture, stirring until all flour is dampened.

Add chocolate and blend. Then beat vigorously 1 minute. Bake in

reased pan, 8x8x2 inches, in, moderate oven (826 degrees P.) 1 hour,

f

pread Coffee Frosting on top and sides of cake.

COFFEE FROSTING

4 tablespoons butter 2 tablespoons strong coffee ]

2 cups sifted confectioners' (about)

sugar Dash of salt

Cream butter; add part of sugar gradually, blending after each

addition. Add remaining sugar, alternately with coffee, until of right

consistency to spread. Beat after each addition until smooth. Add

salt Makes enough frosting to cover tops of two 9-inch layers.

Mam** Of The Week i

MONDAY

Breakfast—Chilled grapefruit, ready to eat

cereal, scrambled eggs, fried potatoes, buttered toast, coffee or cocoa.

Lunch—Salisbury steak, Spanish beans, watercress salad, wine jelly

•with peaches, lady fingers, tea or milk. Dinner—Breaded veal cutlets,

green peas, German fried potatoes, lettuce salad, French pastry, coffee

or beer.

TUESDAY

Breakfast—Sliced nectarines with cream, hot

rice with cream or butter, suear and cinnamon, boiled eggs, buttered

toast, coffee or cocoa. Lunch—Ham omelet, mixed green salad,

swiss cheese and crackers, tea or milk. Dinner-—English mutton

chops, broiled fresh mushrooms, mixed vegetables, Escarole salad,

fruit compote, cookies, coffee.

WEDNESDAY

Breakfast—Sliced pineapple, ready to eat

cereal, ham and eggs,, rolls, coffee or cocoa.Lunch—Chilled melon,

Pig's knuckles and sauerkraut, boiled potatoes, ruit cup, tea or milk.

Dinner—Larded tenderloin of beef, egg plant en casserole, canned asparagus

salad, nut loaf cake, stewed pears, coffee.

THURSDAY

Breakfast—Stewed prunes, ready to eat cereal,

coddled eggs, broiled bacon, buttered toast, tea or milk. Lunch—

Hamburger patties with fried onions, canned corn, dressed lettuce,

fruit gelatin, tea or milk. Dinner—Boiled corned beef, cabbage,

turnips, potatoes-onions, mixed green salad, Harvest layer cake, coffee

or beer.

FRIDAY

I * ****^»« | Break fast—Stewed pears, hot oatmeal with

cream, shirred eggs, raisiiwiut toast, coffee or cocoa. Lunch—

Macaroni and cheese, lettuce and tomato salad, orange pudding, tea

or milk. Dinner—Shrimp Newberg in rice ring, buttered beets, cucumber

boat salad, Camembert cheese and crackers, coffee.

SATURDAY

| Breakfast—Sliced bananas with ready to eat

cereal, baked eggs, broiled ham, hot biscuits, jelly, coffee or cocoa.

launch—Mixed grill, cucumber salad, layer cake, tea or milk. Dinner—

Boiled leg of mutton with caper sauce, mashed turnips, fried potatoes,

lettuce and grapefruit sulad, orange souffle, coffee.

SUNDAY

'• " I Breakfast—Sliced peaches with cream, ready

to eat cereal, buckwheat cakes, fried eggs, breakfast sausage, maple

syrup, coffee or cocoa. Dinner-—Cream of onion soup, Boast turkey,

cranberry jelly, corn fritters, buttered peas, ripe olives, radishes, meringue

a la creme, coffee. Supper—Chili con carni con frijoles, toasted

crackers, sliced tomatoes, fruit cup, coffee or tea.

• Sidney Snow will be pleased to supply any of these recipes.

Just write care of this paper. 12

Tel. 644 Brewster Tel. 47 Croton Falls

Opposite Depot

Purdy & Penny

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS

Estimates Cheerfully Given

Brewster, N. Y.

W

Phtitvirtfht, Cinidian T'f.il Buntu

ITHOUT a major crime at far back as man can remember; without

needing to maintain charitable institutions, and with the lowest tax

rate of any autonomous area in the United States or Canada, Prince

Edward Island it a New World Utopia. Smallest of Canadian provinces,

It is 145 mi lei long by from four to 35 wide, it wat the birthplace of the idea

which became the Canadian Confederation. Off the beaten track in the

sheltering Gulf of St. Lawrence, it is a peaceful, charming island that

tourists are just beginning to discover. The toil it red and almott stoneless.

Some of itt beaches are 20 miles long. Fine highways girdle the

province through pastoral landscape and at the originator of the silverblack

fox industry, itt 600 ranches are points of perpetual interest. The

world's largest car ferry links the island with the mainland. Layout shows

the main motor routes; section of highway and a prise Prince Edwardj

Island fox. O

WISE OYSTERS LEARNED

THAT ABSENCE MAKES THE

HEART GROW FONDER

A Fine Recipe For Those Who Do Not

Like 'Em Raw

If one is in doubt as to the real Vt tablespoon flour

definition of an oyster it need merely Salt and white pepper

be said that it is the answer to many 1 cup oyster liquor

a worried housewife's prayers and ths

Melt the butter in a pan and add

desire of many a good stomach.

to it the flour; when well mixed strain

Unfortunately, these tasty bivalves

in the oyster liquor through a piece

do not honor us with their presence at

of cheesecloth; add thin cream .onion

all seasons of the year but perhaps

juice, parsley, salt and pepper, and let

they are wise, they probably know

thicken to a custard like consistency.

that if they were available all the

Clean the oysters; drop them into the

time, they would cease to be so popu­

simmering sauce and let cook until

lar, at least this is the way with some

their edges curl up.

thing that we can have wherever the

urge arises.

Beat the yolks of eggs until very

It slightly goes against the better light, add salt and rich cream, mix

judgment of some people to eat said well, and add the stiffly beaten egg

bivalves in their raw state and so, for whites. Pour mixture into a hot iron

such people as well' as for those who frying pan which has not been greas­

eat them in any state, food experts ed, and cook in a moderate oven

and hungry people who like to experi­ twenty minutes or until the omelet

ment have settled themselves down, has risen well and is a light brown on

tried out this and that and at last top. Pour the creamed oysters on a

arrived at several definite ends, one hot flat platter. Take the omelet out

of which appears in the form as fol­ of the frying pan very carefully with

lows:

the aid of a spatula and a pancake

BAKED OYSTER OMELET

18 oysters

8 eggs

% cup thin cream

% cup rich cream

\i teaspoon onion Juice

1 teaspoon chopped parsley

turned, and set it on top of the

creamed oysters. A thin coating of

the omelet will stick to the pan, but

do not scrape that out. The omelet

should not be completely set through,

but should be a little soft and runny

in the middle.

The Cost of Scarcity. Nature's refusal to cooperate with the

As any housewife knows, the pig- New Deal's economy of scarcity has

killing, crop-curtailment program,

depleted breeding stock requiring

plus the drouth, is now being reflect­

years to rebuild and caused a scarcity

of corn despite heavy imports from

ed in high prices for pork and other

abroad. This is the price which con­

products, now at the highest levels In

sumers have to pay for the fallacious

eleven years. The worst is yet to come.

assumption that there Is profit to any­

The farmer who profited more on a body from goods not produced.—

larger volume of sales at lower prices, Springfield Union.

has few hogs to sell. Packing plants

o

are operating at a fraction of normal

If we had more unemployed artists,

capacity, hundreds of employes have

unemployed fiddlers and tooters, un-

been laid off and the railroads and

imployed writers and the government

truckers are suffering in consequence. would give them jobs, we would have

Since a shortage of any kind of mere bad pictures, more bad music

meat means a greater demand for oth­ and mere bad books in this now too

er kinds, beef prices have also risen on perfect country.—Charleston News and

top of already sensational Increases. Courier.

For SMOOTH, balanced

flavor ...aged slowly in

.glass-lined tanks to the

very peak of mellowness

•,„>. insist upon

Record Crowd Attends

Annual Highway Bake

missioner, was unable to attend. He chess, Orange, Rockland and Ulster.

was represented by other heads of County engineers of all these counties

the state highway department in­ attended. Local guests included Mayor

cluding Thomas F. Farrell, chief en­ Spratt.

Approximately 750 attended the 11th gineer, and E. W. Wendell, assisant There were no speeches.

annual clambake of the State Depart­ chief engineer. Others attending in­ The committee arranging the bake:

ment of Public Works, local highway cluded Roy Finch, secretary of the Mr. Coombs, chairman, Howard B.

division, at the Dutchess turnpike state licensing board of professional Coleman, D. J. Oonia, Raymond J.

headquarters Saturday afternoon. engineers and land surveyors and A. Michaels,, Frank Oakley, A. A. Han­

John H. Coombs, chairman of the C. Mullen, district engineer of the son and T. J. Moran.

committee arranging the event, said New York, New Haven and Hartford

•it was the largest crowd ever to at-railroad

company. Counties in this Life's hardest up.s and downs are

'tend the department's bake.

highway district represented were keeping up appearances and keeping

Westchester, Putnam, Orange, Dut­ down expenses.—(Los Angeles Times.

A. W. Brandt, state highway com­

PURE SEMOLINA BULK ELBOW *fe #fe A .

MACARONI or SPAGHETTI J ,bs 1U^

MUELLER'S PRODUCTS A pkgs -

FRESHPAK BETTER QUALITY *% «S% 4%

TOMATOES . . 3&29'

THE NEW 1937 *g £\

RINSO -~* Slo^

BLUE PLATE or REX Jg

DOG FOOD YOORCHOKI »4^

WILSON'S CERTIFIED ««g •

CORNED BEEF . n ~15'

CLAPP'S

BABY FOODS

BAKER'S

COCOA .

H-0 OATS

OXYDOL

SPRY

CAMPBELL'S

Big 3. 25/ Anniversary Values

J* lb. can 9/

lBO.pkfl.19?'

W 3 55/

BEAMS WHHPORK 3»n«22/

HECKERS'

FARINA £12/ ft: 21/

DEL MAIZ NIBLETS 2-n,25/

FLAKES or GRANULES

CHIPSO . 2»fl.-P^.39/

OVALTINE 6 ti»25/

RIALTO STANDARD QUALITY

PEAS . . No. 2 en 10^

POCONO

OLEO STSSSSLV 2ft* 25S

CAMAY SOAP - 5<

fRESHPAK GELATINE

DESSERTS SsSs 4 p^li

flni P'C or DEL MONTE

PINEAPPLE JUICE dm cans J&mw*

CAMPBELL'S ASSORTED

CniRPC EXCEPT CHICKEN

U V U r Q & TOMATO 3

KAFFEE HAG

DEL MONTE

PEACHES or HALVES

THE NEW SUPER-CREAMED

cans 2.5i

or SANKA

COFFEE 39

S;17i

ORISCO £19« 3 £55x

IVORYSOAP 5±6'2&.19'

SPECIAL WEEK END VALUES!

NNfc QjKANULAIbD HH

dU OAR CUSTOMER

WM,T *° POUNDS TO A CUSTOMER ,b ' ^ j | T

FRESHPAK A jm **

COFFEE ,R,CH & RESTFUL" Mm ' bs ' **W I ^

m mi "BETTERMiffl;

BEST CENU1NE SPRING

OF LAMP

FANCY LONG ISLAND

SUCKLINGS

Week End Delicatessen Specials!

YOUR CHOICE OF SIZES

TENDER PINK MEATED

CELERY FED

CAREFULLY SELECTED

AVER. WEIGHT APPROX. 5 lbs

EXCEPTIONAL FLAVOR

YOUR CHOICE CALIF. PEA or RED KIDMEY BEANS

OVEN BAKED BEANS . . * 12/

ARMOUR'S

SKINLESS FBANKFOBTS . '»29/

BROADNICA

"MELLO" BOILED HAM . *'» 19/

FRESH

POTATO SALAD . . . M5/

Fresh Fish Specials!

FRESH

Garden fr^/MfalMttffl

LARGE SIZE FLORIDA

GRAPEFBUIT

lb-5/

••25/

GRAPES *» TOKAY .

HONEY DEW 'EST

CELERY T^LE HEARTS bch.JO/

FILLET of HADDOCK lb.18/

FRESH

SCALLOPS ib. 25/

FRESH

R€D

po«* FILLETS * 1 * /

2*15'

•AM M FOR EATING - 4 _

APPLES „d COOKING 5 •»-17s

SWEET POTATOES 5 ft* 14s

TURNIPS YHXOW . 4»».10s

GRAND UNION


PAGE FOUR THE BREWSTER STANDARD — ESTABLISHED 1869 FRIDAY. OCTOBER 1. 1937

THE BREWSTER STANDARD

Brewster, New York

Nolan Named For

Supreme Court

Putnam County Forms

Junior Red Cross

Lincolndalc Downs

Carmcl 130

Stunt Auto Races At

Danbury Fair, Oct 2, 3,

Introduce new and familiar foods

to a ch Id by giving small amounts at

flrst; then increase them gradually.

E. W. Addis Estate, Publisher

Friday, dHobcr 1, 1937

We believe In service for others,

Colliding at 40 miles an hour, crash­

. Ikff

J. Addison Young, Official Referee, in health of mind and body to fit us The Lincoln Agricultural School ing through flaming planks, hurtling a

Published Weekly at Brewster, Putnam

Placed Judge Gerald Nolan's Name for better service, and in worldwide football aggregation came through with distant truck and rolling over and ov­

Before the Delegates of the Judicial! friendship. For this reason we are flying colors when they met and de­

County, lrA.Y.

er in an automobile Is "all In a day"

Convention of the Ninth District at • joining the American Junior Red feated the Carmel team Wednesday with Luck Teter who will be seen at

Entered at the Post Office at Brewster White Plains, September 25. Cross. We will help to make Its work with a score of 13-0. Llncolndale's the Danbury Fair its first two days,

as second class mail.

j successful in our school and commu- two scores came as a result of Mc­Oct.

2 and 3.

County Judge Gerald Nolan of nity, and will work together with

Carthy's beautiful kicking and Velga's

Lucky says he always has a premo­

Yonkers, was nominated as the Re-1 Juniors everywhere in our own and passing. Both scores were passes nition when an accident is abaut to

Republicans Name

publican candidate for Justice of the other lands" ^ renewcd afflllatlons wlth befall him. He has been in the hospi-

Supreme Court in the coming election, j On Monday, September 27, Miss jth Carmel team tnat m 1936 beat the Town Tickets

Representative Fish Addresses County

Committee After the Business of

Making Nominations for Town Offices

was Completed Tuesday Evening.

The Republican County Committee

with only one absent greeted Assemblyman

D. M. Stephens, chairman, on

Tuesday evening and within a very

short space of time handed in the

town nominations, listened to Mr.

tal 22 limes ' nad 16 rIbs and both co1 "

to fill the position on the bench va- [ Maude Lewis, Assistant to the Direc-J.. „ h d foURnt 7_0 game it tar bones broken and 58 stitches takcated

last fall by WDltamP Bleakley, j tor. American Junior Red Cross, will J" a flrst of tne Kawn

at a. convention of Republican dele-. come from National Headquarters in botn teams c&rmeVs was mark„

gates to a Ninth Judicial District' Washington to organize the Junior ed wlih many fumbles and power­

convention held last Friday afternoon : Red Cross in the schools of Putnam

house end-sweeps with Green toting.

In the Little Theatre of the County | County. Miss Lewis will visit the

Acting-Captain McDade, ever smil-

Center.

| schools of Putnam Valley. Kent and L genIal &, lost the toss and Car.

Official Referee J. Addison Your*, ^Kcrn? ^ ^ D ^ L f ^ r S P* ChOSe to reCelVG Lincolndale got

-

of New Rochelle. former member or \^SSLS^^SSS!!PUS^* off It's only poor kick of the game and

the Appelate Division, Second Do- fesdT C^d^rm? SriSfand dld n0t ** »elr hand, on the ball

~>*~ZZ f^v «u» MwrAm. t«~ w.! Tuesaa y' Coia a ! afterwards in the first quarter except-

Pish's stirring remarks and adjourned j Nolan before the convention. Seconds m m 7 It spontaneous move-,, , ,,u, h lr1

he d

In time to join friends at the annual *> the nomination came from State ment b b scno^ chndren of Ulc | yard Ine Carmel. J*******

dinner of the Putnam County Real Senator Frederic H Bontecou of jUnlted * ^ Canada and Austra]iai *" *Z*SJ* JKS ££.

Estate Board at Mahopac Hotel. Millbrook. representing Dutchess. ed in its sustained drive to pass Lln­

because tn wlshed to share m tne

Nominations for Town Offices follow: county; Stanley B Johnson, of Or-,work colndale's 25 yard marker.

of tne Red Cross for the men

Town of Carmel:

ange county; County Judge James W. m the trenchefit camps and hospitals Ujcohidale had the ball at the end

Supervisor: Orson H. Lyon. Bailey, of Putnam county; Miss Na-Lg ,ne world war After the Armts-;

Town Clerk: Edward Ganong.

Justice of Peace ( 4yrs): William

A. Mead.

Justice of Peace (4 yrs): John W.

Donegan.

Justice of Peace (2 yrs): Chauncey

G. Craft.

Collector: C. Leslie Hadden.

Supt. of Highways: E. Waldo Erickson.

Assessor (4 yrs): John R. Cole.

Assessor (2 yrs): Francis J. Ganong.

School Director: Bradford Klock.

Town of Kent:

Supervisor: Clarence H. Wooley.

Town Clerk: Edward Christian.

of tne flrst garter and the beginning

talle Couch, of Nyack. for Rockland Uce' money contributed by these*' 0 ' the 2d but failed In yardage 8

county; and Frank Devlin, of Yonk- i cnildren was used to help thousands ': B ave and

Carmel the ball at midfleld. A

costly fumble by Green on the next

ers. representing Judge Nolan's native I ^^idren^ln" Europe who were suf-'

Westchester. iferi from tne wldespread devasta- Play recovered by Rlgney of LAS gave

_ - . *-.

O'NeUl.

Supt.j>f Highways: Floyd Knapp.

Collector: Lenor Harbold.

Assessor (4 yrs): Harold Poshay.

Assessor (2 yrs): Edward Wlxom.

Assessor (2 yrs): Willis Jones.

School Director: Clara E. Stevens.

Town of Patterson:

Supervisor: Arthur L. Newcomb.

Town Clerk: William O. Taylor.

Justice of Peace (4 yrs): Junta W.

Dykeman.

Justice of Peace (4 yrs): William J.

Simpson.

Assessor (4 yrs): Charles G. Segelken.

Assessor (2 yrs): Claus A. Moline.

Supt. of Highways: Charles Swanson.

Colletcor: Henry W. Burton.

School Director: Frances E. Gerow.

Town of Philips town:

Supervisor: Gilbert Forman.

Town Clerk: Edward Oollard.

Justice of Peace: Chester E. Nelson.

Justice of Peace: Augus MacDonald.

Assessor (4 yrs): Norman Champlln.

Assessor (2 yrs): Samuel D. Vandemark.

Supt. of Highways: William P. A.

Hustis.

Collector: Edward Adams.

School Director: Elizabeth A. Jaycox.

Town of Putnam Valley:

Supervisor: Gustave Ekholm.

Town Clerk: Thomas Blanchard.

Justice of Peace: Clement C. Gorley.

: tinn nf war tne bal1 back to the Aggies near the

as one whom he considered to be "one ' eluding our island territories. Ite gjgt ° «"*»• ^ A h & i tne£

of the most distinguished judges and n^bera^ave^an^ahno^ unUrn^d £ * * gmJjM a^eldjhem

one of the finest men that this great £ » * £ * * * g g ^ ^ ^ but poorly. A return of punt, one by

community in which they live and to MoOarthy^past the goal, put the pighelp

others less fortunate than them- skbl ° n Carm f s twenty yard line

selves; they can assist In national I wbere Carmrl Ambled again. Lincolndisasters

such as the floods of last ,d a le recovered it and came back with

year, when Juniors contributed $4,000 a s P eedv attack in Une Pangea and a

towards relieving the sufferings of I flnal Pass from McCarthy to Rufflns

children in the flood area; they can * or ^ &**• score - T^ dr °P klck b en In one side of his face. His wife

always goes to the hospital with him

and stays till he comes out.

None of the performers In the Teter

Dare Devil troop is allowed to be married.

None of them drinks, they train

vigorously, inspect each other's equipment

and understudy one another.

They work together realizing each

rmiinc-m ,.„'• ,!,. nbvifovm for hi, ,"." ", "-" :u"(rw;pu mm- iir,; , , , - .man's safety is for the good of all and

n m t a ^ n ^ & ^ d ^ l n ^ r S f e

State of New York has ever produced."

"I am not unmindful of the task

which lies before me," Judge Nolan

added. "I am not unmindful of the

Justice of Peace (4 yrs): John Borg- 'great Judges who have worked in that

wald.

court, and who are working in it today.

Justice of Peace (4 yrs): James J.

y

"I have believed, and always can „ i correspond with members of the Jun- McCarthy failed leaving the score for

believe, in an independent Judiciary" L. ^ CrQSS m forel c0UntrleSf the flrst half at 6-0 in Llncolndale's

he asserted as the gathering^nearly 1 ^ tnus grow toward a broader un_ favor.

200 delegates interrupted him with

derstanding of other peoples. These In the third stanza Carmel held the

t o U °" *


ID AY, OCTOBER 1. 1937 THE BREWSTER STANDARD — ESTABLISHED 1869 PAGE FIVE

k

HAPPENINGS

Robert S. Cleaver, Jr., has entered

Taft School at Watertown, Conn.

— o

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M. Adrian returned

last week end from a trip to,

Sebago Lake.

o

Miss Dorothy Ryder, of Brooklyn, N.

Y., spent ihe week end at the Ryder

Homestead at Peach Lake.

o

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Poster and

their daughter, Sarah, viitW Dr. and

Mrs. Robert S. Cleaverxj«*winday.

- o «•••*

Miss Madeline Mackey visited in

Brewster on Sunday and missed some

of her friends after the fashion of

ships that pass in the night.

o

Miss Grace Towner returned home

on Thursday aboard the Rex after

spending the summer in Italy with

friends.

Elizabeth Denton will enter the

Training School for Nurses of Flushing

Hospital, Flushing, L. I., on Monday.

o - •

The Brewster Garden Club and

guests had an enjoyable dinner meeting

at Broadmcadows Inn on Friday,

September 24.

c—— ^

Alfred Wells and Harry H. Wells, Jr.,

of Brewster, and Charles T. Wilson,

Jr., of Mahopac, have returned to

Yale. We expect to hear plenty from

all three.

o

Virginia WelJs returned to Rosemary

School on Wednesday.

o

The District Nursing Association will

meet at 2:30 Wednesday afiternoon,

October 6, in the Nurses Room.

o

The Cecllian Society will meet Monday,

October 4. with Mrs. Daniel H.

Bloomer.

— o

The Sacrament of the Lord's Supper

will be administered at the Presbyterian

church at the morning service on

Sunday next.

o .

Tile Woman's Auxiliary of St. Andrew's

church will hold a "Tea and

Food Sale" Friday, October 22, from

3 to 5 p. m. at the home of Miss

Maria Birch.

- o

Mrs. Bruce English who recently

recovered from a fracture of the leg,

went hurriedly to Northern Westchester

Hospital on Thursday with an inflamed

appendix.

The Rosary Altar Society of St.

Lawrence OToole's church will hold a

covered dish supper at the School

Hall at six-thirty o'clock Wednesday

evening, October 13.

o

There will be a card party at American

Legion headquarters Tuesday

evening, October 5, at 8:30. The Ladies

Auxiliary will serve delicious refreshments.

Prizes will be an interesting

feature. The admission is 50 cents,

p

A card party for the benefit of St.

Black Comes On

The Air Tonight

Kenneth H. Berkley, general manager

of the National Broadcasting

Company, says that Justice Hugo L.

Black will speak from Washington

over the nationwide facilities of NBC

tonight from 9:30 to 10 o'clock, eastern

standard time.

o •

B. H. S. Alumni

Will Meet Oct. 5

On Tuesday evening, Oct. 5, at 7:30

there will be an important meeting of

the B. H. S. Alumni Association in the

High School. At this meeting new officers

for the coming year will be elected.

Every member is, therefore, asked

to be present.

If there is anyone who is interested

in joining the Association, the present

members extend to you a very cordial

invitation to attend the meeting on

Oct. 5, as plans are being made to

make the meetings and activities of

the organization more enjoyable during

the coming year.

o — • —

New Curb to Improve

Approach to Court

CROTON FALLS

Mrs. Anna B. Hitchcock of Melrose,

Mass., and formerly of this place spent

a few days last week with her brother-in-law,

Jabez H. Moses.

Mrs. Thomas Flood of Lincolndale,

entertained the Rainenite Club on

Monday evening. The high scores at

cards were held by Mrs. Nellie

Juengst,, Mrs. M Purdy and Mrs. May

Muller. Delicious fereshments were

served.

Mrs. Ralph Outhouse who has been

ill is much improved.

Miss Marguerite Leonard has returned

from a New York Hospital and \s

with her brother has moved into the

apartment over Robusto's store. Mrs.

Cypher and children of North Salem,

have moved in the apartment in the

J. H. Moses building vacated by Miss

Leonard.

The baseball game played last Sunday

with the Goldens Bridge Terriers

was won by the Croton Palls A. c. by

a score of 4 to 3. Next Sunday afternoon

the same teams will meet on

this field again. A good game is promised.

Mr. and Mrs. William Kurner will

be hosts for a card party in their home

in Baldwin Place on Saturday even­

/?

With the parking space at the rear

of the county buildings about completed,

the supervisors, at a meeting

Friday afternoon voted to build a curb

along the front of the courthouse

property on the main street. This

Joseph's church will be held at the concrete curbing will match the pre­

home of Mrs. William Kurner, Sat-

.

If the full stop

,

sign

.

drive

,.

of the

sent curbing along the front of the

, urday, Octorber 16, at 8 p. m. Ad- county office building.

troopers were tried out in the vil age misskm 50 cents ^ ^ wil, ^ ^ The parking space, built at a cost

and offenders cou d pay fines that|and refresnmente.

of nearly $5,000, will accommodate 50

would be "something" in the opinion | p ^ or 60 cars. It has two entrances, one

of some who are concerned for the Mr. and Mrs. John E. Cleary, of between the office building and a

safety of children.

North Brewster, left yesterday for At- courthouse and another at the north

TT ., ""T.. , , , llantlc City, where they will spend four side of the courthouse. This parking

How emotions can^either help to «te-l attendlng the Sales Congress of space will be most convenient for all

velop or to noar a ch Ids personality te ^ Metropolltan Ufe Insurance Co. who transact business at the county

explained in Cornell bulletin &U*.\m/dlear/won this trip 1fr being the buildings in the future.

Single copies are sent free on request leadin sales repreSentative from the

from the Office of Publication, Roberts Peekskill Distrlct.

Hall, Ithaca, N. Y.

Mrs. Colvin Addresses

The average New York State angler

Bertram A .Bell, governor of Young

Put. County W. C. T. U.

caught 28 fish during 1935, the State

Republican Clubs of Putnam County Conservation Department reported.

£ Pining to hold the "Make BeUeye The fl was arrived at on tne ^ The 52nd annual convention of the

Bal of the Philipstown Club in

Putnam County W. C. T. U. was held

Cold,of ts from 85000 Izaak Waltons,

Sprhig. October 20. This club is

in the Presbyterian church at Cold

con-|who hooked total of nearl tW£) and

ducting a vigorous drive for

Spring Wednesday. Mrs. D. Leigh

newia nalf mIUion members of the flnny

Colvin made the principal addresses

members.

tribe that year. More than 141,000 at the afternoon and evening sessions.

licenses reported no fish taken. Mrs. George Jaycox, county president,

Mr. and Mis. Percy Stuart enter­

—• o —

conducted roll call. The devotional

tained a party at dinner on Sunday

The third annual Mid-Hudson service in the afternoon was led by

in honor of their son-in-law, Mr.

Stamp exhibit, the career of whicn I Mrs. Leslie Anoney and in the evening

Sherman Bijur, whose birthday was was launched in 1935, will be held in|by lSTBt Jayc0Xi Mrs. Sarah Barnes.

the occasion of celebration. In the

. , „ . Poughkeepsie again on Nov. 19 and 20 president of the Cold Spring unit,

afternoon the party had the pleasure iflnd nt lndicatlons are that it will made the welcoming address with

of watching the ladies tennis finals at jbe the b| t event t held it was response by Miss Minnie Hayt, of

Kishawana Country Club in which |disclosed at a meetlng of ^ Dutchess Brewster. Mrs. E. 6. Agor was secre­

Mrs. Bijur won from Mrs. Ralph Proc- phllatcllc Soclety m the j ^ o^p. tary of the meeting. The treasurer's

bell.

report was made by Mrs. Josephine

\ The suite in the Martinique, en­

Troxell, of Carmel, and the Loyal

Mr. and Mrs. R. Somers Vreeland

gaged by Assemblyman Stephens for

Temperance Legion report by Miss

and Mr. and Mrs. Will Winston, of

the use of Argonne Post, did service

Minnie Hayt. The memorial service

t«c u« ux ~e«»»c jruat,um ocxvicc ig^^em California, guests of Mr. H.K^TZ^ZZZA jJMrT^toi£TwS

for severs en husiastlc veterans who Vreeland, left hlm last week end l?"*** Mar^ E Smfth coim^v

admit trying to get a few cat naps ,or .hnrf . lt t_ Bn«.ton and a dav B ,., * M ^ smith, county

on the floor, the while Prank Reed!£ r L ^ l L ^ ^ S "SJ/TSZ |P resIdent for man * years « was visIt


PAGE SIX THE BREWSTER STANDARD — ESTABLISHED 1869 FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1. 1937

NORTH SALEM P U R D Y S

THIS PAGE IS DEVOTED TO OUR NORTHERN

PEACH LAKE

With the ideal weather over the

week end we expected to see a large

number of week enders but a good

many were among the missing. A number

drove up on Sunday Just for an

outing.

The warm spell on Saturday tempted

a few to go in swimming but the

water has turned quite chilly and the

lake is working making the water

none too inviting.

The "Three Horsemen." Bud Jackson.

Bob Shays and "Fran" Carney,

landed on Saturday morning but found

a scarcity of girls. Joan Hampton and

Buth Conelly were among those present

and crashed the dance at Bloomerside

with the boys. Fred Grey and

Bill Hubel were also headed for the

dance but a blowout in one of Freddy's

balloon tires changed their minds.

Vails golf course was about the

busiest place about the lake over the

week end. It was ideal weather for the

game and the course was fairly dotted

with players.

Chester Shear and Sonny McArdle

were seen scouting around the grove

looking for some of their girl friends

but without success.

Adele Shays has been confined to

bed with a severe cold ever since she

returned to her home in Queens Village.

Billy Hubel who had planned to enter

Fordham University has changed

his plans and is now a freshman at

N. Y. V., where he is taking a premedical

course.

Judge and Mrs. Frawley with

daughter Edeanore and Frank March

spent the week end at the "Shanty."

Hleanore and Frank spent most of

their time on the tennis courts.

Mr. and Mrs. O'Brien have packed

up anfl left for their Mt. Vernon home.

We can expect to see OBle almost every

week end while the weather permits.

Fred Purdy is closing his "Camp

Idlewilde" this week and going back

to his home in Croton Falls. Fred is

generally the first one over and

about the last to leave.

Mrs. fda Reynolds also wound up

her stay at the lake this week and is

planning a stay at Atlantic City.

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Conelly and daughter

Ruth were up over the week end.

Ed is getting his cottage, which he

purchased the early part of the season,

in fine shape.

Henry Ludwig had a big crew of

neighbors working on his new cottage

over the week end. The place is now

closed in except for windows.

Walter longley has started work on

the new cottage he is building near his

present one on the new road that la

being put through and which will open

some choice building sites.

Mr .and Mrs. Adam Becker are taking

advantage of the fine weather and

ore spending a few weeks at their cottage.

There will be a meeting of the Vail's

Park Association Inc. at the Pavilion

on Sunday, October 3rd at 11 a. m.

Installation of the new officers will be

the order of business.

The weekly card parties of the Vails

Park Association which are held at the

Pavilion have been discontinued for

the season and a few of the card players

who arrived early enough on Friday

evening went over to Bloomerside

for a game. Charlie has facilities for

heating his pavilion and will continue

his parties throughout the winter

starting about 8:30 p. m.

The store at the pavilion is still

open for business with Johnny Vassak

still on the job. Johnny spends most

of the time painting the furniture in

preparation for next season, with Rudy

Schaefer and Jack Foley seeing that

he does a good Job.

A fairly good crowd showed up at

the ball field last Sunday to enjoy

what was to have been the last gamp

of the season and were disappointed

for the reason that the team from

Yonkers failed to show up. Everyone

of our boys was on hand so they chose

:sides an dhad a friendly exhibition

among themselves. As soon as Ed

Lyon, our manager and first baseman

can prepare it, we will give a summary

of the season .

Our newlyweds Lester and Lillyan

Jenkins, who are residing in Hastings

on the Hudson, have been spending

their week ends at the lake and Les

has been covering center field for our

learn as usual.

*E& Kling has taken on the contract

to make alterations at the "Coops"

cottage on Lake Shore Drive which

was purchased by Bob Shay this season.

Bill Johnston returned home from

the Medical Center late last week and

friends who dropped in at the hotel

over the week end gave him a warm

welcome. Bill is looking fine considerering

the serious ordeal he has gone

through.

Dick Reg8n is telling a story of how

he rescued a painter from Brewster

who had painted himself on the roof

of the garage on the Nichols estate.

We have noticed that young Billy

Johnston has been very attentive to

a oertain young lady lately and there

are rumors in the air.

Grandma McDowell who has spent

the summer with her daughter. Mrs.

William Polye. has returned to her

home in the Bronx.

NORTH SALEM

The North Salem Improvement Society

had a very enjoyable card party

at the beautiful spacious home of Mr.

Gifford Cochran last Wednesday afternoon.

There were twenty tables of

auction, contract and pinochle. There

was a prize for each table. The door

prize was a very pretty basket decorated

with ribbon and filled with

delicious homemade jams and marmalades.

It was won by Mrs. Benjamin

VanScoy. Delicious refreshments were

served in the dining room.

The Republican Club met last Wednesday

with a good attendance. After

the meeting a magician practiced some

of his tricks for the amusement and

sometimes the embarrassment of those

present.

We are glad to report that Mrs.

Eugene Struhsacker is recovering

nicely from the effects of an accident

in New York. She was riding in a taxi

when in order to avoid another car

the driver suddenly jammed on the

brakes. Mrs. Struhsacker was thrown

and suffered a severe cut across the

top of her head and shock. It was most

fortunate that nothing more serious

occurred.

The members of St. James Guild

will meet at the home of Mrs. Fred

Tompkins on Tuesday, October 5.

The Dorcas Society will meet at the

Methodist Hall on Wednesday, Oct.

6. Each member is asked to bring her

own lunch and coffee will be made

and served at the Hall. A quilt will be

tied during the afternoon.

Mr. and Mrs. Porter At Lie of New

York, and Miss Lydia Kipling of White

Plains, were guests of Mr. and Mrs.

Charles Close on Sunday.

Mr. and Mrs. Leslie A. Cannon of

Southport, Maine, called on friends in

town this week.

Rev. Robert N. Turner returned

from his vacation and will have charge

of the services at St. James church on

Sunday, Oct. 3. Sunday school will not

be resumed until Oct. 10.

The Danbury Fair opens tomorrow

(Saturday) and will continue through

next week. Many of our townspeople

expect to attend as usual.

Mr. Floyd Reynolds has gone to

Katonah to live for the winter months.

News of the Croton Falls Rifle Club

The regular Sunday match was held

at the outdoor range at Tilly Foster

on Sept. 26. Eldently a good many of

the members took adantage of the fine

weather to take the family out for an

airing in their cars which accounted

for the poor turnout of members.

There was a stiff breeze blowing

across the range which accounts for

the scores being lowered.

We were glad to welcome Joe and

Ran Genovese back on the firing line.

They have been too busy fishing during

the summer to think of any shooting.

At the last meeting a discussion was

held relative to holding a shooting

match on the outdoor range open to

everyone. Medals and merchandise

were suggested as prizes but no definite

decision was made and the matter

laid over.

Following are the scores:

Four Position Match: 50 Yards.

L. Cole 343, F. Light 345, R. Genovese

328, W. Duffy 325, Madeline

Nichols 322, R. Williams 320, J. Genovese

309, A. Hansen 282.

De War Course. 100 Yards.

F. Light 387, L Cole 386, A. Hansen

375, Madeline Nichols 371, W. Duffy

369, H. Nichols 364.

Re-entry Match.

F. Light 196, L Cole 195.

Brewster Gossip

What with the Democratic and Republican

County Committee meetings

which were held on Tuesday evening

at Carmel most of the gossip along

Main street has turned political. Comments,

good, bad and indifferent can

be heard on all sides on the nominations

for the town ticket but we, leave

these items for the more serious section

of our news.

Argonne Post No. 71 of the American

Legion also had a lively meeting

at their headquarters in Brewster on

Tuesday evening at which the officers

for the ensuing year were elected with

the following results: Harvey Seaman,

Commander; Louis Hobby, Adjutant:

Daniel B. Brandon, 1st Vice Commender;

William J. Foley, 2d Vice Commander;

William Bienerstein, 3d Vice

Commander; Fred KJing, Sergeant at

Arms; Dr. Robert Cleaver, Historian;

Harold Beal, Chaplain; Daniel B.

Brandon, treasurer.

A post card addressed to the entire

gang at the hardware store was received

from Henry Rechen who is at

Cornell struggling with his text books.

From the number of tickets sold at

Andersons drug store for the Danbury

Fair it would seem that everyone in

Brewster will be there.

o

A variety of play materials is essential

for a child's all-round development.

Toys are needed for vigorous

physical activity; for manipulative

and creative play; and for dramatic

play.

—o

Tilings to consider in buyinjg all

kinds of electrical equipment, flown

electric refrigerators to electric irons,

are suggested in Cornell bulletin E-

358. Single copies are- sent free from

the Office of Publication. {Roberts

Hall, Ithaca. N. Y.

WESTCHESTER READERS

Q

Ed Link of Hudson Believes in Diamonds

For accuracy on this operation there shop the hole has to be held within

la nothing like a diamond drill, aays plus sero and minus three-tenths.

Ed Link, veteran machinist in the This means that it cannot be over-

plant of the Hudson Motor Car Comsire at all nor undersUe more than

pany. This it one of the many opera­ three-tenths of one-thousandth of an

tions that has to be held to extremely inch. This is splitting hairs as for as

close limits. Ed Link states that he ? accuracy is concerned and that is why

has very little leeway on this opera­

the diamond drill is used on Hudson

and lerraplane piston pin holes

tion. In the parlance of the machine* drilled in the aluminum alloy pistons.

The Household

o

By LYQIA LE BARON WALKER

UICK work without careful

planning may give an impres­

sion of getting ahead, but it is the

carefully planning beforehand that

results in the faster progress. This

has come to my attention recently

with renewed force.

Two carpenters have been on one

job. One man dashes ahead and

finds he has to do the work all over

again. The other

carpenter appears

to be slow,

but when he does

set to work, he

completes what

he has to do in

very short time,

und without making

mistakes. He

does not have to

do his job over.

The latter is

making a success

of his work, the

former is often

merely making a

botch of, his, and

since doing a

thing twice over

delays completion,

he is actually

the slower

worker, although

to the onlooker

he does not always

seem to be.

Bustling about work, keeping actively

in motion and tiring oneself

unnecessarily, do not promote

completion of a task. There is ever

the element of risk in such methods.

The person, for instance, who,

instead of opening out a step ladder

and securing the fastenings,

thinks he can lean this kind of a

ladder against a wall without taking

the trouble to properly adjust

it, may be quicker in setting it up,

but he is courting accidents. Many

a mishap has been the result of this

very thing.

The dressmaker who cuts material

before seeing that the pattern

is laid so that the nap of the

goods comes as it should in all portions,

may have to cut some of the

pieces over again, or spoil the appearance

of her garment. When

duplicate portions must be cut more

material will be required, and more

money as well as time will have

to be spent.

Careful planning and preparation

are time and money savers. This

does not mean that slow work is

either quickest or best, but that

well considered plans are essential

to good methods.

t e e

Great Convenience.

The homemaker will find it a

great convenience to have a record

of the sizes and measurements

of the members of her family.

It often happens in a round of

shopping that something is found

that you know is wanted, and

needed by some member of the

family. It may be a handsome pair

of gloves at such an attractive price

that you certainly would buy them,

if only you were sure they would

fit. Or it may be that stockings, in

just the wunteJ shade, are being

featured at one of the shops. You

are tempted to buy them, but there

is an uncertainty about the size.

The hosiery, in all probability will

he ftll sold 'H't by tomorrow ui. the

Gertrude Lawrence To

Aid Children's Ass'n

Proceeds of a benefit performance of

"Susan and God." a comedy in three

acts starring Gertrude Lawrence, to

be held on Tuesday evening, October

26, will aid the Westcheteer County

Children's Association, it was announced.

Written and directed by Rachel

Crothers. "Susan and God" opened in

Washington Jast week and is now in

Baltimore. The New York opening is

scheduled to be held at the Plymouth

Theatre, Thursday. October 7.

Miss Lawrence, the brilliant British

actress appearing in the stellar role,

needs no introduction to American

audiences. Her ability as a comedienne

was established in the long New York

run of "Private Lives,' in which she

played the role of Amanda Prynne,

opposite Noel Coward. Last season she

was co-starred with Mr. Coward in

"Tonight at 8:30."

The actress made her debut in America

in Andre Chariot's Revue of 1924

and subsequently appeared in "Oh,

Kay," "Treasure Girl," "Candle

Light." and "International Revue."

The play "Susan and God" marks her

first appearance under the management

of John Golden.

Mrs. Ralph H. Matthiessen of Irvington-on-

Hudson, is chairman of

the theatre benefit committee of the

Children's Association.

Among the members of the committee

assisting her are: Mrs. Earl

Appleman of Bronxville, Mrs. Markle

Bannard, Mrs. W. Barton Eddison and

Miss Alyn Matthiessen of Irvingtonon-Hudson,

Mrs. John Tyssowski of

Dobbs Perry, Mrs. Bertrand P. Bell of

Mt. KLsco. Mrs. Emerson Bigelow,

Miss Elizabeth Parrelly and Mrs.

William P. Irwin of Rye, Mrs. Richard

Blum of Purchase, Mrs. William Bolton,

Jr., of Tarrytown, Mrs. Robert E.

Broome of North Tarrytown, Mrs.

Lucius M. Bush and Mrs. Nelson W.

Cornell of Pelham, Mrs. P. Patrick

Gormely of New Rochelle. Mrs. S.

Pierre Hull of Yonkers. Mrs. Jesse B.

Perlman of Montrose, Mrs. Alfred O.

Rose of Pleasantvilie and Miss Marjorie

Squires of White Plains.

alluringly low sum of the sale price.

So you pass by both gloves and

stockings, just because sizes are not

known definitely. The opportunity

to buy thriftily is lost.

Let me recommend a loose-leaf

notebook for the records. A little

book that will fit into a small handbag

is just the tiling, especially if

it has the index margin. Devote

one page or more, as needed, for

each individual. On a page for husband

or sou jot down size of shirts,

collars, gloves, shoes, socks, coats,

trousers, belts, etc. On a page for

yourself, and other women members

of the family, set down all measurements

required for frocks, coats,

lingerie, shoes, stockings, hats,

gloves, belts, etc.

Shoes and Slippers.

It is true that you would scarcely

buy shoes for anyone without having

them tried on by the one who

is to wear them. But you could get

bedroom slippers or traveling slippers,

if you had both the number

for the length, and the letter for

the width of shoes.

It is a good idea to make a note

of favorite colors, and any decided

personal preferences of individuals,

such as, for example, whether a

woman likes service weight or chiffon

stockings, or lisle and wool for

colder weather, etc.

CROTON FALLS

HAPPENINGS GATHERED BY OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENTS EVERY WEEK

Household Hints

By BETTY WELLS

T N AMERICA, a lady with a house

* and no maid usually has an

easier life than her sister abroad

who has several servants, and this

is because of all the mechanical

helps we have to simplify the hard

jobs.

But there are no machines for

raising babies, and not likely to

be any! So, it looks as though we'll

keep on being tied at home pretty

close during the years when the

children need watching, because

nursemaids are hard to got and

expensively out of the question for

most of us.

In certain progressive communities

and especially in the larger

cities there are nursery schools for

pre-school age children. These are

actually neighborhood play places

with some one on the job watching

to see that the children are

There are no maehineB for raising

babies.

safe and happy. These will no doubt

be the eventual solution of the problem

of the busy mothers who can't

be two places at once—in the

house doing the work and in the

yard watching the children play

outdoors.

The nursery school is fairly rare

as yet, but we know one neighborhood

of mothers who clubbed together

and organized a playground

for their own youngsters. The way

it worked was like this—two mothers

would be on duty at a time

and all the children of the group

were gathered together to play under

these watchful eyes. They took

it by half-day shifts, and no one

woman had to serve but once a

week. This left each mother free

the rest of the time for her work

or for going out. Since the success

of the scheme depended on dependable

co-operation, each mother

made it a point to be on the

job when her turn came so that

she could feel free to park her own

youngsters the rest of the time.

Think how many hours of worry

that saved—knowing that the children

would be in good hands!

• • •

The Easiest Way.

There's no two ways about it, a

buffet service is the easiest way to

feed a crowd. And it has an informal

cameraderie about it that

practically guarantees a good time.

No danger of lulls when you're helping

yourself to entertainment along

with the relishes and ham. And so

all the crabbers - at - lap - suppers

should take a back seat. If they

had to do the work, they'd get the

point. However, it's gracious to

make things as smooth as possible

for guests as well as hostess and

in the interest of that, we offer these

tips for buffet suppers:

Lots of little tables—if you entertain

this way often, it's a good

idea to have several nests of tables.

They won't be in the way between

times and for buffet occasions, they

will provide table tops for the men

A buffet supper Is the easiest way

to serve a gay gang.

at least who don't manage so well

with their plates on their laps since

they don't have laps worthy of the

name.

A stack of party trays — very

fancy ones to get away from the

cafeteria touch. But they'll make

for less spilling and dropping.

Individual salts and peppers, so

that each tray can have a set. Saves

too much jumping up and down,

and they needn't be expensive.

Serving spoons and forks—separate

ones for each dish of something

good. This will eliminate a lot

of confusion.

A big pitcher of ice water—whatever

else you have to drink, be

sure there's water to drink—and

handy. And it goes without saying

that it will save you a lot of

dither to have enough coffee or tea

ready so there won't have to be

delays in the middle of the party

while you retire to tke kitchen.

Napkins big enough for business.

Remember that a little cocktail

napkin isn't good for much, so

when you're serving a hearty supper,

have hearty sized napkins to

repair the damage of accidents that

will happen.

$ By BeUy WeUa — WNU Swvlce.

Peach pits add flavor to canned

peaches; one cracked pit cooked in

each quart of syrup and removed before

adding the syrup to the peaches

is enough.

Grouping of furniture, including

pictures and lamps, should generally

balance each other in height, width

and effect of lightness or heaviness,

housing experts say.

Otto Offenhauser

Optometrist

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted

Hours 9:00 A. M. to 12. 1 to S

Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays

Dahm's Jewelry Store

Brewster, N. T.


Repair & Cabinet Shop

NO JOB TOO SMALL

ALFRED D. VOBES, JR.

29 Prospect St. Tel. 8-J Brewster


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1937 THE BREWSTER STANDARD — ESTABLISHED 1869 PAGE SEVEN

Stone Mason Work

GRADING AND DRIVEWAYS

E. G. MOORE

Tel. 183-W Brewster

JOSEPH C GENOVESB

Counsellor at Law

4 No. Main Street

BREWSTER, N. T.

TeL Brewster 617

REAL ESTATE

Notice of Filing Completed Assessment

Roll with Clerk

After Grievance Day

(Tax Law, Sec. 29)

Notice is hereby given that the Assessment

Roll for the Town of Southeast

in the County of Putnam for the

year 1937, has been Anally completed

by the undersigned Assessors and a

certified copy thereof was filed in the

office of the Town Clerk, at the Town

Hall, Brewster, Town of Southeast,

where the same will remain open to

public inspection for fifteen days.

Dated this 15th day of September,

1937.

THOMAS F. MULLARKEY,

J. RALPH TRURAN,

HENRY O'HARA,

Assessors of the town of Southeast.

Pursuant To An Order of the Hon.

James W. Bailey. Surrogate of the

County of Putnam, Notice Is Hereby

Given, to all persons having

claims against the Estate of Ell B.

Crosby, late of the Town of Patterson,

in said County, deceased, to present

the same, with the vouchers

thereof, to the undersigned, Albert N.

Towner, as Executor, at his residence,

and place of transacting business, in

the Town of Patterson, Putnam County,

New York, on or before the 13th

day of December, 1937.

Dated May 24th, 1937.

ALBERT N. TOWNER,

Executor.

Pursuant to an Order of the Hon.

James W. Bailey. Surrogate of the

County of Putnam, notice is here by given

to all persons having claims against

the estate of Oscar Bailey, late of the

Town of Southeast, in said County,

deceased, to present the same with the

vouchers thereof to the undersigned,

Daniel H. Bloomer, as executor at his

residence and place of transacting

business in the Town of Southeast,

Putnam County, New York, on or before

the 24th day of November, 1937.

Dated Brewster, N. Y., May 14, 1987.

DANIEL H. BLOOMER,

Executor.

F. LEON SHELP,

' Attorney for Executor,

Brewster, N. Y.

County Court—Putnam county

STEPHEN BROWN,

Plaintiff,

—a gains t—

HENRY O. HOLMES.

Defendant.

In pursuance of a judgment of foreclosure

and sale, duly granted in the

above entitled action, and entered in

the Putnam County Clerk's Office, on

the 26th day of July, 1937,1. TOWNER

KENT, the undersigned, Referee in

aaid judgment named, will sell at pub-1

lie auction on the front steps of the

County Court House, Carmel, Putnam

County, New York, on the 18th day of

September, 1937, at 10:00 o'clock A. M.,

Daylight Saving Time, the premises

described in said judgment as follows,

via:

ALL that certain parcel and farm

of land situate, lying and being partly

in the Town of Patterson and partly

in the Town of Southeast, County

of Putnam and State of New York.

and bounded and described generally

as follows, to wit:

BEGINNING at the northwest cor-

•ffilHIllIBlllIilffllRlllllMllBllllRlillRllflilllll'WIllllli

I FLOWERS

jjj For All Occasions

I CUT FLOWERS

| POTTED PLANTS

* FLORAL DESIGNS

m 'The Best of Quality and Service'

Brewster Nursery

H. P. HOWELL, Mgr.

39-W Peaceable Hill

Pursuant to an Order of the Hon.

James W. Bailey, Surrogate of the

County of Putnam, N. Y., notice is

hereby given to all persons having

claims against the estate of F. Leon

Shelp, late of the Town of Southeast,

in said County, deceased, to present

the same with the vouchers thereof

to the undersigned Mary Fargis Shelp,

as Executrix at her place of transacting

business at the office of Doane C.

Corns to ck, her attorney, Putnam County

Savings Bank Building. Main Street,

in the Village of Brewster, Putnam

County, New York, on or before the

11th day of April, 1938.

Dated Brewster, N. Y., September

21, 1937.

MARY FAROIS SHELP,

Executrix.

DOANE C. COMSTOCK,

Attorney for Executrix,

Brewster, New York.

Surrogate's Court of Putnam County

New York

Pursuant to Batata, I

and appoint the teams of th

gate Court of lifts Counts' of

IB the Sate of Maw York, dux** the

year llff. for she total of lesssss of law

and fact and for the bmxkm and datermination

of aB matters of wfaka

•aid Govt baa Jurlsdlcttan, at wnlaa

a Trial Jury wll bo required to attend,

to ba held In the Court Houae In the

Town of Carmel, In aald County, aa

fpOovw:

On the last Monday of the

of February. April i

and the first Tuesday of June and

Datod, December 7th, 1988.

. VMES W. BAILEY,

Surrogate.

Piled December 7th, 19*8.

Putnam County Daiiuaalrt Office, a*4

L JAMES W. BAILEY, Surrogate of

the County of Putnam and exoffldo

clerk of the Sumagatsr*

Court, do hereby certify that

the preceding la a true copy of

(LBJ the original dodgnat'-on of the

trial terms of the Snoop

Court of the County of Putnam

for the year 1987. now on fife) In

my office.

JAMBS W. BAILEY.

COUNTY COURT

of

PUTNAM COUNTY. NOW YORK

Pursuant to Statute. I hereby order

s UL>« J? tra i S&RTS SS&J78 ZSEZ

and adjoining lands of Lincoln Birch

and lands of Francis B. Thurber;

thence running easterly along lands of

said Francis B. Thurber to lands of

Dorothy Daggitt; thence running

southerly along lands of Dorothy Daggitt

to lands of George Zimmer;

thence running westerly along lands

of George Zfenmer; thence running

northerly along lands of Oeorge Zimmer,

lands of Andrew Stock, lands of

Orville Field and Edward Field and

lands of Lincoln Birch to lands of

Francis B. Thurber, being the place of

beginning; estimated to contain 168

acres of land, be the same more or

less.

BEING a portion of the premises

conveyed by J. Bennett Southard, Referee,

to Henry O. Holmes and including

also about 8 acres conveyed to

Henry O. Holmes by WiUard J. Dykeman,

and being all the lands in the

Town of Patterson and the Town of

Southeast, State of New York, owned

by Henry O. Holmes.

SUBJECT to mining and mineral

rights owned by parties other than the

defendant herein.

SUBJECT to a first mortgage of

88,000 now a lien on said premises.

Dated at Brewster. N. Y., this 3d day

cf Aug*«t. 1837.

TOWNER KS84T,

Referee.

THEODORE K. SCHAEFER

Plaintiff's Attorney

Brewster, New York.

The shove sale is hereby adjourned

by consent of the parties to October

2, 1837. at 2 o'clock p. m. at the same

place-

Dated September 18, 1937.

State of New York, during the year

1887 for the trial of issues of law and

fact, and the hearing and determination

of ail criminal matters of which

aaid Court has jurisdiction, at which

a Grand Jury and Trial Jury will be

required to attend, to be held in the

Court House in the Town of Carmel,

in aaid County in the year 1887, as

follows:

On the First Tnesdsy of Jane

On the First Tnesdsy of December

I further order and appoint the

terms of the Court of the County of

Putnam in the State of New York, for

the trial of Issues of law, and the

hf»"*ng and decision of motions and

other proceedings at which no jury

win be required to attend, to be held

in the Court House in the aforesaid

town of Carmel on the second Monday

of each month, and at the office of the

County Judge of Putnam County is

the village of Cold Spring in aaid

County, on the second and fourth Saturday

of each month, except during

the months of January and August.

Dated. December 7, 1888.

Autumn Sports

Beckon Sportsmen

Counsellor at Law

Brewster, N. Y.

Telephone 280

Insurance Real Estate

George W. Sloat

Funeral Director

Carmel 70

Lleeued In New Yc

New Jersey

Tony Cioccolanti

General Contractor

and Mason

Telephone 371

Srewster, N. Y.

New York Supreme Court:

Putnam County

DIVING L. SHELDON,I

Plaintiff)

—against—

HARRY E. HOW£S|

and "MARY" HOWES.,

wife of Harry E.|

Howes,, if any, the

name "Mary" being i

fictitious, the true |

first name of the wlfei

of Harry E. Howes, |

if any, being unknown, |

and others, |

Defendants.

Summons

&

Notice

To the Above named Defendants:

YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED

to answer the complaint in this action,

and to serve a copy of your answer,

or. if the complaint is not served with

this summons to serve a notice of appearance

on the Plaintiff's Attorney

within 20 days after the service of this

summons, exclusive of the day of service;

and in case of your failure to

appear, or answer, judgment will be

taken against you by default, for the

relief demanded in the complaint.

Dated: June 28th. 1838.

BRADFORD KLOCK.

Attorney for Plaintiff,

Office & Postoffice Address,

Carmel, New York.

"TO HARRY E. HOWES and

"MARY" HOWES, the wife of Harry

E. Howes, if any, the name "Mary" being

fictitious, the true first name of

the wife of Harry E. Howes, if any, being

unknown," the above named defendants

in this action: The foregoing

summons is served upon you by publication,

pursuant to an order of Hon.

Lee Parsons Davis, a Justice of the

Supreme court, dated' the 23rd day

of July, 1837. and filed with the complaint

in the Office of the Clerk of

Putnam County at Carmel, N. Y.

Parkway Speed

Limit Starts Oct. 9

P O RTABLE

$,i TOUCH CONTROL

FREE

carrying cm.' •

•Trade-mark for key-tension devtofc

This •marine invention adapts key*

tension to n-frw'i finaer prcaaurfl

For Sale By

H. J. MAYNARD

Carmel, Phone 68

United Cigar Store

Brewster

QenUcmen: Please tell me about Royal •

three moderately priced models, rwnptrtc

with carrying case. Aleo details of $1.00 a

week payment plan.

THE

PUTNAM COUNTY

SAVINGS BANK

Brewster, N. Y.

Incorporated 1871

OFFICERS

Alexander F. LobdeU, President

Arthur F. Budd, Vice President

David P. Vail, Vice President

Margaret R. Mat-key, Secretary

and Treasurer

Doane G. Comstock. Counsel

Deposit* made on or before the

tenth business day of January,

April, July or October or the

third business day of other months

will bear Interest from the first of

these month*, respectively. In

teres* compounded quarterly.

FIRST

NATIONAL BANK

BBEWSTEB,

of Fades*!

N. Y.

Capital $100,000

Surplus $31,500

The object of this action is for the

sale or partition of a parcel of land BURGLAR

JAMES W. BAILEY. of which Myron P. Howes died seised

Putnam County Judge. situate in the Village of Brewster. PROOF VAULT

Putnam County Clerk's Office, as.: Town of Southeast. Putnam County. A modem burglar proof safe

I. PERCY L. BARKER, Clerk of the New York, and bounded West by Rail­

County of Putnam and of the road Avenue; Northeast by Oak Street; deposit vault has recently

County Court of said County, do Southeast by lands now or formerly

hereby certify that the preced­

been installed. Boxes sent

of the estate of Ada C. Howes and

ing is a true copy of the original having a frontage of approximately for $5 per year.

designation of the terms of the 100 feet on Railroad Avenue and a

County Court of the County of frontage of I'M feet on Oak Street.

Putnam for the year 1887, now Dated: July 23. 1837.

on file in my office.

HENRY H WELLS, President

BRADFORD KLOCK.

J. DOUGLASS) MEAD, Vice-President

PERCY L. BARKER,

Attorney for Plaintiff,

TOWNER KENT.

County Clark.

Office dc Postoffice Address,

B. D. STANNABD. Cashier

Referee. Dated December 7, 1888.

Carmel, New York. DANflHL S. 8TANNABD,

Greatly Expanded Production

Required for Full Recovery

2*1

FOR RELIABLE

RADIO REPAIRING

Throughout the 49,000 square miles (Resolutions of Benjamin F. Barnes

CALL CROTON FALLS 204 of territory which make up the Empire and other Supervisors requesting

G. E. SALLSTROM

State, the season of autumn presents that certain Westchester roads be

to the follower of outdoor activities made "speedways" were answered by'

and lover of Nature three of the most the Park Commission in an announce­

By HAROLD G. MOULTON

intriguing months of the year from ment that speed limits on all West­

President, The Brookings Institution

the standpoint of recreation and chester roads except the Bronx River

health-giving activities.

Parkway are to be raised to 40 miles

The cooler weather of the fall sea­ an hour. The new speed limit will

son makes conditions relatively ideal go Into effect at 12:01 a. m. Satur­

for the more strenuous sports and reday, Oct. 9, according to an announcecreations.

For the motorist there are ment on the police teletype.

WASHINGTON — Recovery in the

United States has gone far, but it has

been marked by two striking charac'

teristics—slowness of the gains in the

durable goods Industries and the per*

sistenco of a great volume of unem-

The recovery movement between

1934 and 1936 was thus soundly based.

Production was stendlly mounting, purchasing

power was being spread broadly

among the masses, speculation was

not excessive, business men had not

thousands of miles of the best high­ Because of its curves, narrow roadploymcnt. At the Brookings Institu­ stocked up with heavy supplies of

ways and motor parkways in the land way and points at which traffic is ob- I tion. We have made a comprehensive goods, and the general balance be­

through quiet and relatively uncrowd- scured, the present speed limits of 35 analysis ol the American situation tween production and consumption wai

ed country-sides and along beauteous miles an hour on the Bronx River which included a detailed study of the satisfactory.

mountainsides. Hundreds of miles of Parkway is considered as fast as traf­ produi ii


PAGE BIGHT THE BREWSTER STANDARD — ESTABLISHED 1869 FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1. 1937

Hunters Prepare

For Fall Season . -n«

The first of the several qpept

days for hunters in this state will 66

cur Friday, when the season on woodcock

in the portion of the state lying

north of the tracks of the main line

of the New York Central Railroad extending

from Buffalo to Albany and

north of trie main line tracks of the

Boston and Albany (Railroad extending

from Albany to' the MHsskeffusetts

state line, will be declared open. Hunters

of woodcock j^faJ^fie^JiHdl? quarry

from 7 o'clock in the morning until

sunset each day, including the opening

day.

The day's bag limit for each hunter

is four woodcock and persons shall

not possess at any one time more than

four of these birds. They may be taken

with a shot gun only, not larger

than number 10 gauge fired from the

shoulder, but they shall not be taken

with or by means of any automatic

loading or hand operated repeating

shot gun capable of holding more

than three shells, the magazine of

which has not been cut off or plugged

with a one piece metal or wooden filler

Incapable of removal through the

loading end thereof, so as to reduce

the capacity of said gun to not more

than three shells at one time in the

magazine and chamber combined.

These birds may be taken from the

land or water with the aid of a dog,

but not from or by means, aid or use

of a automobile or aircraft of any

kind.

Persons hunting woodcock are not

required to have the Federal duck or

hunting stamp, but, of course, must

have their New York State hunting,

fishing and trapping license.

The open season in the southern

half of the state on woodcock begins

October 15. The first day for the taking

of the migratory wildfowl is October

9.

b

There has been no violence in the

Illinois glass company strike. Apparently,

people who work in glass factories

don't throw stones.—Boston

Transcript.

o

Now that he is in the molasses business

maybe Prof. Tugwell can get his

friend Harry Hopkins to place pancakes

and waffles on the required list

on relief diets.

We have just received a big stock

of Endicott-Johnson Shoes

Dress and

Work Shoes

FOB MEN

$1.95

1 up

Children's Shoes $1.19

1 «P

Also a full line of U. S. Rubbers

Hats Cleaned and Blocked

U. S. Shoe Repair

66 Main St Brewster

BhQ RITZ

Brewster, N. Y. Phone 688

TIME SCHEDULE

Evening Continuous from 1 P. M.

bUP.IL

Matinee Wednesday at 8:00 P. M

Saturday Continuous Performance

from 2 p. in. to 11 p. in.

Sunday and Holidays Continuous

Performance from 8:80 to 11 P. M.

Fri. Sat. October 1 and 2

"Love Under Fire"

—with—

Loretta Young, Don Ameche

News Interesting Shorts

Saturday Matinee Only—

"Ranger Courage"

With Bob Allen

Sun. Mou. October 3 and 4

"Naughty Marietta''

—with—

Jeanette MacDonald, Nelson Eddy

One Mile from Heaven

—with—

Claire Trevor

NEWS

Sun. Only—Episode 8 of

Robinson Crusoe of Clipper Island'

Tnes. Wed. October 5 and 6

"San Quentin"

—with—

Pat O'Brien, Humphrey Bogart

News Mickey Mouse Cartoon

Latest Issue "March of Time"

Thurs. Oct 7—One Day Only!

"Two Wise Maids"

—with—

Alison Skipworth, Polly Moras

'Talent Scout"

—with—

Donald Woods, Jeanne Madden

NEWS

Fit Sat. October 8 and 9

"Toast of New York"

—with—

Edward Arnold, Jack Oakk

Franc** Farmer

News Interesting Short Subjects

Saturday Matinee Only—

"Cowboy Star"

with Charles Starrett

CENSUS OF JOBLESS

jj.ll* JJi TO S^AR ON NOV. J6

(Continued from Page 1)'

bavis, @&0fc§£ ofj^fheJChfeOiber of

bommeree of the United States,

and Chester M. Gray of the American

Farm Bureau Federation.

Mr. Biggers, who prefaced what

he had to say with the statement that

he was greatly pleased and encouraged

by what was said in the conference

gave out the census plan after the adjournment.

"Blanks are to be distributed to

approximately 31.000.000 families by

the Postofflce Department, on Nov. 16

and 17," he said.

"These blanks are to be filled out

by the unemployed, and partially employed,

and mailed by midnight Nov.

20. During the six weeks following

Nov. 20, an enumerative house-tohouse

census will be conducted in

typical cities, towns and counties

scattered throughout the nation, and

the" results of these enumerative

Checks will be compared with the registrations

from the same areas to determine

the average percentage of

variation.

"Further checks as to accuracy also

may be made by the Works Progress

Administration in various localities

and by the United States Employment

Service, as well as checks by private

agencies, such as Social Service Federations,

primarily to detect exaggeration

of falsification.

Tabulation of all detailed data Is

to be made by the bureau of the census,

and preparation of the final re­

port will be made in conjunction with

Census Bureau experts as promptly

as possible for Congressional use."

Mr. Biggers indicated his agreement

with the voluntary registration plan

as authorized by Congress and chosen

by the President, and expressed, that

It can be made successful If the Job Is

well done and the wholehearted cooperation

of all people in all walks of

life is obtained.

In support of the plan, Mr. Biggers

explained that the machinery of the

Postofflce Department had been chosen

because of the completness of Its

organization for reaching all sections

of the country; because its many local

contacts would make it easiest for the

unemployed and because it would be

least costly.

He indicated that prior to distribution

of the registration blanks an

intensive educational plan would put

into effect, making use of all the

agencies for reaching the public.

The cooperation of the Governors

for all the States will be sought; the

clergy and the schools will be Invited

to give support; posters and window

cards will be employed; appeals will

be issued In various languages, speakers

will be enlisted, and Information

booths will be established in postoffices

wherever necessary, equipped with especially

trained personnel, including

interpreters. Appeals will be made to

the patriotism and unselfish interests

of all types and classes of people, but

particularly the unemployed, to insure

the success of the undertaking.

Those who attended the conference

were, in addition to those named,

Secretary Roper, Secretary Perkins,

Harry L. Hopkins, Works Progress

Administrator; Arthur J. Altmeyer,

chairman of the Social Security Board;

William L. Austin, Director of the

Census; Stuart A. Rice, chairman of

the Central Statistical Board; Secretary

Wallace, W. Frank Persons, Director

of the United States Employiment

Service, and C. B. Utley of the

Postofflce Department, representing

the Government.

Others attending were M. W. Thatcher,

president of the Fanners National

Cooperative Grain Corporation;

Fred Breckman, substituting for L. J.

Taber, president of the National

Grange; W. Averell Harriman, chairman

of the Business Advisory Council;

Noel Sargent, secretary of the National

Association of Manufacturers, and A.

F. Whitney, president of the Brotherhood

of Railway Trainmen.

WHO KNOW

TRUCK SERVICE

Oar men have had long and

successful experience in serv­

icing Dodge Truck*. They

know your Dodge Truck and

every part in it.

We also have the complete

facilities and the special tools

to give you fast, efficient

service at minJBWp cost. And

we use genuine parts.

Bring your truck in now for

a free safety check-up.

George T. Tator

Tel. 329 Brewster. N. Y.

DODQI

• T-II4

PLYMOUTH

New Exhibit

At the Fair

Star Racer Is Coming

Enjoy the Comfort of a

Hoffman

OIL BURNER

BUILT FOR A LIFETIME OF SERVICE!

Installed In One Day By Factory-Trained Men!

Large storage plants, modern delivery equipment and all

the facilities of a competent heating organization are at your

call 24 hours a day.

THE PURCHASE OF THIS BURNER DOES NOT

OBLIGATE YOU TO ANY OIL CONTRACT.

Hoffman Fuel

12 Wildman Street Phone 816 DANBURY

Represented in Brewster and vicinity by

Kemutk J. Griffin

Brewster Phone 142-J

An OU Burner to as Goo* t* the Comnaay thai Installs it

New York Inspects

Foreign Milk

Bertftia Berber.t Hafmmond-Zabblle,

Carmel: Report of appraiser filed and

order assessing estate tax entered.

• o

200 ATTEND

REAL ESTATE DINNER

(Continued from Page 1)

New York," and Mr. Pish and Mr.

Donohoe took a walk, taking leave

graciously and leisurely as if they

really did not want to miss anything.

Judge Shea paid compliment to Mr.

Joyce and Mr. Melgard In which all

Joined with applause and then made

a very brief but lively sketch of the

Board. Wtoat with the younger set

showing their Interest in the seven

piece orchestra of Hotel Mahopac

Judge Mack didn't attempt anything

learned. After advising brokers not to

cut fees he told a score or more amusing

tales of the less fortunate folk who

get into court .He also paid tribute to

the beauties of Putnam and Dutchess

counties and expressed the wish that

they would not burden themsedves

with long term obligations as many

upstate cities had.

There were one or two fine solo

numbers by entertainers of the orchestra

and a bit of what might be

aalled community singing. Dancing

began about ten thirty and within an

hour the crowd had broken up leaving

only a few groups of people to visit

for a while with friends they see too

seldom in this crowded life.

Mahopac and Brewster were probably

represented by the greatest number

of cltuvens with Carmel a close second.

Patterson didn't send too many this

year but Cold Spring did well and

Northern Westchester too. Tom Sutton.

Duncan Bulkley and Mr. and Mrs.

Rogers were conspicious by their absence.

It is really easier to count the

absent than to name over those who

were there. \

Beautifying Roadsides. • < •

Hugh J. Williams

1-r.mt 1 HQM6T.2' p

Perkins Cow Makes

New Official Record

A feature never before seen at the

"Kansas City Cyclone" and Others at

Danbury Fair and one calculated to

Danbury Fair October 9.

18,000 Farms and Large Dairy Plants

; Roadside improvement'gives an. oyt*-

prove interesting, instructive and ar­

Outside of New York State will be

portunity for pfopW^bw^rs^ civic

tistic will be provided in the display

A lightning-fast track plus one of the Supervised by Inspectors of New

clubs and highway departments to co­

to be made by Wlton Lackaye, of San­

greatest arrays of cars and drivers York 8tate to Permit Outside Milk

operate in building safer, more attracdy

Hook. It will have place In the Main

hailing from all parts of the United to Enter New York Market.

tive and more economical roads and

Building and no doubt will be a center

States will be the setup in the pro­

roadsides.

of attention every day from October

gram of "big car" dirt track auto races

Carefully kept slopes prevent ero­

To prevent the shipping into New

2 to October 9.

to be staged at the Danbury Fair Satsion

and later expense for cleaning of

York State of milk produced on inurday

afternoon. October 9.

ditches and culverts. Property values

Consisting of English and Colonial

sanitary dairy farms outside the State, j are enhanced by roadside development

Antiques the exhibit will be a sophis­

intent on corralling the strongest the State Department has put into iTraffic hazards are reduced by keeping

ticated one carrying appeal to those

lineup of speedsters to appear on the operation a new system of dairy farm I mud and debris from coming on to

who appreciate furniture and glass

coming card Ira Vail, director of inspection, according to an announce- | the highway,

ware and lanterns and cabinet making

events, Immediately signed up one of met by C. A. Holmquist, director of

of the better type, 17th and 18th cen­

the outstanding stars of the country the division of sanitation of the Detury

modes. .

to enter his "Miller Special" in the

scheduled speed classic. Billy Winn,

Some Fair patrons will conjure to

of Kansas City, was the first to enter

mind's eye homes of long ago in which

this premier meet of the fall season.

an English reading stand had a favor­

The "Kansas City Cyclone" will be

ed place with Its holders for candles

well remembered by the sport fans as

or lamps—the whole adjustable to use

the only American driver, who gave

of larger volumes if need be. Grand­

the foreign stars a stiff battle In the

children and great grandchildren per­

Vanderbllt Cup Race at the Roosevelt

haps treasure hopes of owning Regency

Raceway, Roosevelt, N. Y., last season.

chests and Chippendale mirrors.

Winn held down "third position

Others entirely familiar with such throughout the 300 mile grind only

treasures at the present time will find to be forced out of competition at the

as much to admire in this exhibition 288 mile mark with motor trouble. He

as folk to whom they have been offer­ has been riding in great form this seaed

only in museums, and illustrations son, having recently captured the 100

hitherto. There is a beautiful back­ mile dirt track championship race at

gammon and card table with inlaid top the New York State Fair at Syracuse,

that is sure to awaken envy in the

most virtuous and unselfish as well as N - Y ; , ^ "J 8 4 v

" ^ J * *# dl * •

A new record exceeding the aovrage

of the Guernsey breed for her age

and class has just been completed by

a two year old cow, Glynwood's Poylgala

471590 of Cold Spring, New York,

tested and owned by George W. Perkins.

Her official record supsrvlsed by

Cornell University and announced by

the American Guernsey CaUle Club Is

6911* pounds of milk and 404.0 pounds

of butte^ fat In class GGO.

TT

Smoking And Drinking?.

Control of signs and billboards

Watch Your Stomach!

partment.

means less distraction for drivers.

For quick relief from indigestion,

For the first time in the history of Well placed gasoline stations and re­

heartburn and acid stomach due to

the Department, out-of-state milk freshment stands leave ample room

excessive smoking and drinking try

supplies are being given strict super­ for parking off the highway. Finally,

Adla Tablets. Sold on money back

vision at their source. Since July 1, the attractive development of road­

guarantee. Hopes Drug Store.

a corps of 14 milk sanitarians, who sides makes for pleasant impressions

will inspect some 18,000 farms and as travelers use the highways and vis­

about 169 dairy plants shipping milk itors leave the community with the

into the State, have been added 'to hope of coming back again to enjoy

the Departments bureau of milk sani­ the beauty and safety of well-made N. CIOCCOLANTI

tation. General sanitary conditions on and well-kept roads and roadsides.

farms, as well as stables and equip­

General Contractor

ment used in milk production, will be

Roadside improvement consists of

carefully examined. Two of the sani­

two major activities. The first has to

A

tarians, who are also veterinarians,

do with the removal of rubbish, the

will make physical examinations of

filling of unsightly mudholes, the re­

herds as a check on the results obmoval

of billboards and objectionable Builder

tained by the local veterinarian. About

signs. The second task is to plant at­

Phone 742

2,300 dairy farms have been Inspected

tractive flowers, shrubs and trees In

"

to date.

a way that will not hide curves, rail­ HO Marvin Ave. Brewster, N. Y.

the most hardened "collector.' mlnutive speed star in razor edge form

road crossings and other danger spots

Early blown glass, copper luster, for the October 9th gasoline derby Milk and cream shipped into this along the highway.

and his many admirers are banking on

which is new, and many examples

State for fluid consumption have been

him to come through with the day's

bound to arouse enthusiastic admira­

subject to the same standards as those

top honors.

tion will be shown. There will also be

for domestic supplies and local health

Currier and Ievs prints and an oil por­

Clashing with Winn will be none officers have been responsible for see­

The Green Light Restaurant

trait of no less noted figure in the

other than Bob Sail, of Paterson, N. ing that foreign milk and cream met

equine world than Nancy Hanks her­

J. Ball, eastern A. A. A. champion of the prescribed requirements for many

self.

1935 and runner-up for the 1936 title, years.

has been burning up the eastern This strict supervision of out-of-

So one can see that, be it matron or tracks with a string of consistent perstate milk supplies Is required by law

maiden, cleric, merchant or sports­

SERVES A NEW SPECIAL

formances that have put him within which provides for licensing by permit

man a treat is in store when Fair pa­ striking distance of this seasons cov­ of milk shipped into this State. Pertrons

reach the Lackaye booth, Its eted crown. The fleety New Jerseyite mits are predicated on inspection of

walls with Colonial paper and its con­ will furnish keen competition to the

RAVIOLI

the sources of such milk to Insure

tents teeming with atmosphere that balance of the field.

conformity with New York standards

only such lovely articles can engender.

Brewster-Carmel Road Phone 261 BREWSTER

Knowing Mr. Lackayes' literary and

Another ace pilot who will bear and sanitary requirements. The law

dramatic ability one can realize the

watching on the afternoon's card of became effective July 1.

enjoyment he takes in presenting a

thrills and spills is Verne Orendorff,

stage set as admirably as the one at

the Tallahassee, Florida, "terror." Or­ yooooooooooooooooooooooosg

the Fair.

endorff a threat on any track will pilot

a brand new "Hal" D. O. Special that Before The Surrogate ATlWAftl 4>t?»ANBURY THlATRIft

is considered one of the "hottest"

Putnam County, New York

PURDYS STATION speed wagons In the east.

mm mm

Other track drivers who will seek JAMES W. BATJLET, Surrogate

Central High SchooQ News eastern auto racing supremacy In the

GLADYS SWANSON, Secretory

Dr. Richie has completed the medi­ coming program are Walt Brown, of

cal inspection of all pupils in this Massapequa, L. I., Bud Walker, of lOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOQOI

district.

Hewlett, N. Y., Len Perry, the Madison Estates of:

The attendance for the district N. J., kingpin, Walt Ader.of Bernards-

averaged 96 per cent for September vllle, N. aJ. Ader captured the Inde­ George O'Brien, Southeast: Surety

with the 1st and 2d grades of North pendent circuit championship last bond, consent and petition filed and

Salem school leading with 99 per cent. year and seeks new fields to conquer order entered.

4 Days Beg. SUN. OCT. 3

OCT. 1 to 7

THE RITZ BROTHERS

The museum this week has an ex­ entering this A. A. A. program of races.

Anne Rhea Weir, Philips town: He-

in

"100 Men

cellent display of photographic ap­ These and many other top flight drivport

of special guardian and opinion

paratus and enlarged photographs by ers will complete the afternoon's card.

"Life Begins At And A Girl"

filed.

Mr. Drinkwine. Efforts are being made There will be a program of seven

College"

Starring

to organize a Camera Club.

events with the feature race of the day Arthur Hustls, Philipstown: Will,

Mr. Warner gave an illustrated lec­ going thirty laps.

petition, oath and designation filed.

The 3 Days Years Beg. Merriment THU. OCT. Comedy 7

DEANNA DUBBIN

ture on "Our Wall Pictures, their The necessary qualifying time trials

Joan LORETTA Davis, Tony YOUNG Martin

with

Stories and Significance" on Wednes­ will start at 2:00 p. m. Competitive

Mary E. Sherwood, Patterson: Will

WARNER BAXTER

ADOLPH MENJOU

day morning. Twenty-five large wall

filed.

ALICE BRADY

racing to get under way at 3:30 p. m..

MISCHA AUER

pictures were arranged on easels on

o

Cornelia Mandeville DeYancy, Phil­ "Wife Doctor

BILLY GILBERT

the stage as Mr. Warner explained St Andrew's Episcopal Church ipstown: Citation and proof of ser­

and

them.

Rev. Frederick A. Coleman, Rector vice, waiver and answer filed.

and Nurse"

LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI

Next weeks assembly on Wednesday

Loyalty Sunday

—plus—

Plus

at 9 a. m. will feature Fire Prevention 8 a. m. Holy Communion.

Robert W. Weir (minor, New Jersey:

JANE WITHERS

Week.

10. Church School.

Petition for ancillary letters of guard­

"The Man Who

"The Novelty Trio" program last 11. Holy Communion and sermon. ianship, exemplified copy of guardian­

Mas. 2 P. M. Eve. 7 P. M. on

Friday was one of the best ever seen Topic: "Loyalty;"

ship proceeding filed, decree entered "Wild and Woolly' Cried Sunday 5 Wolf" P. M. on

here.

The offertory anthem will be sung and ancillary letters of guardianship

by a guest soloist, Mrs. Charles K. issued to Verona Trust Company.

The second Card party of the season Stover.

for the benefit of the Seniors' Wash­

Johanna Sheppard, Southeast: Pe­

Today is the beginning of a "Come

Tomorrow Brings A Good Time

ington trip will be held at Bloomers

tition for letters of administration,

to Church" effort which is being fos­

pavilion, Peach Lake, Oct. 13.

oath, designation, waiver and retered

by the Vestry, the Woman's

nunciation filed.

Mrs. Goodrich, our librarian, htas

Auxiliary, the Guild and the Faculty

to You and Your Friends

organized a Library Club with Doris

of the Church School throughout the William Stall, Patterson: Petition for

Bergh as president and Dorothea

month of October.

judicial settlement and account of

Ludwig as secretary and treasurer. Wednesday, 7:30. Choir rehearsal, proceedings filed.

They are preparing to present an as­

o

sembly program for Book Week In Uncle Ab says the second-hand Bernice Shenfeld (minor), Carmel:

November.

trash of today becomes the antique Stipulation filed.

\W

treasure of tomorrow.

Carrie M. Weir, Philipstown: Report

of appraiser filed and order assessing

estate tax entered.

FAIR

Oct. 2-345-6-7-8-9

EC/L // PS £8

^M *£

8 Days Full of Interest and Entertainment

Teter's Dare Devils-Oct. 2 and 3

Hinkle's Rodeo-Oct. 4

Harness Races-Oct 5-6-7-8

Dog Show-Oct. 6 and 7

Cat Show-Oct. 8 and 9

Auto Races-Oct. 9

Cattle, Sheep. Swine. Vegetables

Fruit, Flowers, Big Machinery Show


Extensive Midway. Music by Two Bands

Splendid Free Grand Stand Attractions


Wift JJretogter fetanbarb

Brewster, Putnam County, N. Y., Friday, October 1,1937

NOTICE OF REDEMPTION OF TAX

SALE OFFICE OF THE TREASURER

OF PUTNAM COUNTY

Brewster, N. Y., August 25, 19S7

The Treasurer of the County of Put­

nam, pursuant to Chapter 180 of the

Laws of 1900, entitled "An Act in rela­

tion to unpaid taxes in the towns of the

County of Putnam," as amended, gives

notice that the time for the redemption

of lands sold under this act on the 14th

day of January, 1936, for unpaid taxes,

will expire on the 14th day of January,

1938, after which the persons entitled

thereto may receive the deeds of such

sales.

SOUTHEAST

An unfinished house and a lot situate

at Lake Tonetta, in the town of South­

east, Putnam County, New York', known

as Plot No. l-A on a map of lands of

Tonetta Lake Corporation filed in Put­

nam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 101A. Supposed owner, Charles A.

Brooks. Sold to Putnam County for

$23.89

An unfinished house and a lot situate

at Peaceable Hill, Brewster, in the town

of Southeast, Putnam County, New York,

known as Plot No. F-3 on a map of

Curtis & Hazzard filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 109. Sup­

posed owner, Leroy Hancock. Sold to

Putnam County for $43.55.

A house and lot located at North Main

Street, Brewster, in the central part of

the town of Southeast, Putnam County,

New York, bounded north by Oak

Street, east by Oak Street, south by

lands of S. B. Hoag, west by North Main

Street Supposed owner, Myron P.

Howes Estate. Sold to Theodore K.

Schaefer for $102.73.

A tract of land located at Guinea, in

the southerly part of the town of South­

east, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about twenty-five acres, bounded

north by lands of S. P. Field, east by

lands of S. P. Field, south by lands of

A. Coullon, west by lands of S. P. Field,

excepting therefrom 8/10ths of 1 acre,

located on the northerly side of Field's

Lane, in the town of Southeast, being

the same premises conveyed by the

Liverpool Realty Corporation to Helen

Caulfield by deed dated October 26,1934.

Supposed owner, Liverpool Realty Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$126.54.

A cottage and a tract of land located

at Joes HiUs, in the easterly part of the

town of Southeast, Putnam County, New

York, containing about one acre, bound­

ed north by lands of Redmond, east by

the Highway, south by lands of V. Red­

mond, west by lands of V. Redmond.

Supposed owner, J. A. Lamb. Sold to

Putnam County for $21.40.

A building lot located at Putnam Ter­

race, Brewster, in the central part of

the town of Southeast, Putnam County,

New York, bounded north by lands of

J. Comeskey, east by lands of A. Knapp,

south by lands of J. Comeskey, west by

New York Central R. R. Co. Supposed

owner, William Slocum Estate. Sold to

Putnam County for $13.81.

A building lot located at Allview Ave­

nue, Brewster, in the central part of

the town of Southeast, Putnam County,

New York, bounded north by lands of

C. Merrick, east by lands of Star Ridge

Co., Inc., south by lands of A. & M.

Forschner, west by Highway. Supposed

owner, Robert Trojahn. Sold to Thomas

J. Forschner for $31.30.

PATTERSON

A vacant lot located at Towners, in

the central part of the town of Patterson,

Putnam County, New York, bounded

north by lands of Towners Realty Co.,

east by lands of Towners Realty Co.,

south by lands of Towners Realty Co.,

west by lands of Towners Realty Co.

Supposed owner, Patrick C. Hanbury.

Sold to Putnam County for $16.53.

Four plots of land located at Towners,

in the central part of the town of Pat­

terson, Putnam County, New York,

containing about one acre, bounded

north by lands of Towners Realty Cor­

poration, east by lands of Towners

Realty Corporation, south by lands of

Towners Realty Corporation, west by

lauds of Towners Realty Corporation.

Supposed owner, Isabel M. LeMastre.

Sold to Putnam County for $34.48.

A house and lot located at Orchard

Street, in the northern part of the town

of Patterson, Putnam County, New

York, bounded north by lands of William

Johnson, east by lands of Catherine

Doudera, south by the Street, west by

the Street. Supposed owner, James E.

Smith. Sold to Putnam County for

$48.63.

A bungalow and lot located at Town­

ers, in the central part of the town

of Patterson, Putnam County, New York,

bounded north, east, south and west by

lands of Towners Realty Corporation.

Supposed owner, Robert Wilson. Sold to

Putnam County for $29.14.

A tract of land located at Towners, in

the central part of the town of Pat­

terson, Putnam County, New York,

known as Plots 1-2-3, Section A, bounded

north by lands of Charles Swanson, east

by lands of City, south by lands of Carl

Bauch, west by the Street. Supposed

owner, Rose K. Niss. Sold to Putnam

County for $21.32.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Plots Nos. 6128

and o'144-U148 on a map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

130D-D. Supposed owner, Victor John­

son. Sold to Putnam County for $27.49.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Plots Nos. 0246-

6255 on a map of lands of Mirror Holding

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130D-D.

Supposed owner, James H. Murray. Sold

to Putnam County for $24.10.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town ol Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Dance Hall on

a map of lands of Mirror Holding Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office. Supposed owner, Putnam Lake

Property Owners Association. Sold to

Putnam County for $29.18.

A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Patterson, Putnam

County, New York, known as Club

House, garage, small lake and park, on

a map of lands of Mirror Holding Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office. Supposed owner, Putnam

Lake Property Owners Association. Sold

to Putnam County for $191.10.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Patterson, Putnam

County, New-York, known as Plots Nos.

6039-6043 on a map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

130D-D. Supposed owner, Louis Bastone.

Sold to Putnam County for $26.98.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Plots Nos. 6256-7

and 6273-5 on a map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

130D-D. Supposed owner, Steve Gar is.

Sold to Putnam County for $25.82.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New.York, known as Plots Nos. 6282-

6283 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130D-D.

Supposed owner, Cyril Osterhaus. Sold

to Putnam County for $17.67.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Plots Nos. 6149-

6153 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130D-D.

Supposed owners, Catherine Petrozza

and Mary Bastone. Sold to Putnam

County for $30.20.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Plots Nos. 6223-

6225 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130D-D.

Supposed owner, Daniel Quilty. Sold to

Putnam County for $22.77.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Plots Nos. 6289-

6290 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130D-D.

Supposed owner, William Sullivan. Sold

to Putnam County for $19.01.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Plots Nos. 2696-

2700 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam Coun­

ty Clerk's Office under File No. 149C.

Supposed owner, Simon Blitzstein. Sold

to Putnam County for $16.34.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Plots Nos. 2832-

2836 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam Coun­

ty Clerk's Office under File No. 149C.

Supposed owner, Simon Blitzstein. Sold

to Putnam County for $15.82.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Plots Nos. 6106-

12 and tennis court, on a map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under

File No. 149G. Supposed owners, Putnam

Lake Property Owners' Association.

Sold to Putnam County for $19.77.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Plots Nos. 6478-

6482 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam Coun­

ty Clerk's Office under File No. 149G.

Supposed owner, Albert Hoetzel. Sold

to Putnam County for $16.69.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Plots Nos. 162-

164 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam Coun­

ty Clerk's Office under File No. 149H.

Supposed owner, G. Camp. Sold to Put­

nam County for $18.30.

A tract of land situate at Putnam

Lake, in the town of Pattersonfc Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

785-789 on a map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

149. Supposed owner, Elizabeth Maurer.

Sold to Putnam County for $17.43.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Plots Nos. 1527-

1531 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam Coun­

ty Clerk's Office under File No. 149A.

Supposed owner, Virginia Reilling. Sold

to Putnam County for $17.43.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Plots Nos. 5239-

5245 and bungalow, on a map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under

File No. 149F. Supposed owner, N.

Compti. Sold to Ann C. Carroll for $21.58.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Plots Nos. 3113-

3117 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam Coun­

ty Clerk's Office under File No. 149J.

Supposed owner, D. Kastopolos. Sold to

Putnam County for $17.43.

l'JIII.II MOWN

A tract of land with factory thereon,

located at Cold Spring, in the western

part of the town of Philipstown, Put­

nam County, New York, bounded east

by the Highway, south by lands of

Marsh and Rupert. Supposed owner, As­

toria Silk Works. Sold to Putuain Coun­

ty for $545.81.

A tract of land located at Cold Spring,

in the western part of the town of Phil­

ipstown, Putnam County, New York,

bounded north by Bank Street, east by

Foundry Pond, south by lands of Run-

dell, west by lands of Astoria Silk

Works. Supposed owner, Astoria Silk

Works. Sold to Putnam County for

$41.79.

A tract of land located at Cold Spring,

in the western part of the town of Phil­

ipstown, Putnam County, New York,

bounded north by Bank Street, east by

Foundry Pond, south by lands of Run-

dell, west by lands of Astoria Silk Works.

Supposed owner, Astoria Silk Works.

Sold to Putnam County for $32.49.

A factory and two vacant parcels of

land, located at Cold Spring, in the west­

ern part of the town of Philipstown,

Putnam County, New York. Supposed

owner, Astoria Silk Works. Sold to Put­

nam County for $210.03.

A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Nelsonville, in the western

part of the town of Philipstown, Putnam

County, New York, containing about

four acres, bounded south by lands of

Uhl Brothers, west by the Highway.

Supposed owner, Frank Chamberlain.

Sold to Putnam County for $56.49.

A tract of land located at Garrison, in

the western part of the town of Philips-

town, Putnam County, New York, con­

sisting of building lot, bounded north by

Highway, east by lands of Horton, south

by lands of Robinson Estate, west by

Albany Post Road. Supposed owner,

Herman Deppe. Sold to Henry Kasten

for $25.68.

A tract of land with buildings thereon,

located at North Highlands, in the north­

ern part of the town of Philipstown,

Putnam County, New York, containing

about fifty and three-tenths acres,

bounded north by lands of Forman,

south by lands of Huestis, west by Al­

bany Post Road. Supposed owner. Dol­

phin Holding Corporation. Sold to Put­

nam County for $128.35.

A tract of land located at East Moun­

tain, in the northeastern part of' the

town of Philipstown, Putnam County,

New York, containing about two hun­

dred acres, bounded west by Dutchess

County. Supposed owner, Mrs. K. Foder-

meyer. Sold to Putnam County for

$390.89.

A tract of land with building thereon,

located at Cold Spring, in the western

part of the town of Philipstown, Putnam

County, New York, bounded north by

Main Street, east by lands of Nanla,

south by lands of Filebrown, west by

lands of Mosher Estate. Supposed owner,

Rosario Friesenda. Sold to Putnam

County for $56.49.

A tract of land located at North High­

lands, in the northern part of the town

of Philipstown, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lots Nos. 3 to 34, inclu­

sive. Supposed owner, Clarence Gar­

land. Sold to Putnam County for $17.42.

A tract of land with buildings thereon,

located at Garrison, in the southwestern

part of the town of Philipstown, Putnam

County, New York, bounded north by

lands of Goodrich, east by Beacon-Bear

Mountain State Highway, south by lands

of Grassi and Episcopal Church prop­

erty, west by lands of New York Central

and Hudson River Railroad. Supposed

owner, Highland Grange, Incorporated.

Sold to Putnam County for $925.15.

A tract of land with house thereon,

located at North Highlands, in the west­

ern part of the town of Philipstown, Put­

nam County, New York, bounded north

by lands of Haight, west by lands of

Huestis. Supposed owner, R. A. Markley.

Sold to Municipal Mutual Corporation

for $42.06.

A tract of land located at Cold Spring,

in the western part of the town of Phil­

ipstown, Putnam County, New York,

bounded north by lands of Julian, east

by Market Street, south by New Street,

west by lands of Perry Estate. Supposed

owner, James Towner Estate. Sold to

Vilage of Cold Spring for $18.24.

A tract of land with blacksmith shop

thereon, located at Garrison, in the

southern part of the town of Philips-

town, Putnam County, New York,

bounded north by lands of Yannatella,

east by lands of Grassi, south by drive­

way, west by lands of Belchor. Supposed

owner, Estate of Daniel Mooney. Sold to

Gladyce A. Ware for $57.18.

A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Cold Spring, in the western

part of the town of Philipstown, Putnam

County, New York, bounded north by

lands of Munson, east by lands of Groves,

south by lands of Pond, west by Church

Street. Supposed owner, Emily Noble.

Sold to Seward L. Bloomer for $54.40.

A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Cold Spring, in the western

part of the town of Philipstown, Putnam

County, New York, bounded north by

lands of Monstretallo, south by lands of

Pond, west by Stone Street, known as

Briggs Place. Supposed owner, Alvin D.

Pond. Sold to Municipal Mutual Corpor­

ation for $32.49.

A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Cold Spring, in the western

part of the town of Philipstown, Putnam

County, New York, bounded north by

lands of Pond, east by lands of Mathews,

south by lands of Satterlee, west by

Stone Street. Supposed owner, Alvin D.

Pond. Sold to Municipal Mutual Corpor­

ation for $55.00.

A tract of land located at Cold Spring,

in the western part of the town of Phil­

ipstown, Putnam County, New York,

bounded north by lands of Smith, west

by lands of Dale. Supposed owners, John

and Margaret Tietgln. Sold to Estate of

Chalmers Dale for $54.99.

A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Cold Spring, in the western

part of the town of Philipstown, Putnam

County, New York, bounded north by

lands of Lunn Terrace, east by lands of

New York Central Railroad, south by

lands of Fresenda, west by Market

Street. Supposed owner, Alvin D. Pond.

Sold to Municipal Mutual Corporation

for $48.07.

CARMEL

A tract of land with garage thereon,

located at Carmel, in the northern part

of the town of Carmel, Putnam County,

New York, containing about one-quarter

acre, bounded north by lands of Baxter,

east by Street, south by lands of Ferris,

west by lands of Blake. Supposed owner,

Chester Adams. Sold to Putnam County

for $123.17.

A tract of land located at Mahopac, in

the central part of the town of Carmel,

Putnam County, New York, containing

about one-half acre, known as Plots Nos.

20, 21, Map 53. Supposed owner, Cecelia

Butteri. Sold to Municipal Mutual Cor­

poration for $18.30.

A tract of land with club house there­

on, located at Mahopac, in the central

part of the town of Carmel, Putnam

County, New York, containing about

three and one-half acres, bounded north

by lands of Ball, east by the Street, south

by the Street, west by the Lake. Sup­

posed owner, Capoham Holding Corpor­

ation. Sold to Municipal Mutual Corpor­

ation for $1,035.44.

A tract of land located at Mahopac, in

the central part of town of Carmel, Put­

nam County, New York, containing about

one acre, bounded north by lands of

Morini, east by lands of C. C, south by

lands of C. C, west by the Street. Sup­

posed owner, Mary E. Dunn Estate. Sold

to Raymond B. Costello for $55.33.

A tract of land located at Carmel, in

the northern part of the town of Carmel,

Putnam County, New York, containing

about one acre, bounded north by the

Town Line, east by the Street, south by

the Street, west by lands of Ewen. Sup­

posed owner, Walter Gantz. Sold to

Charles E. Nichols for $6039.

A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Carmel, in the northern part

of the town of Carmel, Putnam County,

New York, containing about one-half

acre, bounded north by lands of Ceme­

tery, east by lands of Ballard, south by

the Street, west by lands of Sloat. Sup­

posed owner, Carrie Hopkins. Sold to

Municipal Mutual Corporation for

$218.76.

A tract of land located at Carmel, in

the northern part of the town of Carmel,

Putnam County, New York, contain­

ing about eighty-six acres, bounded

north by lands of Mendenez, east by

lands of City, south by lands of Kervel,

west by the Street Supposed owner,

Elizabeth P. Jewett. Sold to Doris Agor

Edes for $28037.

A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Mahopac, in the central part

of the town of Carmel, Putnam County,

New York, containing about one-quarter

acre, bounded north by lands of Ga-

nong, east by the Street, south by lands

of Church, west by the Lake. Supposed

owner, Lake Mahopac Ridge Incorpo­

rated. Sold to Municipal Mutual Cor­

poration for $252?73.

A tract of land located at Mahopac,

in the central part of the town of Carmel,

Putnam County, New York, containing

about one-quarter acre, bounded north

by lands of M. F. A., east by lands of

Girl Scouts, south by lands of Hallock,

west by the Street. Supposed owner,

Bernhart Levine. Sold to Municipal Mu­

tual Corporation for $17.17.

A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Mahopac, in the central part

of the town of Carmel, Putnam County,

New York, containing about one acre,

bounded north by lands of Carleson, east

by the Street, south by the Street, west

by the Street, Supposed owner, Mrs. J. B.

Maffey. Sold to Municipal Mutual Cor­

poration for $120.81.

'A tract of land located at Carmel, in

the northern part of the town of Carmel,

Putnam County, New York, containing

about 190 x 180 feet, bounded north

by the Street, east by lands of Barrett,

south by the Street, west by lands of

Lane. Supposed owner, Helen F. Ma-

honey. Sold to William H. Miller for

$3038.

A tract of land located at Carmel, in

the northern part of the town of Carmel,

Putnam County, New York, containing

about 172 x 100 feet, bounded north by

the Street, east by lands of Stymus,

south by the Street, west by the Street.

Supposed owner, Helen F. Mahoney.

Sold to William H. Miller for $42.84.

A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Carmel, in the northern part

of the town of Carmel, Putnam County,

New York, containing about one-half

acre, bounded north by lands of Horton,

east by lands of Horton, south by lands

of Horton, west by the Street. Supposed

owner, Edith R. Mullen. Sold to Mu­

nicipal Mutual Corporation for $45.55.

A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Carmel, in the northern part

of the town of Carmel, Putnam County,

New York, containing about one-eighth

acre, bounded north by lands of Brown,

east by the Street, south by lands of

Blake, west by lands of Jennings. Sup­

posed owners, McNulty Family. Sold to

Putnam County for $20739.

A tract of land located at Mahopac,

in the central part of town of Carmel,

Putnam County, New York, containing

about 13,350 square feet, known as

Plots 32, 34, Block K. Map 54. Supposed

owner, George C. Rudin. Sold to Munici­

pal Mutual Corporation for $25.11.

A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Carmel, in the northern part

of the town of Carmel, Putnam County,

New York, containing about one-quarter

acre, bounded north by lands of Mead,

east by the Street, south by lands of

Seymour, west by lands of Ryder. Sup­

posed owner, John Shield Estate. Sold

to Raymond B. Costello for $57.19.

A tract of land located at Carmel, in

the northern part of the town of Carmel,

Putnam County, New York, containing

about one-half acre, bounded north by

lands of Mouls, east by lands of Mouls,

south by lands of Stahl, west by lands

of City. Supposed owner, Julia Singer.

Sold to Putnam County for $17.43.

PUTNAM VALLEY

A tract of land located at Tompkins

Corners, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, containing

about thirteen acres, bounded north by

lands of Parkway, east by lands of Park­

way, south by lands of Tompkins, west

by lands of Taconic Park. Supposed

owner, Adirondack Realty Corporation.

Sold to Putnam County for $47.97.

A tract of land with garage thereon,

located at Barger Street, in the town of

Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, containing about one acre, located

next to Kruger in Larksburg Develop­

ment. Supposed owners, Otto and Hilda

Kranter. Sold to Maude Lee for $30.51.

A tract of land located at Oscawana

Lake Road, in the town of Putnam Val­

ley, Putnam County, New York, contain­

ing about sixty-two acres, bounded

north by lands of Henderson, east by

lands of Wagner, south by the Highway,

west by lands of Wagner. Supposed own­

er, James E. Odcll. Sold to Municipal

Mutual Corporation for $103.02.

A tract of land located at Oscawana

Lake Road, in the town of Putnam Val­

ley, Putnam County, New York, bounded

north by lands of Odcll, east by lands of

Odell, south by lands of Odcll, west by

the Highway. Supposed owners, William

and James Olley. Sold to Putnam Coun­

ty for $25.15.

A tract of land located at Adams Cor­

ners, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, containing about

four acres, bounded north by lands of

Beverly Hills Corporation, east by lands

of Knapp, south by lands of Barnum,

west by the Highway. Supposed owners,

Heirs of David J. Reed. Sold to Putnam

County for $49.67.

A tract of land located at Adams Cor­

ners, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, containing about

one acre, bounded north by lands of

Wixon, east by Highway, south by lands

of Barrett, west by lands of Knapp. Sup­

posed owners, Heirs of David J. Reed.

Sold to Putnam County for $23.22.

A tract of land located at Peekskill

Hollow, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, containing

about fifteen acres, bounded north by

Town Line, east by Town Line, south by

lands of Hunt, west by lands of Putnam

Valley Realty Corporation. Supposed

owner, Nelson W. Rogers. Sold to Put­

nam County for $118.71.

A tract of land located at Oscawana

Lake East, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Lot No. 53, bounded north by lands of

Ahearns, east by lands of Ladd Park,

south by lands of Ladd, west by lands of

Ahearns. Supposed owner, Charles H.

Stahl. Sold to Gladyce A. Ware for $19.64.

A tract of land situate at Oscawana

Lake, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plot

No. 92, Abele Park, on a map of lands of

Wanagru Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under File

No. Mod. 6E. Supposed owner, Raymond

J. Atherley. Sold to Putnam County for

$24.38.

A tract of land 'situate at Camp Look­

out, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 256-257 on a map of lands of Walter

Clifford Country Estate, filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

121A Modified. Supposed owner, Mrs.

M. J. Barnsby. Sold to Putnam County

for $22.49.

A tract of land with house thereon,

situate at Lake Peekskill, in the town of

Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Plots Nos. 20-21, AB12,

Section B, on a map of lands of McGol-

rick Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No. 185.

Supposed owners, Michael and Elsie

Bruckschlogl. Sold to Municipal Mutual

Corporation for $51.15.

A tract of land situate at Oscawana

Lake East, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plot No. 37, OLE2, on a map of lands of

Wanagru Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 34A. Supposed owner, Louis Carlo.

Sold to Putnam County for $1836.

A tract of land situate at Oscawana

Lake Road, in the town of Putnam Val­

ley, Putnam County, New York, known

as Plots Nos. 1-3-5, Block 14, on a map of

lands of Hudson Heights Development

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 112. Sup­

posed owner, Cassel Cooper. Sold to Put­

nam County for $18.13.

A tract of land situate at Oscawana

Lake Road, in the town of Putnam Val­

ley, Putnam County, New York, known

as Plots Nos. 2-4-6-8, Block 14, on a map

of lands of Hudson Heights Development

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 112. Sup­

posed owner, Cassel Cooper. Sold to Put­

nam County for $22.49.

A tract of land situate at Hilltop Es­

tate, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plot

No. 21 on a map of F. K. James Company

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office un­

der File No. 115. Supposed owner, Owen

Cosgrove. Sold to Putnam County for

$18.35.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 205-207, FB53, Section G, on a map

of McGolrick Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 185. Supposed owner, Anna Cassidy.

Sold to Putnam County for $18.69.

A tract of land situate at Camp Look­

out, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plot

No. 153 on a map of lands of Walter Clif­

ford Country Estate, filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

121 A. Supposed owner, Jack C. Fleischer.

Sold to Putnam County for $24.72.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 28-32, lib, Section A, on a map of

lands of McGolrick Realty Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office un­

der File No. 185. Supposed owner, Peter

Fresco. Sold to Putnam County for $26.73.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 19-24, FB67. Section F, on a map of

lands of McGolrick Realty Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office

under File No. 185. Supposed owner,

John Griscti. Sold to Putnam County for

$23.73.

A tract of land situate at Oscawana

Gardens, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 2 and 4, Block 11, on a map of

lands of Hudson Heights Development

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 112. Sup­

posed owner, Jerome Hauser. Sold to

Putnam County for $17.55.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 50-51, EB60, Section F, on a map of

lands of McGolrick Realty Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office

under File No. 185. Supposed owner,

William Haner. Sold to Putnam County

for $1832. •

A tract of land situate,at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 79-81, EB60, Section F, on a map of

lands of McGolrick Realty Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office

under File No. 185. Supposed owner, Hal-

ford C. Hyde. Sold to Putnam County

for $17.62.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 40-47, EB61, Section F, on a map of

lands of McGolrick Realty Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's OfHce

under File No. 185. Supposed owner, Hal-

ford C. Hyde. Sold to Putnam County

for $31.06.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 48-52, EB61, Section F, on a map of

lands of McGolrick Realty Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office

under File No. 185. Supposed owner, Hal-

ford C. Hyde. Sold to Putnam County

for $23.05.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 60-63, EB61, Section F, on a map of

lands of McGolrick Realty Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office

under File No. 185. Supposed owner, Hal-

ford C. Hyde. Sold to Putnam County

for $19.12.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 1-3, EB62? Section F, on a map of

lands of McGolrick Realty Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office

under File No. 185. Supposed owner, Hal-

ford C. Hyde. Sold to Putnam County

for $17.59.

A tract of land situate at Hill Top Es­

tate, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plot

No. 1 on a map of lands of F. K. James

Company, Hill Top Estate, filed in Put­

nam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 115. Supposed owner, William D.

Lockwood. Sold to Robert J. Schappert

for $31.62.

A tract of land with house thereon,

situate at Lake Peekskill, in the town of

Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Plots Nos. 123-124, DB52,

Section E, on a map of lands of McGol­

rick Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No. 185.

Supposed owner, Jacob Lederer. Sold to

Municipal Mutual Corporation for $47.67.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 63-65, DB54, Section E, on a map of

lands of McGolrick Realty Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office

under File No. 185. Supposed owner,

James Lacarus. Sold to Putnam County

for $18.13. •

A tract of land situate at Camp Look­

out, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plot

No. 185, Ml, on a map of lands of Clifford

Country Estate filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 121A. Sup­

posed owner, Elizabeth Mulligan. Sold to

Putnam County for $20.96.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plot

No. 232, FB55, Section G, on a map of

lands of McGolrick Realty Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office

under File No. 185. Supposed owner, Mc­

Golrick Mortgage Company. Sold to Put­

nam County for $23.90.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 39-40, B3, Section A, on a map of

lands of McGolrick Realty Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office

under File No. 185. Supposed owner, Mc­

Golrick Bond and Mortgage Company.

Sold to Putnam County for $17.01.

A tract of land with house thereon,

situate at Oscawana Lake, in the town of

Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Plot No. 15, on a map of

lands of Wanagru Realty Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office

under File No. 6A. Supposed owner, Jo­

seph O'Grady. Sold to Municipal Mutual

Corporation for $78.27.

A tract of land with house thereon,

situate at Oscawana Gardens, in the town

of Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Plot No. 16, B10, on a

map of lands of Hudson Heights Devel­

opment Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's OfHce under File No. 112.

Supposed owner, Samuel Parnes. Sold to

Municipal Mutual Corporation for $57.46.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 27-29, FB65, Section G, on a map of

lands of McGolrick Realty Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office

under File No. 185. Supposed owner,

Leonore Rich. Sold to Putnam County

for $18.13.

A tract of land situate at Camp Look­

out, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plot

No. 283 on a map of lands of Clifford

Country Estate filed in Putnam County

Clerks Office under File No. 121A. Sup­

posed owners, Leo Stillman and Edward

Freudenberg. Sold to Gladyce A. Ware

for $26.66.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 141-144, Bl, Section A, on a map of

lands of McGolrick Realty Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office

under File No. 185. Supposed owner, Jo­

seph Schultz. Sold to Louis Polstein for

$22.55.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 411-412 and % of 413, DB53, Section

E, on a map of lands of McGolrick Realty

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 185. Sup­

posed owner, Benjamin Slovak. Sold to

Putnam County for $18.82.

A tract of land with house thereon,

situate at Lake Peekskill, in the town of

Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known cs Plots Nos. 68-72, EB63,

Section F, on a map of lands of McGol­

rick Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No. 185.

Supposed owner, Catherine Skocigaric.

Sold to Louis Polstein for $51.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 145-147, EB64, Section F, on a map

of lands of McGolrick Realty Corpora­

tion filed in Putnam County Clerk's Of­

fice under File No. 185. Supposed owner,

Adelaide Silsbee. Sold to Putnam Coun­

ty for $18.13.

A tract of land with house thereon,

situate at Lake Peekskill, in the town of

Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Plots Nos. 33-37, EB73,

Section F, on a map of lands of McGol­

rick Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No. 185.

Supposed owner, Anna S. Schulz. Sold to

Municipal Mutual Corporation for $70.00.

A tract of land with house thereon,

situate at Lake Peekskill, in the town of

Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Plots Nos. 47-48, GB76,

Section H, on a map of lands of McGol­

rick Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No. 185.

Supposed owner, William Spiegelbaum.

Sold to Municipal Mutual Corporation

for $116.70.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 59-63, AB8, Section B, on a map of

lands of McGolrick Realty Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office

under File No. 185. Supposed owner, Isa­

bella Sampson. Sold to Putnam County

for $25.44.

A tract of land with a house thereon,

situate at Oscawana Lake East, in the

town of Putnam Valley, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plot No. 132, OLE1,

on a map of lands of Wanagru Realty

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 94A. Sup­

posed owner, George W. Thompson.

Sold to Municipal Mutual Corporation

for $54.34.

A tract of land situate at Hilltop Es­

tate, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plot

No. 2, on a map of lands of F. K. James

Company filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 115. Supposed own­

er, Frank A. Thomson. Sold at Putnam

County for $18.99.

A trac't of land with a house thereon,

situate at Lake Peekskill, in the town of

Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Plots Nos. 94-97, EB62,

Section F, on a map of lands of McGol­

rick Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No. 185.

Supposed owners, V. K. Tate, W. D.

Pugh, H. A. Maxwell and W. A. Gardner.

Sold to Louis Polstein for $52.33.

A tract of land situate at Oscawana

Lake East, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plot No. 59, O.L.E. 2, on a map of lands

of Wanagru Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 34A. Supposed owner, J. G. Webb.

Sold to Putnam County for $23.08.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known

as Plots Nos. 88-90, DB53, Section

E, on a map of lands of McGolrick

Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No. 185.

Supposed owners, John Wolfe and Theo­

dore Thieben. Sold to Putnam County

for $20.44.

A tract of land situate at Oscawana

Gardens, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 21-22-23. O.G., Bl, on a map

of lands of Hudson Heights Develop­

ment Corporation filed in Putnam Coun­

ty Clerk's Office under File No. 112. Sup­

posed owner, Jack Zinsberg. Sold to Put­

nam County for $19.06.

A tract of land with house thereon,

situate at Lake Peekskill, in the town of

Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Plots Nos. 36-38, EB62,

Section F, on a map of lands of McGol­

rick Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No. 185.

Supposed owners, Harry Zeitsoff and

Patrick J. McCarty. Sold to Municipal

Mutual Corporation for $67.60.

KENT

A tract of land located at Carmel

Country Club, in the southwestern part

of the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, containing about 120,386

square feet, bounded north by lands of

Carmel Country Club, east by lands ot

Carmel Country Club, south by lands of

Carmel Country Club, west by lands of

Carmel Country Club. Supposed owner,

Emma Sterrett. Sold to Putnam County

for $113.93.

A tract of land located at Carmel

Country Club, in the southwestern part

of the town of Kent, Putnam County.

New York, containing about 47,755

square feet, bounded north by lands of

Carmel Country Club, east by lands of

Cooley Realty Co., south by lands of

Carmel Country Club, west by lands of

Carmel Country Club. Supposed owner,

Charles J. Ward. Sold to Putnam County

for $55.30.

A tract of land located at Carmel

Country Club, in the south western part

of the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, containing about one acre,

bounded north by lands of LeCraw, east

by Golf Road, south by lands of Carmel

Country Club, west by lands of Carmel

Country Club. Supposed owner, Ralph


PAGB TWO THE BREWSTER STANDARD — ESTABLISHED 1869 FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1937

P. Lewis. Sold to Putnam County for

$51.90.

A tract of land located near Meads

Corners, In the northwestern part of the

town of Kent, Putnam County, New

York, containing about twenty-nine

acres, bounded north by lands of Omins

Farm, east by lands of Azzimonti, south

by Highway, west by County Line. Sup­

posed owner, Ernest Pahnestock. Sold to

Putnam County for $41.22.

A tract of land located at Mooney Hill,

in the northeast part of the town of Kent,

Putnam County, New York, containing

about seventy-six acres, bounded north

by lands of Educational Alliance, east by

Highway, south by Highway, west by

lands of Wooster. Supposed owner, Mor­

ris Florea. Sold to Putnam County for

$234.52.

A tract of land located at Hill and Dale

Club, in the southeast, part of the town

of Kent, Putnam County, New York,

known as Lot No. 5, Block G. Supposed

owner, Austin Kelley. Sold to Putnam

County for $26.17.

A tract of land located at Hill and Dale

Club, in the southeast part of the town

of Kent, Putnam County, New York,

known as Lot No. 5, Block F. Supposed

owner, George S. Miller. Sold to Putnam

County for $30.16.

A tract of land located at Gipsy Trail,

in the central part of the town of Kent,

Putnam County, New York, containing

about one hundred and two acres, bound­

ed north by lands of Carboni, east by

lands of Gipsy Trail, south by lands of

Patgen, west by the Highway. Supposed

owners, Mount and Robertson. Sold to

Putnam County for $32828.

A tract of land located at Kent Cliffs,

in the west central part of the town of

Kent, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about thirty acres, bounded

north by lands of Richardson, east by

lanc'.j of Ford, south by lands of Putnam

Valley Realty Company, west by lands

of Putnam Valley Realty Company. Sup­

posed owner, John Post Estate. Sold to

Putnam County for $21.70.

A tract of land located at Hook Dis­

trict, near Hortontown, in the western

part of the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, consisting of wood land.

Supposed owner, Mary Robinson. Sold

to Putnam County for $1820.

A tract of land located at Kent Cliffs,

in the southwestern part of the town of

Kent, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about fifteen acres, bounded

north by lands of Pullen, east by lands

of Townsend, south by lands of Ford,

west by lands of Ford. Supposed owner,

Nelson W. Rogers. Sold to Putnam

County for $116.56.

A tract of land located near Kent Cliffs,

in the western part of the town of Kent,

Putnam County, New York, containing

about six acres, bounded north by lands

of Peckham, east by lands of Peckham,

south by Highway, west by lands of

Peckham. Supposed owner, Charles E.

Shier. Sold to Putnam County for $17.45.

A tract of land located at Robinson-

town, in,the northern part of the town

u£ Kent, Putnam County, New York,

containing about eight acres, bounded

north by lands of Ballard, east by lands

of Sutherland, west by lands of Smalley.

Supposed owner, Sylvester Barrett. Sold

to lies, Incorporated for $17.74.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 192-163

on a map of lands of Mirror Holding

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130-1. Sup­

posed owner, John Olsen. Sold to Put­

nam County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 262-265

on a map of lands of Mirror Holding

Coiporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130-L Sup­

posed owner, Mrs. Sue Comerford. Sold

to Coleman S. Townsend for $22.79.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 394-395

on a map of lands of Mirror Holding

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130-1. Sup­

posed owner, John Brandt. Sold to Put­

nam County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 519-520

on a map of lands of Mirror Holding

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130-1. Sup­

posed owner, John Barth, Jr. Sold to Put­

nam County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

.New York, known as Plots Nos. 636-637

on a map of lands of Mirror Holding

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130-1. Sup­

posed owner, Fred Karlson. Sold to Cole­

man S. Townsend for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 666-668

on a map of lands of Mirror Holding

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130-1. Sup­

posed owner, William D. Fallman. Sold

to Putnam County for $18.71.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 671-672

on a map of lands of Mirror Holding

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Ottice under File No. 130-1. Sup­

posed owner, Lena Kramer. Sold to Put­

nam County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 740-742

on a map of lands of Mirror Holding

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130-1. Sup­

posed owner, Lena Larson. Sold to Put­

nam County for $18.53.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 792-794

on a map of lands of Mirror Holding

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130-1. Sup­

posed owner, Otto Frey. Sold to Putnam

County for $19.97.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 839-840

on a map Of lands of Mirror Holding

Corporation filed in PuUiam County

Clerks Office under File No. 130-1. Sup­

posed owner, Nicholas D. Santis. Sold

to Putnam County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. -1.329-

1,332 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130A-A.

Supposed owners, J. Burns and M. J.

Muldowney. Sold to Putnam County for

$22.78.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 1,613-

1,617 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130A-A.

Supposed owners, George E. Huntington,

Marion A. Wood and Frank H. Wood.

Sold to Putnam County for $25.62.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 1,732-

1,733 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130A-A.

Supposed owner, John M. Marshall. Sold

to Putnam County for $17.15.

• A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 1,754-

1,758 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130A-A.

Supposed owner, Bruno Heitz. Sold to

Putnam County for $25.61.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 1,762-

1,763 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office wider File No. 130A-A.

Supposed owners, Dean C. Moss and

Norman Fielding. Sold to Putnam Coun­

ty for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 2,044-

2,048 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed In Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130A-A.

Supposed owner, George A. Schick. Sold

to Putnam County for $25.61.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 2,060-

2,062 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130A-A.

Supposed owner, George H. Mullens.

Sold to Putnam County for $19.97.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 2,081-

2,085 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130A-A.

Supposed owners, William Cunningham

and Louis Hellwig. ScAd to Putnam

County for $25.61.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 2,193-

2,197 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130A-A.

Supposed owner, Eric Thomas. Sold to

Putnam County for $25.61.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 2,597-

2,598 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130B-B.

Supposed owner, Natalie Beane. Sold to

Putnam County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 3,001-

3,003 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130B-B.

Supposed owner, Patsy S. Mangino. Sold

to Putnam County for $19.97.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 3,215-

3,216 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130B-B.

Supposed dwner, Miss K. Foster or Pau­

line B. Coles. Sold to Putnam County

for $17.14.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 3,569-

3,570 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130B-B.

Supposed owner, Charles H. Elbert. Sold

to Putnam County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 3,601-

3,604 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130B-B.

Supposed owner, Patrick F. McCabe.

Sold to Putnam County for $22.79.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 3,626-

3,628 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130B-B.

Supposed owner, William Foszman. Sold

to Putnam County for $19.96.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 3,704-

3,707 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130B-B.

Supposed owner, Isabelle C. Franch.

Sold to Putnam County for $22.78.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 3,762-

3,765 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130B-B.

Supposed owner, Lucia Mecioni. Sold to

Putnam County for $22.78.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County",

New York, known as Plots Nos. 3,818-

3,819 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130B-B.

Supposed owner, Johanna DeAlleaume.

Sold to Putnam County for $17.40.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

In the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 3,840-

3,841 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130B-B.

Supposed owner, George B. Coles. Sold

to Putnam County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 4,014-

4,018 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerks office under File No. 130C-C.

Supposed owner, John Gerken. Sold to

Putnam Couaty for $25.01.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 4.019-

4,020 on a map of lands ol'Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 180C-C.

Supposed owner, Andrew J. White. Sold

to Putnam County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 4,077-

4,081 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130C-C.

Supposed owner, John Gerken. Sold to

Putnam County for $25.60.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 4,128-

4,127 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130C-C.

Supposed owner, George WeinzierL Sold

to Putnam County for $17.14.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

In the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 4,166-

4,167 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130C-C.

Supposed owner, William F. Dudley.

Sold to Putnam County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 4,604-

4,608 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130C-C.

Supposed owner, Mary Sigrist or Mary

Singrist. Sold to Putnam County for

$25.61.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 4,841-

4,845 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam Comity

Clerk's Office under File No. 130C-C.

Supposed owner, John Hendrick or John

Hendricks. Sold to Putnam County for

$25.66.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 4,846-

4,850 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130C-C.

Supposed owner, Henry Hendricks. Sold

to Putnam County for $25.61.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 5,081-

5,082 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130C-C.

Supposed owner, James E. Devanney.

Sold to Putnam County for $17.14.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 5,162-

5,163 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 136C-C.

Supposed owner, Harry Hanes or Harry

Harris. Sold to Putnam County for $17.13.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 5,352-

5,355 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130D-D.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$18.05.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 5,366-

5,367 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 136D-D.

Supposed owner, August Geislnger. Sold

to Putnam County for $17.13.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 5,745-

5,749 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130D-D.

Supposed owner, Joseph Losquardo or

Joseph Lusgandro. Sold to Putnam

County for $25.61.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 5,831-

5,832 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130D-D.

Supposed owner, Tillie Gesualai or Til-

lie Gesulldi. Sold to Putnam County for

$17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 5,914-

5,915 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130D-D.

Supposed owner, Bernard Feigin. Sold to

Putnam County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 5,977-

5,978 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130D-D.

Supposed owner, Ernest L. Gale. Sold to

Putnam County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 6,068-

6,070 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130D-D.

Supposed owner, Mary Bastone. Sold to

Putnam County for $19.97.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 6,402-

6,403 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130D-D.

Supposed owner, Emma Streisland or

Emanuel Strusand. Sold to Putnam

County for $17.14.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 6,432-

6,433 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130D-D.

Supposed owner, Walter Monnis or Wal­

ter Nonia. Sold to Putnam County for

$17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 6,521-

6,525 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130D-D.

Supposed owners, Rose and Stephen Fo-

bor. Sold to Putnam County for $25.61.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 6.551-

6,552 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130D-D.

Supposed owner, William DeVito or Wil­

liam and Joseph DeVito. Sold to Put­

nam County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County.

New York, known as Plots Nos. 6.568-

6,572 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130D-D.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$19.36.

. A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 6,627-

6,628 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130D-D.

Supposed owner, Frank Search or Frank

G. Searck. Sold to Putnam County for

$17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 6,629-

6,632 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130D-D.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$18.06.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 6,650-

6,651 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130D-D.

Supposed owner, Elizabeth Hallihan or

Elizabeth C. Hollahan. Sold to Putnam

County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 6,746-

6,749 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130D-D.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$18.07.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 6,868-

6,869 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130D-D.

Supposed owner, Rose Ricci. Sold to Put­

nam County for $17.15.

' A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 7,071-

7,072 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130E-E.

Supposed owner, Michael Joyce. Sold to

Putnam County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 7,089-

7,091 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130E-E.

Supposed owner, August Hahn. Sold to

Putnam County for $19.97.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 7,251-

7,252 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130E-E.

Supposed owner, Emily. Wagner. Sold to

Putnam County for $17.14.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 7,521-

7,523 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130E-E.

Supposed owner, Gerald Griffin or Ger­

ald F. Griffin. Sold to Putnam County

for $19.96.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 7,524-

7,525 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130E-E.

Supposed owner, James F. Tully. Sold

to Putnam County for $17.14.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 7,837-

7,840 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130E-E.

Supposed owner, Luigi Salerno or Luge

Salino. Sold to Putnam County for $21.45.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 7,853-

7,858 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam Coun­

ty Clerk's Office under File No. 130E-E.

Supposed owner, H. Schmitt or Herman

Smith. Sold to Putnam County for $26.42.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 7,869-

7,870 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130E-E.

Supposed owner, William O'Hara. Sold

to Putnam County for $17.15.

A tract "of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 7,889-

7,893 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130E-E.

Supposed owner, Frank Egan. Sold to

Putnam County for $25.66.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 7,991-

7,992 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam Coun­

ty Clerk's Office under File No. 130E-E.

Supposed owner, Charles Francis. Sold

to Putnam County for $16.46.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 8.009-

8,011 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130E-E.

Supposed owner, Annie York or Anna

York. Sold to Putnam County for $19.97.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 8.070-

8,071 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130E-E.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration or Matthew Gibney. Sold to

Putnam County for $18.12.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 8,315-

8.317 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130E-E.

Supposed owner, Richard Devine. Sold

to Putnam County for $19.97.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 8.608-

8,609 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130F-F.

Supposed owner, James A. Butler or

Albert Butler. Sold to Putnam County

for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 8,632-

8,635 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130F-F.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration or Charles P. Kniffen. Sold to

Putnam County for $22.78.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Plots Nos.

8.695-8,699 on a map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

130F-F. Supposed owner, Louis Ferez

or Louis Ferney. Sold to Putnam Coun­

ty for $25.61.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 8,794-

8,796 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130F-F.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration or Harry Sanders. Sold to Put­

nam County for $19.96.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 8,956-

8,957 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130F-F.

Supposed owners, Hazel V. and Ray­

mond J. Lowery or Hazel and Raymond

Lowery. Sold to Putnam County for

$27.62.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 8,965-

8,967 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130F-F.

Supposed owner, Susan Munro or Susan

Murro. Sold to Putnam County for $19.97.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New-York, known as Plots Nos. 9,004-

9,008 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130F-F.

Supposed owner, Margaret Nostrand.

Sold to Putnam County for $25.61.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 9,106-

9,107 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130F-F.

Supposed owner, Joseph Crowe or Jo­

seph S. Crowe, Jr. Sold to Putnam Coun­

ty for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 9,233-

9,234 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130F-F.

Supposed owner, Domenick Polito or

Lisandrina Polito. Sold to Putnam Coun­

ty for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 9,247-

9,252 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130F-F.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$19.00.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 9,285-

9,286 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130F-F.

Supposed owner, Eugene A. Lyman or

Eugene A. and Kathryn Lyman. Sold

to Putnam County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 9,393-

9,397 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130F-F.

Supposed owner, Matthew Dohan or

Matthew Boham. Sold to Putnam Coun­

ty for $25.61.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 9.530

9,534 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130F-F.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$19.71.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 9,719-

9,721 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130F-F.

Supposed owner, Domenick Polito or

Dominico Polito. Sold to Putnam Coun­

ty for $19.96.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 9,786-

9,787 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation pied in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130F-F.

Supposed owner, Florence Feeney. Sold

to Putnam County for $17.14.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 9.957-

9,958 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130F-F.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 10.273

10,277 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130G-G.

Supposed owner. Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$19.70.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 10.281-

10.284 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130G-G.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$18.17.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 10.481-

10,486 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130G-G.

Supposed owner, George Norris. Sold to

Putnam County for $28.42.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 10.489-

10.490 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130G-G.

Supposed owner, Mrs. J. A. Grace or

Catherine T. Grace. Sold to Putnam

County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 10.549-

10,550 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130G-G.

Supposed owner, Margaret Benaditto.

Sold to Putnam County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 10,775-

10,778 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No.' 130GrG.

Supposed owner, Mr. and Mrs. Klitz and

Emily Matkes or Theresa Klitz. Sold to

Putnam County for $22.78.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 10,846-

10,848 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130G-G.

Supposed owner, Humbert Ferraro or

Humbert Serraro. Sold to Putnam Coun­

ty for $19.97.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 10,938-

10,940 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130H-H.

Supposed owner, Peter Chiappetta or

Peter Chropetta. Sold to Putnam County

for $25.61.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 11,013-

11,016 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130H-H.

Supposed owner. Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$18.06.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 11,206-

11,210 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130H-H.

Supposed owner, Mr. and Mrs. J. W.

French or Thabella French. Sold to Put­

nam County for $25.61.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 11,442-

11,446 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130H-H.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$18.46.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 11,467-

11,468 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130H-H.

Supposed owner, Sam Codall or Sam

Caddall. Sold to Putnam County for

$17.14.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 11,479-

11,483 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130H-H.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$19.71.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 11,553-

11,555 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130H-H.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$20.05.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 11,679-

11,683 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 1361. Sup­

posed owner, Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $19.69.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 11,687-

11,691 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 1301. Sup­

posed owner, Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $19.69.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 11,694-

11,695 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 1301. Sup­

posed owner, E. C. Herter. Sold to Put­

nam County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 11,696-

11,697 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 1301. Sup­

posed owner, John H. Connors. Sold to

Putnam County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 11,867-

11,876 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 1301. Sup­

posed owner, Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $17.63.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 12,034-

12,035 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 1301. Sup­

posed owner, K. Byrne or Katherine

Bryan. Sold to Putnam County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 12.036-

12,041 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 1301. Sup­

posed owner, Agillo Curto. Sold to Put­

nam County for $17.12.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 12.074-

12,075 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 1301. Sup­

posed owner, Gertie Byrne or Gertrude

Bryne. Sold to Putnam County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 12,105-

12.110 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 1301. Sup­

posed owner, Rene Bouisset. Sold to

PuUiam County for $17.12.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 12,398-

12,402 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 180J. Sup­

posed owner, Walter Hillebrecht Sold

to Putnam County for $19.25.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos, 12,408-

12,412 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold-

ing Corporation filed in Putnam Comity

Clerk's Office under File No. 130J. Sup­

posed owner, Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $18.17.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known at Plots Nos. 12,596-

12,598 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130J. Sup­

posed owner, Reuben Friedman or Reu­

ben L. Friedman. Sold to Putnam County

for $19.97.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 12,616-

12,619 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130J. Sup­

posed owner, George Brown. Sold to

Putnam County for $22.78.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 12,897-

12,900 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130J. Sup­

posed owner, Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $18.04.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 12,909-

12,910 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130.T. Sup­

posed owner, Arthur Jensen: Sold to

Putnam County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 13,107-

13,108 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130J. Sup­

posed owner, James H. Bowers. Sold to

Putnam County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 13,109-

13,110 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130J. Sup­

posed owner, Frederick Benjamin or

Fred A. Benjamin. Sold to Putnam

County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 13,355-

13,356 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130K-K.

Supposed owner, George Murphy or

Mirror Holding Corporation. Sold to

Putnam County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 13,357-

13,358 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130K-K.

Supposed owner, Marion F. Harris or

Marion Harris. Sold to Putnam County

for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Pptnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 13,407-

13,411 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130K-K.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$19.71.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 13,591-

13,592 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130K-K.

Supposed owner, William Gurr or Wil­

liam A. and Anna Gurr. Sold to Putnam

County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 13,606-

13,608 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130K-K.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$34.76.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 13,825-

13,829 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130K-K.

Supposed owner, Edward E. Haas. Sold

to Putnam County for $23.93.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 14,505-

14-507 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130K-K.

Supposed owner, Daniel E. Campbell or

Daniel Campbell. Sold to Putnam County

for $18.97.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the 'town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 14.585-

14,588 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130K-K.

Supposed owner, James McGarr. Sold to

Putnam County for $23.93.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 14,635-

14,637 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130K-K.

Supposed owner, George Mitrovich or

Rudolph Bures. Sold to Putnam County

for $19.96.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 14.642-

14,646 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130K-K.

Supposed owner, John Kennedy or Mir­

ror Holding Corporation. Sold to Putnam

County for $19.45.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 14.661-

14,666 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130K-K.

Supposed owner, Ada Campbell. Sold to

Putnam County for $28.42.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 14.796-

14.799 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under FUe No. 130K-K.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$22.78.


AY, OCTOBER 1,1937 THE BREWSTER STANDARD — ESTABLISHED 1869 PAGE THREE

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmcl,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 14,879-

14,880 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130K-K.

Supposed owner, Gilbert Mitchell. Sold

to Putnam County for $17.14.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 15,356-

15,359 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130L. Sup­

posed owner. Nelson and Randall Page

or Nelson Randall Page. Sold to Putnam

County for $22.78.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 15,468-

15,471 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130L. Sup­

posed owner, Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $19.90.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

In the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 15,480-

15,486 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130L. Sup­

posed owner, Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $18.07

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel',

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 15,863-

15,866 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130L. Sup­

posed owner, David Casqualli or David

Cosquaillo. Sold to Putnam County for

$22.78.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 15,972-

15,975 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130L Sup­

posed owner, Martin Bendel. Sold to

Putnam County for $22.78.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

In the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 16,033-

16,034 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130L. Sup­

posed owner, Mrs. C. Schlutter or Chris­

tie H. Schlutter. Sold to Putnam County

for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 16,359-

16,364 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130L. Sup­

posed owner, Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $2123.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 16,433-

16,436 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130L. Sup­

posed owner, Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $17.84.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 16,515-

16,516 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130L. Sup­

posed owners Nelson and Randall Page.

Sold to Putnam County for $17.14.

) A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

'in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

' New York, known as Plots Nos. 16,854-

16,855 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130M-M.

Supposed owner, Josephine Romano.

Sold to Putnam County for $15.26.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 16,884-

16,885 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130M-M.

Supposed owners, Home Realty Com­

pany. Sold to Putnam County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 16,918-

16,919 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130M-M.

Supposed owners, Ralph Civalo and

Nicholas Pope or Pape and Ciroloa. Sold

to Putnam County for $17.14.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 17,144-

17,145 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130M-M.

Supposed owner, Charles Romano. Sold

to Putnam County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 17,146-

17,148 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130M-M.

Supposed owner, Patsy S. Mangini or

Patsy S. Mangino. Sold to Putnam

County for $19.57.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 17,228-

17,229 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130M-M.

Supposed owner, Ida Cohen. Sold to

Putnam County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 17,280-

17,284 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130M-M.

Supposed owner, Mrs. Anthony J. Maida

or Amelia Maido. Sold to Putnam County

for $25.61.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 17.290-

17,294 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerks Oifice under FUe No. 130M-M.

Supposed owner Mrs. Anthony J. Maida

or Amelia Maido. Sold to Putnam County

for $25.61.

A truct of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 17.342-

17.343 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130M-M.

Supposed owner, Michael Carballo or

Michael Cavallo. Sold to Putnam County

for $17.14.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 17.499-

17,500 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Oilice under File No. 130M-M.

Supposed owner, Frank D. Kernstock.

Sold to Putnam County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 17,520-

17,525 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130M-M.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$21.27.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 17,526-

17,529 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130M-M.

Supposed owner, Samuel Solomon or

Mirror Holding Corporation. Sold to

Putnam County for $17.91.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 35-44 on

a map of lands of Mirror Holding Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Offlce under File No. 130-1. Supposed

owner, Ann F. Anderson. Sold to Putnam

County for $30.08.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 244-246,

bungalow and garage, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation filed in Put­

nam County Clerk's Offlce under File No.

130-1. Supposed owner, Ida Siolumd.

Sold to Putnam County for $77.36.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 493-496

on a map of lands of Mirror Holding Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Offlce under File No. 130-1. Supposed

owner, Frank Robinson. Sold to Putnam

County for $17.69.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

In the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 497-499

on a map of lands of Mirror Holding

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130-1. Sup­

posed owner, Lillian O'Neill. Sold to

Putnam County for $17.17.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 893-901

on a map of lands of Mirror Holding Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 130-1. Supposed

owner, Mirror Holding Corporation. Sold

to Putnam County for $17.81.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 926-939

on a map of lands of Mirror Holding Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Offlce under File No. 130-1. Supposed

owner, Mirror Holding Corporation. Sold

to Putnam County for $21.32.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 985-980

and bungalow, on a map of lands of Mir­

ror Holding Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Offlce under File No.

130-1. Supposed owner, Dorothy Stern.

Sold to Putnam County for $27.61.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 1,634-

1,636 and bungalow, on a map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation filed in Put­

nam County Clerk's Offlce under File No.

130A-A. Supposed owner, Frank H. Pal­

mer. Sold to Putnam County for $24.66.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 1,878-

1,879 and bungalow, on a map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation filed in Put­

nam County Clerk's Offlce under File No.

130A-A. Supposed owner, Peter McNeil.

Sold to Putnam County for $40.81.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 2,180-

2,192 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130A-A.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$16.50.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 2,207-

2,258 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130A-A.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$44.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 2,280-

2,307 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130A-A.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$22.20.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 2,381-

2,432 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130A-A.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$44.13.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 2,985-

2,989 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130B-B.

Supposed owner, Martin Bendell. Sold

to Putnam County for $20.91.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 3.481-

3,485 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130B-B.

Supposed owner, Louise Staley. Sold to

Putnam County for $20.91.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 3.058-

3,660 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130B-B.

Supposed owner, Thomas Barnes. Sold

to Putnam County for $17.17.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 3.952-

3,956 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130C-C.

Supposed owner, Edmond L. Barry. Sold

to Putnam County for $19.24.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County.

New York, known as Plots No6. 4,116-

4,118 and bungalow, on a map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation filed in Put­

nam County Clerk's Office under File No.

130C-C. Supposed owner, Conrad Gall.

Sold to Putnam County for $07.23.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 4,187-

4,188 and bungalow, on a map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation filed In Put­

nam County Clerk's Office under File No.

130C-C. Supposed owner, Walter R.

Welch. Sold to Putnam County for $22.17.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 4,218-

4,227 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130C-C.

Supposed owner, Madeline Schwartz.

Sold to Putnam County for $30.08.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 4,394-

4,398 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130C-C.

Supposed owner, Patsy DeVito. Sold to

Putnam County for $20.91.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 4,689-

4,691 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130C-C.

Supposed owner, Elsa Osborn. Sold to

Putnam County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 4,698-

4,700 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130C-C.

Supposed owner, Elsa Osborn. Sold to

Putnam County for $17.14.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 5,210-

5,212 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130C-C.

Supposed owner, John I. Temple. Sold

to Putnam County for $17.17.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 5,522-

5,524 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130D-D.

Supposed owner, Salvatore Natolitano.

Sold to Putnam County for $17.17.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 5,896-

5,899 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130D-D.

Supposed owner, Harry Walsh. Sold to

Putnam County for $19.02.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 6,601-

6,604 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed In Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130D-D.

Supposed owners, D. and P. Castellan.

Sold to Putnam County for $19.02.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 6.615-

6,626 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130D-D.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$19.92.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 6,670-

6,721 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130D-D.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$47.48.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 6,784-

6,788 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130E-E.

Supposed owner, C. Scapa. Sold to Put­

nam County for $20.90.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 7,369-

7,372 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130E-E.

Supposed owner, Anna E. Kare. Sold to

Putnam County for $19.02.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 7,395-

7,398 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130E-E.

Supposed owner, W. Wolte. Sold to Put­

nam County for $19.02.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 7,399-

7,402 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130E-E.

Supposed owner, E. Spring. Sold to Put­

nam County for $19.02.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 7,473-

7,475 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130E-E.

Supposed owner, Elizabeth P. Roche.

Sold to Putnam County for $17.17.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 7,650-

7,660 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130E-E.

Supposed owner, Michael Piscogta. Sold

to Putnam County for $20.90.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 7,774-

7,776 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130E-E.

Supposed owner, C. Mattiole. Sold to

Putnam County for $17.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 7,928-

7,931 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130E-E.

Supposed owner, W. M. Zimmerman.

Sold at Putnam County for $19.35.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 8.330-

8.332 and bungalow, on a map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Offlce under

File No. 130E-E. Supposed owner, Alex­

ander Razatkie. Sold to Putnam County

for $24.64.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 8,466-

8,470 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130E-E.

Supposed owner, Katherlne Dunleavie.

Sold to Putnam County for $20.91.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 8.593-

8,597 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130F-F.

Supposed owner, Katherlne Dunleavie.

Sold to Putnam County for $19.24.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 8.761-

8,765 and bungalow, on a map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation filed in Put­

nam N County Clerk's Offlce under File

No. 130F-F. Supposed owner, Margaret

Higgins. Sold to Margaret Higgins for

$138.61.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 9,162-

9,164 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130F-F.

Supposed owner, Rose Smith. Sold to

Putnam County for $17.17.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

In the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 9,207-

9,211 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed In Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130F-F.

Supposed owner, Katherlne Dunleavie.

Sold to Putnam County for $1923.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 9,328-

9,337 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130F-F.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$18.51.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 9,350-

9,351 and bungalow, on a map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation filed in Put­

nam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 130F-F. Supposed owner, Thomas

Fagnano. Sold to Putnam County for

$55.83.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 9,363-

9,387 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130F-F.

Supposed owner. Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$25.38.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 9,410-

9,432 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130F-F.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$24.61.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 9,448-

9,467 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130F-F.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$22.89.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 9,484-

9,522 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130F-F.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$31.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 9,540-

9,568 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130F-F.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$27.98.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 9,571-

9,635 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130F-F.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$51.38.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 9.641-

9,675 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130F-F.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$34.47.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 9,823-

9,874 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold-

in Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130F-F.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$44.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 9.877-

9,919 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold-

in Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130F-F.

Supposed owner. Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$39.02.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 9,945-

9,955 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130F-F.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$19.23.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as PlotsyNos. 9.999-

10,025 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130F-F.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$20.19.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

Lo the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 10213-

10,223 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130G-G.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$18.24.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 10.311-

10.318 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130G-G.

Supposed owner, Robert R. Sizer Com­

pany. Sold to Putnam County for $26.51.

A tract of land situate at Lako Cnrmel,

In the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 10.691-

10,693 and bungalow, on a map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 130G-G. Supposed owner, Frank

Worthman. Sold to Putnam County for

$50.24.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 10,729-

10,774 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Oifice under File No. 130G-G.

Supposed owner. Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$40.69.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 10,779-

10,833 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130G-G.

Supposed owner. Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$34.92.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 10,951-

10,953 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130H-H.

Supposed owner, Louis Ballinger. Sold

to Putnam County for $17.14.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 10,984-

10,986 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130H-H.

Supposed owner, Louis Dollinger. Sold

the Putnam County for $17.17.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 10,997-

11,007 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130H-H.

Supposed owner. Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$19.22.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 11,026-

11,030 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130H-H.

Supposed- owner, Sebastian Stelletoni.

Sold to Putnam County for $20.90.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 11,036-

11,040 and bungalow, on a map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation filed In

Putnam County Clerk's Office under

File No. 130H-H. Supposed owner, Mik-

ka Muntter. Sold to Putnam County for

$141.69.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 11,168-

11,192 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130H-H.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$20.79.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 11,211-

11,227 and 11,235-11.256 on a map of

lands of Mirror Holding Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office

under File No. 130H-H. Supposed owner,

Mirror Holding Corporation. Sold to

Putnam County for $25.87.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 11,343-

11,356 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130H-H.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$20.17.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 11,389-

11,416 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130H-H.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$27.40.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 11,421-

11,431 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130H-H.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$19.35.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 11,547-

11,552 on map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130H-H.

Supposed owner, Alice Gold. Sold to

Putnam County for $20.80.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 11,566-

11,569 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130H-H.

Supposed owner, P. Castellano. Sold to

Putnam County for $19.02.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 11.583-

11,630 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's offlce under File No. 1301. Sup­

posed owner, Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $42.79.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 11,635-

11.675 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 1301. Sup-

psed owner, Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $38.01.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 11,785-

11,807 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 1301. Sup­

posed owner, Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $25.01.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 11.810-

11,856 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 1301. Sup­

posed owner. Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $41.88.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Plots Nos.

11,905-11,923 on a map of lands of Mir­

ror Holding Corporation filed in Put­

nam County Clerk's Offlce under'File

No. 1301. Supposed owner, Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation. Sold to Putnam County

for $22.54.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 12,024-

12,029 and bungalow, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation filed in Put­

nam County Clerk's Offlce under File No.

1301. Supposed owner, Mary Walsh. Sold

to Putnam County for $102.93.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 12,087-

12,104 and, 12,111-12,244 on a map of

lands of Mirror Holding Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Offlce

under File No. 1301. Supposed owner,

Mirror Holding Corporation. Sold to

Putnam County for $95.74.

A track of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 12,430-

12,469 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130J. Sup­

posed owner, Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $34.29.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 12692-

12,693 and bungalow, on a map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Offlce under File

No. 130J. Supposed owner, Veronica Lan-

gan. Sold to Putnam County for $33.16.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 12,854-

12,858 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130J. Sup­

posed owner, James H. Murray. Sold to

Putnam County for $17.36.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 12,925-

12,954 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130J. Sup­

posed owner, Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $22.62.

A track of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 12,957-

12,967 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130J. Sup­

posed owner, Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $23.72.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 12.992-

13,003, on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130J. Sup­

posed owner, Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $19.14.

A tract of land, situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 13.010-

13,020 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130J. Sup­

posed owner, Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $16.60.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 13,088-

13,092 and bungalow, on a map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 130J. Supposed owner, Josephine

Rega. Sold to Putnam County for $53.89.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 13,195-

13,196 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130K-K.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$14.50.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 13.290-

13,291 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130K-K.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$14.93.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 13.393-

13,401 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130K-K.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$25.43.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 14,699-

14,722 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130K-K.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$25.19.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 14,791-

14,793 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130K-K.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$20.02.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 14,802-

14,816 and 14,824-14,825 on a map of

lands of Mirror Holding Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Offlce

under File No. 130K-K. Supposed own­

er, Mirror Holding Corporation. Sold

to Putnam County for $23.41.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County*

New York, known as Plots Nos. 15,094-

15,160 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130K-K.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$48.24.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 15,395-

15,402; 15,406-15,407 and 15,412-15,415 on

a map of lands of Mirror Holding Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Offlce under File No. 130L. Supposed

owner, Mirror Holding Corporation.

Sold to Putnam County for $21.35.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 15,416-

15,419 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130L. Sup­

posed owner, COnilo Machinelli. Sold to

Putnam County for $19.02.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 15,428-

15,441 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130L Sup­

posed owner, Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $19.51.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 15,445-

15,449 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130L Sup­

posed owner, Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold at Putnam County for $15.01.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, knnwn as Plots Nos. 15,457-

15,463 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130L. Sup­

posed owner, Meyer Brislow. Sold to

Putnam County for $22.34.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 15,550-

15,738 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130L. Sup­

posed owner, Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $111.10.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 15,828-

15,832 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130L Sup­

posed owner, Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $14.55.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 15,948-

15,952 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130L Sup­

posed owner, Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $15.00.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 15,983-

15,985 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130L. Sup­

posed owner, Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $14.43.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 16,082-

16,086 and stone house, on a map of

lands of Mirror Holding Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Offlce

under File No. 130L. Supposed owner,

Gertrude B. Gordon. Sold to Putnam

County for $176.18.

New York, known as Plots Nos. 13969-

13973 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation. Supposed owner. Mir­

ror Holding Corporation. Sold to Putnam

County for $18.40.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 14.293-

14,296 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130K-K.

Supposed owner, Cathleen O'Brien. Sold

to Putnam County for $17.69.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 14.352-

14.355 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130K-K.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$17.68.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 14.387-

14,391 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130K-K.

Supposed owner, Testran Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$20.92.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 14.490-

14.495 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130K-K.

Supposed owned, James H. Murray. Sold

to Putnj'tn County for $18.55.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 14,667-

14,080 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Oilice under File No. 130K-K.

Supposed owner. Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$21.30.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel.

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 16,186-

16,195 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130L. Sup­

posed owner, John and Bridget Mallory.

Sold to Putnam County for $26.96.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 16,217-

16,221 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130L Sup­

posed owner, Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $20.73.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 16,327-

16,329 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130L Sup­

posed owners, James and Nettie Dyke-

man. Sold to Putnam County for $17.16.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 16,399-

16,403 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130L Sup­

posed owners, Volt/, and Schwartz. Sold

to Putnam County for $20.90.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 16,415-

16,422 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130L. Sup­

posed owner. Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $17.08.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 16,486-

16,490 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Offlce under File No. 130L. Sup­

posed owner, Vincent Jacobelli. Sold to

Putnam County for $19.24.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,


PAGE POOR THE BREWSTER STANDARD — ESTABLISHED 18(59 FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1, 19

New York, known as Plots NOB. 15,480-

15,486 and 15,491-15,547 on a map of

lands of Mirror Holding Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office

under File No. 130L. Supposed owner,

Mirror Holding Corporation. Sold to

Putnam County for $52.54.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots NOB. 16,639-

16,643 on a map of lands of Mirror Holding

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130L. Supposed

owner, Camelia Realty Corporation.

Sold to Putnam County for $19.24.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Noa. 17,196-

17,199 on a map of lands of Mirror Holding

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130M-M

Supposed owner, James Monaghan.

Sold to Putnam County for $19.02.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 17,486-

17,496 on a map of lands of Mirror Hold-,

ing Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130M-M.

Supposed owner. Mirror Holding Corporation.

Sold to Putnam County for

$1921.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

tn the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 17,556-

17,566 on a map of lands of Mirror Holding

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 130M-M

Supposed owner. Mirror Holding Corporation.

Sold to Putnam County for

$19.21.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 17,590-

17,707 and 17,710-17,741 on a map of

lands of Mirror Holding Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office

under File No. 130M-M. Supposed owner.

Mirror Holding Corporation, Sold to

Putnam County for $95.18.

A tract of land situate at Lake Carmel,

in the town of Kent, Putnam County,

New York, known as Terry House, on a

map of lands of Mirror Holding Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 130M-M. Supposed

owner, Mirror Holding Corporation.

Sold to Putnam County for $22*6.

Edward D. Stannard,

Treasurer of Putnam County.

My Neighbor

An ornate vase detracts from the

flowers which are put into it. Buying

a vase for its decorative value

is another matter.

• • •

If cup cakes are turned upside

down on cake cooler when taken

from the oven the tops of cakes will

be level for frosting.

• • •

Prunes used in preparing salads

should be soaked in warm water for

10 or more minutes so that stones

may be easily removed.

• • •

Overstirring and mixing is the

quickest way to ruin muffins. Just

a few minutes' overheating will

make muffins rise to peaks.

• • •

When putting hot foods through

food ricer, rinse ricer in warm water

and foods will stay warm and

lumps can be more easily removed.

• • •

Never put the salt into your lettuce,

tomato or other salad sandwiches

when you are preparing

them, for the salt makes them limp

ere the time of consumption.

• Associated Newspapers.—WNU Service.

•PAINTED HORSE"

Congo, America's only okapi, is

pictured here as he made his debut

in the Bronx zoo, New York city.

The "painted horse of the jungle"

was captured in the Belgian Congo

by pygmies. He looks like a cross

between a zebra and a giraffe, but

is neither.

POTPOURRI

The Earth's Dimensions

From pole to pole, the earth is

7,900 miles thick. However, there

is a slight bulge in the middle

and its thickness at the equator

is 7,927 miles. The distance

around the earth, at its surface,

is 24,900 miles. Mountain ranges

are so small in comparison to

the earth's circumference that

they are inconsequential.

fci Willi in NtwfcpuptJ Union.

The Marriage

Problem

Br W. L. GEORGE

Tit 7«rt irtlcli written by the left

mitbot ei "Caliban."

Marriage Will Neither Endure Nor

Disappear

TUB worst of discussion is that most

people see everything lo black or

In white. When the future of mar'

riage occupies the conversation you

find one side saying that very soon

there will be no marriage at all and

that we shall all live In a state of free

love. Meanwhile others reply that marriage

hns existed for thousands of

years and is not likely to disappear.

My own opinion Is that marriage as

we know It will neither etfdure nor disappear;

it Is a human institution, and,

like other human institutions, It will

change.

Certainly one understands those who

see In divorce the dawn of free love,

for divorce made easy enough reduces

marriage to something very like free

love. Divorce is a new thing from the

popular point of view. It existed In

Greece and in ancient Rome, but mainly

for men. It almost disappeared under

the Influence of Christianity, until

the last century. Now we hear that

the American rate Is one divorce in ten

marriages, while that of Chicago is one

in six.

No wonder that they cry out, "Here i$

free love," tince they can almost procure

a divorce by filling in a form. But however

natural it may be to be deceived, if

one I* deceived one it wrong. I am convinced

that those who fear free love are

wrong.

Consider what happened in Russia.

As soon as the Bolsheviks came into

power the marriage system disappeared

and was replaced by free love; but by

degrees Russian marriages were registered

by an official, and now they ore

performed in the regular way by agents

of the Soviet

Why is this? The answer contains

the whole future of marriage. Russia

abandoned free love year by year as

Russia allowed private property to

form again.

The Soviet probably did not reollze

the relation between marriage and

property, but it Is very Intimate.

Where there Is no property and where

children pick up a living like animals.

you do not need marriage. Where the

community owns all property, and

therefore takes care of the children,

you do not need marriage. But where

men and women havo something to

leave, it is essential that the state

should know who Is to have it when

the owners are dead, and the state

must know who is responsible for the

child. Otherwise there will be quarreling

and starvation—some sort of

msrrlage is the only way of registering

the information.

Some tort of marriage will therefore

survive to the end of time, because there

will always be a tie because men and

women will always want to form homes.

Those who do not agree with me should

remember that the higher animals—namely,

the mammals and the birds—form very

united families. Mankind will have to

change beyond recognition before it lives

in free love, or, we might say, free of

love.

Only marriage will certainly change.

In many parts of Europe and in the

Southern States of America divorce is

very difficult or impossible.

I believe that by degrees the divorce

laws of the world will tend to

become the same.

They will never be quite the same,

since one law does not fit sunny Texas

and icy Canada, but we shall not indefinitely

witness a state of things

where Nevada grants a divorce practically

without a reason, while Sout!)

Carolina refuses to grant any divorce

at all.

Of one thing I am sure: morrluge

will not become more difficult.

Continual pressure is put upon the

legislator to demund of people who

want to marry Unit they should produce

certificates ui health, of Identity

and of morals. That will never go very

far, because we know only too well

that any Impediments put in the way

of marriage bring about immorality.

In time to come marriage will be as

easy to contract as it is today, but It

will be Bubject to a bumun divorce

law.

I believe that divorce will be granted

without any formality to couples who happen

to be childless, since their divorce

affects no one else. On the other hand, I

believe that public opinion is turning

uguimt die present system, which allows

a child to know three or four fathers in

as many years. That is to say, divorces

where there are children are likely to be

suspended for tome years to give Uie

couple a chuiue of reconciliation.

In other words. I do not believe

that the future will be loose or harsh.

1 have every hoj»e that It will temper

logic with kindness.

C j'ubiic Leaser, inc.—WNU service.

Laughing U ExercU*

Laughing exercises Is a regular pari

of each day's recreuilou program at a

Pacific Grove, Calif., playground.

Chinese Culture

Not So Ancient

as People Suppose

Babylonia and Egypt Are

Ahead of It in Time

Ann Arbor. — Some people

have claimed that the famed

and ancient civilization of China

grew and nourished in the isolation

that occidental travelers

knew when they first went there

in comparatively recent times.

Others hold that China's civilization

and its arts were lifted

"ready made" from the Near

East civilization of Babylonia

and Egypt.

Neither theory has any basis of

fact, declared Carl Whiting Bishop

of the Freer Gallery of Art, Washington,

D. C, in an address before

the University of Michigan Institute

of Far Eastern Studies here.

New knowledge of the last few

years is upsetting some long favored

conceptions of China and its

cultural rise. For one thing Chinese

civilization is not one of the oldest

in the world, as has been popularly

supposed.

What China truly can claim, said

Mr. Bishop, is a longer continuous

history than most nations have,

which helps lend an air of antiquity

really unpossessed.

Actually Babylonia and Egypt

were flourishing thousands of years

before China. But China has

changed so slowly that it has retained,

almost into present times,

some characteristics which have

disappeared from other nations long

ago. This, again, lends it an air of

antiquity to probing men of modern

times.

A River-Valley Civiliration.

The early origins of China's civilization,

said Mr. Bishop, appear to

have arisen in the basin of the great

Yellow river, making it another one

of the well-known "river-valley

civilizations" like those along the

Nile, the Indus and the Euphrates

rivers.

When Babylonia and Egypt had

advanced well on the way to organized

civilization the Chinese

dwelt in a state of barbarism only

a little more advanced than that of

the American Indians on the Atlantic

seaboard at the time of the landing

of Columbus, declared Mr.

Bishop.

One fact indicating that Chinese

civilization was probably not of independent,

isolated origin is that

few, if any, of the domestic animals

or food plants of either the

modern or ancient Chinese were of

native origin. Not only did these

forms appear in the Near East long

before they appeared in China but

also there appear to be no wild

forms native in China from which

they could have come. However,

the migration of these foods and

plants was accomplished before the

beginning of China's historical period

and hence, again, their presence

seems to lend another bit of

evidence to great antiquity; antiquity

really not possessed.

Changes Came Very Slowly.

At the earliest known historical

time in China—about the middle of

the second millennium B. C.—society

was divided there into two great

classes: land-holding feudal lords

and a great mass of serf population.

The former class can be said

to have been in the Bronze age of

civilization, while the latter were

still, in effect, dwelling in the New

Stone age of their ancestors.

Then, about the Eleventh century

B. C, came the invasion of China

by the peoples of unknown but probably

related origin, the Chou. With

this invasion came significant

changes that occurred slowly but

surely. By 200 B. C, China was

finally coming into her Iron age,

said Mr. Bishop.

Autocratic government in China,

centered in a single emperor, did

not arrive until the Third century,

B. C, Mr. Bishop added, With this

important change Chinese civilization

took on those characteristics

that marked it for the next two

thousand years or until the impact

of sea trade routes led to its col*

lapse.

Briton Sees Great

Advance in Battle

to Defeat Cancer

New York.—A "great advance

in the struggle against

cancer" was reported by Dr.

W. Cramer, of the Imperial

Cancer Research fund, London,

to the American Journal

of Cancer here.

This is the fact that the increase

in cancer during the last 20 years,

in England at least, is almost all in

tfie age groups over 65 years.

This isv true for cancer of the organs

most frequently attacked by

cancer, such as the tongue, esophagus,

stomach, intestines, liver and

pancreas in men, and the uterus

in women. The only exception is in

the case of breast cancer in women.

Here there is found a significant

increase even in the earlier ag«

v groups.

Tkm R^ffmrm' Gattrrtj

JOHN LARDNER

Explain* the Biack Art

It Is even possible to make the ingenue guilty in the end, provided

you have plenty of nerve and a second, sweeteringenue up your sleeve.

By JOHN LARDNER

CRITICS have referred to me

as a close student of detective

literature, one of them

going so far as to say: "Lardner

is the closest student of detective

literature in the world.

He never spent a dime in his

life."

There's a mint of money to be

made in mystery fiction these days.

Look at Agatha Christie. Look at

S. S. Van Dine. Look at Dorothy

Sayers. Look at Rockefeller, who

is the exception that proves the rule.

And after looking at these parties

for about five minutes (or ten, if

you are astigmatic), try to realize

that you, too, can be one of the

15,604 men, women, and kiddies who

make an income of $1,000,000 or less

per annum by writing detective stories.

The main thing is to keep up to

date. Trends and fashions change

swiftly in the detective-story racket.

A few years ago you could hang the

rap on the butler on page 312 and

clues that pointed straight at the

ingenue in the first chapter. But

plots have tightened up since then.

Homicidal butlers are taboo. Dangling

clues are not considered cricket.

It is even possible to make

the ingenue guilty in the end, provided

you have plenty of nerve and

a second, sweeter ingenue up your

sleeve.

Another thing, the killer should

not turn out on the last page of the

book to be a total stranger. Time

was when a bearded Kurd or a onelegged

traveling salesman, perfectly

new to the reader, could emerge

at the finish and confess that he

assassinated J. D. Bedrox, D. D. S.,

in the interest of painless dentistry.

You can't get away with that now.

The murderer has got to be somebody

whom the reader suspected

in chapters II, III, IV, and VIII, but

forgot all about in chapters V, VI,

VII, IX, and X.

Maybe I could make it easier for

you tyros to earn a fortune if I

gave you a short sample of the art,

a sort of skeleton mystery story.

All right, I will do so, and I will

call it "The Skeleton Mysiery Story."

This title is a great hunch,

closely akin to genius, because it

gives you students a chance to write

a whole series of books with rhyming

titles, like, for instance, "The

Gelatin Mystery Story," and—well,

you get the idea. Good, eh?

Here's the Formula.

Now, first of all, you can have

your choice of three detectives, as

follows:

a. Silas Q. Peagreen, a Welsh

sleuth, who plays wild Welsh airs

on his flute or carves small statuary

out of ice-cubes to assist concentration.

Peagreen will not travel

in anything but the sidecar of a

motorcycle. He likes to read Dante,

has a comical Samoan valet, and

lives in a remodeled dog kennel.

b. Mary Ellen Smith, a tiny, fluffyhaired

kindergarten tot who speaks

with a lisp and has a peculiar

knack for tracking down criminals,

especially murderers. She is partial

to rag dolls and chews tobacco.

Somewhere in her career Mary Ellen

picked up the art of jiu-jitsu.

She can send the toughest killer

sprawling headlong.

c. Pete Mackerel, the stuttering

detective, who never goes anywhere

without liis pet wolf, Lobo. Pete is

seven feet tall, abnormally shy, and

wears a pince-nez. He raises giant

radishes for a hobby. Faults at the

sight of blood.

With one of these three eccentric

but lovable sleuths in mind, we can

get on with the story. I am going

to give you specimens of chapter

I, chapter VIII, and chapter X, because

those (working proportionally,

on the decimal system) are the

important chapters in any mystery

story. Viz. and to wit:

Chapter I (the crime).

No one seamed to know how it

happened. The body lay there—a

little grotesque, a little askew, a little

dead—on the deep bearskin rug.

The firelight threw weird flickers

•through the room, snowing here a

scattered pack of cards, there an

ivory-handled dagger, there a pool

of blood.

"H'm," mused Silas Q. Peagreen.

"Diss iss very vunny."

He drew the flute from his pocket

and played a few snatches of

"March, Men of Harloch." Then he

studied the people in the room—the

footman, the beautiful bride, the old

lawyer, the soap tycoon. He picked

up a blood-stained card from the

floor.

"The deuce of spades," said Peagreen,

with a soft sigh.

Chapter I-b (the crime).

There was the body. There was

the shiv, with its ivory handle, and

there were the pasteboards, and

there was the gore. Nobody seemed

to give a d-n about it.

"Screwy layout," lisped little

Mary Ellen Smith to herself. "I'm

thuprithed to thee it."

She grinned absently at the soap

tycoon and bit a slab of Old Hickory

off the plug. She studied the cards

on the floor.

"Five athes in one pack," growled

the fluffy-haired tot to herself.

"Thith mutht be a clip joint."

Chapter I-c (the crime).

The body lay on the floor. Pete

Mackerel studied it tensely. Then

he smiled an apology at the beautiful

bride as his pet wolf, Lobo, bit

off her finger.

"S-s-s-some fun, eh, kid?" stammered

Pete.

Suddenly he saw the blood on the

floor and fainted dead away.

Chapter VHI-a (the hunch).

Silas Q. Peagreen put aside his

flute after 13 hours of constant playing.

He looked down from the window

of his apartment and gazed

idly at the other tenants moving out

of the building.

"I got it," said Silas. "I must

have been blind not to see it before.

The cunning, cunning fiend."

Chapter VHI-b (the hunch).

Little Mary Ellen Smith put her

last dollie to bed and chewed a hunk

off the plug. A slow smile came

over her pan.

"I muthta been a thap not to thee

it thooner," she lisped. "Thith'll

mean the hot theat for—"

Chapter VlII-c (the hunch).

Pete Mackerel stammered "D-ddown,

Lobo!" as the trusty wolf bit

off his arm. Then he fainted dead

away—but not before smiling slowly,

for he knew the answer at last.

Chapter X (unanimous).

The killer backed into a corner

and bared his teeth in a snarl.

"You got me," he said, "but you

won't keep me"—and he popped a

tablet into his mouth.

The others started to rush to his

aide, but the sleuth held them back

with a quiet wave of the hand, saying:

(a) "It iss too late."

(b) "He'th done it. Tho long,

thucker."

(e) "G-g-g-gracious sakes!"

And the old lawyer crumbled to

the floor, giving a life for the life

he took.

it, licll Syndicate.—WNU Service.

First Hogs in 1539

The first hogs to reach what is

now the U. S. were brought to Florida

in 1539 by DeSoto.

His Family

By CLARISSA MACKIE

© McClure Newspaper Syndicate,

WNU Service.

fj ENRY WINGATE'S family re-

*- x garded him with reproachful

eyes while their tongues plied him

with questions and criticisms.

"You have hurt me deeply, my

dear," sobbed his mother softly.

"Why, I don't even know the name

of the girl you are engaged to."

"What is her name, Hen?" asked

his sister, Gertrude, eagerly.

"Prudence Mallowe."

"I wonder if she is related to the

Mallowes of Fairfield?" remarked

Mrs. Wingate, drying her eyes.

"I don't know," said Henry with

a wicked gleam in his gray eyes. "I

do know that she has cousins by

the name of Stubbs."

"Stubbs?" they echoed, painfully.

"Is he a millionaire — your

Stubbs?"

"No. And he isn't my Stubbs; he

is Prue's cousin."

"Henry, please talk seriously

about your—your Miss Mallowe,"

pleaded his mother.

She patted his hand gently. "Has

she a family?"

Henry counted on his fingers,

"Father, mother, two sisters, and

three big brothers—all married,"

with a swift glance at his youngest

sister.

"Catty!" she flashed back.

"What does her father do?" went

on the catechism.

"Railroad man."

"Oh—engineer?" asked Mrs. Wingate

faintly.

"I will ask her tomorrow," Henry

looked grim now. He wondered why

they couldn't take his word for it

that the girl of his choice was wonderful,

no matter what her family

relations might be. He had fallen

in love first and then gradually

SHORT SHORT

STORY

Complete in This Issue

heard about the "family." "I'll run

you all out in the car to her tea

shop."

"A tea shop—I'd love to have one

—it's so smart," murmured Rosa.

The other girls looked interested.

"I knew a girl in college, Margaret

Wayne, who told me that she

was going into that business some

day," murmured Laura.

Henry lighted his pipe and they

all looked at his thin dark face, so

quietly content in his new happiness.

"Do you want to go, Mother?"

he asked. "I know you would

enjoy the ride anyway," he added.

"DRUE'S TEA ROOM" as a

swinging wooden teapot announced,

was in a pretty bungalow

in a sheltered corner at a popular

shore resort. The Wingates entered

in a body and a pretty waitress

showed them to a round table in a

window overlooking the ocean.

"I wonder where she is, Hen," remarked

Gertrude.

"Busy, I suppose," he murmured,

and taking out a card, scribbled

something on it and gave it to the

waitress. "Please give that to Miss

Mallowe," he said.

DRUDENCE MALLOWE from the

' doorway of her little office had

seen the arrival of the Wingates,

and had fled wildly back into the

room and closed the door. She sat

down on the wicker couch and put

her fingers over her big blue eyes.

"I am frightened to death," she

told herself. "They look so-so upstage.

Henry is such a dear, I

could see his eyes searching for me

—I hope they will be friendly." She

jumped up and began to fluff her

bronze tinted hair. When Henry's

card with its scribbled sentence,

"The Wingate family, en masse,"

was handed to her, she kissed it

and slipped it into the pocket of her

pink linen dress. "They are my

family now," she thought with a

thrill.

She came down the room, tall,

graceful, well poised and very lovely.

Her blue eyes seemed to envelop

Henry in some deep warmth.

Then Henry presented Prudence to

his mother, who lifted her face and

kissed her. There were tears in the

girl's eyes. "My own mother died

when I was small," she said.

"I must have known your mother,"

said Mrs. Wingate with a startled

glance. "You are so like someone

I used to know—Prudence—

Prudence—I have forgotten your

name, but I had a dear friend

named Prudence Mallowe."

"That was my mother's name—

my father married again. My real

name is quite formidable—Margaret

Prudence Mallowe Wayne;

when I went into this business I

took my mother's name just for the

tea room—I loved to hear people

call me by her name."

"Then you must remember me,"

put in Laura; "Margaret Wayne

was at college with me."

"Dad? Oh, he has something to do

with the railroad—the L. T. & St.

C.—president or something like

that."

"Something like that!" Henry

himself gasped at the "take-it-forgranted

manner" of his beloved.

Then came the climax—a short, rubicund

man, polished, suave, the

very last word in fashion, came

along and was presented—

"My cousin, Senator Stubbs."

Keeping Up

WilnScienie

Serv/be

e Science Service.—WNU Service.

Orchards Gassed to

Produce Improved

Crops Regularly

Weather Will Not Count,

Say Method's Devisers

Washington.—Fruit trees are

made to produce regular crops,

and on time, too, regardless of

the previous winter weather, it

Is claimed in a patent just

granted here to Daniel Glenn

Sorber and Marston H. Kimball,

California researchers of

the United States Department

of Agriculture, and assigned to

Henry A. Wallace as secretary

of agriculture.

This is accomplished, the inventors

reveal, by literally gasattacking

the trees with butylene. a

hydrocarbon gas.

"There are thousands of acres of

walnuts, peaches and other deciduous

fruits, including apples, pears,

apricots, plums, prunes, cherries

and bush berries now planted in

areas where in certain years winter

weather conditions are unfavorable

to the formation of flowers, the

setting of fruit, and the production

of a crop," state the inventors.

"This condition results in failure of

trees to produce regular crops, occasioning

heavy losses and often seriously

crippling the industry."

Will Produce Uniformity in Fruiting.

Such fruit trees as lemon and avocado

also exhibit marked alternate

bearing tendencies, say the inventors.

"The result is a heavy production

one year, followed by lighter

producing the next, with attendant

cultural and marketing difficulties

which produce economic losses."

The process used by the inventors

to stimulate growth and produce

uniformity in fruiting is this: About

two weeks before the normal or

desired leafing, start of the growth

cycle, or blooming time for the variety

of trees being treated, the

trees are enclosed in tents or gastight

covers.

Then butylene gas is released inside

the tent until the proportion of

gas to the atmosphere is 1 part of

butylene to 100,000 parts of air. The

temperature during treatment is

kept between 60 and 100 degrees

Fahrenheit". The length of treatment

is from one to two hours.

Gas and other chemical treatments

have been used hi the past to

stimulate opening of cut flowers,

production of roots on cuttings, etc.,

but this is the first time whole trees

have been gassed to make them

blossom at the desired time.

Longer Life for

Working Classes

Has Been Gained

New York.—Longer life for

the working classes in this

country has been gained during

the past quarter of a century as

a result of public health activities,

a report of the Metropolitan

Life Insurance company

shows.

The expectation of life at birth

for the industrial policyholders of

this company crossed the 60 year

mark for the first time in 1935. In

1911 the expectation of life at birth

for this class of the population was

only 46.63 years whereas now it is

60.25 years.

Expectation of lite at birth for the

working classes is now almost as

good as for the population as a

whole, it appears from comparison

or the life insurance figures with

those of the United States registration

area. For the whole population,

in 1934, life expectation at birth was

60.25 years.

The gaii in life expectation of the

insured wage earners appears even

more striking when compared with

urban dwellers rather than with

the population as a whole. This is a

fairer comparison, the life insurance

statisticians point out, because the

insured wage earners live chiefly ir<

cities. White males af age ten in the

urban area of the United States

gained 3.95 years of hie from 1911

to 1930, while white male industrial

policyholders 'at the same age gained

6.77 years from 1911-12 to 1930. At

the same age white females in the

industrial policyholder group gained

a year more Uian those in the urbac

area of the United States.

The gum in life expectauor foi

the industrial class is all me more

striking and encouraging because

it was made during a quarter century

that included Uie World war,

the devastating 1918-19 influenza epidemic

and Uie economic depression,

each of which greaUy affected the

lives and health of the population

Commenting on this, the life insurance

officers compliment the

health authorities.

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