1941-05-29 - Northern New York Historical Newspapers

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1941-05-29 - Northern New York Historical Newspapers

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VOL. LXXII, No. 5 Brewster, Putnam County, N. Y., Thurs., May 29, 1941 Established 72 Years $2.00 per year

oosevelt Orders

New Draft July 1

Men Reaching 21 Since First Registra­

tion Are Expected to Number About

l.OOO.OtO.

On Monday President Roosevelt

ordered a second registration under

the Selective Service Act on July 1.

He said in a proclamation that an­

other registration was required "in the

interest of national defense."

New registrants will include those

jen who, on or before July 1, have at-

led their twenty-^flrst birthday and

lave not registered previously. Regis­

tration will take place in the United

States proper and in Hawaii, Puerto

Rico and Alaska.

Every male citizen and every male

alien residing in these areas, other

than those specifically exempted by

the Selective Service Act, must com­

ply with the registration order If he

has reached his twenty-first birthday

since the initial registration.

Selective service officials have esti­

mated that about 1,000,000 men will be

required to register under the proc­

lamation.

Special Cases Provided

As in the first registration, the Pres­

ident arranged by proclamation for the

handling of special cases. These cover

inability of an individual to register

because of "circumstances beyond his

control" or because he Is not in the

United States, (Puerto Rico, or the two

and the territories and island pos­

sessions.

An individual outside these limits is

required, however, to submit to regis­

tration within five days after his en­

try into the continental United States

and the territories.

A selective service official said that

it was probable that the 1,000,000 men

to be registered would be rated ac­

cording to priority for military service

a new national lottery similar to

*e one held last year after the first

registration of 16,500,000 in October.

According to present tentative plans,

the new registrants in each local draft

area would be added at the bottom of

the present list of men available for

service.

Responsibilities of Local Boards

The registration will be conducted

by 6.500 local draft boards, which are

charged with responsibility for classi­

fying men. according to their avail­

ability for service considering such

factors as dependency, employment es­

sential to defense and the like.

Some authorities expressed the be-

Jief that many young men to be reg-

ered in midsummer may be sum­

moned to the Army within a few

months despite the fact that men reg­

istered last year will come ahead of

them on the local draft list.

This view is based on the fact that

last year's registration included* so

many millions of men employed in es­

sential industries or the heads of

families, whereas a comparatively

small percentage of this year's group

will have such reasons for deferrment.

Mr. Roosevelt called upon the Gov­

ernors of the States and of Hawaii,

Puerto Rico and Alaska, the District

of Columbia commissioners and all ex­

isting local draft boards and agents to or

handle the work of the second reg-

Post Office Service

Available May 30

Post Office regulations for Memorial

Day, May 30th:

There will be no City Delivery or

Rural Free Delivery Service. The office

will be open from 7315 a. m. to 10:00

a. m. for the transaction of business.

The lobby will remain open until 6:00

p. m. for the convenience of box hold­

ers and the dispatch of mall.

Ti>is announcement by Seth B.

Howes, postmaster, Brewster, N. Y.,

states the regulations people are gen­

erally accustomed to on holidays,

o

Westchester Gets

Secession Threat

Rural Towns Would Form New County

if Representation on Board is Re­

duced. Supervisors Weigh Plan.

Most Speakers Back Proposal to Cut

Number on Board—Referendum In­

dicated.

The rural townships of Northern

Westchester County will attempt to

secede from Westchester and establisn

a new county if the Westchester

charter'is amended to strip the north­

ern area of its present representation

on the Board of Supervisors, Ralph O.

Ellsworth, president of the Poundrldge

Property Owners Association declared.

The northern towns constitute half

the county's area but less than a

tenth of its population. (Mr. Ellsworth

said the secession proposal had been

discussed at conferences in several

towns and that civic leaders favored

the creation of a new county rather

than annexation to nearby Putnam

County or Connecticut. He explained

that the plan would require approval

of the Legislature and of Westchester

voters and would entail the assumption

by the new county of a part of West­

chester's debt.

Mr. Ellsworth spoke at a public

hearing conducted last week by a com

mittee of the Board of Supervisors

which is considering the submission to

voters in November of three referenda

to the county charter.

The guffgested Propositions

One proposition would abolish the

Board of Supervisors of forty-four

members and create an administrative

board of ten or twelve members, each

representing 50,000 inhabitants without

regard to town boundaries. Another

would create a county debt control

commission and the third would in­

stall a central assessment bureau to

supplant all local bureaus.

Mr. Ellsworth, who is a magazine art

director, said the 400 members of his

association preferred remaining in

Westchester but would not counten­

ance a loss of their one Supervisor on

the county board—a loss which they

contended would Increase the cost of

government, reduce efficiency, impair

home rule and place the control of

county government in the hands of the

five Westchester cities.

Of the half-dozen speakers at the

hearing, however, Mr. Ellsworth was

the minority. None asked for submis­

sion at this time of debt commission

assessment bureau referenda, but

Gen. O'Ryan Speaks

At Bedford Tomorrow

World War Commander of 27th Divis­

ion, Now Head of the New York State

Civilian Defense, Will Be Principal

Speaker at Memorial Day Exercises

on Bedford Village Green.

_ all except Mr. Ellsworth favored the

istration. He urged employers again to early submission and adoption of the

proposition creating a small county

board. Submission of that proposition

in November became a virtual certainty

when organizations having more than

19,000 members declared that they

would make it mandatory through peti­

tions if the Board of Supervisors did

not order the referendum.

Demands Action By Board

Mrs. Joseph V. Meigs of Hastings-on-

Hudson, speaking for the Westchester

League of Women Voters and the

Westchester County Federation of

Women, which have 34.000 members,

said that a failure of the county boatd

to act on the measure at its June 2

meeting would be tantamount to re­

jection, and the women's organizations

then would begin circulating petitions

to get the necessary 12.000 signatures

in time for filing within the specified

sixty days before the November elec­

tion.

Ralph A. McClelland, chairman of

the county board's committee on char­

ter amendments, replied that June 2

was a fair limit for the women to set.

He indicated only the county board

proposition would be submitted.

Julian Olney of White Plains read a

statement from the Federation of

Westchester Taxpayers Association;,

which has 5.000 members, advocating

submission of the county board pro­

position "as this step is in line with

the original purposes of the new

charter and there is considerable de­

mand for 6uch an amendment." The

federation asked the supervisors to

draft the new ten or twelve districts

at once.

Other organizations endorsing the

county board proposition were the

Hartsdale Association, the Nonpartisan

Committee of Peekskill and affiliates

of the Westchester County Federation

Major-General John F. O'Ryan of

North Salem, a severe critic of Amer­

ican isolationists, will be the principal

speaker at Memorial Day services

which will be held on the Bedford

Village Green by Robert F. Crandall

American Legion Post 129, tomorrow

morning.

Major-General OTRyan, war time

commander of the 27th Division, A. E.

F., and former New York Police Com­

missioner, was recently appointed co­

ordinator for the State Civilian De­

fense Commission.

The Memorial Day program will fol­

low a short parade at Bedford Village,

according to General Chairman Ro-

maine L. Lenz. The parade will start

at 10:50 a. m., and services on the

Green are expected to get underway

at approximately 11 o'clock.

A half dozen communities will be

represented in the parade, Mr. Lenz

reports. He said the line-up will in­

clude Boy and Girl Scouts and volun­

teer firemen from Poundrldge, Bedford

Village, Katonah, Croton Falls and

Bedford Hills. The Crandall Post and

Auxiliary will lead the marchers. The

parade will begin at the intersection

of Stamford Road and Middle Patent

Road and terminate at the Green,

about a half mile distant.

Program Given

The Memorial Day services will open

with a welcome by Legion Commander

Kenneth Hunn of Katonah and invo­

cation will be given by the Rev. John

J. Flynn, pastor of St. Patrick's

Church, Bedford Village. Following

Major-General OlRyan's address, leg­

ionnaires will pay tribute to departed

comrades and taps will be sounded by

>arles Alexander. The Rev. Ernest C.

». .ter, pastor of the Katonah Presby­

terian Church, will pronounce benedic­

tion.

The musical portion of the program

will consist of selections by the

Purdys Central and Katonah High

School bands.

Assisting Mr. Lenz in arranging the

program are Commander Hunn, Ray

B. Ferguson and Paul Noe.

Crandall Post legionnaires will at­

tend two memorial church services

this Sunday, May 25. At 11 a. m., they

will hear the Rev. Ernest A. Yarrow.

Jr., speak from the pulpit of the Cro­

ton Falls Federated Church and at 8

p. m. they will attend a union memor­

ial service in the Katonah Methodist

Church; the Rev. George Benton Smith

will deliver the sermon.

Honor War Dead

Mr. Lenz urges all legion men and

auxiliary members to assemble at each

church, in uniform, 35 minutes before;

services are scheduled to begin.

Prior to Memorial Day, the Crandall

Post will decorate the graves of 400

war veterans in Bedford and nearby

towns. Early Memorial Day morning,

legionnaires will lay wreathes at the

base of honor rolls in Katonah and

Bedford Hills and also at the Katon­

ah War Memorial.

St. Lawrence A. C. Wins

Over Bedford Hills, 8-6

St. Lawrence A. C. rang up its

fourth win of the season on Sunday by

downing Bedford Hills 8-6 on a wind­

swept field before the largest attend­

ance of the season.

Coasting along on an 8-4 lead going

into the ninth. Big George Butler

suddenly lost control and gave up

three passes and two hits as Bedford

pushed two markers across before the

side was retired. Butler was touched

for seven blows including Ascenzi's

homer and handed out eight bases on

balls. Altamura gave up ten hits while

issuing five free tickets to first.

On Memorial Day the Larries ./ill

meet the Ossining A. C. on Electrozone

Line Of March For

Memorial Day Parade

Units to Form by 9:30 for Parade and

Services at G. A. R. Monument and

Cemeteries.

Field and Sunday they will play the

Beacon A. C. Both games starting at

3 p. m.

Safety Records High

In Electric Company

The Memorial Day parade will take

place at 10 o'clock Daylight Time,

Friday, May 30th. It will form on Main

Street in front of the Knights of

Columbus Building and the blacksmith

shop of F. S. Hall. From 9:30 until

the parade has passed through Main

Street Route 6 traffic will be sent

through Oak Street. The parade will

go west through Main Street turning

south at the First National Bank. At

the Crosby Post Memorial Monument

short services will be held after which

ritual services will be held at tne

Methodist and Catholic cemeteries.

The parade and services are being

held in the morning this year at the

request of the American Legion mem­

bers, and I shall be glad to find out

how people feel about the change,

which time is more convenient, which

A. W. Milliken Issues Honor Certifi-1 time has the more spiritual effect on

cates to 113 Employees of Brewster

District.

Honor Certificates were awarded to

113 employees of the Brewster District

including the Mahopac, Katonah and

Pawling Areas of the Eastern Division

of the New York State Electric & Gas

Corporation and the Ridgefield and

the people, which time is better for

children and grown-ups on hot days.

We should not be too much interested

in providing a long time during the

day to do other things for the day

was. as I understand it, set apart for

a Memorial Day and we should keep

it such especially in these troublous

times but. if possible, the exercises

How time off for registration.

Some of those who have become 21

since the first group of 10,500,000 men

was signed up on Oct. 16 have already

registered and volunteered for a year

of training. A provision of the draft

laws allows voluntary service by men

18 to 21.

The July 1 date was chosen, it was

understood, in order that men regis­

tering then would have time to find

out before Fall whether or not they

might expect to be called for duty.

This would permit them to plan ahead

for their Fall and Winter work or ed­

ucational schedules.

The manner of integrating these

ew men with the first group of

draftees in each local area has been

under consideration here for several

months. Two principal methods were

studied. One called for sandwiching

them among the original registrants by

lottery: the other, for adding them to

the end of the lists. Officials said that

the latter method probably would be

used.

Each man would get a registration

number when he signs up. Each of the

6,500 areas thus would have a No. 1,

No. 2, etc. One set of corresponding

numbers then would be drawn in the

national lottery. If "50" was the first

umber drawn, that would be "Order

o. 1" and men holding the number

would be the first of the new reg­

istrants called to serve if there was

no reason to defer their training.

Tne expectation was that thousands

of the men registered July 1 would be

called for service within a few montjis

ever, though they were put at the end

of their local draft lists.

Officials said that local boards would

be inclined to go quickly through then-

older registrants in order to reach men

who had neither dependents nor es- OJ WMWWJ.

s-ntial employment and were at an

>e which the Army wanted.

Garden Club To Hold

Informal Exhibit

The Brewster Garden Club will hold

an informal flower exhibit Friday,

June 13th at the home of Mrs. H. H.

Wells. The exhibit will be on display

from 2=00 to 5:30.

Miniature rock garden, dinner and

luncheon table arrangements, as well

as horticultural specimens will • be

among the attractions to toe seen.

The proceeds will be given to the

Brewster Chapter of the American

Red Cross. Admission is 25c to mem­

bers and friends. The Garden Club

cordially invites the public to the

Wells home on June 13th. Please save

the date.

Ragweed Must Go

Ragweed is a menace to many

people. Asthma and hay-fever are ag­

gravated by this common weed. The

New York Federation of Garden Clubs

is staging a drive to stamp it from our

hills and vacant lots.

The Brewster Garden Club sent to

the Federation and bought eight

posters which they have placed io

strategic locations in the village. Wool

you look at one with its large green

picture and learn to recognize and de­

stroy this weed?

Litchfield Districts of the Litchfield {should be at a convenient time. I

Electric Light and Power Company sooke to some members of the Village

who last year suffered no accidents

causing them to lose time from their

work. The certificates were awarded by

Mr. A. W. Milliken, Vice President and

General Manager of the Eastern Di­

vision through the Department Heads

and Supervisors at a special meeting

recently held in Brewster.

The awards are presented annually

as the result of records made in an

accident prevention program. The pur­

pose of the competition is to reduce

accidents by stressing to employees the

importance of following the simple

safety rules which have been estab­

lished. This program is largely re­

sponsible for the downward trend of

serious employee disabling accidents

since 1037.

The following employees were award­

ed certificates for the year 1940.

M. K. Mulligan. M. R. Bruen, H. E.

Duignan. D. A. Challinor. B. Winans,

W. Alexander, P. Hulte, F. M. King, J.

M. Sloan. R. L. Blake. E. W. Conroy.

M. W. Michell. E. Buresch. R. C. Lin­

coln. D. J. Dickinson. J. W. Stevens,

W. J. Roach. A. F. Light. S. Belknap,

0. B. Johnston. C. P. ©tiles, F. C.

Kobo. H. Newkirk. P. F. Sellers, N. S.

Patrick, J. H. Pfaefflin, E. P. Fenn, G.

H. Taber.

Also D. Bennett, H. Burhans, F. H.

Frost. A. L. Lazarus, J. E. J. Beits,

R. T. Prltchard, V. W. Miller, J. J.

Scallon. J. L. Martin, R. J. Ross, C.

Fox. W. D. Post, H. Stewart, G. H.

Lewis. R. W. Ingersoll. E. J. Burns, A.

Baird. A. R. Dixon. W. T. Pritchard,

G. Smith, A. V. Lapke. C. Peaters. G.

T. Patterson, F. B. Light. D. R. Shaw,

J. M. Kova, M. B. Farand. C. Baxter.

Also J M. Smith. M. O. Maples. P.

J. Harmon. S. A. Cole. A. D. Bruno,

A. S. Martyn. R. J. Frost. E. L. Turene,

E. M. Thompson. M. R. Penny, D. W.

Huson. J. P. Gaines. B. T. Heinen. H.

E. Seaman. L. V. Zecchin, H. Schaefer,

F. J. Killory, P. J. Jones. D. G. Bfcerle.

D. B. Smith, I. Gardinier, W. E. Town­

er, J P. MoCabe. E. M. Dahm. If. W.

Baxter. H. O. Anderson. C. E. John­

son. J. Nalley , F. W. Hunt, F. A.

Rogers.

Also J. G. Ballard. L. B. Lockwood,

H. C. Woodin. R. L. Lenz. A. L. Daven­

port. C. J. Wilsea, W. G. Rhodes, L.

A. Duckworth. L. T. Tuttle, M- •*•

Fischer. F. H. Barlow. A. E. Clasgens,

E. H. Ross. H. B. Williams. H. R. ,1c-

Collum. W. R. Tilford, H. M. Rowe. J.

1. West. W. W. Bennett. E. L. Barn­

ard. C F. Kellogg. A. J. Weik, P. W.

Hunt, J. M. Burke. L. Brennan, A. H.

Roy and J. J. Cranston/

Many of the employees who received

honor certificates for their perfect ] Although the government is organ-

records in 1940 have avoided lost-time lizing a camp for conscientious object-

Board and they told me to do as I

wished about the change. All persons

and organizations are invited to take

part in the parade. The formation will

be as follows:

Colors

Clergy

•Spanish War Veterans

Veterans of Foreign Wars

American Legion

Members of Present U. S. Army

Italian-American Society

School

Firemen

The Boy Scouts will act as escorts

to the school children.

Regardless of convenience or incon­

venience let us join in these services

and so do our share in our own com­

munity in honoring those who were

actively engaged in the formation and

defense of the Republic.

HENRY H. WELLS. Mayor.

Brewster. N. Y.

May 28. 1941. —i Oi

Opportunity Open For

Civilian Registration

There was a fine response to the

Westchester Home Defense question­

naire held last week, but many resi­

dents, either from pressure of work or

a misunderstanding, did not turn up

at the registration booths. In check­

ing around, the committee has found

practically none within the range

limits who will not gladly fill out the

cards.

In view of the critical foreign sit­

uation, it is most important that the

New York State Defense Council,

through the county and local councils,

shall have a 100% record of all the

possible helpers toward defense,

whether it be in the line of nursing,

food preparation, clerical work, repairs

of all kinds, in order to be ready for

any possible catastrophy or emergency

that might arise.

Blank questionnaires can be secured

at the Purdy drug store in Croton Falls,

and at the Post Offices at Purdys and

North Salem. All persons who have

not filled them out are urged to do

so. and leave them at the places Just

mentioned.

Butler's Art School

Calls Summer Students

The Art School under the tutelage

of Harry P. Butler will start Its sum­

mer classes Monday, June 2. There will

be classes morning and afternoon

Mondays and Tuesday. The Art School

has been growing and has had twenty-

two enrolled students the past year.

The art classes started in June, 1938,

and has been very successful and many

of Mr. Butler's students have exhibited

in local art shows. Any one wishing

to study under Mr. Butler may reach

him at telephone 308, Carmel or his

studio at Leeside, Carmel, N. Y.

— —o-

Dr. Lynskey Speaks

Of Pope's Message

Woman Economics Professor, Address­

ing Communion Breakfast Suggested

People Listen to the Pope's Radio

Message to the World on Sunday,

June 1.

No Objectors

Called for Camps

accidents for several years.

Motorists Warned On

Eve of Holidays

FLOWERS

The young people of the Village are

asked to bring flowers for soldier and

sailor graves to the High School

this aiternoon and the ladies of the

village are asked to come to the school

this evening and tie the flowers into

wnall bunches.

Three New Stores

Built At Patterson

Mrs. Anna Burke, of New York City.

visiting Miss Kate Durkin.

This Spring building activity in

Patterson has resulted in three new

modern, fireproof stores in the business

section opposite the New York Cen~

'tral railroad station. The stores locat­

ed on the site of the well known

Carey block are made of concrete pro­

ducts. W. L. Browne, of Patterson, Es

in charge of renting these units which

may be examined at any time.

Kishawana Announces

Opening Dance, May 31

The date the good old Kishawana

Indians have finally announced is

just what the dancers expected, Sat­

urday, May 31. So with small minds

and great bent on making gay the

same date, there should be a good

crowd to welcome the prodigals from

points distant and enjoy Bob Hatch's

orchestra.

The Harbor is duly licensed. There

are new decorations and fair greens

considering the continuing drought.

This week end several returning golfers

will be at the club and on the course.

Next week if the demand continues

and weather permits there will be a

record turnout as three days of holi­

day making appear.

Albany. May 28—A plea for a Mem­

orial Day holiday free from traffic ac­

cidents was voiced today by State

Commissioner of Motor Vehicles Car­

roll E. Mealey.

Commissioner Mealey called attent­

ion to the fact that, since Memorial

Day falls on Friday, it will be a thre?-

day holiday for many, with traffic cer­

tain to be increased on every highway

and hazards certain to be intensified.

"Make allowances for this increased

traffic in your week-end driving," the

Commissioner urged. "Be sure your

car is in a road-worthy condition,

drive at a safe speed, show some con­

sideration for your iellov operator, ob­

serve every traffic regulation and sig­

nal, and exercise care at all times.

Then you will do your part in making

this holiday and every day safer on

the road."

The commissioner suggested that

"while we are honoring the memory of

our War dead, we woula not be remiss

in giving a thought to our traffic toll."

New York 6tate's World War dead

totalled 13.956. More than that num­

ber died in traffic accidents in the

State in the past five years.

ors at Cooperstown in Otsego and ht.s

called for its first levy of objectors to

combatant and non-combatant mili­

tary service, county draft boards have

not been given any quotas of con­

scientious objectors to fill. Each of the

Dutchess County's five draft zones has

found a few conscientious objectors,

who were given Class 4E deferme:u

after extensive examinations.

A first requisition of seven consci­

entious objectors has been ordered to

report at Cooperstown Camp on June

5. All seven men have passed physical

examination imposing the same phys­

ical standards as fixed for Class 1A

draftees. No Class IB conscientious ob­

jectors, with minor physical defects,

will be requisitioned until the army

starts taking Class IB men.

The program for civilian camps for

conscientious objectors, will be carried

on under civilian direction. The feder­

al government will pay for transpor­

tation expenses to conscientious ob­

jector camps, but men will be required

to pay their own expenses, estimated

at $35 per month, for the year of ser­

vice. No uniforms are prescribed.

At the first annual Communion

breakfast of the Rosary Society ot 3t.

Joseph's Parish, Croton Falls, N. Y,

held at The Gay Nineties Inn, Brew­

ster, Sunday morning, Mrs. Francis.

Kean, chairman, introduced Elizabeth

Mary Lynskey, PhJD., assistant pro­

fessor of political science of Hunter

College, who spoke on the internation­

al situation particularly conditions in

the Far Bast which were emphasized

during China week.

Dr. Lynskey suggested that serious

attention be given the message from

the Pope to be broadcast June 1. She

reviewed the main points in the pre­

vious messages of His Holiness which

have not yet influenced those who

make war to seek to improve condi­

tions in accordance with Christian

principles.

Rev. Edward V. Dargin, J.CJD., pas­

tor of Holy Family Church, New

Rochelle, formerly of St. Joseph's

Church, was present to express his ap­

preciation of the work of the Rosary

Society in the parish. He made some

interesting comments on the handling

of news of current events in diplomatic

circles and in newspapers and pointed

to the importance of weighing care­

fully the material circulated before

making decisions. He urged sending

carefully considered opinions to the

lawmakers of the nation.

There were brief talks by Rev. Henry

C. Breen, pastor of St. Joseph's

Church and Rev. John G. Leddy, as­

sistant pastor, who arrived after the

Masses. They were pleased to not© the

attendance of seventy-five women of

the parish whose influence in promot­

ing the work of the parish contributes

to the well-toeing of the community.

They also commended the hospitality

of The Gay Nineties in serving a fine

repast.

Among those present were M r s.

Francis R. Kean. Miss Elizabeth N.

Lynskey, Mrs. Philip Doyle, Mrs. James

J. McNulty, Mrs. Edward B. Shay, Mrs.

John Keough, Miss Mary Fuller, Mrs.

William A. Sullivan. Miss Julia Ma-

noney. Miss Gertrude Sullivan, Mrs. J.

B. Griffen, Mrs. W. Witheridge, Mrs.

A. Zimmons, Mrs. A. Helm, Edi'h

Miller, Margaret Monahan, Mrs. Jos.

H. Robusto, Marguerite Lovell, Eleanor

Halm, Mrs. H. Clasen. Mrs. Charles

Nieb. Mrs. Walter R. Estes, Sr., Miss

Marion Juengst, Mae Kinash, Mrs.

Saydu Wuest, Mrs. Ellen CBhea, Mrs.

Alice Costello, Mrs. Dolly Busher, Mrs.

Ammingiator Bondath, Mrs. Harold

Bittner, Alice Carroll, Mary F. Galla­

gher, Mrs. Leo Gallagher, Alvina La-

May, Florence Gallagher, Mrs. Thomas

Flood, Katherine G. Hughes, Mis.

James O'Loughlin, Katherine Goudey,

Rose Bittner, Mrs. Ellen Dowd, Miss

Ellen Flood. Miss Catherine Flood,

Miss Margaret A. Flood, Mrs. C. Vuott,

Mrs. James W. Gagnier, Jesse de Iberti,

Mrs. George Egan. Mrs. W. Little,

Marion O'Meara, Rose A. OMeara,

Ann Vassak. Mrs. Ray Sweeney, Mrs.

John Vassak. Mrs. P. V. Ryan, Mrs.

John M. Juengst. Mrs. William John­

ston, Miss Beatrice Corley, Mrs. Rich­

ard Regan. Mrs. John Christopher,

Mrs. Walter S. Paulsen, Mrs. D. Hor­

ace Paulsen.

Ten Recruits Called

For Induction, June 4

Putnam Service Board Will Send Ten

Men to Governors Island. Peterson,

Blanco and Folchetti, of Brewster,

Are Among Those Called.

Miss Jennie Gardner is now at 23

Highland Terrace, Gloversville, New

York.

"Larries" To Have

Busy Week End

St. Lawrence A. C will play two

games over the coming holiday. One

on Memorial Day and one on the fol­

lowing Sunday. The games will be

played in the afternoon on the Electro-

zone Field, Brewster.

Welch Brothers Retire

From Railroad Service

Interest in the list of names of men

called for induction in the U. S. Army

is running high. The greatest national

lottery has been in operation for sev­

eral months since the number 158 was

called, and as groups of eight, ten or

twenty departed, friends and relatives

of boys in one way and another gave

them a "send-off." The next two weeks

will bring more farewell parties as man

will leave on June 4 and June 11.

The men selected by the Putnam

County Service Board No. 301 for in­

duction, June 4 at Fort Jay, Governors

Island follow:

V-1689 George Albert Peterson, Brew­

ster, N. Y.

1051 John Henry Miller, Garrison,

N. Y.

1199 William Henry Whitehill. Cold

Spring, N. Y.

1203 Albert Edward Robinson, Ga;-

rison, N. Y.

1218 Howard Tompkins, Mahopac

Falls, N. Y.

1219 Miles Pasquale Blanco, Brew­

ster, N. Y.

1223 Earl Walter Travis, Tompkins

Corners, N. Y.

1225 Allen Wayne Olson, Cold

Spring, N. Y.

1234 Anthony Constantin Scalzo,

Cold Spring, N. Y.

1244 Robert Folchetti, North Brew­

ster, N. Y.

The men will report to the Board at

Putnam County Court House at 9 a. m.

They will leave Brewster on the ex­

press for New York City.

Assigned to U. S. S. Washington

Douglas Relyea, who is now station­

ed on the U. S. S. Washington, re­

turned to Philadelphia Sunday night

after a two day visit at his home in

North Brewster. Douglas, in comment­

ing about this new battleship, "Queen

of the Seven Seas," says it is so mas­

sive and .beautiful that one trip around

it is worth more than a thousand

words of description.

Osborn on Radio Program

Putnam County citizens were inter­

ested in the Fort Dix program broad­

cast Sunday afternoon as Frederick

Osborn, Jr., who was the leader of the

eleventh Putnam County contingent

was one of the speakers. Private Os­

born told of the pleasure of camp life

and of the ambitions of the men. He

spoke of his work for the signal corps.

n

Fish Called to Duty

. Representative Hamilton Fish has

been ordered to active duty by the

army as a colonel in the specialist

serve for four weeks of training. He

was ordered to report at Fort Brag?,

N. C, July 1 to serve until July 28.

o——

VFW Memorial Service

The Memorial Day observance of the

Veterans of Foreign Wars will be heid

at Milltown Rural Cemetery at 2 p. m.

sharp on Memorial Day, May 30.

o —

Eddie Tuttle Feted

By Brady-Stannard

On Tuesday evening a party of

twenty-three men of the Brady-

Stannard Chevrolet Company gave a

dinner in honor of Edward S. Tuttle

at The Nineteenth Hole, Somers, N. Y.

Mr. Simeon Brady, Jr., and Mr.

Daniel E. Stannard made arrange­

ments for the party. Mr. Howard

Tuttle was a guest. Musical entertain­

ment, solos and roller skating routines

by Alfred Fortenese provided enter­

tainment between the courses of a

fine menu planned with the accent on

turkey. "Gourmet" should really get

around to the Nineteenth Hole.

The occasion for this party was the

impending departure of Eddie, popular

automobile mechanic of the Brady-

iStannard staff for an Army training

camp.

Combined railroad careers of 101

years ended for two brothers, Martin

and Timothy Welch. Conductors on

the Harlem Division, when they re­

tired April 30 and May 31 respectively

at farewell receptions in the Con­

ductors' Room in Grand Central

Terminal.

Both brothers began work as brake-

men and served as freight train con­

ductors before arriving at their posi­

tions as conductors on commuting

trains between White Plains and New

York City.

Martin Welch. 70. lives at 307 Cen­

tral Avenue. White Plains. Timothy

Welch. 68. resides at 5 Casino Avenue.

Brewster. They said they would "take

life easy" following their retirements.

M. E. Welch. Superintendent of G.

C. T.. Electric. Putnam and Harlem

divisions, who is no relation, spoke nt

the receptions and they received

purses.

The committee in charge of the

Brewster Fire Department carnival,

William Rich. Charles Makenny.

Thomas Durkin. Clayton Merrick and

Leon Garnsey. went to New York City

Sunday to select merchandise for the

carnival.

(Engineers To Meet in

.Mt. Kisco, June 5 ., i '"

On the evening of Thursday, June

5th, the Westchester Chapter of the

New York State Society of Professional

Engineers will take over the American

Legion Hall. Mt. Kisco for- the organ­

ization's annual Northern Westchester

meeting. In keeping with tradition,

this gathering is being planned as the

climax of a very successful season o!

lectures in which the breath-taking

collapse of the Tacoma Bridge, the in-

tricasies of three dimensional color

photography, the manufacture of

glass, the details of crude oil refining

and the all important problem cf

modern defense were studied with in­

tense interest.

The June meeting will feature an

illustrated lecture on the construction

methods of the 85 mile long Delaware

Aqueduct and will be given by an en­

gineer of the New York Board of

Water Supply. The meeting will be

open to visitors.

o —

Harry H Wells. Jr.. expects to be

home soon on his first leave liom

Fort Lee. Va., where he is in the

quartermasters department.


PAGE TWO THE BREWSTER STANDARD — ESTABLISHED 1869 THURSDAY, MAY 29. 1941

Happenings of Yester Years

1921—TWENTY TEARS AGO

L. B. Lent and his son Murray -were

In town this week.

Mr. and Mrs. Edward T. Palmer announce

the birth of a son on Tuesday.

Murray WUtse was able to visit his

mother over the week end.

Mr. and Mrs. Babbage, of Montclair,

were guests of Mrs. L. B. Lent this

week.

Mr. and Mrs. Ward D. Hopkins

visited Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Hopkins

over the holiday.

Mr. and Mrs. Seth Heartfield, of

New York, were guests of Mrs. Amy

Howes on Saturday.

Arthur J. Mackey with his wife and

daughter stopped in Brewster while

enroute to Lake George.

Miss Susia McCall welcomed a party

of 25 friends on Friday evening. Games

and dancing were enjoyed and refreshments

served.

Rev. Mr. Goosecove will conduct

service in the old Southeast Church

and also at de Forest Chapel in Milltown

during the summer months.

W. P. Davis now in charge of the

Harlem shops, North Brewster, has

The Ladies of the Presbyertian

Just returned from, a tour of Inspection

Church will hold a cake sale at the

extending as far west as Chicago and

home of Mrs. L. Starr Barnum on

St. Louis.

Friday.

The Ladies of the Presbyterian

Church will serve ai luncheon for

doctors and nurses who will meet for

conference on Tuesdny at the Town

Hall. The luncheon will be served at

Reed Memorial Chapel.

On Monday evening Dr. and Mrs. W.

N. Boynton entertained In celebration

of Dr. Boynton's birthday. Auction

bridge and delicious refreshments made

the evening enjoyable. It was not until

after cigars were passed that the

doctor was summoned to attend upon

a victim of an automobile accident

and was obliged to leave his friends.

Hc«tia by George L. Enright and Miss

Bessie E. Grady. The sermon was

preached by Rev. Charles J. Callan.

After the Mass pictures were taken of

visiting Knights of Columbus and the

attendant clergy. Father Phelan entertained

the priests and many friends

at the Rectory.

Thomas Flanagan died on May 28th

aged 43 years. Deceased was born in

Ireland. He married Catherine McD.

Donegal in 1901. His widow and nine

children survive. Mr. Flanagan was

formerly employed by H. H. Vreeland,

the N. Y. Condensed Milk Co. and by

G. W. Hall. He seemed competent to

execute any task. His funeral was held

at St. Lawrence Church on Tuesday.

Interment was at St. Lawrence Cemetery.

lflll—.THIRTY YEARS AGO

Frank Murtha is a new clerk at

Dlehl & Sons.

Miss M. May Grady has the position

of bookkeeper at A. F. Lobdell's.

John R. Yale has purchased Eaton

and Keller's bay team.

Frank C. Cole has been confined to

his home with an attack of old-fashioned

ague.

The regular meeting of the District

Nursing Association will be held with

Mrs. W. A. Ferris on Wednesday.

Frederic S. Barnum, was elected

president, Henry H. Wells, secretary

and Ambrose F. McCabe and William

H. Lyon directors of a College Club at

White Plains last week.

Brewster High School was represented

at the Athletic Association's track

meet at Briarclifl on Saturday. Seth

Heartfield won in his event which was

the standing broad jump. Ross Beil

and Maurice Heartfield failed to get a

place In the standing high Jump and

Stanley Day wrenched a tendon so

Ridgcway Theatre

Opens on June 16

Setting the keynote for their third

season at the Ridgeway Theatre, White

Plains, which they promise will top

anything they have ever done. Dorothy

and Julian Olney announce that the

Initial offering of their series will be

the world-premiere engagement of

Frank Craven, famous Broadway and

Hollywood comedian, in "Village

Green," a new comedy of New England

life by Carl Allensworth. The play,

which is described as a worthy successor

to Mr. Craven's most recent vehicle,

"Our Town," in both the theatre

and movie versions of which he acted

the role of the stage manager, will

open the Ridgeway on Monday evening,

June 16. Its engagement In

Westchester is preliminary to an early

Fall opening on Broadway.

Mr. Craven arrived from Hollywood

this week and casting has already begun

In preparation for the first performance

of the laugh-packed play. In

order to be able to offer their Westchester

patrons this well-known star

in his newest role, the Olneys are

opening the season two weeks earlier

than has been their custom. Tickets

will go on sale at the box-office of the

Ridgeway on Monday, June 9.

o

Writers to Dedicate

Frank Dole Memorial

A monument to the memory of

Frank Dole, sponsored by the Dog

Writers' Association in recognition of

the tremendous services he rendered to

dogs and the dog game through his

writings, and in which many of his

friends in the sport have had a part,

will be dedicated at the Metuchen, N.

J., cemetery on Decoration Day at 11

a. m.

Miss Rosalyn Terhune. president of

the writers' organization, will preside

at the exercises and the Rev. Dr.

James W. Flfleld, of Kansas City, Mo.,

an old friend of Frank, will speak.

The inside of a closet may be made

attractive if it is painted or covered

with wallpaper to blend with the color

scheme of the room.

basket containing 64 carnations and

other remembrances were presented to

Mrs. Hoyt. Refreshmetns were served

by Mrs. M. H. Hoyt and Mrs. F. A.

On the evening of May 26th a dozen

of N. P. Tuttle's friends called un­ severly that he will be laid up for a

Hoyt.

expectedly to congratulate him on his fortnight.

The churches of the village w^l

birthday. They found him busily em­

unite in a Union Memorial Service at

ployed in his garden. Mrs. Tuttle In­ Rev. M. H. Gardner noticed for the St. Andrew's Church on Sunday evevited

everyone to come in the house. first time this morning that the ravages ning. Crosby Post will attend in a body

Card tables were produced and bridge, of one of the greatest tree pests in this and Rev. J. L. Lasher will deliver an

followed by refreshments, was enjoyed. country, the elm leaf beetle had been address.

Miss Julia Towner and W. E. Smith renewed on trees of that variety.

held the high scores.

G. H. Seagrave, Adjutant of Crosby

The W. C. T. U. met with Mrs. A. S. Post, has issued instructions for

Rev. T. P. Phelan's twenty-fifth an­ Cole on Friday. After the business Memorial Day to Comrades, designatniversary

jubilee was honored by a meeting a pleasing program of music ing the programs to be carried out. At

notable service at St. Lawrence Church and reading, arranged by Mrs. John 9 a. m., members are to meet at the

on Monday. The trains brought visitors Pugsley, was rendered. The following Post Rooms and details will be sent to

from New York and Brooklyn and members took part, Mrs. Clifford the cemeteries. In the afternoon the

many autos brought people from near­ Truran. Miss Florence Shove. Mrs. procession will form on Main Street

er places. There was a long list of Albro Travis and Mrs. Wilson Crane. and proceed to the nearby cemetery

church dignataries. Father Phelan

for the usual service. In the evening at

celebrated the Mass together with a : Mrs. Ferdinand A. Hoyt, according to the Town Hall Major William Lang-

number of other priests. The choir, an account in the Fishkill Standard, don, of New York City, will deliver an

under the direction of Mrs. Martin T. was given a surprise party on the oc­ address and show steropticon views of

Grady, rendered Rosewig's Mass in G casion of her sixty-fourth birthday at war scenes in Louisiana, Mississippi

with the offertory selection O Salutaris her home on Dutchess Terrace. A large and Port Hudson.

%

STUDENTS!!

ONE OF

THESE 100 FREE TRIPS

TO THRILLING, FAMOUS GREENFIELD VILLAGE AND DETROIT, MICH.

Just help name the cars of the new streamlined

•MM." ubiib bsiUd **«

MMWM**".

gasy, and Fun to D°^

>£%eStale : £y&t&&-

1891 GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY 1941

•SEW**

'SYSTEM

...... vJ/:•:• x


THURSDAY. MAY 29, 1941 THE BREWSTER STANDARD — ESTABLISHED 1869 PAGE THREE

Five Colleges Enter

Polo Championship

Memorial Day Races

At Carmel Track

Bears Top New Milford

In Track Meet Tuesday

Gene Sarazen and Patty Berg

* Play Golf on Quaker Hill

Play Starts June 7 at Blind Brook

Turf and Polo Club. Tale Defends

Purdys Trims Bears

Title.

Goshen Racing Season 10 to 8, Monday

For the first time in nearly ten

years, Westchester County Is to be the

Attracts Crack Horses The Bears lost their eighth game in scene of the year's Intercollegiate Polo

twelve starts (Monday afternoon when Championship. With Ave colleges com­

Central of Purdys scored a 10-8 de­

Grand Circuit Opens on July 28 and

peting, the Blind Brook Turf and Polo

cision on Wells Field.

Continues Through AUK. 9. New

Club at Purchase is to be host to the

The Bears outhlt their opponents

Club House and Pari-Muiuel Win­

tournament which starts Saturday,

but handed out a number of unearned

dows Are Ready.

June 7 and concluded, granted weath­

runs with sloppy fielding.

er conditions, with a final round on

The box scores:

Saturday, June 14.

More than 100 trotters and pacers

swung into intensive spring training

Central

Yale, Harvard, Princeton, West

this week at Good Time Park in prep­

ab r h po a e Point and Pennsylvania Military Colaration

for the first two weeks of con­ Doyle, ss 3 1 0 2 4 0

lege have entered teams, forming one

secutive harness racing ever held in

of the best balanced fields of recent

D. Lundy, p 4 2 0 2 1 0

Goshen. Among the crack sulky-cullers

seasons. In the draw, announced by

hitting their stride are Spencer Scott,

Moravick, If 4 1 1 3 0 0 the Intercollegiate Polo Association,

1940 Hambletonian winner and Plorl- Inness, rf 3 2 1 0 0 0 Yale and West Point meet In the

mel, spring book favorite to cop the Porrazzo, 3b 3 0 1 1 2 0 opening game, June 7. On Thursday,

June 12 a double header will be plav-

1941 edition of the $40,000 trotting M. Lundy, c 4 1 1 4 5 0 ed forming the semi-final round.

dertoy.

Cole, 2b 4 1 1 2 0 0

Exceptionally warm weather in April Rapp, lb 4 12 7 0 1

speeded workouts and put the horses

in faster form than usual, with

Alexander, rf 31 0 10 10 7 21 0 12 0 3 1

Charlie iLacey, Fred Egan, Billy Dicker- Doole, cf Brewster 10 0 10 0

son. Harry Pownall, Harry Whitney

ab r h po a

and Ed Klrby burning up the triang­ Lotrecchaino, If 2 1 0

ular mile oval, while Walter Cox, dean

of trainer-drivers, straddles the rail

Carlo, c 4 1 2

and dreams of the day horses tutored Tranquilli, ss 3 2 1

by him won the first four monies In Stefanlc, 3b 4 1 2

the Hambletonian stake.

Scolplno, rf-p 4 0 2

Grand Circuit racing will open at

Goshen July 28 and continue through Hennchlon, cf 2 0 0

Aug. 9 to give Goshen the longest Nagle, cf 2 0 0

major league race card In Its history. Turnrose, lb 2 1 1

Fans who'for the second year can bet!JJJX Vichl, *A 2b 7 3 2 0

mutuels will see two Hambletonian Lee, rf 2 0 1

stakes this year since a preview to the

0 0

harness classic will be held July 30

at Historic track, followed one week

later by the sulky derby at Good Time

Park.

Little Pat, 1:58%, who has won the

free-for-all pacing feature at Historic

track the last three years, is among

the equine stars tuning up with Lacey

reporting to Owner Homer Blery that

the gelding is as good as ever. Another

pacer which has the raliblrds agog Is

Nlghthawk, who may be brought to

Goshen for training during May. As a

full brother to Blackhawk, largest

money-winner pacer of 1940. Nighthawk

Is a real threat In the $5,000

Village Farm stake at Historic track,

July 30.

A new clubhouse and additional

windows for parl-mutuels have Just

been completed by E. Roland Harrlman

at his half-mile oval known for nearly

a century as Historic track. Other

improvements will make the racing

strip one of the fastest and best in the*

East, according to Al Saunders, race

secretary. William H. Cane, owner of

Good Time Park, also is increasln

facilities for pari-mutuel wagering in

anticipation of his August race meeting.

o

Memorial Day Races

At Danbury Track

With the 40-lap Memorial Day

Sweepstakes, the longest race yet run

this year In Connecticut, as the feature

event tomorrow night, May 30 at the

Danbury Speedways In the Danbury

Fair Grounds. It Is expected that over

7,000 doodlebug lovers will flock to

Danbury for the big racing card.

That the lovers of automobile racing

will be hungry to see the speed demons

seems likely inasmuch as last

Friday night's program was washed

out by a heavy rain storm shortly before

the time for the first race at 8:30

o'clock.

Cappy Lane, who directs the races

for C. Stuart McLean says that the

largest and best field of drivers for

the spring season will be on hand to

battle for the hundreds of extra dollars

offered for the sweepstakes.

All three previous race winners here,

Johnny Ringer of the Bronx, Henry

Banks of Royal Oak, (Mich., ana

Georgle Rice, world's Indoor champion

from nearby Mllford, Conn., will

strive to pull down the lion's end of

the money as well as the glory that

goes with a victory.

However, there will be two dozen

other daredevils on the track including

Wild Bill Holmes of Brewster. N.

Y.; Broncho BUI Schindler. the onelegged

wizard from Freeport, Ted

Tappett of Manhassett, Ernie Gesell of

Inwood. Billy Troutwlne of Rldgefield.

Len Duncan of Brooklyn, Johnny

Swier of Brooklyn. Mike Joseph of

Philadelphia who will be leadfooted In

the hope of getting home In front.

The doors to the $100,000 grandstand

will be opened at 7 o'clock and

the speeders will tune up their cars at

that time.

There will be free parking for close

to 5,000 cars on the grounds in the

rear of the spacious grandstand.

T Tomorrow, (Memorial Day, there will The Brewster track team emerged

be horse racing at the Carmel track. victorious for the first time this sea­

The time Is 2:30 p. m. and admission son Tuesday afternoon when they de­

is 40 cents and grandstand 25 cents. feated New Mllford 50 1|6 to 35 513

The Carmel Driving Club, sponsor of on the New Mllford track.

Exhibtion Match To Open New Golf Course

the racing announces that new colts, The meet was well contested and

3 year olds and 2 year olds will be seen times made In the running events

On Decoration Day.

at this race.

were exceptionally fast. One of the

best races of the day was between

Fred Burdlck of Brewster and Earl cf Friday morning of this week four of j now a group of workmen have been

New (Mllford in the mile run, the America's foremost golfers will play an busy on Quaker Hill, under the dlrec-

What To Do

Brewster runner sprinted the entire exhlbltlon match on North Quaker ; ion of Landscape Engineer Hewlett

last lap to pass the New Mllford boy Hill, several miles from Pawling . A .Sutton. The course has been designed

and break the tape in the exception­ ribbon will be stretched across in front!by Robert Trent Jones, America's

In Westchester

ally fast time of 5 minutes 1.5 seconds of the first tee and at a given signal foremost golf architect. The President

to break the Brewster school record by the new course will be declared open of the re-organlzed Quaker Hill Coun­

13 seconds.

and a match will be played between try Club Is Archibald McLean with

Fairfield and Putnam The 440 yard dash proved another Patty Berg, former U. S. Women's Albert Akin as Honorary President.

thriller when Plnckney of Brewster Champion, and Helen Dettweiler, for- Among the committee heads are:

For the newly resident Putnamt'e and Tetro of New Mllford sprinted the'mer Western Women's Champion, and

who may want to know what this last 100 yards neck to neck and broke Gene Sarazen, ex-champlon of the

county provides for recreation, or fo? the tape In a dead heat. The time was world and one of the most famous

the native son looking for the new in­ 545 seconds. Bill Blenensteln copped golfers of all time, and Jimmy Deterests,

there has just been issued an the half mile for the Bears while maret, former Masters and Western

annual compilation of all the county's |

n facilities.

one of these games, the winner of the It's the tenth annual edition of

first day's match meets Pennsylvania "What To Do" in Westchester, Fair­

Military College and In the other, field and Putnam Counties. As indi­

Princeton and Harvard come together. cated by Its title, this 68 page volume

Play on the two Saturdays will be at not only covers the county thoroughly

3:30,* the time for the double header but also brings out the high points of

not yet having been set.

the neighboring counties to the North

This Is earlier in June than the In­

and Bast.

tercollegiate has been played for sev­ Everything from the many public

eral years. The fact that most of the parks and beaches, to the finest of the

students who form the teams will go private clubs for boating, swimming,

into training mtimt with Reserve SVM Officer ^ golf and other sports is listed. For

units lateVln June* mWthls necesl^ach of the clubs there is complete information

on qualifications and costs

sary.

of membership, a contact officer, and

The site of play. Blind Brook has a schedule of fixed events. Horseback

had a long and Interesting history in riding, polo, tennis, archery, hunting

polo and was the place where the In- and Ashing, hiking, trap and skeet

29 8 9 21 7 9 tercolleglates were played for the lass shooting, ice skating, skiing, musical

time in Westchester County, during

Central 203 221 0—10

events. Summer theatres, and arts and

1043. Constructed in the early twenties crafts are among the subjects exhaus­

Brewster 201 012 2—8 by the late John McEntee Bowman, tively treated.

• o

the site of this year's Intercolleglates There also Is a complete tide table

Lou Garrison, Pitcher has seen visiting British International for the Sound, railroad connections,

teams train on its turf and has staged and a full sized county road map In

Returns for a Visit

contests among the best players of the the publication.

country.

Established In .1931, the compilation

Lou Garrison, well known pitcher of In the coming tournament, Yale has grown annually until today prac­

the Brewster baseball team of 1917 and will be defending the title with a very tically every recognized recreational

other pre World War I years visited strong team, but preliminary play organization In the county has a list­

in Brewster on Monday. Garrison, a during the season has indicated some ing. The 1941 edition is available at

fleet runner, could be relied upon to real opposition for the El is. Princeton, the publication office, 32 Depot Plazi,

take any base that particularly need­ winners of the indoor championship White Plains, and at most county

ed taking. Today at 56 he keeps up during (March at West Point, has the newsstands.

with sport. Indoors, by boxing men that three who took that title—Bud Rose,

are training; outdoor he continues to Jules Romfh and Bob Osmun—with

walk. He covers lots of territory that the addition of Walter Hayden or "Larries" To Have

way, rapidly too. He continues train­ Philadelphia, who has ridden on naing

table regulations that keep heart tional champion indoor and outdoor Busy Week End

and wind sound.

Blue Hill Farms teams. Harvard is led

Garrison visited with his team mate by Tommy Higglnson, who has played St. Lawrence A. C. will play two

Charlie Tuttle, another famous Brew­ at Meadow Brook the last couple of games over the coming holiday. One

ster pitcher. He expects to return soon. years; West Point has a veteran trio on Memorial (Day and one on the fol­

At present he Is working In Brooklyn. led by George Brown and the fast lowing Sunday. The games will be

But he feels the call to Brewster moving young Del Carroll, who has played In the afternoon on the Electro-

where his heart 1*.

been a member of Pegasus teams In zone Field, Brewster.

• o

Inter-Clrcult play on the national

scene, is the mainstay of P. M. C.

Brewster Track Team Yale rides with its indoor trio of Dave

Wllhelm, Bob Johnson and Jlmmv

Second in Tri. Meet Daniels, strengthened by George H.

Mead. Jr., who was with Stewart Igle-

The Brewster tracksters turned In hart on the strong Great Neck team

their best performance of the season at Meadow Brook last season.

last Thursday afternoon when they

finished second in a triangular meet.

Carmel, the host school, won the meet

with 43 points, the Bears gathered 37

while Shrub Oak brought up the rear Nine Old Men To Play

with 18.

Statesmen. June 7

The meet was exciting and closely

contested throughout, with Carmel

packing too much power in the field Lowell Thomas' "Nine Old Men" will

events. They picked up 25 of their square off in a softbairgame for charh^h

McLean to Judge

Harness Race Meets

C. Stuart (McLean, Jr.. racing secretary

of the Danbury Fair, has been

appointed associate Judge of the big _

harness horse meeting at the Roravelt!^e«&ain»r. Time "lO.f seconds.

U VumD U and C seem' to In^rmon-! *•*"'* team of senators and represent

SSy J Z P th2e^Si£ BeyUdT ot\**y* jj^rlfflth etadlum. Washington.

Shrub Oak turned in the outstanding

performance of the day when he copi­ Representative Fish, who plays with

ed both the 100 and 220 in close to

Lowell Thomas during the summer re­

record time.

cess of Congress, is having a difficult

Earle Plnckney romped home a

time selecting the starting lineup for

winner In the 440 with Charley Stef­

the "Statesmen" as he has 30 candianlc

right at his heels with John

dates and every member of Congress

Morrow, a freshman newcomer. In

who can swing a bat is qualified to

fourth to give the Bears nine points jP'JW

in that event. The mile run. a new I Tne Thomas E. Dewey, Chairman, Golf

and Greens; Ralph Relnhold, chairman,

Membership; Ralph Carson,

Chairman, Finance: Lowell Thomas,

Chairman, House and Entertainment;

Tony Furco won the 100 for the other Open Champion, one of the most fam-|G. Lynn Sumner, Chairman, Publicity;

first places in the running events.

Raymond Gunnison, Chairman. Gen-

Jimmy Collins pulled an upset when

Harold

he took first place In the high jump:

The Gene Sarazen, Patty Berg,

LStV^n£

since Lowell lineup Thomas is further claims complicated the right

event on the Brewster schedule, was to play Walter Johnson, but Mr. Fish

won by Fred Burdlck followed by has objected on the double ground

Harold Enzian. The only other first that Walter Johnson halls from Wash­

place registered by Brewster was in

ington, and having lost a recent elect-

Ion for Congress he qualifies for the

the relay when Enrlght, Lotrecchaino, "Statesman" since a statesman is a

Reed and Alfke led the field from dead politician.

start to finish.

Among the "Nine Old Men" will be

Furco and Lotrecchaino finished Lowell Thomas, Lanny Ross. Father

third and fourth In the hundred and Flanagan, Babe Ruth, Eddie Eagan,

Furco also picked up a third in the Ted Shane, Les Kramer, Colonel

220. Bill Blenensteln was nosed out of

n * lan rB *' Ttae 5 ous players In the country.

The new golf course Is known esjeral Sports and Trails; and

. . the Quaker Hill Country Club, and Is!Williams, Chairman, Tennis.

Alfke won another In the broad Jump located on North Quaker Hill about a . _

while Carlo easily won the pole vault,.;mile North of the famous old Quaker Helen Dettweiler, Jimmy Demarct golf

Tetro, New Milford's all around per-!Meeting House. For more than a yer.r match Is scheduled for 9:30 a. m.

former won the shot as well as tying

for first in the 440 and placing In the

high jump.

Douglas Cows Make

The Bears have one more meet left Shot: Won by Tetro (NM>; 2. Rogers iNcW Official Records

on their schedule and that Is the all- (B); tie for third between Foley (B).;

Important Putnam County champion- Salocks (NM>. Distance 35 feet 9'j

ships that will be held at iMahopac Inches. |

next Tuesday. Haldane of Cold Spring! High Jump: Won by Collins (B>; Peterborough, N. H.—Three Guernswlll

be represented on the cinders for,tie for second between Palmer andev cows owned bv Elizabeth Douglas or

- . .._.- _.«. „ , «.. i...!Tetro (NM) Heiehth 5 feet 1 inch. '*,., „nc+0„ M v UaVa lllcf fl„,oVia^

Broad Jump: Wen bv Alfke (B»: 2. Till > Poster> N - Y - haVe Just finished

Lotrecchaino (B): 3. Whitney (NMvnew official records for production

Distance 18 feet 2 inches. | which entitles them to entry in the

Pole Vault: Won by Carlo : tie Advanced Register of The American

for second between Vichl fB), Col- r Cattle Club These animals

11ns (B) and Earl (NM). Helghth 8 ? U f rnM * Cattle ," anImals

feet 6 inches. (include five year old Stadacona Rex-

880 yard relay: Won by New Milfor^elle 423726 producing 10490 9 pounds pf

(Russell. Ritchie. Bostwick and Trav- "k and 587.8 pounds of butter fat In

ers>; 2. Brewster (Enrlght, Lotrec- cla " A the first time with Carmel the top

heavy favorites to win from IMahopac

and Brewster.

The summary of the Brewster-New

Milford meet:

100 yard dash: Won by Furco (B);

2. Russell (NM); 3. Lotrecchaino (B).

Time 11 seconds.

220 yard dash: Won by Russell

(NM>; 2. Furco (B); 3. Tetro (NM).

Time 24.8 seconds.

> seven and one-half year old

440 yard dash: Tie for first between chalno. Reed and Alfke). Time 1 mln- Stadacona Betsey 363025 Producing

Plnckney (B) and Tetro (NM); 3. ute 38 seconds : 10617.5 pounds of milk and 507.8

Bostwick (NM». Time 54.9 seconds.

pounds of butter fat In class AAA, and

880 yard run: Won by Blenensteln

two year old Stadacona Friend's Joan

(B); 2. Weeks (NM); 3. Halpln (NM). To remove cake from a tin pan, allow 530852 producing 7536.3 pounds of milk

Time 2:13.8 seconds.

It to cool from five to seven minutes and 376.2 pounds of butter fat in class

One mile run: Won by Burdlck (B); before trying to remove it. GGG.

«* -*'., ^^^j^^wvm,*: i^^MBBw**

Mahopac Chiefs Win

Over Somers A. C.

Mahopac Chiefs continued in their

winning ways Sunday when they

trounced the Somers A. C. 13-7 in a

slugfest played at Central School

Field. The-game marked the return to

action of Fulton ' Wlxon, former star

with the Mahopac Firemen, who played

center field and got four hits.

The Chiefs took the lead right in

the first inning and never relinquished

Ses AiMrica's Mvist.

It with Ward Mead. Mahopac left­

Miles per gallon, say happy owners! ft*I T\ I

most btautihd car

hander, throwing steadily. Bill Mustlon

and Wixon led the batting at­ MKKon-dollar ride and handling easel

SKYWAY SERIES

tack, each driving In four runs, while

STUDEBAKER

Bob Frost was the pivot man on two

sparkling double plays.

Lowest repair cost in owners' experience!

on PrtsWent Bght aad

Dtllmtil il Uctory. South Band, ai of

Decoration Day the Chiefs play the

Coranaadtr chassis

$m* ». IMI-wbiKl to ekaato •>ilh-

Connecticut All Stars while on Sun­ • More money when you trade in!

otf noMco-Todotol In iadodod.

day Manager Francis McAllister has

booked a return game with Somers, to

fill a vacancy left by a late cancellation.

BREWSTER GARAGE

The score by innings of Sunday's

contest:

Phone 2019, T. IL Durkln, Prop., Brewster, N. Y. Sub-dealer, Croton Falls Garage, Croton Falls, N. Y. .

Somers A. C 102 000 031— 7 10 2

Chiefs 403 Oil 04x—13 12 2

Batteries—Mead and Curtis; Shemtovich.

G. Wuesenhofer and Sullivan.

Umpires—Haight and Law.

Old Timers Game

Set for June 1

Joe Renak sends word that the "Old

first place In the half ^lle Bob, Timers" game will be played Sunday,

0

June i a; 2:30 p. m. Players In the

Harlem Valley are asked to pass the

ta y third ?t5. place il In tltlrf the_broad jump mVSe'P" .www,^inn„ Buranelll. S£«l John n.»v Kiernan. .i«„i, n-~-.. Gene word along. John Slncerbox, of Was-

Rogers and Durgie finished third and

Tunney, Prank Buck, Jack Dempsey, salc, Is one of the leaders of the re­

fourth In the shot.

Paul Webb, James Melton and Gene union game plans and will be glad to

The Bears are pointing for the

Sarazen.

hear from prospective players,

County Championship Meet that -will Among the "Statesmen" will be

o

be held at Mahopac next Wednesday Senator Mead, Representatives Ray- In five years a botanist pulled 37,639

afternoon, and from Coach Geesman burn, and Martin, Senators OMahoney. weeds from a plot of land only ten

right down to Gene Brandon, the LaPollette. Davis, Taft and Thomas. feet square.

manager, the Brewster team Is hoping

to bring home the championship.

Doug Utter, star dash man, has been

out of the last two meets with a pulled

muscle and should be able to re­ Auto Races Under Lights

turn to action In that meet. George

Carlo and Larry Enrlght. another pair

of point winners have been nursing Friday, May 30, 8:30

minor Injuries should be ready for action

and contribute a few points Danbury Speedways, Danbury Fair Grounds

toward the Brewster cause.

MEMORIAL DAY SWEEPSTAKES

The summary of last Thursday's

meet:

40 Laps — Star Drivers — Thrills Galore

100 yard dash: Won toy Reynolds

: 2. Owen (SO): 3. Furco (B): 4.

Grandstand 55c. 85c — Boxes $1.10

Raceway. He held the same position 220 vard dash: Won by Reynolds Annex 44c - Children 25c Free Parking Inside Grounds

last fall.

: 2. Smalley :

All Cooking by Chinese Chef

mHmm " W «M kmf hmtk Vy

State.

•Mrf. Fiwi»illn< with r»wi car's riding and driving performance.

2. Green (C>: 3. Alfke (B); 4. Kite .

mmmm mm* tUw. Mmmi M» I*

MaLean received his appointment Distance 19 feet 6 inches-

All Our Foods Made Up To Take Out

TW» r»«»»»ii o—••• »y. OS Stop in soon—let him prepare your car for a

from the New York State Harness Shot: Won by Smith (C>: 2. Christie

2fcl

Racing commission and it is quite an ; 3. Rogers


PAGE FOUR THE BREWSTER STANDARD — ESTABLISHED 1869 THURSDAY, MAY 29, 1941

flflje Pretoster grtanbarb

£ W. ADDIS ESTATE, Publisher MABJORIE L. ADDI8, Editor

Published Weekly at Brewster, Putnam Oounty, N. Y.

Entered at the Post Office at Brewster as 8econd Class Mall

Subscription per year, $2.00; single copy, Five Cents.

THURSDAY, MAY 29, 1941

INVASION OF NORTH WESTCHESTER

The portion of Westchester County known as North" West-

Wadsworth Quits

Motor Deaths Increase

As Season Advances

Seat In Assembly Albany, May 28—'For the third con-

" secutive month, motor deaths In New

He Will Devote His Full Time to a Job' ^ . f / 1 ^ ^ " 6 8 ^ ^ " ^ £SSl

in Curtiss Wrlrht's RufTntn Plant | R P° nd|n B month of last year despite

Son «r RenrPsonfriiL TrS in vill decreases J at AHnnv Goe^ I, to' nlfrni SSfc n *>°fo accidents and In-

Juries ' Stat€ Motor VeWcle at Alban>. Goes Into Defense Work. ioner Carro„ R Mealey announced Commiss- t0.

James J. Wadsworth has resigned!^,,1? "*""* PUWlC ApH1 aC ° ident

from the State Assembly to devote full'

Chester has always been an orphan to the lower county legions of time to his new dutiesin the P^^-Ue^w^e^^den^lW 6 &

voters, and public improvement hounds. The county's most lavish o^SyWflWo 88*2?^^

recreational facilities and other capital investments paid for by North J "I have today submitted my reslgna^

Westchester taxpayers as well as South Westchester taxpayers are way .wadsworthsaid to a statement ie-'i month a year ag0 - In terms of per "

below our geographical boundaries. This sort of thing will go on as;leased Tuesday. "After full considera-1JS^kue^^ta aSnnJurlea dllong

as there are four cities in Westchester. There isn't much that cairg, 01 ^ SSSfVtWiS SSSotSl^Sg 1A , per cent and 2 * per cent '

Fish To Speak At

Peekskill, Memorial Day

Representative Hamilton Fish ha

been secured as the principal speaker

for the memorial services to be held

at Pugsley Park, Peekskill, on Memorial

Day.

The committee, headed by John J.

Heleker has made plans for the holiday

observance by a parade and

memorial exercise.

Major Raymond T. Moniz has been

selected as Grand Marshal of the parade.

Invitations have been extended to

schools, fraternities and patriotic organizations

asking them to participate.

The annual Memorial Church Service

will be held on Sunday, May 25th

2SK S e l X S n ^ Muriel

such a cruel purpose greatly distressed _. „, «„.~,ni *« ,..,...!,.„ f,,,-.i,,.,at

the First Methodist Church. Rev.'the tree and Jesus, nailed upon tt.|22B!2SPnSin"SEt Xk ^e foUow

Kenneth B. Truran will .be the speaker, sensed this. And in His gentle pity for ft?2221 SJl X*EXJlL «?*

Invitations to review the parade have all sorrow and suffering said to It, fe.^Sg^jSJiTSL? PattSIon

been sent Mayor William T. Horton "Because of your regret and pity for gg* *** J a5^e^Srison/SS?

and members of the Common Council.; my sufferings, never again shall theJfiV 25ok Mrs L^li? H Fereuson'

Board of Park Commissioners. Board dogwood tree grow large enough, to begg/• 9° ok J "g^mS slle *?_ G ^ W '

of Water Commissioners, Board of used as a cross. Henceforth it shall be|JJ£if •JJJ £*a'£tn mrtdane Cold

Education, officials of the Town offender and bent and twisted and the'M° s hw. Miss Hizabeth "^ldane Cold

Cortlandt. Mayor and Board of Trus- blossoms shall be in the form of a \fSS^J&SP&^mSS&iKHalL

" V W overmen wn,*. ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ i

whites again.

To facilitate and speed parts of the

lend-lease program that affect agriculture,

a joint Anglo-American food

committee has been formed.

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST. SCIENTIST

KATONAH, N. Y.

ANNOUNCES A

FREE LECTURE

ON

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

BY

THOMAS E. HURLEY. C S. B.

LOUISVILLE, KY.

Member of The Board of Lectureship of The Mother Church, The

First Church of Christ, Scientist, in Boston, Mass.

IN

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

KATONAH, N. Y.

MONDAY EVENING JUNE 9. 1941

8:15 O'CLOCK, D. S. T.

THE PUBLIC IS CORDIALLY INVITED

will remember."

Your sincere friend and Rector.

GEORGE PAULL T. SARGENT.

PATTERSON

On account of the holiday this week

both the afternoon and evening work

classes of Red Cross will be omitted.

The many friends of Mrs. Wilbur E.

Gerow are pleased to hear that she

was able to leave St. Francis Hospital

on Saturday, but will spend some time

in Poughkeepsie with her sister, Mrs.

F. C. Sommer for necessary treatment

and observation.

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Gransaul and

two children made a brief visit here

with her mother, Mrs. Henry Ludin,?ton

before sailing for Trinidad where

Mr. Gransaul has a responsible position.

be done about it except to "secede" from Westchester. We've often demand complete and undivided at- j ri

A comparison of the April accident

been snubbed but never invaded.

summary with that of April, 1940 re-

; "After ten consecutive years in ^KS^USSBTS the Tolow in?

The latest attempt to reduce North Westchester to a Vassal bany. I naturally take this step with ^ ^ / " l ^ l i " J&JSPiEX;

state" is the move on foot among three County Taxpayers and votttV jfiuPrV^thft TStsffi 1 u'tuSS'Sffi ^ £ H " i S

organizations to force a vote on the "liquidation" of our Board of opportunity to serve in a defense in- „Z* innW ~"t

Supervisors. They would take advantage of the new County Charter j dl Fatal week end accidents increased

accident? increased

100 per cent.

^K

The number of drivers under 21

The Assemblyman also said he would

to call a referendum on the proposal to reduce our Board of Super-|reti« "tempor.rUy" at lea,r taa.^CffiS'lr*

visors from 44 ,o 12 men representing 12 "legislative" district \ « ^ ffSSSTwuSS^ » L " ^ J 2 ^ S , 2?*.* eXCMSlVe

R

v£Sj speed Increased 27 per cent.

the county. ' lican Representative from New York*3 Fatal head-on collisions increased 70

Theoretically this proposal may have merit. But it would de^ jjgjjfctt >***&

per cent.

, .. • i x J • l I *T«*uawwwi, "ma oi

his


line

line

to

WJ

serve

aei»ci npr..„9(.p- vera noted in the fnllowtroy

the last vestiges of direct representation we have. And in central- in the Assembly, was an authority on

per

decreased more than six per

! creases re noxea m ne

inr?

izing our county government to the nth degree it would NOT save b^^Sl?liw.^K'HlS&5S2; Pedestrian deaths decreased more

money for the taxpayers. i S S S ^ ^ f f i ^ t & T J S K I f e W per Cent and pedestrian Miss Frances Eichner, Mrs. Richard

Goodrich, Miss 'Florence Fltzmorr's

and Mrs. William Mulchay, spent Saturday

In New York.

Mrs. George Dutcher has returned

from a visit with her sister, Mrs.

Gordon Prout and family In White

Plains.

Mrs. J. C. Austin and Miss Louise

Austin, spent Sunday In New Haven.

The R. F. "D. Carrier will not cover

his route on Decoration Day and the

Post Office will be closed from 9:30 to

5 p. m.

Caretaker Lewis Schenck has Maple

Avenue Cemetery in fine shape for

* Memorial Day when many will ho

North Westchester people know now. that their participation in.U^was f ^ f i ^ g ^ ' * * :

doubt come there to place flowers upon

night accidents decreased 5.8

Westchester's great advantages merely consist of the privilege ot pay- of workers over 40 years old corre-LjLSit

the graves of loved ones.

ing high taxes on a 100 million dollar debt. Possibly, after paying g o n d . ^ J - J * * » * « accidents ; occurring in business Rev. H. E. Hlllery. Principal Stanley

areas decreased more than 20 per cent.

these taxes there might be enough left to buy gasoline with so as to community.

Hoffman and Mrs. Earl Robinson took

In Rural New York, fatalities totall­

be able to drive to Southern Westchester to sit in a County owned Mr. Wadsworth was mentioned fre-

the members of the 8th Grade to New

ed 89, an increase of more than 64 York City by automobile on Tuesday

park or "swim in a County owned pool. No ladi,S;-and_ many e f | S £ § % £ S " 3 F ^ | g . S a j W S f l S « f J S !

and many interesting and educational

places were visited before their return

those screaming for the reduction in the size of the Board happen to Thomas E. Dewey.

bered 34. a decrease of 2.9 per cent. that evening.

be women, there are far more important matters andiproblcms to be

The fatality record in Metropolitan

ironed out this year than the "liquidation" of the county supervisors. Communications New York continued to decline with The Assessors are at work each day

deaths totalling 69, a decrease of more looking over property for the new As­

If by any chance you North Westchester people are accosted by St. Bartholomews Church than 25 per cent compared to the sessment Rolls.

a man or woman with a petition calling for a referendum on this In the City of New York

April, 1940 toll.

Tlie Message.

Mr. and Mrs. John Watts and two

matter, don't sign it blindly.

Second Sunday after Easter Red Cross Ships

children have rented the Fred Burr

residence.

There will be petitions in circulation, no doubt, for the forcingi

April 27, 1941 Quota of Garments

of such a referendum through. And your best friend, or that reputable ,My dear Friends:

woman leader in your community may be passing such a petition Mg-Jf During """Wj* the Spring « days £ « as , we « * drive! « . TO. Fgto

around. Don't sign it. unless you are thoroughly in sympathy with the beautiful dogwood in blossom, tot jjj? JJsJTK

the idea of more centralized government after knowing full well that\ us ^ er ls th a s ^SSR&X at the! ^ c> C o h Mr. and Mrs. John Towner of Al­

Putnam County Red Cross

bany were Sunday guests of Miss

in Memorial Hall, Car-

Ethel Towner and brother. James E.

mel. last Thursday were a bevy of ac­

Towner.

tivity. In the Board Room the Home

m m

Service Committee met with Field

Dr. and Mrs. J. V. Ellson and son

this North Westchester area would have JUST ONE representative time of the Crucifixion the dogwood KeBenSe ^aret Le^to- Stanley of Philadelphia, spent the

week end at the Sloat camp at Whaley.

in the County Board of Supervisors instead of seven, under the pUmlJS^&m^m&m! and* s S n / w S f f l . . ? i , f f ^ L ^ S K

8

—North Westchester Times.

tree, that it was chosen^ t K I ^ J ^ ^ ^ ^ / ^ Private John C. Cope spent the week

end with his mother at their summer

home on Birch Hill.

EVERYTHING FOR THE TABLE

Jones Market

PURDYS. NEW YORK

^ Where Route 22 and 118 Meet

Holiday Special

Fresh Killed Broilers (local) lb 9Q C

Jersey Pork Loin lb Q9 C

Chuck Roast - Prime Beef lb 93 c

Prime Roast Beef - New Port Style lb ^1c

Fancy Veal Chops lb 99

Fancy Assorted Cold Cuts lb Qlc

Premier Grape Juice

2 Large Super Suds

Complete Line of Fresh Killed Poultry

Permier wax or cut Beans

Full Line of

pt- 15 c an< * qL 27 c

35 c

No. 2 can 9 for € )ts

Groceries — Fresh Fruits and Fresh Vegetables — Seafood

Also complete line of "Birds Eye Frosted Foods"

We carry a large assortment of Cold Beer in bottles and cans

A full line of Garden Plants and Vegetables

FREE DELIVERY — TEL. OROTON FALLS MS

Open Sunday* 8 to 1:15 and 5:3« to 7 p. w. Au* Kilbt-rt-r. Pi op.

Surrogated Notes

Estates of:

Ida M. Blake, Carmel—Petition filed

and order appointing transfer tax appraiser

entered.

Clara M. Bennett, Carmel—Petition

for letters of administration, oath,

designation filed: decree entered and

letters of administration granted to

Gladys B. Swanson.

Patrick Brandon, Patterson—lAffldavit

and notice of motion filed.

which were sent off this week. The

clothing, all of which is made of new

materials, made an array to delight

the heart of any merchant. The layettes,

each wrapped in a pink outing-

flannel blanket, particularly caught,

the fancy. Women's and girls' dresses j

Edward Garrison. Carmel-Citation In Norwalk btlOOt

and proof of publication filed: testi-

v M. K. Zlmmer.

[ The Square Deal

A ARMY-NAVY STORE

1-3 Park St. Corner Main St.

Is Holding A

SALE

on

MENS SLACK SUITS

$ 2.98

MEN'S WORK SHIRTS

MENS WORK PANTS

$ 1.25

A Nice Line of

STRAW HATS

for Dress or Farm use

Shoes for your Entire Family

Pants to match your coat

and vest

A. Fineberg

RREWSTEK. N. Y.

Mr. and Mrs. T. Walter

spent Sunday in Newburgh.

Birds ill

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Whaley and

daughter are living in their smail

tenant house until the big farm house

so badly damaged by fire is made livable

again. The origin of the Are is

still a mystery.

Mrs. Helen Spaulding celebrated her

87th birthday last Sunday with a large

family gathering of children, grandchildren

and great grandchildren, 17

in all from Patterson, Poughkeepsie.

Danbury. White Plains, and Long Island

at her home near West Patterson.

A buffet lunch was served and

she received many gifts and flowers.

Another disastrous fire occurred last

looked very attractive. Mine with ^ ^ ,f when

pretty handkerchiefs tucked in their ,aiRednlck's WpHnw.irv p«t.mir«n* Restaurant «n on t> the Powllna Pawling

pockets. Flannel shirts for men were|Rd f d t . { tartu. Mr.

n^L P ^lr l ^d ly HurSl°/ e A SL2S SS Mrs " Rednlck »ve to a smaller

S r ? % tH m nnS?n Sh" t^t^ifiu house close by and he attempted to

list of the quota, which went well ontor enter onH and cOV£

save

„,„

the /,ocVl cash rAaU£r register, Af/,

etc.,

"over the top, will be published at an but was driven back by the smoke and

early date.

flames and the entire contents were a

total loss there being no insurance except

on the building. The Patterson

Rifle Club Takes Part firemen responded quickly but no

water was available and the building

was destroyed.

The death of Mrs. George Hull ocmony

taken. Members of the Croton River Rifle curred last week at her home in Flor­

Frederick K. James Putnam Valiey-j olulj attended the match of the Norland

, Affidavit supplemental filed: citation citation order issued. entered walk Rod and Gun Club on Sunday. ida after a long illness. Her mother

Those who took part were Frank Mrs. Addle Turner of Quaker Hill, who

Albert Mead. Southeast—Petition for Williamson, Frank Patrick, Louis spent the winter in Florida with her.

letters of administration, oath, des­ Drinkwine. Pierre Le Commandeur, will return about June 1st. Mrs. Hull

ignation, and bond filed: decree ente/- William Alexander and Frank Light. before her marriage was a trained

|ed and letters of administration William Alexander won in the nurse and will toe remembered very

igranted to Mabel Townsend Mead. Marksman class in Match No. 1, took pleasantly by many whom she served

William H. O'Neil Southeast-^Spec-i second pJace ln Match No_ 3 and mird so efficiently in that way.

lal guardian's report filed.

place in Match No. 4.

Henry Alfred Slbenman. Putnam Louis Drinkwine took second place Friends here regret to learn of the

Valley—Memorandum of law filed. in the Marskman class in match No. 4.! serious illness of Mrs. M. P. Cornwall

Agusta P. Wing. Patterson—Consents Frank Williamson took first place in • in an Ogdensburg hospital.

filed and amended order assessing tax the Marksman class in match No. 3. o

entered.

John H. Zlmmer. Southeast—Peti­ Frank Light took third place in the j LOW TYPE ANIMAL

tion for letters of administration. Sharpshooter first place in class (Match in No. Match 2. and No. first 1.

A sponge is an animal. Ancient

§ {oath, designation, renunciations, and in Match No. 3.

scientists disagreed for many years as

^ bond filed: decree entered and letters Next Sunday, the members of the to whether they were members of the

0O66&frft666$3SO0O0OOS6Od0d6<

Residence - 65 PHONE Office - 158

A. P. BUDD

INSURANCE AND REAL ESTATE

Mortgage Loans, Mortgages Bought and Sold

Main Street Savings Bank Building Brewster. N. Y.

*000000060000000fr6S00006C>C>060006>30000000000000000QOO<

Established 1867

S. O. AVERY Co

George E. Dickinson, Prop.

Plumbing and Heating Contractor

&1&L. Offl Burners

Agent for Hoffman Fuel Co.

Fuel Oil — Range Oil — Kerosene

Telephone Brewster. Office 684, Residence 2172

Hoffman Fuel Co., Danbury 816

Peacedale Farm

ANNOUNCES

Direct-to-Home Delivery every week

of our farm-fresh products

FANCY TABLE EGGS

REAL TENDER BROILERS

FLAVOR-FRESH FRYERS

CREAMERY TABLE BUTTER

Hickory-smoked BACON and HAMS

Telephone Brewster 513 for our driver to call. He will show

you our products, explain our service and tell you how you can

receive some real useful kitchen equipment at wholesale prices

by using Peacedale Farm Products.

Special Introductory Offer

Free sample of our Hickory-Smoked Bacon with initial order

for two (2) dozen Peacedale Farm Eggs

PHONE

2180

or

532

For

SHELL

Fuel Oil and Range Oil

BRADY-STANNARD FUEL CO.

87 North Main Street, Brewster. N. Y.

Prompt Service. Satisfaction Guaranteed

>0000000000000000000000000000000000000000300»

NO matter how complicated the order you give

us, you'll get your lumber just as you wanted it

-and in a hurry. We pride ourselves on our wide

awake service at all times.

'Where a Promihe i» Kept'

DANBURY-BREWSTER LUMBER CO.

Phone 787

East Main St. Brewster. N. Y.


iTHURSDAY. MAY 29, 1941 THE BREWSTER STANDARD — ESTABLISHED 1869

spending some time with Mr. and Mi\>.

Horace Bullock and family at Candlewood

Lake. Miss Mary Churchill who

WEDDED WEDDED

Whitsunday Services

8 a. m. Holy Communion. The Youth

of the Church will hold a corporate

Visits them now and again enjoys the

swimming. Probably the May swim-. communion,

ming in Candlewood is a record thts| 10. Sunday School.

season when 40 degrees has often beeni 11. Holy Communion and sermon,

the early morning temperature. I'The Promise and Fulfillment."

o 6 p. m. The Youth of the Parish will

Miss Jean Hopkins, daughter of Mr. go to St. Thomas' Church. Bethel, for

and Mrs. Ferdinand T. Hopkins, of;a Youth Rally.

Katonah, was one of three seniors at Monday 7:30 p. m The Girls

Elmira College who received numerals Friendly Society.

for their interest and achievement in Tuesday. 8 15. A Card Party in the

sports, awarded at the annual banquet Parish Hall under the direction of the

of the Athletic Association held in Youth of the Parish.

Fasset Commons on the Elmira camp >s Thursday 1 p. m. Covered Dish

recently. To win numerals, students Lunheon of the Guild at the home of

must have accumulated at least 300 Mrs. Harry Reynolds. 7:30 p. m. Choir

points under the college point system,Rehearsal.

through participation in one or more: Friday. 7 p. in. Acolytes Guild and

sports. Pi Alpha Fraternity.

Memorial Day Parade

Starts 10 A.M. May 30

Business Opportunity

A Block of 3 New Scores

Located in Patterson, N. Y.

Available for Occupancy June 1

For Rental Particulars See

W. L. BROWNE

Phone 3108 Patterson. N. Y.

Memorial Day Races

At Carmel Track


YES — WE HAVE

BEER & ALE

25 Different Brands — Cold when you want it

ALSO A VARIETY OF

BEVERAGES

Cold when you want it


Flowers and Vegetable Plants

Week End Specials on Fruits 8 Vegetables

CHAS. G. MERGARDT 8 SON. Tel. 2110

WE DELIVER

GRADE A RAW MILK

PAGE FIVE

READING NOTICES

Hopkins-Schutz Brans-Keating

Miss Elizabeth Charlotte Schuw,

Mrs. Armenia Budd Shepard spent

Wednesday with Mrs. E. W. Addis.

Mr. and Mrs. Alonzo B. Klaw are at

Amalon Farm for the summer.

Mrs. Clinton Burns is at her home

for the summer.

-o-

Prenatal consultations will toe held and

at Carmel High School, Friday, June'N. Y.

6 from 1-4 p. m.

Mrs. Herbert Turner has left Brewster

to take a position in Danbury.

She is living at 13 Fairview Avenue,

o

Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Penny, of Binjhamton,

spent the week end with relatives

in Brewster.

• o • —

1 The marriage of Miss Katherine

daughter of Mr. Daniel J. Schutz, of Keating, daughter of the late Mr. and

Star Ridge Road, Brewster, N. Y., be- Mrs. John Keating, of New Mllford,

came the bride of Mr. Ernest Clayton Conn., and Mr. J. Bowling Bruns, Jr., The time for the Memorial Day

Hopkins, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Bowling Bruns, parade In Brewster this year will be

C. (Hopkins, 8 Putnam Terrace, Brew-i0f 270 Park Avenue, New York Cltv, 10 a. m. May 30. This gives two hours

ster, N. Y.. in a pretty wedding cere-: and Buena Vista, Brewster, N. Y., took before lunch and lots of leeway for

mony at the First Baptist Church of;place Wednesday, May 28, 1941 In the baseball games and other sports that

Brewster, at noon Saturday, Mary 24,; church of Saint Ignatius Loyola, New will be crowded into the three days ol

1941. York City. The ceremony was perform - holiday, fortunately resulting from the

The Rev. Thomas E. Ellis, former ed by Rev. Walter A. Rellly, S. J., fact that Memorial Day falls on

pastor of the church, performed the headmaster of Loyola School in the Friday.

double ring ceremony. The bride was | presence of a small company of rela- The parade on Memorial Day, a

given in marriage by her father. |tives and intimate friends.

ceremony instituted by the late Civil

Mrs Kenneth C. Hopkins, of Brew-. ^ brlde was glven ln marriage by War veterans of Crosby Post G. A. R.

ster. sister-in-law of the tor degroom, her uncle> Judge Thomas H. Keating, and Commander Frank Wells, nas

was matron-of-honor. Bridesmaids of New Miu-ord. she was attended by continued to fill up the ranks with

were Miss Frances Plnckney, Brewster; Mlss Marguerite Alice Bruns as mald- soldiers of other wars and citizens

Hemmer, Rochester, of_nonor. Mr. j. Edgar Bruns was serving the community in other wavs.

best man.

Firemen, Italian-American clubs and

school children accounting for large

units.

tin Dr Frederick W. Schutz. brother Spanish War veterans H. H. Wells

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Baldwin are a*,

their home in Tilly Foster for the

summer.

hcld »' *L*S> e FOR SALE—Frigidaire, $25, Ave cu.

ft. Double bed, complete, three quarter

bed, complete. Suitable for summer

cottage. Call 409 Brewster. Sol A. P. Budd, Insurance, Real Estate

Tomorrow, Memorial Day, there will FOR SALE—Dahlias, 10c a piece. FRIDIGAIRE, 5 cu ft. for sale cheap.

be horse racing at the Carmel track. Mrs. Erickson, East Branch A v?.. Telephone 711 Brewster. 50tf

The time Is 2:30 p. m. and admission Brewster, N. Y„ or Phone 2405 Brew­

is 40 cents and grandstand 25 cents. ster. 5pl NEWLY decorated bungalow

The Carmel Driving Club, sponsor of

Peaceable Hill. Tel. 2028 Brewster.

the racing announces that new colts,

3 year olds and 2 year olds will toe seen

at this race.

LOST—2 keys on ring. Between

Eaton Kelley's and Main St. Finder

please leave at Brewster Standard. 5ol

FURNISHED ROOMS, single or for

housekeeping for rent. Phone 2248

Brewster. 50i

FOR RENT—Modern cottage of five

rooms. Bath, heat, gas, garage, located

on Route 22 north of Police Barracks.

Inquire of W. M. Smaller on premises.

5ol

°' *' 'S^T^n

&ft£& Sttft&SS.* ff5 SKMSS "durinTthe S&Slg Fred H*», L*«n*» of Argonne

SS5JS? bridegroom, all or Lj^ ^r departure of the couple. p^t No. 71) veterans of Foreign Wars

The bride wore an attractive gown 'HerJxruquet^0f calafillies was caught

of white marquisette over satin ^^J^J^SJ^^LSSTSSnS'S*

a sweetheart neckline of French lace,; Mr- and Mrs J. Bowling Bruns. Jr

and a full skirt. Her tulle veil —I:will make their home ln their newly

on

CARD OF THANKS—We wish to

express our sincere thanks to the! Gardner, handy man wanted

neighbors and relatives and friends small estate. Tel. 2016 Brewster.

on

who gave us their sympathy and as- I '•— —

sistance at the time of the death of j APARTMENT, 3 room, available Im-

John H. Zimmer. j mediately. Tel. 2552 Brewster. 5tf

Mr. and Mrs. George Zimmer,

Fred Zimmer,

WANTED—Girl for housework. Call

Louisa M. K. Zimmer.

531 Brewster.

4p2

FOR RENT—Two, three and four

room apartments about 1000 feet north | or Danbury Brewster Lumber Co.

of cheese factory; running water,'

electricity, rent reasonable. For Infor-1 LAWN KEYS and LOCK WORK. C. N.

Hancock. Leave work at Peaceable HIU

lltf

LAWN MOWERS REPAIRED

matlon stop at first stucco house MttlSST* Trui Repair Shop,

of cheese factory. James Tavino. Sol Tel. 2103 or 2412 Brewster. 148

like

Main.

3o4

****BBMHMmma»HMMMtmm*mm»mmMmm*m*&mmtMM^

fastened by a coronet of

blossoms. Her shower bouquet orange

TO RENT—Large pleasant front

room, furnished. Mrs. C. P. Truran, 44

Center St., Brewster. 3o4

of Arthur E. Hansen Post, and bands

of Danbury, Bethel and Brewster, have

YOUNG Woman for general house­

kept the parade, organized to honor Anderson's Drug Store

work in small family. Phone 2093

the soldier and sailor dead, a com­

Brewster. , itf

built cottage ln Brewster.

munity ceremony. People are ac­

36-38 Main Street Phones 934 or 936 Brewster. N. Y.

customed to the parade starting about

FURNISHED ROOMS for men, com-

was of

two o'clock. But no doubt the word

fortable accommodations in the heart

white gardenias and white sweet pea3. TWO BtCWStCf Girls

will spread rapidly that the hour has

of the village. 34 Marvin Avenue. 47tf

The matron-of-honor and brides-'^ , \\r 11 1

been changed to 10 a. m. More than CUT RATE SPECIAL

Jay Fitzpatrlck, big game hunter, maids wore white marquisette trimm- VjradUatC at WClleSlCy 600 school children will account for a

FOR RENT—Apartment, four rooms,

1

expects to pass some week ends in this

vicinity as summer unfolds.

ed with lace, (with tight fitting bodices

large share of the spirit and effort

furnished or unfurnished, refrigerator

$1.00 size Hinds Honey & Almond Cream 49c

o

and full skirts. The matron-of-honor (Special to the Brewster Standard^ that make possible the flowers for the

and gas stove. Tel. 465 Croton Falls.

wore a tiara of yellow' daisies and wellesley, Mass.. June 1—Two Brew- decoration of graves and the largest

Miss Beverly Johnson of New York

carried an arm 'bouquet of yellow ster giris, Miss Alice H. Stephens and single marching unit. Time will tell 500 X-Cel-O Facial Tissue 21c

When You Think of Flowers

City is spending a few days with Mrs.! daisies. The bridesmaids wore a tiara I MISS Jean McConaughy, will'be candl- whether 10 a. m. is a more conven­

THINK OF FLORIART

Thad Crane.

of white daisies and carried white dates for the Bachelor of Arts degree ient parade hour. There's only a week *>«»>»»*»*>l*»>l*>J»l>J*>l>l»J>J»J>J*fc>!*>Ja83j>j»j>jfc>»l»l»jft3«ft»»j*>i»,S,»j5.»ift»r

Phone 2343 Brewster

daisies. !Bt the 63rd commencement of Welles- to prepare, let's go.

Private Vincent Studley is now ad­

^lillB!l!nili!IBi!!;K!!!l«[!!l| FOUR ROOM APARTMENT with

Mr. Raymond T. Schutz, of Ceres, ley College. The commencement exer-

iiBiiiinininiiin'iniiiiai! • • • • • u a _

dress 29th Headquarters

heat and garage.

Company.iN. Y., brother of the bride was soloist c ^ wnj be held June 16th in

Lawrence Folchetti.

Fort Benning. Georgia.

North Brewster.

(rendering the "Sweetest Story Ever Alumnae Hall. The principal speaker

50 tf

Told" and "Because." The Rev. Philip wm, be Mr. Archibald MacLeish, fam- Fish To Speak At

C. Irwin's Store

EXPERIENCED Waitresses Wanted

The large stop sign at the inter- j Anderson, pastor of the church was at 0Us poet and librarian of the Con-

section otinp rtf of Dt'Aennnt Prospect Street Gtvoot and nnH Hav'c Day's tho the console nnntnln of r\f the 11-m organ. nt*rran His T J i < program nriwrpam passional .. !..._« Library, r 11......... and „., J the *i,„ diplomas

JUIAM^P Mahopac. June 7

—Write giving; phone number. Box 205,

Former A. £5 P. Manager

Brewster, N. Y. 2tf

Hill does not produce action.

Included Eventide by Harker; Romance Will be awarded Miss Mildred H. Ic- This week the Women's Republican

by Gltterbart: Canzonetta by Feder- Afee. president of Wellesley.

Club of Putnam County Is announc­

MILK-FED Broilers, raised in bat­

Swimming is quite the order of the leln and Chant d'Amor by Gilette. Miss Stephens is the daughter of ing the annual luncheon will be held

day now and all the lake fronts are After a wedding breakfast for the Assemblyman D. Mallory Stephens and on Saturday, June 7 at Mahopac Hotel,

General Grocery

teries. Stoneleigh Farms. Carmel. Tel.

n if

2251 Brewster. 2ol

looking gay as the bathing beauties wedding party and immediate familv, Mrs. Stephens of Garden Street. She Lake Mahopac at one o'clock. Repre­

blossom out.

which was served at The Gay Nineties prepared for Wellesley at the Brewster sentative Hamilton Fish, Senator Allan

Cold Cuts, a Specialty

FIVE ROOM apartment, furnished or

o

Inn, the couple returned to the home High School and at Dana Hall in A. Ryan, Assemblyman D. Mallory

; unfurnished, all improvements. Anna

On Sunday the entrance to the de­ of Dr. Frederick Schutz on Star Ridge Wellesley. A major In French, she has Stephens and others will appear as

Beer and Beverages On Ice *

, Rooney, East Branch Avenue. 5tf

velopment on the Peach Lake Road Road, where they received the con- been a member of L'Alllance Francalse guest speakers.

was effectively blocked by a driver ap­ gratulatlon of their many friends.: and as a freshman was placed on the


Open Daily 8-7 — Sunday 9-12

SMALL Electric Rrange, double bed,

good condition, for sale. Tel 2318

parently sleeping at the wheel. Later Mr. and Mrs. Hopkins left for Honor List. She Is a member of Alpha

a wedding trip to Lake Mohonk In the I Kappa Chi, the Student Society inter-

10 MAIN ST. Brewster 52tf

TEL. 2258

The decorating committee at Kish- Catskllls. ested In the classics and Senior Mem- Memorial Day Races

BREWSTER. N. Y. li^!:

niiiiiBnii

awana Country Club will be glad to The bride's going-away costume was ber of House Council,

At Danbury Track

• • i

have a hand tonight and tomorrow. an Alice-blue and white sheer silk suit Miss MoConaughv prepared for Well-

Bystanders will also be welcome. wlth white accessories. iesley at the White* Plains High School

The bridegroom Is employed as a'and is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. With the 40-lap Memorial Day

Tennis and swimming attracted week clerk in the Pension Bureau of the Donald McConaughy of Dingle Ridge Sweepstakes, the longest race yet run

end guests to many resorts in this New York Central Railroad.

Road. She has been a major in His­

this year in Connecticut, as the feature William Heuss & Son

area over the week end. The prevailtory,

and a member of the Zeta Alpha,

event tomorrow night. May 30 at the

ing winds made lots of water sport.

the Society interested in modern Danbury Speedways in the Danbury

Littell Wedding At

o

drama. Miss McConaughy's mother Fair Grounds, It is expected that over

B. F. Sage of Peaceable Hill has Quaker Hill, May 31 was graduated from Wellesley ln the 7,000 doodlebug lovers will flock to Granite Memorials

class of 1914.

Danbury for the big racing card.

raised some fine tomato plants. Now

that the rains are coming tomatoes

o-

The marriage of Elizabeth Duval , _, ~ _

will get a break.

Littell, daughter of Mrs. Emlen Tren- StOfK SllOWer rOt

o chard Littell of Quaker Hill, Pawling, « ^ • ,->*

• Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Costello have J and James Harold Childs, Jr., son of avlrs. L,arl l*niraseilO CAMEO THEATRE

returned from their air trip to Call-1 Mr. and Mrs. James H. Childs of Se-

Telephone: Brewster 688

fornia and are now at home at 84-49 i wlckley. Pa., will be solemnized at 4> Mrs. Alfred Chirasello was hostess

168th Street, Jamaica, L. I. I o'clock, Saturday afternoon, May 31, at for a stork shower at her home on

BREWSTER, N. Y.

o Akin hall. Quaker Hill. Dr. Frederick Center Street, for Mrs. Carl Chirasello. Fri. and Sat., May 30 and 31

The opening dance at KishawanalL. Gamage of Pawling school will per- Games were played and refreshments ALICE FAYE - JOHN PAYNE

Country Club will be held Saturday form the ceremony. served,

evening, May 31. Bob Hatch's orches-1 Escorted by her brother, Emlen Those present were Mrs. George

tra will play.

Trenchard Littell, Jr., who will give her Lewis, Mrs. Emmett Green, Mrs. Harry THE GREAT

in marriage, the bride will wear a gown Stewart, Mrs. Ran Genovese, Mrs.

The Guild of St. Andrew's Church of ivory satin, made with a heart William Post. Mrs. Alma Durkin, Mrs.

will sponsor a food sale and tea at shaped neck, long sleeves and a train. James Ballard. Mrs. Frank Morgan. AMERICAN

the home of Miss Sarah E. Vail an Her veil will be of Duchess lace, and Mrs. George Barber. Mrs. Raymond

Friday, June 6th, 1941 from three she will carry a bouquet of stephanotis utter and Miss Gertrude Durkin. BROADCAST

until Ave.

and sweet peas.

Please Note: There will be a

o

Mrs. Williamson Thomas of Rumson. METHODIST CHURCH

Special Holiday Matinee on Fri­

The Women's Auxiliary of St. An­ N. J., will be the matron of honor. Rev. Charles A. Dann, Minister day, Decoration Day—Continuous

drew's Church will hold a food sale at She will be gowned in blue silk jersey

from 2:30 P. M.

the home of Miss Sarah Vail, Carmel with cluny lace. Her headdress will be Church School at ten o'clock. Morn­ — Saturday Matinee Only —

Avenue, on Friday, June 6.

a band of yellow daisies and she /ill ing Service at eleven.

•'BOSS OF BULLION CITY"

carry a bouquet of African daisies. The theme for the sermon will be, with Johnny Mack Brown

Gardening is the principal occupi- Frances M. Martin of New York City, -The Cost Of Progress."

tion of early morning and evenings, the maid-of-honor, will be gowned the The Junior Choir will meet on Tues-

Tomato plants are in demand and ac- same as Mrs. Thomas. . ^ay after school.

cording to the wiser should go in this] The bridesmaids, Evelyn Beard of Arrangements are being made for

week. I Lexington, Ky.. Mrs. Wyllys Terry. Jr.. u^ children's Day Program to be held

o — | of New York, Mrs. Armistead Burke of on the m0ming of June 15.

Mrs. T. T. Chapeau and her daugn-i Richmond, Va., and Mrs. Emlen T. „

ter Wendy are returning next week to Littell, Jr.. of Baltimore. Md., will be Memorial services of Brewster Odd

their home In Jacksonville. Florida, I gowned alike in blue silk Jersey witn peiiowS and Rebekahs will be held Li

after a long visit at the home of Mr. cluny lace. They will wear bands of Qdd Fellows Hall Tuesday, June 10.

and Mrs. Albert E. Dodge of Pawling. blue daisies in their hair and will carryblue

delphinium and yellow African The open meeting of the Cecilian

The Memorial Day parade in Brew­ daisies.

„ Society will be held at Dingle Ridge

ster will start at 10 a. m., daylight Mrs. Littell, mother of the bride, will pa,, the home of

saving time. This is a departure from

Mrs. B. O. Nichols.

the custom of holding the parade at

wear a pale green crepe gown with a u

1:30 p. m. All Interested note well the

pleated skirt, and Mrs. Childs* gown Brewster Grange will sponsor its

arrangements for May 30, 1941.

will be of blue crepe. fl^] dance of the present series at the

o——

James H. Childs of Sewickley, Pa., Grange Hall, this evening. Music by

Dr. Alexander Vanderburgh Is chair­

will attend his son as best man. The Swede Stolt's Hayseeders. Dancing 9man

of a committee to raise funds for

ushers will ibe Jchn C. Oliver, Jr.. Se- 1 D. S. T. Refreshments will be served.

United China Relief in Putnam Coun­ wickley; Walyer M. Kelly, Scarsdale; ,»

ty. Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt and Charles A. Foster, Jr., and A. Town- Leslie White. Jr.. is a patient in

Pearl Buck are^advocating,. the work of send Winmlll, New York; T. Worthing- Danbury Hospital recovering from in-

this group. Mrs. George A. Fitch is ton Johnson, Greenwich. Conn., George juries received in an automobile acorganizing

county committees. P. CNell, Sewickley; H. Van Buren cident late Sunday night. By some

Richard, New York; E. Carlton Gran- mischance his car hit a tree and a

Mrs. Mabel Erickion* entertained the

berry. Greenwich. Conn., and William stone wall. He was thrown clear of

Pinochle Cheer -Glvto on Friday eve­

M. Wherry. 3rd.. New York. the wreckage. His speedy recovery Is

ning at her home in Tilly Foster. The

Immediately after the ceremony, a anticipated. Last year Leslie toured the

winners were Mrs. James Patterson,

reception will be held at the home at united States in good Jorm, and his

4:30 o'clock. Later, the couple will friends were amazed that accident

Marble

TWO APARTMENTS to Rent—6

rooms and bath, 134 and 136 Main St.,

Brewster. Doane C. Comstock. 2tf

HOUSE, 3 or 4 rooms, furnished or

unfurnished. Near Brewster. Phone

2120 Brewster. Itf

FOR RENT — Apartment in new

building. Call at 159 E. Main St. or

phone evenings 2439 Brewster. Mrs.

Mary Scolpino. Itf

Opp. Oakwood and St. Francis Cemetery

MT. KISCO, N. Y.

* Telephone 4851

Prices Very Reasonable Satisfaction Guaranteed

Sun.-Mon.-Tues., June 1-2-3

GARY COOPER

BARBARA STANWYCK

MEET JOHN DOE

Sun. Mat. Only—Ep. 14 of

"Green Hornet Strikes Again"

Wednesday, June 4 1 Day Only

A GIRL, A GUY

AND A GOB

GEORGE MURPHY

LUCILLE BALL

Mrs. Nicholas Prisco. Mrs. Jennie Dun- j leave for a wedding trip, and will re- befell him on home territory.

ford and Miss Mary Gallagher. side at Sewickley. Pa., upon their re­

o

turn.

Infants should not be over-encourag'

Mary Alice Truran. daughter of Mr. The bride's traveling ensemble will ed to stand or to begin walking; when

and Mrs. J. Ralph Truran, a student be of blue and white silk print with their bones and muscles are strong

of Bernard Taylor at the Institute of long matching silk coat; white pique enough they will start of their own ac­

Musical Art of the Juilliard School of hat trimmed with blue patent leather cor


PAGE SIX THE BREWSTER STANDARD — ESTABLISHED 1869 THURSDAY, MAY 29. 1941

PEACH LAKE • NORTH SALEM • PURDYS • CROTON FALLS

THIS PAGE IS DEVOTED TO OUR NORTHERN WESTCHESTER READERS •*»*****•• HAPPENINGS GATHERED BY OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENTS EVERY WEEK

CROTON FALLS

Many from this .place attended the

card party held In the Gamers school,

on Wednesday evening and several of

them were among the prize -winners.

Mrs. George Juengst, Mrs. Alex Burgess,

Mrs. M. Colitto, Mrs. William

Maier, Mrs. William Purdy, Mrs.

Arthur 8mith, Mrs. Joseph (Reynolds,

Mrs. James Hughes, Mrs. Hemy

Juengst, Mrs. Charles Burgess. This

card party was under the auspices of

the Junior League. The proceeds were

added to the Summer Camp Fund,

used to send a number of children to

camp this summer.

Miss Dorothy Adams is now employed

in the Bard-^Parker factory in

Danbury.

The Thrift Sale held in the Triangle

Cabin, on Thursday and Friday

of last week was very •successful. Proceeds

of $100.00 have been added to

the treasury of the District Nursing

Association.

Levi Burk, who has been employed

by the Utah Construction Corp., here

has gone to Lackawack, N. Y., to work.

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Turner and

children, and Miss Marie LeVar.n

spent the week end in camp in Kent,

N. Y.

The June meeting of the Auxiliary

of the Fire Department will toe held

on Tuesday afternoon, in the Are

house at 2:30 p. m. A report of the

recent card party will be presented

by Mrs. W. Purdy and the drawing for

the hand-made scarf will be made.

A card party will toe held in Parish

Hall, on Friday evening. May 30th, at

8:30 p. m., by the members of St.

Joseph's parish. Contract, bridge, pinochle,

and bingo will be played an 1

prizes awarded. Refreshments will be

served. Tickets of admission are flftv

cents.

The Annual Homecoming Service of

the Union Valley Church will toe held

at 3 o'clock on Sunday afternoon,

June 1st. The service will be conducted

by the Rev. Mr. Ball and Rev. Mr.

Chichester. The members of the

church, the friends and former residents

of this locality look forward to

this Homecoming Service each year.

Westchester County owned beach

and pool at Playland, Rye, N. Y., opened

for the 1041 season last Saturday,

May 24th. Fireworks will toe held each

Tuesday and Friday evenings as In

previous years.

The Town Board of North Salem,

will meet at the Town Hall, in Salem

Center, on the second Tuesday of June

at 7:30 p. m. Any resident of the town

having business to bring before the

Town Board can do so at this time.

The forty-four piece band of Central

High School, will accompany the

C rot on Falls Fire Department In the

parade to be held in Bedford Village

on Memorial Day. A white satin and

gold braid trimmed majorette costume

and baton have been purchased by the

school to toe used In parades in which

the band takes part.

Those of Croton Falls who received

questionnaires last week were, Gordon

Mayes, Frederick Purdy Gray. George

Frederick Fowkes, Joseph W. Brown,

George Bruce Crites, and George

Maier.

Mrs. Nellie O'Loughlin will serve on

jury duty next week.

Plans are progressing satisfactory

for the firemen's carnival which will

be held on Thursday. Friday and Saturday.

July 17th, 18th, and 19th, on

the grounds where the previous carnivals

have been held at the intersection

of Croton FalLs-Alahopac Roads

and Route 100. The merchandise this

year is of a very high grade of goods

and the assortment is very attractive.

The Auxiliary of the Fire Department

will again have charge of the refreshment

booth, and assorted sandwiches,

cakes, pies, hot dogs, hamtourgs, ice

cream, coffe and sodas will be on sale.

Ralph Outhouse has the contract to

repair the roof of the Federated

Church.

Mr. and Mrs. James Connors and

family are planning to move to

Brooklyn, N. Y.

Several from this place attended the

card party held In the Methodist

Church Hall, on Wednesday evening,

and brought home the usual average

of prizes.

The Ladies Aid Society of the

Baptist Church has set the date of

June 18th for their supper, to be held

in the Baptist Church. The committee

are Mrs. C J. F. Decker. Mrs. Fred C.

Warner and Mrs. J. T. Jeflery.

Friday Will Be Memorial Day

"The noblest memorial of a hero is

not a reverence for his dead bones, but

the reproduction of his heroism." This

day is dedicated to the spirit of sacrifice

and idealism which prompted

the fathers, sons, and brothers, of a

former generation to offer their lives

in defense of a cause. The "Glory of

War." is a phrase of little meaning to

the present generation, but the causes

and outcome of our wars are as vital

to us today as they were to the heroes

whose memory we cherish.

On Friday evening of this week the

last of the spring card parties of St.

Joseph's parish will toe held in the

church hall at 8:30. Pinochle, bridge,

contract, and bingo will be played and

prizes awarded for high scores. Tickets

are on sale now at fifty cents.

Mrs. Marian Fowler has sold her

bungalow at Peach Lake.

The little daughter of Mr. and Mrs.

George Costello has been named Alice

Jane.


THURSDAY, MAY 29, 1941 THE BREWSTER STANDARD — ESTABLISHED 1869 PAGE SEVEN

VILLAGE OF BREWSTER,

NEW YORK

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS

Separate sealed proposals for (1)

general construction, (2) heating, (3)

plumbing, and (4) electrical work in

connection with the construction of a

Are house and appurtenances will be

received by the Mayor and Board of

Trustees of the Village of Brewster,

Putnam County, New York, at the

Village Office, 94 Main Street, Brewster,

New York, at 10 a. m., Daylight Saving

Time, on the 10th day of June, 1041,

at which time they will be publicly

opened and read. No bids will be received

prior to said hour, and none

thereafter.

Information for bidders, form of

proposal, plans and form of contract,

including specifications may be examined

at the office of the Village Board,

94 Main Street, Brewster, New York,

and copies thereof may be obtained

from the office of the Village Board

or from Harold B. Truran, architect

at 42 Center Street, Brewster, N. Y.,

upon making a deposit of Ten Dollars

($10.) for each set as aforesaid, which

amount will be refunded to the bidder

who duly submits a bid accompanied

by a certified check as hereinafter

provided and in accordance with the

requirements contained in the plans

and specifications and who applies for

a refund within thirty (30) days after

the date when the bids are opened

and who returns the plans and specifications

undamaged.

The Board of Trustees of the Village

of Brewster reserves the right to reject

any or all bids, or to accept the one

that in their Judgment will be for the

best interest of the Village of Brewster.

Attention of bidders is particularly

called to the requirements as to conditions

of employment to be observed

and minimum wage rates to be paid

under the contract.

A certified check made payable to

the order of the Village of Brewster.

New York, in the amount of 10% of

the bid, must be deposited by each

bidder with his bid, as a guarantee

that in case the contract is awarded

to him, he will, within ten (10) days

thereafter, execute such contract and

furnish a satisfactory performance

bond. On failure to do so, he shall

forfeit* the deposit as liquidated

damages, and acceptance of the bid

will be contingent upon the fulfillment

of this requirement by the bidder. The

checks of the unsuccessful bidders will

be returned immediately upon the

award of the contract.

The successful bidder will be required

to furnish a performance bond

as required by the contract, in approved

form, and with sureties satisfactory

to the Board of Trustees of

the Village of Brewster, which bond

shall be in the amount of the contract.

VILLAGE OF BREWSTER,

NEW YORK.

W. BOYNTON TOWNER,

VILLAGE CLERK.

Dated, Brewster, N. Y.

May 21, 1941.

$19,000

VILLAGE OF BREWSTER,

NEW YORK

FIRE HOUSE BONDS

NOTICE OF BOND SALE.

Sealed proposals will be received and

considered by the Board of Trustees

of the Village of Brewster, New York

at the Village Office in said Village,

at 10 o'clock A. M., Eastern Standard

Time (llo'clock A. M., Daylight Saving

Time) on the 10th day of June, 1941,

for the purchase at not less than par

and accrued interest of

$19,000 Fire House Bonds of said

Village of Brewster, of the denomination

of (1,000 each, dated May 1,

1941, maturing $2,000 on May 1 in each

of the years 1942 to 1950, both inclusive,

and $1,000 on May 1, 1951,

and bearing interest at a rate not exceeding

six per centum per annum

payable semi-annually November 1 and

(May 1. Principal and interest payable

at the First National Bank of Brewaters,

N. Y., in Brewster, New York,

with New York exchange. Bonds will

be in coupon form and may be converted

into fully registered bonds,

and are general obligations of the

Village payable from unlimited taxes.

Each bid must be for all of said

bonds and state a single rate of interest

therefor. Unless all bids are

rejected the award will be made to

the bidder complying with the terms

of sale and offering to purchase said

bonds at the lowest rate of Interest,

not exceeding the rate above specified,

stated in a multiple of one-quarter or

one-tenth of one per centum per annum,

without reference to premium,

provided however that if two or more

bidders offer to purchase said bonds

at the same lowest rate of Interest

then such award will be made to the

bidder offering the highest premium.

The right is reserved to reject any or

all bids. Each bid must be enclosed

in a sealed envelope addressed to the

undersigned Village Clerk and marked

on the outside "Proposal for

Bonds" and must be accompanied with

a certified, or bank, or trust company

check to the order of Village of Brewster

for $380 as a good faith deposit

to secure the Village against any loss

resulting from the failure of the bidder

to comply with the terms of his bid.

No Interest will be allowed on the

amount of the good faith deposit.

Said bonds are issued for the purpose

of paying the cost of construction

of a village fixe house in said Village

pursuant to the Village Law and

General Municipal Law, as amended,

said purpose having a period of probable

usefulness of twenty years. Pur­

Roofing

Bird Approved Roofers

Bonded and

Guaranteed Work

Hawley Roofing Co.

Tel. 2258 Danbury

Desirable Lots

REASONABLE PRICE

Putnam Terrace. Brewster

From 60 x 90 to 60 x 120

Inquire

A. Fincberg

1-3 PARK ST.. BREWSTER

Consolidated Radio

Service

81 Edgemont Road, Katonah, N. Y

C. R. Travis Katonah 616

RADIO SERVICE THAT

"SPEAKS FOR ITSELF"

Represented In Brewster by

Goossen Furniture

Telephone 2379 Brewster, N. Y

JOHN SNIDERO

Trucking

8AND, GRAVEL

TOP son.

PHONE 2545

Brewster

ALFRED VICHI

Mason

General Contractor

Phone 2269

70 Carmel Ave., Brewster, N. Y.

N. CIOCCOLANTI

General Contractor

*

Builder

Phone 742

M Marvin Ave. Brewster, N. I'.

VILLAGE TAX COLLECTOR'S

NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the tax

roll and warrant for the Village of

Brewster has been left with me for

the collection of taxes levied thereto

and I will be in my office, Room 5.

94 Main Street, where I will receive

taxes from June 1st to June 30 from

nine o'clock in the morning until four

o'clock in the afternoon, excepting

Saturdays, Sundays and holidays, and

that for said period of time taxes may

be paid to me without additional

charge, and that on all such taxes

remaining unpaid after June 30, five'

per centum will be added for the first j

month and an additional one-half of

one per centum for each month and I

fraction thereof, thereafter until paid.!

Dated May 20, 1941.

W. BOYNTON TOWNER,

Collector.

age assessed valuation of the real

estate of said Village, subject to taxation

as determined by the last completed

assessment roll and the four

preceding assessment rolls of said

Village, is •1.841.067.00. The total

bonded debt of the Village, including

the above mentioned bonds, is

$34,000.00 of which amount none is

water debt. The population of the

Village (1940 census) was 1,863. The

bonded debt above stated does not insuant

to the General Municipal Law, clude the debt of any other subdivis­

as amended, provision has been made ion having power to levy taxes upon

for the payment from funds provided any or all of the property subject to

therefor in the current budget hereto­ I the taxing power ol the Village. The

fore adopted of a sum equal to at fiscal year commences March 1. The

least five per cent of the entire esti­ amount of taxes levied for each of the

mated cost of the improvement. fiscal years commencing March 1,

In the event that prior to the de­ 1938. March 1. 1939. and March 1,

livery of the bonds the income received J1940. was respective]}- $23,045.50, $24,by

private holders from bonds of the 04158 and $24,073.70. The amount of

same type and character shall be such taxes uncollected at the end of

taxable by the terms of any Federal each of said fiscal years was respect­

income tax law. the successful bidder ively $1,638.26. $1.942.49 and $2,189.66.

may. at his election, be relieved of his The amount of such taxes remaining

obligations under the contract to uncollected as of the date of this

purchase the bonds and in such case notice is respectively $710.41. $96624

the deposit accompanying his bid wLl and $1,487.49. The taxes of the fiscal

be returned.

year commencing March 1. 1941,

The approving opinion of Messrs. amount to $26,00324 none of which

Dillon, Vandewater & Moore, Attorneys has been collected. A detailed report

of New York City, will be furnished of essential facts will be submitted to

to the purchaser without cost. any interested bidder.

FINAiNCIAL STATEMENT Dated. Brewster, New York.

The assessed valuation of the real May 21, 1941.

estate subject to the taxing power of

W. BOYNTON TOWNER.

the Village is $1^79,943.00. The aver-

Village Clerk.

Those who chisel away the guaranties

of constitutional rights undermine

their own liberties.

FIRST

NATIONAL BANK

BREWSTER, N. Y.

Member of Federal Deposit

Insurance Corporation

Capital $100,000

Surplus $34,000

BURGLAR

PROOF VAULT

A modern burglar proof safe

deposit vault has recently

been installed. Boxes rent

for $5 per year.

HENRY II. WELLS, President

J. DOUGLASS MEAD, Vice-Fres.

E. D. STANNABD. Cashier

D. E. STANNARD, Asst-Cashier

NOTHING WILL BE

LEFT UNDONE

During the time we have

served this community—cur

advice has always been direct

and to the point Select

a reliable and capable

mortician—place In hit

hands the handling of all

necessary details—choose a

servioe in keeping with your

income—and rait secure in

the knowledge that nothing ,

will be left undone to assure

perfection.

GEO. W. BLOAT

Funeral Director

TeL 579

Cannel. N. Y.

©i»J7 B.C.

Church Services

niniiiiiiiiiiaiiiiaiii'aiiiiiaiiiifliiiiiBiiiiaiiiiifliiiiiBiaiiiiiniiiiBiiiiaiiiimi iiiniiiviiittiiwiiiiaaf

Artesian Wells and Supplies

Complete Pump Installation

— Deming and Myers Line —

FULL STOCK — of Shallow and Deep-Well Pumps, Tanks

and Accessories, Cylinders, Parts, Hand Pumps, Motors.

Agents for

Permutit Water Conditioning

Ask Us About Service Insurance

P. F. BEAL & SONS

TEL. 2460 EST. 1891 BREWSTER, N. Y.

•iMiMiuiuauiaiiuflM^

Q.

TMl WIAJMIR FOR TOM

COLDER and

COLDER

but who cares ?

Since our local weatherman has b«.^>.. -sing

Red Trademarked coal he's gotten quite playful.

Well, there's nothing like Famous Reading Anthracite to give

you that "who cares" attitude toward the co/dest weather. W%

the low ash hard coal—laundered to free it of impurities. You

can depend on it to UP the thermometer and lower your coal

bill. And those RED trademark spots on the coal are your guar*

antee that you're getting the gen- jfjM*Hjje

uine "Famous Reading". «.

EATON-KELLEY CO.

Ea*t Main St., Brewster, N. Y.

Telephone 2087 and 2067

READING

CROTON FALLS

Fish To Speak At

Mahopac, June 7

The summer schedule of Masses in

St. Joseph's parish, will go Into effect

Uncle Alb says this is about the time

next Sunday, June first. Masses in St. This week the Women's Republican

we throw the seed catalogs in the

Joseph's Church, Croton Palls, will be Club of Putnam County is announc­

waste-basket and reach lor a road Covered Dish Luncheon Christian Endeavor at 8, 9, and M o'clock. In Goldens ing the annual luncheon will be held

map.

Planned for June ,4 Field Day, May 30th Bridge at 9 o'clock. The summer Mass on Saturday, June 7 at Mahopac Hotel,

In Piefcsch Pavilion, Peach Lake, will Lake Mahopac at one o'clock. Repre­

be at 10:30 a. m., and on the followsentative Hamilton iPlsh, Senator Allan

Mrs. Theodore Edwards will be Christian Endeavor Societies from ing Sunday, June 8th, a Mass will be A. Ryan, Assemblyman D. Mallory

hostess for a covered dish luncheon of Brewster will participate in the lBth said in the Auditorium in the Lincoln Stephens and others will appear as

the Women's Missionary Society of the annual Westchester County c. E. Field

Upholstering

School to accommodate those living in guest speakers.

Presbyterian Church on Wednesday, Day on Memorial Day at the Pound- that locality. The Junior Young

June 4. All are welcome to attend this ridge Reservation. Stephen Masarech, Peoples Club of St. Joseph's parish,

AGE-OLD FACT

affair for a nominal fee provides County Recreation Superintendent, will meet each Tuesday evening, at 7:46,

Furniture Repaired agreeable social hours part of which be in charge of all activities.

and the Senior young peoples club Four thousand years ago, the Egypt­

may be spent out-of-doors in garden An Inter-District Softball game, meet each Thursday evening at 8 ians knew the exact value of "pi," the

and Recovered and on lawn under shade trees. Mrs. starting at 10 a. m. will be the feature o'clock. After the meetings a special ratio of the circumference of a circle

| Edwards and Mrs. Clarence TutUe will of the day. Teams from the Northern hour is spent.

to its diameter.

• SUP COVERS - made to order supply any details prospective guests part of the County will be up against

• VENETIAN BLINDS

require.

some stiff competition from Yonkers The Federated Crusaders held a A little fat or oil spread on the tip

• UPHOLSTERY MATERIALS

o

and Tarrytown.

picnic meeting on Sunday evening by of the spout of a cream pitcher will

• FEATHER PILLOWS

TRINITY LUTHERAN

In the afternoon the Individual hiking to Butler's hill to hold their keep the spout from dripping.

groups will compete in a track meet meeting. The speaker was Herbert

LOWEST PRICES

Grange Hall, Park St., Brewster, N. Y. and relay races. A 60-yard dash, 8 Turner of this place. They returned

Pastor William M. Horn pound shot put and a high-jump con­

The members of the cast of the

home by auto. Mr. E. A. Yarrow, Jr.,

Services and Sunday School—9=30 A. M. test will be the main features of the

Easter Pageant which was given in

attended the luncheon meeting of the

Brown Upholstering Co.

boys' meet. The girls are scheduled to

the Presbyterian Church, will meet at

Westchester Congregational Ministers

Next Sunday Pastor Horn will be have a 60-yard dash, basketball throw

the parsonage at 7 p. m. on Saturday

Association, held in Scarsdale, N. Y.,

20 White Street

preaching • in Rochester, and arrange­ and a jumping relay. A beautiful

evening and go to the Y. M. C. A.

on Tuesday at noon.

Tel. 893 Danbury ments are now being made for a sup­ bronze trophy will toe awarded to the

gymnasium, in White Plains, to witply

preacher. It may be that the ser­ Intermediate and Senior Society comness

the athletic events, afterwards

vice will begin a few minutes, due to piling the greatest number of points.

Miss Marie LeVarn was hostess to going for a swim in the pool.

tight train connections.

Horseshoes, golf and tennis will be

the Sunday School Teachers meeting

Friday is the day for the annual offered for those not participating In

at her home on Tuesday evening. After Cards have been received from Mr.

»ooooooooooo6oooooooooooq< Spring Festival at the Wartburg. The races.

the meeting delicious refreshments and Mrs. Vernon Schworm, who are

day opens with a service at the Wart­

were served.

in California.

C. E. arrows will guide the partici­

The Putnam County | burg Chapel at 11 o'clock at which pants from Route 22 to the reserved

Pastor Horn will be the speaker. The area.

Miss Helen Doyle visited her two Daniel Gallagher of Cross River was

afternoon will feature dramatics, songs

sisters who are in the Convent of the struck and killed by a hit-and-run

National Bank

Divine Compassion, White Plains, on

and an exhibit. You can get your

driver near the George Supple store

Saturday.

i lunch right there on the grounds. And

in Lincolndale, on Monday night.

Carmel, N. Y. I for the children, pony rides. It Is a CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

good place to go for the Decoration

Day family outing.

• "Ancient and Modern Necromancy,

Devotional booklets for June are

(Alias Mesmerism and Hypnotism, De­

here. They were prepared this time by

nounced" is the subject of the Lesson-

Dr. Stanley Blllheimer of Palmyra, Pa.

|Sermon in all Churches of Christ-

June 8th is Trinity Sunday and vte

Scientist, on Sunday. June 1.

'shall have the Lord's supper admin - The Golden Text is: "There is no

Jistered then. This June 8th service ! wisdom nor understanding nor counsel YOU MEAN TO SAY

I only will be preceded by a brief ser- against the Lord" (Proverbs 21:30).

ivice of Public Confession at 9:15. Among the citations which comprise

: Please note the time. In many churches the Lesson-Sermon is the following

Interest Department 'there Is a confession Service On Fri­ from the Bible: "Then was brought ELECTRIC COOKING

day before the Communion Sunday. unto him one possessed with a devil,

Trust Department We shall not separate the two parts blind, and dumb: and he healed him.

by that much; but as a preliminary to insomuch that the blind and dumb

Christmas Club

our regular service, we shall have the both spake and saw. . . . But when

Order for Confession at nine-flfteen, the Pharisees heard it, they said, This IS NOW THAT CHEAP?

Safe Deposit Bores g two weeks hence. The June 1st service fellow doth not cast out devils, but by

B)OOOOOOOPOOOOOOOOOOOOObO


PAGE EIGHT THE BREWSTER STANDARD — ESTABLISHED 1869 THURSDAY. MAY 29, 1941

CROTON FALLS

NEXT WEDNESDAY

is Constance Bennett's

COSMETIC DAY

at the

Palace Theatre

Danbury

LADIES . . MY FIFTEEN BEAUTY

AIDS ARE YOURS ABSOLUTELY

FREE!

Renumber They Are Not Just

Samples But Full Retail

Size Packages

I OMll l JI SET IS

VALUED AT J12.75

And This

AMAZING GIFT IS YOURS

With the purchase of an Evening

Price Orchestra admission ticket,

at either the Matinee or Evening

Ferforuiancet. at this Theatre

COMMENCING

Wed., June 4th

AND EVERY WEDNESDAY

Thereafter For

FIFTEEN WEEKS

signed:

Starlight Plans

jOpening, July 1

Ridgefield Playhouse

Ridgefield 1000 Free Parking;

Thursday, May 29

A Great Combination

The Bad Man

Wallace Berry - Lionel Barrymore

Plus

The French Sport-drama

They Meet On Skis

Wissia Dina - Henri Presles

Friday and Saturday, May 30-31

Alice Faye - Cesar Romero

Jack Oakie in

The Great American

Broadcast

with the

Four bakspotk - Nicholas Bros.

Sat. Mat. Only - MMI p. m.

LADDIE

Tim Holt - Virginia Gilmore

Sunday and Monday. June 1-2

Vivien Leigh - Laurence Olivier

in

That Hamilton Woman

with

Alan Mowbray - Henry Wilt-ox on

Tuesday, June 3

Thomas Mitchell

Geraldine Fitzgerald

in

Flight From Destiny

Also: Short Subject*

Wednesday, June 4

Lew Ayres - Lionel Barrymore

The People vs.

Dr. Kildare

Also: Information Please

Thurk.. Fri., Sat.. June 5-S-7

MEET JOHN DOE

She knew what this going to the

Fanchers' meant to him. Angry,

helpless, tears filled her eyes as the

fatigue of the trying day overcame

her and she visioned Bill's impatient

irritation.

"Oh, you're always forgetting

something," he would begin in the

tone that she knew so well."

A sensation of bitterness surged

over Jerry. Did marriage ever

mean anything for a woman except

exactions? Bill's comfort, Bill's

pleasure, Bill's relatives, why, they

filled her life to the exclusion of

everything else.

The train came to r. f- ? and Jerry

rose with a sigh.

"Hello, honey, I'm p'ad you got

my message. Mary Luen thought

you must have run in :iext door,

for the bag was still in the hall,"

said Bill, tucking hei turn through

his. "I was half afraid »•* u wouldn't

come in tqwn since the party was

called off. I'm son oi u.ad it's off,

to tell the truth, lor it v. as certain

to have been an all-night affair. I

hated to have you disappointed,

though. What do you say we have a

little dinner all by ourselves and

then take in a show?"

After having braced herself for

indignant disapproval. Jerry's reaction

to the changed situation was a

bubbling joyousness that made Bill

burst forth spontaneously: "I say,

honey-girl, we have better times

when we step out all by ourselves

than at any party that was ever

thrown."

Jerry was silent, but she squeezed

his arm satisfactorily. Her spirits

began to descend a little as they

neared their favorite cafe. Should

she tell Bill the truth about the

bag? What good would it do? Thenevening

might be spoiled—no, she

decided, she'd not tell him. What

a man didn't know, etc.

"Head lettuce with Roquefort

cheese dressing," she ordered happily.

Civil Officers May

Attend Training Schools

York, will be the scene of a three-day practical demonstrations, the Training fare Officials Association and various

School for Town Clerks, beginning on Schools will compress into a short per­ State Departments.

June 12th.

Members of the Croton Palls Fire

iod of time an intensive course of

Second Thoughts

The Justices of the Peace will con­

Department will meet at the fire

training for the town and county of­ Suet will go through a food choppar

house on Memorial Day at 10:00 a. m.. Several prominent stars of the en­

Four training schools for the town

vene at St. Lawrence University, New ficers.

easily if the chopper is dipped in boil­

to start for Bedford Village to take tertainment world have been announc­

-o

and county officers of New York State

York, on the morning of June 16th, for The Schools are sponsored by the ing water and used while hot.

part in the parade, which will start ed by Starlight Theatre at Pawling for

will be held at leading colleges during

a four-day School.

Board of Trustees of the Town and

at 11 a. m. The local Boy Scout Troop .their 1041 season, which will open July By ROBERT M'CHESNEY the month of June.

A two-day School for the Clerks of County Officers Training School and

will also march, and as many as pos­ 'ifirst. Among the featured players to

the Boards of Supervisors of the var­

(Associated Newspapers.)

Bureau of Public Service Training of She ion the telepnone): "I'm afraid

sible are asked to attend.

appear are Miss Allison Skip worth In

WNU Service.

A four-day School for Welfare Ofious counties will be held on June the State Education Department, with your dinner will be burned a little to-

I the mystery thriller Criminal At

ficers will open at Hobart College, 19th and 20th at Cornell University, the co-operation of the Association of .night, darling."

Mrs. Fritz Krafft observed her birth­ -'Large; the screen favorite, Ramon

Geneva, New York, on the morning of i Ithaca, New York.

Towns, the County Officers Associa- He: "What's the matter? Did they

day on Wednesday, May 28th. Ihci- iNavarro in Command To Love; Miss FOR the third time since 9 a. m.

June 9th. Through lectures toy outstanding Uon, the State Charities Aid Associa- have a fire at the delicatessen?"—

dently the birthdays of her three chil­ Diana Barrymore, daughter of John 1

the telephone rang and it was

Colgate University, at Hamilton, New' authorities, classroom discussions and tion, the New York State Public Wei-1 Phoney Phun.

dren occur in May also.

Barrymore, and who is now being only 10 a. m. then. Jerry took the

.featured on Broadway, will appear in receiver off the hook with a sigh. It

The Rainbow Club met at the home ;Mr. and Mrs. North, if this play is re- did seem as if the era prior to uni­

of Mrs. William Luther on Tuesday ' leased in time for summer stock; and

evening, and two names were drawn Doris Dudley, who has been featured

versal telephone service must have

in the "Blanket Club." Mrs. Oscar :this winter on the radio series, Meet been much more peaceful for busy

Marshall and Mrs. Ceylon Caulfleid I Mr. Meek, will stage and star In the housewives than this hectic age of

FIRST -NATIONAL

were the winners.

play made famous by John Barrymore, constant interruptions.

SUPER-MARKETS

Mv Dear Children.

The first call had been from Bill's

Janice Outhouse, daughter of Mr. For the first time in its history Aunt Mary, announcing her intend­

and Mrs. Purdy Outhouse has recover­ Starlight will conduct a summer ed arrival for lunch; later, the

ed from an attack of German measles. j dramatic school, in addition to the butcher had called giving the exas­

(regular professional company. This perating news that he'd not be able

Mrs. John T. Jeffery has been laid ; group will be limited to a small num- to send broilers that day—Aunt

up for several days with an Injury to Iber of young people interested In ap­ Mary doted on fried chicken. To

her kneecap. It was necessary to have pearing with the professional company,

make matters worse, Mary Ellen

it in a cast for several days.

land will be under the supervision of

'Mr. Ned Wayburn, who has been stage

had cut her thumb badly and was

The fifth annual concert of the Cen­ director and executive producer for very gloomy in consequence; little

•" QUALITYanJ SAVINGS /

tral High School band will be held in such famous Broadway names as Zleg- help could be looked for from that

9

the auditorium of the High School on lfield, Shubert, and Dillingham. Mr. quarter. And now—this!

Friday evening, June 6th. The program 'Wayburn will coach the group In all "Is that you, Jerry?"

mmmmmammm

of the forty-five piece band will be 'phases of theatrical production, and is "Yes, dear."

made up of marches, waltzes and over­ | now holding auditions in his New York "Your voice didn't sound natural

tures, under the direction of Mr. Leon 'offices at 5 West 4«th Street.

47 MAIN ST., BREWSTER, N. Y.

somehow. Say, Jerry, we're invited

Singer. Several guest artists will be on

o

OPEN SATURDAYS TO 8 p. m.

to dine with the Fanchers tonight

the program also.

Tea Room Experts

at their new studio-apartment. It's

sure to be a wow of a party." Storeu ut*e>i Thar*, until & o'clock

Good size in dairy cows is said to le Open New Business

"But, Bill—"

second only to breeding in determin­

Closed Fri., Memorial Day, May 30

ing the ability of cows to produce

"But me no buts! We're going. I

Mrs. Helen Hart Bronson and Miss

milk. Bach additional 100 pounds on

wouldn't miss it for the world. It's

Majorie Workman, long identified with

EVANGELINE FVAPORATtD

a cow means 600 to 800 more pounds

been got up in a hurry—Jack just

the tea room business in this vicinity,

of milk produced in a year, dairy ex­ ihave opened their newest venture the

called up some of the fellows and

perts say.

Tea Cart in the Brownlee homestead, told them to breeze in about seven MILK

Danbury.

with their wives."

MIIL3ROCM CI iftra Vtot*4 Ray Treated • Contents

The south side of the attractive "But, Bill, dear—"

1 pint

Revolutionary house has been taken "Now listen, honey, I'm in a rush.

over for the purpose and such changes You know what I'll need. I won't SODAS

btls

made as were necessary in adapting it

PALACE

have time to come out to dress, so MILLBitOOK MILL^iiOOK C.d C.J-J • hardlpak of 6 btls - Contents

to its new role.

you put my things in that light over­

Danbury, Conn.

Mrs. Mjpnson andfBMi&s Workman night bag and come in on the six-

have been business associates for a

KOLA

5 DATS BEG. FBI. MAY 30th

o'clock train—Hello, Dick! Yes, I'm

number of years and are well known

experts in their field. They started

ready to start now—Remember, PURE RfcrKt*HI*G RfcFKfcbhll • Contents

ROBERT TATLOR

their careers at the White Turkey Inn, Jerry, the six-o'clock. I'll meet you

as

when that hostelry was operated by at the station."

MOXII 2 iff 25c

Mrs. C. C. Morgan. Later, they con­ The receiver at the other end

"Billy The Kid" ducted the Split Rock Tavern on the clicked and Jerry sat still, her

Danbury-Norwalk road, and following

with

mind in a whirl of resentment and

that the Rainbow Tea room at Pound

FI-NA-ST BREAD

anxiety. Aunt Mary already on her

BRIAN DONLEVY

Ridge, all well known and popular resorts.

Last year, Miss Workman suc­

way—Bill out of his office for the Enriched weth

In Technicolor

cessfully operated the Tallyho which day probably.

Extra Vitamins

— Co-Feature —

combined restaurant and curb service, "Are you perfectly sure that you and Minerals 2 15c

Jane Jackie on the New Mil ford road.

have taken proper care of Mary

WITHERS COOPER Mrs. Bronson, the niece of Mr. and Ellen's thumb, Geraldine, dear?"

in

Mrs. B. O. Nichols of Dingle Ridge asked Aunt Mary the moment she

Farm, Brewster, and Miss Workman saw that member swathed in white

"Her First Beau" have frequently entertained parties cotton cloth.

from this vicinity,

3 DAYS BEG. WED., JUNE 4th

o

Aunt Mary had a decided will of

her own and though Jerry assured

'Reaching for the Sun* Pour thousand years ago, the Egypt­ her that the injured thumb had been

starring

ians knew the exact value of "pi," the thoroughly soused with antiseptics

Joel EUen ratio of the circumference of a circle from the family bottle, luncheon had

McCREA DREW to its diameter.

to be postponed while the bandage

— 2nd Hit —

was removed, lotion applied and a

George Martha

Ends Tonitc

fresh bandage secured by Aunt

BRENT scorrr

"PENNY SERENADE" Mary's capable hands.

in

Plus 'They Met In Argentina" The clock was chiming five as the

door closed behind Aunt Mary and

'They Dare Not Love'

Jerry was free to race frantically

ENDS THURS. MAY 29th EMPRESS upstairs to pack Bill's evening

TOPPER RETURNS

• Danbury •

clothes in the bag. At 5:45 Mary

Pius

STARTS TOMORROW (Fri.) Ellen had deposited the over-night

LADY FROM LOUISIANA

— For One Week —

bag by the hall door and retired to

the kitchen to nurse her still painful

EXTRA! EXTRA!

thumb. The telephone was ringing

I WANTED maddeningly as Jerry ran down the

LADIES

stairs. Mary Ellen being out of

sight, she feverishly took down the

HERE IS A VERY IMPORTANT INGS receiver, only to get no response to

MESSAGE FROM

-««»r Willi AM her hurried "hello—hello—hello."

CONSTANCE BENNETT

Lovely Star of Stage and Screen

MILLAND-HOLDEN At the first stop a pretty girl en­

. V.A»NI MIAN tered the car carrying a smart-look­

TO YOU

ing bag. A bag! Jerry leaned swift­

MORRIS-DONLEVY ly forward and groped beside the

V,:- Constance Maote • Veronica-t'S^ seat where her bag should have

been. It was not there—it never

Plus

had been there—it was right where

SELECTED SHORTS Mary Ellen had put it by the hall

Headed By

door. The train going the other

Mai Fleischer New

direction had already passed the

Technicolor Cartoon

next stop—anyway, Bill was to meet

"RAGGEDY ANN

the six-o'clock—the full horror of

and

the situation broke over her. What

RAGGEDY ANDY"

would Bill say?

ilb

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**


tTOfje JJretoater &tanbarb

Brewster, Putnam County, N. Y., Thursday, May 29, 1941

NOTICE OF REDEMPTION OF TAX

SALE, OFFICE OF THE TREASURER

OF PUTNAM COUNTY.

Brewster, N. Y., April 25, 1941.

The Treasurer of the County of Put­

nam pursuant to Chapter 180 of the

Laws of 1900, entitled "An Act in rela­

tion to unpaid taxes in the towns of

the County of Putnam," as amended,

gives notice that the time for the re­

demption of lands sold under this act

on the sixth day of September, 1939,

for unpaid taxes, will expire on the

sixth day of September, 1941, after

which the persons entitled thereto may

receive the deeds of such sales.

SOUTHEAST

A tract of land located at Croton

Mines, in the southwestern part of the

town of Southeast, Putnam County,

New York, containing about thirty-

three acres. Supposed owner, Charlotte

M. Elman and Fannie R. Ratett Sold

to Mrs. Ann Mildner for 639.60.

miLirsTowN

A tract of land located at Manitou, in

the southern part of the town of Philips-

town, Putnam County, New York,

known as Mountain Park lot Supposed

owner, Philip Bentz. Sold to Putnam

County for 613.31.

A tract of land with residence there­

on, located at East Mountain Road, in

the western part of the town of Philips-

town, Putnam County, New York. Sup­

posed owner, Elizabeth Bryant Sold to

Municipal Mutual Corporation for

6100.00.

A tract of land located at Avery Road,

in the southwestern part of the town

of Philipstown, Putnam County, New

York, containing about fourteen acres.

Supposed owners, Electa Covert Sarah

Newell and Rebecca Young. Sold to

J. Bennett Southard, Jr., for 6110.00.

A tract of land located at Manitou, in

the southern part of the town of Phil­

ipstown, Putnam County, New York,

known as Mountain Park Lot No. 27.

Supposed owner, F. Cornelia. Sold to

Putnam County for $14.90.

A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Garirson, in the southern

part of the town of Philipstown, Put­

nam County, New York, containing

about one hundred and twenty acres.

Supposed owners, Ferman and Evans

Dick. Sold to Municipal Mutual Cor­

poration for $1,134.77.

A tract of land located at Garrison,

in the southern part of the town of

Philipstown, Putnam County, New York,

containing about two acres. Supposed

owner, Herman Deppe. Sold to George

Gerace for 660.00.

A tract of land with house thereon,

located at East Mountain, in the eastern

part of the town of Philipstown, Put­

nam County, New York, containing

about seven acres. Supposed owner, Her­

man Gackel. Sold to Municipal Mutual

Corporation for 6125.00.

A tract of land located at Manitou, in

the southern part of the town of Philips-

town, Putnam County, New York,

known as Lot No. 33 in Mountain Park

Development Supposed owner, Charles

GrofT. Sold to Putnam County for 618.47.

A tract of land with house thereon,

located at North Highlands, in the north­

ern part of the town of Philipstown,

Putnam County, New York, containing

about two acres. Supposed owner, John

Hagen. Sold to Municipal Mutual Cor­

poration for 650.26.

A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Cold Spring, in the western

part of the town of Philipstown, Put­

nam County, New York. Supposed own­

er, Harry Ludwig. Sold to Municipal

Mutual Corporation for 6126.00.

A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Manitou, in the southern part

of the town of Philipstown, Putnam

County, New York. Supposed owner,

R. A. Markley. Sold to Putnam County

for 637.34.

A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Cold Spring, in the western

part of the town of Philipstown, Put­

nam County, New York. Supposed own­

er, Robert Mooney. Sold to Municipal

Mutual Corporation for 657.54.

A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Cold Spring, in the western

part of the town of Philipstown, Put­

nam County, New York. Supposed own­

er, Elizabeth Montiflori. Sold to Munici­

pal Mutual Corporation for 652.50.

A tract of land with store thereon,

located at Cole Spring, in the western

part of the town of Philipstown, Putnam

County, New York. Supposed owner,

Frank Nania. Sold to Putnam County

for $57.57.

A tract of land with house thereon,

located at East Mountain, in the eastern

part of the town of Philipstown, Put­

nam County, New York. Supposed own­

er, Bertha Owens. Sold to Municipal

Mutual Corporation for 62142.

A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Garrison, in the southern

part of the town of Philipstown, Put­

nam County, New York, containing

about thirteen acres- Supposed owners,

Curtis Russel and Wife. Sold to Mu­

nicipal Mutual Corporation for $42.79.

A tract of land located at Manitou.

in the southern part of the town of

Philipstown. Putnam County, New York,

known as Mountain Park Lot No. 30.

Supposed owner, Fenton Smith. Sold to

Putnam County for $14.99.

A tract of land located at Manitou.

in the southern part of the town of

Philipstown, Putnam County, New

York, in Mountain Park Development.

Supposed owner, Fenton Smith. Sold to

Putnam County for $14.99.

A tract of land with house thereon,

located at North Highlands, in the

northern part of the town of Philips-

town, Putnam County. New York,

known as Lots Nos. 1 and 2. Supposed

owner, Natalie Salicitio. Sold to Put­

nam County for 627.00.

A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Cold Spring, in the town of

Philipstown, Putnam County, New

York. Supposed owner, J. Bennet South­

ard. Sold to J. Bennet Southard, Jr., for

6155.00.

A tract of land located at Manitou, in

the southern part of the town of Phil­

ipstown, Putnam County, New York,

known as Lot No. 15, Jones Makel Lot

Supposed owner, Fenton M. Smith. Sold

to Putnam County for $10.67.

A tract of land located at Manitou, in

the southern part of the town of Phil­

ipstown, Putnam County, New York,

known as Mountain Park Lot No. 7,

Thomas Berman Lot Supposed owner,

Fenton M. Smith. Sold to Putnam Coun­

ty for $16.67.

A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Cold Spring, in the western

part of the town of Philipstown, Put­

nam County, New York. Supposed own­

er, Fenton M. Smith. Sold to Municipal

Mutual Corporation for 6150.00.

A tract of land located at Manitou, in

the southern part of the town of Philips-

town, Putnam County, New York,

known as Mountain Park Lot No. 10,

George Trind Lot Supposed owner,

Fenton M Smith. Sold to Putnam Coun­

ty for 618.47.

A tract of land located at Manitou, in

the southern part of the town of Phil­

ipstown, Putnam County, New York,

known as Lot No. 11, Mountain Park.

Supposed owner, Fenton M. Smith. Sold

to Putnam County for $18.47.

A tract of land located at Manitou,

in the southern part of the town of Phil­

ipstown, Putnam County, New York,

known as Lot No. 5, Philip Benz Lot

Supposed owner, Fenton M. Smith. Sold

to Putnam County for $16.67.

A tract of land located at Manitou,

in the southern part of the town of

Philipstown, Putnam County, New York,

known as Mountain Park Lot No. 30,

D. J. Donovan Lot Supposed owner,

Fenton M. Smith. Sold to Putnam Coun­

ty for 615.37.

CARMEL

A tract of land situate at Mahopac

Falls, in the town of Carmel, Putnam

County, known as Plots Nos. 16, 17, 38

and 39, on a map of Rldgeview Acres.

Supposed owner, Kenneth Adams. Sold

to Putnam County for 627.41.

A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Mahopac Falls, in the west­

erly part of the town of Carmel, Put­

nam County, New York, containing

about two and one-half acres. Supposed

owner, Emma J. Barrett Estate. Sold to

Municipal Mutual Corporation for

$164.15.

A tract of land located at Mahopac

Falls, in the westerly part of the town

of Carmel, Putnam County, New York,

containing about one hundred and

twenty acres. Supposed owner, Harold

H. Barrett Sold to Putnam County for

$200.70.

A tract of land situate at Mahopac

Falls, in the westerly part of the town

of Carmel, Putnam County, New York,

containing about two acres. Supposed

owner, Harold H. Barrett. Sold to Put­

nam County for $19.47.

A tract of land situate at Mahopac,

in the southerly part of the town of

Carmel, Putnam County, New York,

containing about 45 feet by 50 feet Sup­

posed owner, Anna Blenis. Sold to Mrs.

Elizabeth Smith for 625.00.

A tract of land with house thereon,

situate at Mahopac, in the central part

of the town of Carmel, Putnam County,

New York, containing about seven

acres. Supposed owner, Thomas Bren-

nan. Sold to Federal Investors, Inc. for

6200.00.

A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Carmel, in the northerly part

of the town of Carmel, Putnam County,

New York, containing about one acre.

Supposed owner, Camp Gilead. Sold to

Dorothy Carey Reiffen for 6110.00.

A tract of land located at Mahopac, in

the westerly part of the town of Carmel,

Putnam County, New York, containing

about eighteen acres. Supposed owner,

Flora W. Dean. Sold to Putnam County

for 615.28.

A tract of land located at Mahopac,

in the southerly part of the town of

Carmel, Putnam County, New York,

containing about one-half acre. Sup­

posed owner, Lewis W. Haight Sold to

Hilda £. Benjamin for $15.49.

A feed store located at Mahopac Falls,

in the southerly part of the town of

Carmel, Putnam County, New York, on

lands of Spencer A. Townsend Estate.

Supposed owners, C. S. Horton and Son.

Sold to Putnam County for 643.72.

A tract of land with hotel thereon,

situate at Mahopac, in the town of Car­

mel, Putnam County, New York, known

as Plot No. 128 and Canal Lot. on map

of lands of Mahopac Point filed in Put­

nam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 57. Supposed owner, Illustrated

Fashion Features. Sold to Municipal

Mutual Corporation for $316.93.

A tract of land situate at Mahopac,

in the town of Carmel, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 104-109,

on a map of lands filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

11B. Supposed owner, Muriel Kegelman.

Sold to Putnam County for $24.09.

A tract of land situate at Mahopac,

in the town of Carmel. Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 120-123,

inclusive, on map of lands filed in Put­

nam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 11B. Supposed owner, Muriel Kegel­

man. Sold to Putnam County fur $17.10.

A tract of land located at Carmel. in

the northerly part of the town of Car­

mel. Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about sixty acres. Supposed

owner, Kernerb Corporation. Sold to

Putnam County for 644.95.

A tract of land situate at Mahopac,

in the northerly part of the town of

Carmel, Putnam County, New York,

containing about five acres. Supposed

owner, William Kuver. Sold to Putnam

County for $14.72.

A tract of land situate at Mahopac, in

the town of Carmel, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plot No. 12, Block

G, on map of lands of Mahopac Hills

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office

under File No. 54. Supposed owner, Lake

Mahopac Holding Company, Incorpo­

rated. Sold to Putnam County for $24.29.

A tract of land located at Mahopac

in the central part of the town of Car­

mel, Putnam County. New York, con­

taining about one-quarter acre. Sup­

posed owners, George Lunning and wife.

Sold to Putnam County for 620.03.

A tract of land situate at Mahopac

Falls, in the town of Carmel, Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

9-12, on map of lands filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

111B. Supposed owner, Elizabeth Mac-

Intyre. Sold to Putnam County for $13.78.

A tract of land situate at Mahopac, in

the town of Carmel, Putnam County,

New York, known as west 20 feet of

Plot 10, 11, Block O, on map of lands of

Lake Mahopac Ridge filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

163A. Supposed owner, George L. Park­

er. Sold to Putnam County for $00.84.

A tract of land with two houses there­

on, located at Carmel, in the easterly

part of the town of Carmel, Putnam

County, New York, containing about two

and one-half acres. Supposed owner,

Pearl Rivet Sold to Municipal Mutual

Corporation for 6125.00.

A tract of land located at Carmel, in

the northerly part of the town of Car­

mel, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about twenty-six acres. Sup-

poser owner, Schuyler Securities Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

643.72.

A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Carmel, in the northerly part

of the town of Carmel, Putnam County,

New York, containing about four and

one-half acres. Supposed owner. Estate

of Charles B. Travis. Sold to Federal

Investors, Inc., for 6710.00.

A tract of land situate at Mahopac, in

the town of Carmel, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 2, 5, and

60 feet west side of 7, Block K, on maps

of lands of Mahopac Hills, filed in Put­

nam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 54. Supposed owner, James Van

Kueren Estate. Sold to Putnam County

for $39.50.

A tract of land with house thereon,

situate at Mahopac Falls, in the town of

Carmel, Putnam County, New York,

known as Plots Nos. 45 and 46, Block

No. 33, on map of lands of Lake Secor,

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office

under File No. 151. Supposed owner,

Edward Wurzel. Sold to Golden Rod

Motor Service, Inc., for $37.28.

PATTERSON

A tract of land located at High School

District in the northern part of the town

of Patterson, Putnam County, New York,

containing about twenty-three acres.

Supposed owner, Beach Island Marble

Company. Sold to Putnam County for

634.87.

A tract of land located at Towners

District in the southern part of the town

of Patterson, Putnam County, New York,

containing about one-quarter acre. Sup­

posed owners, Eli B. and Elbert C. Cros­

by. Sold to Putnam County for $13.51.

A tract of land located at Dykemans

District in the southern part of the town

of Patterson, Putnam County, New York,

containing about sixteen acres. Supposed

owner, Mrs. J. H. Curry. Sold to Olav

Hansen for 622.80.

A tract of land located at Towners

District, in the southern part of the town

of Patterson, Putnam County, New York,

known as Plot No. 10, Section D, on map

of lands of Mountain View Development

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Supposed owner, J. F. Donlin. Sold to

Putnam County for $14.31.

A tract of land located at Field's Dis­

trict Lake Carmel, in the southwestern

part of the town of Patterson, Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

6280 and 6281, Map No. 5, on a map of

lands of Mirror Holding Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Supposed owner, Christopher Foster.

Sold to Putnam County for $19.14.

A tract of land located at Field's Dis­

trict Lake Carmel, in the southwestern

part of the town of Patterson, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

6232 and 6233, Map No. 5, on map of

lands of Mirror Holding Corporation

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Supposed owner, Daniel Hopkins. Sold

to Putnam County for $15.79.

A tract of land located at Towners

District, in the southern part of the town

of Patterson, Putnam County, New York,

known as Plot No. 4, Section C, on map

of lands of Mountain View Development

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Supposed owner, Helen M. Lowa. Sold

to Putnam County for $13.68.

A lake and dam located at Well Curb

District, Putnam Lake, in the southeast­

ern part of the town of Patterson, Put­

nam County, New York, containing

about two hundred acres, on map of

lands of Mirror Holding Corporation.

Supposed owner. Mirror Holding Corpo­

ration. Sold to Putnam County for

$368.08

A tract of land located at Towners

District, in the southern part of the town

of Patterson, Putnam County, New York,

known as Plot No. 24, Section D, on map

of lands of Mountain View Development

filed in Putnam County Clerk's Office.

Supposed owner, I. Newcomb. Sold to

Putnam County for $13.68.

A tract of land located at Elm Tree

District in the southern part of the town

of Patterson, Putnam County, New York,

containing about twenty acres. Sup­

posed owner, Brewster House, Incorpo­

rated. Sold to Putnam County for $17.74.

A tract of land located at Haviland

Hollow District in the eastern part of

the town of Patterson, Putnam County,

New York, containing about six hundred

and seventy-five acres. Supposed own­

er, Tatow Corporation. Sold to Putnam

County for $1,177.53.

A tract of land located at Elm Tree

District Croton Swamp, in the central

part of the town of Patterson, Putnam

County, New York, containing about ten

acres. Supposed owner, James E. Town­

er Estate. Sold to Putnam County for

$18.69.

A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Stephens District in the

northeastern part of the town of Pat­

terson, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about .495 acres. Supposed own­

er, P. W. Townsend. Sold to Federal

Investors, Inc., for $410.00.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 120

and 121, Map 1, on map of lands of Mir­

ror Holding Corporation. Supposed own­

er, Mirror Holding Corporation. Sold to

Putnam County for $13.78.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 345

to 348, Inclusive, Map 1, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Mrs. C. Freldel. Sold to

Stella Korn for $16.59.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 1008-

1012, Inclusive, Map 1, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Lawrence Scott Sold to

Oscar J. Busfaery for $70.00.

A tract of land with bungalow there­

on, situate at Putnam Lake, in the town

of Patterson, Putnam County, New York,

known as Lots Nos. 1070 and 1071, Map 1,

on map of lands of Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Supposed owner, Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation. Sold to Olav Hansen for

625.00.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

try, New York, known as Lots Nos. 1094-

1099, inclusive, Map 1, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Arthur Smadbeck. Sold to

Putnam County for $11.88.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 1143,

1144, 1145, 1150, 1151, 1243, 1244, 1251,

1252, 1253, 1373, 1374, 1375. 1376, 1377,

Map 1, on map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation. Supposed owner, Ar­

thur Smadbeck. Sold to Stella Korn for

$13.13.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 1410

and 1411, Map 1, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner. Mirror Holding Corporation.

Sold to Putnam County for $11.72.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

try, New York, known as Lots Nos. 1685

and 1686, Map 2, on a map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Arthur Smadbeck. Sold to Put­

nam County for $13.68.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 1879

to 1881, inclusive. Map 2, on map of

lands of Mirror Holding Corporation.

Supposed owner, Elizabeth H. Connell.

Sold to Joseph Duffy for $15.78.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lot No. 2159,

Map 3, on map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation. Supposed owner, Ar­

thur Smadbeck. Sold to Putnam County

for $13.12.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 2490,

2491, 2492, 2533, 2534, 2535, 2553, 2554,

Map 3, on map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation. Supposed owner, Mir­

ror Holding Corporation. Sold to Put­

nam County for $15.09.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

try, New York, known as Lots Nos. 2886

and 2887, Map 4, on a map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Mirror Holding Corporation. Sold

to Putnam County for $13.99.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 3138,

3139, 3140, Map 5, on a map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Arthur Smadbeck. Sold to Stella

Korn for $6.45.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lot No. 3651,

Map 6, on a map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation. Supposed owner,

Arthur Smadbeck. Sold to Putnam Coun­

ty for $12.45.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 3842-

3844, inclusive, Map 6, on a map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Lydia R. Vent. Sold to

Putnam County for $14.39.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty. New York, known as Lots Nos. 3873-

3877, inclusive. Map 6, on a map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner. Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Stella Korn for $16.62.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 3883

and 3884, Map 6, on a map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Mrs. D. Maurer. Sold to Putnam

County for $13.74.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 3894,

3895, 3896, 3897, 3898, 3942, 3943, 3944,

Map 6, on a map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation. Supposed owner,

Arthur Smadbeck. Sold to Putnam Coun­

ty for $13.47.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 4898,

4899, 4900, 4901, 4902, 4003, 5065, 5066,

5067, 5068, 5069, Map 7 on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner Arthur Smadbeck. Sold to

Putnam County for $13.82.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 5156,

5157, 5161, 5162, 5163, Map 7, on map

of lands of Mirror Holding Corporation.

Supposed owner, Arthur - Smadbeck.

Sold to Putnam County for $11.97.

A tract of land With bungalow there­

on, situate at Putnam Lake, in the town

of Patterson, Putnam County. New York,

known as Lots Nos. 5182 and 5183, Map 7,

on map of lands of Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Supposed owner, Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation. Sold to Williard L.

Browne for $25.83.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 5242-

5245, inclusive, Map 7, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Mary Colasona. Sold to

Putnam County for $15.16.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 5321

and 5322, Map 7, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Charles Donohue. Sold to Put­

nam County for $13.90.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos.

5382 and 5383, Map 7, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, O. Burkhalter. Sold to

Putnam County for $13.05.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 5521

and 5522, Map 7, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Arthur Smadbeck. Sold to Put­

nam County for $12.49.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 5608-

5613, inclusive, Map 7, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Arthur Smadbeck. Sold to

Putnam County for $13.64.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 5649,

5650, 5651, 5652, Map 7, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $15.21.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lot No. 5687,

Map 7, on map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation. Supposed owner, Ar­

thur Smadbeck. Sold to Putnam County

for $12.59.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 5762

and 5763, Map 8, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner. Mirror Holding Corporation.

Sold to Putnam County for $14.00.

A tract of land with bungalow there­

on, situate at Putnam Lake, in the town

of Patterson, Putnam County, New York,

known as Lots Nos. 5978 and 5979, Map 8,

on map of lands of Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Supposed owner, Martha Rush.

Sold to Putnam County for $32.90.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 6001

and 6002, Map 8, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, A. L. Law. Sold to Putnam Coun­

ty for $13.37.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 6003-

6005, inclusive, Map 8, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owners, Harvey and Lulu Snyder.

Sold to Putnam County for $14.31.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 6016-

6020, inclusive, Map 8, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Arthur Smadbeck. Sold to

Stella Korn for $11.87.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 6057

and 6058, Map 8, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owners, A. C. Cappola and C. Boree.

Sold to Putnam County for $13.37.

A tract of land with bungalow there­

on, situate at Putnam Lake, in the town

of Patterson, Putnam County, New York,

known as Lots Nos. 6059-6063. inclusive,

Map 8, on map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation. Supposed owners, H. A.

and J. A. Rohrs. Sold to Putnam County

for $68.56.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 6074.

6075, 6076, Map 8. on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Arthur Smadbeck. Sold to Put­

nam County for $7.10.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 6120,

6121, 6122, 6123, Map 8, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Stella Korn for $14.00.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 6189-

6191, inclusive, Map 8, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $15.05

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 6336

and 6337, Map 8, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Mrs. H. Seifert Sold to Putnam

County for $14.30.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 6509

and 6510, Map 8, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, F. Finn. Sold to Putnam County

for $14.30.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 6602-

6605, inclusive, Map 8, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Arthur Smadbeck. Sold to

Putnam County for $12.79.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 9828,

9829, 9830, 9831, 9832, 9833, 9834, 9835,

9836, 9837, 9838, Map 10, on map of

lands of Mirror Holding Corporation.

Supposed owner, Arthur Smadbeck. Sold

to Putnam County for $14.30.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 9931-

9935, inclusive, Map 10, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Benenzo Vores. Sold to

Stella Korn for $18.64.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 9948,

9949, 9950, 9951, 9952, 9982, 9983, 9984,

9985, 9986, 9987, 9988, 9989, 9990, 9991,

9992, 9993. 9994, 9995, 9999-10008, May 10,

on map of lands of Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Supposed owner, Arthur Smad­

beck. Sold to Putnam County for $1607

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 10007-

10008, inclusive, Map 10, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Kaiser Kaiser. Sold to

Putnam County for $12.75.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 10038-

10039, 10040, 10041, 10042, Hap 10. on

map of lands of Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Supposed owner, Arthur Smad­

beck. Sold to Putnam County for $16.71.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 10077,

10078, 10079, 10095, 10096, 10097, Map 10,

on map of lands of Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Supposed owner, Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation. Sold to Putnam County

for $15.90.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 10149-

10151, inclusive, Map 10, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owners, Mary V. Golding and

Helen T. Ackers. Sold to Putnam County

for $15.47.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 10184-

10188, inclusive, Map 10, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Stella Korn for $18.19.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 10247

and 10248 Map 10, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, H. Golden. Sold to Putnam Coun­

ty for $13.99.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 10286

and 10287, Map 10, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, H. Golden. Sold to Putnam Coun­

ty for $13.99.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 52, 53,

54, 55, 56, Map A, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Mirror Holding Corporation.

Sold to Fred Drolet for $11.25.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 155-

156, Map A, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation. Supposed owner,

Dr. H. Statkin. Sold to Putnam County

for $14.22.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 393 to

395, inclusive, Map A, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, John Younger. Sold to Putnam

County for $12.37.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 427

and 428. Map A, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, C. D. Williams. Sold to Putnam

County for $13.68.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lot No. 444.

Map A. on map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation. Supposed owner, Sarah

Freed. Sold to Putnam County for $12.29.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 525,

526, 527, 528, 530, 531, 532, 533, 534, 535,

536, 537, 540, 541, 542, 543, 544, 564, 566,

566, 567, 574, Map A, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Arthur Smadbeck. Sold to Put­

nam County for $14.31.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 1581-

1599, inclusive, Map B, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $12.84.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots. Nos. 1963

and 1964, Map B, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Arthur Smadbeck. Sold to Put­

nam County for $11.84.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 2117-

2122, inclusive, Map B, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Stella Korn for $18.04.

A tract of land with unfinished bunga­

low thereon, situate at Putnam Lake, in

the town of Patterson, Putnam County,

New York, known as Lots Nos. 2533 and

2534, Map B, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation. Supposed owner,

Mirror Holding Corporation. Sold to

Putnam County for $27.08.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson. Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 2565-

2568, inclusive, Map B, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owners, Florence J. and Ulrich

Ellenborsen, Jr. Sold to Stella Korn for

$14.62.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 2590-

2593, inclusive, Map B, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owners, Florence and Ulrich El­

lenborsen, Jr. Sold to Stella Korn for

$17.21.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 2827

and 2828, Map C, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Mirror Holding Corporation.

Sold to Putnam County for $13.78.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 2853-

2856, inclusive, Map C, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Mirror Holding Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $15.87.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 2882

and 2883, Map C, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, N. Lucas. Sold to Putnam County

for $13.68.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 2907

and 2908, Map C, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Arthur Smadbeck. Sold to Put­

nam County for $13.99.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 3043

and 3044, Map C, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Mirror Holding Corporation.

Sold to Putnam County for $13.46.

A tract of land situate at Putnam Lake,

in the town of Patterson, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 3403

and 3404, Map C, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner. Mirror Holding Corporation.

Sold to Putnam County for $12.75.

PUTNAM VALLEY

A tract of land located near Tomp­

kins Corner, in the town of Putnam Val­

ley, Putnam County, New York, con­

taining about fifteen acres. Supposed

owners, Charles G. Austin Heirs. Sold

to Golden Rod Motor Service, Inc., for

$55.00.

A tract of land located near Barger

Street in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, containing

about two acres. Supposed owners, Heirs

of Amos and Ellas Barger. Sold to Put­

nam County for $12.85.

A tract of land located near Barger

Street, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, containing

about seven acres. Supposed owner,

Arity Barger. Sold to Golden Rod Mo­

tor Service, Inc., for $15.85.

A tract of land situate at Camp Sun-

nybrook, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plot No. 12, on a map of lands of Regal

Development Corporation filed in Put­

nam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 139C. Supposed owners, James and

Vincenta Burns. Sold to Putnam County

for $13.89.

A tract of land situate at Oscawana

Lake East in the town of Putnam Val­

ley, Putnam County, New York, known

as Plot No. 140, on a map of lands of

Wanagru Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 94A. Supposed owner, Louis Berg­

man. Sold to Putnam County for $16.65.

A tract of land situate at Oscawana

Lake East, in the town of Putnam Val­

ley, Putnam County, New York, known

as Plot No. 141, on map of lands of Wan­

agru Realty Corporation filed in Put­

nam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 94A. Supposed owner, Louis Berg­

man. Sold to Putnam County for $16.65.

A tract of land situate at Oscawana

Gardens, in the town of Putnam Val­

ley. Putnam County, New York, known

as Lots Nos. 1, 3 and 5, Block No. 12, on

map of lands of Hudson Heights Devel­

opment Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No. 112.


PAGE TWO THE BREWSTER STANDARD—ESTABLISHED 1869 THURSDAY, MAY 29, 1941

Supposed owner, Charles L. Blaine. Sold

to Putnam County for $22.66.

A tract of land situate at Oscawana

Gardens, in the town of Putnam Val­

ley, Putnam County, New York, known

as Lots Nos. 2, 4 and 6, Block No. 12, on

a map of lands of Hudson Heights De­

velopment Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No. U2.

Supposed owner, Charles L. Blaine. Sold

to Putnam County for $22.66.

A tract of land situate at Oscawana

Lake East, in the town of Putnam Val­

ley, Putnam County, New York, known

as Plot No. 142, on map of lands of

Wanagru Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under

File No. 94A Supposed owner, Louis P.

Bergman. Sold to Putnam County for

$16.65.

A tract of land with house thereon,

situate at Oscawana Lake East, in the

town of Putnam Valley, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plot No. 143, on

map of lands of Wanagru Realty Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 94A. Supposed

owner, Louis Bergman. Sold to Munici­

pal Mutual Corporation for $33.56.

A tract of land situate at Oscawana

Lake East, in the town of Putnam Val­

ley, Putnam County, New York, known

as Plot No. 144, on map of lands of

Wanagru Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 94A. Supposed owner, Louis Berg­

man. Sold to Putnam County for $16.65.

A tract of land situate at Oscawana

Lake East, in the town of Putnam Val­

ley, Putnam County, New York, known

as Plot No. 145, on map of lands of Wan­

agru Realty Corporation filed in Put­

nam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 94A Supposed owner, Louis Berg­

man. Sold to Putnam County for $16.65.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known* as

Plots Nos. 6 and 7, Black No. 64, Section

F, on map of lands of Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

185E. Supposed owner, Greta Binder-

man. Sold to Putnam County for $18.69.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 19 and 20, Block No. 23, Section C,

on map of lands of Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

185B. Supposed owner, Marion Con­

nelly. Sold to Putnam County for $18.69.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 145 and 146, Block No. 1, Section

A, on map of lands of Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

185. Supposed owner, Elizabeth Dorn-

bierer. Sold to Municipal Mutual Corpo­

ration for $22.29.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 61-63, Block No. 52, Section E, on

map of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office. Supposed owner, Joseph

Di Poalo. Sold to Putnam County for

$22.29.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 23-26, Block No. 61, Section F, on

map of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 185E. Sup­

posed owners, Michael Davis and Frank

Sargent Sold to Putnam County for

$25.87.

A tract of land situate at Abele Park,

in the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Plot No.

91, Abele Park Modified Map filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under

File No. 6E. Supposed owner, Hugh Fay.

Sold to Putnam County for $28.26.

A tract of land situate at Abele Park,

in the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lot No.

152, on Abele Park Modified Map filed

in Putnam County Clerk's Office under

File No. 6E. Supposed owner, George

D. Grundy, Sr. Sold to Putnam County

for $19.89.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 10-14, Block No. 52. Section

E, on map of lands of Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

185D. Supposed owner, Richard Giben.

Sold to Putnam County for $29.44.

A tract of land situate at Oscawana

Gardens, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plot No. 1, Block No. 2, on map of lands

of Hudson Heights Development Corpo­

ration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 112. Supposed

owner, Hudson Heights Development

Corporation. Sold to Putnam County for

$32.88.

A tract of land with house thereon,

situate at Oscawana Gardens, in the

town of Putnam Valley, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plot No. 2, Block

No. 2. on map of lands of Hudson

Heights Development Corporation filed

in Putnam County Clerk's Office under

File No. 112. Supposed owner, Hudson

Heights Development Corporation. Sold

to Municipal Mutual Corporation for

$235.28.

A tract of land situate at Oscawana

Gardens, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plot No. 3, Block No. 2, on map of lands

of Hudson Heights Development Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 112. Supposed

owner, Hudson Heights Development

Corporation. Sold to Putnam County for

$40.45.

A tract of land situate at Oscawana

Gardens, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plot No. 4, Block No. 2, on map of lands

of Hudson Heights Development Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 112. Supposed

owner, Hudson Heights Development

Corporation. Sold to Putnam County for

$37.26.

A tract of land situate at Oscawana

Gardens, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plot No. 5, Block No. 2. on map of lands

of Hudson Heights Development Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 112. Supposed

owner, Hudson Heights Development

Corporation. Sold to Putnam County for

$37.25.

A tract of land with garage thereon,

situate at Wildwood Knolls, in the town

of Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Lot No. 1, on map of

lands of Oscawana Lake Realty Cor­

poration. Supposed owners, Heirs of

Margaret Hicks. Sold to Golden Rod

Motor Service, Inc. for $41.27.

A tract of land situate at Oscawana

Gardens, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plot No. 4, Block No. 13, on map of lands

of Hudson Heights Development Cor­

poration filed in Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 112. Supposed

owner, Charles L. Blaine. Sold to Put­

nam County for $14.50.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 12 and 13, Block No. 5, Sec­

tion A on map of lands of Lake Peek-

skill Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's office under File No. 165.

Supposed owners, Charles and Mary

Hasse. Sold to Putnam County for $20.49.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 5-7, Block No. 66, Section G,

on map of lands of Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

185F. Supposed owner, Albert Jonson.

Sold to Putnam County for $22.29.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 125 and 126, Block No. 63,

Section F, on map of lands of Lake

Peekskill Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under

File No. 185E. Supposed owner, J. J. Kel-

leher. Sold to Putnam County for

$18.69.

A tract of land situate at Oscawana

Gardens, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plot No. 2, Block No. 13, on map of

lands of Hudson Heghts Development

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 112. Sup­

posed owner, Louis Lipschitz. Sold to

Putnam County for $15.23.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 237-239, Block No. 57, Sec­

tion F, on map of lands of Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

185E. Supposed owners, Cunard W. and

Juanita Lundsten. Sold to Melvina B.

Hammond for $22.29.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 61 and 62, Block No. 28, Sec­

tion C, on map of lands of Lake Peek-

skill Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

185B. Supposed owner, George Mc-

Gahan. Sold to Agnes McKiverkin for

$18.71.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 40-44, Block No. 51, Section E,

on map of lands of Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

185D. Supposed owner, William Martin.

Sold to Putnam County for $25.43.

A tract of land with house thereon,

situate at Lake Peekskill, in the town of

Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Plots Nos. 1-4, Block

No. 52, Section E, on map of lands of

Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation filed

in Putnam County Clerk's Office under

File No. 185D. Supposed owner, Herbert

K. Mason. Sold to Municipal Mutual

Corporation for $300.00.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 476 and 477, Block No. 53,

Section E, on map of lands of Lake Peek-

skill Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

185D. Supposed owner, Margaret Ma-

luch. Sold to Putnam County for $18.69.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peek-

skill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 461-463, Block No. 53. Section E,

on map of lands of Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

185D. Supposed owner, Arthur Mueller.

Sold to Putnam County for $2227.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 145 and 146, Block No. 62,

Section G, on map of lands of Lake

Peekskill Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office under

File No. 185F. Supposed owner, Mone

Realty Corporation. Sold to Putnam

County for $18.69.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 33-37. Block No. 73. Section

F. on map of lands of Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

185E. Supposed owner, Paula Nemeth.

Sold to Putnam County for $29.44.

A tract of land situate at Abele Park,

in the town of Putnam Valley, Putnam

County, New York, known as Plot No.

158, on map of lands filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under Abele Park

Modified Map. Supposed owners. Heirs

of David O'Meara. Sold to Putnam

County for $19.89.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 80 and 81, Block No. 62, Sec­

tion F. on map of lands of Lake Peek-

skill Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No.

185E. Supposed owner. Frank Oelsch-

iager. Sold to Putnam County for

$17.08.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley.

Putnam County. New York, known as

Plots Nos. 86 and 87, Block No. 64, Sec­

tion F, on map of lands of Lake Peek-

skill Realty Corporation filed in Put­

nam County Clerk's Office under File

No. 185E. Supposed owner, Helen G.

O'Meara. Sold to Putnam County for

$18.69.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 50-54, Block No. 25, Section C, on

map of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation filed In Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 185. Sup­

posed owner, Stephen Rosner. Sold to

Putnam County for $29.44.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 41-43, Block No. 53, on map of

lands of Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion filed In Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 185D. Supposed

owner, Julia Serlno. Sold to Putnam

County for $19.67.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, In the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 67-70, Block No. 23, Section C, on

map of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation filed In Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 185B. Sup­

posed owner, Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation. Sold to Putnam County for

$25.87.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 168-170, Block No. 53, Section G,

on map of lands of Lake Peekskill Real­

ty Corporation filed In Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 185F. Sup­

posed owner, Ludwig Snyder. Sold to

Putnam County for $19.87.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 45 and 46. Block No. 25, Section C,

on map of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under File No. 185B. Sup­

posed owners, James and Mary Vigard.

Sold to Putnam County for $18.69.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, In the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 10, 11 and one-half of 12, Block

No. 62, Section F. on map of lands of

Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation filed

in Putnam County Clerk's Office under

File No. 185E. Supposed owners, John

Wagner and George Rueck. Sold to Put­

nam County for $20.49.

A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Oscawana Lake, in the town

of Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York. Supposed owner, Isaac Yocum.

Sold to Municipal Mutual Corporation

for $350.00.

A tract of land with house thereon,

situate at Lake Peekskill, in the town of

Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Plots Nos. 20 and 21,

Block No. 59, Section D, on map of

lands of Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion filed In Putnam County Clerk's

Office under File No. 185C. Supposed

owner, Claude Sowden. Sold to Melvina

B. Hammond for $70.00.

A tract of land with house thereon,

situate at Lake Peekskill, In the town

of Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Plots Nos. 36-38, Block

No. 62, Section F, on map of lands of

Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation filed

in Putnam County Clerk's Office under

File No. 185E. Supposed owners, Harry

Zeitsoff and Patrick J. McCarty. Sold

to Putnam County for $78.79.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 236 and 259, Block No. 55, Section

G, on map of lands of Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation. Supposed owner,

Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation. Sold

to Putnam County for $17.76.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 114, 115 and 116, Block No. 56, Sec­

tion E, on map of lands of Lake Peeks-

kill Realty Corporation. Supposed own­

er, Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation.

Sold to Municipal Mutual Corporation

for $17.63.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 363 and 364, Block No. 53, Section

E, on map of lands of Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation. Supposed owner,

Lake Peekskill Corporation. Sold to Put­

nam County for $13.78.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, In the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107,

108, 109. 110, HI. 112. 113, Block No. 55,

Section E, on map of lands of Lake

Peekskill Realty Corporation. Supposed

owner, Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $21.04.

A tract of land situate at Lake

Peekskill, in the town of Putnam

Valley, Putnam County, New York,

known as Plot No. 235, Block No. 55,

Section G, on map of lands of Lake

Peekskill Realty Corporation. Supposed

owner. Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $14.07.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley. Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 35. 36. 37, 38, 39, 40. 41, 42. 43. 44,

Block No. 58, Section F, on map of

lands of Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion. Supposed owner. Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation. Sold to Putnam

County for $20.11.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7, 8, 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 63.

64. 65. 72. 73, 74. 75, 119. 120. 121, 125.

126. 127, 128, 129, 130, 134, 135. 143. 144.

145, 146. 147, 148, 149, 150. 151, 152, 161,

162, 1C3. 164, 165. 166. 167, 168. 169, 170.

171. 172, 173, 174, 175, 176. Block No. 60.

Section F, on map of lands of Lake

Peekskill Realty Corporation. Supposed

owner, Lake Peekskill Corporation. Sold

to Putnam County for $65.13.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley. Put­

nam County, New York, known a6

Plots Nos. 1. 2. 8. 4, 5. 6, 7, 8. 9, 10, 11,

Block No. 73. Section F, on map of lands

of Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation.

Supposed owner. Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation. Sold to Putnam County for

$20.86.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 59, 60, 61,

62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72,

185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 191, 192, 193,

194, 237, 238, 239, Block No. 57, Section

F, on map of lands of Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation. Supposed owner,

Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation. Sold

to Melvina B. Hammond for $49.47.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 4, 5, 10, 11, one-half of 12, 71, 72,

Block No. 62, Section F, on map of lands

of Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation.

Supposed owner, Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation. Sold to Putnam County for

$18.98.

A tract of land with shack thereon,

situate at Lake Peekskill, in the town

of Putnam Valley, Putnam County,

New York, known as Plots Nos. 89-91,

Block No. 62, Section F, on map of

lands of Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion. Supposed owner, Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation. Sold to Putnam

County for $34.38.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 41, 42, 43, Block No. 47, Sec­

tion D, on map of lands of Lake

Peekskill Realty Corporation. Supposed

owner, Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $14.05.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16,

17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27,

28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 65, 66, 67, 68,

69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79,

80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90,

91, 92, 93, Block No. 49, Section D, on

a map of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation. Supposed owner, Lake

Peekskill Realty Corporation. Sold to

Putnam County for $61.12.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76,

77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87,

88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98,

99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107,

108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116,

117, 118, 119, 120, 121, Block No. 50, Sec­

tion D, on map of lands of Lake

Peekskill Realty Corporation. Supposed

owner, Lake Peekskill Corporation. Sold

to Putnam County for $58.59.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16,

17, 18, Block No. 59, Section D, on map

of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty Cor­

poration. Supposed owner, Lake Peeks-

kill Realty Corporation. Sold to Putnam

County for $20.36.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16,

22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32,

33, 34, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123,

124, 125, Block No. 58, Section D, on

map of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation. Supposed owner, Lake

Peekskill Realty Corporation. Sold to

Putnam County for $38.07.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 177, 178, 179, 180, 181, 182,

183, 184, 185. 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 191,

192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 167, 198, 199, 200,

201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, Block

No. 60, Section D, on map of lands of

Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation. Sold to Putnam County

for $3821.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 41, 42, 43, Block No. 47. Sec­

tion D, on map of lands of Lake

Peekskill Realty Corporation. Supposed

owner, Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $15.25.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15,

16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27,

28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69,

70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81,

82, 83, 84, 85, 86. 87, 88. 89, 90, 91, 92, 93,

Block No. 49, Section D, on map of lands

of Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation.

Supposed owner, Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation. Sold to Putnam County for

$84.07.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 76,

76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84. 85, 86. 87,

88, 89, 90, 91. 92, 93, 94, 95, 96. 97, 98, 99,

100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108.

109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114. 115. 116, 117,

118. 119. 120. 121, Block No. 50. Section

D, on map of lands of Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation. Supposed owner,

Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation. Sold

to Putnam County for $80,31.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 363 and 364, Block No. 53,

Section E, on map of lands of Lake

Peekskill Realty Corporation. Supposed

owner. Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $15.66.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 100. 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107,

108, 109, 110. Ill, 112, 113. Block No. 55.

Section E, on map of lands of Lake

Peekskill Realty Corporation. Supposed

owner. Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $34.93.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley.

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plot No. 235. Block No. 55. Section G.

on map of lands of Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation. Supposed owner,

Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation. Sold

to Putnam County for $15.66.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 59, 60, 61. 62, 63, 64, 65, 66. 67, 68. 69.

70. 71. 72, 185. 186, 187, 188. 189, 190,

Block No. 57, Section F, on map of lands

of Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation.

Supposed owner, Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation. Sold to Putnam County for

$44.98.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, In the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 191, 192, 193, 194, Block No.

57, Section E, on map of lands of Lake

Peekskill Realty Corporation. Supposed

owner, Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $3.96.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16,

22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33,

34, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124,

125, Block No. 58, Section D, on map of

lands of Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion. Supposed owner, Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation. Sold to Putnam

County for $50.65.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43,

44, Block No. 58, Section F, on map of

lands of Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion. Supposed owner, Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation. Sold to Putnam

County for $24.03.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18,

Block No. 59, Section D, on map of

lands of Lake Peekskill Realty Cor­

poration. Supposed owner, Lake Peeks-

kill Realty Corporation. Sold to Putnam

County for $2226.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13,

63, 64, 65, 72, 73, 74, 75, 119, 120, 121, 125,

126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 134, 135, 143, 144,

145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 161,

162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168. 169, 170,

171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 176, Block No. 60,

Section F, on map of lands of Lake

Peekskill Realty Corporation. Supposed

owner, Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $92.17.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, In the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 177, 178, 179, 180, 181, 182, 183, 184,

185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 191, 192, 193,

194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201, 202,

203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, Block No. 60,

Section D, on map of lands of Lake

Peekskill Realty Corporation. Supposed

owner, Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $50.67.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 4, 5, 10, 11, one-half of 12, 71

and 72, Block No. 62, Section F, on map

of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty Cor­

poration. Supposed owner, Lake Peeks-

kill Realty Corporation. Sold to Putnam

County for $22.36.

A tract of land with house thereon,

situate at Lake Peekskill, in the town

of Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Plots Nos. 89-91, Block

No. 62, Section F, on map of lands of

Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation.

Supposed owner, Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation. Sold to Putnam County for

$44.79.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 1. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. Block No.

73, Section G, on map of lands of Lake

Peekskill Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office. Assessed,

Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation. Sold

to Putnam County for $2120.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, In the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 9, 10, 11, Block No. 73, Sec­

tion F, on map of lands of Lake Peeks-

kill Realty Corporation. Supposed own­

er, Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation.

Sold to Putnam County for $16.11.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 17, 18, 114, Block No. 1, Sec­

tion A, on map of lands of Lake

Peekskill Realty Corporation. Supposed

owner, Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion. Sold to Municipal Mutual Corpora­

tion for $37.85.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 10, 11, Block No. 5, Section A,

on map of lands of Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation. Supposed owner,

Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation.

Sold to Putnam County for $13.16.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, In the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 5, 6, 43, 44, Block No. 9. Sec­

tion B, on map of lands of Lake Peeks-

kill Realty Corporation. Supposed own­

er, Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation.

Sold to Municipal Mutual Corporation

for $25.94.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, In the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 43, 46. Block No. 16. Section

B, on map of lands of Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation. Supposed owner.

Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation. Sold

to George Hertzel for $13.08.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 59. 60. 61, Block No. 26, Sec­

tion C, on map of lands of Lake

Peekskill Realty Corporation. Supposed

owner, Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $19.62.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 109, 110, HI, Block No. 28.

Section C, on map of lands of Lake

Peekskill Realty Corporation. Supposed

owner, Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $19.62.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 41, 42. 43, Block No. 47, Sec­

tion D, on map of lands of Lake

Peekskill Realty Corporation. Supposed

owner, Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $16.94.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 6, 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

16. 17, 18, 19. 20. 21, 22. 23. 24. 25. 26, 27,

28, 29. 30. 31. 82, 33. 84, 65. 66, 67, 68, 69,

70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81,

82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93,

Block No. 49, Section D, on map of lands

of Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation.

Supposed owner Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation. Sold to Putnam County for

$8924.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75,

76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87,

88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99,

100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108,

109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117,

118, 119, 120, 121, Block No. 50, Section

D, on map of lands of Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation. Supposed owner,

Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation. Sold

to Putnam County for $84.80.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 44, 45, 46, Block No. 52, Sec­

tion E, on map of lands of Lake

Peekskill Realty Corporation. Supposed

owner, Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $22.29.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 17, 18, 19, 20, 363, 364, Block

No. 53, Section E, on map of lands of

Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation.

Supposed owner, Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation. Sold to Putnam County for

$23.09.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105,

106,107,108,109,110, 111, 112,113, Block

No. 55, Section E, on map of lands of

Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation. Sold to Putnam County for

$33.79.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 170, 171, 172, Block No. 56,

Section E, on map of lands of Lake

Peekskill Realty Corporation. Supposed

owner, Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $34.06.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 59, 60, 61. 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67,

68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189,

190, 191, 192, 193, 194, 207, 208, Block

No. 57, Section F, on map of lands of

Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation. Sold to Putnam County for

$45.50.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16,

22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32,

33, 34, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123,

124, 125. Block No. 58. Section D, on

map of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation. Supposed owner. Lake

Peekskill Realty Corporation. Sold to

Putnam County for $66.41.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, In the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42,

43, 44, Block No. 58, Section F, on map

of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty Cor­

poration. Supposed owner, Lake Peeks-

kill Realty Corporation. Sold to Putnam

County for $29.64.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 9, 10 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17,

18, Block No. 59, Section D, on map of

lands of Lake Peekskill Realty Corpora­

tion. Supposed owner, Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation. Sold to Putnam

County for $29.58.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12.

13, 63, 64, 65, 72, 73, 74, 75, 119, 120, 121,

125, 126. 127, 128. 129, 130, 134, 135, 143,

144, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 152,

161. 162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168, 169,

170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175. 176, 177, 178,

179, 180, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187,

188, 189. 190. 191, 192. 193. 194, 195, 196,

197, 198, 199, 200, 201. 202, 203, 204, 205,

206, 207, 208, Block No. 60, Section F,

on map of lands of Lake Peekskill

Realty Corporation. Supposed owner,

Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation. Sold

to Putnam County for $168.84.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 4. 5, 53, 54, 55, 56, 71, 72, Block

No. 62, Section F, on map of lands of

Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation.

Supposed owner. Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation. Sold to Putnam County for

$26.01.

A tract of land with house thereon,

situate at Lake Peekskill, In the town of

Putnam Valley, Putnam County, New

York, known as Plots Nos. 89-91, Block

No. 62, Section F, on map of lands of

Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation. Sold to Putnam County

for $47.40.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plots Nos. 1, 2. 3, 4, 5. 6, 7, 8, 9. 10, 11,

Block No. 73, Section F, on map of lands

of Lake Peekskill Realty Corporation.

Supposed owner, Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation. Sold to Putnam County

for $31.46.

County Clerk's Office under Modified

Map No. 121D. Supposed owner, Walter

Clifford Company. Sold to Putnam

County for $4124.

A tract of land situate at Abele

Park, in the town of Putnam Valley,

Putnam County, New York, known as

Plot No. 14, on map of lands of Wanagru

Realty Corporation filed in Putnam

County Clerk's Office under File No. 6E.

Supposed owner. Wanagru Realty Cor­

poration. Sold to Putnam County for

$36.64.

A tract of land situate at Oscawana

Lake, East, In the town of Putnam Val­

ley. Putnam County, New York, known

as Plots Nos. 1, 2, on map of lands of

Wanagru Realty Corporation filed in

Putnam County Clerk's Office. Sup­

posed owner, Wanagru Realty Corpora­

tion. Sold to Putnam County for $11.85.

A tract of land situate at Camp Look­

out, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 4 and 5, on map of lands of Walter

Clifford Company filed in Putnam

A tract of land situate at Camp Look­

out, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plot

A on map of lands of Walter Clifford

Company filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office under Map No. 121A. Sup­

posed owner, Walter Clifford Company.

Sold to Putnam County for $22.66.

A tract of land situate at Lake Peeks-

kill, in the town of Putnam Valley, Put­

nam County, New York, known as Plots

Nos. 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10,11,12,13, 14,15,

16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27,

28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 89,

40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51,

52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 59A, 59B, 60A, 60B,

61 A, 61B, 62A, 62B, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68,

69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80,

81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 97, 98,

69,100,109, 110, Block No. 19, Section C,

on map of lands of Lake Peekskill Realty

Corporation filed in Putnam County

Clerk's Office. Supposed owner, Lake

Peekskill Country Homes, Incorporated.

Sold to Putnam County for $173.97.

A tract of land located at Wood Street,

in the eastern part of the town of Put­

nam Valley, Putnam County, New York,

containing about five acres. Supposed

owner, Regina Russell. Sold to Thomas

Connell for $54.27.

KENT

A tract of land located near Reser­

voir D, in the eastern part of the town

of Kent, Putnam County, New York,

containing about one hundred and

thirty-four acres. Supposed owner, Ay-

veebee Corporation. Sold to Putnam

County for $111.41.

A tract of land with bungalow there­

on, located in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, containing about

two and one-half acres. Supposed

owner, Benjamin Bowering. Sold to

Putnam County for $43.15.

A tract of land with house thereon,

located at Townsend Ridge, in the east­

ern part of the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, containing about

two acres. Supposed owner, Antonia

Rina. Sold to Federal Investors, Inc. for

$200.00.

A tract of land with house thereon,

located near Kent Cliffs, in the western

part of the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, containing about

one-quarter acre. Supposed owner,

Charles Seifert, Snyder, et al. Sold to

Putnam County for $3327.

A tract of land with bungalow there­

on, located near Kent Cliffs, in the west­

ern part of the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, containing about

one-half acre. Supposed owner, Bruce

Smith. Sold to Putnam County for

$35.00.

A tract of land located near Farmers

Mills, in the central part of the town

of Kent, Putnam County, New York,

containing about ten acres. Supposed

owner, Alfred B. Stone. Sold to Har­

rison Hollander for $2725.

A tract of land located near Farmers

Mills, In the northern part of the town

of Kent, Putnam County, New York,

containing about one acre. Supposed

owner, Victor B. Tompkins. Sold to Mrs.

Cassie Tompkins for $13.17.

A tract of land with bungalow there­

on, located at White Pond Colony, In

the northern part of the town of Kent,

Putnam County, New York, at south

end of White Pond. Supposed owner,

Edward Ganong. Sold to Putnam Coun­

ty for $31.49.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as one-half

of Plot No. 361, Plots 362 and 363, on

map of lands of Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Supposed owner, Constance

Smalley. Sold to Putnam County for

$14.20.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Plots Nos. 795

to 799, Inclusive, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Stephen Magerkurch. Sold to

Putnam County for $18.37.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, In the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Plots Nos. 800

and 801, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation. Supposed owner,

Arthur Smadbeck. Sold to Putnam

County for $13.66.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Plots Nos. 802

to 811, inclusive, on a map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Arthur Smadbeck. Sold to Put­

nam County for $14.08.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, In the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

672 to 882, Inclusive, on a map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Arthur Smadbeck. Sold to

Putnam County for $23.39.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Plots Nos.

1151 and 1152, on a map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Walter Breden. Sold to Putnam

County for $14.25.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel. in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Plots Nos. 1275

to 1278, inclusive, on a map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Samuel Shalepsky. Sold

to Putnam County for $16.99.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Plots Nos. 1625

and 1626, on a map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation. Supposed owner,

George Semitta. Sold to Putnam Coun­

ty for $14.25.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Plots Nos. 1768

and 1769, on a map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation. Supposed owner.

Edwin Hogan. Sold to Putnam County

for $14.25.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel. in the town of Kent. Putnam Coun­

ty. New York, known as Plots Nos. 1770

and 1771. on a map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation. Supposed owner,

/


THURSDAY, MAY 29, 1941 THE BREWSTER STANDARD—ESTABLISHED 1869 PAGE THREE

John F. Gackstetter, Jr. or John F.

Gacksteter. Sold to Putnam County for

$17.21.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known es Plots Nos.

1932 and 1933, on a map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Virginia Campbell. Sold to Put­

nam County for $1425.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Plots Nos. 2071

and 2072, on a map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation. Supposed owner,

Samuel Shulepsky. Sold to Putnam

County for $1425.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Plots Nos. 2104

to 2108, inclusive, on a map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Samuel Shulepsky. Sold

to Putnam County for $18.37.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Plots Nos. 2262-

2272, inclusive, on a map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Arthur Smadbeck. Sold to Put­

nam County for $14.36.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Plots Nos. 2308-

2313, inclusive, on map of lands of Mir­

ror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Arthur Smadbeck. Sold to Put­

nam County for $13.47.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 2443-

2447, inclusive, on map of lands of Mir­

ror Holding Corporation. Supposed own­

er, Otto A. Merkel, Jr. Sold to Putnam

County for $18.37.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 2448-

2452, inclusive, on map of lands of Mir­

ror Holding Corporation. Supposed own­

er, John J. Healy. Sold to Putnam Coun­

ty for $18.37.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 2750-

2752, inclusive, on map of lands of Mir­

ror Holding Corporation, Supposed own­

er, Samuel Wallach. Sold to Putnam

County for $15.63.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos.

3100-3104, Inclusive, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Leonard Katz. Sold to Putnam

County for $18.37.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 3142

and 3143, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation. Supposed owner,

Edward Sullivan. Sold to Putnam Coun­

ty for $14.25.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 3203-

3208, inclusive, on map of lands of Mir­

ror Holding Corporation. Supposed own­

er, Mikka Muntter. Sold to Putnam

County for $20.60.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 3219

and 3220, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation. Supposed owner,

Dorothy Campbell. Sold to Putnam

County for $14.25.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 3231-

3235, inclusive, on map of lands of Mir­

ror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Frank Wordschek. Sold to Put­

nam County for $18.37.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

3481-3485, inclusive, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Louise Staby or Louise Staly.

Sold to Putnam County for $25.77.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

3501 and 3502, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation. Supposed owner,

Marie M. Stewart. Sold to Putnam

County for $1425.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

3516-3520, inclusive, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Cline end Barry. Sold to Putnam

County for $1827.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

3620 and 3621, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation. Supposed owner,

Louis Cuccia. Sold to Putnam County

for $1425.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Plots Nos.

3820-3827, inclusive, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, William H. Lorenzen. Sold to

Putnam County for $22.47.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

3894-3898, inclusive, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Otto Berthold. Sold to Putnam

County for $1621.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

4197-4200, inclusive, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, George Dalglesh. Sold to Putnam

County for $15.82.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

4264-4265, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation. Supposed owners,

William and M. Meades. Sold to Putnam

County for $14.25.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent. Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

4641-4645, inclusive, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Samuel Wallach. Sold to Putnam

County for $18.37.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

4646-4648, inclusive, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Dorothy Kenzie. Sold to Putnam

County for $14.74.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

4777-4779, inclusive, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Edna Omody. Sold to Putnam

County for $15.63.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

4871 and 4872, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation. Supposed owner,

James Sullivan. Sold to Putnam County

for $1425.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

4902-4904, inclusive, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Anna Reis. Sold to Putnam

County for $15.63.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

5210-5212, inclusive, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, John J. Templeton. Sold to Put­

nam County for $15.63.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

5242 and 5243, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation. Supposed owner,

Edith Sampson or Edith Hampson. Sold

to Putnam County for $1721.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

5318 and 5319, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation. Supposed owners,

Martha and C. Metz. Sold to Putnam

County for $13.66.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, In the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lot No.

5348, on map of lands of Mirror Holding

Corporation. Supposed owner, Frank

Mangerie, Jr. Sold to Putnam County

for $12.88.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

5515-5518, inclusive, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Agnes Grippen. Sold to Putnam

County for $15.82.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

5819 and 5820, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation. Supposed owner,

Catherine Baroch. Sold to Putnam

County for $1425.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

5969-5970, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation. Supposed owner,

A Shamroth. Sold to Putnam County

for $1425.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

6012-6014, inclusive, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Edward Walsh. Sold to Putnam

County for $14.74.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

6110 and 6111, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation. Supposed owner,

Howard Hitchcock. Sold to Putnam

County for $1425.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

6117-4121, inclusive, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owners, Phil and Mae Voekerath. Sold

to Putnam County for $18.37.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

6425-6429, inclusive, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Edward Brossman. Sold to

Putnam County for $1827.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

6487 and 6488, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation. Supposed owner,

Dorothy H. LeMien. Sold to Putnam

County for $13.66.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car-

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 6553-

6555, inclusive, on map of lands of Mir

ror Holding Corporation. Supposed own

er, Charlotte Winston. Sold to Putnam

County for $15.63.

A tract of land with bungalow there­

on, situate at Lake Carmel, in the town

of Kent, Putnam County, New York,

known as Lots Nos. 6559-6562, inclu­

sive, on map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation. Supposed owner, Elsie

Snoeck. Sold to Putnam County for

$37.42.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 6563-

6567, inclusive, on map of lands of Mir­

ror Holding Corporation. Supposed own­

er, A Smadbeck. Sold to Putnam Coun­

ty for $13.68.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town, of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty. New York, known as Lots Nos. 6642-

6646, inclusive, on map of lands of Mir­

ror Holding Corporation. Supposed own­

er, John Fitzgerald. Sold to Putnam

County for $18.37.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel. in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, Known as Lots Nos. 7342

and 7343, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation. Supposed owner,

Sam Kastenown. Sold to Putnam Coun­

ty for $14 25.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel. in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty. New York, known as Lots Nos. 7395-

7388. inclusive, on map of lands of Mir­

ror Holding Corporation. Supposed own­

er, William Frank Nolle. Sold to Put­

nam County for $16.99.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 7399-

7402, inclusive, on map of lands of Mir­

ror Holding Corporation. Supposed own­

er, Elsie Syring. Sold to Putnam Coun­

ty for $16.99.

A tract of land with bungalow there­

on, situate at Lake Carmel, in the town

of Kent, Putnam County, New York,

known as Lots Nos. 7407-7409, inclusive,

on map of lands of Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Supposed owners, George and

Lillian Haarman. Sold to Federal In­

vestors, Inc., for $37.23.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 7574-

7578, inclusive, on map of lands of Mir­

ror Holding Corporation. Supposed own­

er, Anna Danfelt Sold to Putnam Coun­

ty for $18.37.

A tract of land with bungalow there­

on, situate at Lake Carmel, in the town

of Kent, Putnam County, New York,

known as Lots Nos. 7701-7704, inclusive,

on map of lands of Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Supposed owner, Arthur Bur­

rows. Sold to Joseph Herlihy for $20.14.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 7833

and 7834, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation. Supposed own­

ers, Joseph and Kate Grieco. Sold to

Putnam County for $14.25.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 7869

and 7870, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation. Supposed owner,

William O'Hara. Sold to Putnam Coun­

ty for $1721.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 7917-

7920, inclusive, on map of lands of Mir­

ror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Leo Daubeck. Sold to Putnam

County for $16.99.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos.

8007 and 8008, on map of lands of Mir­

ror Holding Corporation. Supposed own­

er, Ellen Perry. Sold to Putnam Coun­

ty for $14.25.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lot No. 8072,

on map of lands of Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Supposed owner, Mathew Gib-

ney. Sold to Putnam County for $12.88.

A tract of land with bungalow there­

on, situate at Lake Carmel, in the town

of Kent, Putnam County, New York,

known as Lots Nos. 8815-8820, inclusive,

on map of lands of Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Supposed owner, Angelius Na-

politano. Sold to Federal Investors, Inc.,

for $37.02.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 8869

and 8870, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation. Supposed owner,

Aaron Gottlieb. Sold to Putnam County

for $14.25.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 8897

and 8898, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation. Supposed owner,

Guido Silvaggi. Sold to Putnam County

for $14.25.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 8989-

8993, inclusive, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Charles Bard. Sold to Putnam

County for $16.91.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 9141-

9145, inclusive, on map of lands of Mir­

ror Holding Corporation. Supposed own­

er, Samuel Shelupsky. Sold to Putnam

County for $18.37.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 9393-

9295, inclusive, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Robert Hart well. Sold to Putnam

County for $15.63.

A tract of land with bungalow thefe-

on, situate at Lake Carmel, in the^own

of Kent, Putnam County, New York,

known as Lots Nos. 9302-9304, inclusive,

on map of lands of Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Supposed owner, Samuel

Rosenberg. Sold to Federal Investors,

Inc., for $43.03.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 9363-

9366, inclusive, on map of lands of Mir­

ror Holding Corporation. Supposed own­

er, A Smadbeck. Sold to Putnam Coun­

ty for $12.82.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel. in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 9412,

9413, 9414, 9417, 9418, 9419, 9420, 9421.

9422, 9429, 9430, 9431, 9432, on map of

lands of Mirror Holding Corporation.

Supposed owner, A. Smadbeck. Sold to

Putnam County for $20.70.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos. 9504,

9505, 9506, 9507, 9508, 9509, 9510, 9511.

9515, 9516, 9517, 9518. 9519, on map of

lands of Mirror Holding Corporation.

Supposed owner, Mirror Holding Cor­

poration or A. Smadbeck. Sold to Put­

nam County for $17.97.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

9736 and 9737, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation. Supposed owner,

Linda Chille. Sold to Putnam County

for $14.25.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

9766-9768, inclusive, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, W. J. King. Sold to Putnam

County for $15.63.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County. New York, known as Lots Nos.

9989-9990. on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation. Supposed owner.

Sidonia Butler. Sold to Putnam County

for $1425.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

9993 and 9994, on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation. Supposed owner,

Olga F. Perry. Sold to Alfred A Doherty

for $13.66.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

10108-10110, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Hedwig Kuhn. Sold to

Putnam County for $15.63.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

10281-10284, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, A. Smadbeck. Sold to Put­

nam County for $12.84.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

10367-10371, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Antonia Sinatra. Sold to

Putnam County for $18.37.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

10551-10553, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Helen A Licorsl. Sold to

Putnam County for $15.63.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

10917 and 10918, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Philip Faingnert. Sold to Putnam

County for $13.66.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

11058 and 11059, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, John J. Durr. Sold to Putnam

County for $13.66.

A tract of land with bungalow thereon,

situate at Lake Carmel, in the town of

Kent, Putnam County, New York,

known as Lots Nos. 11131-11133, inclu­

sive, on map of lands of Mirror Holding

Corporation. Supposed owner, Julia

Fanning. Sold to Federal Investors, Inc.

for $43.03.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

11161-11165, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, A Smadbeck. Sold to Put­

nam County for $13.15.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

11363-11366, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, A. Smadbeck. Sold to Put­

nam County for $1629.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

11369-11383, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, A. Smadbeck. Sold to Put­

nam County for $16.46.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

11384-11388, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, A. Smadbeck. Sold to Put­

nam County for $1828.

A tract of land with bungalow there­

on, situate at Lake Carmel, in the town

of Kent, Putnam County, New Yorla

known as Lots Nos. 11434 and 11435, on

map of lands of Mirror Holding Cor­

poration. Supposed owner, William H.

Baxter. Sold to Joseph Herlihy for

$25.20.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

11572 and 11573, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Lydia Deacon. Sold to Putnam

County for $14.25.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

11748 and 11749, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Nina Berlingo. Sold to Putnam

County for $14.25.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

11763-11765, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Dr. Harry H. Schilkret.

Sold to Putnam County for $15.63.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

11865-11866. on map of lands of Mirror

Holding Corporation. Supposed owner,

A Smadbeck. Sold to Putnam County

for $14.25.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

11892-11895, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, A Smadbeck. Sold to Put­

nam County for $16.99.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

11896 and 11897, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, A. Smadbeck. Sold to Putnam

County for $1425.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

11935-11940, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, A. Smadbeck. Sold to Put­

nam County for $19.73.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

11949-11954, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, A. Smadbeck. Sold to Put­

nam County for $13.48.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

11955 and 11956, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, John Martinez. Sold to Putnam

County for $13.66.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lot No­

ll 978, on map of lands of Mirror Holding

Corporation. Supposed owner, A. Smad­

beck. Sold to Putnam County for $11.84.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

12003-12006, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Nina Berlingo. Sold to

Putnam County for $16.99.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

12558 and 12559, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Lillian Keenan. Sold to Putnam

County for $1425.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

12616-12619, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, George Brown. Sold to

Putnam County for $22.91.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lot No.

12668, on map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation. Supposed owner, Ray­

mond Martin, Jr. Sold to Putnam

County for $12.88.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

12808-12812, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Joseph Sevick. Sold to

John Rantter for $18.37.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

12905 and 12908, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, A. Smadbeck. Sold to Putnam

County for $14.25.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

13039-13042, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, A Smadbeck. Sold to Put­

nam County for $12.55.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

13147-13150, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Elizabeth Jackson. Sold to

Putnam County for $16.99.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

13292 and 13293, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Max Michelma. Sold to Putnam

County for $14.25.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

13298-13300, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Mary Mead. Sold to Put­

nam County for $15.63.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

13336 and 13337, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, John Camperlango. Sold to Put­

nam County for $14.25.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

13501-13505, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Agnes M. George. Sold to

Putnam County for $16.91.

A tract of land with bungalow there­

on, situate at Lake Carmel, in the town

of Kent, Putnam County, New York,

known as Lots Nos. 13720-13724, inclu­

sive, on map of lands of Mirror Holding

Corporation. Supposed owners, J. and M.

Camperlango. Sold to Federal Investors,

Inc. for $62.22.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lota Nos.

13842-13846, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, A Smadbeck. Sold to Put­

nam County for $1827.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

14057-14062, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, L. C. Behring. Sold to

Herbert G. Wieland for $17.88.

owner, Charles Moldt. Sold to Minerva

Birmingham for $1425.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

14651-14660, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, A. Smadbeck. Sold to Put­

nam County for $24.13.

A tract of land situate of Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

14667-14677, inclusive, and Nos. 14681-

14685, inclusive, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, A Smadbeck. Sold to Putnam

County for $33.45.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

14699-14706, inclusive, and Nos. 14715-

14722, inclusive, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, A. Smadbeck. Sold to Putnam

County for $16.77.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

14733-14735, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Anna Smith. Sold to Put­

nam County for $15.63.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

14736-14738, inclusive, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Katherlne Liston. Sold to Put­

nam County for $14.74.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

15042-15045, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owners, A. and M. Parour. Sold

to Putnam County for $16.99.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots No. 15046-

15047, on map of lands of Mirror Hold­

ing Corporation. Supposed owners, Clar­

ence McClure. Sold to Putnam County

for $14.25.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos.

15082-15087, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, A Smadbeck. Sold to Put­

nam County for $13.48.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos.

15226-15256, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, A. Smadbeck. Sold to Put­

nam County for $21.71.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos.

15331-15333, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Samuel Wallach. Sold to

Putnam County for $15.65.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos.

15352 and 15353, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, J. Saccomanno. Sold to Putnam

County for $14.25.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos.

15408-15411, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, J. Saccamano. Sold to Put­

nam County for $16.99.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos.

15480-15486, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, A. Smadbeck. Sold to Put­

nam County for $13.82.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos.

15667 and 15668, on map of lands of Mir­

ror Holding Corporation. Supposed own­

er, A. Smadbeck. Sold to Putnam Coun­

ty for $12.16.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos.

16196-16200, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Harriett Wheeler. Sold to

Putnam County for $18.37.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos.

16233-16239, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, A Smadbeck. Sold to Put­

nam County for $13.82.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos.

16282-16285, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, A Smadbeck. Sold to Put­

nam County for $12.54.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos.

16342 and 16343, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Clara K Smith. Sold to Putnam

County for $13.66.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos.

16409-16414, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Samuel Wallach. Sold to

Putnam County for $19.73.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos.

16624-16626, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, A. Smadbeck. Sold to Put­

nam County for $15.63.

A tract of land situate at L,ake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos.

16942-16946, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Joseph Monahan. Sold to

Putnam County for $16.91.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos.

17352-17356, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Harold Ritch. Sold to Put­

nam County for $18.37.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos.

17386-17390, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Thomas Reilly. Sold to

Putnam County for $18.37.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam Coun­

ty, New York, known as Lots Nos.

17708 and 17709, on map of lands of Mir­

ror Holding Corporation. Supposed own­

er, A Smadbeck. Sold to Putnam Coun­

ty for $12.16.

EDWARD D. STANNARD,

Treasurer of Putnam County.

Buck Fever

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

14107-14109, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Julian Muller. Sold to

Herbert G. Wieland for $15.63.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

14224-14228, inclusive, on map of lands

of Mirror Holding Corporation. Sup­

posed owner, Leonard Amberg. Sold to

Vera Callis for $18.37.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

14249-14253, inclusive, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Leonard Amberg. Sold to Vera

Callis for $18.37.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

14304 and 14305, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owner, Raymond Monahan. Sold to Put­

nam County for $18.66.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

14513 and 14514, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

owners, George and H. Kalden. Sold to

Putnam County for $14.25.

A tract of land with bungalow there­

on situate at Lake Carmel, in the town

of Kent, Putnam County, New York,

known as Lots Nos. 14611-14613, inclu­

sive, on map of lands of Mirror Holding

Corporation. Supposed owner, Blanche

Brighton. Sold to Joseph Herlihy for

$43.03.

A tract of land situate at Lake Car­

mel, in the town of Kent, Putnam

County, New York, known as Lots Nos.

14633 and 14634, on map of lands of

Mirror Holding Corporation. Supposed

Twin Hankies

This young fellow's predicament

won first prise in a national flash

photography contest. Even though

he's well armed, the little hunter

seems to have buck (ever upon

sighting the ferocious (teddy) bear.

O

Don't tolte my

WORD fa ii!

r -

4^M

M

• ^^H

"

JH

i Q

m

.j||

EO

0*

' * •

l- - I

i 4 ^ I

L " '•?

^

FRANK COLBY

ALIAS

HEINOUS

FELONIOUS

• • •

Today's words are the Unholy

Three of the average vocabulary.

Even among speakers of the highest

education these mispronunciations

are frequently noted: "uh-LYE-uss,

HEE-nee-uss, FELL-on-uss."

Alias should be accented on the

first syllable. The "a" is long as

in day: AY-lee-uss.

HEINOUS has but two syllables.

Accent the first which is exactly like

the word hay: HAY-nuss.

Felonious has four syllables. The

accent falls on the second: fell-OH-

nee-uss.

(Capitals indicate syllables to be

accented.)

• • •

Question: How should one pro­

nounce dishabille? A. S. G.

Answer: Not "DISH-uh-bill" as is

so frequently heard. This French

word is now Anglicized. The first

syllable rhymes with miss, not dish.

Accent the third syllable, which

rhymes with feel: diss-uh-BEEL.

UJcU Syndltiiu— WNU 5*» vitc.)

Striking accessory notes are a

fashion "must" this season. Your

quest for novelty and chic should

lead you to the handkerchief counter

where you will be rewarded with a

real "find" in the way of plaid

hankies: The "trick" is to wear

these plaids in pairs, as here shown.

You may choose these hankies in

little pin checks or big bold plaids,

with background colors that match

or blend with the latest colors. These

hankies never fail to add that dash

of spice to the always smart, simple

suit.

MJBRB YOU

BITT£M

OM TH£

Pft£jw\l6£&

N^*

^T

£

H>OkfrfrA0W

MUCH A0OLTT

AMATOMY*

toU I GDUUM

«1T T7OL0M

FOR A.

uueeK.:

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l*»ut»Uc Ledger—WNU Service.)

O


PAGE FOUR THE BREWSTER STANDARD—ESTABLISHED 1869 THURSDAY, MAY 29, 1941

by Thornton W

Burgess c^J

SOME LITTLE PEOPLE PUT

THEIR HEADS TOGETHER

"Either Peter*§ crazy,

Or else he's dreadful lacy."

T*HAT is the word that Sammy

•*• Jay passed among Peter Rabbit's

friends in the Green Forest

and on the Green Meadows. Then

he told how he had found Peter sitting

half asleep in the beginning of

what he meant should be a path

through the bramble-tangle on the

edge of the Green Forest, and how

Peter had indignantly insisted that

he was working, like Striped Chip-

"Wouldn't it be fun if we could

really make him work?" said Danny

Meadow Moose.

munk and Happy Jack Squirrel, preparing

for winter.

Jimmy Skunk chuckled. "Why,

Peter doesn't know what work is,"

said he. "It would do him good

to learn."

"Do you suppose he could learn?"

asked Johnny Chuck, looking very

doubtful.

"Wouldn't it be fun if we could

really make him work?" said Danny

Meadow Mouse, who is himself a

very industrious little fellow.

"Work! Ho, ho, ho. Peter Rabbit

work!" Sammy Jay shouted right

out. "Why, Peter Rabbit couldn't

work if he tried. He doesn't know

how. He'd go to sleep right in the

middle of it or he'd go to dreaming,

which amounts to the same thing.

It would be a great joke to make

him, but it can't be done."

"I'm not so sure about that," said

Bobby Coon. "Where.did you say

THAT first coating of nail wax

that you use for your manicure is

a real "must" for your pedicure,

too. It fills the little ridges and rough

spots that often appear on the nails

of toes. So the polish flows on more

smoothly. Polish is, therefore, lots

easier to remove later.

iRHeased by Western Ncwtpuper Union.I

he was working, or thought he was

working?"

"In the bramble-tangle on the

edge of the Green Forest," replied

Sammy. "He thinks he's going to

cut paths all through it so as to

have them ready for use in time of

danger when the snow is deep and

he would find it hard work to reach

the dear Old Briar Patch. But you

know Peter! He'll never do it in

the world. He never does anything

until he has to. He'll fool around

there for a few days trying to make

himself believe that he is working

and then he'll give it up and forget

all about it until some time when he

really needs those paths and hasn't

got 'em."

"Br'er Rabbit needs to be saved

from hisself," chuckled Unc' Billy

Possum. "Ah reckon that if we'uns

put our haids together we'uns may

be able to make Br'er Rabbit cut

those paths and learn what it is to

really work. It cert'nly would be

a joke. What was yo' idea, Br'er

Coon?" v

"Why," replied Bobby Coon, pulling

his whiskers thoughtfully, "I

thought that if some time, when Peter

is over at the bramble-tangle we

could make him think that Reddy

Fox was coming and that he couldn't

possibly reach the Old Briar Patch

he would go to work on those paths

right smart. Nothing but a good

scare will ever make Peter work."

Unc' Billy nodded his head approvingly.

"Nothing easier in the

world," said he. "Br'er Jay can

just keep an eye on Br'er Rabbit,

and when he sees him over by the

bramble-tangle he can pass the word

along to Br'er Fox, and as soon as

he sees Br'er Fox coming he can

give Br'er Rabbit warning. Br'er

Rabbit will be for starting right

away fo' the 01' Briar Patch, but if

Br'er Hawk just happens (Unc' Billy

smiled when he said that) to be

sailing about at that time Br'er Rabbit

done gwine to get into that

bramble-tangle somehow, and he's

gwine to be so mighty uncomfortable

that he will be cutting paths

before he knows it."

"Ha, ha, ha! The very thing!"

cried Sammy Jay. "Let's try it."

And as the others were quite willing

they all put their heads together

and planned just how they would

play a joke on Peter Rabbit and

teach him what real work is.

(Associated Newspapers—WNU Service.)

Go 'Way!

With aU Brooklyn at his disposal,

this nervy fly selected the cute nose

of Elizabeth Field. Her reaction is

quite natural, for who wants to be a

landing field for a fly, even if it is

friendly?

Today's Crown of Thorns

^

Witch' Slayer's

Story Is Upheld;

Given Freedom

Governor Orders Release of

Killer After Hearing

'Evil Eye' Story.

DENVER.—A tale about an "Indian

witch" who terrorized the people

of southwestern Colorado's high

mesa country with his "evil eye"

has won freedom from prison for

32-year-old Alfonso Tafdya.

Gov. Ralph L. Carr ordered Tafoya's

immediate release from the

state penitentiary when he received

confirmation of the convict's story

that he killed the "Evil Eye Man"

in 1936 "because he used his powers

to force my wife to make love

to him."

"This man's story is as strange

as any tale that was ever told of

the evil eye, sorcery and witchcraft,"

the governor said as he

commuted Tafoya's 18-to-25-year

sentence for second-degree murder.

The governor said a reign of terror

began in the mesa country shortly

after a man named "Indian

Mike" Navarro rode in on a burro

back in 1929.

Navarro stopped at the Tafoya

home and announced: "I'm Indian

Mike. Indian Mike has great powers."

Mumbo-Jumbo Man.

To prove it, Indian Mike mumbled

a few words over Mrs. Tafoya,

who had been ill.

"The Indians and Spanish-Americans

of that isolated country swear

the woman was made well immediately,"

the governor said. "After

that Indian Mike was a big man in

the mesa country."

Boasting loudly about his supernatural

powers, Indian Mike lived

off the fat of the land for several

years. Then people began to doubt

his prowess.

"So Indian Mike announced that

he had put a hex on Tafoya's sister,"

the governor's story goes.

"The girl died—and Indian Mike

was feared again."

The governor said he had gathered

evidence that the Indian used

his reputation to force his attentions

on women of the district.

"One night in 1936 Tafoya learned

that his wife was one of Indian

Mike's unwilling victims," the governor

said. "He took his hunting rifle

and put five bullets in the man."

Pleaded to Charge.

Alfonso went into District court

at Durango and pleaded guilty. The

judge sentenced him to from 18 to

25 years in prison.

For four years Tafoya was a

model convict. Then the governor,

who had investigated his story for

many months, decided the man was

telling the truth.

"I freed him," he said, "because

he shot to protect his home."

Tafoya has gone back to his wife

and three children in the mesas near

Bayfield. Now he is the big man

in the mesa country, because he ended

the reign of terror by killing Indian

Mike.

The Indians and Spanish-Americans

near Bayfield have served notice

they want no more "Indian

Mikes" with "evil eyes" in their

neighborhood.

Governor Carr said the citizens of

the area hanged a man—half Indian

and half Negro—who posed as a

witch shortly after Indian Mike was

killed.

"Federal men cut him down before

he died and the people of Bayfield

are sure he's still running," the

governor said.

Drouth? Colorado Farmer

Gets Too Much Water!

GREELEY, COLO.—While most

irrigation farmers are complaining

of a shortage of water, Albert Hengelfe,

Weld county farmer, is objecting

to getting too much. Hengelfe

has filed a $3,620 damage suit

against a neighbor, Fred Ehrman,

charging that an excess flow of

water from the Ehrman farm has

inundated 35 acres of corn.

Douglas, Ariz., Boasts

Unusual Church Square

DOUGLAS, ARIZ.—Douglas residents

believe their city has the only

"church square" in America.

Four churches are situated on

each corner of one block in the city.

The block is enclosed by an iron

fence.

Churches in the "square" include

Episcopal, Methodist, Baptist and

Presbyterian.

Gunsmith's Wife Walks In

On Holdup, Routs Bandits

STAFFORD, KAN.—Mrs. F. L.

Heyens walked in on three men

holding up her husband in his gun

shop. Ignoring their shouted "Hands

up!" she opened fire. One surrendered.

The other two fled, but were

captured after a 90-mile-an-hour

chase by sheriff's officers.

There Is No Shortage

Of Grandparents Here

TIPTON. IND.-Lynda Marie Burton,

daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert

Burton, who was born a few

weeks ago, lias an ample quota of

grandparents. Living are a greatgreat

- grandmother, four greatgrandparents

and tliree grandparents.

:*:::::*:*:V:!:!:::!:tJ!:t::::5:J:t^

THRIFT CUTS—MORE MEAT FOR YOUR MONEY

(See Recipes Below)

MEATS FOR BUDGET MEALS

If you're meat-wise, then you're

budget-wise! For the less expensive

cuts of meat have

a way of making

food dollars really

s-t-r-e-t-c-h.

What's more,

the thrift cuts of

meat are equally

as chock full of

flavor, healthguardingvitamins,body-building

proteins and minerals as the

more expensive ones. When you

buy a chuck roast instead of chops;

hamburger instead of steak; or baby

beef liver instead of calves liver,

your economy isn't depriving your

family or guests of even a teeny,

weeny bit of food value. That's the

verdict of nutrition experts. And

they know.

Economy in purchasing meat

comes from knowing the wide variety

of different meat cuts available,

and from purchasing some of the

cuts which are not in greatest demand.

For example, a pot roast of

beef, delicious as it is and as much

as it is enjoyed by everyone, sells

for considerably less per pound than

a rib roast of

beef. The reason,

of course, is that

there is a greater

demand for rib

roast.

You'll surely be

pleased, and surprised,

too, at the

way you can save

money on your

food budget, at the same time adding

variety to both your family and

company meals, by following to­

-day's penny-pincher recipes.

•Stuffed Shoulder of Lamb.

How to Buy: Good quality lamb is

pinkish and well-marbled with fat.

Outside fat is smooth, hard, glossy

and cream-white. Look for both government

inspection stamp and packer's

private grade stamp. Find the

grade that suits you, then always

buy it. Ask your meat man to bone

the shoulder, leaving a cavity to fill

with stuffing. (You can use the

bones for broth, soup or gravy

stock.)

How to Cook: Prepare a well-seasoned

stuffing; fill cavity, then sew

up edges or skewer in place. Weigh

meat after stuffing to compute cooking

time. Place fat side up on rack

in open pan, rub with salt and pepper.

Cook in slow oven (325 degrees

F.), allowing about 35 minutes

per pound. Garnish with mint

leaves and a vegetable; serve. Delicious!

Dressing for Lamb.

2 slices bacon NJ

2 cups bread crumbs

1 cup sour apples, chopped

1 cup raisins

% cup celery, chopped

Fry bacon until crisp and add to

bread crumbs, raisins, diced apples

and celery. Season with salt and

pepper and pile lightly into cavity

in lamb shoulder.

Eye-of-Round Roast.

How to Buy: The lean of beef

should be well-marbled with fat,

firm, smooth, glossy: soon after the

meat is cut, the surface should turn

bright red. The outer fat should

be fairly thick, firm, flaky, creamwhite.

In lower grades fat is softer,

yellower. Though price per

pound will perhaps exceed that of

rib roast, it is all solid meat—no

bones, no fat, no waste of any kind.

LYNN SAYS:

Spread apple or crabapple jelly

over tiie top of roasting ham,

veal or pork for the last 30 minutes.

The jelly gives an appetizing

flavor and a glossy brown top.

Crumbled bacon adds a wonderful

new flavor to cooked green

beans, yellow or white squash,

browned navy beans or spinach.

Add the bacon in the last 5 minutes.

Long, slow cooking at a low

heat is the general rule for cooking

the thrifty cuts of meat.

Ranking low on the butcher's

price list but high in nutrition

are such meats as kidney, brains,

heart and liver. They make delicious

dishes when properly

cooked.

THIS WEEK'S MENU

Cream of Pea Soup

•Stuffed Shoulder of Lamb

Parsley Buttered Potatoes

Buttered Carrot Strips

Sweet Cabbage Relish

Peppermint Ice Cream

Chocolate Cup Cakes

•Recipe Given

It goes a long way. For best results,

slice very thin.

How to Cook: Put meat, well covered

with fat, on rack in open roasting

pan. Sprinkle with salt and

pepper. Place in moderate oven

(325 degrees F.) and allow about

25 minutes per pound for rare beef,

28 to 30 for medium and about 35

for well done. Do not baste. Potatoes

may be cooked in same pan

with roast.

Swedish Meat Balls.

(Serves 6)

2 pounds finely ground beef

1 cup mashed potato

% cup apple sauce

Vk teaspoons salt

Mi teaspoon pepper

VA teaspoon nutmeg

Shortening

1 can vegetable soup

Vi cup milk

Combine beef, potato, apple sauce

and seasonings. Roll into small balls

the size of a walnut. Brown well in

hot shortening, in baking dish. Pour

on soup and milk and bake in moderate

oven (375 degrees F.). Thicken

gravy; serve.

Cubed Steak With Vegetables.

Cube 1 pound of thrifty cut of

steak, such as round or chuck.

Brown it in hot fat. Add 1 cup boiling

water and 1 teaspoon cornstarch,

mixed with a little cold water, and

salt and pepper to taste. Stir until

mixture is boiling. Add' 1 large

green pepper cut into squares, and

2 large sweet onions cut into eighths.

Cover and simmer until steak is

tender. Add 2 large tomatoes cut in

eighths and cook 2 minutes longer.

The gravy may be seasoned with a

few drops of seasoning sauce. Serve

at once. Boiled rice is an excellent

accompaniment.

Stuffed Flank Steak.

(Serves 6)

1 flank steak (about 1% to 2 lbs.)

4 cups dry bread

l k cup milk

% cup boiling water

VA cup butter

Vt cup finely chopped onion

Vi cup finely chopped parsley

1 egg

\Vt teaspoons salt

Pepper

Have your butcher score the steak

and cut a pocket in it. Break the

bread into small

pieces. Mix milk

and boiling water.

Pour over

bread and let soak

until soft. Melt

the butter, add

onion and cook

without browning,

about 5 minutes.

Add to

bread-milk mixture the parsley,

beaten egg, salt and pepper. Press

this stuffing into the pocket of the

steak. Bake in a shallow pan, uncovered,

in a moderate oven (350

degrees) two hours. Slice it generously

and garnish with sprigs of

crisp parsley.

There's plenty of good, substantial

eating in stuffed flank steak, so

the rest of the meal can be simple.

A vegetable (stewed tomatoes,

beans or cauliflower, perhaps); dessert

and beverage would round out

a satisfying, appealing menu.

Veal Birds With Mushroom Sauce.

2 pounds veal round

bread stuffing

3 tablespoons flour

3 tablespoons lard

salt and pepper

1 small can mushroom soup

Have veal round cut into one-half

inch slices. Cut into pieces for individual

servings as nearly 2 by 4

inches in size as possible. Place a

spoonful of stuffing on each piece,

roll and fasten edge with toothpicks.

Dredge with flour and brown on all

sides in hot lard. Season. Pour

mushroom soup over veal birds,

cover and cook very slowly until

done, about 45 minutes.

For variety, instead of using a

bread stuffing, spread finely chopped

onion over the meat, place a partially

cooked carrot ui the center,

roll and fasten.

lUcit'^M-d l>> \Vvelvili!lit:» , »picr Uuluaj

Summer Blacks Give

Contrast to Colors

Dark Suits of Faille, Crepe

Noticed in Fashiondom.

By CHERIE NICHOLAS

In sharp contrast to the color excitement

that is now going on in

fashion realms at top speed, comes

the message of renowned enthusiasm

for "summer blacks."

The trend to stylish, summery

blacks is noted in advance dress and

millinery collections. "Just now interest

centers about stunning suits

neatly tailored of black silk faille or

crepe. For immediate wear there's

nothing smarter than a black faille

redingote or jacket suit enhanced by

frothy white frills. Black faille and

black taffeta are favorites for slim

and demure classic daytime dresses

which serve so effectively as a background

for the alluring while lingerie

accents.

A vast program of summery black

sheers is on the way. These take

on enchanting touches of neckwear

and costume jewelry. Many of these

sheers are lavishly pleated. Some

are lace trimmed. The newest whim

of fashion is the detachable apron of

matching black sheer, often lacebordered.

The cause of black is eloquently

set forth in hats that are daringly

wide of brim. Style-minded women

are wearing handsome huge black

Milans with their gay print frocks,

and the fashion will gain momentum

when the summer program gets into

full swing. Very much in the picture

are immense underarm bags of

shiny patent leather, together with

matching pumps that have pert

bows.

Sheer Redingote

One of the big successes of the

season in daytime costumes is the

print crepe frock with a redingote of

monotone sheer. For the very attractive

model pictured, Evelyn Alden

designed a sheer navy coat,

topping a scatter-dot printed cape

dress. Interesting and new is toe

traunto detail on the high-positioned

twin pockets on the coat. These

sheer redingotes are sure to prove

a happy possession, as they will

serve as a separate summer wrap

over your light frocks.

Lace in Demand

Lace is being used for everything,

dresses, coats, hats, bags, gloves. A

new entrant is the little knifepleated

shoulder cape of sheerest

lace.

The new redingotes, made of

sturdy cotton or linen allover lace,

are good looking. Make them up in

white or pastels. You will find that

the lace redingote serves as a

charming summer wrap.

Fads and Fancies

Like to embroider? If so,

there's inspiration to do and to

dare, for smart slack suits are

now being trimmed with elaborately

embroidered pockets. A

word to the ambitious is sufficient.

A newcomer in the millinery

realm is the hat with the two-way

brim. Turn the softly styled wide

brim up and you have the latest

pompadour type to be worn back

on the head. Turn it down and it

plays the role of the very fashionable

"covered wagon" drooping

brim that frames the face and

the pompadour hair-do in a picturesque

manner.

The dress with the transparent

yoke is front-page fashion news.

If you are handy at "fixing over,"

a yoke of colorful chiffon or other

silk sheer might be the means of

transforming a dress with a nonetoo-flattering

neckline into a gay

little flatterer. You could make

the yoke first and baste it in, cutting

toe cloth of the dress underneath

away. This is an especially

clever way of giving a summery

look to a simple black frock

you've perhaps worn all winter.

Heart on Wrong Side,

He Passes Army Test

NEW YORK. — Army dootors

who examined Francis Rice, 21

years old, called in the draft, told

him he was in good health and

would be accepted—although his

heart, liver and appendix were all

on the wrong side of his body. He

was cautioned to inform the examining

doctor of this condition in

the event of illness to prevent inaccurate

diagnosis.

Big Yarn but U. S.

Won't Swallow It

Sailor Spins Saga of Sea

That's Real Thriller.

DETROIT.—Boasting of experience

that would furnish ample material

for several books, world adventure

series, movie plots and radio

thrillers, it appeared that life had

just begun at 20 for Corin Parrish,

British seaman, soldier adventurer

—and deserter.

A brief synopsis of the Parrish

story was unfolded in the young adventurer's

cell, during an interview

at the immigration detention home.

The yarn began by a flight from

home, Wombwell, England, five

years ago; an 18-month campaign

in Spain; life aboard ship through

tropical storms; running battles

with bombing planes and submarines;

life on a raft after his ship

had been sunk from under his feet;

flight aboard a ship leaving Antwerp

as the German hordes poured in;

bombings at Dunkerque; bombing

in the English channel, the same

in English and Welsh ports, etc.,

etc., etc.

"Yes, I've seen life in the raw,"

Parrish told his audience with a

yawn. "I suppose they are going

to ship me back to it all. But what

do I care? What else can happen

to me?"

Parrish was arrested through an

anonymous phone tip. Immigration

flies charge that he deserted a Belgian

ship at New Orleans August 2,

together with another youth.

The young sailor had a different

version.

This included brutal officers;

slimy food; faulty navigation, which

he said landed them up the coast

of Florida instead of the Gulf, mutiny

and finally a strike of 30 of the

crew of 40.

"They threw 30 of us off the ship

at New Orleans and took her back

to England with a crew of Mexican

laborers," he said.

It is this flair for detail that left

the immigration inspectors unimpressed

with the balance of the

story. The ship's papers, they said,

revealed that only two of its crew

had come ashore at any time, and

these two, Parrish and his friend,

had simply deserted.

Girl Pulls Off Patriotic

Pants as Mexico Cheers

MEXICO CITY. — "Never," said

Verduguillo, the famous bull fight

authority, "has anything like it happened

at a bull fight."

He was referring to the compliment

paid Matador Carlos Arruza

by a beautiful American girl at the

fight.

Arruza had just finished killing a

bull. The young woman raced down

to the edge of the ring from the

seventh row, shrieking her admiration,

removed her panties and flung

them at the matador. They were

a flaming red.

Arruza had no time to recover

from his amazement, for she had removed

another pair, which were

white, and they were sailing through

the air in his general direction.

Even before they hit the ground

she was taking off a third pair, in

blue, and they came sailing out after

the other two.

By this time the crowd, which

had been applauding Arruza, began

applauding the girl. Her identity

was a mystery, but all the Mexicans

were convinced she was an American

and a patriotic American—they

thought so because of the colors of

her panties.

Icy River Water Dampens

Man's Suicide Intentions

LOGANSPORT, IND. — George

Cook told police he saw this happen

on the Wabash:

A well-dressed man about 35 years

old tied a heavy rock around his

neck and jumped 14 feet into the

river.

He stood for a moment shivering

in water up to his knees.

Then he picked up the rock,

climbed back on the bank, untied

the rope and walked away.

Hunter Fires on Rabbit,

Bullet Hits Him in Face

DOUGLAS. WYO.-Leroy Robb,

18, shot a rabbit. The shot passed

through the animal, hit a rock and

ricocheted and struck young Robb

in the mouth. He was knocked unconscious.

When he recovered consciousness

he opened his mouth—out fell the

bullet, three teeth and part of his

lower jaw.

Ho Hum, Twins Again

HOLDENVILLE. OKLA. — It

wasn't too much of a surprise when

twin girls were born at the Warren

Robinson household. Mrs. Robinson

is a twin, her grandmother is a twin,

and Robinson's uncle is a twin.

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