40 – Hotels, Restaurants and Leisure, and Tourism Services

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40 – Hotels, Restaurants and Leisure, and Tourism Services

This table shows a list of topics identified as relevant by different stakeholder groups. They can be considered as stakeholders’ suggestions or requests

for topics to be monitored or disclosed by organizations.

Additional information about the project can be found at https://www.globalreporting.org/reporting/sector-guidance/Topics-

Research/Pages/default.aspx

40 Hotels, Restaurants and Leisure, and Tourism Services

31 Topics

Owners and operators of hotels, resorts and cruise-ships. Includes travel agencies, tour operators and related services not classified elsewhere.

Owners and operators of leisure facilities, including sport and fitness centers, stadiums, golf courses and amusement parks. Owners and

operators of restaurants, bars, pubs, fast-food or take-out facilities. Includes companies that provide food catering services. Tourism

organizations. Owners and operators of casinos and gaming facilities. Companies providing lottery and betting services.

Sustainability

Category

Economic

Topic

Indirect

economic

impacts

Topic

Specification

(if available)

Local

community

Explanation Reference(s) 1 Constituency

Support of local community, employment of local

residents, monitoring economic contribution to the local

environment

169, 215 Business

Contributes to the economic development of the

neighbouring communities

Sustainability Topics for Sectors: What do stakeholders want to know?

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Page 1 of 28


Sustainability

Category

Environmental

Topic

Materials

sourcing

Topic

Specification

(if available)

Sourcing

standards and

practices for

cleaning

products -

Environmental,

health and

safety criteria

Explanation Reference(s) 1 Constituency

Sustainable procurement covers measures taken by

companies to integrate environmental and social criteria

in the selection and management of suppliers.

Sub-sector: Cleaning Products

¦ Formal sourcing policy covering environmental and

social issues

¦ Information on the integration of environmental,

health and safety criteria when purchasing cleaning

products

¦ Details on environmental product specifications for

purchase

¦ REACH (or other international standards) compliance

¦ % of green cleaning products purchased with ecolabels

¦ audit of suppliers on environmental or social issues

(e.g. subcontractors on health and safety risk, working

conditions) and percentage of suppliers audited

¦ percentage of buyers trained on sustainable purchases

133, 152 Financial

Markets &

Information

Users

¦ Purchasing of products with reduced environmental

impacts (including harmful chemicals, ecolabels), are

directly of concerns in the industry. Sector leaders select

products and suppliers based on environmental

specifications, which include compliance with REACH or

ROHS. Cleaning company can shortlist preferred

suppliers with more environmentally friendly alternatives

(eco-products).

¦ Specific attention has to be given also to suppliers of

cleaning products' health and safety management

Sustainability Topics for Sectors: What do stakeholders want to know?

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Sustainability

Category

Topic

Topic

Specification

(if available)

Sourcing

standards and

practices for

cleaning

products -

International

and national

standards on

the restriction

of chemicals

and/or

hazardous

substances

Explanation Reference(s) 1 Constituency

system as employees are handling potentially harmful

chemical products

Sustainable procurement covers measures taken by

companies to integrate environmental and social criteria

in the selection and management of suppliers.

Sub-sector: Cleaning Products

¦ Formal sourcing policy covering environmental and

social issues

¦ Information on the integration of environmental,

health and safety criteria when purchasing cleaning

products

¦ Details on environmental product specifications for

purchase

¦ REACH (or other international standards) compliance

¦ % of green cleaning products purchased with ecolabels

¦ audit of suppliers on environmental or social issues

(e.g. subcontractors on health and safety risk, working

conditions) and percentage of suppliers audited

¦ percentage of buyers trained on sustainable purchases

133, 152 Financial

Markets &

Information

Users

¦ Purchasing of products with reduced environmental

impacts (including harmful chemicals, ecolabels), are

directly of concerns in the industry. Sector leaders select

products and suppliers based on environmental

specifications, which include compliance with REACH or

ROHS. Cleaning company can shortlist preferred

suppliers with more environmentally friendly alternatives

(eco-products).

¦ Specific attention has to be given also to suppliers of

Sustainability Topics for Sectors: What do stakeholders want to know?

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Sustainability

Category

Topic

Topic

Specification

(if available)

Sourcing

standards and

practices for

food and

beverages

Explanation Reference(s) 1 Constituency

cleaning products' health and safety management

system as employees are handling potentially harmful

chemical products

Impacts of Food & Beverage Procurement

Practices and performance related to food and beverage

procurement

Major impacts identified through food and beverage

procurement

457 Mediating

Institution

Food and beverage operations are often part of fullservice

hotels, though they may not be directly under the

hotel’s operational control. Furthermore, food and

beverage operations are rarely the primary revenue

source or business model for a hotel. At the same time,

environmental and social issues surrounding food and

beverage are often among the most relevant to guests

and other stakeholders As such, the scope of material

issues for a food and beverage company has certain

overlap with full-service hotels, but in relation to other

topics and aspects of hotel operations may be less

material. Practices relating to food and beverage should

be further evaluated as to their boundary and level of

inclusion in reporting.

Much overlap exists with Food & Beverage companies

and restaurant companies, however in hotel companies

the issue arises as a general topic rather than the

itemized topics within Food & Beverage that may arise

individually as material for a foodservice company.

Sustainability Topics for Sectors: What do stakeholders want to know?

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Sustainability

Category

Topic

Materials

sourcing and

use

Topic

Specification

(if available)

Operational

supplies

Explanation Reference(s) 1 Constituency

Significant impacts from the purchase and disposal of

operational supplies

Key operational supplies with environmental and social

impact risks

Actions to minimize impacts of key operational supply

purchases

457 Mediating

Institution

Hotels have a diverse supply chain encompassing

hundreds of products. It is important to identify which

purchases have the most significant impact in their

disposal. Significance may be by weight of products, their

environmental impacts from associated materials, the

reusability or recyclability of their design and waste

infrastructure. Examples mentioned include mattresses

and carpeting.

It is important to identify which purchases have the most

significant impact in their upstream lifecycle. Significance

may be by scarcity of raw materials, environmental &

social impacts of their manufacture and distribution, and

stakeholder perception. Examples mentioned include

bathroom tissue.

International Tourism Partnership working group has

been established on Supply chain issues

http://www.tourismpartnership.org/what-wedo/working-groups

Sustainability Topics for Sectors: What do stakeholders want to know?

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Sustainability

Category

Topic

Topic

Specification

(if available)

Wood-based

products from

responsibly

managed forests

Explanation Reference(s) 1 Constituency

Sourcing of wood based products (paper, furniture, etc)

from responsibly managed forests.

The following sections of the GRI reporting guidelines

may be used by a reporter to mention FSC related

activities, those are:

- Profile - Commitments to External Initiatives: 4.12

externally developed economic, environmental, and

social charters, principles, or other initiatives to which

the organization subscribes or endorses.

- Environmental Impact: EN 26: Initiatives to mitigate

environmental impacts of products and services, and

extent of impact mitigation.

- Product: PR3: Type of product and service information

required by procedures and percentage of significant

products and services subject to such information

requirements.

The above indicators are mostly not quantitative and a

reporter may find difficult to integrate FSC related

information.

Ideally there would be a quantitative indicator related to

certification scheme or initiative regarding the supply

and the final product within the GRI guideline.

185, 569 Civil Society

Organization

In order to ease the reporting of FSC related activities,

we propose to include two indicators related to supply

and final product content. The wording could follow the

Food Processing Supplement and worded as follows:

“Percentage of purchased material by volume and

weight which is verified as being in accordance with

Sustainability Topics for Sectors: What do stakeholders want to know?

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Sustainability

Category

Topic

Topic

Specification

(if available)

Explanation Reference(s) 1 Constituency

credible, internationally recognized responsible

production standards, broken down by standard”.

This topic reflects significant impacts, risks and

opportunities for an organization itself and its

stakeholders as well as requires active management or

engagement by the organization.

By buying FSC certified products, companies provide

incentives for responsible forestry and can enjoy their

purchases knowing it has not contributed to the

destruction of the world’s forest or even come from

companies involved in human rights abuses. Almost

everything made from wood and other forest products

are available with the FSC label. Finding FSC products

becomes easier everyday. Literally every day, more FSC

products become available.

This topic is relevant for all 52 business/industry activity

groups.

These simple steps can be followed by companies to find

and buy FSC products:

1. Check the FSC marketplace at marketplace.fsc.org (in

January 2013, the marketplace is still a beta version)

Please note this database will currently only search for

manufacturers and distributors, not retailers. There are

only a few exceptions where retailers are also certified.

To find products carried by your local retailer, please

contact them directly. We are working on including other

search options to this database in the future.

Sustainability Topics for Sectors: What do stakeholders want to know?

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Sustainability

Category

Topic

Plastics use and

management

Topic

Specification

(if available)

Explanation Reference(s) 1 Constituency

2. Ask your retailer

Chances are, they will carry FSC certified products. If not,

let them know you would be interested in certified

products. Not all certification systems are equal and only

FSC guarantees that the product has been made from

environmentally and responsibly managed forests.

By asking for FSC certified products, you show that there

is a demand. This is an important and simple way how

you can help FSC to make a difference.

Plastic, a valuable material, can generate significant

positive, or negative, impacts on economy, environment

and society. Plastic should be treated as a resource and

managed judiciously.

353, 367 Civil Society

Organization

A disclosure on management approach for plastics,

including governance, strategy, risks, opportunities,

considering: opportunities for product redesign,

increasing recycled content, implementing reclaim

and/or reuse which could attract economies, brand

loyalty, investment, employee goodwill, and; risks to the

business, stakeholder health, environment and society

(including reputational/social license to operate,

regulatory, investor, insurer, and liability risks) for

plastics that are directly harmful to stakeholders, or

indirectly through plastics being wasted/littered.

Performance indicators regarding the types and volumes

of plastics being used, collected and/or distributed

downstream; the portion that is made of post-consumerrecycled,

bio-based, biodegradable, compostable, and/or

oxobiodegradable material; the ratio of expected life-

Sustainability Topics for Sectors: What do stakeholders want to know?

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Sustainability

Category

Topic

Topic

Specification

(if available)

Explanation Reference(s) 1 Constituency

span of plastic products in contrast to the duration of

their intended use; these volumes broken down by end

of life disposition.

Most of this disclosure can be captured through the

existing GRI framework (e.g. GRI G3 EC9, EN1, EN2,

EN22), but commentary is needed to ensure disclosers

appreciate the materiality of plastic; these aspects of the

G3.1 EO sector supplement (EO1, E22, E27, SO9, EO8,

EO9, EO11) should be reused for Hotels, Restaurants,

Leisure, Tourism and also for

facilities/office/dining/catering management. Refer to

the Plastic Disclosure Project ( www.plasticdisclosure.org

) for more details on the suggested questions. PDP will

align its questions to GRI G4 to assist disclosers.

Plastic can have significant positive, or negative, impacts

on the economy, environment and society:

Economics: There are significant cost savings available to

organisations that treat plastic as a resource (e.g.

through redesign, use of recycled content, reclaiming,

etc.) and risks of increased direct costs (regulation,

liability, cost of capital, insurance) to organisations that

do not lead in this area as well as indirect economic costs

to impacted industries (e.g. food production, tourism)

Environment: Plastics that are wasted or littered

become extremely harmful to the environment, which

will have a material effect on biodiversity and the global

food chain, both nearby and far outside the local area of

operations

Society: Some plastics are harmful to stakeholders

Sustainability Topics for Sectors: What do stakeholders want to know?

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Sustainability

Category

Topic

Topic

Specification

(if available)

Explanation Reference(s) 1 Constituency

during manufacture, use and/or disposal (e.g. due to

phthalates, BPA), impact the wellbeing of society (e.g.

effect of litter on community spirit and their interest in

sustainability).

While a valuable invention, which benefits society in

many ways, the negative impacts associated with

society's growing use of plastic are not fully recognised.

Roughly 85% of plastic used in products and packaging is

not recycled, and most plastic produced in the last 60

years still remains in the environment today.

Approximately 70% of discarded plastic is from single-use

food and beverage containers. Discarded plastics persist

in the environment for dozens or hundreds of years,

accumulating across the globe, often out of sight of the

producers and users. The direct physical impacts of

plastic are significant to the organisation in increased

costs or missed opportunities, and related economies

(e.g. over $1.2bn in annual damages to ocean-related

industries in Asia-Pacific), the environment through

harming habitats and species, and to stakeholders health

when exposed to the chemical ingredients; and are

magnified if fragmentation of the plastic occurs, making

it available for ingestion to additional species, who

adsorb the chemical ingredients and/or the toxins carried

on the plastic. These negative impacts could be avoided

and turned into positive impacts, if plastic was treated as

a resource to be managed judiciously (e.g. the US

economy lost $8.3bn worth of plastic packaging in 2010)

Sustainability Topics for Sectors: What do stakeholders want to know?

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Sustainability

Category

Topic

Energy

consumption

Topic

Specification

(if available)

Hotel

operations

Explanation Reference(s) 1 Constituency

- "It is not good business practice to throw away valuable

resources".

Significant consumption of resources from hotel

operations

455, 456 Mediating

Institution

Energy usage, water usage, materials and waste

generation/disposal/diversion, GHG emissions, per room

night for site consumption.

The use phase of hotels is the most consumptive and

relevant to all stakeholders from the viewpoint of hotel

operations. All hotel companies that publish GRI reports

will report some type of energy, water, waste, and

carbon indicators, either in aggregate, in units of

intensity, or both.

Though all companies disclose this information, more

precision is needed to standardize the boundaries,

quantification methods, and metrics used to enable

common reporting and comparison globally. This has

been done for carbon footprints for room nights but not

at an organizational level and not for all relevant metrics.

See also the Hotel Carbon Measurement Initiative which

has produced guidance documents, using wide industry

collaboration and stakeholder consultation.

http://www.wttc.org/activities/environment/hotelcarbon-measurement-initiative/

Control of energy and water consumption, reduction of

GHG emissions, measures taken to become more energy-

215 Business

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Sustainability

Category

Topic

Topic

Specification

(if available)

Explanation Reference(s) 1 Constituency

efficient

Energy

efficiency of

operations

Energy use has to be efficient not to place burden on the

environment and to become more profitable

Energy consumption, total 153 Financial

Markets &

Information

Users

Control of energy and water consumption, reduction of 215 Business

GHG emissions, measures taken to become more energyefficient

Fuel

consumption

Water

consumption

Energy use has to be efficient not to place burden on the

environment and to become more profitable

Ships fuel consumption of vessels by ship-type 153 Financial

Markets &

Information

Users

Hotel

Significant consumption of resources from hotel

455, 456 Mediating

operations operations

Institution

Energy usage, water usage, materials and waste

generation/disposal/diversion, GHG emissions, per room

night for site consumption.

The use phase of hotels is the most consumptive and

relevant to all stakeholders from the viewpoint of hotel

operations. All hotel companies that publish GRI reports

will report some type of energy, water, waste, and

carbon indicators, either in aggregate, in units of

Sustainability Topics for Sectors: What do stakeholders want to know?

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Sustainability

Category

Topic

Topic

Specification

(if available)

Explanation Reference(s) 1 Constituency

intensity, or both.

Though all companies disclose this information, more

precision is needed to standardize the boundaries,

quantification methods, and metrics used to enable

common reporting and comparison globally. This has

been done for carbon footprints for room nights but not

at an organizational level and not for all relevant metrics.

See also the Hotel Carbon Measurement Initiative which

has produced guidance documents, using wide industry

collaboration and stakeholder consultation.

http://www.wttc.org/activities/environment/hotelcarbon-measurement-initiative/

Control of energy and water consumption, reduction of

GHG emissions, measures taken to becme more energyefficient

215 Business

Water

withdrawal

Water

consumption

and

management in

water scarce

areas

Energy use has to be efficient not to place burden on the

environment and to become more profitable

Water consumption in m 3 153 Financial

Markets &

Information

Users

Impacts associated with water withdrawals, usage, and 337, 457 Mediating

discharge in water-scarce locations of operation

Institution

Hotel operations located within water-stressed areas

Water withdrawals in water-stressed areas

Water consumption and conservation efforts from

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Sustainability

Category

Topic

Topic

Specification

(if available)

Explanation Reference(s) 1 Constituency

operations

Water discharge in locations without adequate

wastewater treatment infrastructure

Guest engagement for water conservation

Water scarcity has the potential to impact operational

costs, feasibility of development, community relations,

and other environmental impacts. The impacts

associated with water may go beyond operations inside

the hotel building. In addition, the guest experience can

be affected in several ways relating to water.

Wastewater

Management

and treatment

See roundtable proceedings document, and see also

Reference document #1 for Material Topic #5 below.

Impacts associated with water withdrawals, usage, and

discharge in water-scarce locations of operation

337, 457 Mediating

Institution

Hotel operations located within water-stressed areas

Water withdrawals in water-stressed areas

Water consumption and conservation efforts from

operations

Water discharge in locations without adequate

wastewater treatment infrastructure

Guest engagement for water conservation

Water scarcity has the potential to impact operational

costs, feasibility of development, community relations,

and other environmental impacts. The impacts

associated with water may go beyond operations inside

the hotel building. In addition, the guest experience can

Sustainability Topics for Sectors: What do stakeholders want to know?

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Sustainability

Category

Topic

Topic

Specification

(if available)

Explanation Reference(s) 1 Constituency

be affected in several ways relating to water.

See roundtable proceedings document, and see also

Reference document #1 for Material Topic #5 below.

Treatment and reuse of wastewater, implementation of

a solid waste management plan, management and

reduction of chemicals used and pollution

215 Business

Biodiversity,

ecosystem and

habitat

protection

Impacts of

tourism on

coastal and

marine

ecosystems

Inappropriate waste and pollution management bears

high environmental and health risks.

Overfished, polluted, taken for granted, carelessly

abused and destroyed, and much more fragile and

complex than we once thought ... the largest living space

on Earth is fast deteriorating.

Massive influxes of tourists, often to a relatively small

area, have a huge impact. They add to the pollution,

waste, and water needs of the local population, putting

local infrastructure and habitats under enormous

pressure. Some resorts empty their sewage and other

wastes directly into water surrounding coral reefs and

other sensitive marine habitats. The increased popularity

of cruise ships has also adversely affected the marine

environment. Carrying up to 4,000 passengers and crew,

these enormous floating towns are a major source of

marine pollution through the dumping of garbage and

untreated sewage at sea, and the release of other

shipping-related pollutants

Expenditure on projects for biodiversity, natural

ecosystems, landscapes, protection of coastlines,

609 Civil Society

Organization

153 Financial

Markets &

Sustainability Topics for Sectors: What do stakeholders want to know?

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Page 15 of 28


Sustainability

Category

Topic

Emissions to air

- GHG emissions

Topic

Specification

(if available)

Hotel

operations

Explanation Reference(s) 1 Constituency

protection of natural habitats

Significant consumption of resources from hotel

operations

Information

Users

455, 456 Mediating

Institution

Energy usage, water usage, materials and waste

generation/disposal/diversion, GHG emissions, per room

night for site consumption.

The use phase of hotels is the most consumptive and

relevant to all stakeholders from the viewpoint of hotel

operations. All hotel companies that publish GRI reports

will report some type of energy, water, waste, and

carbon indicators, either in aggregate, in units of

intensity, or both.

Though all companies disclose this information, more

precision is needed to standardize the boundaries,

quantification methods, and metrics used to enable

common reporting and comparison globally. This has

been done for carbon footprints for room nights but not

at an organizational level and not for all relevant metrics.

See also the Hotel Carbon Measurement Initiative which

has produced guidance documents, using wide industry

collaboration and stakeholder consultation.

http://www.wttc.org/activities/environment/hotelcarbon-measurement-initiative/

Sustainability Topics for Sectors: What do stakeholders want to know?

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Sustainability

Category

Topic

Waste

management

Topic

Specification

(if available)

Generation,

disposal,

diversion

Explanation Reference(s) 1 Constituency

Significant consumption of resources from hotel

operations

Energy usage, water usage, materials and waste

generation/disposal/diversion, GHG emissions, per room

night for site consumption.

455, 456 Mediating

Institution

The use phase of hotels is the most consumptive and

relevant to all stakeholders from the viewpoint of hotel

operations. All hotel companies that publish GRI reports

will report some type of energy, water, waste, and

carbon indicators, either in aggregate, in units of

intensity, or both.

Though all companies disclose this information, more

precision is needed to standardize the boundaries,

quantification methods, and metrics used to enable

common reporting and comparison globally. This has

been done for carbon footprints for room nights but not

at an organizational level and not for all relevant metrics.

See also the Hotel Carbon Measurement Initiative which

has produced guidance documents, using wide industry

collaboration and stakeholder consultation.

http://www.wttc.org/activities/environment/hotelcarbon-measurement-initiative/

Treatment and reuse of wastewater, implementation of

a solid waste management plan, management and

reduction of chemicals used and pollution

215 Business

Sustainability Topics for Sectors: What do stakeholders want to know?

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Sustainability

Category

Topic

Topic

Specification

(if available)

Social Labor conditions Human capital

development

Explanation Reference(s) 1 Constituency

Inappropriate waste and pollution management bears

high environmental and health risks.

Waste Scope I: Total waste in tonnes

Waste Scope II: Percentage of waste which is recycled

Waste Scope III: Hazardous waste total in tonnes total

The key sustainability factors for the hotels, restaurants,

bars & recreational services sector are linked to its

employees, who drive the business and are the face of a

company toward its customers. This makes it

indispensable for companies to employ progressive

human resource policies that include talent attraction

and retention, human capital development, occupational

health & safety, and group-wide ethical principles that

cover the entire supply chain.

Legal protection of employees, paying living wage, policy

to prevent exploitation

153 Financial

Markets &

Information

Users

460 Financial

Markets &

Information

Users

169, 215 Business

Migrant workers

Human

trafficking risks

Relevant because of basic human rights to live

Trafficking in persons, or human trafficking, involves the

recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or

receipt of a person (a woman, man or a child), often over

international borders but also frequently within the

boundaries of a single country, for the purpose of

exploitation. It is a widespread abuse, affecting

developing countries, countries in transition and

industrialized market economies alike. The majority of

victims of human trafficking are between the ages of 18

and 24, with most having received a job offer prior to

their departure

249 Mediating

Institution

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Sustainability

Category

Topic

Topic

Specification

(if available)

Explanation Reference(s) 1 Constituency

Safe labour migration is a key driver of sustainable

economic development in both sending and receiving

countries. The protection of migrant workers is becoming

an increasingly important issue for a number of global

industries, as well as for home and host governments.

Trafficking of workers, particularly women and girls, into

global supply chains remains a significant reality, in part

due to poorly regulated recruitment industries. Pockets

of good and innovative practice in responsible

recruitment and combating trafficking exist but have yet

to be taken to scale.

254, 437 Mediating

Institution

Recruitment

and

employment

Over 215 million international migrants living outside

their countries of origin play a vital role in the global

economy. Recorded remittances received by developing

countries, estimated to be US$325 billion in 2010, far

exceed the volume of official aid flows and constitute

more than 10 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) in

many developing countries. The vast majority of migrants

today are low-paid workers in industries ranging from

apparel, electronics and construction to agriculture,

hospitality, and domestic service. From the point of

recruitment, through employment and to the point of

return home, these workers are vulnerable to

exploitation. Protection mechanisms to safeguard their

rights continue to be wholly inadequate and access to

legal remedy is poor in both host and home countries.

Recruitment and employment of migrant workers

Number of migrant workers employed

253 Mediating

Institution

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Sustainability

Category

Topic

Topic

Specification

(if available)

Explanation Reference(s) 1 Constituency

Countries of origin

Gender of workers

Positions within company

Length of contracts

Recruitment channels

Any fees for recruitment

Passport retention

Migrant workers both internal and external are a

significant and growing feature of all company activities.

There are over 200 million migrants in the world. They

are found within nearly all business sectors and across all

regions. Many migrant workers, particularly those

working in unskilled jobs are subject to discrimination

and are vulnerable to exploitation and abuse.

Impacts on local

communities

and services

Operation of

tourist

establishments

For many migrants exploitation begins during

recruitment. Exorbitant fees and other charges, often at

usurous rates of interest can leave many migrant

workers effectively bonded labour whatever the

subsequent conditions of employment.

Company due dilligence and reporting should therefore

extend into the supply chain for labour.

In view of continually increasing transport flows,

companies also need to consider the needs of local

communities in the tourist destinations in which they

operate.

460 Financial

Markets &

Information

Users

Sustainability Topics for Sectors: What do stakeholders want to know?

HOTELS, RESTAURANTS AND LEISURE, AND TOURISM SERVICES

May 2013

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Sustainability

Category

Topic

Topic

Specification

(if available)

Explanation Reference(s) 1 Constituency

Effects on locals` access to basic services and housing,

respect of their rights for land, water and property

acquisitions, , that can affect local communities live

quality

215 Business

Local

community

involvement

Unlawful sex

tourism

Operation of

tourist

establishments

Human

trafficking risks

and child abuse

Local communities` life circumstances have to be

ensured and their rights respected.

Social projects and community involvement at holiday

destinations

Adherence to the Code of conduct for the protection of

children from sexual exploitation in travel and tourism

(http://www.thecode.org/)

153 Financial

Markets &

Information

Users

304, 499 Mediating

Institution

Policies and management systems related to the Code.

Breach of the code leads to violation of the following

human rights:

Universal declaration of human rights : articles 3, 4,5, 12

and 13

Convention on the rights of the child: articles 3, 6, 9, 11,

19, 32, 34 and 35

See section 3.3 as example on Kuoni human rights impact

assessment covering children

http://www.kuoni.com/docs/assessing_human_rights_i

mpacts_0.pdf

Unlawful Sex Tourism 110, 457 Mediating

Institution

Sustainability Topics for Sectors: What do stakeholders want to know?

HOTELS, RESTAURANTS AND LEISURE, AND TOURISM SERVICES

May 2013

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Sustainability

Category

Topic

Topic

Specification

(if available)

Explanation Reference(s) 1 Constituency

Hotel operations in areas of high risk of unlawful sex

tourism

Employee- and guest-facing practices to identify and

mitigate lawful sex tourism

Sex tourism and its related risks of human trafficking and

child abuse are rare in occurrence within hotels.

However, instances of occurrence have substantial

impact. Hotels may not necessarily have the ability to

prevent unlawful sex tourism; however they can take

measures to identify occurrences and consequently act

to remedy the situation.

Several industry initiatives exist to combat unlawful sex

tourism, such as the ECPAT Code of Conduct and the

International Tourism Partnership Human Rights Working

Group.

Sex tourism is referenced as one of the worst forms of

child labor by the ILO convention 182.

GOVERNANCE / EUROPE: boardroom lady boom: is it

possible without quotas?

On 22 June, the CapitalCom agency published its 2011

survey into the boardroom gender mix of CAC 40

companies, with fairly encouraging results: the

proportion of women on the board has doubled in recent

years, from 10.5% in 2009 to 20.8% in 2011.

Other

Corporate

governance

Gender

participation on

governance

bodies

389 Financial

Markets &

Information

Users

In January, the French parliament adopted legislation

imposing quotas for the proportion of women on the

Sustainability Topics for Sectors: What do stakeholders want to know?

HOTELS, RESTAURANTS AND LEISURE, AND TOURISM SERVICES

May 2013

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Sustainability

Category

Topic

Topic

Specification

(if available)

Explanation Reference(s) 1 Constituency

board of major companies. Under the measures, the

development of female board membership is mandatory

and gradual: 20% for listed groups, public companies of

an administrative, industrial and commercial nature by

January 2014, rising to 40% by January 2017. The law

also stipulates that companies with no women present

on their board must appoint at least one within six

months of it being on the statute books (voted on 13

January 2011). In France, some 2,000 companies are

affected (the 650 largest listed firms and companies with

more than 500 employees and those generating sales in

excess of €50bn). In terms of sanctions for

noncompliance, appointments that run counter to the

parity principles are to be declared null and void and

attendance fees are to be temporarily suspended.

At the European level and at the instigation of the Vicepresident

of the European Commission, Viviane Reding,

the European parliament will decide in March 2012 on

whether to adopt common legislation on this matter (a

mandatory proportion of women in decision-making

positions of 30% in 2015 and 40% in 2020). This will

depend on the level of improvement seen based on the

selfregulation of European companies, in accordance

with the equality initiative adopted by the European

Commission in December 2010 and the European

parliament resolution of 17 January 2008 calling for the

Commission and member states to promote a balance

between women and men on company boards,

particularly where member states are shareholders.

Sustainability Topics for Sectors: What do stakeholders want to know?

HOTELS, RESTAURANTS AND LEISURE, AND TOURISM SERVICES

May 2013

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Sustainability

Category

Topic

Topic

Specification

(if available)

Explanation Reference(s) 1 Constituency

Food safety

Natural and

cultural heritage

Health risks

from fast food

Management

and operation

of tourist

establishments

Europe as a whole illustrates the degree of hesitation

between a soft-law approach and conventional

legislation (quotas in this instance), but it is clear from

the experience at national level that the second method

tends to get much better results.

The problem of obesity is now so severe that some argue

it is one of the biggest health problems in the world,

which increasingly affects both developed and

developing countries. While consumer and parental

responsibility play a part in the epidemic, the fast-food

sector has come under scrutiny in the context of this

‘right to health’ challenge for its perceived role in

contributing to obesity. Concerns have also been raised

about the use of trans-fat to enhance flavour in fast (and

other) foods, which, it is argued, pose more severe

health risks than ordinary saturated fat.

Contribution to the protection of the heritage,

sustainable utilization of wildlife species, use of native

species for landscaping, communications with customers

regarding sustainability issues

66 Mediating

Institution

215 Business

Operation of touristic establishments have to be in

harmony with local environment, otherwise they risk to

change the ecosystem which is a great environmental

risk. And also, the lack of communication of appropriate

behaviour and of local values can lead to causing

damages to natural and cultural heritage.

Compliance with natural and cultural heritage and local

sustainability principles, provision of access for persons

215 Business

Sustainability Topics for Sectors: What do stakeholders want to know?

HOTELS, RESTAURANTS AND LEISURE, AND TOURISM SERVICES

May 2013

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Sustainability

Category

Topic

Topic

Specification

(if available)

Explanation Reference(s) 1 Constituency

with special needs

Sourcing

strategy and

policies

ESG standards

of suppliers

Contributes to the preservation of local environment and

to the integration of people with disadvantages

How do you ensure that your suppliers adhere to a

standard of ESG compliance similar to that of your

company?

153 Civil Society

Organization

Local and fair

trade services

and goods

When assessing the performance of your procurement

and purchasing functions: Do you incentivise your

procurement management for the selection of ESG

performing suppliers even if you might have to carry a

premium over less expensive suppliers?

Purchasing local and fair-trade services and goods,

enabling local entrepreneurs to develop and sell

sustainable products, use of local goods in operation,

design, etc.

215 Business

Sustainable procurement is environment-friendly and

contributes to the development of local communities.

1

All references can be found at https://www.globalreporting.org/reporting/sector-guidance/Topics-Research/Pages/default.aspx

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References

All references can be found at https://www.globalreporting.org/reporting/sector-guidance/Topics-Research/Pages/default.aspx

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110

133

152°

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215

249

Forest Ethics, n.d. Model Forest Resources Policy. [Online]

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Global Sustainable Tourism Council (GSTC), 'Global Sustainable Tourism Criteria: Working Together for the Universal Adoption of Sustainable

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Hunter, P., 2010. Human Trafficking and Business: Good practices to prevent and combat human trafficking, New York: United Nations Global

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253 Institute for Human Rights and Business (IHRB), 'The Dhaka Principles for Migration with Dignity', Dhaka, 2011.

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May 2013

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353

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