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View - eTheses Repository - University of Birmingham

View - eTheses Repository - University of Birmingham

View - eTheses Repository - University of

PERCEPTIONS OF AN IRISH DIMENSION AND ITS SIGNIFICANCE FOR THE ENGLISH HISTORY CURRICULUM by PAUL EDWARD BRACEY A thesis submitted to The University of Birmingham For the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY School of Education The University of Birmingham December 2007

  • Page 2 and 3: University of Birmingham Research A
  • Page 4 and 5: ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to th
  • Page 6 and 7: Research into action Questionnaires
  • Page 8 and 9: LIST OF TABLES Table 1: Summary Cha
  • Page 10 and 11: INTRODUCTION AN IRISH DIMENSION IN
  • Page 12 and 13: of the 21 st century. The study als
  • Page 14 and 15: multicultural Britain. Secondly, du
  • Page 16 and 17: Rather than the manufactured clash
  • Page 18 and 19: whole curriculum during the period
  • Page 20 and 21: historical context in which an Iris
  • Page 22 and 23: treatment need to be placed against
  • Page 24 and 25: and vibrant multicultural society.
  • Page 26 and 27: easonable way of explaining why so
  • Page 28 and 29: The case presented by The Parekh Re
  • Page 30 and 31: largely exclude an Irish dimension
  • Page 32 and 33: 19 th century liberal orthodoxy’s
  • Page 34 and 35: Clearly, an Irish dimension has for
  • Page 36 and 37: lecturer in History Education at th
  • Page 38 and 39: These arguments have implications a
  • Page 40 and 41: The impact of an Irish dimension wi
  • Page 42 and 43: curriculum and argued that children
  • Page 44 and 45: description of a black history appr
  • Page 46 and 47: eason to assume that it would encou
  • Page 48 and 49: e treated cautiously. Nevertheless,
  • Page 50 and 51: about the role of an Irish dimensio
  • Page 52 and 53:

    stereotypes. The need to challenge

  • Page 54 and 55:

    of ‘movers and shakers’, histor

  • Page 56 and 57:

    studies can be used to provide tent

  • Page 58 and 59:

    Teachers in Development Education p

  • Page 60 and 61:

    teaching Ireland as part of the Sch

  • Page 62 and 63:

    to allow for the different contexts

  • Page 64 and 65:

    give their perceptions of dimension

  • Page 66 and 67:

    dimension in the curriculum. It is

  • Page 68 and 69:

    in which an Irish dimension is deve

  • Page 70 and 71:

    Documentary evidence Clearly there

  • Page 72 and 73:

    It is possible to indicate how well

  • Page 74 and 75:

    Catholic) schools replied to the qu

  • Page 76 and 77:

    questionnaires. At best it can be t

  • Page 78 and 79:

    teachers who had been involved in i

  • Page 80 and 81:

    Pilot study All volunteers from the

  • Page 82 and 83:

    outside the classroom. The approach

  • Page 84 and 85:

    Stage 1: Secondary school history t

  • Page 86 and 87:

    these responses making reference to

  • Page 88 and 89:

    Case Study 3. Half of the Roman Cat

  • Page 90 and 91:

    a third of the responses related it

  • Page 92 and 93:

    Respondents who said they did not i

  • Page 94 and 95:

    Irish dimension at Key Stage 4 rega

  • Page 96 and 97:

    Respondents not teaching an Irish d

  • Page 98 and 99:

    taught included two Foundation/Key

  • Page 100 and 101:

    or more lessons’, ‘it is mentio

  • Page 102 and 103:

    more credited it with some importan

  • Page 104 and 105:

    Only a third of the respondents fel

  • Page 106 and 107:

    The final stage of the questionnair

  • Page 108 and 109:

    Clearly, these views may not be typ

  • Page 110 and 111:

    CHAPTER 4 THREE MINI CASE STUDIES U

  • Page 112 and 113:

    esults based on questionnaire data

  • Page 114 and 115:

    The first interviewee worked in a c

  • Page 116 and 117:

    The interviewee’s response sugges

  • Page 118 and 119:

    ut the topic was generally well rec

  • Page 120 and 121:

    dimension had limited importance in

  • Page 122 and 123:

    its possibly a philosophical thing

  • Page 124 and 125:

    The interviewee related Irish histo

  • Page 126 and 127:

    within their AS/A2 courses. There w

  • Page 128 and 129:

    drew out the significance of events

  • Page 130 and 131:

    This suggests that multicultural an

  • Page 132 and 133:

    An Irish dimension was the speciali

  • Page 134 and 135:

    alternative Modern World Studies, e

  • Page 136 and 137:

    The interviewee said that one of th

  • Page 138 and 139:

    course. Overall, the impression giv

  • Page 140 and 141:

    school for three years but had expe

  • Page 142 and 143:

    dimensions were related to topics a

  • Page 144 and 145:

    Famine/Hunger was an important feat

  • Page 146 and 147:

    parents had decided to stay there o

  • Page 148 and 149:

    felt that the National Curriculum a

  • Page 150 and 151:

    with this issue. Some interviewees

  • Page 152 and 153:

    CHAPTER 5 PROJECT CASE STUDY I: PER

  • Page 154 and 155:

    The Director and Project Facilitato

  • Page 156 and 157:

    including references to the Belfast

  • Page 158 and 159:

    The Project Facilitator suggested t

  • Page 160 and 161:

    uzzing … they were saying to us

  • Page 162 and 163:

    context. Throughout the project pup

  • Page 164 and 165:

    The first teacher interviewee was o

  • Page 166 and 167:

    assignment based on ‘Bloody Sunda

  • Page 168 and 169:

    course. Some pupils with Irish back

  • Page 170 and 171:

    same room and the whole issue of ha

  • Page 172 and 173:

    closely related to their work with

  • Page 174 and 175:

    CHAPTER 6 PROJECT CASE STUDY 2: PER

  • Page 176 and 177:

    issue will be dealt with by investi

  • Page 178 and 179:

    which focused on the life of a youn

  • Page 180 and 181:

    An examination of the rationale rel

  • Page 182 and 183:

    The interviewee worked with individ

  • Page 184 and 185:

    Church of England schools developed

  • Page 186 and 187:

    produced by the school related to t

  • Page 188 and 189:

    incorporate broader curriculum init

  • Page 190 and 191:

    Key Stage 4 was followed by an asse

  • Page 192 and 193:

    taught it as the Modern World Study

  • Page 194 and 195:

    arisen in the school. They noted th

  • Page 196 and 197:

    to produce materials at Key Stage 3

  • Page 198 and 199:

    meant that it was difficult to iden

  • Page 200 and 201:

    The first teacher interviewee invol

  • Page 202 and 203:

    note that, despite their alleged su

  • Page 204 and 205:

    The third teacher interviewee was i

  • Page 206 and 207:

    contribution to the Midlands Histor

  • Page 208 and 209:

    History was taught as separate subj

  • Page 210 and 211:

    of stories could be associated with

  • Page 212 and 213:

    This clearly went beyond the requir

  • Page 214 and 215:

    When asked about their perception o

  • Page 216 and 217:

    link had been made redundant as res

  • Page 218 and 219:

    CHAPTER 7 ‘MOVERS AND SHAKERS’

  • Page 220 and 221:

    they provided a unique insight into

  • Page 222 and 223:

    The interviewee had undertaken this

  • Page 224 and 225:

    include both published and local re

  • Page 226 and 227:

    this course required young people t

  • Page 228 and 229:

    had included sufficient support for

  • Page 230 and 231:

    alone. So there are opportunities t

  • Page 232 and 233:

    teachers will take on that. I don

  • Page 234 and 235:

    underlining thread in courses throu

  • Page 236 and 237:

    interpretations and provided an app

  • Page 238 and 239:

    Modern World Syllabus at GCSE and i

  • Page 240 and 241:

    teachers in schools. They noted com

  • Page 242 and 243:

    in a professional capacity for abou

  • Page 244 and 245:

    secondary students. They used TIDE

  • Page 246 and 247:

    I think it links to anti-racist edu

  • Page 248 and 249:

    teaching of a range of dimensions w

  • Page 250 and 251:

    CONCLUSION AN IRISH DIMENSION IN TH

  • Page 252 and 253:

    proved to be greater than expected

  • Page 254 and 255:

    Britain, as part of Four Nations Hi

  • Page 256 and 257:

    conservative approach towards the c

  • Page 258 and 259:

    (3) Irish immigration should be see

  • Page 260 and 261:

    Table 11: An Irish dimension in the

  • Page 262 and 263:

    Clearly this was an aspiration of t

  • Page 264 and 265:

    well as the significance of immigra

  • Page 266 and 267:

    Britain. The way in which the Key S

  • Page 268 and 269:

    dimension in both the present and f

  • Page 270 and 271:

    APPENDIX I: Example of an interview

  • Page 272 and 273:

    8. The bigger picture a. Are there

  • Page 274 and 275:

    Please put a tick in the appropriat

  • Page 276 and 277:

    Question 3. How important is Irish

  • Page 279 and 280:

    5. DO YOU INCLUDE MULTICULTURAL HIS

  • Page 281 and 282:

    11. History textbooks at KS3 Please

  • Page 283 and 284:

    13. History textbooks at AS/A2 Plea

  • Page 285 and 286:

    For questions 4, 5 and 6 please tic

  • Page 287 and 288:

    6. Tick the comment which shows the

  • Page 289 and 290:

    8. History textbooks at KS1 Please

  • Page 291 and 292:

    APPENDIX IV: Perceptions of histori

  • Page 293 and 294:

    APPENDIX VI: Perceptions of histori

  • Page 295 and 296:

    APPENDIX VIII: Perceptions of histo

  • Page 297 and 298:

    APPENDIX X: Case Study 5 (48 Histor

  • Page 299 and 300:

    BIBLIOGRAPHY Ajegbo, K; Kuwan, D; S

  • Page 301 and 302:

    Bracey, P. & Gove-Humphries, A. (20

  • Page 303 and 304:

    DfEE/QCA(1999) History: The Nationa

  • Page 305 and 306:

    Haydn, T. (1996) ‘Nationalism beg

  • Page 307 and 308:

    Macpherson, W. (1999) The Stephen L

  • Page 309 and 310:

    Price, M. ‘History in danger.’

  • Page 311 and 312:

    Starkey, D. (2001) Elizabeth. Londo

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