nutrition for optimal performance - Intraining

intraining.com.au

nutrition for optimal performance - Intraining

NUTRITION FOR OPTIMAL

PERFORMANCE

Peita Stanfield

Sports Dietitian/Exercise Physiologist


Sports Nutrition

WHAT DOES A GOOD DIET DO?

Keeps you healthy: Carbohydrate = healthy

immune system

To provide adequate energy for training session

To meet all requirements for protein, vitamins and

minerals.

To ensure the athlete is well hydrated

To promote recovery after a training sessions


A Healthy Diet





Eat a variety of foods from all food groups.

Unprocessed food is best!

Eat regularly (5-6 meals/day)

Match intake with output to keep at optimal

body weight

Keep saturated fat intake down - „Bad Fat‟

Sausage rolls, meat pies, full cream milk, salami


Everyone has different demands for energy

requirements depending on……


• Age

• Sex

• Body size

• Growth

Phase (child,

puberty)

• Activity Level

• Injury factor


A Healthy Diet

“The use of supplements does not compensate for

poor food choices and an inadequate diet”

(Second IOC Consensus Statement on Sports Nutrition)

Only 3 supplements with scientific evidence they

work....

Multivitamin

Fruit 2 serves/day

Vegies 5 serves/day

Dairy 3 serves/day

Good sources of carbohydrate

Lean Protein


More colour and nutrients

Fruit and vegies – use as much colour as

possible for vitamins and antioxidants

Variety with grains – mulitgrain bread, rice, rye,

couscous, muesli/oates

Aim for 1 dinner meal/week of fish

Aim for 3 x fatty fish (salmon, tuna etc)

Don‟t consume sports drinks unless in

competition and trialling for use in marathon


Carbohydrate

• main fuel your body uses for energy, particularly at high

intensities.

• Carbohydrate is stored in your muscles and liver.

• During exercise, carbohydrate stored in your muscles

provides the main source of energy. Liver carbohydrate

helps to delay the onset of fatigue.

• Your body uses your liver glycogen over night for

energy while you are sleeping.

• So, if you do not top up these stores with a pre-meal

snack after an overnight fast (during sleep) you will

already be starting your workout with LESS

carbohydrate (glycogen) and LESS energy.


Carbohydrate is ESSENTIAL

Low carbohydrate diets = Bowel Health

Brain only works off carbohydrate

Essential vitamins and minerals

Use „HEALTHY‟ carbohydrate option

- Fruits and low fat dairy

- Wholegrains, oats, muesli, rye

- Sweet potato, potato, corn

- Couscous, rice, pasta etc

More about PORTION CONTROL


How much should I eat?

PRE-TRAINING/COMPETITION

CARBODHYRATE = 1-4g/kg of BODY WEIGHT

1-4 hours before training

What does this mean???

RECOVERY – POST-TRAINING

30mins AFTER

1g/kg of body weight of carbohydrate


What is 50g Carbohydrate?











800mL-1000mL of Sports Drink

500mL of Orange Juice

2-3 muesli bars (60g)

1 round of honey or jam sandwiches

200g yoghurt and a banana

1 ½ cups of cereal with 1 cup milk with fruit

200g yoghurt and muesli bar

Fruit salad (3 pieces of fruit)

Powerbar (42g)

2 crumpets with honey


Training – Morning sessions??

1g/kilogram VERY DIFFICULT

Aim for at least 1 piece of toast with honey OR

banana

Before a race (something easy in your stomach)

Examples: powerbar + powerade

2 pieces of toast with honey

Practice in long runs what you may need for

competition

NEVER try something new in competition


How much extra should I be eating

Your requirements differ depending on the person

Eat extra for your ‘session type’

1 hour session continuous aerobic – add around 600-

1000kJ of high carbohydrate food (Depending on

metabolism)

This could be an ‘Up and Go’ straight after training on

top of your normal intake or slightly more carbohydrate

at breakfast

3 hour run on weekend – remember you may be having

gels DURING the run (marathon training DOES NOT

equal ‘I can go out and scoff whatever I want!’

(unfortunately!)


Requirements for a marathon

30-60g carbohydrate/hour

Gels- usually about 25g, try for 2 x gels/hour

HALF MARATHON – WORTH HAVING GELS

Haile gebrselassie’s dietitian

Powerade (usually weaker in strength in events)

Weight self before and after long runs

OK to lose about 1% of body weight, but 2% is

pushing it.

Example 65kg female – lose 0.65kg, 1.3kg or more –

effects of dehydration


EXAMPLE MEAL PLAN

Average Female

Pre: Training

1 slice of honey on toast

Breakfast (30mins after)

½ cup muesli with 150g low fat yoghurt and banana

Morning Tea

Skinny cappuccino and piece of fruit (or sweet tooth – 3 x choc chip biscuits)

Lunch

Multigrain sandwich or wrap with 60g meat/chicken OR 100g fish

Plenty of salad

Afternoon Tea

Low fat yoghurt and piece of fruit

Dinner

120g meat/chicken OR 200g fish

2 cups of vegies

¾ cup rice OR 1 cup pasta OR 1 med potato OR cob of corn OR 2 rings of sweet potato


LONG RUN DAY – FEMALE

Dinner Night prior

120g meat/chicken OR 200g fish

2 cups of vegies

1 cup rice OR 1 ½ cups pasta

Pre-run: 1 x powerbar

During 3 hour run: 1 gel each hour ( trial in couple of longer runs leading up to gold

coast: 1 gel each 30mins)

Immediately post: Up and Go OR milk drink (good electrolytes)

Breakfast (9:30am)

2 eggs on toast (2 slices)

Lunch (1pm)

Sandwich

Afternoon Tea (4pm)

Yoghurt and Fruit

Dinner (7pm)

As per above

2 glasses of wine!


EXAMPLE MEAL PLAN

Average Male

Pre: Training

2 x slice of honey on toast

Breakfast (30mins after)

¾ - 1 cup muesli with 150g low fat yoghurt and banana

Morning Tea

Skinny cappuccino + Muesli bar + 40g nuts

Lunch

Multigrain sandwich or wrap with 60g meat/chicken OR 100g fish

Plenty of salad

Afternoon Tea

Low fat yoghurt and piece of fruit

Dinner

150g meat/chicken OR 250g fish

2 cups of vegies

1 cup rice OR 1 ½ cups pasta OR 2 med potatoes OR combination of potato/sweet potato and

cob of corn


LONG RUN DAY – MALE

Dinner Night prior

150g meat/chicken OR 250g fish

2 cups of vegies

1 ½ cups rice OR 2-3 cups pasta

Pre-run: 1 x powerbar

During 3 hour run: 1 gel each hour ( trial in 2 runs: 1 gel each 30mins)

Immediately post: Up and Go OR milk drink (good electrolytes)

Breakfast

3 egg omlette on toast (2 slices)

Orange juice

Lunch

Sandwich x 2

Afternoon Tea

Yoghurt and Fruit

Dinner

As per above

2 glasses of wine!


How Much Do I Need to Drink?

Do WEIGHT test and develop a plan

Do a Check after each session

BODY WEIGHT

(1 kg lost = 1L sweat to replace)

URINE COLOUR

Drink back a little more than lost

(1.5 x fluid loss)

Specific Gravity Testing

Some elite athletes have access to this


How Much Do I Need to Drink?

Do WEIGHT test and develop a plan



Know your HYDRATED weight & start HYDRATED

Drink over the day

Drink 300-500ml 30-60 min BEFORE

Check URINE COLOUR BEFORE

Do you know much fluid you usually lose in a race?

Weigh yourself before and after event

Gives you an idea of how much you need to drink

Obviously length and intensity of race, weather, humidity play a

roll (elite vs recreational runner)

Typically need 150-300ml each 15-20 min


Athletes Trying to Lose Weight

Training in arvo - Eat what you would normally eat

before training and your normal dinner but try and

time so it is within the hour after training

OR Divide normal meal in half (e.g. Recovery meal

PLUS smaller dinner)

Training in morning – divide breakfast in half

Aim to consume snacks that have nutrient quantity such

as protein and vitamin and minerals (as well as

carbohydrate)


Energy Expenditure

Rest Day

Sleep in – wake at 7am

Breakfast

2 pieces of toast

2 eggs

Coffee on Skim

Morning Tea – Fruit and

yoghurt

Training

90min run at 5:30am

Piece of Toast with honey

Breakfast – 7:30am

Banana straight after run

1 piece of toast

2 eggs

Coffee on skim milk

MT – Yoghurt


Trying to Lose Weight?

Protein helps fill you – eat at every meal

Eat small meals regularly

Weight yourself once weekly

Drink plenty of water

Make use of foods with high fibre content/low

glycaemic index between training to help

improve satiety

Know your portion sizes


SUMMARY

Eat a wide variety of foods around training

Never try something new before competition

For optimal performance, an athletes diet should be

high in carbohydrate, moderate protein and low in fat

Keep well hydrated

Eat within 30 minutes of exercise to promote recovery

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines