05-18-1927 - Village of Pinckney

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05-18-1927 - Village of Pinckney

PINCKNEY DISPATCH

Vol. 45

— —v

Pinckney, Livingston County, Michigan, Wednesday, May 18, 1927 No. 20

' --^

«^O^X e

::: M- alas.- of tile Linear, y

•-o:e last Friday evening a a.-

• .-, from a financial and

: . ndpoir.t. Every seat a a.

' i.i'idir:^ room was i

. Abhourrh it is iinposMb'e : :

'.(> estimate the atteiaaun •

: e to have been about • 00

.- ! M> v "orth of ticket- e . •

e.aas w ere all Well tak. '.

iv'••••>: S and misfortunes v. haoor

Father" drew laugh after

li.a'.b-t'n Rokms in the- role .

play the South Lynn High School

iai-e ball team at Pinckney, Friday,

May '.It). Game called at 4 :00 P. M.

K\ -rybedy come as then is onh m .•

lore notne game, that bl>

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! a. i • •%

t lo\'..

Howell

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out. by---Swarthout 1"

bv I obb 1. Bas(>s on

artlaait--7, off Filkins <

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0 Ancient Ceremonial Masks

•{ What is believed to he th" first col

Li: lection of ceremonial masks ever anith

l] era] from the regions of the nppei

r> Amazon tins been brought to Amerle;

' l by Arthur II. Either, a 1'hilarielplil!

naturalist, who made an expeditint

0

(i }n f r> Vor*^ Anifrlffi lp the Interest* f

Q! DANCE AT PATTERSON " LA^r! '

I Despite the unfavorable wahar

I the dance at Chalker's Dance llaa.

1 •' I Patterson Lake, last Saturda\ nil.' 1 '

10 O-iirew a? couple. There will he ar.ot

0 f) ! dance rriven there this Saturday n a '.

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bali-

.. off

Two base hit Grave.-,. Double

'.'a.rthoul to Hendeo, Hemin;'-

Pi k. la-.-ipire-A. Lavcy.

S,ore by inninjrs

1 2 3 4 5 H 7 S it Tl.

\ 10 10 0 3 10 0 i;

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o—•

May 21.Dances part old and part a a

Cood music and a pood time prom;

( d. Pall .*1,00. Refreshments served.

let. cars and trucks.This was

in cxcia., of the best day.-, !'•

record.

.Mired Sloan, president of t:

.•raj Motors was present, and md

tin line in car number .1),34 7 v.

was a coach.

DANCE TONIGHT

h:\a-lon \o. 3 of the Altar Society Mr. and Mrs. James Lou^hlin

if St. Mary's church tfivi a dance at Rushton vivSitod Miss Helen Tipl

the I'inckncy Opera House tonight. over the week end.

ESTABLISH ALL TIME RECORD

The Chevrolet Motor Co. set a mac

production record for monthly production

when they produced I11,!n'',7

units in the month of April thr- i- a-

all time production record for p-,..--

shitt cars.

On April 29 they built r>,34 7 ("la-vn-

U'lit,-

'.' in • * -

(, e

OIL

Look

All-Weather Tread scientifically design i

to give better traction and slow even

A Balloon Tire with the famous Goodyear

tread wear.

29x4.40 - - - - - $11.95

31x5.25 - - - ---$21.95

Get Our Low Price on Your Size

S.NCLA.R ^ ^ ^ U A V E i Y

STATION

CHAPELS

HOWELL

P,NCKNEY

MICH.

MICH

ITS THE SAME OLD STORY

Hand a Customer 100 Cents for has Dollar and He'll

Appreciate It Every Time—Our Business Proves It

Watches -Diamondi -Clock* -Jewelry #-SiWerware

Fine Cut Gla**—Art GUee—- Umbrella*—Pyrex ..

Toilet Articles—Fountain Pens—Eyertharp Pencils

Optical Goods

Everything For Shower—Wedding-— Anniversary

A SQUARE DEAL PRICE TAG SAYS DOLLARS

SAVED TO PINCKNEY PATRONS-We Don't Mean

Maybe

l^

CASH SPECIALS

1 CAN OF GOOD CORN

EXTRA GOOD PEAS, PER CAN

10c

10c

BEST PACK TOMATOES, PER CAN

LARGE CAN OF MILK

10c

10c

LIPPINCOTTS CATSUP

10c

JELLO, PER PKG.

10c

I KELLOG'S BRAN FLAKES

10c

* > ROLLS OF WAX PAPER 10c

HOWELL FLOUR

96c

BETTY CROCKER

$1.13

j SUGAR, lOtbs 67c |

' 2 LARGE PKGS. KELLOG'S CORN FLAKES... 25c

i 2 FRENCH MUSTARD

25c

2 lbs. SEEDLESS RAISINS 25c

6 BARS P.G..R. N. M. or FLAKE WHITE SOAP 25c

1 QT. JAR BEST DILL PICKLES 25c

7 HQi-LS TOILET PAPER 25c

TRY OUR 1 tb PAILS OF SUNNY BOY

PEANUT BUTTER, NONE BETTER 25c

FREE

BAGS

GROCERY

OR

db

FREE

BASKETS

C. H. KBMMBDY


TMF.

PINrKNFY DISPATCH

New Thow'es of Life Really Based on Common

Consciousness of God

By BISHOP G. G. BENNETT, Duluth.

m

FARM

CK

1 — l'. S. S. (alifornia us It passed under Brooklyn bridge when th>- J.n-j.1 lleei euLered tiie Hudson river

2.—Inspection of Levasseur biplane in which Captain Nungesser, Freneh uce, will try nonstop flight fron

Paris to New York. 3—Kamon de Vulera delivering his farewell address on Boston common.

NEWS REVIEW OF

CURRENTEVENTS

Kellogg Curtly Refuses to

Discuss Mellon Letter

With England.

By EDWARD W. PlCKARD

WHFN Secretary of the Treasury

Mellon in a recent letter to

President Hibhen of Princeton university

stated that "all our principal

debtors are already receiving from

Germany more than enough to pay

their debts to the United States."

there was immediate protest In Kngland

against the accuracy of the

statement in so fur as it applied to

Great Britain, chancellor of the Exchequer

Churchill and others made

heated speeches, but it was not supposed

that the government would

take formal notice of the matter.

Last week, however, Washington

was surprised to receive from Great

Britain a long note Attacking Mr.

Mellon's letter and asking that the

United States government "fake steps

to remove the unfortunate Impression

that has been created by the issue

of this statement."

Secretary of State Kellogg ('(inferred

with ['resident Coniidge and

others and then handed to the British

ambassador this decidedly curt

reply :

"Tiie government of the United

States regards the correspondence between

Mr. Mellon and Mr. Hibhen as

a purely domestic i]|>< ission nnd does

not d"slre to engage in any formal

diplomatic exchanges upon the sub-

Ject.'

Mr. Mellon. be»]e\!rig the attacks in

the British note shnuhl not go unanswered,

gave out a statement justifying

and explaining at length the

position he has taken In the discussion.

Plplomntic circles In London were

as much surprised by (lie British note

as was Washing'! mi. In government

opposition rlnlfs there was an Inclination

to suspect that the note was

meant larg'-ty for home consumption

and for the benefit of the Conservative

party, which has .]i!hculty In explaining

the budge! deficit.

A

MKBICAN correspondents In Geneva

say that the underlying

Idea of all delegations (except the

American) at the League of Nations

economic conference whi^h opened

last week is that the most practical

Step toward world reconstruction nnd

general prosperity would be the cancellation

of all war debts and reparations

Some of therq niso had

schemes for the limitation of production

of wheat, corn cotton, copper

and other goods, chiefly produced in

the United States. The American

delegates, headed by Henry M. Robinson

of Los Angeles, were primed to

meet all such suggestions. Soviet

Russia, having settled her quarrel

With Switzerland, sent a huncb of

economists led hy Valerian Csslnski

That gentleman u nations

are represented. The conference will

adopt resolutions and make rci'nmniendatlons,

which, however, will not

be binding on the countries represented,

whatever may he the attitude

of their delegations

FACTS and problems of commerce

and trade on the Western continent

„were brought out and discussed

In Washington wherv Loth the third

Pfln-Americnn commercial congress

and the annual meeting of the Chamber

of Commerce of the United States

werf in session. President Coolidge

Was chief speaker at a joint session

of the two bodies and set forth the

development of trade between the

United States and the muntr'^s of

Central and South America He snid

that not only has the United States

purchased more from Latin-American

countries than it has sold to them, but

It had for a long time been the chief

foreign purchaser of their products.

Next day the Chamber of Commerce

heard reports from the principal sections

of the country, all showing present

prosperity with prospect of Its

continuance, except in the case of the

runner. His plight, in the Middle

West and the cotton-growing part of

the South, was described as discouraging.

FLOOD conditions In southeastern

Arkansas, northeastern Louisiana

and western Mississippi grew worse

steadily during the week. The water,

pouring through new crevasses on the

Mississippi, Inundated a region about

.VXJO square miles in extent, only a

few narrow ridges being left above

the surface. Most of the population

already had been gathered at concentration

points, hut many hundreds

were left stranded on the levees and

small high places. The rescue of these

unfortunates was being carried on as

rapidly as possible, being directed by

the scores of navy aviators sent there

by the government. Civilian Dictator

Parker was in general charge of the

rescue operations and was doing

splendid work. Secretary Hoover returned

to Washington long enough to

report to the President, and the result

was a call for another $.1,000,000

subscription to the Fled Cross relief

fund. The spread of disease In the

flooded states was the cause of great

anxiety and of such precautions as

could he taken.

"We have definite reports of 2,">

cases of typhoid fever In the refugee

camps, and there probably are many

others," said F >r, William R. Redden,

medical director for the American

Red Cross. "And the worst part of

the health problem is to come In a

week or ten days, when the disease

has had an opportunity to manifest Itself.

The health problem will increase

as the waters recede."

A hundred tluui-sand persons were

immunized with typhoid and smallpoxantitoxin,

and the Red Cross obtained

from the army ten mobile laboratories

for the purification of water.

['resident Coolidge has indicated

that he did not think it necessary to

call a special session of congress for

providing for relief and rehabilitation

in the Mississippi valley. Senators

Copelund of New York and La Toilette

of Wisconsin disagreed with him

and both of them appealed to him by

wire to cull congress together. They

asserted that funds from private resources

would not be sufficient and

that the flood victims were entitled to

look to congress for assistance.

When Mr. Hoover returned from

the capita! he was accompanied by-

Secretary of War Davis, who was

asked by the President to make n

comprehensive study of the problem

of flood control, in conjunction with

the army engineers, and to submit

recommendations for remedial legislation

prior to the opening of the next

congress. A flood-control conference

also was held tit Peorlu. Ill., With numerous

experts and officials !n attend,;

ance. The people of the Middle W

are so aroused by this disaster, d

scribed by Senator La Kol'.ette as t

greatest in our history, that the

tlonal and state governments may

led at last to provide adequate p

teetlon against a repetition. Pat

work measures and dilatory tar

in the past have combined to m

unified flood control impossible,

cording to those who have studied the

subject. The federal government Is

held primarily responsible.

N

T IM;TY-UOUR

men were entombed

the Everett ville mine near

Fairmont, W. Vii., by an explosion. At

the time of writing 2fl bodies had been

brought out by the rescue crews, and

It was thought certain that all the

rest of the unfortunate miners had

perished, for fire was raging In pnrts

of the workings.

TIlolTJl the peace conference In

Nicaragua failed fo accomplish Its

purpose, because the liberals would

not consent to the retention of the

Presidency by Adolfo Dinz, a two

days' truce was arranged with the

prospect of further negotiations. General

Mnncada, commander hi chief of

the liberal army, repre> nted Doctor

Sncas.a at the conference IU^I he said

he was willing to treat further with

Henry L. Stimson, the emissary of

President Coolidge, provided the government

troops were withdrawn from

the Boaco and Teustepe regions

where unxst of the liberals are concentrated.

"Mr. Stimson told rue,"

said General Moncadu. "that the

United States government intends to

restore peace in Nicaragua immediately

and to use force If necessary to

do so." A number of rhe general's

staff declared that if the United

States formally ordered the liberals

to lay down their arms and cease firing,

they would be compelled to accept.

But, he added, so long as the

United States attempted to lay down

terms, which Included the continuance

of Diaz In office, the liberals

would fight for "constitutionality and

Justice for Nicaragua."

\/f ARSHAL CHANG TSO-LDTS Pe-

*•** king government executed the

Chinese Reds caught In the raid on

the Russian embassy grounds, and

the other day it was reported that the

Russian propagandists nabbed at the

time were to be tried by court-martial.

The Moscow government therefore

transmitted to Peking a strong

note warning Chang that If the Russians

received the same sentence as

the Chinese Communists, Russia would

"Immediately take the Inevitable

steps." The trials were postponed

and a conference of Chinese officials

wits held at which, according to rumor,

It was decided that the Russians

should be deported. Mme. Michael

Borodlne, the captured wife of the Soviet

adviser to the Cantonese government,

presumably will have a separate

trlul.

Miles F.ampson, British minister to

China, has reported to his government

that the Fiankow faction of the Cantonese

has offered to oust the Reds

and make common cause with thf

Nanking moderates if the powers will

cease further action against It. The

offer was made by Foreign Minister

Kugene ('hen himself, but the London

officials were suspicious that It was a

ruse to gain further delay.

Somp person or persons In Peking,

apparently desirous of creating the

Impression that there was lack of bar

ninny In the American government

over its Chinese policy, sent out the

report that Minister Mac-Murray liar]

resigned, This was tlatly denier] in

Washington and the administration

showed consj i]cr;ihle Irritation over

this and other false press stories from

foreign sources. At present Mr. ("Viol

idgc docs not sec that any advantage

could he derived by sending another

note concerning the Nanking outrages

and he does not helleve the other

powers have agreed to follow up the

former note and press for compliance

because conditions In the ranks of tin-

National 1st party are too chaotic.

pitKMIKlt pniNCARE electrlfiec

* France by the announcement that

the government was planning the construction

of a vast system of fortifications

on Its northern and eastern

frontiers, so powerful and extensive

that another

ing i entrai and south America, returned

last week to Washington. President

nnd Mrs. Coolidge and numerous

ofliclals went out to Helling fi>|


Parents of 24

in Hard Struggle

AJ1 Born Within 23 Years;

Six Die in Infancy,

18 Alive.

Goodhue, Minn.—Twenty-four chilireu

were born to Mr. and Mrs. Anton

Rosener of this village, all within

KJ years.

Among them were five sets of twins.

Six of the children died in babyhood.

-Eighteen are living, and all

but four have left the parental roof.

The last born of the children arrived

In 1909—Edward, who with his brothers,

William, nineteen, and Theodore,

twenty, and a sister, Rosie, twentyone,

remain at home.

Anton Rosener Is the village blacksmith,

who came here about -8 years

ago, after seven years in Hastings,

Minn., to which city he immigrated

from Austria with his wife and three

children.

In those early years there was much

blacksmithing, much shoeing, much

wagon-making and repairing to be

flone. The arrival of the vanguard of

the amazing procession of children

was hailed with joy. With the wages

from the Hastings shop, a garden and

food prices within reason, they could

get along, though they could save

nothing.

Borrowed to Buy Beds.

When they came to Goodhue their

family had increased to six children,

the youngest of whom was three

months, the eldest, eleven years. They

had acquired few household furnishings

and Anton had to borrow money

from his partner with which to buy

additional furniture, including a bed

or two to meet the exigency provided

by the "little blessings" that were

arriving so frequently.

Business was good in the blacksmith

shop, but with mounting household

^expenses—the doctors' bills, the

food, the school books—the multiplicity

of births caused the parents much

concern.

"Would you, if you had your life

to live again, like to have another

large family?" Mrs. Rosener was

asked.

She shook her head; silent a moment

while in quick review of the

years of her motherhood, then smiled

and reconsidering her negative gesture,

said :

"If I could have good health—

yes."

"Oh, but It was hard work to take

care of them," she continued. "I put

In a big garden—three lots—and then

got use of another lot so I could raise

more. I raised all the vegetables for

winter use.

"Twenty at the tnhle every meal.

But I fed them good, We had a cow

and pigs—yes—and some apple and

plum trees, and a cherry tree, too. I

« * •

made sauerkraut and did much canning.

Butter I made, too.

"I did all the sewing aud mending

until the girts got large enough to

help. I knitted all their stockings. I

got clothes from other people and

made them over for us. For myself

I never went down in my husband's

pocket for a cent.

Illness Passed Them By.

Neither husband nor wife has ever

been incapacitated by illness of any

sort. All the children that have grown

up have had excellent health.

"Smallpox,"""measles, scarlet fever—

all around us sometimes," Anton Rosener

said, "but rny children, they never

have none of them. I think I lucky!

We don't keep tiiern in house because

weather cold or It ruin. They stay

out much and they keep healthy."

His sons, William and Edward, help

their father in the shop, but in an indifferent

way. They view blacksmithing

in the village as a waning trade.

They do not care to learn it. Their

brother, Theodore, is a barber, and

that is more to their liking. Or, there

is Steve, now twenty-six, chief mechanic

in the Red Wing fire department.

"He has a real job," these

younger brothers say.

Grace was the first of the children

to leave home. She married Harry

Howard, a Minneapolis painter. One

after another, the 14 others went

away. "I had to shove them out to

care for themselves as soon as I

could," Mrs. Rosener said sadly.

"Now only four left. Rosie marry,

but I keep her here just as long as

we can get along together."

German Beauties Shy;

Shun Bathing Suits

Berlin.—Germany is soon to have a

beauty queen worthy of the title

"Fraulein Deutschland" to participate

In international beauty contests.

The crowns of all gretchens, including

that of Hilde Quandt, who was recently

chosen as the prettiest girl

from 50 competitors, have been challenged

as unrepresentative. So the

League of Cultivation of Physical

Beauty has organized a contest on the

American plan. Forty-four cities already

have consented to select their

prized beauties.

The rules provide that girls will not

have to wear bathing suits unless they

desire, hut "no artificial aids to shapeliness"

are to be permitted beneath

whatever single tight-fitting garment

the contestants want to wear. The

bathing-suit regulation was made optiona!,

the league announced, because

many provincial gretchens shy at revealing

too much of their figure in

public. The winners of the city contests

will then enter the finals in Berlin.

American "Friendship Dolls" in Japan

THE PINCKNEY DISPATCH

'• • - | '" -

Camp McCoy to Be |

Leader for Artillery i

Oamp McCoy, Wis.—This military j

reservation, extending over 1,400 acre*

of Monroe county, is destined within |

the next three years to be the great- j

est artillery training camp in the

United States. Thousands of regular

army, organized reserve and National !

Guard artillery troops from nine

states will be gathered here each year '

for intensive training. ,

This was learned definitely when i

some of the details of a three-year

improvement plan, already under way,

were explained.

Such progress has already been

made that, beginning in June, the

regular and National Guard artillery

from Missouri, Iowa, Illinois, Wis- ,

cousin, North and South Dakota,

Minnesota and Nebraska will do their

training here. Later, Michigan urt.il- i

lery, which will this year train at

Camp Grayling, Mich., will be added

to the list. In no other part of the

United States will so large an aggregation

of artillery be gathered togetlier

Camp McCoy, named in honor of

the late MaJ. Gen. Robert H. McCoy

of Sparta, commander of the Thirty- \

second division during the World war,

is little known to the average person

of the service.

It has been used for a government |

firing range for 15 years and army !

officials have long been aware of ita

advantages as a large camp site.

Royal Chef Prefers Job j

in American Kitchen

Eureka Springs, Ark.—A chef who ',

served his apprenticeship in the kitchen

of the Russian royal palace and

prepared food for the tables of three

czars finds Americans much easier to

please.

j

After catering to the appetites of

monarchs, W. C. Thompson, an Es- |

thonian by birth, now is a chef in a

resort hotel here. It is no trouble at

all, he says, to cook for American rail- j

lionaires.

Thompson's first experience as a!

cook for royalty was under Alexander !

II and then Alexander III and Nicho- j

las II. ;

***#****#**********#*-*-*-5f *-i l

'

* j

Throng Seeks Cures J

Following "Miracle" J |

Edense, Denmark.—Pilgrims +

are flocking to this famous old

* Danish city, where Hans Chris-

* tian Andersen was born, following

reports of miraculous cures

effected at spiritualist meetings.

The cures are attributed to

the intervention of Brother

Johannes, who died here two

centuries ago. It is declared

that he restored the sight of a

£ blind girl recently after noted

* physicians had failed. Many

cures of cripples also are re-

* ported.

* The police recently forbade

* the holding of secret meetings

*

by tiie spiritualists.

* * * * * * * # * * • * * - * • * * * • * * • * • * • * * * * * * :

Daughters of wealthy Japanese received 48 American ••;;•,cm! hip .;. ;i -. ' . i,e


4 •

Wir'f ^

i

&

-v*

.¾¾ •

Constant

j

. if « V ^1.

>••* V

THE COMMUNITY

FILLING STATION

C. A. Weddige, Prop. Main St. and Dexter Rd.

RED CROWN GASOLINE

WILL GIVE YOU POWER AND MILEAGE

CORDUROY TIRES

WILL GIVE YOU SMOOTH AND EASY RIDING

OUR SERVICE IS GOOD.

WHAT MORE COULD YOU ASK

SPECIAL - - • This Week

CORDUROY CORD 30x31-2 Casing and Tube

$9.75

WATCH OUR SPECIALS EVERY WEEK

LET US BID

THE PINCKNEY

;^„» ^-ir-i.pm-1 -x i *j • M.IC^T^. i^iJufc,-;^ ^,^-

ON YOUR WORK

That we can save you money on all plumbing work

you may be contemplating, is easily and quickly

proved by allowing us to bid on the work. We are

glad to guarantee your satisfaction with the work.

We make a speciality of installing automatic water

systems, septic tanks, gasoline engines etc.

I Carry a Full Line

Of Pumps,Gasoline Engines and Plumbing Supplies

and repairs, Septic Tanks.

George Meabon

Pinckney, Mich.,

The prime virtue of

the Electric Refrigerator

is its practically

unchanging cold. It

maintains a steady,

food-preserving temperature—and

this

it does automatically.

Ihe electric refrigerator

solves the problem

of keeping foodstuffs

always in perfect, health,

serving condition — with'

out your raising a finger.

Come in and let us tell

you more about

•*

For

MEMORIAL DAY

Hags 5c to $2.00

Aato Flag Sets 25c-50c

Cemetery Vases 10c

Glass Vases 10-15-25 c

LINE'S BAZAAR

Howell. OppositeCourthouse

PLAINFIELD

W. H. Caskcy, Mrs. Caskey and

Billy Dale of Stockbridge were Sunday

dinner g-uests of A. L. Dutton.

Mr. and Mrs. Ferris Smith and

daughter, Thelma, of Howell spent

Sunday at the S. T. Wasson home.

Rev. ClaVk and family returned

Saturday from a visit with relatives

in Fayette, Ohio.

Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Topping have

been spending a few days with Detroit

friends.

Clarence Kleinsmith and family of

Iosco and McClure Hinchey of Howell

were Sunday guests at the James

Caskey home.

Ferris and Glenn Caskey who have

been visiting their aunt, Mrs. Kleinsinith

returned home Sunday.

Will Secor of Unadilla was in town

Sunday.

Mis.s Elle»"Wasson was home from

Howell with her parents, Mr. and

Mrs. S. T. Wasson, over the week end.

We are informed that Elmer Chipman

has sold his farm and will move

to Detroit.

Achievement Day was observed at

the village school Wednesday .

A business meeting of the Methodist

Guild and W. F. M. S. was held

with Mrs. Mary Wasson Wednesday

afternoon.

UNADILLA.

Miss June Lawler spent Sundry

with Miss Esther Barnum.

Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Teachout spent

Saturday and Sunday in Jackson the

guests of relatives.

George and Jennie Richmond ar.d

Lanes Richmond and family attended

th funeral of the four days old baby

of Mr. and Mrs. Otto Lisby. Mrs. Lhby

was formerly Iva Richmond.

"Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Cambu •-•

spent the week end in Detroit with

his parents.

The following teachers have

hired for the coming year

dilla township schools:

McRorie, Mrs. Lillian Wylie,

Chas. McRorie, Miss

Miss Florence I'owel

Whittaker.

Fred Hudson spent Sunday at

be<

in tin;,

Supt., Cha

Mi-

Nellie Dentor

and Mi.ss'Nett;

th

G. A. Pyper home.

George Marshall was a Sunday visitor

at the home of Lawrence Gorto i

Mi.ss Simpson, a missionary wh )

has spent 15 years in China will spea.;

at the M. E. church Sunday night,

May 22 at 7 :30.

A number from here attended th

play "The Poor Married Man" give \

given by the Waterloo Gleaners

a '„

Gregory Friday night.

Many of the young people here ar

looking forward to the Young People

Conference to be held at Pinckne

May 21. Anyone interested in attend

ing see Mrs. Rose.

Miss Agnes Watson spent Saturda;

in Jackson.

Mrs. Albert Roepcke has purchase*

a new baby grandr piano.

Mr. and Mrs. ustin Gorton

Friday in Ann Arbor.

spen

Mr. and Mrs. W r m. Marshall spen

Sunday in South Lyon with thei

daughter, Mrs. George Meabon.

Airs. George Marshall, Mrs. L. E

Hadley and Mrs. Claude Rose attend

ed a dinner party at the home of W

J. Crosman Tuesday.

Jenessc Teachout spent Monda;

evening with Maxine Marshall.

Ralph Teachout and family visitc(

her sister, Mrs. Marsh at Brightoi

Sunday.

Stephen Hadley and family

spent

Sunday in Lansing.

Mae Cranna of Ann Arbor and Dewc:

Johnson of Chelsea spent Sunday at

the home of the latter's parents.

Clara McVey and Mae Cranna at

tended a party in Belle Oak

evening.

Frida^

Ralph Teachout spent Friday even

ing at the home of Walter Corser.

Car! Lillywhitc and family of

liowel! and W. J. Powers and family

of Lansing spent Sunday at the Ear

Wheeler home.

The Collins Memorial was very well

attended last Friday about 200 beinf

present. Two very interesting talki

were given by Dr. Goodrich of Albior

and Sidney D. Eva of Detroit. Alfreo

T 'au, Chinese student at the Univer

sity of Michigan gave a short address

and Miss Teems also of Ann Arbo:

favored with two solos. Miss Simpson,

a missionary from China gave a talk

at the grave on Mr. Collins work in

China. Mrs. Janet Webb who attended

the funeral of Judson Dwight Collinr

seventy-five years ago was present.

MARION

,,. ---o Ellsworth is very ill at

the home of her daughte] Mrs. "" Shuo

Ladies Aid will meet June 2

oal Moore.

with Mrs. Lyle Redinger for supper.

W, J. Gaffney and wife were in Detroit

Monday,

Mrs. Bernard Mumingham is critically

ill following an operation at St.

Joseph's Hospital, Mt Clement.

DISPATCH

Clarence Kriah underwent an operation

for removal of hia tonsils at a

Detroit hospital Tuesday.

Bernard Murningham Sr. is visiting

hia daughter, Mrs.Hattie Craig, of Mt.

Clemens.

Mrs. F. K. White of Howell spent

Tuesday at the home of J. D. White.

Dorothy Smith entertained the

mumps last week.

E. Hoisel of Jackson visited at the

home of his son, E. J. Hoisel Jr. over

Sunday.

Tracy Horton andfamily attended

I

a birthday party for Bert Brown, the

florist, in Howell and on Saturday a

birthday surprise for Joe Brown in

Howell.

Mrs. Selma Opelt, an old resident of

Marion, died at the home of her

daughter in Fowlerville. She leaves

another daughter, Mrs. Thomas Armstrong,

and several grandchildren.

Frank Anderson accompanied Jack

Johnson to the State Sanitarium last

week for medical advice and x-ray

examination.

Plans are completed for a delightful

time, Marion Play Day at Marion

Center on May 20. Everyone invited

to attend,

Fred Earsen and wife of Howell

spent Sunday at the Wm. Ruttman

home.

Leslie Bowen and wife moved to

Roy Placeway's tennant house at Anderson

last week. He will work for R.

M. Tubbs in the saw mill.

Fred Moore and family spent Sunday

at the home of Basil White.

Hillman Bros, have purchased the

Chilson elevator and will move it to

their farm to replace the house recently

destroyed by fire.

Mrs. E. J. Hoisel, Mr. and Mrs.

Matt Brady, Mrs. Emma Gravenstein,

Mrs. Lucy Nash, Mrs. James P. Harris

and Mr. and Mrs. J. D. White attended

the funeral of Mrs. Caspar

Vollmer at Pinckney Friday.

Bailey and Dave Smith spent Sunday

with Ed Smith in Howell.

Mrs. Clara Sickles was in Brighton

Saturday to consult Dr. Melius.

Mrs. Frank Gehringer has been confined

to her bed the past two weeks

with lumbago.

Frank Anderson purchased a new

Ford truck last w r eek.

The Insurance Bureau of the War

^Department has made a settlement in

full with the heirs of the late Albert

L. Roberts, who lost his life during

the world war. He carried ten thousand

dollars insurance.

Beatrice Woodin entertained Helen

OBrien of Owosso over Sunday.

Hollis Lewis and wife spent Sunday

at the home of Isaac Lewis.

Matt Holzsinger and family were

Sunday guests at the home of Wm.

Gaffney.

Mrs. J. D.White attended the Kings

Daughters meeting at the Hotel Livingston,

Howell Tuesday evening.

Owing to the increase in the large

amount of milk sold Ben White has

been forced to purchase another milk

truck.

Patrick and Lee Lavey, Mrs. Ellen

Loughlin, Ernest White and familyvisited

relatives here Sunday.

C. C. St. James visited his wife who

is taking radium treatment at Grace

hospital, last Saturday.

Tracy Horton and family spent

Sunday at the F. E. Beach home.

Horace Hanson attended the 8th

grade examination at Howell Saturday

and Virginia Gaffney

rowlerville Thursday.

the one at

Miss Maude Watters of Plainficld

was a week end guest of the Anderson

girls.

Walter Miller was in Detroit on

business Monday.

Robert Miller and Arnold Zwick of

the Munsell school wrote the 8th

grade examination at Fowlerville last

Friday.

Lester Hunt spent Sunday with his

sister, Mrs. Walter Miller.

Mrs. Percy Carson and daughters

were in Howell Saturday.

Church services will be held at the

Iosco M. E. church at 9:00 A. M. and

Sunday School at 10:00 A. M. during

the summer months.

Fred Wainwright has a new Twodoor

Ford sedan.

Lester Hunt and Walter Miller were

Sunday afternoon callers at the home

of Will Brown.

Frank Watters and family were

Sunday visitors at the home of Don

Martin.

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Smalley visited

at the home of their daughter, Mrs.

John Murand Sunday.

Miss Alice Jensen and friend of

Battle Creek spene the week end at

the home of Mrs. John Ruttman.

Adrian Lavey of Pinckney was

[town Thursday.

Mrs. Maude Bullis and Mrs. Thelma

Groshans visited Mrs. Glen Meir of

Munith Wednesday.

The Ladies Aid met with Mrs. Norjman

Whitehead Thursday for supper.

Elmer Chipman has sold his farm

and will move to Detroit soon.

I Mrs. Agnes Ball and Mrs. Anna

| Moore spent Friday with Mrs. Edwin

j McCorney of Jackson.

! Vere Worden and family and F. A.

5 Worden of Jackson spent the week

| end at the Worden home here.

i Miss Alma Grimes of Stockbridge

j was a recent caller at the Fred Bollinger

home.

j Fred Bollinger who has been ill is

i improving.

| Friends here have received word

I that Mrs. Fred Stowe, formerly Mrs.

I Kittie Bullis, has returned to Michi-

1 '. ?an.

i Several friends from here attended

'he funeral of Mrs. Halstead Gregory

[ .t Marshall last Wednesday.

1 Mr. and Mrs. Fred Bollinger celebrated

their 46th wedding anniverary,

May 11th by giving a dinner for

I i few friends.

Mrs. Gertrude Crossman and Mrs.

arl Bollinger and daughters were in

Chelsea Wednesday.

Mrs. Belle Barker and Mrs. William

v .ilson of Munith called on Gregory

fiends Wednwday.

in

'

-better

vegetables

"After applying Vigoro," write* Ad

Hcnoig, of Necaah, Wisconsin. 1 bad

tomatoes three weeks carlfer than the

year before. They were of a better quality,

more delicious, and uniform Is sUe.

"The same success was evident with

thereat of my vegetables,"

Vigoro la the idea] plant food for

lawns, flowers, gardens, shrubbery and

trees. It is easy to apply; results are

quick and certain.

Clean, dust less, weediest, and Odorleaa

! Vigoro Is not to be compared with

any other plant food you have ever

known. It isn't at all costly.

ISpecify

A Swift & Company

pnpwdp/anthod

product

Teeple Hardware

»wwww^v»^^^sV»**^Aff.vviftA*MA*A*^Afl«w*AM^A*^^ i

A Friendly Bank

s/br

UTHE

PF©PU

We win customers

by our

friendly

spirit

We hold them

by our unexcelled

Banking Service.

Pinckney State Bank

Tires Galore

There are scores of different brands of tires on the

market—they all look pretty much alike—everyone

claims he has the best—there are all kinds of "Special

Offers" floating around—it is no wonder car

owners are confused. Here is one sure way to., play

safe. Buy a genuine Miller tire from us—they cost

no more—frequently less.

Miller Tires Last Longer

LIGHT AND HEAVY HAULING OF ALL KINDS, MOVING

MICHAGAMMEGAS

Pinckney Service

Mrs. Lena Rice is in Monro* caring

for. her sister's children.

The children in Miss Lam home's

room rave her a surprise recently.

Mr. Gusenbar of Jackson was in

town on business Monday.

R. G. Chipman made another car

load shopment of material for base

ba1 bats to the factory last week.

Mrs.Luceai Watters WM in Lansing

Monday.

W.H. MEYERS, Prop.

)fice

VEEDOIL

Garage

Don W. VanWinkle

Attorney at L*w

o er First State Saving

Howelf, Mich.

C. ALBERT FROST

Justiceof the Pcact

Bank,


i^tai

A^nki

" -,- \

f

1

mu

i

^

»«•••«•!•*••••»«»•*»««*«**»»»•*»?••*•*

Everythii

(If there is anything in the grocery line we have it.

Our aim is to carry at all times a fresh and complete

line of

Staple and Fancy Groceries

If it is something in the line of Baked Goods we are

ready to supply your wants with Bread, Cakes, Cookies,

etc.

At our meat counter we have a complete line of

Meats of All Kinds

kept fresh and wholesome in a perfectly

market.

sanitary

Reason & Reason

AGELESS

QUALITY WORK IN SCOTCH AND SWEDISH

GRANITE MONUMENTS

The old-time tried Scotch and Swedish

granites have no superiors for high

grade monumental work.

The ran^e of color and the style of

finish cover a variety that will meet any

requirement.

" Reliable work. Prompt service.

Now is the time to order your work

for Memorial Day.

MARK EVERY GRAVE

Joseph L. Arnet

MEMORIALS AND BUILDING STONE

Phone 8914 208 W. Huron St. Ann Arbor, Micb

WE SERVE OR SELL IN QUANTITY

MILLER'S

Ice Cream

Fruits, Nuts, and Confectionary

Box Candies

Complete Line of

FRUITS IN SEASON

Bananas, Oranges, Grape Fruit

Grapes, Lettuce, Celery, etc.

JOB GENTIL&

WE SERVE OUR PATRONS

Conscientiously with the purpose in mind of providing

them with the best and freshest of everything in

the line of Baked Goods such as Bread, Rolls, Cakes,

Pies etc. We observe the highest rules of sanitation

and cleanness in our bakery which you are invited to

inspect at any time.

Visit our

Cafeteria and Lunch Counter

For Delicious and Appetizing Meals. Order as little

or as much as you want .

BAKERY

/

Pincknzy

' riCliN^Y

3=

£H?P acch

Entered at the Postoffice at Pinckney,

Mich, as Second Class Matter.

PAUL W. CURLETT

PUBLISHER

Subscription,$1.25 a Year in Advance

LOCAL AND GENERAL

Cus Fe-k of Dexter was in town on

business Tuesday. _

Mrs. Ad'Jic Pierce, Miss Grace

Young, Yountf, Earl and Erwin Marin

of Dt-t.roit were recent visitors at the

home of Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Teeple.

Mrs. Albert Wilson returned home

from a visit with Jackson relatives

Sunday.

Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Weeks and

daughter, Lois, of Howell were Sunday

visitors at tlie home of Mr. end

Mrs. C. W. Dinkel.

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Ross of Harbor

Springs, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert

Ro.-s and family of Detroit were Sunday

irtie.-ts of Mr. and Mrs. K. T.

Read.

Rushton spi.-nt the week end with Mrs.-

lielen Tiplady .

Mrs.Juim-s \ash of North Hamburg

is the gimst of Mrs. W. C. Hendee.

DISPATCH

The Misled Helm* Fiedler and mna

luoWU, Il«JV. Ma>i;i"oft, Luiiuy aid

Daniel VanSlambrook and Stacy Hall

attended the Detroit Christian Knelt

avor Convention and Pune-,uet at

Lansing Saturday evening. Rev. Maycroft

gave the address of w» leom.-

and Lonnie VanSlambrook the toast

in response to it.

Miss Mae LeBarron of i'oniiac is

tiie guest of the Haze sisters.

Ambrose Murphy, Claude Kenm-dy.

Dallas Cox and Roy Bird of Ann Arbor

went to Detroit Tuesday to see

the New York-Detroit base bail game.

Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Hendee had for

Sunday guests Mr. and Mrs. Lyle Hencee

and family ofAnnArbor and Fern

and Forbes Miller of Howell.

Mi-s. Mark Swarthout, Mrs. A. C.

Vvutkins and Clare Swurthout were in

Jiov.'ell Monday.

Mr. and Mrs. George Gn-mer and

daugliter, Marion, visited Mr. ami

Mrs. J. Sullivan of Chelsea Monday

evening.

Mrs. John Williams of Niagara

Falls was the guest of Mr. and Mi

i Id Farnuni several days last .e k.

Me-(hti,ies W. S. Bourbonnais, K:

m >t Frost and Fred Bowman weiv i.v.

Howell Monday.

Mr. and Mrs. Will Allen of How- 1!

and Jack Bielwell of Brighton Wei.

Sunday visitors at the Will Dot kin-.

home .

Mr. and Mrs. Will Dixon and sen.

Maynard of Dexter, Mr. and Mrs. L.

J. Swarthout and family of Pingtve

Mis.-, Olah Docking was home from

weiv Sunday guests at the home of

Marvindale over the week end. Mr. and Mrs. Mark Swarthout.

Thi.- Misses Eva Bently and Mary

Mr.and Mrs. George Givim-r mm r

Moats of Coi'unna, Mr. Hayden and

ta.tm-d at dinner Monday evening M»-.

Will Cox of St. Johns spent the we k

..:.u Mi.. Malachy Roche of Fowh


THE PINCKNEY DISPATCH

Evelyn Brent

Winsome Dresses

for little Girls

Ribbon Adda to Beauty

of Fashionable Felt Hat

Story

IN THE AQUARIUM

tf T AM going t«> tell you a story of

1 the aquarium tonight," said the

Sandman.

"The aquarium, you know, is the

borne of many mem hers of the fish

family. This is a big city aquarium

I am now speaking about, though of

course there are little aquariums,

too."

"Yes," said Nancy, "for I call my

fish bowl where my two gold fishes

are an aquarium."

"Of course," agreed the Sandman.

"Well, In this big aquarium there

have been many new arrivals', some

*ea robins, toad fish, a new pipe fish.

The pipe fish daddies help the mothers

carry the little pipe fish eggs

about and are really wry useful pipe

4K"

Martha Martin

named, 60 you may take \ur choice

here.

"But it Is of the talk be; ween two

lobsters that I want to te!l \ou ;d>out.

"'It was a great joke.' s:ii>I I.ouis

Lobster, and how I did litnirJi in my

lobster fushion when I tirst heard it.'

"Tell It to me," said Leon l.obMer.

"'You see," Louis Lobster continued,

'senile one wrote a siory about

lobsters. Now the only lobsiers which

had been seen by the one um» made

the pictures of the lobsters were lob

sters all ready boiled aial ready to

eat.

"'Of course, such lobsters are red.

"'l'ut the one iiinkii,-' the pictures

never thought that lo!rs(cr> were any

other color at all at any time.

"'And so the lobsters in the pictures

were painted red and they were

supposed to he In the sea and uere

supposed to be adventuring lobMers.

and not ones ready to eat.

"'Wasn't that absurd'.' l'ut at the

same time, it was a little sad."

"'It was perfectly absurd.' said

Leon, 'but why sad?'

"'Sad,' said I.otiK 'to think how

little some people know of lobsters.

"'Now, here \v;i> some one with a

groat talent for painting and yet some

one who knew nothing about lobster-!

"'It was so dreadfully ignorant. Almost

as though one knew how to skip

a rope but didn't know who discovered

America!

drnost as Icmoi

as that.

ran

Jral

-kral

per

're

to

und

sn't

job

. 1

tain

of

rose

not

me

felell-

asid.

met

Iped

l."

the

IM1JIcial

tnireat

a

X

Charminc Evelyn breni, motion-picture

actress, called the "Gunwoman,"

and a featured player in the "Underworld,"

has the greatest opportunity

of her screen career.

a

o

Q

a

o

(i

For Meditation

oooooo

By LEONARD A. BARRET!

THE MISSION OF SORROW

IT IS from some vineyard of sorrowing

experience that the best fruit

of life is pressed. Had it not been

for the death of Arthur Hailam and

the broken heart of Tennyson, we

would have had no "In Memoriam."

At times the poet Robert Browning

wrote with so great a sorrow in his

heart that he could not see his pen

for tlie thick darkness. In his dungeon

cell i'unyan wrote his "Pilgrim's

Progress." I>ante in the loneliness of

his exile Journeys in a real experience

from hell to heaven. For four long

years the heart of Angelo suffers, during

which time his crushed spirit 1«

transformed into beautiful angels

alnted upon chapel walls. As the

rodiK'l of Luther's experience Oerlany

got her Hible. Mozart wrote his

Kequiem suffering from a disease that

.was f:ist eating away his life. The

Ibeautiful music of "Blossom Time" is

the product of the broken heart of

Schubert. The exquisite poem, "O,

Lo\e That Will Not Let Me (Jo," was

written by (Jeorge Matheson as he was

going blind. —

Many attempts have been made to

escape sorrow. "Drown your sorrow

in the flowing bowl," are the last

words of (in old festival song. It is

the way of the fool. Sorrow Is not

escaped by such a process; it only

lends to despair at the last. Another

attempt to escape sorrow is to become

Indifferent to it. Desire nothing and

we shall not he disappointed. If one

could remove from the heart all emotions

one could perhaps live an impassive

life. Human nature makes

such an attitude of heart impossible.

Another way of escaping sorrow is

to deny it. This makes such a draft

upon the imagination as to render it

impracticable. The stern realities of

our modern life will not stand for it,

There is no escape from sorrow. The

problem is not one of escape hut of

purpose. Sorrow is an angel of

mercy sent to reveal the deep secrets

of life. He who suffers becomes

strong. Sorrow is

i voice speaking

messages nf courag<

hope and love

heard like the cry,

"All's well tr

the darkness of the

n i -111 —

AM is ivHI th-V f.iith nr,'.', W'.snrn N"i w.~ fM[i, r I'm on)

— < )

FOR THE GOOSE—

A

LMTTA women jf they ain't got

some'ni to In- unhappy over, got

nothin' to be happy about.

A woman's a-e ain't to he judged

! by her years, but by her conquests.

; The more conquests she's got the

! j ounger she stays.

P.ein' in love i« bein' «o blinded by

the searchlights from another car that

' you can't see nothin' else.

»

A woman can never forgive you for

bavin' once been admired by her husband.

FOR THE GANDER-

People that want you to work for

nothin' must think you're worth It.

Lawyers, doctors and Providence

has a hard time eollectln' what's been

promised to them once the danger is

over.

One girl enn hnndle four men better

than one man can handle two

girls.

If a man has got a lottn Irons In the

fire, some of them are likely to baro

his fingers.

As one cross-word puzzler to another,

be sure yon are off with tat

emu, before you are on with the

i

(Copyright.)

Junior Frock Long-Waisted,

Straight of Bodice,

Full of Skirt

The iong-walsted dress fur school,

play or parties, says the ' Woman'B

Home Companion, U the style chosen

111 nine cases out of ten for the girl

Who is going on fourteen. The junior

true.: Is loug-waisted, straight of

bodice and slightly full of skin.

In the picture it is shown in two

ways. For the eight-year-old at the

left It Is made In nileen green chauibray

with snug little pockets at either

side of the low waist. The lower edge

of the waist is bound and lapped over

the gathered sklrL

You'll notice that the unusual cut of

the dress at the shoulder line is itself

a trimming touch. The back is cut almost

straight across at the top and the

edge is bound and lapped diagonally

over the front at the shoulder. This

version of the Junior frock may strike

the popular compose note if the bindings

at neck, shoulder and waist art

of a contrasting color or fabric.

The older girl at the right wears a

dress of washable silk. It is a warm

shade of beige with a rippling peplum

lined with self-color fabric, set up on

the waist. A bright red patent-eather

belt encircles the top of the hips and

is repeated at a low waistline. Belts,

sleeve buttons and tie of narrow ribbon

are of the same bright red.

Flannel, kasha and jersey are equally

suitable materials to use if the

young girl wants a dress of moderate

warmth. If developed In crepe de

May Be Developed in Crepe de Chine

or Wash Silk.

chine or In printed or wash silks you'll

have a charming party frock. A wide

variety of cottons will make up most

attractively in this design either with

or without the peplum — gingham,

light-weight madras, sateen, cotton

print or linen. Among the sheer fabrics

organdie, batiste and dowvred or

cross-barred dimity are good for a

simple cool summer frock. A soft fabric

like voile may also be used but in

this case the peplum should be omitted.

Dainty Powder Boxes

and Caricature Pins

Square little powdvr bo\es, with colored

enamel tops and center settings

in cut-out motif, acquire an antique

touch in a little protruding edge of

engraved gold. A mirror is the only

adjunct, aside from the powder which

the box mav contain, for it is taken

for granted that only powder is required

after milady has stepped from

her boudoir for the evening ball of

, party, lilack is the favored choice In

these little host*, with navy next and

the pastel shades of rose, yellow,.lavender

and green following.

Caricature pins made of white metal,

resembling platinum, and set with

small rhinestones, are being featured

in an array of sizes and designs to

*Uit the many demands made. Squares,

ovals and angular shapes of solid design

or cut-out, as well as those with

figures surrounded by a fine framework,

may be worn as hat ornaments,

shoulder pins or belt buckles.

Sashes of Sheer Net

Now Much in Evidence

As the season advances the popularity

of the sash will increase. We

see them on sports frocks, tailored

dresses and dance frocks. Even the

obi sash has come back, and Is strongly

stressed by a prominent French

couturier as a front decoration for

afternoon and evening dresses. Sashes

of sheer net are much in evidence,

and the embroidered net sashes are

decidedly effective on white evening

gowns.

Many novel arrangements of the

sash are Introduced by the various

dressmakers and huge buckles are often

nsed to catch the folds together.

So the sash is very much a matter

of irttilvldual taste. And If you prefer

a belt you may wear a narrow or

wide on& All widths are fashionable

and you may wear *wo or three of the

narrow width.

Anna Q. Nils&on, the "movie" star,

whose delicate blond beauty lends

itself exceptionally well to the new

mode in millinery, is seen wearing a

small black felt in her film, "Easy

Pickings." Ths grosgrain ribbon band

remains important on most of the new

felt hats. The bands may be matching

or merely harmonizing in tone and

sometimes appear in as many as three

shades for contrast.

Long Sleeve Is Favored

by Cheruit for Evening

Cheruit develops a new evening

theme based on the luxurious coat of

the Persian prince and applies a deep

band of chiffon on the bottom to give,

length. A number of these models are.

developed with long sleeves for evening

in copper or brass, silver and

black solid sequins. The same Idea

marked by a hip flare falling from

heavily corded or stitched or finely

tucked theme over the hip Is shown 1ft

evening wraps and those for daytimes

A point movement is emphasized In

many models. The backs are slim and

straight, while this pointed movement

comes at the front and extends, often,

at the sides. Some of them are like

single petals of a flower and may

be folded back without cutting ths)

goods.

At lot of coat collars, especially for

evening, are composed entirely of

either one tone in chrysanthemums'

or in two tones—some in black, with

an occasional one in orar»;e, In the

coat fabric often. Frocks are sometimes

fastened with big buttons at one

side, moving from the top of the shoulder

down under the arm to the hip.

An important evening theme, too, is

the reiterated use of the "smoking,"

which usually has a full, flounced

skirt in either chiffon or In tulle, while

the jacket may be solid sequins embroidered

in gay motifs, in colored

lace of embroidered chitTon such as

one worked in while el.enille dots

which increase in quantity and become

solid at the bottom.

The single button fastening comes

at the tip of the square-cornered

'revers which lifts the waistline above

normal, but on the whole the waistline

in these "smoking" themes is

normal.

The typical deep ruille on many

frocks is nsed in many themes and

is shown quite often in taffeta

frocks. bleep chiffon ruffles are

sometimes used on bolero types in flat

maierials.

Newest in Earrings

Are Long and Slender

Karrings are long and slender.

Women are seen wearing long strings

of tiny brilliants with a colored gem

at the end. This is a decided novelty,

in any case, for the ultra-fashionable

woman. Emeralds, a perfect match If

possible and somewhat large, are

eagerly sought after to make the

"drop'' for these new earrings. The

characteristic of the new ornament Is

the size of the final gem, which is very

much largvr than those composing the

string that supports it. The string

sometimes looks quite inadequate to

the purpose. When very tiny brilliants

are used they are enclosed In

a "claw" and a platinum chain holds

them firmly in place.

As a variation of the colored drop

earring, there Is the diamond drop,

held in place at the end of a chain

of diamonds, that in some ways look

still handsomer than the colored drop,

which, curiously enough, always

smacks of lack of perfect style.

New Silhouette Mode

in New York Resorts

Youthful frequenters of New York

clubs and darning places are setting

a new silhouette mode. These gay

young tilings are either wearing period

frocks with full fluffy skirts and

slender bodices or tightly-fitted sheath

lines which outline their half-develops

d figures. One sees more sheath

gowns than period types worn on

sophisticated girls. Beaded sheaths

lltting snugly over the bust line,

nipped in at the normal waist line and

drawn snugly over the hips ending in

very abbreviated skirts, are recent additions

in flapper styles. Many glrli

nre wearing black fitted sheaths and

when dancing among well-formed

women they look like email anU.

Every genuine Monarch package bean UM Lkm

Head, the oldest trademark In the United Staff

covering* a compk complete line of the world's finest fesi

product* — Coftee, Tea, Cocoa. Catsup. Picktaa,

Peanut Butter, Canned Fruits and Vegetable*

and other superior table ipecialt

MONARCH

Quality for 7o Wears

Monarch it tfa* only tutionally kdvartietd brand jt

QUALITY FOOD PROP DOTS told excluaivalr throes* the

DMO who own and operate tneir own stone.

RE1D,

MURDOCH & CO.

p^ffKUfi,^ 1853

Chicago Pittsburgh Boeton NnrYoA

Jacksonville Tampa Lot AagaW

Cleansing Mercury

The bureau of standards says that

a simple way to remove dirt from

mercury Is to shake the^mercury vigorously

with some cane sugar, after

which the metal Is filtered off through

a pinhole in the bottom of a paper

cone. The whole operation may b«

repeated If necessary. Instead of filtering

through a pinhole, the mercury

may he squeezed through several

thicknesses of cloth.

It takes a man with a lot of brass

to dispose of n gold brick.

"BAYER ASPIRIN"

PROVED SAFE

Take without Fear as Told

In "Bayer" Package

Does not affect

the Heart

Unless you see the "Bayer Cross"

on package or on tablets you are not

getting tlec genuine Bayer Aspirin

proved safe by millions and prescribed

by physicians over twenty-five years foi

Colds

Headache

Neuritis

Lumbago

Toothache Rheumatism

Neuralgia Pain, Pain

Each unbroken "Bayer" package contains

proven directions. Handy bores

of twelve tablets cost few cents. Drug.

gists also sell bottles of 24 and 100.

BUSINESS PLACES

FOR SALE—FLINT, MICH.

Your sur((^> ;- cL-y\.rit\ by buying a bust*

ncss in Mifliii.*nn u urns* bnimiinK r• ity.

( ONFE< TIONKKY AM) RKSTAl RAN'T

RtCfiijiti $j.'i.i"i" \ r ; nu i mr.pHt Hum; opposite-

tlw.iOr, r.-nt $t"0, Hiibrrnt JiiJ, near,

by city. I'ric r> J.'i.'i'd. ' 2 each, rtlu 527.

(JROCERY—YIKAT MARKET

Rproljits $40.ono yr r>nt S•>o. modern fixtures.

BR:«K1II i.'i '''00, trrmn File 1351.

KU)R1NT SHOP

with crrenhnuse; rent $7f> inrlu, store, I

TTT.H. : krr.-i •nruiUsc 24 xfl o. VrUo $4,000. FU« 1141.

(»ROCER Y—M EATS— R E At. CWitTI

Receipts Jf.fiO wk.; Lot 45x115; equipment

new Bargain $12,000. V\)v U31

GROCERY—MEATS—REAL ESTATB

Receipts $7,500 mo.; est. 7 yrs.: Htorc 40x5*,

hax 9 rooms. 2 ^ai Karaite; eU'Kftnt fixture*}

bi-at part of Flint, othfr Interests comp«l

Sale. Prlro $30,500 Vile U50

GROCERY—MEATS—REAX ESTATE

Receipts $500 wk. ; HaRlnaw st., 8 roora^

garage. 3 cars; lot 42x120; ovmer retiring.

Price »11.350. File 1342.

THE API'I-E-COT.E COMTAVT

1001 Transportation Bid*.. I>«trolt, Mich.

fLEAR YOUR SKIN

^* of disfiguring blotche* and

^^^ inrUtioo*. UM

Resinol

IRISH WATER KrA>'lEI>8 AND COCKEB

Spaniels Registered stork. Also a real dog

food cheap Cecil O Williams, Atlantic, I*.

one sue

and walk or

in comfort by using

A! 1 e n'» Foot-f

th« Antiseptic,

I Healing Powder to

shake into jour shoe*.

ALLEN'S ]

. FOOT = EASE j

W. N. U., DETROIT, NO. 20-1*27.


•tf»

u

1 HE PINCKNEY DISPATCH

TWO WOMEN

FOUND HELP

Their Sickne»« Banished by

Lydia £. Pinkham's Vege*

table Compound

Mrs. Nina Matteson, Box 206, Oxford,

N. Y., writes—"If it had not been

for your medicine,

1 could not have

done my work as it

should ha/e been

done. Mother told

me of Lydia E.

Pinkham's Vegetable

Compound,

and I had read In

d i ff e r e n t papers

what it had done

fordifferent women.

She wanted me to

ry it, so my husband

got me one bottle at first; then I

took two others. Now I am feeling

quite strong again."

Mrs. Ernest Tanguay of Adama,

(Mali., says she was ill for four years

•Ad eould not sleep nights or go out on

the Btreet. She read about the Vegetable

Compound and decided to try

tt After taking eight bottles she was

able to do all her work and go anywhere

and is quite herself again.

This dependable Vegetable Con>

pound Is a household word In thousands

of homes. The fourth generation Is

now learning the merit of Lydia E.

Pinkham's Vegetable Compound.

For more than half a century, this

reliable medicine has been used by

women with very satisfactory results.

If the Vegetable Compound has helped

other women, why shouldn't it help

you?

A Man*i Man

Abraham Lincoln has always be:?n

our favorite American statesman, but

since learning from no less a historical

authority than our Mr. MoKee

himself that James Madison did more

than any of our great Americans to

Introduce and popularize long trousers

to take the place of knee

breeches, we fee!, what with our legs

and all, that perhaps we have underestimated

this great man's service to

his country.—Ohio State Journal.

Bra»s Band for Juneau

Juneau, Alaska, capital of an empire

of more than f>fHU.MH) square miles,

has a full brass hand for the first time

In ten years. It Is financed by funds

from public dances. The hand provides

one of the few opportunities for

amusement.

BABIES CRY

FOR "CASTORIA"

Prepared Especially for Infanta

and Children of All Ages

Mother! Fletcher's Castorla has

been in use for over MO years as a

pleasant, harmless substitute for Castor

Oil, Paregoric, Teething Drops and

Soothing Syrups. Contains no narcotics.

Proven directions are on each

package. Physicians everywhere recommend

it.

The genuine hears signature of

0ODDS

^PILLS^

>, *V' C STIMUIA"'

I Do 0000000<

Moose Makes Himself

Captive in Snow Zoo

Anchorage, Alaska.—The Alaskan

railroad now boasts a zoo.

The menagerie was thrust upon

the organization and there appears

no way to get rid of the

extra burden but to declare war

and use gunfire.

It happened at Tunnel, where

the road maintains a gigantic

hole, known as the gravel pit

Into thlR snow-covered, Innocent-looking

clearing walked a

large bull moose not yet relieved

of its antlers. He floundered

and floundered about In the

loose snow until he tramped out

a pit whose high wall prevented

all exit. When men approach

he charges at them with the arrow-pointed

shovels. He exhausted

the crop of willows for

food and railroaders have been

hauling hay to him. How to get

the moose, declared by every one

as the largest ever seen In the

North, out of Its dilemma uninjured

Is a problem.

IOOOOOO-C

'8L00Q RAINS' FAIL

TO FRIGHTEN FRENCH

Phenomenon No Longer Is

Cause of Terror.

Paris.—A few da.,m ugo a shower of

red rain fell at many places in southern

and central France. It is signiticaut

of the progress of popular enlightenment

that, ulthough the event

was generally described in the French

press as a "shower of blood," this

phrase was used in a conventional and

not a literal sense. No attempt appears

to have bevn made in any quarter

to invest the phenomenon with a

miraculous or mysterious character,

and no superstitious fears appear to

have been aroused by its occurrence.

Times have changed. Among the socalled

prodigies recorded in ancient

and medieval chronicles, none are" 1

more frequently mentioned than

strange showers, of one sort or another,

which alarmed mankind not

only on account of their apparently

supernatural character, but also because

they were regarded as portents

of coming wars and other calamities.

The catalogue of things alleged to

have fallen in these showers is a long

one. It Includes fishes, frogs, rats,

mice, serpents, Insects, grain, honey,

manna, sulphur, ink, milk and—most

frequently of all—blood.

Homer and Virgil Mention Them.

Stories of bloody rain are related by

Homer, Virgil and several Roman his-*

torians. Plutarch speaks of showers of

blood following great battles and asserts

that bloody vapors, distilled from

the bodies of the slain, impregnated

the clouds, from which they were subsequently

shed on the earth.

Gregory of Tours declared that a

shower of blood fell over Paris In/fyie

year 4S2 A. D., when "many people

had their clothes stained with it and

cast them off in terror." The same

phenomenon was observed at Brescia

for three days and three nights before

the death of Pope Adrian II in the

year 872. Another three-day shower

of blood is said to have occurred in

France and Germany in March, 1181.

In 16G9 one of these "blood rains"

took place at Chatlllon-sur-Seine.

"There fell in various parts of the

town," says the "History of the Academy

of Sciences," "a sort of rain, or

reddish liquid, thick, viscous, and foul

smelling, which resembled a rain of

blood. The prints of great drops of It

were observed on walls; It was this

fact that led to the belief that this rain

was made of stagnant, muddy water

raised by a whirlwind from some pond

in the neighborhood."

Although the nonmiraculous nature

of red rains was thus susjrected at a

comparatively early date, they continued

to be a sources of terror to the

Ignorant majority of Europeans until

a generation or so ago, while even in

scientific circles some curiously erroneous

notions concerning tl.ein prevailed

down to the middle cr latter

part of the Nineteenth century.

Wind-borne Material.

Microscopic examination showed

that Hie rain was red lened with earth.

or mineral material, but the source of

this material remained for a long time

uncertain. It is now well recognized

that the falls of colored rain and also

of dry dust that occur at rather frequent

inters.ils in southern and central

Europe are due, in must cases, to

wind-borne material blown up from

the Sahara desert,

Several cases in which enormous

quantities of solid matter have been

carried groat distances by the winds

have formed the subject of elaborate

investigations on the part of meteorologists.

Thus during the three days, March

8 to 10, 1001, heavy dust storms occurred

in the deserts of southern Algeria,

and the sequel of these storms

was carefully studied by Hellmann

nnd Meinardus. A widespread cyclonic

storm, centered over Tunis at

the time, sucked up the dust, which

was carried northward by the winds

at high altitudes.

Deposits from this dust cloud occurred

over an area extending as far

as 2,500 miles from the place of origin.

Keports collected from hundreds of observers

Indicated that 1,800,000 tons of

dust fell over the continent of Europe,

and one-third of this fell north of the

Alps.

As much more Is believed to have

fallen over the Mediterranean, while

on the African coast Itself the deposit

Is supposed to have amounted to VJQ,-

000,000 tons.

Dick Whittinglon's Cat

Called Myth by Mayor'

London.—History won't vouch for a

cat that has charmed children for centuries,

Sir Rowland P.lades, lord

mayor of London, shocked traditionalists

by announcing In a speech here.

The cat which Is supposed to have

brought his predecessor, Sir Richard

Whittington, fame and fortune never

existed, Blades declared.

The lord mayor said he had been

seaching the records and had failed

to find any contemporary reference to

the cat. The story of Dirk Whlttington's

cat, he added, has been traced

to an Austrian source two centuries

later and truth must prevail over

sentiment

Quite a Gadabout

Boston.—Having just crossed the

Atlantic for the one hundred nnd sixth

time, Philip G. Penbody of Boston,

seventy, wealthy retired lawyer, Is to

remain In this country only two weeks,

then start his one hundred and seventh.

SUCKER' WINS B£T

BUT LOSES $5,000

Alabama Man Taken in

Confidence Men.

by

Birmingham, Ala.—Birmingham detectives

ure looking for two confidence

men, said to be from New York,

who swindled Alexander B. Lischkoff,

Birmingham r«al estate broker, out of

$o.iX to ca>i>

The gamt [Waved by these men is

a new .Hie in this section of the country.

The two men met Llsrhkoff accidentally

on the street. They talked

of a bii-iness deal. An engagawfent

was made for the three to meet at a

downtown hotel that afternoon.

At the time stated all three sat lo

a hotel room and talked business.

"The two men bet me $100 I could not

raise $.">,o


• - * : *

tf-MSfJ

*m

w*&*ft»*tt

55

*"B

V.*'

•" ' fr"».< If*' . t ¥ m+mmm*-s*tfa'*ip***s united M

marriage to Caspar Vollmer of Putnam

township and came here to reside

where Mr. Vollmer operated a thresh r

outfit for a number of years. A few

years ago they purchased the Perry

Blunt home on Pearl St. and moved

to Pinckney. On May 5, 1927 she

suffered a paralyetic stroke from

which she failed to rally and passed

away on Tuesday, May 10. The funoral

services were held from St.Mary's

church Friday morning at 10:00, Rev.

F. J. McQuillan officiating. Bursal was

in St. Mary's cemetery.

The deceased is survived by her

husband, two brothers, John M. and

William Harris of Putnam, one sister,

two neices and two nephews.

Slow Breathing Best

It has been noted by scientists that

the slow breathing animals are the

longest lived and the least susceptible

to tuberculosis. The rabbit, which is

the most susceptible to the disease.

breathes M times a minute, "while the

horse, the least likely to contract it,

breathes but ten times a minute at

rest. The animal which never is attacked

by tuberculosis and which !»

perhaps the longest lived is the turtle.

Tts respirations are so few that the"

are scarcely perceptible. The observations

and tests on animals have been

made by experts in pulmonary diseases

for the purpose of trying n slow

brenthinK treatment on tuberculosis

patients.

WANTED--Man with car to sell complete

line quality Auto Tires and

Tubes Exclusive territory. Experience

not necessary. Salary $300 per

month. Milestone Rubber Co.

K ast Liverpool, Ohio.

KOR" SALE-Yellow Dent Seed Com,

two years old. Price $5 per bushel

shelled.

Gcorjre W. Ciark

FOH SALE--Ncarly new wajron with

3UXS-. inch tires. This wagon cost

$100 new has not been

used two

months.

Met Chalker

FOR SALE-Dark Oak Dining- Room

Suite consisting of table, six leather

bottomed chairs and combination

buffet and china cabinet. A real bargain.

Inquire at this office.

TO THE LITTLE

HOME

by the side of the road as well as to the

pretentious dwelling place of the financially

mighty we bring the same earnestness

of sincerity and ability.

P. H.SWARTHOUT

FUNERAL HOMe

PHONE NO.39

PINCKNEY

MICH!

•Ol 1B9&O*H*0&* «"*-v< •«««f«0«««ww0a«»

100 dp

v

Entertainment

at the

TEMPLE THEATRE

HOWELL, MICH.

FRIDAY, MAY 20

LOUIS JOSEPH VANCE'S

The Lone Wolf Returns"

Gang Comedy Organ Cartoon

SATURDAY

May 21

SUNDAY

"The Collegians"

'The Fire Fighter"

'The Law of the North"

"Comedy" "News"

BIG

DOUBLE

BILL

Madge Bellamy

A Jazzy Story of The "Summer Bachelor's" Girl f


in

Pretty

v *

Faces

Ankles Preferred

Pretty Ankles

Also

Lupino Lane "News"

Big Two Horn Bill In "HOWDY DUKE"

TUESDAY MAY 24—25 WEDNESDAY

Harold Bell Wright's

"THE WINNING OF BARBARA WORTH'

Starring RONALD COLMAN

-Cartoon" V1LMA BANKY "News"

Coming "SLIDE KELLY SLIDE"

TUE. MAY 31

Free

Cut outThis Whole Adv.. Bring itp

to the Theatre Thurs. Eve. May 26. rl*PP

IT WILL ADMIT YOU FREE 1 ***}

WANTS, FOR SALE, ETC

'OR SALE-Thoroughbred Red Duroc

brood sows with pigs at their side.

Fred Hoffman.

FOR SALE-Work horse, wt about

1300, warranted for work.

H. A. Fick.

OR SALE-Red Kidney seed beans.

Phillip Sprout.

FOR SALE-- Several brood sows due

arly in May.Also Black Mare, o years

old, wt. 1500. Sound and all right.

George Gfeiner

OR . SALE-336 . rod*., of.... Water

7 rontage on Big.. Schoolot.. Lake,.. 2

niles northwest of Pinckney. $2,000

or quick sale.

Guy Hinchey

'OR SALE—Early Seed Potatoes.

John Chambers

WANTED—To buy a new milch cow.

Chas. Whalian, Crystal Beach.

Pinckney, Mici.

FOR SALE-Young Brood Sow, color

red.

M. A. Graves

Baby Chicks—After May lst.I will

sell Barred Rocks and Reds at $14

per 100,White Leghorns at SI 1 per

100. All from pure bred stock.

Custom hatching $5 per 100 eggs.

Mrs. Nora Sider, Pinckney Mich.

FOR SALE—Two Brood Sows due to

farrow about April 30.

Albert Dinkel

Hi

g

FOR SERVICE-Poland China Boar.

Antonija Mrvich, Peter Kelly farm

WANTED-To hire out by the day o*

week. Alex Howard, Koitx facto,

Pinckney, MicV

FOR SALE-Hand picked Red Kidney # % ^ -

seed beans. W. H. Harris. ^ ^ - > ^ %

WANTED-Girl for general housework.

Enquire Mrs. L. C. Pemberton,

527 Gd. River W., Howell,

BEES WANTED—I want to buy

about twenty-five swarms of bees.

Write or phone Marvin Shirey, Pinckney,

Mich., Telephone No. 20 F. 32.

PERCHEON STALLION (Registered)

will stand this season at my farm, f

Paul Fohey, Pinckney, Mich.

Telephone No.35F.21

FOR SALE—Dry wood. Norman Reason.

FOR SALE-Seed Potatoes. See Mike

Mrvich, Peter Kelley farm.

FOR RENT-Rooms over the Dispatch

offiC€ -

Inquire below

£OR SALt-Large black team of

Geldings, young, sound and kind. Also

good chunky work team.

E. L. Mclntyre

FOR SALE- 200 bushel of com, 50

bushel of oats. Also span of work

horse* t wt 2600.

Gay Hail

" i


1TATE - 6P

MICHIGAN

The Probate Cent fer the County of

Livingston.

At \ eessioa of said court, held at

the Probate office in the City of

Howell in said county, on 30th day

of April A. D. 1927.

Present: Hon. Joseph H. Collins,

Presiding Judge of Probate.

In the Matter of the Estate of

George W. Culy, Deceased.

It appearing to the court that tht

time for presentation of claim*

against said estate should be limited,

and that a time and place be appointed

to receive, examine and adjust

all claims and demands against

said deceased by and before said

court:

It is Ordered, That creditors of

baid deceased are required to present

their claims to said court at said Probate

Office on or before the 6th day^

of September A. D.. 1927 at te-i

o'clock in the forenoon, at said time

and place being hereby appointed for

the examination and adjustment of all

claims and demands against said deceased

.

It is further ordered, That public

notice be given by publication of a

copy of this order, for three successive

weeks previous to said day- of

hearing, in the Pinckney Dispatch 4

newspaper printed and circulated in

fcaid county.

Joseph H. Collins

Circuit Judge,acting ir

in the absence of Willi

L. Lyons, Judge of Probate

A true copy

Celesta Parshall,

Register of Probate

STATE OF MICHIGAN

The Probate Court for the County of

Livingston.

At a session of the said Court, held

at the Probate Office in the City r

Howell in the said county, on the 7 th

'day of May, A. D. 1927.

Present: on. Joseph H. Collin?

presiding, Judge of Probate .

In the matter of the estate of Adelb

rt J. Gaffney, Deceased.

It appearing to the court that the

fch-n for presentation of claim*

against said estate should b limited

: d t • •. t a time and place be appointed

to receive, examine and adjust all

claims and demands against s- id d<

1 ••used b; - and b-fore said eourt:

It is ordered, That creditors of said

d' "oas"d arc required to present their

claims to said court at said Probati

Office on or before the 12th day 0

September, A. D, 192". nt t n o' M-

ir. the forenoon, said time and place

being hereby appointed for the ex

; minntion rind adjustment of a)

•laims and demands against said - ^ v'i!'is 1

Lyons, Judge of Probate

A true copy

ir '

Celesta Parshah

Register of Probat

DOMINICANS LET CONTRACT

FOR NEW PAROCHIAL SCHOOL

Contracts have been let for the ne*

St. Dominic'* school. Warren and

Trumbull avenue, Detroit. The

building, which whl cost apprjxima e-

ly $150,000, will include 12 class

rooms, a large auditoriu mand facilities

for social affairs.

St. Dominic's parish was establish:*!

only about six months ago by *-he

Dominican Fathers with th'- 3 Rev. Vincent

F. Kienberger, 0. F., as pastir.

The attendance at s?rvices has gnwr.

until the crowds at Sunday services

have re ached f 5,000.

Manistique—At least 150 delegate?

of the Women's Catholic Order >f

Foresters will convene in this city,

May 24. Elaborate plans for th^ir

entertainment have been made by the

ManKique Court of the W. C. 0. F.

In addition to delegates from nearby

points, visitors are expected from tne

iron and copper country.

Marquette—Two R.demptorist missionaries

from the famous shr.ne of

St. Anne de Deaupre, Oue^ec, conducted

a two weeks' mission in St.

Joan's church here recently. Services

were held in both French and En^

ttsh by the priest*.

'"**n + v for

Myopin

\"'l>i < .»ri *i;;litednPRa. Is *

•••..'if • Km in w ifii \ho rK.vf from * dl*

fnrv-w ;ir* f i*.M r **• nt of rh* reftm'

of il H (»« 'viiirfi r^iiltii In the Imairn

hcit'ST l»lnrr»»d Sml ;in f\v U \H»\

Bi>in«'nrl\ ri>r-i«.»»«i u'

P Aching actively and

nas been

plete the building free from financial

connected with the faculties

of a

encumbrances which was conducted number of leading educational

for six weeks will be continued in- institutions. Before his recent »pformally

until the whole amount is Pomtmant as the head of Marygrovt

rtiied

Collega, he headed the department of

Economics and political science at

Marquette Ur,iverity.

PONTIAC GETS

NEW HOSPITAL

Modern Fireproof Structure

Ha* Four Operating Rooms

and 100 Beds

Pontiac—St. Joseph's Mercy Fospilal,

Pontiac's newest civic pride, waa

Radicated here recently by the Rt. Rev.

Micaael J. Gallagher, D. D., Bishop of

Detroit. The building has four floors

and 100 beds. The architecture is of

the Gregorian style and the structure

is of brick and stone fireproof construction

throughout. !

The hospital has four operating

rooms including the main operating

auditorium, which is built with a balcony,

from which medical students j

and surgeons may witness unusual,

operations. Another feature is that '•

tha building does not contain wards. •

This does not mean, however, that'

patients who are unable to pay for a '

private room will be denied admission.

St. Joseph's is the most recent

Catholic hospital to be opened in the

Detroit diocese. Within the past five

or six years, Catholic hospitals have

been opened at Lansing (St. Lawrence),

Battle Creek (Leila Montgomery),

Detroit (St. Joseph's), and!

Mt. Clemens (St. Joseph's). Plans

have been announced for the erection

of a large hospital under the direction

of the Sisters cf St. Joseph in

Kalamazoo.

With the exception of the Battle

Creek institution, which was the pift

of Mrs. Leila Post Montgomery, fundcampaigns

were conducted for these

hospitals and Catholics and non-

Catholics joined in promoting these

projects in a true spirit of charity and

civic devotion.

St. Joseph's Hospital at Pontiac if

conducted by the Sisters of Mer:y,

with headquarters in Dubuque, Iowa.

LIFE-SAVER LOSES LAST

BATTLE; DEATH IS VICTOR

Girl Saved Eleven Children From

Drowning; Succumbs to Diseaae

*owefl

PERCY ELLIS

AUCTIONEER

Not the Oldest m tne

Not the Loosest list of

JUST THE

Snckney. Phone 19F11

HIRAM R. SMITH

Lawyer

Office in Court

Hooa*

HOWLETf & SWEENEY

Mick.

Atrornt-ys HI Law

' Office over D.-mocrat Ho«vell, Micb

Drs. H.F.&C.LS1GLER

PINCKNEY

Office H«

l:OOto 2:30 P.M.

WANTED!

POULTRY & F.GGS

Wil) pay cash foi poultrv

and eggs delivered at my

poultry plant, and of a hm!n food.

STATE OF MlCiilGAN

THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE

COUNTY OF LIVINGSTON

IN CHANCERY

Frederick Schnodz and Margaret

Schnodz, Plaintiffs

vs

Elijah Marsh, Charles T. Conrad,

Frederick W. Heinicke and Julia

lioinicke, and their unknown heirs.devis"es,

legatees and assigns, and Nathaniel

D. (ioss and Sarah A.>.os:

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