Selwyn House School Yearbook 1977

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Selwyn House School Yearbook 1977

Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2009 with funding from

Selwyn House School

http://www.archive.org/details/selwynhouseschoo1977selw


SELWYN HOUSE '77

MONTREAL, CANADA


CONTENTS

GRADS

JUNIOR SCHOOL

MIDDLE SCHOOL

SENIOR SCHOOL

CALENDAR

LITERARY

SPORTS

ADVERTISEMENTS


Stephen Scott

- Technical Editor

Peter Oliver - Content Editor

Mark Bandeen - Assistant Editor & Layout

Bobby Levy - Advertising Manager

Alexander Patch

- Advertising Assistant

Geoffrey Skinner - Photography

William Powell - Photography

Nicholas Gault

- Literary

George Hedrei - Typing

Constantine Zarifi - Typing Pool

Kevin Ratcliff - Layout

YEARBOOK STAFF

Javier Quintana - Sports

William Smith - Sports

Michael Holy - Grads

Mark Davidson

- Write-ups

Arthur Hsu - Middle School

Nicholas Howson

Christopher Carter

Mr. W. M. Reid

- Senior School

- Junior School

- Staff Advisor

Mr. P. Litvack - Advertising Advisor

Mr. G. C. I. Burgess - Photography Advisor


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1

EDITORIAL

As we write these words, we can see yet another yearbook

beginning to take its final shape. It is really quite a feeling

watching the fruit of the labours of so many different people

beginning to mature. Not only does it give a lot of satisfac-

tion, but it is rewarding for the whole staff to have done

something worthwhile which shortly the whole school will

pour over and appreciate.

As a pictorial and written record of the school's activities,

the yearbook is the only thing that ties together the various

aspects of school life and we feel it is unique in that it has

an appeal for every person related to the school.

In these uncertain times in Quebec when an English pri-

vate school has become more of a stranger than ever before,

it is of paramount importance that our school retain a strong

identity. By afle'^pUng to capture the school's function and

spirit, the yearbook contributes to the achieving of this aim.

We have endeavoured to recognize the vital bodies in the

school in a reflection of the school's daily routine.

We would like to echo the appreciation for a great gradu-

ating class to whom this yearbook is most meaningful, since

it is they who foritribate most to the school atmosphere and

will therefore derive greater satisfaction from it.

Finally, it remains to thank Mr. Reid and this year's group,

and to wdsh luck to next year's crew. You're crazy but it will

feel good when it's all over. Some of you who were with us

this year wiU have seen some of our mistakes and avoid them

in the future. We are confident that you wdll make a good

contribution to our fine tradition of yearbooks.


HEADMASTER'S MESSAGE

1977 YEARBOOK

The story is told of Robert Frost who once stopped at a filling station deep in the Green Mountains of

Vermont. He enquired of the lank, seedy attendant who grudgingly appeared, "What community is this? "

The rustic looked puzzled and replied, "What do you mean, 'community'? "

"Oh," said the great poet, "a community is a place where poeple live together, work and play together

and do things for the common good."

"Umph! ", grunted the man. "This ain't no community. This here is a place! "

The year we have brought to a close has in every respect been constructive, and its hallmark has been community

effort. The youngsters of the Junior School, the teachers and instructors, the older boys, the office

and maintenance staffs and the Senior Class have this year harmoniously '"lived together, worked and played

together and done things for the common good."

In a world permeated with suspicion, fragmentation and selfishness, one can look back on the year, 1976-

77, with special satisfaction and delight. Selwyn House ain't no place; it has wholly proven itself to be a

COMMUNITY.

And to the Graduating Class goes much of the credit for the happy state of affairs. Traditionally, we look

to the Seniors to provide leadership in all activities and good example for the younger boys. The Class of '77

has generously and effectively given both to the School.

To you of the Graduating Class, our sincerest thanks for an excellent year and warmest wishes for every

continued success in your further education.

A. S. Troubetzkoy

Headmaster


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Alexis Troubetzkoy

J. E. Iversen

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L. I. Seville Dr. R. A. Speirs

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STAFF

mm ill

B. S. Stevens

D. P. Williams

J.

P. Martin

G. C. 1. Burgess

B. W. Porter W. M. Reid W. S. Kershaw A. Weber


D. C. Karn

M. Krindle

B. J. Moffat P. Litvack 4M. R. Wearing

B. Williams G. Dowd B. Marker

R. E. Rennie D. G. Cude G. Miheu

G. DeGuire L. Zubizarreta J. R. Varey

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p. Beauchamp P. A. Govan P.L. Marsh M Ghattas

J. Clark E. Pinchuk E. Walker D. L. Hopson

A. Wiggins

Col. R. M. Campbell

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M. McDermott

L. Elbaz

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M. Scott T. H. I. Roberts

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10

Assistant to the Headmaster/

Director of Studies

B.S. Stevens, B.A., Dip. Ed.

(Sir George Williams University,

MacDonald College)

Director of Junior School Studies

(Mrs.) P. L. Marsh, Dip. Ed.

(Ashburnham College, Bedford, London

University)

Middle School Administrator

Mr. L. 1. Seville, Dip. Ed.

(MacDonald College, Sir George Williams

University)

University Counsellor

J. E. Iversen, B.A., M.A.

(McGill University)

J. L. Aimers, B.A., Dip. Ed.

(Sir George Williams University, McGill

University)

P. Beauchamp, B. Ed., (P.E.)

(McGill University)

(Mrs.) J. Clark, B.A., class 1 Dip. Ed.

(Bishops University, McGill University)

D. G.Cude, Dip. P.E., B.A.

(MacDonald College, Bishops University)

G. Deguire, B.A.S.P. in French Studies

(University of Montreal)

G. Dowd, B. Ed., (P.E. & Eng.)

(McGill University)

(Mme.) L. Elbaz, Cert, de Fran^ais, Cert.

de math et de Sciences

(University of Montreal)

G. Gosselin, B.A., Dip. Ed.

(McGill University, Sir George Williams

University)

P. A. Govan, B. Ed. (P.E.)

(McGill University)

BOARD OF GOVERNORS

Chaiiman

H. H. Norsworthy

Vice-Chairman

Ronald T. Riley

E. M. Ballon

A. M. Case

W. S. Cottingham

H. G. Hallward

A. J. Lafleur

Mrs. J. K. MacFarlane

FACULTY

Secretary

Timothy R. Carsley

Treasurer

William H. Daly

D. C. MacKay

K. M. L. Monod

P. F. Nobbs

J. J. Shannon

Mrs. G. B. Skinner

A. S. Troubetzkoy

Headmaster Emeritus

Robert A. Speirs, B.A., M.A., LL.D., Dip.

Ed. (University of Edinburgh, Columbia

University, University of Montreal, Sir

George Williams University)

Headmaster

Ale-xis S. Troubetzkoy, B.A., Dip. Ed. (Sir

George Williams University)

Registrar

J. P. Martin, B.A., B.Ed.

(McGill University, University of

Montreal)

Head of English Department

G. C. I. Burgess, B.A., M.A.

(Sir George Williams University, McGill

University)

Head of French Department

A. Weber, M.A. Dens.

(University of Strasbourg, University of

Massachusetts, University of Montreal)

Head of Geography Department

B. Williams, B.A., Dip. Ed.

(Sir George Williams University)

B. Harker, B.A., M.A.

(University of Alberta)

D. L. Hopson, B.A., A.R.T.C, Dip. Ed.,

Mus. Spec.

(McGill University, University of Toronto)

Donald C. Karn. B.A., B. Ed.

(University of Western Ontario & University

of Toronto)

M. Krindle, Sc, Dip. Ed., Dip. Advanced

Studies in Education

(McGill University, Bishops University)

P. Litvack, B.Sc. (Hons. Math), Dip. Ed.

(McGill University)

G. Maheu, B. Ped., B.A.

(University of Montreal)

B. J. Moffat, B.Sc, Dip. Ed.

(McGill University)

(Mrs.) E. Pinchuk, B.Sc.

(Boston University)

OFFICE STAFF

Lt. Col. R. M. Campbell, CD. (Miss) M. Scott

T. H. Irwin Roberts (Miss) M. McDermott

(Mrs.) C. Varey

Head ot History Department

B. W. Porter, b'.A. (Hons.), B. Ed., Cert.

Ed.

(Carleton University, University of

Toronto)

Head of the Mathematics and the Science

Departments

W. S. Kershaw, B.Sc, Dip. Ed.

(McGill University)

School Librarian

J. R. Varey, class 2 tech. Dip., in special

education

(Sir George Williams University, McGill

University, MacDonald College, Loyola

University)

W. M. Reid, B.A., Dip. Ed.

(Sir George Williams University, McGill

University)

R. E. Rennie, B.Sc, Dip. Ed.

(McGill University)

(Mrs.) E. Walker, Dip. du C.R.E.D.l.F.

(St. Cloud, France; University of

Montreal)

M. R. Wearing, B.A. (Hons. PH.E.

(University of Western Ontario)

A. Wiggins, B.A. M.Ed.

(Sir George Williams University, University

of Maine)

D. P. Williams, B.A., A.C.E.

(Sir George Williams University, Oxon)

L. Zubizarreta

(University of Navarre, University of

Quebec)


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h GRADS


12

DAVE BALLON

Despite seven years of "studies" at Selwyn, Dave has managed to keep his cooL

Everyone is his friend, with the sole exception of the six o'clock shadow. We all

wish him best of luck and success for the future and hope that one day he will be

able to quit "School"" and begin REAL work!

DEAN BARRIERE

The seven years that Dean (also known as Dizzy) has attended the school have

been one long dream. He spent his free periods (I mean study periods) reading up

on the sex life of a snail or planning a potential snowshoe club excursion. If Dean

continues to eat his Cheerios every morning, he"ll soon be looking down at Mr.

Troubeztkoy (and Mr. Gosselin too). Not only does Dean tower over the plebs be-

low, but also graces several worthwhile committees such as the Entertainment

committee with his prescence. His favourite pastimes include speeding around

hairpin turns in Old Montreal in his van, bombing down the slopes of Mount

Tremblant, and teaching the Golden Age club sailing. Dean could be the Harvard

graduate he hopes to become if only he could overcome one great aversion

Adios!

COLIN BIRD

A Friend

- work.

Colin is one of the few people who has been in the school for eleven years. We

are still wondering if it has helped him any. In his years at Selwyn House, he has

picked up quite a few names, the most used ones being: Big Bird, Bird Brain,

Beard, Tweety, Ornothothopolis, and Insect. Colin has been a great asset to our

sports program and has led many soccer, hockey, and rugby teams to victory. He

is presently the Captain of Macauley House. In his years at Selwyn House, Colin

has won such prizes as distinction in choir in grades 3 and 4. Though we may only

remember him for a day or two after we get out of school he will always be remembered

as "the guy whose jokes never made sense".

his friends


DOMINIC CAPET

STOPPING BY THE WOODS ON A SNOWY EVENING

Whose woods these are I think I know.

His house is in the village, though:

He will not see me stopping here

To watch his woods fill up with snow.

My little horse must think it queer

To stop without a farmhouse near

Between the woods and frozen lake,

The darkest evening of the year.

He gives his harness bells a shake

To ask if there is some mistake.

The only other sound's the sweep

Of easy wind and downy flake.

The woods are lonely, dark and deep,

But I have promises to keep.

And miles to go before I sleep,

And miles to go before I sleep.

TIMOTHY FITZPATRICK

- Robert Frost -

Timothy, also known as Fitz, has been an all-round nice guy in his seven years

at Selwyn House. Fitz has been an active participant in nearly all activities. He has

played on soccer, football, hockey, and rugby teams, though sometimes he didn't

play very often. He is presently Captain of Speirs House, and is an acting member

of the Entertainment Committee. Though many of Fitz's hidden talents have not

been displayed to the outside world, he will soon have the chance, as he leaves

Selwyn House forever.

STEPHEN FONTEIN

Well I do, so friend I'm coming through. . .

- His Friends -

Yes, for you I'll always find the time, we will have a bottle

Of wine, old friend, I'm here, by your side, Oh! to the very end. . .

- Chris de Burgh -

Stephen is one of the few veterans of Selly, and he has a lot to show for it.

See that little mark on his head? That's from a blackboard eraser in grade eight.

Over the years, Stephen (Steve, Squeegie, Etienne, or Tienne) has participated

on a few school teams (soccer, gymnastics and track and field) and he spends a lot

of time sailing and skiing.

13


14

DAVID GAMEROFF

Farewell to school, my fast dying friends.

The world is unfolding, I must make amends.

My life has been closed in, a box tied with string,

The new life is beckoning, I must catch its wind.

For nine years I've lived here, for many more not.

And I'll leave this stone building with many a thought

Of the scrapes and the riches, mostly teacher instilled,

To broaden my mind, more than their lives fulfil.

But in the end I have gained more than I've lost,

I've given up nine years, and that's been the cost

Of a Selwyn House knowledge all smothered in trills,

And (I might add disdainfully) a very high bill.

As for me and my friends, we've just finished 'leven

Say goodbye old friends, to the class of seventy seven.

ROBERT HALL

Robert has been at Selwyn House for ten years. During these ten years he has

been a captain of numerous sports teams and has been on many committees.

Robert is known throughout the school for his speed in running races. He present-

ly holds the 100 yard dash record for the school. He has also been known to be

the only one able to talk to Hedrei about some sophisticated sound system he is

building. Robert's presence among his friends will be missed in the years after

our graduation. Good luck in future years.

GEORGE HEDREI

His friends.

George has been a whirlwind of activity ever since he came to Selwvn House

years ago. In grade five he became famous as "Generator George", committed to

terrorizing the halls of the school and tearing down the walls with his fearsome

"ramming" and his peculiar rumbling and screeching sounds. Since that year, he

has become one of those few students whose character is inherent and vital to the

class image. What would grade eleven be without George? Who else would sit at

the front of the class, sound asleep, two feet away from the teacher because he

had been up till 4:00 A.M. the previous night going crazy over his C.B. or fi.xing

someone's toaster? Who else is regularly 4 weeks late on all his assignments but

still manages to maintain first rate grades? Who else would be crazy enough to fix

a movie projector so the class could proceed as planned? George's sole motivation

since he was born has been electronics

- watch out, because when he runs around

with his 10,000 volt "zapper", things start getting dangerous. Of course, no one

can forget his splendid school-bag about 25 years old - stuffed with books. We're

all confident that George will excel in his future electronic endeavours and we're

all very sorry to see him go. We hope that his electronic lust will be able to con-

tain itselt on the appropriate occasions.

I do not know what I may appear to the world; but to myself I seem to have

been only like a boy playing on the seashore, and diverting myself now and then

in finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary; whilst the great

ocean ot truth lay all undiscovered before me.

Sir Issac Newton


ROBERT HOUSEZ

Robbie spent five years at Selwyn House, most of it in class studying (theoret-

ically). He did find time for working in the chocolate bar shop, playing chess,

and editing the EXAMINER. He has, however, participated in a few worthwhile

activities. He has graced with his presence the soccer, basketball and track and

field teams, along with the detention room on many occasions.

He constantly exasperates people over the spelling of his name. "Housez, not

Hoose, and I'm not French! " Over the years he has acquired various nicknames;

Hoose, Rob, Rrrrrrobbie, and. . .uh, well, anyway. . .

Robbie has learned a few things at Sellie, much to the surprise of his class-

mates (and teachers). He has arrived at the amazing conclusion that "if you keep

cutting corners, you will wind up going in circles".

JIMJARDINE

-His Friends-

The school champion of lethargy sleeps so well that only the bell can wake

him. He is notorious for joining teams and never showing up, as well as for not

handing in his English assignments on time.

Ambition: Chief matress-tester

Probable Destination: Being fired for falling asleep on the job.

Favorite Saying: "Capet, you're dead!

" -CENSORED- "

"ZZZZZZZZZZ. .

."

15


16

MICHAEL LECLAIR

Ambition: To be a star photographer for Playboy.

Probable Destination: A special effect.

Activities: Destroying toy houses, making Montreal into an active earthquake

zone, and parting the Red Sea.

Pet Aversions: Pea soup, Metros, and people who are smarter than he is.

Favourite Saying: As with painted or photo-cut out glass shots, the relative

JEREMY NICOL

apertures which are required to hold focus will ordinarily

range from f/11 to f/22, depending on the size of the trans-

parency.

Once upon a time there was a little boy (we think), called Jeremy Nicol. In his

past ten years at Selwyn House, he has excelled in every sporting activity he has

entered. Jeremy has a fetish for perfection; grasshopper soup definitely does not

agree with him, though at one time he naively professed a liking for it. Jeremy is

very fond of talk shows, as he has shown by his great devotion to Johnny Carson's

Tonight Show. As soon as one smells his favourite cologne. Macho, one braces

oneself for the inevitable verbal attack to follow. All of his friends sincerely hope

that he will become the something he most desires in life. Good luck, Jeremy!

DAVID NORRIS

Friends

Dave has always been somewhat of a mystique in Selwyn House School. Al-

though he has led an unblemished life at S.H.S. for ten years, Dave has distin-

guished himself at B.C.S. tor the cult ot needlepoint and botany. His gaunt sta-

ture and dazed look should not be mistaken with the high vitality that exists in

him while playing Robin Trower's Favourites. Dave has been an active member

of all the groupie and rap sessions. He is the originator of "Needle Norris and the

Nifties", which reminds me of his immortal quotation, "We're not the Stones, but

we're nifty." He plans to continue his "education" at U.N.B. where he will seek

fuUfillment in local taverns. 1 am sure that Dave will be remembered for his large

contribution to S.H.S.


PETER OLIVER

Peter has always been somewhat of an enigma at Selwyn House. Famed for his

sociaHst philosophies, he refuses to be identified with Karl Marx, so we'll call it

Social Oliverism for the moment. That's about how idealistic it is. Immaculate,

he'll kill you if call him a slob; he always takes himself quite seriously until it's

time to throw ice cubes out of the 26th floor of the Hyatt Regency in Toronto or

to engage in coffee fights at 3:00 in the morning in Sherbrooke. Bach in school,

away from the humdrum ways of his out-of-school life, he has been known to

add a chuckle to history classes, to hit Mr. Aimers with spitballs and generally

have a good time, not to mention his fearsome exploits with Mr. Litvack.

Prefect, Entertainment Committee member. Yearbook co-editor, and team

sportsman

- Peter is all of these, and he has certainly made a most valid and mem-

orable contribution in all areas of endeavour with which he has been associated.

So much for the past, but what of the future? For Peter, it looks hopeful and

we are all confident that he will tind success in his ambition to become a lawyer;

but failing this, we know he will become an incomparable chimney-sweep.

CLAUDE PELLAN

A student whose hard work and determination, not to mention his imagination

and willingness to work, brought him nowhere, he is thought by many to become

a soccer player in the future; not that he was any good, just that it was the only

thing he ever worked hard at. Sure to become one of the world's greatest. . .

The Flying Frenchman.

17


18

WILLI POWELL

Born in 1960, will probably die in 2057. in late tall. Tlie intervening years are

filled with interesting perceptions and erroneous generalizations: these generaliza-

tions becoming progressively more inane. In the beginning and the end. a small

dust explosion, and a bright reflection of a sphere. The object-a humanoid.

Of course despite all this, Willi was a real ass-et to the Selly way of life, active

in photography and various sports teams. We'll never forget him for his patented

line, "So. . .who're you chasing," which stimulated many a conversation.

KEVIN RATCLIFF

After eleven years of Selwyn, a feeling of triumph is felt upon reaching, and

graduating from, the senior form. The final year is the culmination of many years

work in fundamental studies, and the realization is that "those teachers" were ac-

tually trying to help one by giving more homework. Good luck to all those I have

had the pleasure to know, and may all of your futures be happy and tultilling.

We can work it out

Life is very short and there's no time

For fussing and fighting my friend.

John Lennon/Paul McCartney

MYRON ROSNER

"The way of transgressors is hard. "Si.x years of it, WHEW! !


JOHN SCHWENK

John, to many of us. leaves the memory of a guy who was always there when

.,'"

you needed him (and even when you didn't). His motto, "You only live once. .

led to many an interesting situation. Knowing John will forever brighten our lives.

So long!

AW.H.S. Friend

John, a young man with spunk, will try to steal your girlfriend if you're not

careful.

BILL SMITH

AW.H.S. Friend

Since Bill came to Sellv from Columbia in grade six, his most outstanding

trait, his neutrality, has left us at a loss for means to cut him up. Bill has distinguished

himself as prefect, house captain and member of the entertainment com-

mittee. He has also participated in some worthwhile activities. The school's soc-

cer, hockey and rugby teams would not have been the same without him. Otherwise,

Bill might be found hanging from trees at Mt. Tremblant or sipping Cham-

pagne at breakfast in some exotic country.

Pet Aversions: Soccer goal posts and the Autostade.

Cherished Memories; The 22nd, "Mes Vacances en Suisse," and anything else

concerning W.P.

Hasta Luego!

19


22

^^M

MARK BANDEEN

Mark has left an indelible imprint on the atmosphere at Selwyn House after

five years of studious attendence. In his early years here, way back when, he

taught us all about milking cows and growing cabbages - the proverbial class far-

mer. I must admit though that today he is a changed person: he has gotten into

bigger and better things - eating macaroni, doing P.S.S.C. labs, making George

Hedrei electrocute himself on light organs, you name it, and Mark did it. During

his five years he did find time to indulge in less erudite activities such as debating,

being the assistant editor for the yearbook - as well as co-heading the "layout"

department - football teams, to name but a few. Certainly the halls of Selwyn

House wnll be missing some things next year - that familiar laugh, that blue

knapsack, and the jolly humour.

If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavours to

live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common

hours.

LUCA CEFIS

Wops aren't especially uncommon at Selly; But never before have we come

across such a wopper. Renowned for wearing jeans under his grey flannels, Luca

has tried hard in his five years to maintain as low a profile as possible. However,

he has been a dismal failure. His hair, his incredible flair for setting styles, his

cozin and his caza, his aspirations to play guitar for Aerosmith, his basketball, and

especially his connections with various bands on the mountain have forbidden

this. What will become of him now? It's hard not to be cliched, but the mafia

might become friendly in the next 20 years.

NICKGAULT

Nick is well known for his skilled use of the English language. His oral accomp-

lishments are varied: he has mastered the arts of debating and public speaking,

and has livened up many a class with his cutting sense of humour. Besides his academic

activities he has distinguished himself in the field of athletics. Nick's athletic

abilities are well known both on and off the field.


DAVID HALLER

After five years at Selly, David has come up with a number of pet aversions.

Among them are school, homework, teachers, and people who call him "the

Little Green Sprout". However, he has liked a few things such as skipping games,

science, and nights out on the town with Myron.

MICHAEL HOLY

A friend

Michael burst through the doors of Selly, nose flaring like a bull, ready to at-

tack the Sellv way of life. It's just too bad the doors were locked and the colli-

sion has left him "meatless" today. Indeed, he is characterized by approaching

everything full in the face: responsibilities, parked cars, and trees at Mt. Tremblant.

Also known for his ridiculous laugh, we vAW probably remember him most for his

"burners". Who can forget his initiation as a prefect when it took 41 boys to tack-

le him and hoist him onto the sacrificial teachers desk and slowly, excruciatingly

shaved off his left "burner"

A real asset to the senior basketball team, the collection of grad notes for this

worthy manuscript, and the dynamic member of our entertainment committee.

I'm sure we'll all miss him when he leaves.

ALEXANDER HYDER

- anyways, they're growing back at an incredible rate.

Activities: Various clubs, student librarian, cycling and occasionally games.

Favourite Sayings: "Would you like to see something little boy? " (ho-ho-ho)

"Phudging Physics is Phun."

Ambition: Mechanical Engineer

Probable Destination: Driving trains for Canadian Paciric.

Alex will be remembered at Selwyn for his record for getting six teachers annoyed

in an amazing four minutes - Practice makes perfect.

Alex is an exemplary student: he is hard working and one of the most consci-

encious students at Selly. They made me say it.)

His Friends

23


24

TOMMY KAUFMAN

The "duinph" came to Selwyn House in grade seven under the guise of an acdemic

scholarship. The school has never fully recovered; who can forget the days

when Tommy used to run down a corridor in hot pursuit of a teacher to ask one

more pertinent question (this was grade nine); in grade eleven Tommy became

the accomplished bachelor of the class. However, we must admit that the sports

world at Selly has greatly benefitted from Tom's consistent participation; the ac-

academic world has also benefited, on the rare occasion.

I am sure that Tom will succeed in whichever career he decides to pursue, be it

"girl-chasing" or "bar-hopping" (and if McGill should lower its criterion for

medicine, Tom might even become a doctor).

A Friend

N.B. pet aversions; P.S.S.C. problems, healthy relationships.

Farourite pastime: trying to break up healthy relationships.

TIM LARGE

When Tim joined the Selly crowd in grade seven, he was such a sweet and innocent

little boy - he even used to bring cookies for the teachers every morning.

What a change! Since then, Tim acquired a liking for such things as Genesis (de-

finitely reflecting a lack of taste), girl swopping, "champinki", Russian frolics as

well as several other things, unfortunately unmentionable. Despite an obvious

lack of intelligence he manages to pull off first rate marks. Tim distinguishes

himself on soccer and rugby teams, and undoubtedly is the Selly all-star basketball

player. Even though Tim is supposedly grounded or broke on weekends, you

can catch him skiing into trees on the slopes, or bar-hopping in old Montreal. Tim's

favourite sayings include "I'd walk 100 miles for a camel! " Recently Tim gradua-

ted from head "wall-washer" to dishwasher. Congratulations! May your career

in the future be equally successful.

BOBBY LEVY

Bob infiltrated the Selly ranks in grade five. Bobby, probably one of the most

competitive boys in the school, strives to come out on top of all ot the class & he

manages to come close. Around every Christmas, when success seems imminent,

Bobby migrates to Miami beach where he "catches the rays", and comes back

ready again for the long sprint to summer.

His claims to fame include advertising manager for the yearbook, and several

more to come, (hopefully)


BRENT MAINWARING

When Brent came to Selwyn House in grade seven from 'down south', he car-

ried the true rebel spirit as well as a touch of southern charm. Between grades sev-

en and nine he managed to cause enough trouble to start World War HI. Grade ten

saw a new and improved Brent. He has distinguished himself on the football, rug-

by, and basketball team. He is a good debater, a skilled public speaker, and an a-

ble prefect. Brent also graces the Entertainment Committee with his presence. His

favourite sayings include "So what can I say," and "Large, what an ugly! " Brent

amazes his friends when he pulls off top marks while doing a minimum of work.

It is time for Brent to bronze his rugby cleats, pack up the ugly club, and move

on to "bigger and better things." Chow! *

MANLIO MARESCOTTI

His friends

Manlio or Mario as he likes to be called, came to Selwyn House in the fifth

grade. Along with Cefis, they made up the gruesome twosome of the Italian community

at Selwyn House for the next 7 years. But Manlio did more than just de-

fend his ethnic background, he was also the president, vice-president and chairman

of the board ot the Selwyn House ball hockey league.

Manlio has his redeeming points too; such as his quick wit and his bad jokes.

But mostly his accomplishment of securing a cute auburn from the Study. Manlio

managed to go out with this auburn for nearly a year, even though she was also

very popular with many ot Manlio's peers. Manlio says that he wants to go into

commerce and/or hotel management. It is too bad that Manlio won't be able to

pursue his scientific career, especially PSSC which he likes so much. I wish Manlio

a happy and fulfilling future and hope he succeeds in what he sets out to do; who

knows, I may need a dollar or a hotel room sometime in the future.

DAVID MONOD

A true friend

Ambitions: linebacker on Saskatchewan Rough Riders, headmaster of Selwyn

House, famous nuclear physicist, and renowned gnomologist.

Probable Destination: Pope

Activities: Talking, talking, sleeping, talking, talking, sleeping, etc.

Pet Avertions: Expending energy and waking up.

Favourite Saying: "Yes, 1 know sir, but what's the point of it? "

25


26

ROGER OSMOND

Though only a three year Sellyite, good friends are many among students and

staff, and forever will the "memory be green."

The heights by great men reached and kept,

Were not attained by sudden flight.

But they, while their companions slept.

Were toiling upward in the night.

Henry Longfellow-1858

Now this is not the end. It is not even the beginning of the end, but it is, per-

haps the end ot the beginning.

FILIPPAPICH

Sir Winston Churchill-1942

Filip 'Chippy' Papich, sometimes called 'Jaws" for his over-enthusiasm in Eng-

lish Class joined the Selly crowd in grade 7. The school has never had a chance to

recover. Whether attending an entertainment committee meeting, or rushing off

to a sports practice, Fil- and not Phil- always has a moment to listen to his friends

and help them if he can. Even though he misses no chance to "whoop it up', he

has managed to maintain top marks throughout the years. He has made many

friends, but somehow their names have slipped my mind. Seriously now, Fil has

been a great asset to his class

- keep it up!

A Friend

Human life consists in mutual service. No grief, pain, misfortune, or "broken

heart", is e.xcuse for cutting off one"s life while any power of service remains.

But when all usefulness is over, when one is assured of an unavoidable and im-

minent death, it is the simplest of human rights to choose a quick and easy death

in place of a slow and horrible one.

ALEXANDER PATCH

Charlotte Oilman

Miles from nowhere, not a soul in sight. Oh yeah, but it"s alright. I have my

freedom, I can make my own rules, oh yeah, the ones that 1 choose. Lord my bo-

dy has been a good friend, but 1 won"t need it when 1 reach the end.

Cat Stevens

In Ale.v we have a rare specimen, after eleven years of experimentation. That's

right, eleven years! If you take a close look at him, you would think him a wor-

ker. Well you're wrong. While Al WAS undoubtedly one of the brighter students,

his experience earned him and his friends fringe benefits (eg. twelve donuts for a

table of five). Alex has an unusual claim to fame; he has gone through ten English

teachers in eleven years (may they rest in peace).

A Friend


CHRISTOPHER POWELL

In the ten years Chris went to Selwyn House, he acquired many good points,

though I just can't think of any at the moment. At Christmas, the whole class

chips in to buy Chris a pair of shoelaces and grey socks, but he seems to lose

them by Easter. Every Friday night, Chris polishes the buggy in which he drives

all his friends home, and gets out the bottle of aftershave and the old can of

WINDBREAK, thus attaining the title of "the social charm of Westmount". In

between the numerous skiing adventures at Mt. Tremblant, he manages to attend

the various local frolics. Even though Chris claims to become the world's greatest

nose surgeon, we all know that his secret ambition is to be appointed the head

wall-washer at the Sheraton.

JAVIER QUINTANA

A Friend

A boleadora launched out of an Argentine maternity ward in the Ice Age, and

finally landed at Selwyn House in grade 5. His name was Javier, and the school

simply has never recovered from this onslaught of Argentine brawn and brain.

Javier manages to maintain a very low profile, despite a very distinguished record

in academics and a superb athletic performance. Football, rugby and hockey - a

jock in all with the style of a wall, he has centainly left his indelible impact on

many people. He has also found time to be a prefect, debate, work on the entertainment

committee and completed the invigorating sports section of this manuscript.

We all wish him the best of luck, as he hopes to continue his endeavours at some

American University.

P.S. I forgot to say that Javier is very adept at Math, Chemistry and Physics,

especially impressed by their slope and symmetry. Also, he recently developed

an affinity for gourmet cooking.

- If the day and night are such that you greet them with joy, and life emits a fragrance

like flowers and sweet-scented herbs, is more elastic, more starry, more

immortal

STEPHEN SCOTT

- that is your success. -

Henry David Thoreau

Ne.xt in line to Joe Clarke as Conservative leader, Stephen "Duke" Scott leads

the Tory cause in ideological disputes in History and Political Science classes.

But Stephen, who is actually right of the Queen, will turn around and begin ar-

guing Mar.xist theory if it is good for an argument. This ability to argue both

sides of any subject l*s« distinguished Stephen as a master debater.

Other activities include co-editor of the Yearbook, prefect, racquet star and

fastest eater at lunch. His dress, manners and general deportment leads some people

to call him a slob, but if he realises his ambitions as a lawyer-businessman, we

are sure he will mend his ways.

no man is an islan d.

. . .ask not for whom the bells toll, they toll for thee

John Donne

27


28

GEOFFREY SKINNER

Geoffrey has been in Selwyn House for five years and in that period he has dis-

tinguished as no other student can. No, he's not the all-round sports jock or the

class brain; instead he's a totally different brand of stand-out. In his early years

he was notorious for his wonderful spelling and screaming "bock bock bleep a

duck" in the library. Then as he became more and more familiar with the ways of

the school, he began to sing rock tunes in the halls, and going beserk, (don't ever

ask him how you spell relief), and this year he even helped to compose an original

tune with some interesting lyrics, vvfith his electric harmone: "Private School Blues.

His beserk behaviour has overflowed everywhere, especially in math class: to date

he has been in three wrestling matches with Mr. Rennie, and lost all of them. In

fact, Geoffrey has always been a great refreshment for other students who have

been in his classes. Aside from "having a good time", he has played on the squash

team, involved himself CONSCIENTIOUSLY as Yearbook photographer, and

risen to the fore of the debating scene.

We're all sure that Geoffrey will mend some of his ways as he enters some

learned institution, but we can say for certain that he will still be having a ripping

good time.

BRUCE WILLIAMS

It's been nine years now since Bruce first enlightened the realms of 95 Cote St.

Antoine Road. During that time, he has participated in various activities, but

since we can't talk about anything else, we'll now list them for you.

He began his active life as an avid member of the choir during his first five

years here. Later, in grade ten, he even had the honour of being made editor of

the EXAMINER and kept up the paper's high reputation. During his final three

years, he was an active student librarian.

With all these necessary activities done by one person, what will the school do

without him?

The Human Race is in the best condition when it has the greatest degree of

liberty.

CONSTANTINE ZARIFI

Ambition: Star motorcyclist for Team Triumph.

Probable Destination: Water boy for Team B.S.A.

Activities: Yearbook, Sundry, other rubbish.

Dante

Pet Peeves: Honda, David Bowie, (home)work, English term papers.

We need a god down here,

A man to lead us children:

Take us from the valley of fear.

Make the lights shine down on us;

Show us the road to go.

Help us survive, make us arrive;

Teach us what we need to know.

Bee Gees "Wind of Change"


:^iV:-'':>

ffiH*


30

JUNIOR SCHOOL REPORT

During the school year '16l'll , the universe for Gsades.'lt-Q_4-sontinued to expand. As the final days draw upon us, we look

at RAGGEDY ANN characters who have grown out of their desks and their pants. The security of a Selwyn House year behind

them has turned new boys into old boys, and the number of 'whys, hows, and whens' are a constant reminder to the staff that

the learning process has no end; and that young minds and the eternal questions are contributing to their own immortality. The

thought is both humbling and a source of joy. One hundred and eighty sLx have given one hundred boys strengthened reading,

writing and arithmetical skills, - more confidence in a tongue not their own, - artistic endeavour, - athletic prowess and valued

friendships. They have realised that in a community life is better when one learns to give as well as take: the occasional sadness

at not being chosen first which heightens the happiness when one is. One or two, especially in Grade 4 have learned that one's

own company can be a calming and warming experience. In Grade 1 the year has seen our babies become very definite person-

alities. The effects of this year mW be life: and, hopefully, they have been both happy and positive.

Pat Marsh


\ ^

V,

«» « •


32

FORM 1

R-r-u-n cat run

Sad form I

Sounds to words

Words to sentences

Reading is f-u-n

Ian Chris Andy

James

Derek Reza Andrew

Kyle

Eric Billv Thomas

Rolf

Ravi Kenny Michael

Nicolas and Neil

Work and play

So goes the day

Happy form I

Have a place in the sun.


NOTES ON GRADE 2

There was a young class of grade 2 Hoo-hoo

That really should have been in a zoo Hoo-hoo

At the sight of these twos Hoo-hoos

I felt like plunging in a "trou" Hoo-hoo

Down there in my "trou" Hoo-hoo

I reflected upon what I could do Hoo-hoo

Was I going to be the keeper of that zoo Hoo-hoo

Or was there anything else 1 could do Hoo-hoo

Well, after much thinking, 1 emerged from my "trou" Hoo-hoo

And decided to classify them Hoo-hoo

As they would have been in a zoo Hoo-hoo

McConnell, Sambrook, Usher-Jones you are the bisons.

Husko, Schopflocker, Dubravcik, von Moltke, Kaufman & Maybee

You are the kangaroos. . .

De Butler & Tinmouth you are the bears. . .

Kippen you are the ostrich with its head under its wing lost in a dream.

Taylor, Lemoine, Thompson, Verchere you are the seals. . .

Gillitt you are the wise owl.

Friedberg & Tang Wai you are the little field mice.

Munro you are the parrott that talks, talks, talks, copying everyone.

Et avec tout ce joli monde qu'est-ce que je vais faire

en Frangais?

peut-etre consulter le manuel du zoo

E. W.

33


34

3A

WHEN WE WERE ALL 3

WHAT is the matter with Serge?

There's candy aplenty in

His desk to splurge

What IS the matter with Serge?

WHAT is the matter with Jake?

He's perfectly well and hasn't an ache

And for dessert there's blueberry cake.

What IS the matter with Jake?

Jorizzo

Has eyes like an O

And a desk with no surprises.

He'll ask for a ruler, eraser or pencil

'Cause he has none in supplyses.

Chris, Chris,

Prat, Prat,

Christopher Pratley.

Took great

Care of Matt

Though he was quite free.

Chris, Chris,

Said to Matt,

"Matt Nadler," said he.

"if you must go home with your hockey bag.

You'd better go home with me."

William was a charmer, a happy, laughing fellow,

Peter was a boy with black curly hair,

Andrew was a chap who loved to bellow.

And Bobby was very tair.

Charles had

Great big

Waterproof boots

On,

Charles had a

Wooly

Selwyn House hat,

Charles had

A nav^ blue

Duffle coat on

"And that."

Said Charles,

"Is that."

Etienne asked

Douglas and

Douglas asked

Eduardo

"Could I borrow your eraser

To clean up ny page? "

Douglas asked

Eduardo,

Eduardo said,

"Certainly,

I'll go and get

Miss Hopson's

'Cause mine's disappeared."

Adam Soutar goes

Hoppity, poppity,

Floppitv, joggity. trot.

Whenever I tell him

Politely to stop it, he

Says he can't possibly stop.

dlh


3B

Nos Petits Ecoliers

Le matin ils se precipitent en trombe,

De leur voix joyeuse la classe en est emplie.

Mon dieu, qu'ils ont la beaute de petits anges!

A I'appel de leur Institutrice,

Les voila quise dressent comme de jeunes arbres;

Leurs cheveux lumineux tombent en meches desordonnees,

Laissant entrevoir des yeux qui brillent

Pareil a un miroir venitien.

A ce portrait de I'enfance, je me sens gaie et le coeur attendri.

35


36

4A

4 A was a most distinctive class. It was the only class with two form mistresses, Mrs. Pinchuk and Mrs.

Marsh. With two teachers taking turns calling the roll, the boys never did know whom to expect in the mor-

ning-

A typical art class with 4A would find Alexander Brown working on a mysterious invention, with Kirk

Russel offering suggestions on improvements. Andrew Zitzmann creating new shapes ol aircraft, and Sean

Sofin piecing together a car with 8000 parts. Douglas Green always worked on six projects at once, and

Adrian Barker never thought his work would be any good, although it always was. The painters of the class

were Tarek Razek and Benjamin Mackenzie, and the experimenters in new art forms were Erik Blachford,

Fredrik Svenstedt and George Samuel. Ian Gainov, Frederic Hyde and Dimitri Kydoniefs always did very

precise, minute drawings. And the student who always amazed himself with his own accomplishments was

Chris Keene.

An art class, and indeed, any class with 4A was never a dull experience and will long be remembered by

the two form mistresses.


4B

4B

There were some boys at Selwyn House

To fooling much inclined.

When the teacher's back was turned

They all thought that she was blind.

In history, the Tudors were admired

Their rutfs, and trunks and hose.

Gazdik and Rizkalla wished they could

Dress up like them and pose.

In science all wanted to conduct

Experiments with sticks,

But Bunge and Borromeo astonished all

With their bag of tricks.

En sciences humaines avec monsieur

Matthews and Grant fear to get

A nuckle avec ketsup

But they may get it yet.

In gym when Mr. Wearing said

To hang upside down

Sandblom, Kaps, and McGilton

All put on a frown.

In English in the afternoon

Varey fell asleep soon.

Doheny proceeded to blow a balloon,

And Wallace said, "Let's go to the moon."

Then one day in math class

As Thompson was chattering away

Mrs. Marsh got angry because

She couldn't hear what Marshall had to say.

Once a calamity happened in drama

Higgens lost his shoe.

McPherson suggest hopping home.

What else could he do?

And so these boys of 4B

Disputed loud and long.

Each thought his own opinion right.

But some of them were wrong.

37


38

JUNIOR SCHOOL ART

A visitor to a junior art class would see small children creating great works of art out of all manner of materials.

Detergent boxes, tin cans, and egg cartons may be transformed into monsters or a castle, depending

upon the whim ot the artist. Magazine pictures become collages, and old newspapers become "papier mache",

as the boys work at their creations. Of course, there is also the paints, which covers not only the paper, but

faces in a rainbow of colours. Amongst this havoc is Mrs. Pinchuk, guiding the boys in their work. The obser-

ver would definitely agree that the year has proven to be very productive. Art is still a favourite class for these

very young boys.

-Ellen Pinchuk


!

'"

39


MIDDLE SCHOOL

'^'t^:^:^:


42

MIDDLE SCHOOL REPORT

Due to the extensive renovations undertaken during July and August of 1976, all Middle School classrooms were not in read-

iness in September. In spite of this temporary inconvenience, School got off to a fine start.

The re-location of Middle School classrooms to the second floor has been very beneficial for many reasons. The close geo-

graphical proximity of all the classes has facilitated a more stringent supervision. Even more irpportantly, a more cohesive Mid-

dle School has evolved. This "togetherness" has engendered a noticeable "esprit de corps" amongst all the boys and staff.

In addition to participating in a strenuous academic programme, the boys v^^ere involved in numerous extra-curricular events.

The Grade 5 boys journeyed to Quebec City: the Grade sixers w^ent to Upper Canada Village; the Grade 7 lads spent two days

in Ottawa. A major portion of the Students Combined Appeal was raised by the Middle School. Through the course of the year

each boy was actively involved in the Athletic programme.

To those two or three boys leaving the School - Good Luck!

L. I. Seville

Middle School Administrator


Splash?

Snap!

f

^- ^

^ ^f^

^ ^BSp

Splat!

tfjifr

43


44

5A

FIRST ROW. Left to Right: G. Oonnel. S. Littler, M. Essing, L Sneddon. K. Johnson, G. Sander,

R. Chung.

SECOND ROW: L Ogilvie, G. Adams. T. Antony. F. Aylmer. G. Yull. M. Stevenson.

THIRD ROW: Mr. D. Cude, H. Mehnert. J. Soutar, M. UUman. A. Bandeen, T. MacFarlane.

The class as a whole is 5A

Composed of great groups all the way

With nicknames and sports, favorite pastimes of sorts

We go through school life day by day.

Yoyo and Madams, Uncoola and The- Hag

Are Yull Adams Ogilvie and Mehnert

Big Red and Big E, Big Fen and The Zoo

Are MacFarlane Essig Aylmer and Soutar.

Sneddy Baby and Squirt, Little Littler and Smart Kurt

Complete the list up above

A fabulous group always eager to prove

That a little fun in class never hurt.

When the day's work is done and the TV is running

Charlie's Angels our boys will be watching

Stevenson and Sander, Antony and UUman

Supported by Gouveia. Bandeen and Chung.


5B

5B

There was a young fellow named Eaton

Who was very much like Freedman.

Said Robertson to him

"You fit in a hymn."

Then Freedman said he was "cool man".

There was a young student named Black

And Nemec always punched him in the back.

Dubravick said

"You have a hole in your head."

On his seat they put tacks.

There was a young teacher named Karn,

Tried to teach 5B, have them larn.

He was ever so keen,

Had that impossible dream.

"Give up" sighed Brydon and Mclaren.

There was a young fellow named Von Motke

Who sat on Kristot I quote

Said Dristof "I wish

It was Howard you'd squish."

Nicholas you're as fat as a moat.

There was a young nipper named John

Who was peacefully cutting his lawn

When Tingley said

"Go stand on your head"

And Gregory laughed with a yawn.

Groudis, Ganiere, and Hood

Were walking along in the wood

When met by a bear

And with a bad scare

Ran home as fast as they could.

In front of young David sat Amtmann.

He turned, and said with a "cool man"

If you do not stop

That continuous cough

I'll get Burnham to throttle your hams Ham.

45


46

6A

FIRST ROW: C. Eberts, B. Gordon, J. Archambault, D. YuU. T. Zyto, W. Coffey. D. Sussman.

SECOND ROW; A. Dobell, A. Harting, M. Lukas, G. Groszman. A. Woodall. G. Canlett, G.

Redford, A. Rolland.

THIRD ROW: M. Krindle, M. Morden, P. DeLeonardis, D. Smith, S. Cote, A. Mackay.

ABSENT; G. Jarvis.

As 1 was walking by. . .1. ... a nice kid with lots of terrible jokes asked. .."..., the class's math star. and. ...... the star soccer

player. "Is. . r. . . known as smiley because he never smiles? " . . .5 . . , in the middle of trying to get bigger by putting books

on his chair said "You must mean. . .^ . ., who is always giggling at. . .'. . .'s funny jokes."

By this time. ...... the quiet hard worker, turned to. . . .°. ., the class captain from Lery, otherwise known as Woodlands,

and asked when this nonsense was going to end. Just then. . .IP. ., the smiling silent chap sitting in the front corner turned to

. . H . . who was saying "I'll be there when you need me." Now. . 1?. ., who says he is listening when he is really daydreaming

poked. . }? . ., the nice guy, and asked what was going on? . .14 . . said "I'm okay " but maybe it's. .1? , . who is called moonbeam.

Moonbeam nothing, I am sunshine. . ;9. . shouted.

I am mumsie and totally fantastic was. . J 7 . .'s reply. "I think vou need a haircut" was all. . ! ? . . could say. Watch. . .. . .'s

curls defy a comb. That's nothing. Can I . .20 _ _ show

you how I broke my arm or leg? Do you want me to break your arm

asked. . . .2.1.? Why not said. .-.A . . who, as the shy and quiet historian recorded the details. Now guess who is missing. He is

small and always is talking in French class.

1 Sussman

2 Morden

3 YuU

4 Deleonardis

5 Dobell

6 Gordon

7 Zyto

8 Coffey

9 Smith

10 Canlett

11 Cote

12 Hartwig

13 Rolland

14 Jarvis

15 Lukas

16 Archambault

17 Woodall

18 Mr. Krindle

19 Groszman

20 Mackay

21 Laubi

22 Eberts

23 Redford


6B

FIRST ROW, Left to Right: D. Stevens, D. Ball, S. Gault, C. Donald, G. Daly, P. Maag, P.

Saykaly, A. Sussman, L. Lipes.

SECOND ROW: A. Webster, J. Shearson. M. Wrobel, R. Keene, C. Chang, J. Norman, J. Kowling.

THIRD ROW: Mr. G. Dowd, S. Vinberg, J. O'Brien, B. Sheridan, T. Reid, R. Koenig, R. Duggan.

The Sons of 6B

The players:

Ball- Often referred to as the "Caustic Cadaver."

Chang- Best known for unnatural experiments with mice.

Cowling- His great ambition is to be the "Tidy-Bowl Man."

Daly- Able to inflate himself and become a hockey net.

Donald- Part-time Druid Chieftain and Devil Worshipper.

Duggan- Collecter of two-tone saddle-shoes.

Gault- Mafia chieftan, head of the "Bottlecaps" rackets.

Keene- Has seen snow before.

Koenig- Best known for his impersonations of Persian rugs.

Lipes- Collecter of used bubble gum.

Maag- Possessor of a black belt in noodle whipping.

Norman- Known for his ability to differentiate between numbers of different value.

O'Brien- The "Enforcer" terrorizes the second floor washroom.

Reid- Known for his ability to eat soup and recite poems simultaneously.

Saykaly- Soon will have saved enough money to buy a hair piece.

Shearson- At one time had two heads.

Sheridan- Fluent in Russian. Spanish, and French, and can make himself understood m English.

Stevens- Part-time female impersonator and weightlifter.

Sussman- Able to impersonate his brother very well.

Vineberg- Bible scholar and authority on desk legs.

Webster- Wants to become a Western saddle.

Wrobel- At one time a bouncer at Belmont Park.

Mr. Dowd- Related to none of the above.

47


48

L

7A

ii-

Mil h:

FIRST ROW, Left to Right: D. Stevenson, I. Downey, J. Czaharyn, S. Maag. A. Vivian, N. Briski,

I. Aitken.

SECOND ROW: Mr. G. Gosselin, A. Roland, C. Broomfield, B. MacFarlane, R. Laker, J. Pitblato.

THIRD ROW: M. Alexandre, L. Lapin, F. Kristof, A. Osterland, E. Langshur, R. Riley.

Aitken- Ambition: Pencil sharpener. Probable Destination: Making pencil sharpeners.

Alexander- Talks a lot of garbage. Probable Destination: Politician.

Ballon- Ballon brutallv butchers brave boys behind blindfolded bvstanders.

Briski- Bouncing Briski bounces his way to another bouncingly excellent mark.

Broomfield-Ambition: Pro soccer player. Probable Destination: Back up water boy.

Czaharyn- Occupation: Ripping off 'Las Vegas Laker".

Downey- Class detergent supplier.

Kristof- Ambition: Success. Probable Destination: Failure.

Laker- Ambition: Las Vegas gambler. Probable Destination: Inmate at Alcatraz High Security Jail.

Langshur- Ambition: Chartered accountant. Probable Destination: Cashier at Steinberg's.

Lapin- Ambition: Psychologist. Probable Destination: Lunatic.

Maag- Ambition: Fireman. Probable Destination: Pyromaniac.

Macaulay- Ambition: Goalie for the hockey team. Probable Destination: Goal post.

Macfarlane- Ambition: Mathematician. Probable Destination: Counting his own freckles.

Osterland- Activities: Media, Soccer team, football team, hockey team, basketball team, rugby, and wrestling.

Pitblado- He's the one who is always seen with Mr. Seville and up in a cloud during math thinking he's with a girl.

Riley- Ambition: Girl-chaser. Probable Destination: Bachelor.

RoUand- Ambition: Great ARCHItect. Probale Destination: S.H.S. janitor.

Stevenson- Ambition: Game warden in Indian jungle. Probable Destination: Game.

Vivian- Ambition: Army general. Probable Destination: Army mascot.


7B

FIRST ROW, Left to Right: P. Stewart, E. Hoguet, J. Wallace, C. Schwab, D. Trott, D. Clark.

SECOND ROW: Mr. J. L. Aimers, J. Housez. M. Johnson. P. Templeton, D. C. Stevenson, J.

Hetherington. D. Osmond.

THIRD ROW: I. Brydon, E. Braunstein, M. Delplace, J. Walker, J. Kovalik, T. Eddy, K.

Johannson.

"Forty years on" runs the Harrovian refrain, and it is to that future we must look in trying to judge the prospects for this

score-minus-one of boy energy ;

these becoming all-too-fast young men. how changed from their infancv and innocence as they

emerged from the Junior School cocoon into the dark blazers, sobering responsibilities and wider world of Grade 5. To that

mix has been added a rich infusion of 'new boys' who soon stop feeling 'new' and all too soon are no longer boys.

Braunstein. .Brydon. .Clark: the roll call commences, one institution cherished of old but fallen into desuetude of late. . .jollity,

reserve and e.xuberance is each one's respective motif. Del Place tor dilligence, Eddy for Effervesence..the list rings down

through the years until one can imagine the judge and ta.xi driver, the poet and the pediatrician who in mind haunt halls which

by then may be converted to other uses, but yet, one teels, will never quite lose an interior echo of juvenile laughter and secret

confidence.

Hetherington's chewed pencil, Hoguet's grin as he effortlessly defines word after word, Housez's chipper drive. . .the words

to be proven true in and by lite, in a host ot places and drivers occupations. Juxtapose Johnson & Johannson: our literary whiz

and super jock: consider Osmond & Kovalik: intellect with humour & humour with intellect. Not to forget Schwab. Stevenson

& Stewart: mind, enthusiasm and diligence: poet, p.r. man & priest?

Templeton no longer timorous, my prophecies state; Trott tremendously quieter in his three piece suit, a pillar of the Mon-

treal financial community; Walker the winsome heart-breaker of Quebecois females; and Wallace: wit and wisdom: our tutor

and friend.

No, throne and crowns may fall and halls be deserted: but their voices will linger, in pleasure and in despair; in work and in

play; in laughter and in love, AMEN.

49


50

7C

FIRST ROW, Left to Right: S. Brady, A. Hunger, J. Thomas, P. Norris, S. Hasko, K. Steifenhofer,

L. Reusing.

SECOND ROW: Mr. B. Williams. E. Kilpinen, J. Shannon, B. Devey, T. Valdamins. G. Bray. P.

Broomfield.

THIRD ROW: A. Smith. D. Kennedy. B. Howard, A. Rizkalia. N. Pratlev, C. Poole.

CLASS 7C Notes For The Yearbook

Over several periods, the students of 7C expressed their thoughts on ambition in life and probable destination. Each student

decided on his ambition while his classmates, with the assistance of Mr. Williams, decided the probable destination.

Brady- Ambition: Real estate agent. Probable Destination: A doll house salesman for Simpson's.

Bray- Ambition: Architect. P.D.: Bird house designer.

Broomfield- Ambition: Pilot. P.D.: "Crashing" down the flight of stairs at Selwyn House on the way to lunch.

Devey- Ambition: To inherit a fortune P.D.: Winning the mini-loto low prize.

Hasko- Ambition: Architect. P.D. : House demolition expert.

Howard- Ambition; To invent a cure for a deadly virus. P.D.: To die from the common cold.

Hunger- Ambition: Banker. P.D.: Making Laura Secords' chocolate money molds.

Kennedy- Ambition: City councilman of Westmount. P.D.: City councilman of an isolated fishing village in Newfoundland.

Kilpinen- Ambition: Truck driver. P.D.: Dinky toy test driver.

Norris- Ambition: Electrician. P.D.: Light Bulb salesman.

Poole- Ambition: To be a herpetologist. P.D.: An alligator wrestler.

Pratley- Ambition: To be a prosperous businessman. P.D.: Selling pencils at Peel & St. Catherine.

Reusing- Ambition: To become rich. P.D.: A beggar.

Rizkalia- Ambition: Television reporter. P.D.: Television repairman.

Shannon- Ambition: A veterinarian. P.D.: Dog catcher

Smith: Ambition: A lawyer. P.D.: A gavel manufacturer.

Stienfenhofer- Ambition: An insurance broker. P.D.: A geography teacher.

Thomas- Ambition: To win the Olympic Lottery. P.D.: To win the S.H.S. 25 i lottery

Valdmanis- Ambition: Pilot. P.D.: Test flying paper airplanes out of 7C's windows on to Cote St. Antoine.


MIDDLE SCHOOL DEBATING 1976-77

The new Friday afternoon time slot for this activity has proved successful, and a number of vigorous and worthwhile debates

have been held during the year, on subjects ranging from love and wealth, to capital punishment and coeducation.

Particularly encouraging has been the progress shown by some of the youngest lads: Vidad Gruodis, and Nicholas Tingley of

Grade 5 have gained poise and will be in fine shape for competitive debating by Grade 8. A strong contingent of Grade 6 inter-

est and competence emerged in the persons of John O'Brien, Sebastien (Beastly) Gault and Andrew Woodall. Then, keen inter-

est and ability has been evinced from Grade 7 boys who will enter the wider world of extra-mural competition next year. Eric

Langshur maintained a puckish humour and sure delivery ; Jamie Wallace brought a special blend of intelligence and humour to

his efforts; Garth Bray, Bill Devey and Andrew Smith made first rate contributions, as well.

In addition, all boys have been given a chance to enter public speaking competition. The experience of getting up and speak-

ing in a comprehensible fashion is a valuable one, and it is good to watch the interest in this field continue to expand at the

School.

51


52

£

^

MIDDLE SCHOOL ACTIVITIES

ART

This year, the boys of the Middle School have

been an especially enthusiastic group. They have

done many diverse works such as pen and ink

drawings, clay models, plaster and wire construc-

tions, and brightly painted masks. The boys" im-

agination is endless, and Friday afternoons have

been a most popular time for the creation of

works of art.

MIDDLE SCHOOL ACTIVITIES

WOODWORKING

Ellen Pinchuk

In this club, there has been a group of twelve

boys who have shown a very keen interest. Many

boys new to this activity have been able to learn

not only the use of many tools, but also some of

the pleasures to be gained from working with

wood.

By the end of the year, many homes will be

blessed with chopping-boards. bo.xes. bookshelves,

pencil holders, and other small projects which

have been the result of much trial and error, as

well as bruised thumbs!

J. Martin


MIDDLE SCHOOL ACTIVITIES

BIOLOGY CLUB

A programme of dissection studies highlighted the club's activities. Selected students dissected a sheep

heart as a follow-up to their study of body systems and presented a very interesting display during activities

night. The dissection of a very large bullfrog produced the exciting observation that it was capable of swallowing

large crayfish whole. Yet another group explored how muscles and bones worked together to produce

movement. Other dissections included a perch, and a shark's head.

For the participants, it was the opportunity to learn from actual specimens first-hand.

CHESS CLUB

This year, the Middle School Chess Club

proved to be extremely successful. The twenty-

three boys, who ranged from grades five to sev-

en, were very enthusiastic and serious towards

the games of chess they played. The supervisors,

Jeremy Nicol and Michael Leclair. often found

the boys so wrapped up in the games they played,

that they had to assist the boys with answers to

questions and indecisions stemming from the

competition. All in all, an encouraging year was

experienced and it is hoped that such years can

be repeated in the years to come.

53


54

MIDDLE SCHOOL ACTIVITIES

THE MEDIA CLUB

The Media Club continued this year for boys in the Middle School under the guidance

of Mr. B. Porter. The programme emphasized the influence of communication and the communicator

on our lives in which, according to Marshall McLuhan, "the medium is the mes-

sage". The media, which received particular attention, were newspapers, both local and national,

and magazines. Not only were the contents examined, but also there was a focus on

the physical construction of both. In addition, the area of advertising was critically considered

in order to encourage a more perceptive view of the influence of the communicator

on our lives. Certainly, a different prespective on what we casually accept as reliable information

was received by all.

STAMP AND COIN COLLECTING

Everybody collects something at one time: Ants, Buttons, Cents or Detentions ... as

well as Xantho.xylia, Years and even Zeroes.

But there is a group of people in the Middle School interested in something else: on Fri-

days, these gentlemen meet to discuss coins and stamps. They present their collections, look

at each others' albums, and trade. The meetings usually begin with news about coins or

stamps, or some information about what to collect, how to handle it, and how to use the

catalogues.

So people from the Middle School sharing this interest are now provided with a time and

place for meeting. And let's rejoice that they are putting it to good use.

G. M.


56

C'mon

Wow!

Oh, Yeah?


Hold it!

See?

There! Like that.

57


58

58ff,i.3S£


60

SENIOR SCHOOL REPORT

This has been a remarkable year at Selwyn House: one marked by the opening of new facilities, an enlarged

academic program and great activity and success on the athletic fields.

The expanded library facilities have resulted in it's becoming the center of learning in the Senior School.

Few schools can boast of a library so attractive and functional.

Most of our Senior students have carried a lighter academic load this year. In the belief that the best learn-

ing is that done by the individual himself, these students have made extensive use of the library during their

study periods. It is our hope that they will have learned how to make constructive use of their leisure time by

using the library for regular research and study.

As a result ot this program, greater latitude was allowed to the grade eleven students in their choice of

course options. The re-introduction of political science was a result of a keen interest by several boys to pur-

sue work in this Held.

At the time of writing some of our teams have shown themselves exceedingly well. Debating is flourishing

and our debaters have improved tremendously in their poise and skill while handling difficult topics. Soccer

teams, particularly at the Middle School and Senior levels, have had aggregate success. I am sure there will be

equal successes in hockey, basketball and rugger.

The school year has been a memorable one due in large part to the continuous effort, team spirit and JOIE

DE VIVRE of the students and staff.

B. S. Stevens

Assistant to the Headmaster

and Director of Studies


62

8A

FIRST ROW, Left to Right: A. Argun, J. Zyto, K. Stiefenhofer, D. Baird, M. VanGinkel, R. Gialloreto, M. Stitchberry.

SECOND Mr. R. Rennie, R. Bogert, M. Dungan, D. Prescesky, B. Iton, N. McConnell, D. Hyder.

THIRD ROW: P. Templeton, D. Kutten, C. Creighton, A. Iton. A. Mollis, N. Rideout.

ABSENT; C. Speigel, J. Trott.

8ARENNIE AND THE JETS

Argun Ambition: doctor. Probable Destination: operating table.

Baird- Ambition: no idea. Probable Destination: even less of an idea.

Bogert- Ambition: great African hunter. Probable Destination: fugitive of the law.

Creighton- Ambition: to become the second isambard kingdom Brunei. Probable Destination: inventor of popsicle sticks.

Dungan- Ambition: e.xotic chef in Paris. Probable Destination: waiter in MacDonald's.

Gialloreto- Ambition: clothes manufacturer. Probable Destination: streaker.

Mollis- Ambition: peanut farmer. Probable Destination: president of the U.S.A.

Hyder- Ambition: tycoon. Probable Destination: crooked casino dealer.

Iton A- Ambition: to make Montreal communist. Probable Destination: Siberia.

Iton B- Ambition: to rid the world of all bad. Probable Destination: mugger.

Kutten- Ambition: exohologist. Probable Destination: foreign bacterium.

McConnell- Ambition: millionaire. Probable Destination: wino.

Precesky- Ambition: writer. Probable Destination: newspaper boy.

Rideout- Ambition: doctor. Probable Destination: nurse or maid.

Spiegel- Ambition: owner of Steinberg's market. Probable Destination: president of weight watchers.

Stiefenhofer- Ambition: to write like Shakespeare. Probable Destination: a prop in "Hamlet".

Stuchbery- Ambition: veterinarian. Probable Destination: human guinea pig.

Templeton- Ambition: doctor. Probable Destination: over-taxed garbage collector.

Trott- Ambition: brilliant lawyer. Probable Destination: 10 to 20 in the slammer.

Van Ginkle- Ambition: to become a photographer. Probable Destination: photograph a junkyard.

Zyto- Ambition: to become a surgeon. Probable Destination: washing out bed pans.

Mr. Rennie- Ambition: math teacher in 8A. Probable Destination: 20 years in a padded room.


TOP ROW: Mr. Zubizzareta, Miller, Plojing. Parker, Charton, Kilby, Smeaton, Cochrane.

MIDDLE ROW: Albert, Arnold-Forster, Burpee, Daley, Hall, Gault, Robillard.

FRONT ROW: Herman, Dale, Berton, Zeaman, Kovalik, WUliams, Dawson.

8B Joshua Albert- Ambition: Mr. Seville II. Probable Destination: Mr. Seville's carpet carrier.

Chris Arnold Forester- Ambition: head of sanitation department. Probable Destination: paper-picker-upper.

John Berton- "It wasn't me sir: what did I do? "

Tony Burpee- Ambition: psychiatrist. Probable Destination: believer.

Eric Charton- Ambition: Oxford English major. Probable Destination: University of Paris French major.

Michael Cochrane- Ambition: lawyer. Probable Destination: jailbird.

Richard Dale- Ambition: game warden. Probable Destination: Rhodesia dog catcher.

David Daley- Ambition: world's best goalie. Probable Destination: goal post.

Brian Dawson- Ambition: doctor. Probable Destination: patient.

Alex Gault- Ambition: official S.H.S. biffer. Probable Destination: official biffee.

Steve Hall- Ambition: photographer. Probable Destination: janitor at Nikon Japan.

Jonathan Harmon- Ambition: tallest man in the world. Probable Destination: circus midget.

Quentin Kilby- Ambition: best basketball player in the world. Probable Destination: court janitor.

Eugene Kovalick- ambition: to wipe out communism. Probable Destination: Brezhenev II.

David Miller- Ambition: world's greatest worry-wart. Probable Destination: world's greatest optimist.

Neal Parker- Ambition: nothing. Probable Destination: world's smartest person.

Max Plojing- Ambition: Scandanavian king. Probable Destination: street cleaner in Oslo.

Benoit Robillard- Ambition: Party Quebecois leader. Probable Destination: Liberal Party leader.

Jimmy Smeaton- Ambition: Montreal Canadians owner. Probable Destination: stick boy.

David Williams- Ambition: richest person in the world. Probable Destination: plumber.

Vlad Zeaman- ambition: multimillionaire. Probable Destination T.V. repairman.

63


64

8C

FIRST ROW, Left to Right: A. Sahai, S. Fong, P. Yamamoto, J. P. Guy, J. Jonas, A. Ivory.

SECOND ROW: S. Lafleur, J. J. Remillard, M. Horonczyk, C. Mappin, S. Kohner.

THIRD ROW: Mr. P. Litvack, B. McPhee. D. Owens, G. Clarke, G. Barriere, S. Thompson.

ABSENT: A. Hirsch, S. Solyom, R. Beauchamp.

8C-CAN YOU IMAGINE?

Garth Barriere: understanding math?

Ralph Beaverridge: not up in the clouds?

Greg Clarke: No, no one can imagine.

Glenn Fong: making noise?

John Peter Guy: getting in trouble for something HE did?

Larrv Henderson: enjoying Julius Caesar?

Alan Hirsch: not laughing?

Mark Horowcyzk: not talking?

Andrew Ivory: not making a mistake in Spanish?

Jeremy Jonas: sitting like a human?

Stephen Kohner: not smiling?

Sean Lafleur: not getting mad over a bad test?

Charles Mappin: coming to school not only on visiting days?

Brent McPhee: not saying, "Ahy, come on."?

Teddy Nash: not being hit by a piece of chalk all week?

Doug Owens: being a proud American?

Jean Jaques Remillard: making a mistake in Spanish?

Anand Sahai: not saying, "Mr. Litvack, where are the

quintiles"?

Stephen Solyom: not making a "Magic Square"?

Gregory Thompson: having his legs under his desk?

Peter Yamamoto: not eating chocolate?

Mr. "Turkey" Litvack: passing Monod in math?


9A FIRST ROW. Lett to Right; P. Das. M. Osmond. J. Newman. P. Webster. K. Burns.

SECOND ROW: Mr. B. Moffat. G. Zarifi, G. Galeotti, O. Mersereau, B. Shaer.

THIRD ROW: R. Graham, E. Bernard, C. Chapman. C. Rowland, J. Warner.

ABSENT: M. Beresford, W. McNally, G. Simpson.

During this violently exciting year 9A stood out as one of the most energetic classes of the school. The

class was made up of all types of creatures. Yes, the senior school will well remember Beresford, Roland,

Chapman and others for their difficult and often strange behaviour. Many more will remember the duo of

Warner and Graham and their wild acts both on and off the field of football. Perhaps the greatest and

most enduring individual was the classroom itself. In the course of the year it suffered a hole in the wall,

the falling off of the chalk-brush ledge (or so the little devils said), and the destruction of the bulletin

board. As well, because the back wall was so unsightly, Mark Beresford - a budding young artist-decided

to decorate it with his masterpeices. Here's to Mr. Moffat and all the boys of 9A that made it such a . . . .

. . . different year!

65


66

9B

Andrew Black:

Andy Prociner:

J. F. Chenier:

Stephen Fong:

David Kredl:

David Leopold:

Andrew Nemec:

Jack Ogilvy:

Nick Powell:

J.J.Rio:

Jamie Ross:

Alan Rossy:

David Shannon:

Peter Snyder:

James Thackray:

James Wallace:

Byron Marker:

TOP ROW: J-J. Chenier, P. Snyder, D. Shannon, J. Ross, N. Powell, A. Rossy.

MIDDLE ROW: Mr. B. Marker, D. Leopold, S. Thackry, A. Nemec, A. Browner. D. Kredl.

FRONT ROW: A. Black. |. Oyilvv. J. Wallace. J-J. Rio, S. Fong.

Ambition: professional skate-boarder. Probable Destination; a one way street to intensive care.

"Is the Pope Catholic?

Our Flying Frenchman

Ambition; owning Ruby Foo's. Probable Destination: dry cleaning at Cong Lee's.

A powder-hound lost in a storm out west.

Ambition; to become a drummer. Probable Destination; arrested for embarassing society in the process.

"Where's the leash? "

"How's your sex life, Ogilvy? " "What's sex? "

For Nick, lite flows like beer in a brewery.

Me doesn't let school interfere with his education.

Trick or treat.

"Have you had your pill today? "

He gets a kick out of life by getting out of a car and tiierr being able to look down on the world.

Ambition; hermit in Pointe-au-Pique.

Ambition: future president of Bell-Canada. Probable Destination; a repairman in the Fiji Islands.

"Okay, people, another beer on the house."

After the first week he couldn't take it from us anymore, so he gave up and we took ballet lessons.


9C

FIRST ROW, Left to Right: C. Paton, A. Gursahanie, J-P Bry, T. Lennox, A. Price.

SECOND ROW: O. Rogus, A. Briski. J. Caplan, M. Walford, R. Lande, A. Lazare.

THIRD ROW: Mr. A. Weber, K. Nemec, C. Smith, M. Pateras, S. Jorgenson.

Torben Berns: "Of mice and men."

Andrew Briski: Nothing is impossible, but some people are.

Jean-Philippe Bry: All the things I've learned, I've forgotten, and all the things I've learned I've guessed.

John Caplan: It's strange how much you've got to know before you know how little you know.

Ashvini Gursahaney: "Pee Wee"

Steen Jorgensen: Known for other things besides his great soccer ability.

Paul Korn: The old man's guide is chance.

Robert Lande: To ski or not to ski, that is the question.

Arnold Lazarre: Tomahawk Kid.

Toby Lenno.x: Man, Man, your time is sand, your ways are leaves upon the sea.

Karel Nemec; ?

Chris Paton: "The sun also rises."

Michael Pateras: "Character is what we are; reputation is what men think we are."

Andrew Price: To be or not be, school makes me ask this question a lot.

Owen Rogers: 90 per cent of everything is crud. -Sturgeon.

Chuck Smith: "I'll do my homework. 'Tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow.' "

Mark Walford: Always has a thoughtful comment to say.

Alain Weber: Vive I'imagination!

67


68

10A

FIRST ROW, Left to Right: A. Hsu, S. Gold. M. Davidson, J. Nadler, D. Pitblato, P. Panet-Raymond.

SECOND ROW: Mr. D. Williams, M. Ogilvy. A. Walford, C. Carter, D. Seward, H. Martin, R. Speigel.

THIRD ROW: S. Beresford, S. White, K. Clark, j. Pearson. B. Jolin. A. Murphy.

ABSENT: N. Pong.

Steven Beresford: Co-runner of the Coffee House.

Chris Carter: The kind of poet a student respects. STIFLED!

Ken Clark: He's trying to prove that he's straight, but we already know it.

Mark Davidson: The "hit" man in Arthur's gang.

Nathan Fong: Alas, a closet intellectual - out of the closet.

Sam Gold: A bedroom philosopher, who decided to stay in the bedroom this year.

Blake Jolin: One half of the lunchtime riot-squad.

Arthur Hsu: Leader of Arthur's gang.

Herbie Martin: Herbie, always carrying maple syrup containers, canteens, and bicycle bottles for his asthma, (so he says)

Anthony Murphy: Unfortunately Tony is leaving this year, fortunately he gets to kiss all those girls good-bye.

James Nadler: "Do I look like a nuinchkin? "

Mark Ogilvy: Surprised us all at Pierre's party when he brought a girl, instead of his normal companion.

Phil Panet-Raymond: A "floosy" rugby player.

Jon Pearson: The Village Idiot.

David Pitblado: Gille's best friend. Randy's biggest foe.

David Seward: The only person who can make Spanish sound like a pre-historic language.

Robert Spiegel: Bob's main goal next year is the conversion of his class (and all other ignorants) to Judaism.

Alan Walford: Rumor has it that the "GALACTIC EMPEROR" might step down.

Scott White: Among other things, Scott's poodle died.

Mr. David Williams: "On behalf of 10a, we'd like to thank Mr. Williams for keeping us awake in the morning."


10B

TOP ROW: D. Peets, J. Welsford, R. Iton, B. O'Brian, P. Cook, J. Common.

MIDDLE ROW: W. M. Reid, C. Miller, G. Ballantyne, C. Gelber, P. Baillergeon, M. Shetler, A. Scott.

BOTTOM ROW: N. Howson, B. Fregeau. D. Wilson, M. Osterland, A. Lemaitre, T. Macklem.

ABSENT: R. Blundell.

Pierre Baillergeon: A questionable artistic level in James' P. S. S. C. book.

Gordon Ballantyne: Mourns the passing ot his sideburns, but with equal energy took to writing "J. A." and "J. B." all over his

desk.

Richard Blundell: That look ot injured innocence gets 'em everytime.

James Common: Sits amazed in the back of Math class (and most others) WITH a sorry look on his face, muttering "GOD,

ITON".

Phil Cook: Our famous FRENCH linguist is leaving us for British Columbia.

Barry Fregeau: With an annoying regularity, Barry sleeps through English, Math, French, History, Chemistry, Physics, and

Spanish.

Charles Gelber: Known for cruising around Westmount on Saturday nights with Joe in tow.

Nico Howson: Chief Advocate of Italian Civil Rights in the school and a devotee to the cause of the left handed.

Richard Iton: Richard has strange ideas about the uses of pancake mi.x.

Alfred Lemaitre: Favorite pastime - reliving World War Two.

Tiffany Macklem: Set a record for most injustices received beyond the call of duty, and enjoyed it too.

Colin Miller: if this were a typical class note, we would talk about Colin's HUMUNGOUS nose, but this year we won't.

Blake O'Brian: ". . . Go Away! "

Michael Osterland: Known for spraying Mr. Porter with "Bull E.xtract".

Doug Peets: With Doug, everything is debatable, except the size ot the guy.

Andrew Scott: Next year . . . will Prince Philip be kUled?

Michael Shetler: If you play with balls, you play Mike's game.

Jay Welsford: Is he a reincarnation of Ernest Lester Hutchison?

Donald Wilson: Attentive and always alert (gasp! )

Michael Whitehead: Phantom of the classroom, the spirit of good.

Mr. W. M. Reid: Held intelligent seminars on Eskimo mechanics.

69


CHESS CLUB

The membership of the Chess Club varied with the seasons,

facilitating a fluid and informal program. All manner

of styles were played.

The season began with "fixed opening" exercises in the

form of a loosely-rated tournament. Towards Christmas,

cylindrical and circular board chess was sampled by a few

of the more daring.

The second term marked the beginning of the official

and formal Intramural Tournament. Round Robin play in

three leagues determined eight playoff spots. A sudden

death elimination tourney produced the champion; con-

gratulations to Andrew Briski.

The interscholastic scene was organized by the school's

first board player. A hand picked team played against stiff

competition from the larger schools; St. George's, Massey-

Vanier, Monkland, and Westmount High. Good chess was

had by all.

The activities night display consisted of chess problems

composed primarily by David Kredl. It is not known wheth-

er any of the parents cracked the puzzles. Thankfully, Mr.

Kredl provided solutions as well.

Bernard


DEBATING

Anotlier active year of growth and progress has been evidenced

by tlie Debating Society. A very successful home and away ser-

ies was held with both B.C.S. and Stanstead College. These de-

bates, held both in school and at Peter Oliver's home while in

Montreal, provided an excellent forum for novice debators and

tlic relaxed setting ot a Friday evening. We took the Bishop's

debators out to dinner at La Crepe Bretonne, in order to repay

their years of hospitality. The highlight of this affair was the

Headmaster's generous surprise ot a number of bottles of cider

which, if the ensuing debates were any indication, considerably

added to the loquaciousness, if not the lucidity, of the evening!

The active Wednesday afternoon programme in a Fall relatively

uncluttered with athletic fixtures allowed old talents to be re-

furbished and new ones to be found, especially in the persons of

Donald Wilson, Bruce Williams, Al Hyder, Michael Cochrane, and

Michael Shetler. Another excellent event was the Invitational

Forensic Tournament sponsored by St. Lawrence University in

Canton, New York. A number of our boys reached the finals of

their events against very stiff competition, and David Monod

gained a trophy for his 2nd place finish ni the After-Dinner

Speech category.

The spring term always brings a number of tournaments. Ten

students entered the McGill tourney, while another ten boys

travelled to Kemptville for the North Grenville Invitational Meet,

where Jamie Nadler was judged 5th best speaker out of 72, and

the team of Skinner and Marescotti (alias Macotti) finished

fifth out of thirty-six teams. The school was honoured by gain-

ing a berth in St. Catherine's, Ontario, where Nick Gault is

attending at the time of writing this article. Six boys joined the

coach for the ever-popular U.C.C. Tournament in May, debating

the resolution "There is no such thing as the good life." The grade

nine team of Lennox and Lande will lead a six-man delegation

later in May to the Provincial Championships in Rosemere.

It remains for me to pay special tribute to three graduating

debators, who will be sorely missed. They have formed the foun-

dation of our teams over the last three years. Peter Oliver's sober

yet effective style and ever-thorough preparation, Nick Gault's

alliteration and unusual viewpoints, and Stephen Scott's infor-

mality and presence have inspired many of their peers to an interest,

and effective participation in debating for which 1 am

most grateful.

71


72

WOODWORKING

This year's Wednesday afternoon double period ot woodworking has been a boon to all concerned.

The twelve boys taking part in this activity have been able to use this additional time not only to im-

prove the quality of their work but also to be more ambitious in the projects they have undertaken.

Especially noteworthy are the fine pieces of work produced by Roger Osmond and Steven Beres-

ford. These two boys have not only worked hard at their own projects but have been of considerable

help to some of the younger members of the class. The activity and imagination shown are to be commended,

as are some of the members of the class.

J. P. M.irtin


BRIDGE

Mr. Stevens and Mr. B. Williams met on alternate weeks

with the Senior Bridge Club. There were approximately si.x-

teen students this year and most of the players were exper-

ienced. Students developed experience while playing with

Mr. Stevens or Mr. Williams hovering in the background or

joining in. Once again, competition was informal.

ART

Senior Art Activities Club

V

< t

The boys involved in this year's Wednesday Afternoon Art Activities worked on a variety of

challenging assignments. For example, they learned about line and texture while doing pen and

ink drawings for the "Fourth Dimension", composition while separating various shapes and

piecing them back together, and color while attempting to draw autumn leaves. One favourite

assignment was the "personal collage" using found materials. The results told quite a bit about

each boy. A highlight of the year was a trip to the superb Hermitage collection at the Montreal

Museum of Fine Arts.

^•••"

Ellen Pinchuk

73


74

CAMERA CLUB

After a year's absence, the Camera Club was revived

and experienced one of its most active and successful years.

Involving over twenty-five boys in the senior school, the club

committed itself to the major job of documenting the widely

varied activities occurring within the school year. Indeed,

much of the photo-documentation for this yearbook as well

as for the Newsletter was done by a core group of dedicated

and enthusiastic photographers led by M. Leclair, the only

senior in the club this year. Others, such as S. Hall, C.

Arnold-Forster, J. Jonas, M. van Ginkel, K. Burns, and W.

McNally, produced many sensitive and excellent photographs

and made the usually difficult task of collecting materials

significantly easier. Also, since we had (for the first time)

access to a dark room outside the school, various members

gained basic skills in the processing and printing of black

and white film-skills which extended the familiarity, and use

of the camera, and skills which culminated in several dramatic

and striking displays, or photographic essays, presented on

Activities' Night.

Not only were the efforts confined to still photo-

graphy. Some preliminary material was presented on the

rudiments of film-making. Although there was not a great

emphasis upon this aspect of photography, particularly commendable

results in film were achieved by G. Clarke and J.

Herman who, as a result of many hours of work, scripted

and produced an eight minute film, an excellent work which

was run many times on Activities' Night. They showed that

"the eight millimeter imagination" is fertUe as their MON-

TREAL VISIONS gave us a fresh view of the city.

H i

As staff advisor for the Camera Club, I should person-

ally like to thank each of those mentioned previously, as well

as a number of others who, although they were not with us

for many of the periods, contributed as their commitments

elsewhere were fulfilled. Each and every one of the individuals

should be commended not only for the quality ot his work,

but also for his selfless sacrifice of time (frequently after

school or on weekends) to provide us with, perhaps, the

most comprehensive photographic coverage we had seen in a

number of years.

G. C. Ian Burgess


YEARBOOK yearbook Yearbook

Well, we've done it again. Here around you is the result of another year's labors, by one of the most dedicated groups it

has been an advisor's lot to work with. A new departure was tried this year, with a new division of responsibilities, as can be

seen on the yearbook staff list at the front of this book. Mainly, it worked. While the task was no less heavy, at least it fell upon

more shoulders, enabling staff members to keep up their involvement in games and all the rest of the school activities. This

squib was written in the midst ot the usual turmoil of last-minute checking, but the impression is strong that a good job has

been done by all.

Thanks, boys. It's been a good year.

W. M. Reid

75


76

Oh, Joy. Another fun evening.

I only smile like this 'cause I'd go mad doing anythmg else.

\.J» I ^1^

Sometimes this job does things to you.

TEACHERS SOMETIMES GET

Let's see - ground glass in his


FRUSTRATED TOO!

does not equal ten.

-ijain?

V

Mother told me there'd be davs like this.

Just looking at them all makes me feel jittery.

Honestly. Puellus instead ot puella.

All right. We surrender.


78

Au Tl Pb B. Po At

Portrait of a closed mind.

Gd Tb Dy Ho Ei Tm Yb Lu

i. r. .. • '• '• '

Cm Bk C( E^ Fm Md N^

lO COMPANV

I

~—ifr'

Hydrochloric is even BETTER than ground

glass.

"A thing of beauty is a joy forever"

-John Keats.

Hey. wait a minute. Who's going to write

down my last will and testament?

Will he EVER stop talking?

But, it's supposed to move.


Get that mouse!

What? This isn't Eton?

Come in, Sir. We won't hurt you.

So you see, gentlemen, it's really quite

simple now. isn't it?

I do NOT dance like a duck!

And they're seniors!

^ Ik

79


GUESTS

Under the direction ot M. Weber and Mr. Porter, a stu-

dent-teacher committee succeeded in bringing some interest-

ing guests to the school. In the fall, Laurier Lapierre came to

speak to grades nine, ten and eleven. As an historian, he pro-

vided a background to the separatist movement, relating it to

the newly - elected Parti Quebecois. The questions which followed

his talk concerned both the political issues and M.

Lapierre's television talk show in which he has often inter-

viewed prominent Quebec figures.

One ot M. Lapierre's television guests, Rodrigue Biron,

came to the school in April. He also focused his speech on

the separatist issue, especially the White Paper. M. Biron

made a plea to the students and their families to remain

calm, and to encourage investment from other parts of Canada

in order to alleviate unemployment while bringing Que-

bec back into the federal fold. The question session centered

on the new language paper.

The final guests was a group of young dancers, Les

Ballets Jazz. Grades five to eleven enjoyed an hour-long

presentation of exercises and dance. Jazz, traditional, rock

and folk music provided scope for their dancing.


-


84

CHRISTMAS BALL


SPECIAL CHOIR

TOP ROW: A. HoUis, D. Kennedy, J. Shannon, P. Norris,

T. MacFarlane, B. MacFarlane, T. Valdmanis, A. Vivian.

MIDDLE ROW; Mr. B. Marker, M. Morden, G. Canlett. J.

O'Brien, F. Aylmer, E. Braunstein, D. Osmond, N. Von

Moltke.

FRONT ROW: D. Stevens, T. Hood, C. Robertson, M.

Stevenson, I. Ogilvy, G. Adams.

ABSENT: Sean Lafleur, M. Dungan.

HISTORY FAIR

SCHOOL ACTIVITIES -

S. H. S. At the MONTREAL HISTORY FAIR

SPECIAL CHOIR

New York recital for choir Performances highly praised

The School Choir, under the dedicated leadership of

Mr. Byron Harker, recently gave a major performance in

New York City on Palm Sunday at the Cathedral of St. John

the Divine, North America's largest Gothic church. To a

congregation of approximately 1500 people, the group sang

a pre-Eucharist recital of sacred music which included three-

part Latin motets and two modern songs by Alan Ridout.

During the serving ot the Eucharist, the choir sang two pieces

and later took part in the remainder of the service.

The previous day, the choir had given a recital at the

Amsterdam Nursing Home, a residence for the elderly. There,

they sang Benjamin Britten's "Friday Afternoon Songs" and

Purcell's "Sound the Trumpet" to an enthusiastic audience.

While in New York, these boys, accompanied by Mr.

Harker, visited Radio City Music Hall and attended a performance

of Ringling Brothers Barnum and Bailey Circus. The

New York visit was the culmination of many hours of prac-

tice over the past several years. Prior to this concert, the

Choir had performed at the Mount Royal Villa, a local home

for the aged. Last December, this same group travelled to the

Benedictine monastery at St. Benoit-du-Lac where they sang

communion motets at the eleven o'clock morning Mass, and

later dined with the monks. That afternoon, the choir sang a

pop cantata to a large audience at St. Patrick's Anglican

Church, Magog, Quebec.

The choir's annual spring recital on AprO 27th at St.

Matthias Church concluded a year of many successes. This

very successful concert featured sacred part-songs, madrigals

sung by a double trio, Britten's FRIDAY AFTERNOON

SONGS and Mr. Harker's two and three part arrangment of

PEASANT CANTATA.

Throughout the year, students of both the Senior and Middle Schools joined in the physical reconstruction of history by

means of assembling different pieces of historical evidence into different "projects". These have included a wide range of ap-

proaches, whether it be model constructions, slide shows, collections of "hysterical" cartoons, busts of historical figures, re-

enactments, and so on. Having acquired the use of a display cabinet, the History Department was able to encourage more active

participation of both Schools.

In addition, during the annual School Activities Night, a selection of the best projects was made for entry into the annual

Montreal History Fair (as organized by the Quebec Association of Teachers of History) on St. Helen's Island, at the Old Fort,

from May 12th to the 15th. There were over a hundred entries from Quebec schools in both static and the audio-visual catgories.

James Thackeray won third prize in the Grades 9-1 1 category for his imaginative bust of Louis XVI. Also, in the Junior A-V

category, Clive Spiegel, Nicholas McConnell, Nicholas Rideout, and Robert Gialloreto won third prize for their lively historical

play which portrayed the impact of a Crusader's newspaper on a medieval lord. At the Fair, the students enjoyed a historical

lunch at the Festin du Gouverneur and watched the military drills of the regiments guarding the Fort. It was, indeed, an occ-

asion for all participants.

Participants: Andrew Mackay, Christian Robertson, Nicholas Tingley, Archie Rolland, James Thackeray, Richard Blundell,

Gordon Ballantyne, Nicholas McConnell, Tony Iton, Mike Stutchberry, Nicholas Rideout, Clive Spiegel, Robert Gialloreto,

David Osmond, Clark Scwaab, Trevor Eddy, John Hetherington.

85


WINTER CARNIVAL

A twn-day Winter C.irnival. jointlv .-iponsurcd by

NcKv\ii Hmuso aiul E.C.S., took place mi February 24tli

iiul J-ith. riii'i liiul w inter event was organized by a

hanJ-w.ii knis; group ol senior students from both schools

The first day of tiie carnival programnte saw nine

bus loads of enthusiastic skiers leave tor a day at Smug-

'/ ITi.- [c. Mie aliiiiK' .4luts were

i!i. iiM.iMis. hu! giic Imicc winds

leslrii led i.

iicsu -.kicis o > tin; ii.ivitc and i n tern khI 1,1 tc

riMiU, ,is [he Ji.tn- hit sel \ Ic ing llie intnx' jdvaiKed ski-

ing > mid n. 11 .,

pptT.ii^', However, crnss c(>inur\' skiers

ind mh>\\sImlis \Mie tavoured by slielicrod vunditions

(>n the wtH.ded trails.

During tlie s.mie day. Grades 5 to 7 had mini-carni-

val activities at the Olympic pool and games at L.C.C.

Here, round-robin tournaments in basketball, handball

and hncki \ were offered. Later, Selwyn House spon-

sored a i

schools >

5 and f..

1-11 for I 25 boys of Grade 7 from both

L.c:.C. looked .itter the members of Grade

!'Ik tnll.n\ lii^ d,i\ , So!w\ 11 Mouse hosted a lunch

lor ihc t;,t .S. students and 0111 (dades 8- 1 1 . A

buffet

of hot dogs, chips, ice cream and soft drinks w,is served

in the gym. This was followed by a programme of volley-

ball, skating, tobogganing, snow-sculpting, a slave auc-

tion and pic-eating contest, culminating in choosing a

Carnival King and Queen.

That evening, the carnival was concluded by a very

successful dance at E.C.S. featuring the Hartford Baby

Grande group and T.J.'s Mobile Disco.


88

sf'^^'TlIf*

ACTIVITIES NIGHT

/^•^^


STUDENT COMBINED APPEAL

For the second time in two years, a committee of grade

ten and eleven students formed to organize a money gath-

ering week for charities. Through a lottery and a casino, the

group succeded in accumulating two-thirds of its 3,000 dol-

lars objective. The week-long drive was both fun and fruitful.

TARGET $3,000

89


90

THE GRAD


LITERARY


92

THE MARTIANS

Once there were two Martians. They were green. They came to Earth in a flying

ship. They were scared, but they knew they had to be brave because they were Mar-

tians. They got out of the ship and walked down the street. They ran back to the

ship and flew away.

THE THIRTEEN YEAR OLD DRIVER

Ravi Nayar

Grade 1

All the drivers were in line. The last driver in line was a boy thirteen years old.

All the drivers were laughing at him, but when the race started, the boy passed all

the other cars. He won a gold medal and three thousand dollars from the president.

Thomas de Butler

Grade 2


PETER NELSON AND THE LOST KEY

One day, after school, as Peter Nelson walked home, he noticed that the key for his house was missing

from this pocket. "The only other key is with Mom, and she's away on her trip! " he thought as he angrily

kicked a pebble across the street. "Oh yeah! Mrs. Berk has the old key to our back door! " Peter thought

his troubles were over, but he was wrong. Peter started up the street to Mrs. Berk's house. It wasn't very far

for her house was one house apart from his own. When he got there, he saw the garbage truck just driving

away. He asked her about the key, and she said,

"I just threw it out, Peter."

"Why did you throw it out, anyway? " asked Peter.

"Well, since you got a new key, I thought 1 could throw the old one away," said Mrs. Berk. "Why do you

want it? " she asked.

"Oh, I lost the key to the house." said Peter. "I can't get in the front door: I can't get in the back door.

How can I get in? "

"Can you get in through a window with a ladder? "

"Maybe, may I borrow a ladder, please" asked Peter.

"Yes, you'll see it on your left as you go in."

"Thanks," said Peter. "I just hope a window is open."

Peter went back to his house, with the ladder. After trying five or sL\ windows, he finally got his bedroom

window to open. While he was getting into the house, he saw the the newspaper on the front step. He went

downstairs to the front door and opened it. As he leaned down to pick up the paper, he saw something shiney,

half sticking out from the flower pot. He went over to look at it. He said, "It's the key."

THE HAUNTED HOUSE

Christopher Pratley 3 B

One sunny, Sunday summer day, I decided to go to look at an old house at the end of the road. Everyone

said that it was haunted, but I did not believe them. I took lunch and bicycled down to the house. At the

house, the door was so squeaky that I almost left then. When I got in, all I could see were cobwebs. I went

through them, and then I learned something. I learned that cobwebs didn't taste very good. Then I saw some

stairs, and I decided to go up. The fifth step was so old that it gave way under my weight. I fell to the basement

which looked like a dungeon. I found out that that's what it was. I was in one of them. I saw all kinds

of bones from people who had died there. I saw a place where a block of cement was missing. I followed it

for what seemed like three hours. At the end, I came through a bush and found myself in front of my bicycle,

so I rode home very quickly. The next day, I heard that they were going to take it down and buOd a modern

house. I was glad for two reasons. One was I didn't like the house any more, and the second was that my

best friend was moving in.

Alan Marshall

Grade 4 B

93


AN EGYPTIAN SUNRISE

THE FOREST AT NIGHT

As the owl flies by.

And tlie wind does cry:

Little mice scurry

Without a worry;

And the trees sway to and tro;

They seem to look at the grass below;

And then, the birds start singing;

They sound like bells ringing.

Now, you can see the clover;

I guess the night is over.

James Soutar

Grade 5 A

Like a great crimson light bulb, radiating brilliance upon sand dune's city, I am starting

another day. I shall rise to my zenith and govern the world until 1 gently return to my

dark tomb for another night. I rise, shining in glory, upon the land. Every day, 1 change

from a vivid copper colour to a dull yellow. Lazily, 1 move, climbing the ladder of the sky,

then sliding back down again. My rays bring a glitter ot light deep inside the Sphinx's cold

eyes. Resting mummies stare out on me for the millionth time. Now once again, they will

see me pass high and grand before them. As my view grows higher, 1 sec more ot this Egy-

ptian land, grand in its desolation with tlie dunes and those enduring camels crossing the

desert with their cargoes of men and goods on their humps. I rule it ail; I. the day star; L

the creator ot lite; 1 am the sun.

Timothy Reid 6 B


A BALLAD OF THE SEA

All was dark on that stormy night;

Boats were not safe in the sea.

Captain McArthur stood on the deck,

Dolefully looking toward the lee.

Everyone knew the fate of the ship.

For their vessel was out of control.

Great waves struck the ship's starboard side;

Home was the crew's only goal.

If the ship reached home on that awful night,

Joy would fill the aii'.

Kegs of beer and wine would be drunk;

Lives would be saved through God's care.

Many were hoping and praying for life,

Near to death though they were.

Others were preparing to die.

Privately calling the captain a cur.

Quickly, some men dove overboard.

Rousing shout from the deck.

Sanity was being drained from all men;

The ship was bound for a wreck.

Under the surface, the ship slowly sank.

Venturing toward the shore.

While many men had drowned, four men stUI had hope,

Xavier McArthur was one of those four.

Yarns have been told about that ship, many a tear

has been shed;

Zany though it may sound, those four men are not dead.

Nicholas Briski

Grade 7 A


96

WAITING FOR THE TRAIN

The little train station was quiet when the bright morning sun frightened away the grey ot early dawn. The two hoboes,

stretched out on the poor wooden benches, began to stir. Paco sat up, straightened out his wrinkled poncho, and burped:

Pepe did likewise. "I hope the train to Buenos Aires comes today," said Paco. He walked stiffly over to the big board that

read, "El Porvenir - Horario" and saw the previous day's schedule written faintly in chalk.

"What time does the train to Buenos Aires get here? " he asked the station manager.

"Don't know. It hasn't left Salta yet."

"Let's go over to San Miguel de Tucuman. The trains go through there more often," said Pepe.

"We can't. Anyhow, how would we cross the Rio Salado? "

"Why not? And two days is a long time!

"It's not a long time! "

"It is so! Why can't we go? "

"We're waiting for the train."

"We've been here too long."

"Let's go."

"All right."

They stayed where they were. The ticket seller came out onto the creaky platform with a pot of hot water and a cup filled

with yerba mate. "Want some mate? "

"Sure, thanks." Paco gladly took the warm cup in his hands and sucked the hot drink slowly through the metal bombilla.

Pepe filled it again with hot water, drank his share and passed it on to the teller, who took his turn and passed it back to Paco.

They went on for two hours without exchanging a word.

"Let's go home," said Pepe.

"We can't. We're waiting for the train."

"Let's go."

"All right."

They stayed on the bench where they sat.

"A train! " An express train led by one of the largest locomotives in the country thundered through the station, horn

blaring, shaking the frail structure.

Paco and Pepe tried to pass the time by singing and then by sleeping. At about two o'clock, they had some more mate.

They talked and drank mate until six o'clock, when the train from Buenos Aires passed through on the way to Salta. At eight

o'clock, Pepe said, "Let's go."

"We can't. We're waiting for the train."

"Let's go."

"All right."

They stayed where they were.

Javier Quintana llA


THE TIMELESS TRAIN

The city was not the limit;

Around it was total darkness.

Enlightened by exploding candles

Oi forgotten times.

The tracks led outside the city.

The black corridor was a long ride.

The train plunged into the new city.

The train had anew engine, cargo, box cars

In the new city many stops were made.

The weather varied: rain stained;

Wind stopped; heat burned; snow killed.

The train left the city.

The city was not the limit;

The timeless train ran on.

A. Brociner 9 B

^^L

5^,


98

THE PASSION

The backyard, filled with snow, lay beautifully sculpted

by the wind's light hand. The nearby trees had stopped

swaying and remained still in the frozen silence.

The back door slammed and a small boy slipped out,

dressed warmly in a blue snow suit, hat, mits and scarf. See-

ing the new snow, he ran down the path and dove into it,

burying his face. He threw the snow about him, often rub-

bing handsful of it on his face and neck. The deep snow was

transformed into a series of winding tunnels from which a

red-cheeked, smiling face occasionally emerged. Before long,

the yard was filled with snowmen, fortresses, and various

sculptures.

The boy's mother poked her head outside the door and

called her son in tor lunch. Suddenly, a volley of snowballs

came from behind the snow fortress. A few minutes later,

the boy stepped reluctantly from his protected position and

followed his mother in for lunch.

f^^^

^^N

Later that night, the mother came down the liall to say good night to her son. She opened his door and

saw an empty bed. Turning around, she noticed some light on the bottom floor. The back door had been

left ajar; she threw it open and called out her son's name. Hearing no answer, she stepped outside and looked

around. In the middle of the backyard snow lay her son, dressed only in pyjamas.

The ne.xt day, the disturbed mother accompanied her son to a psychiatrist. When the three of them met,

the mother explained the problem. "I found Richard lying out in the snow in his pyjamas at nine o'clock

last night

- 1 didn't know what to do. He's always liked the snow; he plays for hours during the day until 1

call him in. His father brings him posters of snow-covered mountains and he puts them up all over his walls.

He has a passion for snow, and his whole life revolves around it. He finds no enjoyment in anything but

snow creations. It's a world of fantasy and it is not normal. You have to make him normal."

'"I can take away his passion and make him normal," replied the psychiatrist, "but are you certain that

that's what you want? "

"Yes, I'm certain," the boy's mother asserted.

A month later, it was late February. The boy sat in the kitchen colouring pictures of cats, dogs, and

drummer boys. The colours passed beyond the black lines frequently, but the boy continued, unaware. The

boy's face showed little interest in his colouring, but across the room, his mother smiled in satisfaction. Oc-

casionally, the boy stopped to peer out the window at the falling snow, but soon returned to his book of

bright colours.

Peter Oliver 1 lA


WHAT'S IN A NAME. HEIN?

Timothy Levesque sat down on the psychiatrist's couch and began talking. After about a minute, he lay

down and loosened his tie. He was paying forty dollars an hour so he made up his mind to be comfortable.

He began talking once more.

"I'm totally English," but because my name is French, a lot ot strange things have been happening to me.

I've been unemployed for a long time, now, and when Rene Levesque "attained his current status", numer-

ous job offers started appearing suddenly. 1 received so many offers, I really had to choose among them. In-

cidentally, only French companies wrote. Each firm sent me just a letter in French (which I had to translate)

which stated the salary and demands. I realized, of course, should I decide to accept one of them, a full set

of formal interviews would be necessary, so I "worked my tail off" to clean myself up. I'm telling you. Doc,

I really got e.xcited: I mean, having a job again seems a novelty.

"Finally, I decided on one firm, and set a date for an interview! At first, I was really apprehensive, but as

I entered the manager's office, my nerves tripled. It was the most horrible day of my life. But, when he dis-

covered I was English, he threw me out. My name is Levesque. so he thought I would be eligible. Right now,

I'm very suicidal, and I'm desparate. What can I do. Doc? "

"Qu'est ce qui se passe? Parlez en Francais! "

Hiyr

STOP

Sam Gold lOA

99


REQUIEM FOR A WOUNDED SOLDIER

As wind.s o'crswept tlu barren plains that were

His soul, within .1 heart did cry and through

His veins a blood so melancholy flowed.

And trudging down the path to final rest

He peered through frosted panes to xdew with pain

The shattered dream that formed his past and carved

His broken future.

Glancing at scenes that oft

Hatl broii^hr him hurt, recounting, horror-struck.

The sombre bands ot troops, in faded blue -

Tattered, steeped in an.xiety and sweat.

His met.il fingers re.iched out, grasping paint

And brush to pl.ice upon his mind a clear

Depiction; none was tomid. 'Twas not for \ icw

In concrete tern)s, hut gauged through anguish's scar.

His thoughts careened once more to sights of war.

They'd stood amidst the smoke of rifles, fired

Bv hands unthinking, "midst a hell from which

One could not rise. Like fools they'd fled: attempts

At flight from Death's e'er tight'ning grip were marks

Of cowardice, of reason lost.

He staved

As it p.isrc had held him t.ist; he knew his heart

'Ion well, ,md W'luld not tool himself with tricks

Ot selt-tleceptioii.

Loading t

itlc, head

I I cci . liis boldness glowed from in his breast.

He wrote a speech within his head that he'd

Deliver to his friends, about the wrongs

They'd done, to lose their nerve, forsaking those

Who battled on: but good intent is oft

Consumed bv circumstances: misfortune fell

Upon this soul as powder - blue and flames

Did roar, and sounds and smells of burning flesh

Pervaded the air. His sense of touch did

Now perform Jio more.

The weeks did pass as slow

And feeble worms doth reach their destiny.

And he wandered home to join his love again.

l')iNcasccl and maimed bv vv.n , his spirit spent,

Llis iiiiiul dcstrovcd, but having not the strength

To bear this wretched sight, she left his side.

To look upon his t:ice no longer.

Ne'er

CouKI Ik- his lo\e embrace, and ne'er he'd write

A SOUL], ol love but with his heart alone.

No longer could he hist - this brutal thought

In mind!

He stood, resolved and calmed.

Prepared tor his final flight, while sad did seem

Disciples the birds, the trees, the flowers. Yet he

Remained resolute.

.And then he drew his gun

To his hc.ut, and let his body drink

The bitter poison. Rciching the ground, he made

A last farewell, "(.Jood-bye. dearest world,

C'.ooddne! " And died.

I'>ut e'en the trees wept not.

Benjamin Shacr. 9A


ESCAPE

There is a reason

to watch those people

who are absurd sur-'

after all .

the absurd person

you saw in the

mirror

was vour own reflection

There is a reason

to follow the advice

ot the schizophrenic

even though

he is lost within another

world.

Besides . . .

you should always listen

to your fatlier.

There is a reason

to laugh at the jokes

ot the feeble minded.

Remember the one

that didn't make any sense -

which embarrassed the woman

told it,

your mother?

a reasofi

to create within yourself

someone new

despite the (act

that there is ,i collection

of ancestry

chasing alter ymi.

It's hard to escape.

Tony Murphy 1 OA


102

HOW SIR LOT LE STOUT DID HIM SLAY THE MONSTER OF HANEMORT

Anon withal thanne roode Sir Lot le Stout whenne hy did perceive ther cayme upon hym a villain grym

of syte and fully armed alle except hys head. Sir Lot mayde hym ready withoute delay and putte hys sheeld

afor hym, smote the gyaunt and clave hys head in twayne. Wot, ye right well that thus it was. When hys fel-

lowes saw this deede theye ranne to Sir Lot babbling as theye were woode. Sir Lot felle on theese deemons

and sette each one belike the first theyre master. Thenne Sir Lot wente hym to the hydra's castle and ther

came afore hym the dragones wyf, who was princess beautious, and hy dyd kneele befor her and sayde, Ave

Sir Lot, he gan syng, Flos Mundi, hy sayde, glody's knight, nowe alle Ingelond may seye and syng, hy triumphed

up fulle meryly thatte no knight hadde don more worshippe thanne hy. Butte the devil's wyf dyd

scorn hym and dyd prayse her husey-bande belike a sainte and holey manne. And Sir Lot dyd perceive thatte

she wer possessed as by som wicked fairey-manne, and hy dyd nowe she wer woode. Sow hy departed of her

sayde hy shuld finde the wicked fairey-manne thatte she dyd was possessed by, and he betaughte her unto

God, yette she dyd spitte in hys fayce and kik hys knee and beete with fiste upon hys brestplate. butte hy

dyd mownte hym hys steede and roode hym across maney strange and wyld conterys and crossed maney wa-

ters and valleys wer evil was loged. And ther it chanced hy cam upon a great courtillage and an olde gentel

woman dyd welcom hym and lodged hym in goode faythe, and she dyd entertaine hys horsey. Butte layter

thatte nite hy dyd perceive she crepte to ther welle to fetche water, and hy dyd perceive she mayde potions

in the moonlite, and deemones dyd dance abowt her. And hy dyd slaye her and dyd take alle her treasures to

ward offe evil gostys. Thenne Sir Lot saw knights rideing towards hym and hy dyd perceive they wer the hags

deemones com to attack hym. And the wite fairey-manne dyd see the pliyte of Sir Lot and dyd sprynke pot-

ions onne hym and he dyd laf invisible and ther knights passed hym by. And Sir Lot sette on themme, and hy

strake maney stroke and they wer striken death. And Sir Lot dyd then ride back to castle and dyd find the

Princess dead from grief of the monster and hy dyd perceive the strengh of potins and dyd claim alle the gy-

aunts lands, palaces, domaynes and ritches hys owne.

David Monod 11

B


POE'S FORGOTTEN TALE: THE HOUSE OF HELL

I had neither the strength nor the desire to erect my body aiter I had reposed in the comfortable place

where it remained for a seemingly long time. I knew and loathed the fact that the eternal sleep by slow de-

grees

- almost imperceptibly - would dwindle as the day broke. Monday mornings, as all those of the past,

had led me only to a morbid state of apathy and despair. Mark me now as I am about to pen.

The single, thin ray fell upon my eyelid and thrust deeper into my awakening eye. Wanting no more. I

shut it tightly, but in vain. As I slowly recovered from the introductory pain. I strove for advancement.

My feet touched the familiar ground and in much the same manner, my body breathed the night air which

had been so cherished.

I reached for my clothes and quietly dressed myself. The feeling was horrible, but as one finds sick plea-

sure in vexing oneself, it was uncontrollable.

I did not feel the presence of anyone, for it did not matter. Nothing was said while I ate my solitary meal.

Could this be hell, where life is mute and insufferably devoid of any emotion? Again it did not matter, for

I could feel no difference: all I could feel was the endurance that would slowly ebb.

This endurance, however, was not about to cease, tor I had the notion ot completing my action. I set

forth to school as though evil was the source of all force, and it was not long after that that I found myself

standing in front of a building where all good intellectuals must attend.

Very significantly, I paced to the entrance and shuddered at the thought of what 1 had in store as I always

did when the events were forewarned. It dawned upon me that never was it possible to see existence

on the commencing day of my school cycle - only death seemed acceptable on such days. Becoming wear-

ied, I dragged myself up those scholarly steps.

The door at the top was so unmistakably belonging, but at the same time, distant. It remained motion-

less until I staggered to open it. The glimpse I caught was only surpassed by the vision that followed. Corpses

of all kinds, extended in all directions, their solitary eyes gazing in wonder, flooded my perspective. What

added to the sight was a gruesome figure in the front. Not a sparkle of light shone in his eye and death was

certainly imminent. I walked in and took my place. Alas! The deed was done.

Christopher Powell, IIB

103


104

ALL FOR A LIVING

The night grows dark as the sun recedes behind the houses ot the slum. The streets seem empty, but the

criminals of this area wait for the dreaded hour of crime. The sound of the clock resounds through the town

and like water pouring into a bucket the streets fill with shadv characters. These men are dressed totally in

black and have mud over their faces. Thev can barely be seen because of the night's darkness, and as a blan-

ket of fog moves in, they become invisible. Drops of salty water run, as from a leaky faucet, down their fore-

heads.

As they reach their destination, a feeling of guilt rises like warm ascending air. Inside buildings, volcanic

e.xplosions take place, and safe doors swing open. Jewels, money, and bonds disappear into their pockets or

black bags. The all-encompassing quiet is ominous with the threat of discovery and arrest. Suddenly, sirens

reverberate in the cold night. Desperate breaks to escape are made. There is much yelling. Then, bullets start

flying. Whizzing flames from angry guns dart toward intended targets. A sharp pain is felt as a projectile rico-

chets off a rib, through the heart, and out the back. The bullet has finished its fantastic journey, leaving the

victim's world spinning with blood fountains. A sudden nausea takes control and blackness settles, but life

goes on.

David Miller, 8B


LE RADIATEUR

Dans la classe,

Dans le fond,

Dans le coin.

On trouve le radiateur.

Vert, sombre, et possierieux,

II semble que cette invention etrange,

Merite du respect,

Quelquefois.

Pour la chaleur qu'il irradie

Combien de tete a-t-il senti se pencher sur son corps bizarre,

Combien de papiers jetes la par hasard?

Combien d'emotions,

De reprimandes,

De punitions,

A-t-il vu se nianifester?

Beaucoup.

Combien de livres,

De personnes,

De decouvertes,

A-t-il enregisres dans sa tete qui n'existe pas?

Beaucoup.

Mais, Combien de caresses,

De mots d'amour,

D'acclamations,

A-t-il recus?

Aucun.

Et, pour chaque nouvelle generation,

Le radiateur n'est que quelque chose,

Sur lequel on grave son nom.

David Hvder 8A

105


106

QUIET ON THE SET

The director counted off the seconds to himself while the actors stood in front of him on the artificial set. "Okay,"

McGregor shouted. "Take one - speed . . . and action." The actor stepped briskly from the platform; his foot slipped and he

fell to the floor.

"Cut! Oh, Christ! " exploded McGregor. It was now becoming more a genuine prayer than a simple curse. Shooting of the

new movie had been hectic that day, and McGregor's nerves were like pieces of cold plastic.

"Sorry about that," the actor said.

"Well, it wasn't your fault." McGregor sighed. "Take five while I recover from that." He went into his office, sat down, and

buried his face in his hands. There was a knock at the door, and a tall, burly man entered, throwing a pUe of papers down in

front of McGregor. Without looking up, McGregor asked, "What's wrong now? "

"Jim, I'm getting a helleva lot of heat from the boss about this damn picture. You've already gone way over the budget;

and besides, we were supposed to have this movie ready last Monday, and ..."

"Don't you think I know that? " McGregor blurted out. The two men stared at each other, until McGregor said softly,

"I'm sorry. I know . . . I'll try to have this bloody picture finished by the end of the week."

The other man gazed at him for a moment, and then acknowledged with a movement of his head; he silently walked out,

closing the wooden door behind him. McGregor looked at the door, and then, slowly lay back in his chair, asking himself why

he had ever become a director, "if God wanted me to become a director, he would have . . .," he paused and realized he didn't

know how to finish it. He chortled at his own joke. "What a job," he muttered to himself, "equipment scattered everywhere,

fake rooms stuck together, people everywhere, huge lights on big, black stands, and so many electrical cables strewn aU over

the place that I have to watch that I don't trip. There are men on the catwalks, overhead, manning the lights. There's so much

crap hanging from the ceiling that I'm surprised that the whole thing doesn't come crashing down. It seems like chaos."

He suddenly realized that he had a deadline to meet, and that he had better start filming again. He shuffled from the office

and onto the set. He sat down and shouted, "Okay, back to work; I want to get this thing finished." There was so much con-

fusion that he didn't think that anyone heard him. "I said, 'let's get going! ' " he yelled again. "Hold it! Quiet for shooting,

please! " The bell rang, and suddenly, he could hear a pin drop. The change was incredible.

The scene called for the actor to talk into a portable which he was to carry around with him in a case. The director yelled.

"Speed, . . . and action." The cameras whirred. The phone rang. The actor lifted up the top ot the case and began to speak.

The phone malfunctioned because the top wouldn't stay up. It slowly flopped down. The actor stood looking at it. He moved

his hand slightly and flipped open the top. He watched it slowly flop down again. The cameras were still rolling. He flipped

up the top again. It slowly flopped again. The actor smiled, and McGregor yelled, "CUT! " He swore softly to himself.

Michael Leclair, HA


THE REPORTER

It seemed strange to him that he could

look down and see the rising sun on the dis-

tant horizon. Rising sounds filtered from

below, while a landingjet could be heard

somewhere above and distant. His name was

Jud Evans.

He spat off the ledge, and the spittle

quickly fell out of sight into the void. The

street was darkness below. Surprised, a re-

porter looked up and saw a tiny figure sil-

houetted against the sky. He scurried to a

telephone booth.

The morning sun brought gusts of warm

air. Jud sensed a slow, steady swaying of the

massive structure. His mother would be won-

dering why he didn't answer her calls to break-

fast. He leaned closer to the wall, suddenly

afraid. A pigeon eyed him from a safe distance,

not sure of what he would do. He

scared it off with a wave and a shout.

The interminable horns and sirens of the big city suddenly changed key, becoming louder and more stri-

dent. A crowd was now looking up at him. They were looking at HIM! Jud felt a strange sense of elation,

and suddenly felt glad.

A voice to one side surprised him, and a capped head peered out a window. An official voice told him to

"give it up". He watched the man as he clambered onto the ledge. He was tied. Jud felt tired and edged

away, catching his foot on an edge of cement. He stumbled and caught himself. Sweat appeared on his fore-

head, and he closed his eyes and swayed away from the building. Dropping a camera, a grip of iron grabbed

Jud and yanked him through the window. The crowd below boo-ed, and the policemen urged them away.

Kevin Ratcliff, llA

107


108

CONTINENTAL DRIFT

I feel myself as a newly fallen leaf

uniquely drifting

within a river

pulled downstream with

the rest

touching, blending, flowing

Motion provides life

unable to return to the source

I am pushed

onward

flowing with many currents

drifting by strange fields

to meet a sea

under strange skies

Kenneth Clark I OA


f

CIGARETTES AND GIN DON'T MI

In thecolors of paradox

or

^fn r'fik'

too many referendums to count on one hand,

his eyes shone Lenin red

on a e;leaming fringe of Carter blue

The Peaceable Quandary

inhaled the Liberal joint

and got high on sixty-nine

Seagram's yeast died in the election jigger;

probably gin and tonic . . .

Obviously, Levesque has quite an ancestry;

If Moses separated, why can't I?

Too bad the Jews voted Liberal . . .

Chris Carter lOA

T*'*'

i

\\


*'

^

i


I6»"-

SENIOR SOCCER

4 Wins, 4 Losses, and 9 Ties.

Witli the return of only three veterans from last

year's senior team, captains Colin Bird, Robert Hall,

and Bill Smith were rather skeptical at the beginning

of the season about the team's future. However, coach

Peter Govan formed a complete and unified team which

was to finish the season in first place in the G, M.I. A. A..

The team was led by strong defensive play from goaltender

Mike Osterland and fullback Robert Hall, strong

forward play from Tom Kaufman and Claude Pellan,

and exhaustive two-way play from halfbacks Bill Smith

and Colin Bird. If it were not for the time and effort

devoted by coaches Peter Govan and Randy Rennie, the

team's success would have been minimal.

This years team holds many memories of its games,

in particular having Aslibury's seniors score in the final

minute of the game to tie the score at 1-1, tying Bishop's

seniors after many years of defeat, and losing to L.C.C.

in the quarter-finals of the league playoffs after play-

ing four overtime periods and finally going down to

defeat after the sixth penalty shot. But, above all else,

they remember each other

- Colin Bird for his missed

penalty kicks and rousing pep talks. Bill Smith for his

throw-ins, corner kicks and his ability to talk to the

referees, Robert Hall for his bulldozer tactics, Michael

Osterland for his 1.04 goals-against average, Blake

O'Brien for his ability to keep his knee-pads spotlessly

clean, Chris Carter for his dexterity in side-tackling,

David Seward for his left-footed lofts. Andrew Price

for his right-wing rushes, David Leopold for his goalsaving

header against Father Macdonald. Chuck Smith

for using more tape on his ankle in one game than the

team used in the entire season, Tommy Kaufman for

his blazing speed breaking through the defense, Nick

Gault for scoring the first goal on B.C.S. turf in this

decade, Tim Large for his constant practice in heading

the ball, Peter Oliver for his blistering shots from thirty

yards out, David Pitblado for his "fancy" footwork,

Claude Pellan for combining soccer and boxing skills,

and Peter Govan for his ability to drive the bus and for

forming such a cohesive team.

Congratulations and good Luck!

d>''

.^ 'tV i-

.^. M\

rmtt U\rM

'18^^

t


m ^


114

MIDDLE SCHOOL SOCCER

1 1 Wins. 3 Losses, and 2 Ties.

Ashburv Tournament: 5 Wins, 1 Loss.

Cioals scored for: 47.

Goals scored against: 17.

This year's team was our best Middle School soccer team

to date. Captained by K. Johansson and T. Eddy, they won

most of their matches. The highlight of the season was the

Ashbury tournament, where over three days and four games

they reached the finals against Appleby, only to lose 2-1.

Leading scorer on the side was Jamie Pitblado, who aver-

aged about a goal a game. They all gained much valuable

experience for the Bantam team next year.

Congratulations and good luck in the future!

, :^jFvJ^

k

-

L

BANTAM SOCCER 1976

Team Record

WON 7 LOST 3 TIED 3

Goals For 29 Goals Against 11

This year's side, composed of 16 members, played as a

cohesive unit and enjoved a successful season. Forwards

Ivory, Jonas, Lafleur, Osmond and Wallace moved the ball

cttcctivcly and were well supported bv halfbacks Black,

Hvder. Lennox, Nash and Simpson. Three new additions to

the team, Henderson, Kilby and Robillard played exception-

ally well throughout the season, providing a sound defense.

Czaharyn. Johannson, Laker, Riley and Templeton were

outstanding Middle School team players involved in some

of our games. CJoalkeeper P. Snyder (Most Improved Player)

consistently kept the opposition from scoring until the of-

fense could create ball control and establish an attack.

The new members on the team look forward to another

good season next year, and the graduating members of the

team are confident that the experience gained this year

will enable them to play with the Senior side in 1977.

Captains:

Coach:

J .

Wallace

A. Black

M. Osmond

D. Cude


MIDDLE SCHOOL FOOTBALL

Wins- 0, Losses- 3

This year marked the second consecutive year that the

boys in grade seven were given an opportunity not only to

learn tackle football, but also to test their abilities in an abbre-

viated three game schedule against B. C. S. . Despite being

slightly over-matched in age, the boys constantly showed im-

provement.

Some individuals displayed a more ready grasp of funda-

mentals than others. R. Riley's passing and ball handling

proved to be more than adequate, while D. Trott and A.

Osterland displayed excellent potential as running backs: R.

Laker managed to make Riley's passing appear even better by

making several outstanding catches: F. Kristof, E. Langshur,

N. Ale.xander and J. Pitblado's blocks made yardage much

easier to gain. Defensively, the team was anchored by middle

linebacker K. Stiefenhoffer (all 80 pounds of him) and shored

up by S. Maag and T. Valdmanis.

The most improved player on the team was H. Macauley,

who proved to be the mainstay of the defensive line while D.

Clark inspired everyone with his fine tackling. All in all, the

team learned a great deal about football and the players look

forward to trying out for the Bantam squad next year.

w .^^^'j

Captains: K. Stiefenhoffer

C. Stiefenhoffer

R. Riley.

BANTAM FOOTBALL

Coaches: Offense- P. Beauchamp.

Defense- J. Dowd.

The Bantam football team finished the season with an ex-

uberant win over Massey-Vanier High School (10- 9) in Co-

wansville. The charge was led by a brilliant punt return of 105

yards down the sidelines by running back Jean- Edmond

Bernard, while running back Giovanni Galliotti amassed yard

after yard with steady running off- tackle to establish a good

ground for the offense. Another offensive standout was quarterback

David Daly, who established a good running game

with his backs who were supported by the excellent blocking

of tackles Richard Graham and Andrew Nemec.

On defense, team captains Richard Graham and Andrew

Nemec, both experienced linebackers, proved to be the backbone

of the squad and led the team in unassisted tackles.

Strong play was also emonstrated by Jack Ogilvy and Tony

Iton, both of whom did excellent jobs at the corner-linebacker

positions to contain the opposition. Defensive ends Jamie Ross

and John Warner also provided strong play in the line while

exerting substantial pressure on the opposition.

On the whole, the Bantam team had a fair season while

gaining valuable experience for next year, when it is hoped

that the Bantam team will have a better season with most of

this year's players returning once again at the Bantam level.

115


116

•.4t*-i'*.-


JUNIOR FOOTBALL

This year, the Junior Football team was led to one of the most successful seasons in the school's history (4-1-1 I

by the

excellent coaching provided by Messrs. Wearing, Karn and Burgess, and by the inspired leadership ot captains Brent Mainwaring,

Richard Blundell, Tim Fitzpatrick and Karel Nemec.

The offense was headed by quarterbacks Tim Fitzpatrick and Karel Nemec, while Mark Ogilvy and Javier Quintana provided

a strong running game. Both running backs had excellent seasons along with the alternating quarterbacks who supplied a strong

passing attack. However, not enough can be said about the offensive line. The linemen never seem to get adequate recognition

for the difficult job they execute so well. These boys were doing the dirty work all season long in order to make our team the

team it was. A great deal ot thanks and appreciation should be extended to Gord Ballantyne, Pierre Baillargeon, Mark Bandeen.

Phil Cook, Rich Iton, Phil Panet-Raymond, Andrew Scott, and John Schwenk.

The defense was led and inspired by the incomparable Brent Mainwaring. He not only made the defense what it was-impen-

etrable- but he also inspired the rest of the team with his excellent play. This defense was also supported by a magnificent set

of linebackers and defensive backs consisting ot James Common, Nick Howson. Barry Fregeau, Charles Gelber, Rich Iton.

Nick Powell, Willie Powell, Filip Papich and Manlio Marescotti. The defensive line also demonstrated excellent play and sports-

manship; Pierre Baillargeon, Phil Cook, Tony Murphy, Phil Panet-Raymond, Javier Quintana and John Schwenk are to be con-

giatulated on a job well done.

All punts and kickoffs were returned by Mark Ogilvy and Richard Blundell, both ot whom displayed good hands and speed

which enabled them to excel on the returns. A strong contribution was also made by the special teams covering kickotts and

kickoff returns which, along with the consistent kicking of Javier Quintana. added greatly to the success of the team.

As a result of the superb coaching, the leadership provided by the four captains, and the inspired and determined play ot

the entire team, the Junior football team is to be congratulated on an extremely successful season.

S.H.S. 12 vs. L.C.C.

L.C.C. 21 vs. S.H.S.

B.C.S. vs. S.H.S. 16

SCORES

S.H.S. 7 vs. B.C.S. 7

S.H.S. 34 vs. Stanstead

S.H.S. 40 vs. Massey-Vanier

117


i.jfe.mii.

^> ''


MIDDLE SCHOOL

BASKETBALL

This year's team, led by David Stevenson

and Christian Broomtield, played twelve

games. It consisted ot boys from grade seven,

most with no prior basketball experience. All

the players learnt a great deal and improved

immensely throught the year. The highlights

of the season were a close, low-scoring game

at E. C. S. against their Bantams, and a fast-

moving, skillfully played game against Ecole

Brebeuf, which resulted in a win.

The year's record of five wins and seven

losses was not phenomenal, but the enthusiasm

was maintained throughout the year. The Mid-

dle School players look forward to playing at

the Bantam level next vear.

BANTAM BASKETBALL

We began the 1976-1977 season primarily with the aim of

rebuilding the bantam basketball team rather than compiling

an impressive win-loss record. For this reason, our progress

can best be measured in terms of the players' improvement

of both personal and team fundamental skUls. Although we

were humbled in our games against Lower Canada College

and Pierretonds Comprehensive, we found that we could hold

our own against several teams. Both the players and the coach-

es, Mr. Kershaw and Mr. Rennie, are looking forward to next

season when the team, virtually the same as this year's, plans

to enter the G. M. I. A. A. and hopefully become a contender.

58^

119


SENIOR BASKETBALL,

1976-1977

This year's Senior basketball team was led by coach Geoff

Dowd through an exceptionally enjoyable season against

tough opposition. The team competed in the G. M. 1. A. A.

senior A league and had to face some particularly tough teams.

The highlight of the season was a 60-40 loss to Howard S.

Billings High School, who went on to win the division. The

score gives only a small indication of the excitement and

closeness of the game. The inevitable taxi-cabs drove us to and

from the away games although on one occasion we were kind-

ly provided with Cadillac limousines.

As far as the team goes, everyone enjoyed playing. Mike

Osterland, the top playmaker, never ceased to astound us

with his 40-foot jump shots. Brent Mainwaring pro\'ided the

aggressive drive and quite a few points untU a knee injury

forced him out for the season. Dean Barriere and Jay

Welsford were the two centers and they both came very

close to mastering the turn-around jump shot. Chris Carter

contributed his usual all-out enthusiasm and his unusual foul

shot and Filip Papich was our number one candidate for the

Harlem Globetrotters. Michael Holy managed to score some

points when he wasn't playing for the other team. Tim Large

captained the team and managed to lose his old nick-name of

"cherry-picker" by hitting a few jump shots. Luca Cefis play-

ed hard and is known for his occasional incredible pass in-

stead of his incredible shorts. Sam Gold's long-range shot

and dribbling also contributed when needed.

Although a losing season, we enjoyed much support at

home and had fun playing. Hopefully, Mr. Dowd will be back

next year to try to teach us what to do with the basketball.

121


122

MIDDLE SCHOOL HOCKEY

This year's middle school hockey team, captained by

Shane Brady, had a very successful year. The team was

made up of many new boys. Some of these new boys, inclu-

ding Andrew Osterland. Kristian Johansson, Mark Johnson,

and John Czaharyn were a big asset to the team. The travelled

to L. C. C. on the weekend of March 5 and 6 to participate in

the Junior School Invitational Tournament. In the first game,

the team defeated L. C. C. 3-1, while in the third game, the

boys defeated Ashbury College 4-0, clinching the tournament

title for the team. This team was filled with a sense of great

sportsmanship and a great deal of spirit throughout the year,

which aided considerably in the coach's, Mr. Beauchamp's,

efforts in putting together one of the best middle school teams

in the history of the school. A great deal of thanks and appre-

ciation is extended to Mr. Beauchamp on the part of the merp-

bers of the team tor a very successful season.

BANTAM HOCKEY, 1976 -1977

In view of the success of last year's bantam hockey team,

it was decided to enter the '75-'76 Middle School team into

G. M. I. A. A. competition when the players had come of

Bantam age. By playing a fourteen game schedule, this year's

young team gained much desired experience in extremely

competitive hockey against the large comprehensive high

schools on the island.

A direct result of this experience was that the team was

able to an additional 3-Won 2-Lost 3-Tied record against Ash-

bury College, Stanstead College, and Bishop's College School.

At the close of the season, the team won the Bishop's Invita-

tional Tournament, and appropriate and timely event which

provided the players with a great sense of achievement and

purpose. Not without cause, all concerned with the team

eagerly and confidently await next year in anticipation of a

much more successful season.

Captains: Tony Iton

Brian Iton

John Berton

Benoit Robillard

Coach:, D. G. Cude


123


124

SENIORS AT

THE STANSTEAD

TOURNAMENT


- Ei^*

^^^^^^^^^^^^^H


126


>^i«*«;


SQUASH:1976-1977

This year, tor the first time, S. H. S. tielded a complete squash team, coached by Mr. B. Porter, witli help from Mr. D.

Williams. Twenty-two players competed weekly by means of a squash ladder, and, for each match against other schools, eight

boys were selected on the basis of their weekly play and ladder results. Competition, consequently, was strong for the top

eight positions.

The team played twice against B. C. S. , faring better than expected, considering the youth of the team, but losing both en-

counters. In two matches against Stanstead College, the team tied the first match, Mike Shetler being the runner-up in the 16-

years-and-over categroy and Andrew Black winning the 15-years-and-under competition. In the second match, although the

team lost narrowly, 18-15, strong performances were given by Karel Nemec, Martin Osmond and Arthur Hsu. We thank Mr.

Porter for his guidance and look forward to an active season next year.

Team Players

(those who played in at least 2 team matches)

Michael Shetler (cpt)

Karel Nemec

Andrew Black

Philip Cook

David Ballon

Arthur Hsu

Tif Macklem

Nico Howson

Martin Osmond

Michael Shetler

Team Captain

127


SELWYN HOUSE'S WRESTLING TEAM

For the first time in the wrestling team's existence, Selwyn House's coaching staff entered this surprisingly enthusiastic

team into the G.M.I. A. A. After barely defeating L.C.C.'s team at the beginning of the season, Mr. Wearing decided that if the

team was to be more successful, more effort had to be put into practices. Application of this theory resulted in the improvement

of the wrestling team: Trevor Eddy, Karl Stiefenhofer, Paul Broomfield, David Hyder, Arnold Lazare, Andrew Nemec,

Philippe Panet-Raymond, David Seward, and Scott White. This group not only showed its new-found skills at league meets,

but also at several Midget tournaments held throughout the year. In particular, there were five very enthusiastic wrestlers: Karl

Stiefenhofer. Paul Broomfield, Trevor Eddy. Andrew Nemec, and Philippe Panet-Raymond. who were very successful. In fact,

led by Philippe Panet-Raymond, Selwyn House School entered individuals in the Quebec Games. Philippe himself won a silver

medal in his weight class, while Andrew Nemec and Karl Stiefenhofer both came 4th in their weight classes in the qualifying

round.

Wrestler and No.

Matches Wrestled


fc^F

•^*Sw

129


130

••fri.

^^

RUGBY

An assembly of players on the field

Gaze at each other filled with hatred.

The ball is kicked as the whistle is heard.

And the runners are tackled, as expected.

The ball is released as the runner is jolted;

It rolls out of play, and a line is formed.

The ball is thrown to soar through the air.

And finally into the clutches of a leaping man,

Who holds it in the protection of his body

UntU he hears the scrum half's demand.

The ball is passed down, and the forwards follow

To be ready to "ruck" if the runner is hit.

The "ruck" is formed and the ball is heeled back.

As the ball is picked up, they say, "Pass it to Stoner! "

The game comes to an end as the whistle is heard,

And the final score

Is three to four.

Philippe Panet-Raymond


BANTAM RUGBY

In an exceptional year tor an exceptional team, this

year's Bantam rugby team won both the 15-a-side and the

7-a-side city championships, with a 6-1 record in the 15's

while outscoring the opposition 148-42, and an undefeated

record in 7's. Outstanding individual efforts came from the

most valuable forward, Andrew Nemec. and the most valu-

able back, Chuck Smith. Encouraging play throughout the

year from first-year players John Caplan, Giovanni Galeotti,

Martin Osmond, and John Warner make us extremely opti-

mistic about the future years as well, particularly the next

season, when fourteen players will be returning at the Bantam

level. The superlative efforts of John Berton, Andrew

Black, Jack Ogilvy, Dave Seward, Greg Thompson and Jamie

Wallace cannot be ignored either. On the whole, it was a

very successful year in all respects.

Congratulations and good luck!

131


132


' 1 ;.


134

f^

,1

-n

THE KICK THAT WON IT!!!


SENIOR RUGBY-THE BIG BLACK MACHINE

This year, the senior rugby team was supposed to have an off year, as many of the players were still only in grade ten and

many had not even played any rugby before. After an initial loss to Bishop's senior 'A' team of 18 - and a scoreless tie with

Bishop's 2nd team, we defeated Monklands High School 38 - in our first G.M.I.A.A. league game. That was the key to our

success as it gave us the confidence we needed to upset L.C.C. 4 - 3 in the closest, most exciting, and most competitive game

of the year at Westmount Park. We will all remember Philippe Panet-Raymond diving over for the try to win the game for us,

after being down 3 - at the half. We followed with easy wins of 20 - 4 over Montreal West, 32 - over Westmount High,

30 - over Lachine and 72 - over Malcolm Campbell.

- Richard Blundell, Chris Carter, Tim Fitzpatrick, Charles Gelber, Robert Hall, Nico

Eddie Heath's "girls", our backs

Howson, Richard Iton, Tom Kaufman, Mark Ogilvy, and team captain Bill Smith - distinguished themselves with solid defense

and the ability to score at any given time while our forwards, Peter Govan's "men" - Pierre Baillargeon, Gord Ballantyne,

Colin Bird, Ken Clarke, Tim Large, Karel Nemec, Peter Oliver, Philippe Panet-Raymond, Doug Peets, and captain of the for-

wards Javier Quintana, were able to win possession of the ball whenever they needed to. Most important, however, was the

leadership provided by Bill Smith, Colin Bird, and Javier Quintana, around whom the entire team rallied.

Our final match of the season was against Riverdale High School as we beat them 9 - 3 at L.C.C, giving us a perfect 7 -

record in G.M.LA.A. play. The team picture tells the rest of the story.

-JWi^^'-; "^BBS!^

^*^m

/ ?

t ^

* «

135


136

J / J^k*


TENNIS

This year Selwyn House entered both senior and junior tennis teams in the annual G. M. 1. A. A. tennis tournament held at

the Mirabel Tennis Club. Luca Cefis and Michael Shetler represented the school in the singles section of the senior tournament,

as well as comprising one of the two senior doubles combinations. The other doubles partners were Stephen Fontein and

Christopher Powell. Although the seniors did not do as well as expected, they showed great effort against competitive opposi-

tion, through which they gained valuable experience for the future. Andrew Black and Michael Osterland represented the

school in the singles section of the junior tournament, Andrew advancing to the semi-finals. The junior doubles partners,

Michael Osterland & Sean Lafleur and Andrew Black & John Trott, showed great enthusiasm and determination which we

hope will, coupled with experience, lead to a strong tennis team next year.

Much appreciation should be extended coach Beauchamp who displayed a great amount of courage in appearing on the

court against his pupUs, and who made the tennis program possible. Good luck with future tennis teams and may your tennis

improve greatly, Beauch!

137


138

4th ANNUAL SPORTS BANQUET

This year, on May 25th, the school held its fourth annual sports banquet, with Ron Andrews as the guest speaker. The

banquet was a unique opportunity for the athletically incUned boys of the school, together with their fathers, to pay tribute

to the school's sports program and to those who made exceptional contributions to it. The evening began with informal cock-

tails in the gym which allowed everyone to discuss the year's program and to meet with Mr. Andrews, the N. H. L.*s official

statistician. Shortly after dinner, we were all treated to an entertaining and informative talk which aided in satisfying our

every statistical fetish. Then came the highlight of the evening with the awarding of the prizes, and the prestigious appointments

to the sports guild.

Special credit must be extended to the sports department which helped to organize the whole evening, and which is respon-

sible for the highly successful program which fared so well in competition over the past year.

Sport Award Awarded To

Hoclccy

Basketball

Wrestling

Squash

Rugby

Btm. Most Improved J. Ogilvy

Blm. M. v. P.

A. Nemec

Sr. - Bob Anderson

Trophy

Most Outstanding

Lineman

Sr. Molson Trophy MVP M. Olgivy

Btm. Most Improved

Btm. MVP

Sr. Most Improved

Sr. Most Valuable-Plyr

Btm. Most Improved

Btm, MVP

Sr. Most Improved

Sr. MVP

Btm. Most Improved

Btm. MVP

Sr. Most Improved

Sr. MVP

Mosi Outstanding

Most Outstanding

Most Outstanding

Btm. Back

P. Snyder

J. Wallace

P. Oliver

B. Smith

C. Bird

G. Dowd

P. Beauchamp

B. Mainwaring D. Karn

J. Berton

D. Daly

B. Fregeau

C. Bird

J. Warner

M. Plojing

J. Welsford

T. Large

P. Panet-Raymond

M. Shcller

C. Smith

G. C. I. Burgess

R. Wearing

D. Cude

P. Govan

D. Cude

P. Beauchamp

W. Kershaw

G. Dowd

R. Wearing

B. Porter

Most Outstanding

Btm. Forward

Most Outstanding

Sr. F6rward

J. Quintana

Martin Borncr Trophy B. Smith

M. v. P.

8. Outstanding Athlete in the Middle School

Cassels Trophy - A. Osterland

9. Outstanding Athlete in the Sr. School

McMasier Trophy • B. Smitli

10. Sports Guild-

1. Colin Bird

2. Richard Blundell

3. Chris Carter

4. Timmy Fitzpairick

5. Richard Iton

6. Brent Mainwairing

7. Andrew Nemec

C. Bird

8. Philippe Panet-Raymond

9. Javier Quintana

10. David Seward

11. Bill Smith

R. Wearing


•'Certainly not on this one either."

"A touch of the indoor sports."

"Where does the glass slipper fit? Hmm,

not on this wicked sister."

I ^^139


140

LIBRARY-'76

During the summer of 1976, the school underwent an ambitious program

of renovation of the physical facilities. The change most genuinely appreciated

by the staff and students was the new library. The eighteen-thousand-book

capacity library has been well-harnessed to the needs of the student body. The

modern facilities and design, as well as the spread-out arrangement of books,

has encouraged a much greater use ot the facilities.

But where the ideas and planning began is another question. About si.x

years ago, the extent of our library was a pile of books in one room. That same

year, an agreement was made to engage summer help and a part-time librarian

to arrange these books properly. Fortunately for the school, this part-time

librarian remained tor several years in the school's employ, and became the

pioneer of our library. This was Mrs. Ferguson, whom most of us remember.

The library, however, was still not large enough, and improved facilities became

so conspicuous a need that the motions for a new library came from all

sides. It had been observed that our library was being used more as a commonroom

than as a study centre.

In January, 1974, the Mini-Pugwash I Conference, recommended by Mr.

Troubetzkoy, was held at St. Sauveur. This meeting, which was one hundred

per cent a staff meeting, listed a multiplicity ot objectives and activities of the

school's academic program and possibilities for the future. This meeting follow-

ed committee meetings chaired by Mr. Reid.

After Mini-Pugwash, a seven-man Development Committee was termed with

JS0bylt»

three representatives of the Board of Directors, three repre-

sentatives of the staff and one student. This Committee,

which met several time, quickly established priorities, the

tirst ot which was greatly expanded library facilities.

That same year, Mr. Varey constructed the tirst model of

the library, which eventually determined its present structure.

The third phase of meetings was almost entirely board-dom-

inated, under the chairmanship of Mr. Ronald T. Riley. This

committee dealt with the physical arrangements, and the acqui-

sition of the required tacilities. Eventually, the architectural

firm of ELLWOOD AND HENDERSON was engaged to draw

up the plans, and finally, of the seven select tenders received,

J. A. FALCONBRIDGE LTD. carried out the construction.

The board was able to arrange the financing mainly through

monies alreadv received through the Lucas Foundation, set up

solely to support the school. Other contributions came through

Old Boys, parents, friends of the school, and even from the wife

of the late Algernon Lucas, who left, in her will, money to the

Foundation.

The basic plan ot the Library consists ot two conference


ooms, a reading and reference area, the book section, two

private study areas consisting of portable private-study booths,

and the librarians office with a separate checkout counter.

The eastern conference room is also employed as an audio-

visual room, which is the centre for sound movies, slides, film-

strips and other media which are projected from a separate

booth. There are speakers planted in the ceiling which can

be individually controlled. The two tables in that conference

room were donated to the school by the Montreal Museum

of Fine Arts. The two conference rooms are sealed oft by

double-plated glass.

One area of the library genuinely appreciated by the students

is the lounge area, ne.xt to the reference section, where

one may read a book in the comfort of a lounge chair. Within

that section is the newly-acquired periodical stand, which

has greatly increased the capacity for periodicals. The library

presently holds about twelve-thousand books, has a capacity

of eighteen-thousand, and seats over one-hundred people.

The library office is strategically positioned, offering Mr.

Varey a complete view of the entire library. The office is

spacious and much appreciated.

The library has also been fortunate to acquire, along with

the rich, autumn-coloured carpeting and beautiful draperies,

an air-conditioning unit and humidifier, which are certain to

be appreciated by the students during the long, hot spring

and autumn days.

The library is open during the whole day. as well as be-

fore and after school. Our new library is thoroughly enjoyed

by students, staff members and librarians alike. It is certain-

ly the greatest event ever to occur at Selwyn House.

Special thanks go to Mr. Ballon, Mr. Troubetzkoy, Mr.

Varey and Mr. Reid, who kindly related the details necessary

to the writing of this article.

M. Davidson

141


142

Grade 1. 1st RETZA DIBADJ

Grade 3. 1st JONATHAN BLANSHAY

Grade 4. 1 st GUY WALLACE

DISTINCTION IN JUNIOR FRENCH

(Presented by Mrs. G. Miller Hyde)

ERIK BLACHFORD

Grade 5, 1st

Grade 6. 1st

Grade 7, 1st

Grade 7, 3rd

KURT JOHNSON

DEREK EATON

COLIN CHANG

DENIS STEVENS

JOSEPH KOVALIK

NICHOLAS BRISKI

THE F. GORDON PHILLIPS TROPHY

(Presented by Mr. and Mrs. F.E. Hale)

(For outstanding choral work in the Middle School)

SEAN LAFLEUR

THE GRANT GAIENNIE MEMORIAL AWARD

(For all-round Ability in Grade 5)

TOMMY MACFARLANE

ALL-ROUND ABILITY IN GRADE 6

(Presented by Mrs. A.I. Matheson)

DENIS STEVENS

THE SELWYN HOUSE CHRONICLE CUP

Grade 8, 1st

Grade 8, 3rd

Grade 9, 2nd

Grade 10, 1st

(Essay Writing in Grade 7)

IAN DOWNEY

lAMIE WALLACE

EUGENE KOVALIK

DAVID HYDER

NICHOLAS McCONNELL

BENJY SHAER

ARTHUR HSU

PRIZE GIVING

lUNlOR SCHOOL AWARDS

Grade 2. 1st

Grade 3, 2nd

Grade 4. 2nd

MIDDLE SCHOOL AWARDS

SENIOR SCHOOL AWARDS

ADAM GILLITT

CHRISTOPHER PRATLEY

ERIK BLACHFORD

THE HELEN SPEIRS MEMORIAL TROPHY

(For Outstanding Character in the Junior School)

DIMITRI KYDONIEFS

Grade 5, 2nd THOMAS MACFARLANE

Grade 6, 2nd MARTIN LUKAS

Grade 7, 2nd ANDREW OSTERLAND

THE MRS. MARKLAND PRIZE

(For distinction in public speaking)

ERIC LANGSHUR

THE E. GEOFFREY BRINE AWARD

(For outstanding effort, enthusiasm

and ability in the Middle School)

ANDREW OSTERLAND

Grades, 2nd SEAN LAFLEUR

Grade 9, 1st ANDREW BRISKI

Grade 9, 3rd ASHVINI GURSAHANEY

Grade 10, 2nd MARK DAVIDSON

RT. HON. ARTHUR MEIGHEN MEMORIAL AWARDS

(Presented anonymously)

GRADEIO

1st Prize TIFFANY MACKLEM

2nd Prize CHRISTOPHER CARTER

3rd Prize NATHAN FONG

DISTINCTION IN FRENCH

(Presented by Mr. and Mrs. W.M. Molson)

MARK BANDEEN

MICHAEL HOLY

GRADE! 1

MICHAEL LECLAIR

KEVIN RATCLIFF

NICHOLAS GAULT

DISTINCTION IN LITERATURE

(Presented by Mrs. G.R.H. Sims)

PETER OLIVER


SENIOR SCHOOL AWARDS (Continued)

DISTINCTION IN MATHEMATICS

JAVIER QUINTANA

DISTINCTION IN SCIENCE

JAVIER QUINTANA

DISTINCTION IN SPANISH

THOMAS KAUFMAN

DISTINCTION IN CREATIVE WRITING

Presented by

Mr. and Mrs. C.F. Carsley

NICHOLAS GAULT

DISTINCTION IN GEOGRAPHY

ROGER OSMOND

JAVIER QUINTANA

DISTINCTION IN LATIN

(Louis Tunick Lazar Memorial)

ALFRED LE MAITRE

DISTINCTION IN HISTORY

STEPHEN SCOTT

PUBLIC SPEAKING PRIZE

Presented by

Hon. Justice G. Miller Hyde

PETER OLIVER

THE E.G. MOODEY DEBATING PRIZE

(Presented by Mr. J.L. Aimers)

MICHAEL COCHRANE NICHOLAS GAULT

PETER OLIVER

PRIZE FOR GENERAL EXCELLENCE

(Presented by Mr. T.H.P. Molson)

MARK BANDEEN

THE ANSTEY CUP

(For Inter-House Academic Competition)

LUCAS HOUSE

THE GOVERNORS' SHIELD

(For over-all ascendancy in inter-House Competition)

SPIERS HOUSE

THE REDPATH HERALD AWARD

WINTER CARNIVAL COMMITTEE

THE JOCK BARCLAY MEMORIAL TROPHY

(For all-round Distinction in Grade 8)

DAVID DAZY

THE ERNST BRANDL MEMORIAL TROPHY

(For outstanding Esprit de Corps in Grade 9)

MARTIN OSMOND

THE JONATHON BENBOW MEMORIAL AWARD

(For all-round Distinction in Grade 10)

PIERRE BAILLARGEON

THE GOVERNOR-GENERAL'S BRONZE MEDAL

(For Academic Distinction in Senior School)

JAVIER QUINTANA

THE THOMAS CHALMERS BRAINERD MEMORIAL AWARD

(Presented by Mr. Ciiarles Lineaweaver and awarded to the Senior who, in the

opinion of the Staff and of his classmates, has most successfully combined an

exceptionally enthusiastic and purposeful approach to School activities with

consistently generous concern for the welfare of others.)

BILL SMITH

THE JEFFREY RUSSELL PRIZE

(Presented by Mrs. H.Y. Russel and awarded by judgement of Staff and class-

mates to the Senior who is considered to have shown outstanding all-round

ability and character).

JAVIER QUINTANA

THE LUCAS MEDAL

(In Memory of the Founder of the School, awarded by Judgment of Staff and

classmates, to the Senior who is deemed to have made the most outstanding

contribution to the life of the School by way of academic achievement,

leadership in games and activities, and by good e.xample.)

PETER OLIVER

O CANADA

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN

143


144

;4ut


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