2009 Annual Report - Salvation Army Omaha

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2009 Annual Report - Salvation Army Omaha

What does hope mean to you?

How do you think The Salvation Army helps

provide people with hope?

The text of the 2009 Annual Report of the metropolitan Omaha Salvation

Army is a compilation of responses to these two simple survey questions.

Yet the answers given by individuals who are connected with The Salvation

Army in a multitude of ways are far from simple.

Stephanie, age 49, volunteer, donor and former client:

According to Proverbs 13:12, “Hope deferred maketh the heart sick.”

This would lead one to believe that hope is of substantial worth and a

healing salve to the soul. Hope is a positive expectation or belief that

something good will happen. It is linked to our dreams and goals. It gives

people the will to go forward. Without it, we are lost!

Antonia, age 61, volunteer:

The Salvation Army realizes that one size does not fit all, that people’s

needs cannot be measured by their skin color, accent, gender, religion,

socioeconomic or any other condition. They provide services that make

people feel good about themselves because they are treated like

human beings.


OUR MISSION

The Salvation Army, an international

movement, is an evangelical part of

the universal Christian church.

Its message is based on the Bible. Its ministry is

motivated by the

love of God.

Its mission is to preach the Gospel of Jesus Christ and

to meet human needs in His name

without discrimination.


Dear Friends,

The theme of this year’s annual report is hope. When

people have hope in their lives, it helps them get

through tough times and brings healing. People who

have hope are then able to impact their neighborhoods, their communities

and, ultimately, their world!

The Salvation Army is privileged to serve the people of Omaha. Because of

the support of our many generous donors, we continue to provide physical,

social, emotional and spiritual support to people who desperately need

hope. Throughout the pages of this report, you will be introduced to some

of the people whose lives have been impacted by the holistic programs

offered by The Salvation Army in Omaha.

Of course, helping to build hope is a job that is ongoing. Thank you for your

continued support of The Salvation Army in Omaha. You play an essential

role in helping us build hope in Omaha. May God bless you richly.

Your partner in service,

Major Paul D. Smith

Divisional Commander


Dear Supporters,

Hope means something different to everyone, but

it is a common theme that unites all of us. Hope can

be defined as “to cherish a desire with anticipation” or “to expect with

confidence.” To me, hope is a belief in a better, more positive outcome and

is inspired by seeing The Salvation Army make an impact throughout our

community.

The Salvation Army was a beacon of hope to more than 170,000 people last

year. From programs designed to help children and families receive support

and education to services that assist seniors, the homeless and victims of

emergency disasters, The Salvation Army helps transform the lives of many.

The Gene Eppley Camp, North Corps and the Ray and Joan Kroc Corps

Community Center are safe places that help to instill confidence and

independence, while services such as MASS and CASS provide food, basic

needs and therapy. All of these programs provide a glimmer of hope to

individuals during their time of need.

I’d like to applaud the tireless efforts of The Salvation Army volunteers, staff,

community leaders and donors in helping to create and encourage hope

each and every day.

Sincerely,

Michael Cassling

Chairman, The Salvation Army Advisory Board


Salina, age 33, employee: I think The

Salvation Army inspires hope in many ways. For

some it’s fulfilling the hope of feeding a family or

the hope of giving a child a gift at Christmas or the

hope of starting a new life in Christ.

Alisha, age 16, client: We are taught to

budget just like people in the real world.

Blake, age 21, volunteer: They show

love and compassion by housing families and

getting them back on their feet. The fact that

Christianity is part of The Salvation Army is what

sets it apart and helps families become successful.

Jamie, age 24, Stepping Stones client:

The Salvation Army helps

Provide Hope

through guidance,

assistance and love

and more love.

Family and Children’s Services

Stepping Stones Center — Loving, intergenerational child development and education.

CARES (Comprehensive Adolescent Residential and Educational Services) — Residential and support services for female adolescents

including those who are pregnant and parenting.

Early Head Start — A family-centered program for low-income families who are expecting or have an infant or toddler.

Wellspring — Support, education and advocacy for women, men and children who are adversely affected by prostitution.

Real Life Connections — Educational groups and therapeutic intervention for incarcerated men and women.


Cheryl, age 52, client: Hope means

maybe I will be able to get a job if I just keep trying.

Laura, age 49, employee: The Salvation

Army takes people from all situations where hope

may be nearly lost and helps them restore their

lives through things as small as a food donation or

a Christmas gift or as large as a safe place to live

or skills to start a new life.

Stephanie, age 25, fundraising

partner: Hope is the spiritual guidance that

helps someone get through even the hardest

of times.

Jill, age 30, community partner:

The Salvation Army provides hope by

helping people

others turn away.

Homeless and Behavioral Health Services

37th Street Residential Readiness Program — Educational, goal-oriented community living for people who are homeless.

Transitional Housing — For previously homeless families that are preparing to live independently.

Scattered Site Transitional Housing — Community-based housing for people in final preparation for independent living.

MASS (Material Assistance and Seasonal Services) — Food pantry, heat aid, summer fan program, clothing and material

assistance for people in need. Includes Christmas programs and backpack distributions.

Transitional Residential Program — Residential care for adults needing psychiatric stabilization.

Emergency Community Support — Intensive community support for individuals who have experienced a recent mental

health crisis.

CASS (Community Assisted Support Services) — Community support for individuals dealing with chronic mental illness.

ICS (Intensive Community Support) — Daily visitation for individuals with mental health concerns.


Mike, age 59, volunteer: The Salvation

Army gives people a place to go for comfort and

to revitalize their bodies and souls.

Kristin, age 63, Kroc Center member:

Hope means that the future will bring greater

opportunities and fulfillment. The Salvation Army

provides immediate assistance for people in need

and long-term help through institutions like the

Kroc Center.

Candice, age 50, volunteer: The Salvation

Army guides people toward a goal. They also

provide opportunities that are essential in people’s

lives.

Sarah, age 30, employee: Hope is a reason

to take another breath, believing tomorrow will be

better than today.

Carol, age 67½, Durham Booth Manor

resident and client: If you need someone to

talk to, if you need the food pantry or a minister or

a place to live, The Salvation Army is there.

Susan, age 36, employee:

Joan Kroc intended people

to come here and find

hope through

discovering

their natural giftedness.

The Salvation Army Ray and Joan Kroc Corps Community Center

A state-of-the-art facility where children, adults, seniors, families, businesses and groups can come as members or visitors for fun,

fitness, education, meetings, celebrations, worship or the arts.

Senior Services

Charles and Margre Durham Booth Manor — Comfortable apartment living for low-income seniors.

Dora Bingel Senior Center — Social, recreational and spiritual opportunities for seniors.

Goldenrod Club — Opportunities for fellowship and education.

OASIS (Omaha Area Service Institute for Seniors) — Comprehensive array of one-stop community services for elderly individuals.

Telephone Reassurance/Friendly Visitor — Caring contact with lonely seniors through phone calls and visits.


Barbara, age 52, supporter: In times of

disaster, The Salvation Army is often the first

organization in and the last one out. That is truly

hope in action.

Betsy, age 53, bell ringer: The Salvation Army

asks, “What do you need and how can we help you

get it?”

Jessica, age 31, employee: Hope means the

ability to go through a difficult or challenging time

while believing that there is something good that

can come from the situation.

Dan, age 56, bell ringer and donor: Hope

is helping people find the strength they have within

themselves.

Wendy, age 36, employee: By treating

individuals with respect, The Salvation Army helps

people to know they are worthy of a better future.

Greg, age 46, employee and volunteer:

Whenever hope seems lost or out of reach, The

Salvation Army is there to give you a hand out and

also a hand up.

Jeanne, age 63, bell ringer:

It helps to realize that you must work to achieve

your goals, that help is not a handout. This

preserves dignity and

increases the value

of the help received.

The Salvation Army does this.

Disaster Services

Emergency Disaster Services — A 24/7, 365 days-a-year program offering relief for first responders and survivors of emergency disasters.

Included are provisions of food, water, clothing and spiritual guidance.

Winter Night Watch — Reaching out on cold evenings to individuals and families who are homeless or near-homeless.

ARC (Adult Rehabilitation Center)

Men in despair from drug and alcohol addiction receive the help necessary to turn their lives around. Housing, intensive counseling and

jobs, often associated with The Salvation Army Thrift Stores, are part of this program.


LOCATIONS

The Salvation Army Lied Renaissance Center

Divisional Headquarters & Omaha Social Services

3612 Cuming Street, Omaha, NE 68131

402.898.5900

Citadel Corps Worship & Community Center

Majors Richard & Susan Rubottom

Hubermann-Dietrich Memorial Chapel

3738 Cuming Street, Omaha, NE 68131

402.553.5694

North Corps Worship & Community Center

Lieutenants Joel & Etta Johnson

2424 Pratt Street, Omaha, NE 68111

402.451.4048

Ray and Joan Kroc Corps Community Center

Majors Todd & Catherine Thielke

Administrative Corps Officers

Lieutenant Bersabe Vera-Hernandez

Officer for Youth Development & Outreach

2825 Y Street, Omaha, NE 68107

402.905.3500

Council Bluffs Corps Worship & Community Center

Lieutenants Bradley & Cassandra Burkett

715 North 16th Street, Council Bluffs, IA 51501

712.328.2088

Gene Eppley Camp & Retreat Center

Pete Hoskin, Camp Director

915 Allied Road, Bellevue, NE 68123

402.291.1912

ARC (Adult Rehabilitation Center)

Majors Laurence & Judy McPherson

2551 Dodge Street, Omaha, NE 68131

402.342.4135

Mary-Alice, age 68, supporter:

Hope

is a faith-filled expectation

of good things to come.

Carla, age 47, Salvation Army officer: We meet

individuals at their point of need, with a heart to God, and

a hand to man. It’s what we do — and we do it without

discrimination, in Jesus’ name!

Mike, age 62, supporter: With hope, one has the

inner strength to see his or her problems through, knowing

that there will be a better tomorrow.

Greg, age 47, employee: I see the community stepping

forward whenever there’s a need for material assistance or

other forms of support. All of that wraps up into one big

package of hope.

Darsey, age 29, employee: We try to meet people’s

basic needs so they can look beyond and have hope for a

brighter future.


2010 LEADERSHIP

Western Division

Major Paul D. Smith

Divisional Commander

Major Renea Smith

Director of Women’s Ministries/Divisional

Secretary for Program/Divisional

Leadership Development Secretary

Major Steven Merritt

Divisional Secretary/Men’s Ministries

Secretary

Major Christine Merritt

Women’s Ministries Secretary

Major Greg Voeller

Divisional Financial Secretary

Major Carla Voeller

Assistant Program Secretary/Divisional

Music Secretary/Assistant Camp

Administrator/Moral & Ethical Issues

Secretary

Major Barbara Shiels

Older Adult Ministries Director/Community

Care Ministries Secretary

Captain Scott Shelbourn

Divisional Youth Secretary/Camp

Administrator/Assistant Candidates

Secretary

Captain Jolinda Shelbourn

Divisional Youth Secretary

Joanne K. Bemis

Divisional Director of Community Relations

& Development

Dr. Linda Burkle

Divisional Director of Social Services

Susan Eustice

Divisional Director of Public Relations &

Communications

Linda Garbina

Divisional Director of Planned Giving

Madeline Madden

Director of Annual Fund/Advancement

John Kuzma

Divisional Director of Disaster Services

2010 Advisory Board

Michael Cassling

Chairman

Steve Seline

Vice-Chairman

Joseph E. O’Connor

Treasurer

Nick Taylor

Secretary

Jack Barnhart**

Anne Baxter

Ed Burchfield

Dorene Butler*

* Emeritus Member ** Life Member *** National Advisory Board Member

Chancellor John Christensen

Hal Daub

Joleen David

Howard Drew**

Rex Fisher

John Fraser

Captain James Gentile

Bennett Ginsberg

Gail Graeve

Kent Grisham

Tim Harrison

Tom Hillmer*

Ryan Horn

Fred Hunzeker

Jeannette James

Chris Kircher

James E. Landen***

Carl Mammel

Steven S. Martin

Sharon Marvin-Griffin**

Terry Moore

Dolores Owen

Keith Powell

Bill Ramsey*

Jane Rogers

James P. Ryan

Steve Sawtell**

Charles V. Sederstrom***

Michael H. Simmonds

Kevin Simmonds

Dr. Lee Simmons

Wayne Smith

Gene Spence**

Jim Suttle

Mark Theisen

L.B. “Red” Thomas**

Anne Thorne Weaver

Sue Toberer

Mike Weekly

Jeff Wilke

2010 Women’s Auxiliary Board

Karen Spaustat

President

Nancy Wolf

Vice President

Nancy Hanson

Treasurer

Lou Ann Landholm

Recording Secretary

Susan Coffey

Corresponding Secretary

Sue Toberer

Advisor

Major Renea Smith

Ex-Officio

Devra Bram

Jan Cohen

Susan Conine

Carol Cranston

Dee D’Agosto

Mary Kaye Eggers

Marte Ellis

Jan Faist

Mary Focht

Rosemary Frandeen

Julie Fritz

Polly Goecke

Kathy Gross

Cris Hedgpeth

Mary Alice Hurlburt

Tracy Jerkovich

Linda Johnson

Debbi Josephson

Nancy Kratky

Mary Moberg

Joyce Mullins

Lenore Polack

Sandy Price

Kari Kratky Salem

Dorene Sherman

Marie Simmons

Judy Skinner

Deb Summers

Wanda Utecht

Anne Thorne Weaver

Marcia Weber

Kay Kriss Weinstein

Mary Yoest


SUMMARY OF FINANCIAL SUPPORT

Public Support and Revenue

Public Contributions and Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,917,376

Adult Rehabilitation Center Support and Revenue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,209,943

Allocated by United Way of the Midlands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $579,650

Total Public Support and Revenue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,706,969

Expenses

FISCAL YEAR ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2009

Program and Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$11,173,186

Management and General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $450,943

Fundraising Expense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,106,827

Adult Rehabilitation Center Expense. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,209,943

Total Expense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,940,899

Excess (Deficiency) of Public Support and Revenue Over Expense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ($233,930)

STATISTICS

Christmas

Total Served* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24,322

Back to School

Total Served . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8,630

Family and Children Services

Total Served . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,411

Homelessness Prevention Services

Total Served . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22,198

Senior Services

Total Served . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14,194

Disaster Services

Total Served . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10,473

Winter Night Watch

Total Served . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13,886

Camp

Total Served . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,471

Corps Community Centers

People Participating in

Recreational Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76,619

Omaha Social Service Programs

Meals Served . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56,007

Community Feeding Programs

Meals Served . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34,625

Volunteer Services

Total Volunteers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27,784

Total Volunteer Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53,729

*Christmas 2009 total served number is down as Goldenrod was

cancelled due to inclement weather. This would have been an additional

300 to 350 people served.


Major Gregory Voeller, Divisional

Finance Secretary: The National

Association of Fundraising Executives’

benchmark for returning money to

programs is 70 percent. Anything over

that is considered excellent. We shoot

for 90 percent, but we normally hover

around the 85 percent mark. The last time

I saw a national rating, we were in the top

10 not-for-profit organizations as far as

that goes.

Michelle, age 22, volunteer and donor:

Every dollar that is raised and every minute that

someone volunteers helps give others hope.

Kenneth, age 74, volunteer: My hope is that I

can continue to help others who are less fortunate.

Mary, age 47, bell ringer:

As my daughters and I stand out in the

cold ringing our bells, we talk about how

every single cent

being dropped in our kettle adds up to

provide all kinds

of hope

to all kinds of people in all kinds of situations.

Jenna, age 26, employee: Even in these tough

economic times, The Salvation Army seems to have

done its best to have services remain constant or

even expand to help a greater number of people.

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