1907-09-13 - Northern New York Historical Newspapers

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1907-09-13 - Northern New York Historical Newspapers

THE BREWSTER STANDARD.

ESTABLISHED 1869. BREWSTER, PUTNAM COUNTY, N. Y.t FRIDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 13, 1907. J2.00 A YEAR

f

Well

Well

Well

Well Curbs and Pumps are

many and varied. They're

here in great variety.

Galvanized Curbs and Galvanised

Tubing, Wooden

Curbs and Spruce Tubing,

Rubber Buckets, Oak Buckets.

Patent Buckets, Pitcher

Pumps.Single Acting Pumps,

Double Acting Pumps,Pumps

with Brass Cylinders, Deep

Well Pumps, Cistern Pumps,

Spray Pumps, Pump Parts,

Pump Fixtures, Valves, Etc.

"r|ARpW4g£&

249-251 Main St,

Danbury, Conn.

If Your Sight is

FAILING

COME

HERE.

^Wi' irivt- your 1-yes a careful examination^

^Consultation Free. *

5

S

6. H. WILKINSON,

Optometrist,

Main Street,

Over D&ragan's Shoe Store. I

Danbury, Conn.*

L

••••••••••••••••••••••••••

I Fine

Candy.

Extra Large

H TJ O K

TOWELS,

Special

at

12 1-2 Cents.

Some with'colored borders.

Some plain white, hemstitched.

These towels would be bargains at 15c. at 12JC

they are probably the best towel to buy of the entire

season.

CLEAN BROS,

221 MAIN STREET, DANBURY, CONN.

ISSXnSS&HSSHHXXXHSXn

Large Assortment. •

L

Churches upplied' •

at Wholesale Prices, j

-, :

Ice Cream •

•Supplied on Short Notice all.times2

1 of the year. j»

[P. DIEHL & SONJ

i

Main Street, BREWSTER, N. Y. 8

Going to Get f

a New

Carriage

This Season ?

I have ten carloads of new

vehicles, carriages, two-seaters

and business wagons, and am

sure 1 can do better by you than

you can do anywhere else.

W. C. Peffers,

CROSBY STREET,

DAXBUKY, CONN.

CHAPPAQUA MOUNTAIN INSTITUTE,

Chappaqua, Westchester Co., N. Y.

Home School for boys aud girls

uuder the care of Society ot Friends.

S7th year.College Preparatory, English

and Commercial Courses, Music, Art,

Manual Train ink'. Stenography and

Typewriting. Positious guaranteed

our Commercial Graduates. Large

A1 ult-iic Grounds. Separate Junior

Department and Home Mother for

young children. Rates $260 to 876,

per year, according to room.

W. JAMES CRIST. A. M., Prin.

Send for Catalogue.

CHAS. R. BLENIS. Supt.

NEW YORK GASH GROCERY

AND MEAT MARKET.

Opposite Town Hall, Brewster, N. Y.

-DKALEH IN-

All Kinds of Fresh and Cured Meats,

Poultry, Groceries, Teas, Coffees, Spices,

Fruit, Vegetables. Crockery, China,

Glass, Tin and Wooaen War6 at the

lowest prices. Call and be convinced.

Our Pianos

CHAS. E. BAILEY, Prop.

all right. We want you to know it also.

Our terms are so easy, only $io down and $6 per month,

and 6 per cent, interest on defferred payments, and $250

buys a Beauty of a Piano. The same sort of Piano that

other dealers ask $300 for. Send for free catalogue to-day.

Hunt's Leading Music House,

Incorporated.

JOHN E. HUNT, President.

165 Railroad Avenue, White Plains, N. Y.

The Best Place to Buy a Piano.

E. Stone & Son, Danbury, Conn.

Special Sale

White Muslin

Petticoats,

89c, $1.00, $1.50.

E. STONE & SON, 229 Main St.

Yale and Ryder Win.

DELEGATES

For Yale for Assembly and

Ryder for County Judge:

Southeast No. I 8

Southeast No. 2 7

Carmel No. 2 4

Carmel N 3 2

Kent No- I 2

Kent No. 2 2

Patterson 6

TT

For Taylor for Assembly and

Southard for County Judge:

Philipstown No. I

Philipstown No- 2

Philipstown No. 3

Philipstown No. 4-

Carmel No. I

Putnam Valley

The Friends of Roosevelt and Hughes Rebuke Judge

Southard for his Ardent Support of Hearst Last Fall.

No Political Objection to Taylor, but the Tax-payers

Prefer a Continuation of the Benefits Secured by

Assemblyman Yale.

If Judge Southard had made it his

business last Fall to support John K.

Yale, William H. Weeks, Edward D.

John Q. Nichols, David Lockwood

and Hobart W. Hazen. Thus endeth

for a brief season the struggle to over-

Stannard and Daniel Kent, nominees throw the Weeks family.

of the Republican party for various j With four delegates added to the

county offices, he would now be the j fifteen representing Southeast Yale

ohoioe of those geutlemen and their

friends for the office of County Judge,

with only the election and the mini

counting of the votes and a declaration

of the result between him and

six years more in the same office. He

erred in his opinion that Hearstism

had come to stay and that in spite of

the appeals of President Roosevelt

and Secretary Root, the time was at

hand for the overthrow of the Ke­

nnel Ryder lacked only six of the

number necessary to elect That

was the reckoning when the telephones

were hung up Monday night.

The Fish-Southard-Taylor forces

were in control of the machinery in

nine out of thirteen districts and they

planned to hold cauouses in five

districts Tuesday afternoon at 2

o'clock—in Ludiugtonville at Grif­

fith's store, in Kent Cliffs at CharleB

publican party's candidates from j Kopp's hotel, in Mahopac at the

Charles E. Hughes down. Having j Towu Hall, in Mabopao Falls, near

discovered his error he tried to re- !•;. S. Agor's store, and in Putnam

introduce himself to Republican favor J Valley. The Fish people argued that

by means of a literary and testimonial! Mr. Yale could not be present in all

bureau. But people do not take to j the 'districts at the same moment,

patent politics as easily as they take I The first surprise came at 2:05 when

to patent medicines. The result is the 'phone announced that George

Mr. Southard's testimonials failed as B. Griffith, Watson D. RobiuBon,

same. Julius Doran, John Brooks,

John Patterson and Willard Jas'cox

will represent the district at the

convention, all for Southard and

Taylor, bringing their total up to 18

and there they rest

It was left to the grand old Republican

town of Pasterson to seal with

approval and surplus the verdict

already rendered. Mr. Taylor and

his friends fought aggressively and so

well that they actually scared some of

those who from the first felt sure that

it was only a matter of the size of the

majority for Yale and Ryder. The

total vote was 207. Of this number

158 were cast for the delegates chosen

JAMES E. TOWNER,

ELI B. CROSBY,

CLAUS A. MOLINE.

GEORGE W. WITHERIDGE,

JAMES E. KENT,

EDWARD S. HAVILAND.

all good men and true and victorious

over a list equally good, including

Jerome V. Baldwin, LewisG.Pugsley,

Herbert Winship, Coleman Peck,

Edgar P. Hayt, aud Henry B. Stephens.

Under such auspices Mr.

Taylor's fight was certainly not without

hope.

The decision of the voters assembled

at the several Republican

caucuses held during the week haviug

established the right of the majority

to name John R. Yale for the Assembly

and Clayton Ryder for County

Judge there is no reason why anyone

should continue the fight.

The same district* in whiph 81 votes

have been secured for Yale and Uyder

under the present apportionment

would have been entitled to 80 votes

if the apportionment had, been made

upou the vote for presidential electors

in 1004. The districts giving

18 votes for Taylor aud Southard,

taking the presidential vote as a iiasis

of representation, would give tbetu

27 votes.

Freight grains Wrecked

On the Harlem Thursday about

12:80 a. m., uurtuoouud freight

traiu drawn by two engines, at the

Ice Pond, crashed into the rear end of

the ice train. No one was hurt and

the engines were not seriously damaged

but ten cars were piled up delaying

traffic until about 11 a. m.

But before that time transfers were

made without much difficulty.

a cure for political irregularity, Charles E. Nichols aud Russell

and he lacks the votes to establish Wixon who led the Fish forces in

his "right" to a place in the column Ludiugtonville were so thoroughly

under the eagle. For that reason disconcerted by the crowd of voters

Clayton Ryder's name will be found who rallied around Daniel Kent,

iu the space six years ago given to Chester Barber, Charles Robinson

Judge Southard, and it is a name and Freemau Lewis that they left the

Republicans will remember as one field and permitted the choice of

ever to be trusted.

CHESTER BARBER and

Very properly the first delegates CHARLES ROBINSON

chosen iu this contest will represent by the casting of one vote. While

the towu of Southeast, the home of this was going on John A. Bennett,

the auoestors of Mr. Ryder aud the Mr. Fish's night watchman at the

adopted home of Mr. Yale. A very i New York Sub-Treasury was engaged

remarkable compliment «a« paid to \ in a contest at Kopp's against Nathau

both geutlemen at the caucuses held j B. Smith. Bennett had been coinin

the Town Hall, Brewster, Monday manded by Fish to get away with the

evening when the uaming of fifteen' district. Only 74 voters were expected

delegates was without a dissenting to attend. There was an abundauoe

voice. In the First District, W. A. I of good cheer and every man res-

Ferris presided with Dr. W. L. I ponded. The electiou of Mr. Kopp,

Scofield as secretary aud John H. 1 who is known as the father of the

McQuay and Oscar Bailey as tellers, district is always a sure thing—aud

They couuted only one vote for the his name appeared on 74 ballots, but

following delegates:

Smith's name was on -1:; while Bennett

JOHN S. ENO,

was down aud out with only :ii. So

ROBERT RITCHIE, the Yale-Ryder column with

PATRICK RYAN,

CHARLES KOPP and

WM. A. FERRIS,

NATHAN B. SMITH

OSCAR BAILEY,

added, jumped to tweuty-three, leav-

W. L. SCOFIELD, iug only two more to wiu.

GEORGE MINE.

Mahopac and Mahopac Falls, with

JAMES W. FINCH. an unbroken record of thirty-six

In the second district Edward D. years uuswerviug devotion to Mr.

Stannard presided with George H. Fisli were expected to give their vo tea

Kniffeu as secretary and Wilson H. to Southard aud Taylor but iu this

Crane aud Johu O'Connor, Jr., as instance as iu many others it was the

tellers. The only ballot cast was for: unexpected that happened. Mahopac

ABRAM J. MILLER, as usual gave its three votes, Everett

A. FRAZIER LOBDELL, Beuuett, Edward Beuuett aud George

C. RALPH DIEHL, O. Agor, to Fish, but at Mahopac

P. H. GOGAN,

Falls, Mjjlard F. Agor, who lias

JOHN O'CONNOR, JR., controlled every caucus for thirty

FRANCIS O'BRIEN, years, was able to master only 10 out

THOMAS ENH1GHT. of 108 votes, the balance, 6b, were

Thus fifteen delegates were placed couuted for the Yale-Ryder delegates

to the credit of Vale and Ryder. On WILLIAM B. PIERCE and

the same evening iu the village of THEODORE AGOR.

Carmel, Postmaster Coruish was Thus, while the day was yet youug,

making the first attack on the lead­ Yale and Ryder were on velvet.

ing candidates. He began the attack Later iu the afternoon Putnam

last Spring aud he kept everlastingly^ Valley announced that three Taylorat

it until the boxes fur the reception Southard delegates had won by 1'.

of the primary ballots were closed. I majority. The evening caucuses were

Then, in company with Southard he j four in number, all iu the intud

calmly aud confidently awaited the j Philipstown, and all for Taylor aud

count. When it was announced that' Southard. Hamilton Fish, Johu P.

the total vote was 224, of which he Donohoe and Thomas W. Nelsou

had received only '.'•> and his gaze met' were named iu the Garrisons District

that of the Judge, the pair stoieauay without opposition, and at the Higbsileutly

in the direct iou of Miss Blake's'lauds F. W. Reuu was chosen, iu the

office to compare the results with the] Cold Spring district Samuel Trimble

predictions in her newt-paper. 1 and Raymond O'Couuell, of last year's

Meantime the tellers tabulated the'Hearst Committee, W. H. Truesd* U

result and announced the election of and Arthur Noble were elected by

the following geutlemen to represent Democrats. Nearly all the straight

Mr. Ryder's home district: Republicans in the district led by

WILLIAM H. WEEKS,

H1LLYER RYDER,

j Judge Wood, James Knox. John

! On the Putuam division about

(1 o'clock Thursday near the Carmel

Fair Grouud's platform a broken

axle on the engine derailed a freight

train. Conductor Carroll's north

bound passeuger train due at Brewster

at 8:10 the same evening was held

|*up at Carmel. To-day up to :s p. in.

no trains arrived at Brewster. A

second freight traiu wreck at Crotou

Lake helped to make the situation

very unpleasant.

Crushed Between Cars.

John Phillips employed by the

Crotou Falls Construction Company

was seriously injured Monday morning.

He was "braking" on a narrow

gauge dirt train aud was iu the act of

puttiug on the brakes, as t he traiu

descended a heavy grade, when the

train jumped the track. The sudden

stop caused Phillips to lose his

balance. He fell between the cars

and was painfully crushed.

Dr. W. N. Boyutou wus summoned.

He fouud Phillips suffering intensely.

All examination showed

no broken bones but his thigh aud

abdomen were badly bruised ami internal

injuries seemed probable. He

was removed to his home iu the

Brewster ambulance. Although his

condition seemed critical at first he

has improved wonderfully aud to-day

strong hope is entertained that he will

recover. 'j_ "

Suing for Damages.

N. Burton Rogers, of Daubury, has

been served with papers for two

separate actions brought by persons

who claim damages by reasou of

injuries for which they allege that a

chalteur formerly iu Mr. Roger's employ

was responsible. The total

damages claimed is tU.OOO.

Tile plaintiff in one suit is Grace

Hampsou as administratrix of the

estate of Charles Heady who was on

May 2Uth run over aud killed by his

own wagon near Kidtiefield alter ids

hor.se had taken fright at Mr. Rogers'

automobile. Mrs. Heady was the

only witness of the accident. The

couiplaiut iu the act ion alleges carelessness

on the pari of the chat!cur

and *5,000 ure claimed.

The second suit is brought by

Frank Morasco who was thrown from

lsburg, Seiu Secor «wd Joepu A- his horse near Sodom reservoir on

WILLIAM W. EVERETT. Greene, 74 iu number, voted for Yale June 22d. He alleges that he was

GEORGE PATTERSON. delegates. The total vote in the laid up for five weeks aud sustaiued '

They received 12" votes each. Their district was 208. In Neisonville the very painful injuries. He places his

opponents were Samuel G- Cornish, cond.lions wrre pretty much the 'damage* at *4,UO0.


3

Tfie Brewster Standard, Friday September 13,190V

ACT QUICKLY

JURSfANT TO AN ORDER OF TI1E HON. \

FARMERS AND THE RACES.

«T. J. Bonnott Bennett Ronthnrd, Surrogate or ~" the. "~

foamy ot Inuiinm. X. Y.. notice Is is here hereby given i

Delay Has Boon Dniurerons In Brewster. to nil persons hnvliur cJnlms nffalnat tl the" estate

of (Yiieinoii K. Towiwnd, late of the Town or I

Profits of the Rig Tracks Help to

Saturday I

southeast, In said county, deensod, to present

Run the County Fairs.

Do the right tiling at the rijrlit time. the same with the vouchers tbereot to the [

undersigned Administratrix or the goods, Blood Will Tell.

Act quickly in t lines ot danger.

One thing that amazes the visitor

chattels nnd credits or said deceased at her

Night Talks

Bnckaclic Is kidney danger;

residence and place ot transuding business in j

from out of town who drops In on

the Town or southeast. Putnam county. New J

Doan's Kidney i'lllsiui quickly.

the rscetracks around New York Is

York, on or before the 1st day of December, IMS'.

care nil distressing, dangerous kidney Ills. Dated. May H. uwr.

King Lancelot

that betting Is In full swing despite

.lulln A. Towusend. Administratrix.

By F..E. DAVTSOK — ROTLAK© VT.

Plenty or evidence to prove this.

signs announcing that It Is Illegal.

Barman & Wells.

There is one section of the Percy-

Adam Kerr, farmer, living on the Attorney Tor Administratrix,

Brewster. N. Y.

Gray law—the law forbidding bet­ New burgh and Cochecton Pifte, on

and Governor Stanford

RETROSPECT AND PROSPECT. ting on horseraces In New York State Broad St., Extended. Newburgh, says:

Will hold court

—that Is at once very strong and "About two years ago when Buffering

Sep. 15. '07'—(Deut. 6: 1-15) very weak, says the Broadway Maga­ from a very lame back I heard about

zine. It provides that the State shall Doan's Kidney Pills, got a box at a

At Hillsboro Farm.

The book of Deuteronomy Is a receive out of the gross revenues of

School.

drug store and began using them. At

Friends are invited to visit them and see their large nnd hand­

book of sermons. It contains three the racetracks a certain percent tun.

some sons and daughters. Terms for the season $25. With return

the time I seemed to have no strength

addresses of Moses to the children By the original law the State got

privilege.

of Israel In which he recounts their

in my back and the pain was terrible. Opens

fi per cent. A year ago, when a sharp

history from the hour when they

It hurt me more to sit down; than it

light was made in the Legislature,

GO TO

marched out of Eygpt a race of free

did to walk about and yet £ when I

the mring people consented to an

A. G. McMillan, Lake Maiiopac, N, Y,

men. to that time 40 years after

walked my back got tired andjpained

amendment whereby this percentage

when they stood again at the bound­ is increased gradually until the State

inojworso when I stopped. I called

c. o:

ary line of the Promised Land. - receives 7% per cent The money in a doctor and he gave fine ?some

The old prophet, statesman and from the racetracks goes to the State medicine but it had no effect. A MEM'S

lawgiver at the age of 3 20 knew agricultural societies for the support friend mentioned to me several New-

that he was about to surrender the of county fairs.

burgh people who had been cured of

FOR Charles Vitanza,

leadership of the people to the The amount the county fairs get such troubles by Doan's Kidney Pills

younger Boldler Joshua, and as is so great that It dazzles the up­ nnd I began using them. They put

Has n Pine Line of

Washington made a farewell address state legislators. It averages about new strength in my back, drove all

to the young republic he had found­ 11,000 a day for every day of thc- the aches and pains away uud 1 have

Ladies', Gentlemen's and Boys'

ed, so Moses made these valedictory yenr. The gross receipts of tht not had an attack Blnce.''

addresses before laying down bis Sheepshcad Bay or Belmont Park For sale by all dealers. Price 50c

scepter of authority.

tracks range from $15,000 to $75, Foster-Milburn Co., Buffalo, N. Y.,

AND

Last words are always solemn and 000 a day; they average nearly $30,

Shoes and Rubbers.

Sole agents for the United States.

memorable words. When men are 000.

Remember the name—Doan's—and

jwster High School Pins Prices Low. First Class Shoetunking in

face to face with valedictory condi­ It Is only on gala days that the

take no other.

all its branches neatly done. French,

tions, they do not usually fritter receipts reach the $75,000 figure. IOUNTY COURT OF PUTNAM COUNTY,

German and American Shoes mnde to.

away time in useless speech. Their

CJ New Yoi k,

The Brighton Beach Track paid $32, Pursuant to statute, I .hereby order and ap

order.

words go straight to the mark. It 773 to the State as ltB share of the point the terms or the county Court or tht Circs, 0. Daiun. Ladies and Gents Shoes Polished.

county or Putnam In tin-state or New York toi

Is so here. Moses who had had per­ tax last year. There were less than the trial or issues of law and i:i -i and the hear

sonal knowledge of more than a cen­ thirty days racing at Brighton, so

inir mill determination or all criminal matters 01

Jeweler and Optician. Park Street, Brewster, N. Y.

which Raid Court has Jurisdiction, at which r

V.

tury of history, and whose mind was the gross receipts were a shade un­ Grand Jury and a Petit JwywlU be required tf Main St., Brewster. N

Agent for Shiver, Wheeler &, Wilson Sewing Machines.

unclouded with the least shadow of

attend, to lie held In the Court House In tht

der those of the more fashionable town or funnel in said county, lu the year 1UOT

approaching infirmity recounts the' track i.

as follows:

past. He glosses over nothing, be

On the First Tuesday of Juno and

In every legislative attack on the on the x*cond Tuesday or December.

explains away nothing, he calls racing law the up-State legislators I further order nnd appoint the terms or thi

things by their right names. This

County court, or the County or Putnam In tht

have been swayed by this question of

THOSE IN THE MARKET

state or New York, tor the trial or Issues or law,

' speech of his was to endure forever money. Some earnest conscientious Mie henrlnu and decision or motions and othei

and he does not undertake to show

proceedings at which no Jury will be required U

members, who do not approve of attend, to be held In til" Court House lu thr

tbem up in any but the true llgbt. gambling in any form, seriously de­ ntoresald town or Cariuel on the Second and

FOR REAL ESTATE

The past! Who can endure to re­

Knurl 11 Tui-M|ay or eui.l mom h and at the office

clare that without the racing tax oi the County Judge of Putnam County lu the

view his past, if you ran sit down many agricultural societies would go riUagoot cold sprint. In said county, on th»

Or desiring to find a market for their property

alone with memory and open the

First and Third Saturday ot each mouth

to smash and fairs would be aban­ except during t he mouths oi Junuury uud A at us;

will have prompt attention by applying to

book you yourself have written, and doned.

Dated December 81, won.

read the record you yon self have

J. Bennett southard,

made, and never blanch you are for­ Stops itching instantly. Cures

i'ut ham county Judge

E E . BIRCH,

Filed January 2. ltw.

tunate above all men. There are lilies, eetetua, salt rheum, tetter, itch,

Real Estate Agent and Builder,

Pin nam county Clerk's 00108, SB.

those who, cannot do it. There are hives, herpes, scabies—Doan's Oint­ 1, Edward c. Weeks, clerk ot«the County oi

Phone 0-W.

Putnam Avenue, Brewster, N. Y.

volumes on those shelves they never

ment. At any drug store.

Putnam and of the county court or said count*

do hereby oortliy that the precccdlng is a trui

take down. There are pictures on

copy or the original designation ot the tornw ol

theO untyCourtort.be county or Put nam foi

those wulls whose faces are always

Studying an Oyster's Heart.

the year 1007, now on Hie In my oftlce. For Coughs

turned. There are secrets sealed up

[.seal] a. v. Weeks. Clerk.

To discover the heart of an oyster

In those subterranean passages that

and Colds

the fold of flesh which oystermen call

are never exposed. Gliosis of slain

VRW YOBK SUPUEMKCOIHT.—initmunCo.

tEe "mantle" must be removed. This

foes haunt those corridors, walk In

1B fatal to the oyster, of course, but Charles N. Baldwin and uiioTTluliitltT.

Use Smith's White Pine and .Tar,

the midnight and rattle their chains.

in the interest of science and for the

iigalust •

Complete line of Combs and Hair

The doors are locked and double

benefit of the "curious" it is occasion­ Oscar W Ambler, et ul. Defendant.

Brushes, Soap, SpongeB, Cigars and JOHN T. TOOUMEY,

barred and the hlugeB are rusty. The

in pur ii.i!.!••• iii mi Interlocutor}' Judgment or

ally done. When the mantle has been Part ft Ion and Sale duly made and entered in Confectionery at the

possessor of these ancient memories

above action and bearing; date July SOlh. l'.">;. 1

Licensed Pharmacist.

removed the heart, shaped like a theunderstirned. the Referee in said Judgment

would give all they own if earth­

crescent or horned moon, is bared numud will Hell at Public Auction ut the trout The Family Drug Store,

Successor to W. T. Gunung, The Pioneer Druggist.

quake shock would buw forever out

door oi the Town Hall In the Vlllugeof Hrcw.itt-r.

to the view. The oyster's heart 1B Town or (Southeast. County or Putnam, and James K. smith .Proprietor.

of existence the past, but like Haw­

made up of two parts, Jnst like that State or New York, on t be gid day or Hepteinlier,

thorn's creation it is a hidden ser­

11107, at eleven o'clock In the ion-noon ot tliut Main Street, Brewster, N. I. Olilest, Largest ai Best Epipa Dreg House in Putnam Co.

of a human, being, one of which re­ duy, all the following described premise*

pent in the breast, and the victim

ceives the blood from the gills and MI a.ii iii iii i in- Town or Southeast, county or

continually cries, "It gnaws me! It

Putnam. New York uud liounded uud described

the other drives it out through the ar­ OH IflllOWH:

Notice to Property Owners. Sole Agency for Devoe Perfumes, Soaps and

gnaws me?

teries.

First piece: Hounded on the South by lands

or Iteu/amlu O. Nichols; on the West by the

Nevertheless it is a good thing

Peach Luke Itoad aud lauds of Jessie II. Hatch The Highway commissioner of the Town of and other Standard Toilet Articles. Patent

Gives Diver Strength.

aud John J. Wilkin; on the North by lands or Southeast hereby gives notice to all property

sometimes, as in this case to rebearsa

John J. Wllklu and the road leading to Dunbury.

Paints and Varnishes. Medicines, Etc.

The difficulty a diver experiences In

the past. Moses kuew that the

Couii.: on the Host by the road leudlugover ownere that all weeds and brush uloug the

lifting weights beneath the water is Dingle Hldge, hinds or Herbert

highways of the town must be cut twice a year.

moral effect of such a review would

luuds of Uenjuinln (». Nichols. Containing

partly overcome by a new Italian in­

M, - 145

H before f M-A. the Uniy nm duy of Highway of July aud commissioners the first day In of Prescription Department Unsurpassed. Formulas Famous and

be salutary. It would be both a

Bores oi laud be the same more or less. Certain Towns.-ln towns where the money

vention which has been formally ad­ Second piece: Hounded on the Stevens North b> uua the gepuuuuer. gysteni or luxallou TIM following lias lieen tt udontea the law: tor working Faultless for 50 Years Duplicated. Pure Liquors for Medicinal Use.

warning and an inspiration. A

road leading to Duubury- conn.; on the smith highways; It shall oe the duty or each owuer or

opted by that Government The

warning to avoid past errors and an

by lauds oi Herbert Stevens; und on l he H est lauds and occupants ot lunds owned by uonital-

mechanism is a diving suit, the artiby the road leading over Dingle Hldge: contain- aenta. situated along the highway, to cut the

Main Street, Brewster, N. Y.

inspiration to know that they wers

lug ope acre of land be the same more or less. noxious weeds and brush glowing within th*

ficial arms of whieh are worked from

all in the past. The burnt child

Third piece: Hounded on the Bast by the bounds of the highway iroimng such lands at

the inside by the wearer. The lever­ Peach Lake Road: on the South by lunds of least twice In each year, once before the flu*

dreads the fire. To see where w«

Hubert Vull: ou the West by lunds or Jessie B. day or July aud again beiore the llrst day o'

age thus secured enables the diver to Hatch, Dr. Charles White and lands of Bloomer; September, aud aiso to remove all fences, brush,

lell (iown is to avoid the Bpot here­

lift objets heavier than he could oth­

on the North by lauds of Jessie li. Hatch. Con- ehrubbery or other obstruction causing tie

after. That man gains nothing who

Mining eight ucrcs or hind be the same mjru arming ot suow unou said highway btfore the

erwise handle.' In addition to this

refuses to investigate bis books for

or less. flrst day ol September lu each year. If the

improvement over the old method, a Fourth piece: Helm; a wood lot on Joe s Hills owner or occupaut tails to cut such weeds or ri=3

fear of discovering that be is bauk-4

und bounded on 1 he West by t he Joe's Hills road brush and remove such rei•••••»,. brush, shrubbery

high-power electric light that will

rupt. Better to face the facts at

and lauds ol the Town of SoutLeast, or Alice or other obstruction causing the uniting oi

penetrate the water for some dls Yale: on tin'North by lauds of Herbert Stevens snow as provided In this sectlou, the com

once and apply the remedy. The

and Town or Southeast or Alice Yale; on the mlssloner or highways oi the town In which such

tanco Is placed in the helmet.

weakness of the nation was fully and

East by lands ol Herbert si evens and lands or lauds are situated shaU cause the same to b.

Dodge, and on the South by lands or Dodge; done, and shall give sucu owner notice in will

elaborately disclosed in the address

contalulug ten acres or laud be the same more 1lAg served pcrsouoUy or by mallUig to his |KM>I

of Moses concerning the past.

Heavy, impure blood makes a or less , ollice address. U the commissioner can with due

muddy, pimply complexion, head­

The lour pan-els above det-crlbcd la-lug the diligence aauertalu the same, slating thai ut a

premises devised by the last Will and Testa- spueitied time and place the commissioner "will

But these addresses also referred aches, nausea, indigestion. Thin incut ot Thomas Baldwin to Tyler Baldwin dur- assess the cost thereof against such owner so

to the future. In the plainest and blood makes you weak, pale, sickly. lug his nutural Hie uud ut his decease, to be neglcetlug, mm return the same to the town

divided umong t he children t hut may lie living , board or this town at the meeting held on the

most minute fashion the great law­ Burdock Blood Bitters makes the at the time or the decease or Tyler Baldwin, or. Thursday next preceding the annual meeting or

giver spoke of the future and recap­ blood rich, red, pure—restores peritulated

the laws of their residence fect health.

In Canaan. In the most far-sighted

way Moses foretold their future destiny,

aud gave them the directions

for their conduct, as tribes, as families

and as individuals whe.u they had

crossed the Jordan. Many of the

laws he enunciated were temporary,

sauitary. Jewish enactments that

perished when the occasion passed.

But the vast majority of them are

still in force. They will never become

obsolete for they are based

upon the laws of humanity and are

of universal application. His laws

took it for granted that the nation

would be a perpetual commonwealth

The future: how docs it look to

you? Is it roseate with promise, or

dark with foreboding? Castles in

the air are unsubstantial, but no

one has ever amounted to much in

this world who did not build tbem

You must have the vision in your

mind before you can make it real in

lact. The ability to plan for the future

*is what differentiates man from

the brute creation.

Moses had glorious plaus for the

Children of Israel, aud he told them

of it and his sublime faith swept

over the congregation like a reviving

breeze. Though they had wandered

about in the wilderness for 40 years,

now they are ready to march into

God's country and take possession of

their future home. Already they

saw in vision teeming cities aud

culthaled lields. In anticipation they

tasted the fruit, breathed the air,

bathed in the streams, sal under their

own vine and fig tree, and were

the envy of all* mankind.

Whatever the past has been, have

a bright hope lor the future. L»»ok

back if you must to see where \ou

came from, but look forward more

to see where you are going. Take

glances at the past, take looku at the

future. The past you cannot change.

u c=3 U c ^^^i^a^aai^oaaaa^a^d aca ocaaaa

Mary Smith, Huruh Moore, Julie Ambler and

Tyler Buldwlu.

lu.t.-d. July .11. li.ii;.

Koiieri E. Farley. Referee.

Enemies Who Dwell Together. Buruum A: Wells, PlulutllTs Attorney, White

Natural enemies of the animal

Plains, N. Y.

Abram J. MiUer, Att'y lor Defendant Wllklu,

•world are sometimes found 'living Brewster, x. Y.

together in extraordinary communi­

Horace I>. Barnes. Att'y lor Bert Moore, Mi

Broadway, N. V. City.

ties. A recent writer quotes this ex­ Cluytou Ryder. A try lor Bef't. funnel, tf. Y.

perience of an observer: "On one Goo. £. Anderson. All'y for Bert, tunnel, N.Y.

occasion when ferreting I bolted a "O A TlFTflTTQ

fox, a cat, a stoat and several rabbits

and rats out of the same earth.

The fox bolted first, after giving the

ferret a nip across the back, from

the effects of which it died an hour

later. Next came the stoat and then

the cat, both of which I shot. Then

followed the rabbits and rats promiscuously.

It was a large luirrow on

the bank of a deep, dry watercourse,

and often held a fox when I ferreted

it afterward."

.i sutler visors, suiting the uume

cribes our

e.u-ii owner, una the umuuut assessed ugalnst

him. The time so n vd suull uot be less than

eight days atu-r the iici-sonal service or the uial'..

Big or such notice. The towu board sluill certliy

the itiiioiint or the assessment uuiae'by the hlpl..

PLUMBING

way •-•ommlssiouer to the board oi super visors.

The board or suiM-ivlsors shall cause the amount

so i.-im ii.-u to ih.u. by Uie towu board to ii

Itrlcd .v.-ain-i such d.-lu.(|ii.-ni owner and add< d

WORK.

to his niu'hway uU lor the next ensutm; year—

Addefl by L. 11(00. chap. 5Hi. aud aniciul'e.,1 by

I,. nw3. chap. IHI> an i... iaoi. chap. r,t.)

'"he provisions ol this law musi l«- OOlupllcfl

' Protection for seveu- waheuch year, or Uie loin, tt'll! lose lis quota ol

si ale .in.ii. y. i'le-uw comply without rurfher W C. TAYLOR

1 ii 1 Hi IN 1 O tcvu years ut little cost. uOuoe.

Seud for free booklet. MUo B. Stevens & Co.,

KOrtPUl KITCIUK.

SHi 14th Blu, Washington, B. C. Brunches;

«v>" •• i.| iligi.wny*

Chicago, Cleveland, Hctroll. Eslub. IM.i. Itewstar \ v tuio- • ii •:

i Brewster Livery & Transportation Co. % GEO. N. WISE,

Successors to L. A. Shove,

FLORIST,

What Our Reporter Saw in New

BREWSTER. N. Y.

York.

ole Agents in Brewster and vicinity for the

A recent visit to one of the largest

FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS

paint factories in the world, disclosed Studebaker and Moyer

machinery that was producing in.mm

gallons of Paiut and doing it better

Get my''prioe« on

uud in less time than 100gallons could

Vehicles.

be made by baud mixing.

American Beauty Roses.

This was the celebrated L. o; M.

First Qualitv, Long Stems, from Green Houses ot largest growers in

Paint.

Stylish Top Buggies, Stanhopes, Surreys the Unit*! Smte.-. PALMS AND FERNS. 1 also sell all kinds of

The L. & M. Zinc hardens L. & M.

Nursery, Trees and Shrubs. "~ Prices are right.

White Lead and makes L. & M. Paint and Runabouts now in Stock. Boston

wear like iron for 10 to 15 years.

4 gallons L. 6; M. mixed with 8 gallons

Linseed Oil makes 7 gallons of Buekboards and Lansing Farm Wagons

imint at a oost of less than $1.20 per

gallon.

and Heavy Trucks.

Jf any defect existsiuL. of M. Paint

will repaint.bouse for nothing.

Doiiutious of L. o; M. made to

cljnrchci-.

Splendid line of

The Knox & Smith Undertaking Go.

tiold by J. H. Mci^uay. Brewster:

14 Fowler, Carmel; M. WeMoott uud

Pro., Mahopac.

CHARLES H.SMITH,JR.. Successor,

Double and Single Harness,

Park St., Brewster, N. Y.

Z>SXX*X:F DISSL.

| Light and Heavy.

BAKER AMD COMCTMER/

the luture you cau command. Right; ^^^^^___ niitnsJKit, K. v. C» Horse Goods of Every Description.

Funeral Director and Embalmer.

Calls auswered night or day.

Telephone. Office 12 J. Resideuoe »6.

lu front of you is Jordan. Go boldly ^rtietftnd WeddiagbBupfliied.

m.r II ml bJigU) a new history upon

the further side. 1

Ice Cream a SjyQ'.


"• CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR.

Prsysr Mtetina Topic For Urn Wsek

Beginning Sept. 15.

By REV. 8. H. DOYLE.

Topic—God's omniscience.—Isa. x\, 12-8L

Omniscience means all wisdom or

knowledge, and the omniscience of God

Pimply means that God knows all

things.

1. God knows all about the nntnral

universe. He "knows, nud He only

knows, because He alqu%.mnde It. Scientists

for centuries have beeu trying

to solve the great mysteries of the natural

world. They have put forth theories

which succeed usually In being

overthrown by succeeding generations.

Only a comparatively few of the doctrines

of the universe have stood the

test of the centuries—fir Instance, the

law of gravitation and the belief that

the world Is round: Evolution, while

accepted ns a working plan by many,

has never been nud can never bo demonstrated,

for God only knows how he

created the universe and man, and this

fact Is sufficient for us. He did it and

controls *It in His own time and way,

and until He chooses to reveal to us the

method we can remain silent and trust

In Him. He doeth all things well.

A Labor of Love.

An interesting history Is attached to

a Christian Endeavor mission hall at

Frogmore, Euglaud, situated six miles

from Eversley, the home of Charles

Kingsley, says the ChrlsUan Endeavor

Times. It was built by the BapUst

Endeavorers of Camberley, two miles

from Frogmore. These Endeavorers

started the work in Frogmore by holding

cottage prayer meeUngs, which

were so much appreciated by the people

and blessed of God that within sixteen

mouths they grew Into the work

of this mission hall, a building tbat

Beats more than 100 persons. It was

built by the voluntary and unpaid

labor of the young men of the society,

helped by a few friends. The work

- was In hand for seven months, but the

Endeavorers did not tire of It, and almost

every evening, after the regular

work of the day was over, some of

them were found adding a little to this

labor of love.

The Committee System.

The committee system, like the prayer

meeting and the pledge, is one of

the uuique and dlstincUvo things which

Christian Endeavor has brought to the

young people of the world. It has emphasized

personal responsibility. It

bus given them something to do. It

has put iuto a million minds tbe

thought: "I, too, am a worker in the

Master's kingdom. I muy be young

and Ignorant and unlnfluentlal, but I

have my task as truly as the minister

has his or the Sunduy school superluteudeut

lias his. A member of a committee

Is one to whom something has

been committed, and the particular

task usslgued to me has been committed

to me both by the election of the

uoclety und by the will of God. Then

I will do my best on my committee for

Christ's sake."—Dr.' Francis E. Clark.

Press Work Committee Points.

Bo usuumed to own a skillful pen

thut is not consecrated to Christ

Every society should have a press

committee, if only of one member.

Place upon it the society's most skillful

writers uud also some Eudeuvorers

whom they will train up for tue work.

Whut to write about—anything connected

with your society or church that

if of iuterest to the people for whom

you write. Do not hastily conclude

thut because a matter Interests you It

will therefore Interest every one else.

How to write—neatly, accurately,

systematically, pointedly, origiuully,

briefly. PrucUce the best ways of

aayiug things. Study the best Jouruuls

for models. Do not expect to be

most effective without great painstaking.—Irish

Eudeuvorer.

The Brewster Standard, Friday, September 13. 1907 a

LIFE IN LONDON.

WITH II SWEET STOMACH PROFESSIONAL, FINANCIAL AND TRADE ANNOUNCEMENTS.

AND ACTIVE BOWELS

You have nothing to fear. Jas. K. Towner,

Strong, vigorous, healthy ac­ Auctioneer.

tion of the whole system results

from the use of Dr.

Andrew Seymour,

Practical Painter

And Paper Hauger. House nud Sign

Painting a Specialty. Wood work

guaranteed. Estimates furnished.

P. O. Address, Brewster, 2s. Y.

Bad Symptoms.

The woman who has periodical headaches,

backache, sees imaginary dark

spots or specks floating or dancing before

her eyes, navcnawlng distress or heavy

full feeling My tomach, faint spells, drag-

g!ng>downAeeling In lower abdominal or

tole ropron, easily startled or excited,

S•eguU? or painful periods, with or without

pelvic catarrh, Is suffering from

weaknatge* andyOerangcmcnts that should

have early attention. Not all of above

symptoity app likely to be present In any

case at qne/ttne.

Negloctofl or badly treated and such

cases., ' n run Into maladies which de>

mar . surgeon's knife it they do not

.rest

>fiir no extant nnfi such a ir

• S».TKiTaTi'Py»'-'.M" ffWjit

Westchester Counties.

Mon^y Loaned on Bond and Mortgase.


Landon Wins in Dutchess-

The Dutchess Republicans met in

convention at Poughkeepsie yesterday

and after nominating (ieorge

Wood for County Judge aud Willett

Boysradt for Surrogate tbe County

Committee organized by electing Col.

Laudou, of Poughkeepsie, chairman

in place of John A. Banna, of Dover

Plains. The county nominees are

very strong with the people and it is

said that Col. Laudou as a manager is

more than a match for the Chanters.

We may therefore expect to see

Dutchess back in the Republican

column. At any rate give the Colonel

a chance.

Telephone Announcement.

The Hudson River Telephone Company

lias withdrawn night rales for

messages over its line and beginning

with Sept. '1, 1U;»T, the day rate will

be in force for all local aud loug distance

busiuess whether olTered before

or alter 0 o'clock p. in.

The reason assigned by the management

\g that the lower rate for

nigiit kervioe lias resulted in serious

congestion of trattle during the early

eveniug hour" which it i- dasJftad to

distribute more t>veuly throughout

the day.

Tfte Brewster Standard, Friday September 13,19QV

The Brewster Standard

ISSUED BVEKT FRIDAY AT

BREWSTER, N. Y.

E. W. Annis,EniTon}AsnPnopniKTon

Entered at the Portofflce at Browser, N. T.,

as Second-Class Mall Matter.

BREWSTER, SEPTEMBER 13,1907.

Republican County Convention-

The Republican Electors of the

several towns and districts of Putnam

County are requested to send delegates

to a County Convention to be

held at the Court Bouse, Cariuel, on

Saturday, September 31, 1007, at one

o'clock, p. tu.; for the purpose of

placing In nomination candidates for

Member of Assembly and County

Judge, and performing such other

duties as may be deemed wise, necessary

and proper.

Pursuant to a resolution adopted at

the Republican County Convention

held April 14, 1000 representation is

based upon the vote oast for the

Republican oaudidate for Member of

Assembly at the election held November

0, 1000, and the several towns and

districts are entitled to delegates as.

follows:

Cartnel—No. 1, 3; No. 2, 4; No. 3, 2.

Kent—No. 1,2; No. 2, 2.

Patterson—0.

Putnam Valley—3.

Philipstown—No. 1, 3; No. 2, 1; No.

8, 4; No. 4, 4.

Southeast—No. 1, 8; No. 2, 7.

By order of the Republican

County Committee,

John R. Yale, Chairman.

Dated September 5, 1007.

Republican Nominations.

Supervisor.

'QBOBGfi IIINK.

Town clerk,

EK NEST (). EVEKETT.

•1usl!resot the l*r;i


The Brewster Standard, Friday, September 13. 1907

H APPENINQS.

Emery Makenny is painting James

K. Smith's Main street residence.

Mr. and Mrs. Mortimer Bloomer are

spending the week at Niagara Falls,

Rochester and the State Pair.

Moseman B. Hyatt and Coles B.

Fowler are supplying villagers with

all kinds of garden vegetables.

Announcements of a change from a

credit to a strictly cash business have

been sent out this week by A. F.

Lobdell & Co.

The Village Board has appointed

Samuel H. Ledley village officer to

fill the place left vacant by the resig­

nation of James Leary.

John Sullivan has nearly completed

his new residence just south of Dean's

Corners. A little finishing up* will

make it ready for oooupanoy.

The firemen ot Harlem trains no

longer pay attention to the orders

issued a short time ago by Superin­

tendent Van Tassell regarding coal­

ing engines.

Since going to Spring Valley

Lawrence A. Sneden has been ap­

pointed agent of the Society for the

Prevention of Cruelty to Animals

for that plaoe.

ThoBe who ueglect to pay village

water rents to-morrow will be charged

five per cent, in addition, to the sum

< named in the bills sent out by Collec­

tor Crane August 14th.

A. Ward Chamberlin who repre­

sents the Ford Motor Co. in northern

Westchester county has received

word from the Plant that there are

Ji,81ll Ford runabouts on the road.

The Methodist ladies are holding

a social to-day with Mrs. Philip F

Beal. Cake and candy is on sale and

refreshments are being served. It

will continue late in the eveuiug and

u good crowd should attend.

The highways have been "badly

washed this week by the several

showers and Commissioner "Ritchie

has a force of men raking off stones

and filling in gullies. The loose dirt

has been washed away andjiu many

. places hardpan is uppermost.

The Poudview House at Haines'

Pond on the road to Danbury has

I" -ii purchased by Frank Rotello,

who conducts a wholesale and retail

business in Danbury. The house has

been newly furnished and reuovated

and was especially attractive at the

opening yesterday.

A moving picture entertainment

will be given in the Town Hall to­

morrow night. The latest illustrated

:Sjngs, fourteen kinds of moving

pictures and 80 finestereoptioon views

will miike up the tentertainuietjt.

Admissiou 10, 30 and BO oents. Doors

open at 7:30. Entertainment begins

at 8:15.

Some good people who say that

they prayed for rain, now claim that

the drought was broken in response

to their prayers. We like to think

that they are right, for there is no

way so easy as this when it works. It

may be as well, however, to go on

with the construction of the proposed

village water supply.

Th^e electric light service for* tfye

past two weeks has not been up to

the standard usually maintained by

Juengst & Sons- The lamps go out

for au hour or so at a time aud are

not real bright when burning. The

line has been given an inspection this

week and better service is promised

for next week. The many ligbtuiug

• displays are party responsible for

conditions.

A party of eighteen young people

I from this village enjoyed a straw ride

to Danbury on Tuesday evening aud

called upon Mr. aud Mrs. Durkiu,

where they met a party of about

thirty Dauburiaus. The evening was

spent iu games aud merriment aud a

jolly time seems to be the expression

from those on this side of the State

. liue who also speak highly of (the

• hospitality received aud the refresh­

ments partakeu of. The return trip

was made at 4 a. IU.

Mrs. George Partlow, of Chaupa-

ijua, died last Friday at the home of

her parents, Mr. aud Mrs. Dillizou

Davis, Daubury, aged 21 years. Mrs.

Part low was formerly Miss Emma

Davis aud attended Brewster Uuiou

Free School uutil six years ago wheu

with her family she moved to Chappa-

qua. The remains were ou Mouday

brought to Brewster aud the fuueral

service held iu the Baptist church.

Kev. H. Ii. Westuott officiated, luter-

uieut iu the M. E. cemetery.

Senator Chauncey M. Depew has

returned from Europe.

Whist and dance at Wells' Casino

to-night Tickets 50 cents each.

The entertainers at the Kishawana

Country Club for to-morrow are Mrs.

J. W. White, Mrs. A. Howes and Mrs.

J. Sheridan.

Miss Horton and Miss Schryver of President Brinkman's Reception.

"The Elite'! have returned from their | On Labor Day, at the Kishawana

vacation to prepare for their Fall Country Club in spite of inclement

weather President Brinkman re­

ceived a larger family than ever be-

millinery opening.

Misses

Charles Carlson, of Somers Center,

sold 80,000 piokles during the month

of August, the price ranging from

98 to $5 per 1,000.

Coney Island's Mardi Gras each

afternoon and evening next week.

This year's carnival is called the

"Carnival of States."

Sunday is the last day of grace for

the straw hat. President Roosevelt

discarded his on September 1st and

hel ieves that day the proper time to

cast aside the summer head-gear.

The Prohibition County Conven­

tion has been called for Saturday,

Sept 28th. It will be held in the

Brewster Town Hall in the afternoon,

the hour to be decided upon later.

Angelo Bove's Italian bakery on

Marvin avenue is now completed but

an addition is being put upon the

building for the accommodation of

the help whioh he proposes to main­

tain.

The report that potatoes were to

be scarce and exceedingly high this

year is not borne out by Brewster

farmers who say that the tubers are

plentiful and just as good as the

average.

Bowcatoher should have but little

difficulty in capturing the race for

horses owned in Dutohess, Columbia

or Putnam oounties at the Pough-

keepsie fair Oct 1st, should his

owner, decide to start him.

At the Rockland county fair last

week Hilda B., who captured second

money in the 2:20 trot at Gunnel, won

in the 2:22 olass, beBt time2:20. Bessie

Pandit who; took the 2:27 pace at

Carmel was also a winner, taking the

2:28 pace, best time 2:18$.

An automobile belonging to I. R.

Fenton, of the M. A. MoNeil insur­

ance agency of Lime Rock, was

burned last Friday in the MHltown

rook cut. The cause of the fire was

"back firing." The machine which

was a 100? Rambler was completely

destroyed, the only parts that did not

go up in smoke being the steel frame­

work and riniH for tires.

Eight hour shifts are going into

effeot among telegraphers on the

Highland, Harlem and many other

divisions October 1st At the High­

land depot one extra man will be

added. Operators Allen and Tuttle

now work twelve hours a day and the

extra man in taking four hours from

each will greatly relieve them. At the

Harlem an extra mau will also be em­

ployed.

The football seasou is nearly upon

us aud we notice that various squads

have been called out for practice.

Brewster invariably has a strong

team late in the season, but why not

start early this year. Get together

bovs. Call a meeting and elect a

manager and captain and start the

ball rolling now. Football is a better

revenue producer here than baseball.

Mt Kisco, Pawling aud possibly Car­

mel are to be represented on the grid­

iron this fall.

Anna E. Gallagher and

Sophia Shepard, graduates of Brew­

ster High School, doss '07, have en­

tered New Paltz Normal School.

Miss K. E. Kilcoyne, of New York,

and sister Bessie, of Brewster, have

just returned from a six days' trip

through the beautiful Berkshire Hills.

Now that the trout season has

closed local sportsmen are watching

for September 10th, the first lawful

day to hunt grey squirrels, woodcock

and grouse.

Farmer* are getting rather good

prices for their apples in the New

York markets this week. The first

of the week a portion of the quantity

was held up because of the Jewish

holidays.

Mr. and Mrs. Patr.iok Ryan are in

attendance at the State Fair, Syracuse,

and comfortably quartered at the

Yates House. Hr. Ryan's Ora

Margrave was just inside the money

in the race for three-year-olds.

The Town Board has designated

polling places in Southeast the same

as last year the voters in District No.

1 will register and cast their ballots

on the east side of the Town Hall and

those in District No. 2 on the west

side.

A cake sale will be held by the

Ladies Aid Society of the Presbyterian

ohuroh at the residence of Mrs, Lydia

Yale, next Friday afternoon, Sept

20th. A liberal patronage is solicited.

Ladies are requested to send cakes

without special solicitation.

fore and the cup trials brought out

a field of contestants of unusual

strength, all of whioh is gratifying

OBITUARY.

Miss Edith Penny.

In this village, Wednesday evening

at 8 o'olook, at the residence of her

brother-in-law, Hon. John R, Yale,

Miss Edith Penny departed this life.

Her illness, although of several weeks'

evidence of the growth of the club duration, was not believed to be near

and the adoption in the near future a fatal termination until Wednesday

of changes and improvements which afternoon when general peritonitis,

will increase its popularity and make' due to cancer of the stomach, became

it equal to the best outing house in apparent and she sank rapidly until

the state, with service at all hours.

The features of the day were the eternal rest ended her suffering.

Miss Penny was born in the town of

cup contests which proved exciting Patterson, in 1855 and was a daughter

and held a large portion of the crowd I of Hiram Penny and Melissa Crosby.

until all the tcores had been tabulated

and announoed. For the gentlemen's

cup—30 holes—0. Ralph Diehl and

James White were even up at 104.

There was a tie, also, in the score for

the ladiesoup—0 holes—Mrs. Sheridan

and Miss Griffith going over the

course In 08. There were only two

contestants in the boys handicap—18

holes— Charles Heart field and Dalton

Griffith. The soore was 117 to 124 in

favor of Heart Held.

She first became identified with the

educational and social life here more

than twenty-five years ago when she

was engaged as teacher at the old

Southeast Center school, boarding

during the period of school sessions

with the late Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin

D. Everett. She was unusually apt

and enthusiastic in her work aud

business men of prominence in Brew­

ster, then her pupils, remember her

kindness, patience and helpfulness In

A special brew of clam chowder the schoolroom. Later on Mr. and

after a favorite receipt handed down

to President Brinkman by the ohief

of the old Yolunteer Firemen's

Association of New York was

influential in keeping up the good

work of the players—everyone who

started stayed until the last ladle of

ohowder was served. The soore:

MEN'S HANDICAP-JM Holes.

A. H. Smith, Vice-President of the

New York Central has been indicted

for manslaughter in connection with

the killing of thirteen passengers iu

the wreck of the Brewster express at

Woodlawu last February and must

stand trial late in the fall or early

spring unless additional steps legally

act as a detriment. The iudictmeut

charging Smith with manslaughter is

based ou the death of Clara A. Hud-

sou. Mr. Smith, through his attor-

torueys entered a demurrer, which

was disallowed.

Brewster bchool opened ou Mon­

day for the fail term. The attend­

ance is very large but will iucreabe

October 1st wheu the Compulbory

Attendance Law goes into force. The

lir,M day was spent iu organizing

classes aud arraugiug other brunches.

cf work. The real work ib uow get­

ting well under way. The faculty

consists of F. H. Bennett, principal,

aud the Misses Kate deF. Crane,

Daisy 1. Yale, Mary Duuu, Jennie B.

Gauuu, Auua E. Furred, Mabel

Tallmage, Beatrice M. Yale, I'ua B.

J'nurstou, teackerb.

Richards & Gaston are daily getting

out large quantities of rook near the

abandoned Tilly Foster Iron Mines.

It is there placed in a stone crusher

and converted into rook ballast to be

used for roadbed on the Harlem be­

tween Goldens Bridge and Brewster.

John Brady long employed as en­

gineer ou the Brewster local has bid

in the gravel train run. The gravel

train "ties up" over night in Brew­

ster and Mr. Brady was very fortu­

nate in getting this new run. The

emoluments connected with the new

job are greater and the working time

is several hours shorter.

At the Dykenians Baptist church

on Thursday evening, Sept 10th,

Lu B. Cake and his wife, Ella June

Mead. These two are entertainers of

national reputation, having frequent­

ly been invited the second and third

time to the same church or ball in

cities and large towns. You'll miss

a "heap" if you don't come. 7:80 sharp.

Fred Rioh who was operated upon

last week at the Danbury Hospital is

recovering as rapidly as can be ex­

pected. The operation was a very

delicate one the cell bursting before

he was placed under tbe knife. Blood

poisoning was feared but the danger

is now past. The operation upon

August Herman was more successful

and be is expected home in another

week.

Brewster Lodge, No. 457,1. O. O. F.

have accepted tbe invitation of Dr.

Reed to worship in tbe Brewster

Methodist Episcopal church, Sunday

night, Sept. 15th. It is expected that

there will be a large number present

in honor of the occasion, the lodge

coming in a body in regalia and be­

ing seated at sharp half past seven.

Tbe men of Brewster, outside the

order of Odd Fellows, who are not in

affiliation with other churches, are

especially invited to come with their

wives and lady friends. Topic, Sun­

day night, "An Odd Fellow in the

Time of Christ." Tbe Odd Fellows

will assemble in their ball at seven

o'clock.

The seasou of summer amusements

at Kenosia Park euded on Saturday

night The Lake had an exception­

ally successful season aud it is esti­

mated that at least 100,000 wituessed

the performances. At times the ut-

teudauce has exceeded 10,000 persons

a week aud the average has probably

been at least 8,000. There were

thirteen weeks of shows. Nine weeks

were devoted to comic opera aud

musical comedy aud the other four

weeks to special uttructions iu the

way of vaudeville, minstrels or

comedy. The park was better pat­

ronized this year than ever before

from this direction.

Miu-cl lull HI.. 47

Hopkins 50

Vreeland— u~

Ma lili a nl.... 40

Total

44 42 48 180

65 45 40 UK)

•Ii .'HI ,V.l -Ml

40 64 68 808

64 68 40 808

60 65 68 880

01 60 51 880

00 08 60 855

57 65 68 810

40 48 40 108

H'dp

0

10

81

88

80

88

44

44

68

48

88

BOYS' UANMCAP-18 Holes.

LADIES

Mrs. sinTIIinn...

Mrs. Dixon

Miss orllilili

Mrs. Urlftlth

Mlsslleurttleld..

Total

HANDICAP-O r

Total

00

SO

00

bl

84

H'd'p

0

0

iolcs.

H'd'p

8

(1

8

4

0

0

Final

Score

104

100

170

100

170

174

188

808

177

104

Firal

Score

117

Final

Score

08

SO

08

88

76

Mrs. Yale settled near Brewster and

ever afterward their home was her

home as well as her pride and joy.

Her further pride was the Presby­

terian church and one can scarcely

recall a ladies' aid or missionary

gathering without her presence.

Always alive to every need,

ready to do and tireless in doing,

the home circle audi the ohuroh

circle she loved so well and in which

her counsel aud effort were so

thoroughly appreciated have sustain­

ed a great loss.

The fuueral will be held on Satur­

day, at 11 o'clock a m., at Mr. Yale's

residence. The services will be con­

ducted by Rev. Murray H. Gardner.

Interment at the Milltown Rural

cemetery.

The play off was on Saturday last,

when Mrs. Sheridan and Mr. Diehl,

present holders, won tbe cups.

Milk Prices.

The contract books at Borden's

factory were opened yesterday. Prices

for the next six months average 20j|

oents per hundred pounds higher

than the same months beginning

October 1,1000, as follows:

1007

October $ 1 80

November 2 00

December ' 2 00

1008

January 2 00

February 2 00

March •. 1 80

The quantity of milk signed

about the same as last year.

Danbury Fair Program.

The Danbury Fair of this year,

October8thtol2th, issuretoexoellany

of the previous exhibitions. More

money in prises is offered, new classes

have been added in nearly all depart­

ments, many novel attraction, includ­

ing Roy Knabenshue's airship in

daily flights and the performing seals

from the Hippodrome, have been

booked; $0,000 in purses for the speed

horses will bring the fastest trotters

and pacers to the Fair. The Danbury

Fair Cattle Show is always the best

in the East, the Dog Show rivals that

of the Madison Square Garden; the

exhibition horses, the autos, and the

thousand and one other attractions

will be far ahead of anything hereto­

fore attempted by this progressive

association. The following is the

program in brief of the out-of-doors'

events:

Tuesday, Oct. 8th.—Exhibition of

Blooded Stock, Cattle Sheep and

Horses. At 2 p. in.. Parade of Auto­

mobiles and automobile races. Kna­

benshue's airship in flights around

the grounds.

Wednesday, Oct 0th.- Governor's

Day. Exhibition of Blooded Stock;

continuation of the Cattle Show;

Trotting, class 2:28, pacing classes 2:17

and 2:30, program concerts by two

military bands. Entertainments in

front of the grand stand and airship

flights.

Thursday, Oct. 10th.—The stake

race, 2:15 pacing, purse 91,000; trot­

ting, 2:17 class; pacing, 2:24 olass;

running race. Concerts by bands;

free exhibition by trained seals, and

airship flights.

Friday, Oot. lltb.—Two-twenty

trot for purse of 91,000; 2:27 and 2:24

pacing classes; running race, Concerts

grand stand attractions and the high­

est airship flight of the week.

Saturday, Oot. 12th.—Pacing, class

2:10; trotting, class 2:85; running race.

Concerts and attractions.

1000

91 55

1 70

1 80

1007

1 80

1 05

1 50

is

Double Track Open.

The Harlem now announces double

track service from New York to Brew­

ster. The first train to use the track

regularly was No, 18, leaving Brew­

ster at 12:37 p. ni., Wednesday. The

extra track section from Qolden's

Bridge to Brewster was commenced

by Richards & Gaston two years ago

aud proved to be an exceedingly

difloult proposition. There seemed

to be no end to the blasting in t he

rooky outs just south of Brewster and

the uew bridge spanning the East

Branch of tbe Croton near the

Juengst factories was a long drawn

out job. However, the work has been

well done and the use of stone ballast

on the eutire section insures further

security and freedom from dust.

There was no meeting of the Hospi­

tal Association last Friday night, a

quorum not being present.

Zelous Shove.

Zelous Shove, age seventy-nine

years, died at the home of his son,

Seth H. Shove, of 40 Balmforth ave.,

Danbury, on Monday night at six-

o'clock. He had been on a visit to

his sons in Great Barrington, Mass.,

and Sharon, and while making a stay

of a few days in Dauhury on his

return was taken with/ tbe illness

that caused his death.

The deceased is survived by a wife

ond one daughter, Mrs. J. D. More­

house, of Brewster, and four sons,

Setb H. Shove, of 40 Balmforth ave.;

Fred N. Shove, of 20 Pleasant street,

Daubury, both employed as engineers

on the New York Division of the New

Haven road; Charles Shove, of Great

Barrington, Mass.; and Frank Shove,

of Sharon.

Mr. Shove was born in Kent, Conn.,

where he resided until he came to

Brewster, eleven years ago. He was

the first to serve as Rural Free

Delivery Carrier and continued on

Route No. 1 until last winter, when

failing health compelled him to

retire. He was a kindly disposed

neighbor and friend' and enjoyed the

confidence of all who knew him.

In 1848 he married Miss Polly Lane,

tbe fiftieth anniversary of the

marriage being oelebrated nine years

ago.

The funeral was held in St. Andrew's

church in Kent, Thursday morning at

10 o'clock, conducted by Rev. Frank

Heartfield.

It will be of interest to Mr. A.

Duraut Snedeu's Brewster frieuds to

learu that as tbe result of a competi­

tion with several others he has been

appointed architect for the proposed

uew Second Reformed church build-

iug iu Hackeusack, N. J. The build­

ing iucludiug orgau aud furnishings

will cost about 975,000 aud it is pro­

posed to commence construction as

soou as working plans can he com­

pleted. Without the kuowledge of

Mr. Suedeu the committee haviug the

matter in cha/ge visited Brewster, in­

spected St. Andrew's church, one of

Mr. Suedeu's examples aud were

unanimous iu placing his plans first.

The first actual day of the Jewish

year 5008 was Mouday. Sept. 0th. The

first day of Tishri is called Rosh

Hashouah. It is the most important

holy day auioug the Jews, secoud iu

importance only to Yom Kippur.

The first day of the new year is a day

of mishpat or judgment aud the re­

ligious teaching is that on that day

all persous walk before the Lord iu

judgment. According to the teach­

ing it is then written in the book of I to be given to the class aud import-

judgment what is to be the fate of allj ant committees are to be appointed.

in the coming year. The ttores of ' This, with other business, will occupy

Aaron Fiueberg aud JacobSusuitzsky but a short time Wednesday night.

were closed ou Monday aud part of A pleasant program is beiug provided.

Tuesday iu order that the propria-1A delightful social seasou is beiug

tors could attend religious worship iu I expected aud light refreshments will

New York uUd Daubury. i be served.

Invitations ore out for a meeting to

complete tbe organization of tbe

"New Movement Adult Bible Class,"

which holds its usual meetings each

Sunday uoou iu the Methodist

Episcopal church of this village. Tbe

invitat ion referred to are for a busi­

ness aud social gathering to be held

at the Methodist parsouage adjoin­

ing the church ou Wednesday night,

Sept. lbth, at 7:30 o'clock. We

noticed the six strokes of the bell Last

Sunday uoou. This signal is coming

to mean something. A name is yet

Miss Marjorie aud Messrs. Harold

and Summers Vreeland entertained

at the Play House Wednesday even­

ing with music, dancing, games and

favors, a goodly company of young

people uearly all of whom are soon to

go iuto training for tbe next school

aud college examinations.

Charles S. L. Leikei t Weds.

The marriage of Miss Flora Larissa

Irving Carpenter, daughter of Prof,

aud Mrs. Willard Carpenter, of You-

kers to Charles Samuel Lawrence

Leikert, son of Conductor John F.

Leikert, of White Plains, took place

Tuesday afternoon, Sept. 3d, at four

o'clock in St. Paul's Episcopal ohurch

in Yonkers.

The details of the wedding although

simply carried out, were extremely

artistic and pretty says the White

Plains Record. The church decora­

tions were entirely of yellow. Masses

of goldenrod and sun flowers were

used at the altar while at each pew

clusters of the same blossoms, tied

with yellow ribbon made a veritable

golden hedged path for the bridal

party as it passed dowu the center

aisle to the soft strains from the Lo­

hengrin wedding march.

The maid of honor was Miss Clara

Charlotte Louise Wiggins, of New

York. The bride's maids were Miss

May Leikert a sister of the groom,

Miss Marion Cook of West Spring-

Held and Miss Gertrude Chambers,

of OsBining.

The ushers were John F. Leikert,

a brother of the groom and Mr. Lock-

Mculler and William Russell, Jr.

Following the ceremony an infor-

mal^reoeption was held at the bride's

home, 135 Warburton avenue.

After au extended wedding tour

Mr. aud Mrs. Leikert will go to house­

keeping in New York city.

A stranger who has visited many

towns iucludiug Brewster painting

numbers ou rural mail boxes for a

nominal charge should not be given

auy consideration. He is uot em­

ployed by the government aud has uo

authority to act. He is an imposter

aud can ouly guess at the uumber of

your box.

Tbe taking of the summer special

from the Highland division schedule

last Saturday gives Brewster the

same inadequate passeuger facilities

it has enjoyed for many years. This

train ran from Poughkeepsie to New

Haven passing through Brewster ou

the easterly trip at 7:28 a m. return­

ing at 0:30 p. m. It was very popular

with Brewster folks as they were per­

mitted a full day of shoppiug or visit­

ing iu Daubury or other Couuecticut

cities aud there seems to be uo eud

of kicking at the company's action.

It was announced at the local depot

that it was a paying venture aud the

train although uot taken off uow

"makes up" iu Daubury instead of

Poughkeepsie running ou the same

time. Why uot run the train to

Brewster at uight aud let it "tie up"

here*

PATTERSON.

Dr. T. P. Birdsall is having his

house painted by Artist Conklyn.

Miss Mary Hainea has returned to

Oueouta Normal to complete her term.

After a two weeks' outing with

friends at Peach Lake, Miss Lillian

Mallory has returned.

Miss Hattie Barrett has been en­

gaged to teach this term iu the

Pleasantville High School.

Miss Cecilia Parsons will spend the

winter with her brother in Cali­

fornia She left towu last week.

We are sorry to lose "Gus" Larson

who has gone to Topeka to accept a

position with a railroad company.

The placing of another step at the

entrance of the postoflioe is an im­

provement greatly appreciated by

the public.

Commissioner Watts is receiving

commendations from all sides because

of his unceasing efforts to keep the

highways iu first class shape.

Rev. H. S. Newcomb preached a

very interesting sermon ou Sunday

last in the Presbyterian church in the

absence of Rev. O. S. Dean who held

the charge at Katouah.

Rev. John Authony is actively

workiug for the Prohibitiou cause.

He has visited several towus iu the

couuty aud has called the county

convention at Brewster in the after-

uoou of Sept. 28th. There will prob­

ably be speaking in the eveuiug.

The school meeting last Friday

evening brought out a large number

of taxpayers. The only important

business was the question of site for

the new school house. After little

discussion a vote was taken- The

majority favored the site near the

residence of Mrs. E- H. Gauuug.

Great satisfaction fouud wearing

W L. Douglas Shoes. Lobdell & Co.

are the agents.

BEADING NOTICES.

F OB Fire aud Lite lusunuiou go to A. P. Budd

Brewster, N. Y.

oTHAYED.—Kroui my tuna lu DrewvUle. a

13 11 nisi «-i II springer, l in ny Brudy.

P*OH SALE CHEAP.-Parlor suit couslstlug ot

1 sots uud tour chairs belonging to Presby-

111 km mouse, inquire of Mrs. F. ii. Bogers.

f I v i LET.—Two furnished rooms tor two gent le-

i , iin-u ni' IH.III uud wife, i in>••• minutes unlit

1,11111 dcjHil. Address, P. O. Box «7, Brewster.

V ABIES WILL FIND superior comfort uiid

accoiumodut lous during coutlueiueul, lu a

private couutxy liouse. Irregularities corrected.

skilled midwife. wlUi •-.'•'• yeurs experience. Ad­

dress Mrs. L. Lelir, Ehnsiord, telephone, r. It.

White Plains.

oPEEn oKMNANCE. Notice Is hereby given

O thut complaints supported by proof that

uuy vehicle drlveu within the village ul u spued

greater thuu 10 miles per hour will be euter

i uineii uud proper uctlou tukeu. By order 01

the Vuluge Trustees. W. A. Ferris. President.

U EGISTEKEB LETTEB LOST between the

residence of Miss Funule Crosby uud Mrs.

Churles Bloomer Friday morning. The letter

was addressed to Mrs. Chus. Bloomer uud was

iruiu Mrs. W. c. Bloomer. Finder please leuw

ut the Brewster postonlce.

J. Bdgur Day. Ii. F. D. No --.

A well recommended American couple wit bout

< in ii 11 en. uud uot over !.'• yeurs of uge to

occupy owners farm during the winter in >•>.

Chungs lor rent. A geuerul supervision of pluce

v> ill be cx]>cciod. No stock. Must be very neat

uud references must be exceptlouul. Address

M. E. Hurul Free Bull very. No. 4, Brewster, N. V.

A l"CTlo.N.-Joc Abbott, Auctioneer, win sell

at Public Auction, for tne uudersigneU ut

tiie ln I..-1H.In Place, Mi "•"'• cusl of Hull's Fund,

on Wednesday, sept, isth, ut 10 u. m., 40 choice

Cows, 1 two horse power, i onc-horsc jtower. '.0

'ions ol Bay. 8 Boi-nes. 1 bjulng Wagou, 1 bet

Double Uarncsa, a CuJUialors, i Plows. 1 Spring

Barrow, i (HO nurse Wagon, heavy; l Muck out

Straw. Terms, under 410 cash over »i" uo dujs

credit on approved uotes. Otlo Mcrieiih,

S TAB Ulli'.]'- FABM Is prejiured to served a

limited number of customers the ycur round

with iiiui. In yuan bottles ul " cent*, butler

milk ut 7 cents, crcuui In pint bottles ut SO cents

pel botUe, butler in print* ut £> ccnn> IM-I pound,

eggs ut market price, ull kluds of vegetables und

smuii nulls, ulso struw berry plant* otseverul of

the finest varieties. A Postal curd uddrcosed

Starr Uldge Farui, Brewster, will receive prompt

attention.

G ABBAOE DEPOSITS. No person shuU

throw luy or place uuy dirt, vegetables,

flltn, ushes, shells, filthy water, water, liquid or

rubbish of uuy kind In uuy street or public pluoe

lu suld vllluge, exoepl t lint ushes uud gurbuge

may be placed lu proper reucptucle* aud carried

luto the si ieet II moved uway prouipUy. Any

lH-rsou offending ugulnsl tills oi dluuucc Khull bo

subject lo a penult) of uot less thuu two dollars

una uoi more thuu nw dollars.

Bourd of Health,

Village oi Brewster, Nj X


The Brewster Standard, Friday, September 13, 190?

EPWORTH LEAGUE.

•apt 15: "Instruction in God's word."

"That the man of God may bo com-

plato, furnished completely unto ovory

good work."—II Tim. iii, 17.

By REV. WALTER J. YATES, D. D.

Passages for reference—©out. Iv, 6-10;

XI Chron. xxxlv, 29-83; Acts xvll, n, XI;

Rom. 1, 16; xvl, 25-27.

(Bible Study Day—American Bible So­

ciety.)

It Is a great work which the Amer­

ican Bible society Is doing. Nearly all

branches of the Christian church are

united in the work of distributing the

Bible to all parta of the world. This

Is In the confident belief that It is

God's word and Is needed by all men

to make them wise unto salvation.

The results of this worldwide circu­

lation of the Scriptures are remarka­

ble. Much of the story Is as fascinat­

ing as romance. Heroism and even

martyrdom has been suffered by those

who have done the work. But wher­

ever the book has gone men have

turned to God, believing the "glad tid­

ings," even when they have not met

any missionary and have had no one to

explain the message to them.

The Interest of the league In the

service this day Is double. First there

should be intelligent'Ideas of the duty

we have to send the Bible to all men

, that they may know as fully as we'do

the will of God. And then we should

give attention to the diligent study of

the word among ourselves.

Not every one has come to a clear

recognition of the duty to send tho

gospel to all the world. And there

are multitudes who think themselves

very good Christians who do not have

any systematic habits of giving of their

means for the extension of the king­

dom of God. They have never given

any thought to those matters. One of

the helpful things the league Is doiug

Is In this very direction. It Is educat­

ing our young people to know that they

are under obligation to save every one

whom they can reach by personal In­

fluence and to reach all they can by

their money and prayers. We are be­

coming moro Intelligently benevolent.

The next generation ought to do more

and better work than has ever before

been done.

The second part of this duty we ore

attending to as never before also. We

are studying the Bible. We know

more about It as literature, and we un­

derstand its history more clearly, but

that Is small In comparison with the

fact that we know the Bible itself bet­

ter. We are coming to its depths of

meaning and are feeliug the strong In­

fluences of its teachings taking fast

hold of our daily livlug and surely,

even If slowly, lifting things nearer to

God.

Much more than has yet been done

remains for us to do in this work. The

Sunday school needs strengthening in

every department Then the church

itself ueeds to have deeper and fuller

knowledge of the Bible. The great

fundamental truths of righteousness

need to receive more emphasis until

the whole life of the people Is quicken­

ed by It, until business, politics, fam­

ily life, society and every part of our

complex existence has felt completely

the sway of the Spirit of God. There

needs to be more aggressiveness In our

preaching of the truth. The old pro­

phetic spirit Is needed in baptism of

pulpit and pew. The league needs to

take a firmer hold of all that pcrtaius

to the Christ life and, putting all other

things under foot, live pure and up­

right lives everywhere * ud at all times.

We must be Bible Christians. Com­

pare your thinking and doing with the

standard, and where you have come

short resolve with the help of the Holy

Spirit to correct all the past failures

and rise to the full height of your

privilege lu Christ Jesus.

SKIN ERUPTIONS.

Many persons are much annoyed

by prickly best, hires, bolls and

other skin eruptions, often at­

tended by painful itching and

burning, and sometimes becom­

ing otw tin We and onsichUy sores.

Corpulent people are especially

subject to these maddening In*

flections all caused by impure

blood. Scrofula, Cancer and all

other skin diseases arise from an

impure state of the blood.

DR. KENNEDY'S

AYORITE

REMEDY

if tsken when these symptoms first appear, will pro-

vent serious consequences. It strikes st the cause

of the trouble, by gently opening the IMIWCIB, toning

tho stomach, sUmnlating die kidneys and liver to do

their Important work, and ending In setting up a

healthy action of the system, it may be accepted ns

s cure for all derangements springing from impure

blood. Fever and Ague, Malnrin, Hbettmntlc Gout,

ur

F

and all urinary derangements rapidly improve under

•sir — ' '"

., no appetite, consUpai

skin, take Dr. Kennedy's Favorite Remedy without

ELECTItWTNOTICE.

State of New York,)

county or Putnam, >ss:

Town or Southeast. J

We, the undersigned, composln e noard of

Town officers of snld town. Do 1' why oivB

Notice that nt the General Election «-. be held in

this state on the Tuesday sneec .iiig the first

Monday In November next, (Nove .' rrftth.) the

following officers may be lawmily voted ror, to

wit:

An Associate Judge of the Court of Appeals, in

the place or Dents O'Brien.

An Aasoclate Judge of the Court of Appeals, In

the place or Edward T. Harriett.

Whose terms of office will expire on the Inst

day or December next.

County and District Officers also to be

Elected for ssid County:

One Member or Assembly.

A County Judge, in the place of J. Bennett

southard, whose term of office will expire on the

last, day or December next.

At the said General Election there 1R to be

submitted to the jieople for the purpose of voting

t hereon, the following amendment* to the Con­

stitution:

AMENDMENT NUMBEB ONE.

_dlB*8ecl*o«fenof JaSJele eigW ot CM

fonsuiuueo, so tksjkJt she* read as follows* }

ABTSOU. VIIL

110. No county, citr, town, or linage afcatt

leraafter give any money or property, or loan 1

the same treatment. Tf you have mdlgesUon, dls- fa money or credit Co or in aid of any ln-i

lividual. association or corporation, or be-:

tome directly or indirectly the owner of

you

Itlte,

ordered liver, no appetite, consUpatlon, feverish lividual, association or corporation, or be-

de !f y, ..v Keep H .' n U, ° h0M i MW,, i n .?i ou ff B J!f 0ll Kl t° ok ,n , or bonds of, any association or

X.?.XV OUOn,0arae,r '• Lar K ebot0e,ll -° 0 - AU i torporaUon; nbr shall any such county. I

WriteiDr. David Kennedy's Sons, Rondout, N.Y., | !»** town or village be allowed to incur

for free samplo bottle and medical booklet. Mention , tf»y Indebtedness except for county, cMy,

this paper when you write. i own or village purposes. This section

THE ORIGIN OF SUNDAY. '*

Our Best For God.

To give his very best to Cod would

nave many a young man from the

worst pltfulls that entrap him. It Is

because he gives the second best of

bis love, his strength, his ambition to

aplrltuul things and keeps his best

energies for ihe rest of life that the

average Christlun is such a weak spec­

imen. As George Meredith expresses

It, "The reason so many fall from God

is that they cling to Iilm with their

weakness and not with their strength."

—Forward.

Beware of This Wile of the Devil.

One way the devil secures the fall of

a church is to persuade all the pillars

to lie down and become sleepers.—Tho

Bible Iteader, Richmond, Ya.

..A Minister Treats It From a Scien­

tific Standpoint.

According to the Rev. Robert John

Flood, a member of the American As­

sociation for the advancement of Bel*

ence, the Sabbath was an established

institution in prehistoric times by peo­

ples scattered the world over. It first

originated from moon-worship. Nature

worshipers picked the seventh day as

sacred because the new phase of the

moon appeared on the average every

seventh day.

Ail nations with whom the Hebrews

came In contact observed this anci­

ent custom. The Israelites from their

intimate relation with the Canaan-

Ites and Babylonians, recast It In a

mould of their own. It was kept on

the seventh day of the moon and was

an atonement day. The various pro*

muglatlons concerning the Sabbath,

based on the release from the Egyp­

tians, the travails of the Exile, cub

minated in the Priestly Code given

to the Jews after their return from

captivity. This code commanded, them

to keep holy the Sabbath because God

rested the seventh day from his crea­

tive work, which perfected the Jew­

ish Sabbath. It became an absolute

day of rest. For the first time a pen­

alty was added for the violation of

the command to rest After the Bab­

ylonian captivity the moon lost Its

distinction and only the Sabbattf was

kept sacred, which became the Rab­

bin! ?al Sabbath of the New Testament

times.

The Sabbath was not designed to

last forever. It was a ceremonial and

not a moral law. A new dispensa­

tion was Inaugurated when Christ ar­

ose from the dead, the completion of

His redemptive work. The Sabbath

rest day finished its mission with the

resurrection. The resurrection day

brought too much Joy to be soon for­

gotten, so all Jews and Gentiles hon­

ored the day, not as a sacred but as

a memorial day. The growth of Sun­

day observance Is outlined. The

practice of Lord's day keeping was

made a law of the State In A. D. 321,

under Constantine, and the first law

enjoining complete rest was made b)

the Council of Orleans, A. D. 538.

Mr. Flood decries the Puritanical

Sunday. It should be niace a duy

of Joy Instead of gloom. Children

should not be denied their toys, games

and amusements. They should have

music and recreation, the free UBe of

the whole house, including the dark­

ened parlors. He urges the Christian

to set an example for the faithful oc­

cupation of the day. Enforce the Sun­

day law by public opinion, but use

moderation In resorting to legal en

forcement. Use the law only as a last

resort, and that only when the com­

munity 1B practically a unit in ltd

judgment of the justice of the case.

He thinks little is to be accomplished

by arbitrarily forcing a community to

rest on Sunday. Rather stir up and

lift the moral life and insist upon

the observance of the day because

of the beneflclent effort upon the peo­

ple.

Mlcbell. John K Yale and I. stnrr Barnum.

Five constables In tin- plan* ft John nnncock

.)scnr Bailey. ItCbjntMli I. I'ta'sley. AlhroTravl.

* Three'Aurttioi-s in the place of John W

Towner. WlUiimi E. smith nml William A.Ferris

AH of whom wul hold e.nleo for two year

beginning.fiinuury I. |«R, egnw »wo .Tustion

of the p«i wl«< *U1 hold iWeewr four year

beginning January '. '**

The polling places designated for such election

\re ns roiiowB:

For the First District., at the Town Hall (East

tilde) m the Village of Biewster, in said District.

For the Second Districts at the Town nail,

West Side) in the Village of Brewster, In said

District.

And that tho polls of the election will be

opened at six o'clock in the forenoon and closed

nt five o'clock In tuo afternoon.

The boundary lines of the election districts

aereln referred to are as follows:

District No. I.—Beginning nt a point in the

Matte of the highway near the residence of the

mil' D. D. Steinbeck, at the town line dividing

Patterson and Southeast: thence southerly along

said highway over Brewster mil to Townsend

' :ly and westerly along tin

over the New York, New

lb all not prevent such county, city, town.'

ir village from making such provision for

ihe aid or support of Its poor as may be

tuthorlsed by law. No county or city

mail be allowed to become Indebted for

iny purpose or In any manner to an,

imount which, Including existing Indebt-

idness, shall exceed ten per centum of the

issessed valuation of the it-al estate of

nieh county or city subject to taxation, as

t appeared by the assessment rolls of

utld county or city on the. last assessment

'or state or county taxes prior to the In­

tuiting of such Indebtedness; and all ln-

lebtedness In excess of such limitations,

txcept such as now may exist, shall be

ibsolutely void, except as herein other-

else provided. No county or city, whose

•resent Indebtedness exceeds ten per

tentum of the assessed valuation of Ha

•eal estate subject to taxation, shall be

illowed to become indebted In any "further

imount until such Indebtedness shall be

•educed within such limit. This section

hall not be construed to prevent the issu-

ng of certificates ot indebtedness or rove.

me bonds Issued In anticipation of the

ollectlevi of taxes for amounts nctunll?

ontalned, or to be contained In the taxes

or the year when such certificates or rev-

nue bonds nre Issued and payable out of

uch taxeB. Nor shall this section be con-

Irued to prevent the Issue of bonds to

irovlde for the supply of water; but tho

erm of the bonds issued to provide the

Aipply of water shnll not exeeed twenty

•ears, and a sinking fund shall bo created

•n the Issuing of the said bondR for their

ademption, by raising annually a sum

vhlch will produce an amount equal to

he sum of the principal and Interest of

iald bondB at their maturity. All cerilfl-

tates of Indebtedness or revenue bonds Is-

med In anticipation of the collection of

nx'P, which are not retired within five

;enrs after their date of Issue, and bonds

ssued to provide for the supply of water,

ind any debt hereafter Incurred by any

•Kiril.m or part of n city. If there shall bo

iny such debt, shall be Included In ascer­

taining the power cf the city to become

>therwlse indebted: except that debts in­

curred by the city of New York after the

Irst day of January, nineteen hundred

»nd four, and drHs Incurred hy any rllv of

«ne tecond clan* alter Ihe tlr*i day of January,

nineteen hundred and clahl. to provide for

the supply of water shall not be so In-

-I'l'b-'i. Whenever the liounfle.rles of any

city, are the samo ns those of a county, or

when any city shall Include within Its

boundaries more thr.n ono county, the

power of any county wholly Included

within such city to become Indebted shall

cease, but the debt of tho county, hereto­

fore existing shall not, for the purposes

of this section, be reckoned us n part of

the city debt. The amount herenftcr to

be raised by tax for cownty or city pur­

poses. In any county containing a city of

over one hundred thousand InhaVltdnts.

or any such city of this state. In addltlor.

to providing for the principal and interest

of existing o>M. shall not In the aggro,

gate exceed In any one year two per cen­

tum of the assessed valuation of the reu'l

and personal estate of such county or

sity, to be ascertained as prescribed In

.'his SfiCilOD in rcBPecl to county or city

leu.

AMENDMENT NUMBER TWO.

Ameudlng section two of Article twelve of tin

' 'HUM it in urn, so that It bhull read as follows:

AUTICLE XII.

! 9. All cities are clasuined according to t lit

lateM utule enumeration, us troiu time to turn

made, as follows: The first class includei

Corner; thence southerly and westerly along the

highway to the bridge over the New York, New

Haven A Hartford (Highland Division) Railroad

near the residence of the late Weston Gaining;

thence southeasterly along the New York, New

naven & Hartford (Hlglilnnd Division) Rallrord

to the depot; thence In a line southerly to Pros­

pect Street and along said street to Oak Street;

thence easterly along Oak Street to a cross st reel

intersecting with Main street at the easterly

side of the Connors propeity: thence southerly

along said cross street to Main Street to a point

directly In the center of the northern boundary

line of the Town Hall property; thence soul herly

through the center of the Town nail end across

property or Warren S. Paddock to Marvin Ave­

nue: thence westerly along Marvin Avenue to

Railroad Avenue; thence southerly along Rail­

road Avenue and the Croton Turnpike to tho

Westchester t.'ounty line: thence easterly along

the Westchester county line to the Connecticut

Sttte line; thence northerly along the Con­

necticut si ate Hue to the Town line dividing the

towns of Patterson and Southeast: thence

westerly along said town dividing line to the

place or beginning.

Olstrlot No. I.—Beginning at the same point

as described In the boundary or the First Elec­

tion District and following the same line through

the town to the Westchester county line; thence

ruunlng westerly along said county line to the

line di\ Idlng the towns or Carmel and southeast;

thence northerly along said town dividing line

to the line dividing the towns or Patterson and

Southeast; thence easterly along said town

dividing line to the place nt beginning.

Dated, September ft, Itwr.

George llino. Supervisor.

biiult'l It. Sears, *1

CJeorgq 11. Kniiti'ii. I JUBtlcesor

.i.ni:i • .Mmiy. ithe Peace.

Daniel M. Barnes, J

Ernest o. Everett, Town Clerk.

POLLING PLACES:

At a mooting ot the Town Board the following

places were designated as polling places for the

next General Elect Ion to be held ou Tuesday,

November 5. iwr:

In District No. 1, at the Tonn Hull, (east side)

Brewster, N. Y.

In District No. 2, ut the Towu Hall, (westside)

Brewster, N. Y.

George ulna, supervisor.

Ernest O. Everett, Town clerk.

School Suits.

We have the Biggest Line of Boys Suits in Town. Double Breasted

Belt Suits with Knickerbocker Trousers.

Boys $2.00 Suits at $1.50.

Boys $3.00 Suits at $2.39.

Boys $5.00 Suits at $3.75.

Childrens School Hose at 10c. Tair.

Girls School Dresses from 50c. to 98c.

Ladies White Waists,

Regular $1.00 to $1.50 at ?5o.

New York Stor$,

Fowler Block, - Brewster, N. Y.

65SJB68a?aeS8fi39 St*miSJ?»^M SSyMESBSSSS

1 Watches, f

Clocks, Jewelry,

Eyeglasses,

Spectacles,

Optical Goods.

Richard Michell, " r r Brewster.

Repairing in all Departments of the business.

P URSUANT TO AN ORDER OP THE HON.

J. Bennett Houthard. surrogate of the

County of Putnam, N. Y., notice Is hereby given,

according to law, to all iieisoiis having claims

against Mary A. Jackson, late of the town of

Southeast, Putnam County. New York.deeeased,

to present the same with the vouchers thereof,

to the undersigned Adinlnlt tutor of the goods,

chattels and credits of said deceoent, at bis

place or transacting business attheonice or

Ainain .1. Miller. In the village oi Brewster.

Putnam County, New York, ou or before the l5th

day ol February, 1008.

ward C. Howes, Administrator.

AbramJ Miller,

Attorney lor Administrator,

Brewster, N. Y.

cmceatta&xaacm&csxDiVg^ i

O RDERS AND REGULATIONS OP THJ

Board Ol Health ot tho Town of Southeast

In the County ol Putnam and state of New York

The Board of limit h ol the Town ol Southeast

J iursuaut to the provisions of chapter •-•TO ot t In

ii v. s ol 1B85, dues hereby make the following

Orders and Regulations for the preservation o>

life and health, and the successiul operation o:

chapter 270 ol the Laws of 1886, In the Town o:

(southeast, to wit:

WABTI AND 8U>F8.

I. All waste material and slops, from house*

shall be conveyed to cess-pools and deodorized

or conveyed at least sixty feet rrom any dwelling

house In the Town of Southeast.

rniviBs.

II. All privy sinks In the Town of Southeast

and wlthlu fifty feet or any dwelling house. Bbal

be deodorized and disinfected, and kept free fron

offensive odors.

ill. All privy sinks within the limits or thi

Brewster BW District In the Town or Southeast,

and wlthlu rtfty feet of any dwelling house, Bhal

be cleared out and dlslutectcd at least onoe

each year.

OABBAOI.

IV. All refuse matter and decomposing sub

•taupe wlthlu one hundred leet of any dwellnu

house In the towu ol Southeast shall be effect

ually dlstnlected or removed.

V. No decomposing material, house slept

f arbage, or pulrescrlble substance, detriments

o public health, shall be dumped or placed tl

•iny ol the streets or highways in the Town oi

Southeast, or In any vacant lot within the limit*

ol the Brewster Fire District In said town.

SONTAOlOl s DI8KASSB.

VI. There shall be no public or church funers

Great Clothing Centre

OF BREWSTER, N. Y.

Clothing for Yourself.

Clothiiig for Your Children.

Gents Furnishings

For Everybody.

Ladies Cloaks, Suits, Separate Skirts.

Wrappers Etc. All kinds of White Goods. A full assortment of all

the Latest Styles in Fancy Goods. Clothing for School Children.

Suits of Clothes and Overcoats made to order.

Main Street Opposite Post Ofllce. Brewster, N. Y

CBJKtQ

all cities having a population of one tU^l^^^L^A^J^^SS^r^^Si

dred andre»t trace the lowlands whence I

e:,:ile.

Only one Mv.'e sJftftJcb of road is clear.

lirV'.: 1 a r i i rM. *,i.sight through

I II i r. in—

Th« duty that He gives me now and here.

Ti.f 1 ••*•# end service


The Brewster Standard, Friday, September 13. 1907

gKij

THE BIAKINOS OP GLUE.

PRUNING THE ORCHARD.

t

Helpful Suggestions for Making

Work Effective.

Some orchard pruning is necessarf,

hut there is a vast difference be­

tween pruning and butchering a tree.

All pruning which a tree really needs

should as a rule be done during the

first four years after it has been set

out and with the view of forming a

good and well-balanced head, leaving

a sufficiently open center to admit

sunlight and air. The pruning should

be begun by the man who assists the

planters. One-year-old trees should

invariably be pruned to a switch and

leaders cut back to the second bud

from the tip. In the case of two-

yes-r-old trees, the assistant must

draw it toward him without pulling

it out of the packing, and with his

shenrB form the head of the tree by

cutting away everything but four

brunches, and if he cannot find four,

lerve three coming out on different

sides of the stem. These branches,

although opposite, should be at least

one Inch one above the other^ The

lowest or heaviest branch should be

directed to the south-west, for the

reason that it will protect the tree

against sun-scald and in the spring,

when the ground is soft, this branch

being the lowest and heaviest, will

have a tendency to draw the tree to­

ward the southwest, thus giving more

resistance to the prevailing winds.

All branches left should be cut back

to at least three or four buds with

the leader cut in proportion. If a root

is much longer than the others . it

muRt be cut back in proportion and

the slash must be from below upward

toward the tip of the root, so that

when set in the ground, the cut will

rest on the bottom. Should the •-ee

have a poor system of roots prune to

a switch, and allow one year's growth

betore forming the head.—Field and

Farm.

Strawberry Growing.

Strawberries will succeed In any

soil that is adapted to ordinary farm

or garden crops. Soil should be

thoroughly prepared to a good depth,

well drained and enriched.

Vegetable manure Cmuck, rotten

turk, wood ashes, etc.) is the best.

For field culture set in rows 8 to 3 %

feet apart, 15 to 18 inches in rows;

for garden, 15 Inches apart each way,

leaving pathway every third row.

To produce fine large fruit keep

in hills pinching runners off as soon

as they appear.

Ground should always' be kept

clean and well cultivated. In winter

a covering of leaves, straw, or some

kind of litter will protect the plants.

Do not cover them until the ground

is frozen or so deep as to smother

the plants, .and remove covering be­

fore growth starts in spring.

Mulching will keep the fruit clean

and the soil in good condition during

the fruiting season.—Farm and Stock

Not a Definite Organic Substance, Bat

the Product of Several.

Glue 1s not a definite positive or­

ganic substance as most people sup­

pose. Chemists tell us that glue

does not pre-exist in any animal or­

ganism except under abnormal con­

ditions—as In disease—but is the

product of several transformations.

The first transformation takes

place In drying the hide. If a green

hide is boiled after being prepared in

exactly the same manner by liming,

etc., while it is yet green, an entirely

different product of less consistency

is secured than by drying the hide

after liming and then boiling.

The second transformation seems

to take place in boiling the material,

probably from action of the heat.

The third transformation occurs in

the drying of the Jelly secured in the

boiling operation.

Still another transformation occurs

in the drying of this Jelly Into actual

glue, and this serles v of changes does

not end here, for glue dlssovled In

water and again boiled sufficiently

long loses its form once more and

will not gelatinize, but will remain

in liquid form.

Glue yielding substances are pro­

duced by the animal economy from

proteine bodies, albumen, flbrlne and

caseine. The Imposslbllty 8t pre­

serving for any length of time the

stock from which glue is made rend­

ers it necessary to adopt some sys­

tem In choosing and preserving it

until sufficient^ quantities are collected

without fermentation or decomposi­

tion. Hence the refuse from tanner­

ies consisting of the clippings of

hides, ear and tall pieces of ox, calf

and sheep, and from skins of other

animals are preferred, because they

can be dressed with lime, which re­

moves the hair and acts as an anti­

septic.

The ordintry bone stock glue Is

made from the larger bones of cat­

tle and horn piths, collected from

different sources. A large quantity

of waste bones is accumulated in

the preparation of tinned provisions.

If these have not been overheated

and are in good condition a consider­

able amount of glue can be obtained

from them. The bones from the

head, ribs and feet give a better yield

than those of the thighs and legs.

There is also the hoof glue, which

is made from the hoofs of different

animals. Then there is glue made

from sinews and fleshings, and also

a grade known as rabbit glue made

from the skins of hares and rabbits.

This glue makes a good water test.

LAW8 OF NEW YORK—By Authority.

lEvery law. unless a different time shall

be prescribed therein, shall not take effect

until the twentieth day after It shall have

become a law. Section 48, article II. chap­

ter 8, General Laws.]

CHAP. Oflft.

AN ACT to authorize any ITotestnnt Kptsonpni

church In the diocese of New York to convey

all Its property subject to the payment of its

debts to any other Protestant Episcopal

church In said diocese.

Itccame a law. July a. itw, with the approval

of the Governor. Passcp. three-nniis being

present

The People of the State of New York, repre­

sented In senate and Assembly, do enact as

follows:

Section 1. Any Inccrporated Protestant

episcopal church in the diocese of New \o v k

with the consent In writing of Hie protestnnt

episcopal bishop and coadjutor bishop of the

diocese. If there be such coadjutor bishop, and

or the standing committee- of the said diocese

may through Its vestry transfer and convey all

Its property, real and personal, to any other In­

corporated protestant episcopal church within

said dlocose.nnd execute and deliver a deed

thereof for the consideration of one dollar and

the Agreement by the grantee to pny n'.l the

debts, If any. existing aim Inst the grantor.

{8. This act shall take effect Immediately.

State of New York, Office of the Secretary

of State, as.:

I hnve compared the preceding with the

original law on tile in this ofllcc, and dc

hereby certify that the same la a correct

transcript therefrom and of the whole ol

•aid original law.

• .1011N 8. WHALEN,

Secretary of state.

the same Is a correct transcript there,

from, and of the whole thereof. Given un-

^er my hand nnd the seal of office of the

becrotary of State, at the city of Albany,

this twenty-fifth day of July. In" the year

of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred

nnd seven, ft* 8] JOHN 8. WHALEN.

Secretary of State.

Form For Submission of Amendment

Number One.—Shnll the proposed amend­

ment to Rcotlon ten of article eight of the

Constitution, relating to the limitation of

Indebtedness of cities of the second class,

be approvedf

The Strawberries to Plant.

As the strawberry plant is short

lived and usually has to fight with

grass and weeds for its very exist­

ence a new patch is always in order,

says the Indiana Farmer. Two hun­

dred plants will be enough to set four

rows Of 100 feet in length, and will

be Bure enough for an average family

but 600 to 1,000 plants will be better

for most farmers, as the surplus

fruit can always be sold. As to the

varieties those who are not growing

for market purposes had better plant

the perfect flowering varieties alto­

gether and let the pistillates or im­

perfect flowerng kinds alone. Of the

perfect flowering kinds the Beder-

wood, Senator Dunlap, Glen Mary.

Splendid and Enhance are all right.

The Bederwood Is a long season

berry, begins to ripen early and con­

tinues bearing a long time, sometimes

four weeks or more.

In Plowing the BoiL

Some types of soil can be plowed

deeper then others, and as a rure I

believe in deep plowing at least every

few years, says a writer In Field and

Farm. The deeper loosening of the

soil not only makes a larger reser­

voir to catch the rain, but It gives

more room In which the soli bacteria

may develop and prepare the plant

food. It is known now that certain

bacteria in the soil have much to do

with the preparation of the food for

the plant, and experiments have

shown that these bacteria are found

largely In the first B!X to nine Inches

of the soil, or in that part of the soil

which Is turned by the plow and

btirred with the cultivator; thus deep

plowing favors the development of

these bacteria and the preparation,of

more available plant food than Is ths

result from shallow plowing.

but should never be used to cement

a belt. There is a large quantity of

this glue made in this country, and

a person not very familiar with it

could easily be decleved.

The age of animals yielding glue

stock has an Important Influence on

the product. While from younger

animals the production, as a rule,

Is of a lighter- color, more abundant,

and more easily obtained, it contains

more chondrin, so that for solutions

of equal strength those from mature

animals will be found to be of the

greater consistency and the glue

more solid.

Then, again, there is what Is

known as the pig stock glue, which

is made from the feet of hogs. Next

comes the fish glue'or isinglass. Its

varieties are numerous, and a thor­

ough knowledge of them can only be

obtained when one is personally ac­

quainted with the different factories

and stock from which they are made.

The best of this material, however,

is made from the sounds or air blad­

ders of the different species of fish.

The air bladders of the common

sturgeon and other fish caught in

northerly climates make the best.

STATE OF NEW YORK. OFFICE OF

the Secretary of State, Albany. July 25,

1007.—Pursuant to tho provisions of sec­

tion one of article fourteen of the Consti­

tution of tho State of New York, and sec­

tion seven of chapter nine hundred nnd

nine of the Laws of eighteen hundred and

ninety, sis. notice Is herehy given that tho

following propoBc'd amendment to section

ten of article eight of the Constitution of

tho State of New York Is to be submitted

to the people for approval at the next

General Election in this State to be held

on tho fifth day of November, nineteen

hundred and seven, nnd Ms published onco

a week for three months next preceding

such general election in conformity with

the aforesaid provisions. JOHN 8. WHA­

LEN, Secretary of State.

AMENDMENT NUMBER ONE.

Concurrent Resolution of the Senate nnd

Assembly, proposing an amendment to

section ten of article eight of the consti­

tution, relating to the limitation of indebt­

edness of counties, cities, towns and vil­

lages, by except In* ciMos of the second

cluss from the provisions of said section

after the first day of January, nineteen

hundred nnd eight.

Whereas, the legislature at Its regular

session in nineteen hundred and six dulv

adopted a resolution, proposing an amend­

ment to section two of article twelve of

the constitution relating to tho Umltntlon

of Indebtedness of counties, cities, (nwm

nnd villages, by excepting cities of the

second class from the provisions of said

section nfter the first day of January,

nineteen hundred nnd eight; nnd whereas,

such resolution has been duly published

in accordance with law and the constitu­

tion, and referred to the legislature for

action; therefore: Section 1. Resolved (If

the senate concur), that section ten of ar­

ticle eight of the constitution be amended

to read as follows: Article VIII. { 10. No

county, city, town or village shall here­

after give any money or property, or loan

Its money or credit to or In aid of any In­

dividual, association or corporation, or be­

come, directly or Indirectly the owner of

stock in, or bonds of, any association or

corporation: nor shall any such county,

city, town or village be allowed to Incur

any Indebtedness except for county, city,

town or village purposes. TblB section

shall not prevent such county, city, town

or village from making such provision for

the aid or support of Its poor as may be

authorised by law. No county or city

shall be allowed' to become Indebted for

any purpose or In any mnnner to an

amount which. Including existing Indebt­

edness, shall exceed ten per centum of the

assessed valuation of the %-al estate of

COPPER POIt GOLD.

Death to Use Pes Weevil.

Seed peas may be dipped in hot

water for a few minutes, or exposed

to the gases of bisulphide of carbon.

In order to destroy the pea weevil.

Late peas are not so subject to attack

as those sown early.

Plant cucumbers for pickles, and

when the plants begin to bear pull

off the young cucumbers before they

exceed three Inches in length, being

careful not to allow any of them to

mature.

Do not worry yourself to death

about "the good old times of the

past" but try to make the present

what it should be and plan lor ths

future. _

Bank of England Branch Swindled

in an Unusual Way.

A remarkable story, of halfpennies

being substituted for half sovereings

was told at the Manchester City po­

lice court when Henry Douglas An­

derson, who had been employed at

the Manchester branch of the Bank

of England and after absconding had

been arrested in Canada, was charg­

ed with stealing £1,081, says the

London Mall.

In stating the case for the prose­

cution F. E. Smith, M. P., said that

the prisoner's duty was that of sep­

arating lightweight gold coins from

those of full weight, and he had to

put the full weight coins into bags

which he had to label and sign. On

July 81 he absented himself, and on

August 2 the bank issued twenty-five

bags of half sovereigns to Messrs.

Williams, Deacon's Bank, and four-

ten of them, which had been made

up by the prisoner, were found to

have been tampered with, half sover-

lgns having been replaced by the nec­

essary number of halfpennies to make

up the correct weight. Two other

bags in the bank's treasury wnich

bore his signature were also found

to have, been tampered with in the

same way, and the total sum miss­

ing was £1.081.

On September 18 the bank receiv­

ed a letter from the prisoner in Win­

nipeg, in which he practically admitt­

ed his guilt and made reference to

the mad act he had committed.

Evidence was given by a number

of bank clerks. Including a retired

detective Inspector named John Wool-

ven, who, descsiblng his search lot

Anderson, said he went down to

such county or city subject to tnxatlon, as

it appeared by the assessment rolls of

said county or city on the inst assessment

for state or county taxes prior to the in­

curring of such Indebtedness; and all in*

debtedness In excess of such limitations,

except such as now may exist, shall be

absolutely void, except as herein other­

wise provided. No county or city, whose

present indebtedness exceeds ten per

centum of the assessed valuation of its

real estate subject to taxation, shall be

allowed to become Indebted in any further

amount until such indebtedness shall be

reduced within such limit. This section

shall not be construed to prevent the Issu-

Ing of certificates of indebtedness or reve­

nue bonds Issued In anticipation of the

collectIPJI of taxes for amounts actually

contained, or to be contained In the taxet

for the year when such certificates or rev­

enue, bonds are Issued and payable out of

such "taxes. Nor shall this section be con­

strued to prevent the Issue of bonds to

provide for the supply of water: but the

term of the bonds Issued to provide the

supply of water shall not exceed twenty

years, and a sinking fund shall be created

on the iBSUlng of the said bonds for their

redemption, by raising annually a sum

which will produce an amount equal to

the sum of the principal and Interest of

said bonds at their maturity. All certifi­

cates of indebtedness or revenue bonds Is­

sued In anticipation of the collection of

taxes, which are not retired within five

yeara after their date of Issue, and bonds

issued to provide for the supply of water,

.•mil any debt hereafter Incurred by any

portion or part of a city. If there shall 1M»

any such debt, shall be Included in ascer.

talnlng'tbe power of the city to become

otherwise Indebted; except that debts in­

curred by the city of New York after the

first day of January, nineteen hundred

nnd four, and debit incurred by any eit>i of

Hie wond claee after the flmt day of January,

nlnelern hundred and eight, to provide for

the supply of water shall not be so In­

cluded. \Vhcj>eiter the boundaries of any

city ure the same as those of a county, or

when any city shall include witlrin its

boundaries more titan one county, the

power of any county wholly included

within such elty to become Indebted shall

cease, but the debt of the county, hereto­

fore existing shall not. for the purposes

of this section, be reckoned as a part of

the city debL The amount hereafter to

be raised by tax for county or city pur­

poses, in any county containing a elty of

over one hundred thousand Inhabitants,

or uny such city of this state, in addition

to providing for the principal and Interest

of existing debt, shall nut In the aggre­

gate exceed In any one year two per oao-

tum of .the assessed valuation of the real

and personal estate of such oounty or

city, to be ascertained as prescribed in

this section in respect to county or city

debt, f 2. Resolved (If the senate concur),

that the foregoing amendment be submit­

ted to the people for approval at the gen­

eral election to be held In the year nine­

teen hundred and seven, ki accordance

with the provisions of the election luw.

State of New York, In Assembly, May

I. 11*07.—The foregoing resolution was duly

passed, a naaJorlt)*bf uH the members

elected to the Assembly voting in favor

thereof, three-fifths being present. By ol­

der of the Assembly. J. YV. WADS-

WORTH. JR.. Speaker.

State of New York. In Senate. May 2».

iW,.—The foregoing resolution was duly

piu>sed. a nu\J n-Jty of all the Senators

ejected voting In favor thereof, three-

fifths being present By order of the Sen­

ate, I.. B. PHANLER, President.

State of New York. OfSce of the Secre­

tary of State, ss.: I have compared the

preceding copy of eoncurreut resolution,

proposing an amendment to aeqtJou tan of

article eight of the Constitution, with the

STATE OP NEW TORK. OFFICE OP

the< Secretary of State, Albany.' July 25,

IW)"!—Pursuant to the provisions of sec­

tion one of article fourteen of tho Consti­

tution of the State of New York, and sec­

tion seven of chapter nine hundred and

nine of tho Laws of eighteen hundred and

ninety-six. notice Is hereby given that the

following proposed amendment to section

two of article twelve of the Constitution of

the Plate of New York Is to be submitted

to the people for approval at the ncrt

General election In this State to bo held

on the fifth day of November, nlnete« n

hundred and seven, nnd is published once

a week for three months next preceding

such general election In conformity with

tho nroresald provisions. JOHN 8. WHA­

LEN. Secretary of State.

AMENDMENT NUMBER TWO.

Concurrent Resolution of the Senate and

Assembly, proposing an amendment to

section two ef article twelve of the con­

stitution In relation to the classification

of cities.

Whereas, the legislature at its regulat

session In nineteen hundred and six duly

adopted a resolution, proposing an amend­

ment to section two of article twelve ot

tho constitution In relation to the classifi­

cation of cities; and whereas, such reso­

lution hus been duly published In ac­

cordance with law and the constitution,

and referred to the legislature for action;

therefore: Section 1. Resolved (If-tho sen­

ate concur), that section two ef article

twelve of the constitution be amended to

rend as follows: Article XII. ( 2. All

cities are classllted according to the latent

state enumeration, as from time to time

made, as follows: The first class Includes

all cities having a population of one hun­

dred and tercntji-flre thnunand, or more; the

second class, all cities having a population

of fifty thousand and less than one hundred

and Hcrenty-flre Ihounand', the third class,

all other cities. Laws relating to the

property, affairs of government of cities,

and the several departments thereof, are

divided Into general and special city laWs;

general city laws are those which relate

to all the cities of one or more classes;

special city laws are those which relate to

a single city, or to less than all the cltlet

of a class. Special city laws shall not be

passed except In conformity with the pro­

visions of this section. After any bill

for a special city law, relating to a city,

has been passed by both branches of the

legislature, the house in which it originat­

ed shall Immediately transmit a certified

copy thereof to the mayor of such city,

and within fifteen days thereafter th*

mayor shall return such bill to the house

from which It was sent, or if the session

of the legislature at which such bill wot

passed has terminated, to the governor,

with the mayor's certificate thereon, stat­

ing whether the city has or has not ac­

cepted the same. In every city of the first

class, the mayor, and in every other city,

the mayor and the legislative body there­

of concurrently, shall act for such city

as to such bill; but the legislature may

provide for the concurrence of the legis­

lative body In the cities of the first class

The legislature shall provide for a public

notice and opportunity for a public hear­

ing concerning any such bill In every

city to which It relates, before action

thereon. Such a bill. If It relates to more

than one city, shall be transmitted to the

mayor of each city to which It relates

and shall not be deemed accepted unlesf

accepted as herein provided, by ever>

such city. Whenever any such bill Is ac­

cepted as herein provided, it shnll be sub­

ject as are other bills, to the action of the

governor. Whenever, during the session

at which It was passed, any such bill It

returned without the acceptance of the

city or cities to which It relates, or within

such fifteen days Is not returned, it may

nevertheless again be pSssed by both

branches of the legislature, and It shall

then be subject us are other bills, to the

action of the governor. In every special

city law which has been accepted by the

city or cities to which It relates, the title

shall be followed by the words "accepted

by the city," or "cities," as the case may

be; In every such law which is passed

without such acceptance,. by the wordi

"passed without the acceptance of the

city," or "cities," as the case, may be

Section 2. Resolved (If the senate concur),

that the foregoing amendment be sub­

mitted to the people for approval at the

general election to be held in the yeai

nineteen hundred and seven, in accordance

with the provisions of the election law.

State of New York. In Assembly, Feb

18, 1907.—The ioregolng resolution wai

duly passed, a majority of all the mem­

bers elected to the Assembly voting it

favor thereof, three-fifths being present

By order of the Assembly, J. W. WADS-

WORTH, JR.. Speaker.

State of New York. In Senate, Mar. 5

1907.—The foregoing resolution was dul>

paased, a majority of all the Senator*

elected voting la favor thereof, three-

fifths being present. By order of the Sen­

ate. LEWIS STUYVESANT CHANLER

President

State of New York. Office of the Secre­

tary of State, ss.: I hnve compared the

preceding copy of concurrent resolution,

proposing an umendment to section twe

of article twelve of the Constitution, with

the original concurrent resolution on tilt

In this office, and I do hereby certify that

the mmc is a correct transcript therefrom

and of the whole thereof. Given undei

my hand and the seal of office of the Sec­

retary of State at the city of Albany, thlt

twenty-fifth day of July, in the year'el

our Lord, one thousand nine hundred and

•even. [L. S.] JOHN S. WHALEN, Sec

retary of State.

Form For Submission of Amendment

Number Two.—Shall the proposed amend

of the other departments. In each de­

partment four shall constitute a quorum,

and the concurrence of three shall be

necessary to a decision. No more than

five Justices shall Bit In any ease. From

all the Justices elected to the supreme

court the governor shall designate those

who shall constitute the appellate division

In each department; and he shall desig­

nate the presiding Justice thereof, who

shall act as such during his term of office,

and shall bo a resident of the department.

The other Justices shall be designated for

terms of five years or the unexpired por­

tions of their respective terms of office.

If less thsn five years. From time to time

as tho terms of such designations expire,

or vacancies occur, he shall make new

designations. A majority of the justices

so designated to sit In the appellate di­

vision, In each department shall be resi­

dents of the department. He may also

make temporary designations In case of

the absence or Inability to act of any

Justice In the appellate division, or In

case the presiding Justice of any appel­

late division shall certify to him that one

or more additional Justices are needed for

the speedy disposition of the business be­

fore It. Whenever the appellate division

In any department shall be unable to dis­

pose of its business within a reasonable

time, a majority of the presiding justices

of the several departments at a meeting

called by tho presiding justice of the de­

partment In arrears may transfer any

pending appeals from such department

to any other department for hearing and

determination. No justice of the appellate

division shall, within the department to

which he may bo dc"ftnnted to perform

the duties «»* an appelate Justice, exercise

any of the powers of a justice of the

supreme court, othor than those of a

Justice out of court, and those pertaining

to the appellate division, or to the hear­

ing and decision of motions submitted by

consent of counsel, but any such Justice,

when not actually engaged In performing

the duties of such appellate justice In the

department to which' he Is designated,

may hold any term of the supremo court

and exercise any of the powers of a jus­

tice of the supreme court In any county

or Judicial district in any other depart­

ment of the state. From and after the

last day of December, eighteen hundred

and/ ninety-five, the appellate division

shall have the jurisdiction now exercised

by the supreme court at lis general terms

and by the general terms of the court of

common plens for the city nnd county

of New York, the superior court of the

city of New York, the superior court of

Buffalo and the city of Brooklyn, and

such sddltlonal jurisdiction as may be

conferred by the legislature. It shnll have

power to appoint and remove a reporter.

The justices of the appellate division in

each department shall have power to fix

the times and places for holding special

and trial terms therein, and to assign the

justices in the departments to hold such

terms; or to make rules therefor. | S.

Resalved (if the assembly concur). That

the foregoing amendment be referred to

the legislature to be chosen at the next

general election of senators, and in con­

formity with section one, article fourteen

of the constitution, be published for three

months previous to the time of Buch elec­

tion.

State of New York, In Senate. Feb. 25,

1907.—The foregoing resolution was duly

passed, a majority of all the Senators

elected voting In favor thereof. By order

of the Senate. LEWIS STUYVESANT

CHANLER. President.

State of New York, In Assembly. Mar.

12, 1907.—Tho fbregolng resolution was duly

passed, a majority of all the members

elected to the Assembly voting In favor

thereof. By order of the Assembly, J. W.

WADSWORTH. JR., Speaker.

State of New York, Office of the Secre­

tary of State, ss.: I have compared the

preceding copy of concurrent resolution,

proposing an amendment to section two

of article six of the Constitution, with the

original concurrent resolution on file In

this office, and I do hereby certify that

the same is a correct transcript there­

from, and of the whole thereof. Given

under my hand and the seal of office of the

Secretary of State at the city of Albany,

this twenty-fifth day of July, In the year

of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred

and seven. [L. S.] JOHN S. WHALEN,

Secretary of State.

months previous to the time of such eleo»

tlon.

State of New York, In Assembly, May

22. 1907.—The foregoing resolution was duly

passed, n majority of all the member!

elected to the Assembly voting In favoi

thereof, three-fifths being present. By or­

der of the Assembly, J. W. WADS-

WORTH. JR., Speaker.

State of New York, In Senate, Juno IS,

1907.—The foregoing resolution was duly

passed, a majority of all the Senators

elected voting In favor thereof, three

fifths being present. By order of the Sen*

ate, L. 8. CHANLER President.

State of New York,.Office of the Secre­

tary of state, ss.: 1 have compared the

preceding copy of concurrent resolution,

proposing an amendment to section seven

of article six of the Constitution, with the

origins 1 concurrent resolution on file In

this office, and I do hereby certify that

tho same Is a correct transcript there­

from, nnd of the whole thereof. Given

under my hand and the seal of office of

tho Secretary of State at the city of Al­

bany, this twenty-fifth day of July, In tht

year of iir Lord, one thousand nine hun­

dred and seven. [L. S.] JOHN S. WHA­

LEN, Seoretary of State.

STATE OF NEW YORK. OFFICE OF

the Secretary of State, Albany, July 25,

1907.—Pursuant to tho provisions of section

one of article fourteen of the Constitution

of the State of New York, and section

seven of chapter nine hundred and njne of

the Laws of eighteen hundred and ninety-

six, notice Is hereby given that the follow­

ing proposed amendment to section twen­

ty-seven of article three of tho Constitu­

tion of the State of New York Is referred

to the Legislature to be chosen at the next

General Ek»ctlbn of Senators In this State

to bo hold on tho fifth day of November,

nineteen hundred nnd seven, and Is pub­

lished onco n week for three months next

preceding such General Election In con­

formity with the aforesaid provisions.

JOHN S. WHALEN, Secretary of State.

AMENDMENT NUMBER FIVE.

Concurrent Resolution of tho Senate and

Assembly, proposing an amendment to

section twenty-seven of article three of

the constitution in relation to tho powers

of tho boards of supervisors, nnd county

auditors, or other fiscal officers.

Section 1. Resolved (If tho assembly

concur). That section twenty-Bcvcn of ar­

ticle three of the constitution be amended

to read as follows: Article III. Section 27.

Tho legislature shall, by general laws,

confer upon the boards of supervisors-of

the several counties of the state such fur­

ther powers of local legislation and ad­

ministration as tho legislature may from

time to time deem expedient, and in rotin-

f irs which now have, or mow hereafter have. conn-

l II auditor* or other /Incut officer*, authorized to

audit in!:/-, account*, charge*, claims or demands

again*! the, county, the Ugidature may confer

• n< u power* npntl sold auditors, or final officer**

an tht legislators man, from time to time deem ex­

pedient, t 2. Resolved (If the assembly

concur), That the foregoing amendment

be referred to the legislature to be chosen

at the next general election of senators,

and In conformity with section one, arti­

cle fourteen of the constitution, be pub­

lished for three months previous to the

time of such election.

State of New York, In Senate, May 28,

1907.—The foregoing resolution was duly

passed, a majority of all the Senators

elected voting In favor thereof. By order

of the Senate, L. S. CHANLER, Presi­

dent.

State of New York, In Assembly, June

14, 190".—The foregoing resolution was

duly passed, a majority of all the mem­

bers elected to the Assembly voting In

favor thereof. By order of the Assembly,

J. W. WADSWORTH, JR., Speaker.

State of New York. Office of the Secre­

tary of State, ss.: I have compared the

preceding copy of concurrent resolution,

proposing an amendment to section twen­

ty-seven of article three of the Constitu­

tion, with tho original concurrent resolu­

tion on file In this office, and I do hereby

certify that the same Is a correct tran­

script therefrom, and of the whole there­

of. Given under my hand and the seal of

office of the Secretary of State, at the city

of Albany, this twenty-fifth day of July,

in the year of our Lord, one thousand

nine hundred and seven. [L. S.] JOHN

S. WHALEN. Secretary of State.

STATE OF NEW YORK. OFFICB OF

the Secretary of State, Albany, July X>,

1907.—Pursuant to the provisions of section

one of article fourteen of the Constitution

of the State of New York, and section sev­

en of chapter nine hundred and nine ot

the Laws of eighteen hundred and ninety-

six, notice is hereby given that the fol­

lowing proposed amendment to section

seven of article six ef the Constitution ot

tho State of New York Is referred to ths

Legislature to be chosen at the next Gen­

eral Election of Senators In this State

to be held on the fifth day of November,

nineteen hundred and seven, and Is pub­

lished once a week for three months next

preoedlng such General Election in con­

formity with the aforesaid provisions.

JOHN S. WHALEN. Secretary of State.

AMENDMENT NUMBER FOUR.

Concurrent Resolution of the Senate

and Assembly, proposing an amendment

to section seven of article six of the con­

stitution in relation to judges of the court

of appeals and justices of the supreme

court.

Section 1. Resolved (if the senate con­

cur), that section seven of article six of

the constitution bo amended to read at

follows: Article VI. f 7- The court ol

appeals is continued. It shnll consist ol

the chief judge and associate Judges now

in office, who shall hold their offices until

the expiration of their respective terms,

and their successors, who shall be chosen

by the electors of the state. The official

terms of the chief Judge and associate-

Judges shall be fourteen years from and

including the first day of January next

after their electlou. Five members of the

court shall form a quorum, and the con­

currence of four shall be nocessary to a

decision. The court shall have power to

appoint and to remove its reporter, clerk

and uttonduuts. Whenever and as often

as a majority of the Judges of the court

• . . of appeuls shull certify to the governoi

inent to section two of urticle twelve ol that said court is unuble, by reason ol

the Constitution, relating to the clussltica

lion of cities, be approved?

WhltBtable-ou-Seu and found ths

prisoner's Wife and family living' original concurrent resolution on file in

8TATE OF NEW YORK. OFFICE OF

the Secretary of State, Albany. July 23.

1907.—Pursuant to the provisions of aec-

Uon one of article fourteen of the Con­

stitution of the StaU- of New York, and

section seven of chapter nine hundred and

nine of the Laws of eighteen hundred and

ninety-six, notice is hereby given that the

following proposed amendment to suction

two ef article six of the Constitution of

the State of New York is retried to the

Legjlsluture to be chosen ut the mxl Gen­

eral Electlou of Senators in this State to

be held on the fifth day of November,

nineteen hundred and seven, end Is pub­

lished once a week for three months next

preceding such General Election In con­

formity wkh the aforesuid provisions.

JOHN 8. WHALEN. Secretary of Stute.

AMENDMENT M'MHKK THREE.

Concurrent Resolution of the Senate and

Assembly, proposing an uniendnieiit to

section two of urticle six of the constitu­

tion in relution to justlcts of the appellate

division of the supreme court.

Section 1. Resolved uf the aseinbly con­

cur), That section two of urticle six of

the constitution be amended to read as

hollows: Article VI. f 2. The legislature

shull divide tiie stute into four Judicial

departments. The first department shull

consist of the county ol New York; the

Others shall be bounded by county Unas,

und be computet Slid cyuul In population

as neuiiy as may be. Once every ten

years the legisluture may alter the Judi­

cial dt-pui tiueiiu. but without increasing

Wie number thereof. There shall be an

appellate division of the supreme court.

prisoner's Wife ana family living.' original concurrent resoiuuon on me in cunning 0f n-ven justice* In the Aral

thers. In a drawer he found f«iJ, ^ W " W A D 8 '

UicreafUratviicaneieemayiK^r, tUHtadddlon\^ l \ lli ' J ^.\ D ^^ r - _ . .

aloMockUejudye, of Ui,. court of appeal*, of th, J?, 1 * 1 *,, of , New f**? ^Basale. Jun 11.

iuctvc* of uhxch court t..g in..re fi.au semi irfaili ! 1Wl —Th« foregoing resolutlen was duly

Hi on the hearing of any appcri. except that Uu | P*"^ * " ,u ' wr . 1 . ty ,.°/..„ ul L l ^„, bl ' n " l _ 0 "

court mil u. in «» discretion, direct a tea 1 yumem \ *., , voting

U

in favor thoreof, tliree-

ourt of appeal* sliuu ccuse und determine. Tin

eakvy of (he oMoelaU Judtae* of Ute court of ap­

peal* eliaU be (lie sum of fifittn thousand doUun

a u«ur, and that of tht eliuf judge Ute euiuoj

fifUeu thnueand five hundrpd doluu* u wear

UJhioh ealary eltall be in lieu of and iluMl exekudi

all other c


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J. DIAMOND,

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Tailor and Furrier,

253} Main Street, Danbury, Conn.

Over U. P. Tea Store.

Perfect nitiML' Garmeats Guaranteed.

Cleaning and HemodelUitf.

Telephone.

COVELL OPTICAL CO.

ESTABLISHED 1003.

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mid if you would rather have them

than Spectacles coiue in and we

will show you the most up-to-date

Eye Glasses. Hours gu.ui. tobp.m

17 West St. Danbury.

Awnings! Awnings!!

Now Is the time to Place Your Orders

for 1907 Awnings.

We carry the largest stock in Western Connecticut. Over 400

patterub to select from. Mail aud 'Phone orders promptly -attended

to. All work guaranteed to be right or your money refunded.

PATRICK DURKIN,

12 MAJXOBY ST., DANBURY.. Telepbne 86. •

The Secret of Truss Comfort

lb in wearing the Truss

that's made for your particular

kind of rupture

laud having it fitted proerly.

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especial attention to flttiug

People who have

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Simons' Pharmacy, Mannfac-ariDg (Mists, 35 White it Danfrnry, Coiw.

HENRY B. HAWLEY,

Real Estate Broker,

52 WHITE ST„ **•*«* m HAWLEY BUILDING.

Headquarters for Farms, Villas and Shore Properties in

Connecticut, New York and Massachusetts. Prices

rangii'9' from c < .1,500 to $150,000. Exchange city for

countr> jvealty

Branch Office, Brookfield Center, Conn.

General Election Notice.

STATE OP NEW TORS,

Offlce of the Secretary or State.

«, ... . - . • Albany, July 81, nwr.

To tlie clerk of the county or Putnam:

sir:—Notice Is Hereby Often, I lint, at the General

Election to be held In this -tfato on the

, Tuesday succeeding the first MonrMy In Novem-

' ber next (November 5th), the roHotvlng officers

may be lawfully voted ror to wit:

An Associate Judge or the Court or AppealR, in

the place or Denis O'Brien.

An Associate Judge or the Court or Appeals, in

thenlace or Edward T. Hart let t.

Whose terms or olhee will expire on the last

day or December next.

County and District Officers also to bo

Eloctad for said County:

One Member of Assembly.

A County Judge, In the jiace or J. Bennett

Southard, whose term or office will expire on the

last da}' of December next.

At the said General Election there Is to be

submitted to the people tor the purpose or voting

thereon, the following amendment* to the constitution:

AMENDMENT NUMBER ONE.

Amending Section ten or Article eight or the

constitution, so that It shall read as follows:

ARTICLE VIII. %

110. No county, city, town, or village shall

hereafter givo any money or property, or loun

Its money or credit to or In aid of any Individual,

association or corporation, or become

directly or Indirectly the owner of

i stock In, or bonds of, any association or

I corporation; nor shall any such county,

j city, town or village be allowed to Incur

I any Indebtedness except for county, city,

j town or village purposes. This section

I shall not prevent such county, city, town

j or village from making such provision for

the aid or support of Its poor aa may be

authorised by law. No county or city

; shall be allowed to become Indebted for

any purpose or In any manner to an

amount which. Including existing Indebtedness,

shall exceed ten per centum of the

assessed valuation of the mi\\ estate of

such county or city subject to taxation, as

It appeared by the assessment rolls of

said county or city on the last assessment

for state or county taxes prior to the Incurring

of such Indebtedness; and all Indebtedneas

In excess of such limitations,

except such as now may exist, shall be

absolutely void, except as herein otherwise

provided. No county or city, whose

present Indebtedness exceeds ten per

centum of the assessed valuation of Its

real estate subject to taxation, shall be

allowed to become Indebted In any further

amount until such Indebtedness shall be

reduced within such limit. This section

shall not be construed to prevent the issuing

of certificates of Indebtedness or revenue

bonds Issued In anticipation of the

collection of taxes for amounts actually

contained, or to be contained In the taxet

for the year when such certificates or revenue

bonds are Issued and payable out of

such taxes. Nor shall this section be construed

to prevent the Issue of bonds to

provide for the supply of water; hut the

term of the bonds Issued to provide the

supply of water shall not exceed twenty

years, and a sinking fund shall be created

on the Issuing of the said bonds for their

redemption, by raising annually a sum

which will produce an amount equal to

the sum of the principal and interest of

said bonds at their maturity. All certificates

of Indebtedness or revenue bonds Issued

in anticipation of the collection of

taxes, which are not retired within five

years after their date of issue, and bonds

Issued to provide for the supply of water,

and any debt hereafter incurred by any

portion or part of a city, If there shall be

any such debt, shall be included In ascer­

taining the power of the city to become

otherwise Indebted; except that debts Incurred

by the city of New York after the

first day of January, nineteen hundred

and four, and delta incurred by any city of

the nerond cla** after the flrat day of January,

ntnetrrn hundred and eight, to provide for

the supply of'water - shall not be so Included.

Whenever the boundaries of any

city are the same as those of a county, or

when any city shall include within Its

boundaries more than one county, the

power of any county wholly included

within such city to become Indebted shall

cease, but the debt of the county, heretofore

existing shall not, for the purposes

of this section, be reckoned as a part of

the city debt The amount hereafter to

be rained by tax for county or city purposes,

in any county containing a eity of

over one hundred thousand inhabitants,

or any such city of this state. In addition

to providing for the principal and interest

of existing debt, shall not in the aggregate

exceed in any one year two per centum

of the assessed valuation of the real

and personal estate of such county or

city, to be ascertained as prescribed in

this section in respect to county or city

ubt.

AMENDMENT NUMBER TWO.

Amending Section two or Article twelve of the

Constitution, so that it Hhull read aa follows:

ARTICLE XII.

: 8. All cities are. clussllled according to the

latest state enumeration, us from Uinu to time

made, as follows: The first class include*

all cities having a population of one hundred

and Micnty-flre thoutand. or more; tin

second class, ull cities huvlng a population

of lifiy thousand ami less than o


9

The Bpewater> Standard, Friday, September 13.190?

A. P. Lobdell & Co.

Brewster, N. V.

BOLE AGENTS FOR

•W. L. DOUGLAS

SHOES.

Best Values for Money.

_

S ALE OF LAND IN PUTNAM COUN­

TY for unpaid taxes for year 1908.

s^ln accordance with chapter ISO ef the

•awa ef l*oo. Notice Is hereby given that

Tit the Putnam Ceunty Court House, In

Carmel, N. Y.. on the twentieth any of

September. 1907, at eleven o'clock a. ra.,

ana from day to day thereafter until the

•ale Is completed, the undersigned will

Mil esoh of the parcels of land herein­

after described, at Public Auction, to dls.

charge the tax, penalty and Interost and

exponses of sale which shall be due there,

•n at the time of sale.

The following list and statement shows

an to each parcel to be sold, the town In

which situated, the estimated quantity,

location and description, and present own­

er, as reported by the Town Supervisor,

the amount of each tax remaining unpaid

thereon, with the year In which it was

.assessed or returned, and added to the

wn tax list, and to whom assessed, and

le amount, Including expenses, which

will be due at the time of the sale.

SOUTHEAST.

1. House and lot situated on or near the

highway known aa the Croton turnpike,

bounded on the north by lands late of

Jonathan VanScoy, on the east by lands

lata of Jonathan Van8coy, on the south

Wjr lands now or formerly of Rachel Badt

touthefesterly and easterly Along lands of

William A. Storm 'and lands formerly of

Hiram Paddock to lands of John Wilkin:

thence northeasterly and southeasterly

along lands of John Wilkin; thence south­

easterly and thence northeasterly along

lands formerly of Daniel Stevens to lands

of Herbert Stevens; thenoe running

northerly along lands of Herbert Stevens

to lands of the New York and New Eng­

land Railroad company; thence crossing

the New York and New England rail­

road and running easterly along lands of

the New York and New England Railroad

company to lands of Herbert 8tevens;

thence northerly, northwesterly and west­

erly along lands of Herbert 8tevens;

thence northwesterly along lands* for-

merly of Daniel Stevens, lands formerly

of Hiram Stevens and lands of Warren

S. Paddock; thence running northeasterly

along lands of Warren 8. Paddock; thence

northerly along lands of John Wilkin;

thence easterly along lands formerly of

David B. Richards; thence northensterly

and easterly along lands of John Wilkin

to binds formerly of John Martin; thence

running northeasterly along lands former­

ly of John Martin to lands of Mary

O'Connor; thence running northeasterly

along lands of Mary O'Connor, lands of

John Conners and lands formerly of

Charles M. Boyce to the highway leading

over Joe's Hills from Mill town; thence

crossing said highway and running north­

easterly, northwesterly ' and westerly

along binds of Mary A. Field; thence

crossing the highway leading northerly

from Mllltown and running westerly

along lands of John Kelly; thence run­

ning northwesterly along lands formerly

of Beth N. Klnner, deceased. And now of

8. W. & O. J. Hadden; thence northerly,

easterly and northerly along, lands of 8.

W. *c O. J. Hadden; thence westerly,

northerly, northeasterly, northwesterly

and generally In a northerly direction

along lands of Robert Ritchie, lands of

Dnvld Hall, lands formerly of Lewis

Hopkins, binds of Emily C. Lefferts.

lands of Robert Ritchie, lands of Eliza

J. Nelson, lands of George Morlock, lands

formerly of Catherine M. Crane and lands

of Augusta Keeler and others; thence

southwesterly along lands of . Augusta

Keeler and others; thence easterly along

lands of Virgil E. Barnum; thence south­

erly along the lands of Virgil E. Barnum

and lands formerly of Catherine M Crane;

thence northwesterly, westerly, southerly.

westerly, southerly nnd southwesterly

along lands formerly of Martha M. Cros­

by; thence southerly along lands former­

ly of Lydia M. Yale and others and thence

easterly along lands formerly of Lydla

M. Yale and others to tho highway first

above mentioned; thence along the north-

orly side of said highway to the place of

beginning; also exclusive of lands of the

New York and New England Railroad

oompany. Tax, 1908, $l,70tl.25. Amount

due. $1,898.88. Owner, The City of New

York. Assessed, The City of New York.

A tract of land lying generally along

the old Croton Turnpike, and on both

sides of the East Branch of the Croton

River, and shown on certain maps on

file In the Putnam County Clerk's Office,

and bounded and described as follows, to

wit:

Beginning at the Intersection of the old

Croton Turnpike with the street running

northwesterly and crossing the bridge

known as the Brundage bridge, and at

the south side of tho old Croton Turnpike;

thence running southeasterly and thence

southwesterly along lands .formerly of

and on the went by lands of the City of

SSTSSf- M ^ ^ ' ^ S o ^ b ^ i ^ ' ^ y ' northerly, southwesterly and

MOD, ILK. Amount due, 110.85. Owner. WMterlJ ^ ^ ^n,,, formeriy 0f Cathe-

The City of New York.

1 House and lot situated on or near the

highway known aa the Croton turnpike,

unded on the north and south by lands

ow or'formerly of Rachel Badt, on the

by lands lata of Jonathan VanScoy

Mid on the west by lands of the City of

Now York. Assessed, Rachel Badt Tax,

1*06, 10.98. Amount due. $9.58. Owner,

The City of New York.

8. House and lot situated on or near

the highway known as the Croton turn­

pike, bounded on the north and south by

lands now or formerly of Rachel Badt,

en the east by lands late of Jonathan

VanScoy and on the west by lands of the.

City of New York.. Assessed, Rachel

Badt Tax, 1908, S0.97. Amount due, $9.67.

Owner, The City of New York. •

4. House and lot situated on near the

highway known as the Croton turnpike,

bounded on the north and south by lands

now or formerly of Rachel Badt, on the

east by lands late ef Jonathan VanScoy

and on the west by lands of the City of

New York. Assessed, Rachel Badt Tax,

10.08. Amount due, $9.08. Owner, The

ty of New York.

5. House and lot situated on or near the

highway, known aa the Croton turnpike,

bounded on the north by lands now or

formerly of Rachel Badt, on the east by

lands late of Jonathan VanSooy, on the

south by lands now or formerly of Ar­

thur D. Sneden and on the west by lands

•f the City of New York. Assessed.

Rachel Badt. Tax. 1908. 11.17. Amount

due, 19.88. Owner, The City of New York.

8- HOUM and lot situated on or near the

highway known aa the Croton turnpike,

bounded on the north by lands now or

formerly of Bosnia B. Lent, on the east

hy lands late of Jonathan VanScoy, on

the south by lands now or formerly or

Adsetta M. Mechan and on the west by

Hindu of the City of New York. Assessed,

-Rachel Badt Tax, 1906. 83.41. Amount

pue, 112.28. Owner. The City of New York.

7. Poles, wires and arms on telegraph

line tunning northerly across the town

of Southeast from the Westchester Coun­

ty line to the lino between the towns of

Southeast and Pa'terson. Assessed, Com­

mercial or New England Telegraph Com­

pany. Tax, 1900, '.2. the Croton turnpike,

bounded on the north by lands now or

formerly of Mrs. William Moody, on the

eaat by lands late of Jonathan VanScoy.

•n the south by hi-ids of Harvey VanScoy

and lauds of the City of New York and

on the west by lu.d* of the City of New

York. Assessed, Daniel Rooney. Tax.

1906. $0.98. Amount due, $9.5$. Owner.

The Cltv of New York.

If, A tract of land distinguished or

known as double reservoir' 1 uud addi­

tional tanda and as shown on certain

maps on hie in the I'm nam county clerk's

office and bounded and described us fol­

lows, to wit: Commencing at a point In

the highway leadh g from Southeast Con-

tre in the Town of South Euat, Putnam

County., New York, which point is on tin

east side of said highway and at u point

about 500 fc-ct so ilherly of the bridge

over Croton river uud at the northwest

corner of lands of Henry G. Knox; tinnee

running southerly along lands of Henry

G. Knox to lauds of William A. Storm;

thence westerly. s< uthwesterly and south­

erly along lands of William A. Storm to

tlie New York and New England rail­

road; theme crofting the highway and

Brewster; thence southwesterly along

lands formerly of Walter F. Brewster

and lands formerly of Jonnthnn Vqn

Scoy to tho old Croton turnpike; thence

along the southerly line of the Mil Croton

turnpike and" lands formerly of Jonathan

Van Scoy to the Intersection of the old

Croton turnpike with the highway run­

ning northwesterly from the old Croton

turnpike to Railroad avenue; thence run­

ning northwesterly along the center line

of the Inst mentioned highway nnd cross­

ing the bridge known as the Brundnge

bridge and crossing Hnllrond avenue and

continuing on an extension of snid center

line of said highway to the lands of the

New York and Jlnrlem Railroad com

pany; therrre running northwesterly along

lands of the New York and Harlem Rail,

road company to a point opposite tin

southerly side of the street lending from

the Village of Brewster over Turk 1111

and being In the southerly line of the Vil­

lage of Brewster: thence running easterly

along the southerly line of tho Village

of Brewster and the south side of the

sold street leading over Turk Hill to the

Jonathan VanScoy to lands of Harvey easterly line of the Village of Brewster

southwesterly thence northeasterly along snld line ti

tine M. Crane; thence southerly and

northerly along lands formerly of Au­

gustus 8. Doane; (hence westerly along

lands formerly of Catherine M. Crane;

thence southwesterly along lands for­

merly of Augustus S. Doane and lands of

Warren S. Paddock; thence northeasterly

along lands of Warren S. Paddock; thence

northerly and westerly along lands for­

merly of Augustus 8. Doane; thence

southwesterly, southeasterly and south­

westerly along binds of Warren 8. Pad­

dock; thence southwesterly, southeaster­

ly, southwesterly, southeasterly and

southerly along lands of Daniel R. Sears;

thence southwesterly, westerly and north­

easterly along lands of Daniel R. Bears

and crossing the highway and running

northwesterly along lands now or for­

merly of Lilian Hanford and others;

thence running northwesterly along lands

of Warren S. Paddock; thence westerly

and southwesterly along lands of Elijah

W. Budd; thence crossing the highway

and running northerly along lands for­

merly of Elbert H. Kelley and still con­

tinuing In a course slightly west of north

along binds formerly of Elbert IL Kelley,

lands of Elijah W. Budd, lands of Sarah

E. Hawley and others, lands formerly of

Lyman Sherwood and hinds of Fannie B.

Sears and others to the highway running

toward Dykeman's; thence crossing the

said highway and running northwesterly

along lands now or formerly of Fannie

B. Sears and others; thence running

southeasterly, westerly and southwester­

ly along lands of William C. and John J.

Haviland; thence crossing the highway

and continuing southwesterly along lands

of Jonathan Minor; thence easterly along

lands of Jonathan Minor to londs of Wil­

liam C. and John J. Haviland; thence

southeasterly and southwesterly along

binds of William C. and John J. Havi­

land and lands of Jonathan Minor to

lands of Alexander F. Lobdell; thence

westerly along lands of Alexander F.

Lobdell and lands of Armenia W. Budd;

thence northerly along lands of Armenia

W. Budd to lands of Nelson Sampson;

thence westerly along lands of Nelson

Sampson to the highway leading norther­

ly from Southeast Centre; thence cross­

ing the said highway and continuing

westerly along lands of James Parrel!

and lands now or formerly of Harriet

Townsend .and others; thence southeast­

erly along binds of Armenia W. Budd

and thence easterly along lands of Ar­

menia W. Budd to the highway leading

northerly from Southeast Centre; thence

In a generally southerly course along

said highway and thence easterly and

southerly along the said highway to the

northwest corner of binds formerly of

Murgaret Silk; thence easterly along

lands formerly of Margaret Silk and

thence southerly along lands formerly of

Margaret Silk to lands formerly of Beth

B. Howes; thenoe westerly, southerly

and westerly along lands formerly of

Beth B. Howes to the east aide of the

highway leading from Southeast Centre

past the residence formerly of Benjamin

D. Everett; thence southerly along said

highway to the northerly side of the high­

way leading from Southeast Centre to

Mllltown; thence northeasterly along

lands of Josephine Hlne and others;

thence easterly along lands now or for­

merly of Robert Underbill, lands now or

formerly of Thomas F. Reed, lands of

Edgar Reed, lands of Susan Rogers, lands

formerly of Edson Bcrlbner and lands for­

merly of Lydla M Yale and others;

thenoe southerly along lands formerly of

Lydla M. Yale and others to the highway

leading from Southeast Centre to Mlll­

town; thence running westerly along said

highway to its Intersection witb the high­

way leading from Southeast Centre past

the former residence of Benjamin D. Ev­

erett; thence running southerly along the

last mentioned highway to the place of

beginning, containing 2.047 acres of land,

exclusive of the following described piece

excepted therefrom: Beginning on the

north side of the highway leading from

Southeast Centre past the former resi­

dence of Edward Howes and near the

keeper's residence at Double Reservoir I;

thence crossing the said highway and

running southeasterly and northeasterly

along binds formerly of Samuel M.

Church; thence southeasterly along lands

formerly ef Samuel M. Church and lands

of James Conners; thence northeasterly

along lands of James Conners to lands

of Warren S. Paddock; thence southeast-

erly. southerly and northeasterly along

lands of Warren 8. Paddock, lauds for­

merly of Harmon C. Buruum and lauds

of Warren S. Paddock: thence northwest­

erly along lands of Wan en B. Paddock

and crossing the highway and continuing

northwesterly along lands of James Con­

ners: thence running southwesterly, west­

erly and northwesterly along lands of

Jajneii Conners and continuing northwest­

erly along lands formerly of Rebecca

Barton; thence running northerly along

lands formerly of Rebecca Burton, lands

formerly of Nancy Barrett lands of Ju­

lia Norton, lands of Elijah W. Budd

and lands of James Conners; thence run­

ning westerly along lauds of James Cou­

ncil; thence northwesterly along lands

of James Conners and lands formerly of

Rebecca Barton; thence southerly along

lands formerly of Rebecca Barton and

thence southwesterly along Lands for­

merly of Rebecca Burton, lands formerly

of Nancy Barrett, lands of Julia Norton,

lauds of Elijah W. Budd and lands ef

Jamas Conners; thenoe westerly and

thenoe northwesterly along lauds ef

VanScoy; thence running

along lands of Harvey VanScoy, crossing

the' old Croton Turnpike, and running

along lands of Melville Mead and others;

thence In a generally southwesterly course

along lands of Emma O. Baxter, lands of

Laura J. Bloomer and others; thence

southeasterly along lands of Laura J.

Bloomer and others to lands of Jennie

Knox; thence In a generally southwester­

ly direction along lands of Jennie Knox

to the highway leading from Dean's Cor­

ners to North Salem; thence easterly

along the said highway and lands of Jen­

nie Knox to lands of Abram J. Miller;

thence In a generally southwesterly di­

rection along lands of Abram J. Miller to

lands of William Cousey; thence westerly

along lands of William Cousey to the old

Croton Turnpike; thence crossing tho said

turnpike to the westerly side thereof, and

thence running southwesterly along the

ild Croton Turnpike to lands of John and

Kate Sullivan; thence running westerly

along lands of John and Kate Sullivan to

a corner; thence southerly along lands

of John and Kate Sullivan to lands for­

merly of George Cole, deceased; thence

southwesterly and thenoe southerly along

lands formerly of George Cole, deceased

to lands of Mary Wells Jennings, thence

southwesterly along lands of Mary Wells

Jennings and the old Croton Turnpike to

lands of George Juengst and others;

thence northerly along binds of George

Juengst and ethers, and thence easterly

and thence northerly along lands of

George Juengst and others to lands of

the New York ft. Harlem Railroad Com­

pany; thence northerly along lands of the

New York ft Harlem Railroad Company

to lands of Mary W. Jennings; thence

easterly and thence northeasterly and

thence northwesterly, and thence wester­

ly along lands of Mary Wells Jennings to

lands of the New York ft Harlem Rail­

road Company; thence a generally north­

erly course along lands of the New York

ft Harlem Railroad Company to lands of

Katherine B. Hobbs; thence northeaster­

ly along lands of Katherine B. Hobbs to

a corner; thence northerly along lands of

Katherine B. Hbbbs to lands of the New

York ft Harlem Railroad Company;

thence a generally northerly course along

Lands of the New York ft Harlem Rail­

road Company, and crossing the highway

leading from Dean's Corners to Drew-

ville, to lands of Laura J. Bloomer and

others, thence northeasterly along lands

of Laura J. Bloomer and others, lands of

Btebblns B. Quick and lands of Patrick

McGarry, and thence northerly along

lands of 8tebblns B. Quick to lands of

the New York ft Harlem Railroad Com­

pany; thence In a northeasterly course

along lands of the aald Railroad Com­

pany to a point where a continuation of

a line running northwesterly from the old

Croton Turnpike along the center of "the

highway running from the said Turnpike

to Railroad Avenue would reach the lands

of the New York ft Harlem Railroad

Company; thence southeasterly along the

continuation of said center line of said

last mentioned highway and along the

center line of said highway to place of

beginning, containing two hundred and

forty-six and one-half (24Ctfc) acres of

land. Assessed. City of New York. Tux.

1906, $32.76. Amount due, $48.73. Owner,

The City of New York.

18. A tract of land lying in a generally

southwesterly direction from Double Res­

ervoir I and shown on certain maps on

file in the Putnam county clerk's olllce

and bounded and described as follows, to

wit: Beginning at a point in the highway

leading from Southeast Centre past the

former residence of Benjamin D. Everett

to

the center of snid highway lending over

Turk Hill: thence easterly along the cen­

ter of snid highway to the place of be­

ginning, containing 2CV4 acres of land

Assessed, the City of Now York. Tax

1908.' $9.75. Amount due, $19.29. Owner

The City of New York.

21. A tract of land lying southerly of

the Middle Brunch Reservoir and shown

on a certain map on file In the Putnnm

county clerk's office and bounded nnd de­

scribed as follows, to wit: Commencing

at the south side of the bridge crossing

the middle branch of the Croton river In

the Town of South East and In the high­

way lending from Brewster to Drewvllle

and being southerly of tho property

known as the Middle Branch Reservoir;

thence running ensterly. northerly and

northensterly along Lands of the City of

New York known as the Middle Branch

Reservoir; thence running en«terly nlong

lands of Carrie B. Merrick, formerly oc

cupled by Francis Haines: thence sooth.

erly along .amis of Carrie B. MOT tick,

lands formerly of Roxanna Kelley nnd

lands of Melissa Howes to the highway

lcadlng past the former residence of

Thomas Drew, deceased; thence along

snld highway to Its Intersection with a

highway loading from Drewvllle past tho

Croton Magnetic Iron Mines; thence

southerly along lands of Melissa Howes

and lands of Francis Smalley to the old

highway leading from Drewvllle to Croton

Falls near the Iron bridge of the New

York and Harlem railroad over Croton

river; thence easterly, southerly and

southwesterly along lands of Francis

Smalley to the line between the town ef

Cnrmol and the town of South Enst;

thence northerly along the line between

the town of Carmel and the town of South

Enst and lands of Melissa Howes; thence

northensterly nlong lands of Melissa

Howes; thence northerly nnd northeaster­

ly to the line between the towns of Car­

mel and South East; thence northerly

along snld town line to near the highway

first above mentioned; thenoe southeast­

erly nlong said highway to lands formerly

of Hoxunna Kelley; thence easterly along

lands formerly of Roxanna Kelley: thence

northeasterly and northerly along lands

formerly of Roxanna Kelley nnd lands of

Edwnrd B. Brady to lands of tho City of

New York: thenoe southerly along snid

last mentioned funds to the plnce of be­

ginning, containing 135 acres of land. As­

sessed, the City of New York. Tax. 190R

$13.16. Amount due, $27.09. Owner, The

City of New York.

! 22. A trnet of land lying on the east side

of the old Croton turnpike and opposite

tho promises of George Juengst and oth­

ers nnd shown «m a certain map on file In

tho office of the clerk of tl»e county of

Putnnm and hounded and described ns

follows, to wit: Beginning nt the north­

west corner of the said promises nnd ad-

Joining the lands of Albert Chamberlain:

thenoe. cunning, southeasterly along lando

of Albert Chamberlain; thence southwest-

erlv along linds Of Albert Chamberlain

n«d lam's of George Juengst to the lino

between tho counties of Westchester nnd

Putnam; thenoe southwesterly along snld

lino to the lino between the towns of Cnr-

! mel and South E^Bt; thence northeasterly

alorg lands of Georre Juengst and other*

| and the-co siuthensterrly nlong lands oi

George Jue"gst and others to tho old Cro­

ton turnpike: thenoe running northenster­

ly along tho old Crotpn turnpike to the

place of beginning, containing 5.8S3 acres

of bind. /ss-Hsod. the City of New York.

Tax. 100(5. $1.90. Amount due. $1180. Own­

er. The Cltv of New York.

23. A tract of bind known as Middle

and at a point where the brook known as .' Bra-ch Reservoir shown on certain map

Everett's Brook crosses the said highwuy on Ho In the office of tho clerk of the

a short distance easterly of the residence '. county of Putnam nnd bounded and do-

thence running southeasterly, southerly, June* Conners; lee nor northwesterly.

of Albert Townsend; thence running east­

erly and southerly along said highway to

the bridge over Croton river; thence

southerly along the highway leading to­

ward Brewster to lands of George W.

Hall; thence northwesterly, westerly and

southwesterly along lands of George W.

Hall and lands of William A. Storm;

thence northwesterly along lands of Wil­

liam A. Storm and thence westerly along

lands of William A. Storm to lands of

Borden's Condensed Milk compuny; thence

northwesterly and southwesterly along

lands of said company to lands ol the

New York and New England Railroad

oompany; thence westerly along lands of

the New York and New England Railroad

company to Lands formerly of Benjamin

Pardee; thence Northeasterly along lands

formerly of Benjamin Pardee; thence

southeasterly along lands formerly of

Benjamin Pardee and lands of Albert

Townsend; thence northeasterly and

thence easterly and thence northerly

along lands of Albert Townsend to the

highway first above mentioned; thence

southeasterly along said highway to the

place of beginning, containing eighty-four

acres of Land. Assessed, City of New

York. Tax, 1906. $8.19. Amount due, $17.09.

Owner, The City of New York.

19. A tract of land lying immediately

easterly of the Village of Brewster and

shown on a certain map on file In the

Putnam county clerk's office and bounded

and described as follows, to wit: Begin­

ning at Main street at the easterly abut­

ment of the bridge over the east brunch

ef the Croton river and at the easterly

boundary line of the Village of Brewster;

thence running easterly along lands of

Borden's Condensed Milk company to

lands of Harvey Van Scoy; thence in a

generally sou thwesterly direction along

Lands of Harvey Van Scoy and thence

southeasterly along Lands of Harvey Van

Scoy, lands of John C. Conners, lands of

Edward Hulchlngs, formerly of John

Wilkins, and lands now or formerly of

William N. Strang and others; thence

crossing the old Croton turnpike and run­

ning along lands formerly of Orrin

Hutchinson; thence westerly and thence

southwesterly along lands formerly of Or­

rin Hutchinson to Lands of Harvey Van

Scoy; thence southwesterly along lands of

Harvey Van Scoy to the highway leading

from the Village of Brewster over Turk

Hill; theuce westerly along the center of

aald highway to the easterly line of the

Village of Brewster; thence running

northeasterly and thence easterly along

the easterly line of the Village of Brew­

ster to the pluce of beginning, containing

luVi acres of laud. Assessed, the City of

New York. Tux. 190C. $193. Amount due,

$11.74. Owner. The City of New York.

20. A tract of land lying Immediately

south of the village of Brewster and

shown on pertain maps on file In the Rut--

nutn county clerk's office and bounded

and described as follows, to wit: Begin­

ning at tbe Junction of the highway lead­

ing from the Village of Brewster over

Turk Hill with the old Crotou turnpike;

thence running southwesterly along the

center of said turnpike and thence custer-

ly to lands of Amanda Dykemun; thence

running southeasterly along lands of

Ainimda Dykemun. lauds formerly of

Jonathan Van Scoy and Harvey Van

•coy and land* formerly ©$" Walter ¥•

scribed as follows to wit: Beginning nt

the B'Uth side of the bridge crossing the

middle branch of the Croton river in the

t6. &M.

Amount due, $11.13. Owner, Julia B.

Puhnc-r.

14. Poles and wires from Southeast town

Hue along New York and Rut nam railroad

farm to the highway leading from Kath­

ryn Bruen's to Drewvllle, thence souther­

ly along said highwuy and lands of Icha-

bod Gurrlson. Emma W. Chamberlain,

Coleman Williams, '^a Mam W. Everett

and Lyman s King, eusterly and norther­

ly along said lands of Lyman 8. King,

northerly along lands of Melissa Howes

to the Southeast town line, southerly

alone, town line to lands of Melissa

Howes, thence southerly along lands of

Melissu Howes and Charles B. Gregory

to Westchester County line, westerly

along said line to lands of Concetta But­

ler, thence northerly along Lands of Con­

cetta Butler and Benjamin F. Brown,

westerly along hinds of Benjamin P.

Brown and Anna E. Ganong to Lands of

the City of New York acquired In the

Mahopac proceeding, Unmet- _ northerly,

westerly and northerly uhmg the salt

lands of tbe City of New York to lundi

of Susan Drew, thence northerly alonf

Lands ef Susan Drew, eusterly aluni

Lands of George Knox. Daniel E. Bailey,

heirs of Stephen Vores, deceased: heirt

ef Anna Baker, deceased; northerly along

lands late of Anna' Baker, deceased

Joshua G. Cornue. Coleman Williams

Abram Wright. Charlotte A. Lewis and

the heirs of James Wilson, deceased, ant

the lands of the City of New York, ac­

quired in the Muscoot and Wi'son's Brook

proceeding; lands of the hdfrs of Jamei

Wilson, deceased, and lands late of


The Brewster Standard, Friday, September 13. 1907


aTong ttald'lfhe to fends of John Q. Nich­

ols, southerly alone «ald lands of Nichols

and lands late of George R. Cole, deceas­

ed, and lands- of the* City of New York,

thence westerly, southerly and northerly

alons; "aid lands of the City of New York,

thence westerly along lands of Edward C.

Weeks, southerly along lands late of John

Cornish, deceased, and lands late of

Frances S3. Cornish, deceased, and lands

of Charles B. Travis, southerly along

lands of Chnrles B. Travis and lands late

of Frances H. Cornish, deceased; easterly

along lands late of Frances R. Cornish,

deceased, and Bylvester F. Best, to the

Carmel and Mahopac highway, thence

southwesterly along said highway and

lands of the City of New York, acquired

In the Middle and West Branches pro­

ceeding, lands late of Gideon Lee, deceas­

ed; lands of Carrie B. Baxter and lands of

Clarence H. Baxter, southerly along lnndr

of Clarence H. Baxter, Henry A. Gahn

and George E. Sunderlln. easterly along

lands of George B. Bunderlln, southerlj

along lands of George R. Sunderlln. lands

late of Chauncey B. Ganung and lands of

the City of New York, acquired In the

MuHIMiot and Wilson's Brook proceeding:

westerly along lands of Channccy B. Gn

niing*s heirs, Benjamin Secord, Bentley G.

Beal and Benjamin Secord to the corner

of the hlghwnys, thence northerly alonp

the highway to lands of School District

No. 6. easterly along lands of said Behao 1

District, lands of Nathaniel T. Wright

and George E. Sunderlln, northerly alow

lands of George R. Sunderlln. William E

Gahn and Ira Crane, westerly along land

of Ira Crane and George R. Reed am

northerly along lands of George E. Ree«

and Charles B. Travis, Matlldn J. Smal

ley, Francis D. Halght, Hannnh A. Ben

nett and Lewis E. Cole and others to thi

beginning. Assessed as nonresident lands

Tax, 1906. t2.2G4.27. Amount due, 12,504.76

Owner. The City of New York.

22. Tract of land outlet of Mud Pond

in School Districts l+>n. 9 and 12, contain*

Ing about 263H acres, located from Ma­

hopac easterly and bounded aa follows:

Beginning at the easterly boundary of

School District No. 4 and 'lands of Ed­

ward Wright, thence easterly along landr

of Howard D. Gffnung. Walter J. Bennett

Charles W. Barrett, Henry Vrodenburgh

Maurice C. Welch and wife, Elisabeth

O'Nell. Ella E, Wright. Chester C. Oa-

none, heirs of David Welch, deceased:

John Thorman, heirs of Joseph Ganong

deceased; Gertrude E. Ford, Chester C.

Ganong. Julia Btebblns and others and

Susan Drew; southerly and easterly along

lands of the City of New York acquired

In the Middle and West Branches proceed­

ing, southerly along lands of Anna E. Ga>

nong and Louisa Yores, westerly along

lands lata of Hor tense Mead, northwest­

erly along lands of the heirs of Steven

Vores. deceased, and lands of Julia A.

Btebblns and others, southwesterly along

lands of Julia A. Btebblns and others and

Edward C. Ganong. southwesterly alonv

lands of Adolph Goltse to the highway

leading to Union Valley, northerly and

westerly along the highway and lands of

Charles A. Ganong. Sarah E. Wnrren

heirs of David Welch, deceased; Chester

C. Ganong. Ella B. Wright. Mary E

Wright, Willis A. Ganong, William Dulln

and others and Addison Cole- to the line

of School District No. 4. thence norther)}

along said district to the beginning. As­

sessed as nonresident lands. Tax, 1906

192.30. Amount due, $114.67. Owner, The

City of New York.

23. Tract of land along Mud Pond and

outlet In School District No. 4, contain­

ing about 105 acres, located at Mahopar

and bounded as follows: Beginning m

the southerly line of said district and

lands of Addison Cole, thence runnlnp

westerly along lands of Edward Wright

Addison Cole. Edwin A. McAlpla and New

York and Putnam railroad, southerly

•long said railroad, westerly along lands

of New York and New Jersey Ice Lines

northerly along lands of Edwin A. Mr-

Alpln, School District No. 4, Lewis Wei-

eplel, Arthur Bullurd. Ellas Herrick and

others and Arthur Ballard, easterly along

lands of Arthur Ballard, southerly alonp

lands of Arthur Ballard and the heirs of

John R. Cole, deceased; Edward Wright

and Milan Westcott and others and east

erly along lands of Westcott and other*

and Edward Wright to the beginning, ex­

cepting the lands of the New York and

Putnam railroad contained within said

bounds. Assessed as nonresident lands

Tax, 1B0G. 1204.14. Amount due, $238.22

Owner, The City of New York.

24. Tract of land along Wilson's Brook,

containing about 86% acres, located near

Craft's Station and bounded as follows:

Beginning In the highway leading north

from Craft's Station at lands of the Ot>

of New York, acquired in the reservols

D proceeding, thence easterly along salt*

lands of New York City, southerly alonj.

lands of Chauncey B. Ganong, Mary A

Barrett and James W. Barrett, easterly

and southerly along lands of the heirs of

James Wilson, deceased; southerly along

lands of the City of Now York acquired

In the Middle and West Branches pro­

ceeding, westerly, northerly and westerly

along lands of the heirs of Jamas Wilson,

deceased; westerly along lands of James

W. Barrett and northerly along the high­

way to beginning, excepting the lands of

the New York and Putnam Railroad com­

pany contained within aald bounds. As­

sessed as nonresident landa Tax, 1906

$nn.3i. Amount due, $61.66. Owner, Tht

City of New York.

26. Tract of land containing 277 901-1000

acres, located between Mahopac Falls and

Westchester County Una and bounded a*

follows: Beginning at a corner of th<

highway from Mahopac to Mahopac Fallt

and highway to Baldwin Place, thena

southerly along said last mentioned high

way, lands of Martha Duval and others

lands late of Peter B. Barrett, deceased:

lands of School District No. 11, lands lati

of Peter B. Bsrrett. deceased; lands late

of Kelsey Barrett, deceased; lands of

Isaac Townsend. James H. Potter. Einmo

Austin, Hannah J. Wardell, Thomas E

Barrett, lands late of William V. liasel

ton, deceased; James O. Hadden, Thoraav

B. Barrett and Charles Agor, easterly

•long lands of Charles Agor and Jaree*

O. Hadden. southerly along lands ol

James O. Hadden and Charles Agor, west,

erly. northerly and westerly along landf

of Charles Agor, westerly along lands of

Andrew J. Dingee and James If. Hoag

southerly along lands of Jamas H. HOUK

tteeley T. Hoag and lands late of Aritu

Kennard to county line, westerly alonjr

county line, northerly along landt of Hen­

ry Lyons, Willi*, m Archer and Tamer A

Barrett and the highway from Feeksklb

to Mahopac to a corner of lauds of Josh­

ua L. Dean, southerly and easterly along

said lands of Dean, easterly and northerly

along lands of leaac D. BarreU. northerly

along the said highway, landa late of

William B. Haaelton and Jamea F. Bar-

n-tt. easterly along lands of James F.

BarreU and Sarah B. Barrett, southerly

along landa late of Peter B. Barrett, de­

ceased, and loads of Sarah IE. Barrett,

northerly along said highway and the

highway leading to German Flats to lands

•at Nathaniel Tompkins, easterly along

lands of said Tompkins, southerly along

lands ef the City of New York on the out­

let to Lakes Mahopac and Kirk, to aald

Perkskil! highway and easterly along the

•ami to beginning. Assessed a» nonresi­

dent lands. Tax. 1906. $114.77. Amount

due. $138.89. Owner. The City of New

York.

$6. C. B. Gregory Parcel, located in the

south eastern part of the town, contain­

ing about seventy live acres, bounded

northerly by landa of Melissa Howes

easterly and southerly other lands now

or formerly of Charles B. Gregory, and

westerly by landa of the City of New

York, acquired In the Middle and West

Branches Proceedings: excepting the Mrs.

BdcUe Outhouse parcel, contained within

the said parcel. Assessed, as non-r.ai

dent lauds. Tax. 190C. $au.ti&. Amount due.

$X.S4. Owner. The Cat* of New York.

27. B. F- Brown Parcel, located in th«

south eastern part of the town, contain­

ing about twenty acres, and bounded

fcorlhurij bt land* of Darius H. Vmilit

and Annie 0. Ganong, easterly and south­

erly by lands of the City of New York.

acquired In the Middle- and Went Branch

Proceedings, and westerly by other lands

of B. F. Brown and Darius H. Smith.

Assessed as non-resident landa Tax. 1S06.

$6.90. Amount due, $15.02. Owner, The

City of New York.

28. Darius H. Bmlth Parcel, located In

the south eastern part of the town, con­

taining about'nineteen and one half acres,

and bounded northerly by lands of Annie

B. fjanong, easterly by the B. F. Bmwn

Parcel, southerly by the B. F. Brown

Parcel and by other lands of Darius H.

Smith, and westerly by other lands of

Darius H. Smith and the highway. As­

sessed as non-resident lands. Tax. 1906.

$188. Amount due, $11.11 Owner, The

City of New York.

29. Annie B. Ganong Parcel, located In

the south eastern part of the town, con­

taining about twenty one acres, and

bounded westerly, northerly and easterly

by lands of the City of New York, ac­

quired In the Middle and West Branches

Proceedings, and southerly by the B. F.

Brown and Darius H. Bmlth parcels. As­

sessed aa non-resident lands. Tax. 1906,

$6.90. Amount due, $15.01 Owner, The

City of New York.

80. Mrs. Eddie Outhouse Parcel, locat­

ed In the south eastern part of the town,

containing about three ', quarters of an

acre, and bounded northerly, easterly

and southerly by the C B. Gregory Par­

cel, and westerly by the highway from

Carmel to Croton Falls. Aasessed as non­

resident landa. Tax, 1908, $5.90. Amount

due, $15.01 Owner, The City of New

York.

81. Woodland and quarry located on

southern Una of town, containing about

thirty and one-quarter acres of land,

bounded northerly by lands of James Os-

trander and lands of Joseph H. Travis,

easterly by lands of James Stevens and

others, southerly by the Westchester

County line and westerly by landa for­

merly of Orson Hasen, deceased. As­

sessed. Annie Ganong. Highway Arrear­

age, 1906. $2.20. Amount due, $10.98. Sup­

posed owner. Marianne H. Ganong. _

PHILIPSTOWN.

1 Lot of land situated In North High­

lands. Phlllpstown, Putnam County. N.

Y„ containing about 200 acres, bounded

on the north by lands of Wm. A. Mosher.

east by lands of Wm. A. Mosher. and 8.

Stern, on the south by lands of S. Stern,

on the west by lands of S. Stern and Wm.

O. Jaycox. Assessed, Joslah Huestls es­

tate. Tax. 1906. $9.90. Amount due. $19.44.

Owner (supposed), estate of Joslah Hues-

tie.

4. Lot of land In the northwesterly part

of the Town of Phlllpstown, Putnam

County, N. Y.. containing about 108 acres,

bounded on the north by lands of J. V.

Jordan, on thtt east by the Town of Kent,

on the south by the County Road, on the

west bg lands of 8tephen Mekeel. As­

sessed. Reading Coal and Iron Company.

Tar, 1906, $0.60. Amount due, $9.08. Own­

er (supposed), Reading Coal and Iron

Company.

6. Three Dams across the brook known

as the Foundry Brook, running fnpm the

North Highlands to and through the til­

lage of Cold Spring. Assessed. West

Point Foundry Association. Tax. 1906.

$12.66. Amount due. $26.60. Owner (sup­

posed), N. B. Sanborn and J. IC. Paulding,

Trustees of the West Point Foundry As­

sociation.

7. Lot of land situated In the village of

Cold Spring, Phlllpstown, Putnam Coun­

ty, N. v., being known as the West

Point Foundry property containing about

40 acres of land and being all the land

contained In the following boundaries

with the exception of parcels Nos. 21

and 22, bounded on the north by the Hud­

son River and lands of the estate of Wm.

Kemhle, and lands of the estate of Gou-

verneur Kemble, and landa of the es­

tate of R. P. Parrott and lands now or

formerly owned by P. B. Lawson and

land formerly owned by School District

No. 18 now owned by Wm. H. Taylor and

by Bank Street, on the eaat by lands of

Chalmers Dale, on the south by Dyke

Lane, on the west by the Hudson River.

Assessed, J. B. & J. M. Cornell Co. Tax,

1906, $299.00. Amount due. $848.06. Owner

(supposed). N. B. Sanborn' and J. K.

Paulding, Trustees of the West Point

Foundry Association.

8. Lot of land with building thereon

situated In the village of Cold Spring.

Phlllpstown, Putnam County, N. Y.. used

for the manufacture of metal furniture,

building about 800 feet long by 160 feet

wide, on the northerly part of the West

Point Foundry Association property,

bounded on the north by lands of estate

of R. P. Parrott, on the eaat and south

by West Point Foundry, on the west es­

tate of Gouverneur Kemble and Kemble

avenue. Assessed. J. B. & J. M. Cornell

Co. Tax, 1908. $69.00. Amount due, I.SK.TR.

Owner, (supposed), N. B. Sanborn and J.

K. Paulding. Trustees of the West Point

Foundry Association.

9. Lot of land with building thereon sit­

uated in the village of Cold Spring. Phll­

lpstown, Putnam Co., N. Y., used as i

steel shop, buildings formerly old blucl

smith shops and lately used by the Hah'

win Steel Co., being the most caster!

building used for manufacturing purpw

on the land of the Went Point K**along the

said highway to the lands of Cbareea H.

Judd; thence southerly to the. high wuter

Une of the old mill pond-: thenoe westerly

uiong said high water line to the Une of

Mrs. Abbis O. Townsond: thence easterly

to the. south end of the old dam; thence

easterly along landa of Mrs. Abble ('.

Townecnd to the highway; thence along

said highway to place of beginning, con­

taining 4.6 acres more or less. Aeweseed.

City of New York. Tax., 1906, $24.83.

Amount due, $39.96. 0«w»i, The City of

New York.

8. A tract of, iand lying In a generally

northwesterly direction from Patterson

Village and shown on certain maps us

nle In the Putnam County Clerk'* Office,

and bounded and described as, follows, to

wit:

Beginning at a point In the highway

leading from Waal Patterson Station to

Holmes, n.ea» the residence of William H.

Ballgrd:. running in a westerly direction

Us feet ah>£g lands of said Ballard;

thence northerly 880.11 feet atlli along

lands of said Ballard; IUCJU* in a norther­

ly and westerly defection 67$ feet still

along lands of uaid Ballard; thence north­

erly and easterly 866.88 feet to the aald

highway] thence in a southerly and east­

erly direction along the weat aide of the

•aid highway to the place «f beginning,

containing seven acre* of land, bo the

same more or lega. Assessed, City of

New York. Tax. 1906. $470. Amount due,

$13.76. Owner, The City of New Yark.

9. A t»«ct of land lying east af the New

York and Harlem Railroad at Pa.terson

Station, and shown on a certain map filed

in the Putnam County Clerk's Office, and

hounded and degoribed aa follows, te wit:

Beginning at aouth lino of the highway

whore a*ld line Intersects tho east lino

of the Harlem Railroad Company (u the

Village of Patterson and tunning in a

northerly direction along tho oast line of

aald railroad company 288.3$ feet; thence

aeutb 79*-40-2O, eaat 1560.19 feet; thence to

tho middle of tho Eaat Branch ot the

Cralun River; thence north 7t*-69. east

$09-76 feet; thence aouth 8JM-J8-I6. easj. t-uO

feet; thence south 1'-;.; ee, west lM.Ut feet'

thence south 14'-3>JJ%, west 260 feel; thence

•outh 76»-81Nfc Wegt 610.93. feet; thenoo

north $8Me-8». weat 2$j «1 feet; thn.ee

north

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