Napa River- Napa Creek Flood Protection Project Downtown Napa

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Napa River- Napa Creek Flood Protection Project Downtown Napa

A look at the

Napa River

Napa Creek

Flood

Protection

Project

and its impact on

Downtown

Napa

May 2011


Why is the Napa Project

needed?

22 serious floods on

the Napa River since

1862


Brown Street, Napa - 1905


Main Street, Napa - 1940


Flood Control Act of 1965

authorizes a Napa River Project

Designs are standard COE issue:

– Deepen channel with dredging

– Straighten channel – eliminate Oxbow

– Rip rap banks of a trapezoidal channel

– Levees and flood walls

Proposals go to the voters in 1976 and

1977 – both are rejected


Water Street, Napa - 1986


Third & Main- 1986


February 1986


The ’86 flood was an attention getter…


Resource Agency issues:

Widening and deepening the river would lead

to:

– Excess siltation

– Decrease in oxygen

– Loss of wetland habitat

– Loss of steelhead rearing habitat

Leaving existing bridges would mean deepening

river instead of raising bridges

Leaving contaminants in place isolated with

sheet pile walls would mean continued pollution

of the river


A community coalition comes together

40 agencies, 400 people: Chamber of

Commerce, Sierra Club, Friends of the

River, NV Economic Development Corp.,

Farm Bureau, Land Trust, Conference and

Visitors Bureau…

A new “living river” design is created

March 3, 1998: 27,000+ votes cast,

Measure A passes by 308 votes.


Achieving a Living River

Maintain the natural slope, width, and

width/depth ratio of the river

Maintain or restore the connection of the river to

its flood plain

Allow the river to meander as much as possible

Maintain channel features such as mudflats,

shallows, sandbars, and a naturally uneven

bottom

Maintain a continuous fish and riparian corridor

along the river


The Living River Design

A wider, geomorphic channel design to improve fish habitat, water quality and

minimize sedimentation

Creation of south wetlands

Marshplain terrace

Restoration on the east side of river, cleanup

of toxic sites

Wet-Dry

Bypass

and Bridges

Setback

Floodwall


Project Components

• Improvements to 6 miles of the Napa River and 1 mile of

Napa Creek

• Removal of 53 mobile homes, 16 other residences and 28

commercial buildings

• Creation of 400+ acres of emergent marsh and 150 acres

of seasonal wetlands

• Replacement of 9 bridges

Project results in protection for 3,000 properties from

the “100-year flood event”, translating into $1 billion

savings over the life of the Project.


Before

South Wetlands Opportunity Area

After


The transformation from pasture land to

wetland is gradual…


Common Birds found in the SWOA

In the mudflats:

Black-necked Stilt American Avocet Long-billed Curlew

Spotted Sandpiper Great Egret

Snowy Egret Green-backed Heron


Black-necked stilts


Great egret


Green-backed heron


Common Birds in SWOA

In open water:

American Pelican Western Grebe Mallard

Cormorant Canada Goose Northern Shoveler


Canada goose


Common Birds in the SWOA

In the tules:

Red-winged Blackbird Virginia Rail

Common Yellowthroat Marsh Wren


Hunters in the SWOA

Peregrine Falcon


Award-winning Third Street Bridge

Set the tone for aesthetics of public space


Terracing 2004

Floodwalls Hatt to

First St 2005


Hatt to First floodwall

July 20, 2006


Hatt to First floodwall

March 31, 2008


Hatt to

Floodwall

First floodwallincorporated

into

Veterans revamped Park park portion

Jan May 6, 19, 2008

2008


Catalyst for New

Investment


Investment Summary:

Public & Private, 1997-2010

Estimated total $898 million

- Construction Investment $605 M

- Disclosed real estate purchases $293 M

Primary catalyst: Flood Protection Project


Development

Along

Napa River

First Street Bridge

Veterans Park

Third Street Bridge

Boat dock (future)

The Riverfront

(Morimoto, Tyler Florence,

Fish Story, Napa River Velo)

Fifth Street Plaza

Riverfront Promenade and Floodwalls

Napa Mill

(Napa River Inn,

Celadon, Angele,

General Store, Silo’s)

Riverbend Plaza

Kyser-Lui-Williams

(Cole’s Chop House

Ubuntu, Annalien)

NV Opera

House Theater

Opera House Plaza

at Napa Creek


Oxbow District Development

Ritz Carlton

Hotel Site (351

rooms)

River Terrace Inn/Cuvee

Westin Verasa Hotel / La Toque

Oxbow Public Market

Future Oxbow Commons

(Bypass Channel)

Wine Train


East Napa Historic District Area

Oxbow School

Former Copia

Site: Future Investment Opportunity

Ritz Carlton Hotel Site


Opera House Plaza at Napa Creek


Oxbow Preserve


Napa Art Walk

2010 Theme “Celebrating the Napa River

10 Sculptures along First Street and the river


Upcoming Projects


Railroad relocation

complete 2011

Ritz

Carlton

Site

Floodwalls

2012‐2013

Bypass

2012‐2014

Napa Creek

2011‐12


Flood Project

Railroad Relocation

Third Street closure

2010

First & Third streets

Closure Spring 2011

2-4 weeks

Anticipated

Completion 2012


Napa Creek Terracing & Culverts

Tree Removal / Pearl

Street culvert work

underway

32 months to completion

Culverts, terracing, bridge

removals/replacements


Third St.

Napa Riverfront Green Park:

Construct Summer 2011

Soscol Avenue

Napa River


Oxbow Bypass

Channel

35% Design Now

Underway

Soscol Ave

NVWT


Napa River Overflow

N

Design goals:

Provide 100-yr flood protection

Bypass flows > 3-yr flood

event

Provide erosion protection

Provide public-use areas

Walkway network

Aesthetic appeal

Habitat enhancement


River Landing

Napa River Trail

Kayak Launch (stepped)

Turf-grass area

Kayak

Launch


Town Green

Amphitheater/dissipator

Accessible walkways

Large turf-grass area

Napa Valley Wine Train


Soscol Ave. Bridge

Over Proposed Bypass

Sunlight limited under bridges

Hard surface (overflow

parking)

Aesthetic appeal

Stone-embedded concrete


China Point Trail

China Point

Natural Area

Future China Point

Overlook Park


A FEMA Case Study

FEMA’s Higher Education Program will

document the economic benefits of the

ongoing flood protection program in Napa

Asking for information on job growth,

population growth and new economic

development projects


Some of Downtown’s Newest Attractions

Photos by SF Chronicle


Questions?

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