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HAMILTON POLICE SERVICES BOARD<br />

NOTICE OF MEETING<br />

PUBLIC AGENDA<br />

Monday, May 16, 2011<br />

4:00 o’clock p.m.<br />

Floor Board Room<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> Central Station<br />

3rd<br />

Lois Morin<br />

Administrator<br />

AGENDA<br />

1. Call to Order<br />

2.<br />

Presentation<br />

Presentation<br />

Presentation:<br />

a) Cheque<br />

b)<br />

to St.<br />

2008—2010 Recruitment & Diversity Strategy (PSB 11-050)<br />

Joseph’s Healthcare Foundation<br />

3. Declarations of Interest<br />

4. Adoption of Minutes—April 18, 2011<br />

5. Reward for Information: Unsolved Missing<br />

113a; PSB 09-052)<br />

see also<br />

Person<br />

— Sheryl<br />

Sheppard<br />

(PSB 98-<br />

6. <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service Monthly Report (PSB 11-048)<br />

7. Information Items<br />

(a) Year End Report — Training 2010 (PSB 11-059)<br />

(b)<br />

(c)<br />

Correspondence from Chair Nancy DiGregorio to Office of the City Clerk with<br />

respect to the 2011 <strong>Police</strong> Budget.<br />

Correspondence from Mary Gallagher, Manager of Legislative <strong>Services</strong> I Deputy<br />

Clerk, City of <strong>Hamilton</strong> with respect to the 2011 <strong>Police</strong> Budget.<br />

(d) Correspondence from Debbie Logel Butler, Director of Development, Ronald<br />

McDonald House <strong>Hamilton</strong> expressing thanks for the generous donation from the<br />

Bunko Golf Classic to Ronald McDonald House <strong>Hamilton</strong>.<br />

(e)<br />

Correspondence from Ron Dupuis, Chair, Greater Sudbury <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board<br />

with respect to the 700 MHz Broadband — Allocation to Public Safety Agencies.


<strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board -2-<br />

Public <strong>Agenda</strong><br />

May 16, 2011<br />

(f)<br />

(g)<br />

(h)<br />

Correspondence from the Canadian Association of <strong>Police</strong> Boards with respect to<br />

—<br />

the Call for Nominations 22<br />

Annual General Meeting.<br />

Correspondence from the Canadian Association of <strong>Police</strong> Boards with respect to<br />

the Annual Conference.<br />

22 nd<br />

Correspondence from Barbara Hall, B.A, LLB, Ph.D (hon.), Chief Commissioner,<br />

Ontario Human Rights Commission with respect to the new Policy on Preventing<br />

Sexual and Gender-based Harassment.<br />

8. Other Business<br />

9. Adjournment<br />

THE POLICE SERVICES BOARD WILL ADJOURN THu<br />

PUBLIC PORTION OF THE MEETING AND RECONVENE IN<br />

CAMERA FOR CONSIDERATION OF PRIVATE AND<br />

CONFIDENTIAL MATTERS.


2.(b)<br />

HAMILTON POLICE SERVICES BOARD<br />

- INFORMATION<br />

-<br />

DATE: 2011 April 18<br />

REPORT TO:<br />

FROM:<br />

Chair and Members<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board<br />

Glenn De Caire<br />

Chief of <strong>Police</strong><br />

SUBJECT:<br />

2008 - 2010 Recruitment & Diversity Strategy<br />

(PSB 11-050)<br />

BACKGROUND:<br />

The first step of any strategy is to have a goal. The strategies for recruitment and<br />

diversity have changed three times in the last 10 years, but the goal remains “To be<br />

more reflective of the diverse communities we serve.”<br />

2001 - 2004<br />

The strategy during this period was marketing a “Career in Policing”. A workforce<br />

study was undertaken that identified that over 50% of the workforce was expected to<br />

turnover from 2002 to 2007. We focused on Marketing and pursued recognition as one<br />

of Canada’s Top 100 Employers. We were successful four years in a row from 2003 to<br />

2006. We spent considerable effort in trying to attract women to a career in policing<br />

and saw a measurable increase in applications.<br />

In 2004, the <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service chose to benchmark against reported government<br />

data and to set recruitment and retention goals based on those results. There were four<br />

designated groups identified for employment equity purposes:<br />

1. Aboriginal 3. Gender (Male/Female)<br />

2. Visible Minority 4. Disabled<br />

2004 - 2007<br />

The strategy was to identify gaps and to target recruitment and outreach initiatives in<br />

the under represented areas. We conducted a self identification survey, one of the first<br />

in Canada, and began to hold information sessions out in the community and we<br />

invited community groups to partner with us. We hired a student through McMaster’s<br />

international student placement program, who was from Hong Kong, to assist with<br />

PoLce Serce. Boir epurL Apri 8, 20fl P.ige 1 of 5


marketing to our diverse communities because the Asian community was the fastest<br />

growing in <strong>Hamilton</strong> and it was where we were the most under-represented, at that<br />

time. With community partners, we identified some of the barriers to policing and<br />

worked to eliminate these barriers. For example, members of the community were<br />

intimidated by the physical fitness test, known as the prep test. As a result, we began to<br />

hold prep mentoring sessions, allowing members of the community to try the test and<br />

have a fitness trainer tell them how to improve.<br />

2008 — 2010 - Recruiting and Diversity Strategy<br />

In 2007, we had a diversity audit conducted by Lionel LaRoche from “Diversity Works”<br />

and a marketing study conducted by McMaster University DeGroote School of Business<br />

graduate students. The results of this research helped us to build our three year<br />

strategy. The top three key goals of the strategy were as follows:<br />

1. Establish Internal “Recruiting Champions” Within the Service.<br />

Although Human Resources officially has two recruiters, we actually have over 1,000<br />

recruiters because every member of the Service helps to promote a career in policing.<br />

In addition, we have 20 volunteer members who have been trained on the recruiting<br />

process and who assist us by attending career fairs and community events, and making<br />

presentations.<br />

2. Partner with our Diverse Communities to Establish “Recruiting Advisors”.<br />

The <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service needs to build relationships in our community and our<br />

community wants their members to be hired by our Service. As a result, we regularly<br />

train new community partners on the recruiting process to assist them to mentor and<br />

encourage members from their communities to apply. These Recruiting Advisors have<br />

been instrumental in promoting a career in policing within our diverse communities.<br />

3. Create and Deliver Training to Make HPS a More Welcoming and Inclusive Work<br />

Environment.<br />

We partnered with <strong>Hamilton</strong> Center for Civic Inclusion and developed a three year<br />

training strategy. In addition, we also embarked on an inclusive strategy, ensuring that<br />

we built inclusivity into every topic presented. We began to include civilian employees<br />

in our annual training, blending them in with police officers for two of the four days of<br />

training. The topics contained in the first two days were mandatory for all employees,<br />

including annual harassment and discrimination training, changes to Human Rights<br />

commission, the <strong>Police</strong> complaint process and diversity training.<br />

Poce Se;vics Beard Report #1 1-C3( AprL, 2O ‘age 2 of 5


In addition to the three key strategies identified above, we also completed the following<br />

goals:<br />

• Advertising on HSR buses to attract college and university students;<br />

• implementation of a mentoring program to remove barriers for women and<br />

members of our diverse communities;<br />

• implementation of a mentorship program to share knowledge due to the<br />

significant turnover experienced;<br />

• creation of video testimonials from members of our Service to put on the web<br />

site;<br />

• creation of language links on the website.<br />

RESULTS<br />

The 2004 Self Identification Survey demonstrated that only 6% of our population self<br />

identified as being a visible minority (Statistics Canada language at that time). This<br />

compared with the City of <strong>Hamilton</strong> 2001 census results, which demonstrated 7% of<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> residents self-identifying as being from a visibly diverse group.<br />

As a result of the strategies of the past few years, we have hired an average of 19%<br />

female candidates and 19% candidates from racialized groups. This demonstrates a<br />

significant improvement in our recruitment and retention at the HPS of women and<br />

diverse members. A brief summary of our hiring results appears below.<br />

MOVING FORWARD<br />

Plans are in place to conduct another self identification survey in 2011. We continue to<br />

reach out to our community partners to assist us in promoting a career in policing.<br />

In addition, we wifi be exploring the use of social media to advertise for both sworn and<br />

civilian positions. Recent testing has demonstrated that the use of the web is more<br />

effective than traditional advertising methods.<br />

Pohce <strong>Services</strong> Board Report -i)50 AprO 8, 20. Page 3 5


Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010<br />

2011<br />

Avg<br />

1 4 1 3 2 2 0<br />

1oHce <strong>Services</strong> Board Report #1 L—05() April J8, 2W 1 r’ag 4 if 5<br />

% Racialized 5% 25% 6% 13% 9% 8% 0%<br />

Male<br />

16% 44% 37% 32% 38% 36% 0%<br />

%<br />

Female<br />

84% 56% 63% 68% 62% 64% %<br />

%<br />

Persons<br />

Racialized<br />

Males<br />

3 7 6 7 8 9 0<br />

Females<br />

16 9 10 15 13 16 0<br />

Total Hires 19 16 16 22 21 25 0<br />

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011<br />

Civilian Part time and full time Hires<br />

% Racialized 26% 29% 19% 19% 11% 18% 14% 19%<br />

%<br />

Male<br />

30% 42% 14% 15% 14% 39% 36% 24%<br />

32% 21% 13% 15% 29% 18% 14% 19%<br />

68% 79% 88% 118% 71% 82% 86% 81%<br />

%<br />

%<br />

Languages<br />

Languages<br />

Persons<br />

5 11 12 11 4 6 2 7<br />

Racialized<br />

Female<br />

Males<br />

Multiple<br />

13 30 56 50 25 27 12 30<br />

Females<br />

6 8 8 9 10 6 2 7<br />

6 16 9 9 5 13 5 9<br />

Total Hires 19 38 64 59 35 33 14 37<br />

YTD<br />

Sworn Hires


SUMMARY<br />

We remain committed to our goal to be more reflective of our diverse communities. We<br />

have increased our hiring to an average of 19% for women and racialized persons over<br />

the last five years. In addition, we now target individuals who speak and/or write more<br />

than one language.<br />

Our communities have partnered with us to help attract more members to a career in<br />

policing. We have changed our recruiting to include more outreach in the communities<br />

and we have worked to eliminate barriers by providing mentoring.<br />

De Caire<br />

Chief of <strong>Police</strong><br />

GD/R.Auld<br />

cc:<br />

Deputy Chief Eric Girt, Field Support<br />

Rosernarie Auld, Manager, Human Resources<br />

Ted Mason, Chief Accountant<br />

Po’ice Servce% Board Report -O5O Apri! b. 2( Page 5 of 5


MINUTES OF THE HAMILTON 4•<br />

POLICE SERVICES BOARD<br />

Monday, April18, 2011<br />

4:00pm<br />

Board Room<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> Central Station<br />

The <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board met.<br />

There were present:<br />

Absent with regrets:<br />

Also Present:<br />

Nancy DiGregorio, Chair<br />

Bob Bratina, Vice Chair<br />

James Kay<br />

Madeleine Levy<br />

Bernie Morelli<br />

Terry Whitehead<br />

Irene Stayshyn<br />

Chief Glenn DeCaire<br />

Deputy Chief Ken Leendertse<br />

Deputy Chief Eric Girt<br />

Superintendent Debbie Clark<br />

Superintendent Paul Morrison<br />

Superintendent Bill Stewart<br />

Acting Superintendent Dan Kinsella<br />

Inspector Jamie Anderson<br />

Inspector Warren Korol<br />

Inspector Scott Rastin<br />

Inspector Vince DeMascio<br />

Staff Sergeant Steve Hahn<br />

Staff Sergeant Chris Abbott<br />

Sergeant Tern Lynn Collings<br />

Sergeant Brian Ritchie<br />

Marco Visentini, Legal Counsel<br />

Rosemarie Auld, Manager, Human Resources<br />

Peter Bailey, Manager, Records Business Centre<br />

Ted Mason, Chief Accountant<br />

Rita Lee Irvine, Manager, Corporate Planning<br />

Lois Morin, Administrator<br />

Chair DiGregorlo called the meeting to order.<br />

Chair DiGregorio on behalf of the Board welcomed the newest member to the Board Mr. Jim Kay.<br />

Presentation a) Cheque Presentation to St Joseph’s Healthcare<br />

Foundation<br />

To be presented at the next meeting.<br />

b) Member of the Month For March 2011<br />

Chair DiGregorio and Chief DeCaire presented the Member of<br />

the Month Award for March 2011 to Constable Dan Forrest.<br />

Constable Forrest was recognized for ability to remain<br />

composed, professional and compassionate in a tie of crisis,<br />

which prevented what undoubtedly could have been a tragedy.


<strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board Public Minutes April 18, 2011<br />

Page 2 of 6<br />

c) PRIDE Award<br />

One of the values of the <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service is, “Providing<br />

Quality Service”. This commitment to service excellence is an<br />

important part of an organizations journey towards being<br />

recognized by our community as one of the Best <strong>Police</strong><br />

<strong>Services</strong> in this nation.<br />

There are occasions when members of this Service go above<br />

and beyond the normal expectations of our citizens. These are<br />

not acts of courage in the face of extreme danger, but they are<br />

special acts of compassion, support and quality service that are<br />

worthy of recognition.<br />

Chief DeCaire presented the P.R.I.D.E. (“People Really<br />

Interested in Delivering Excellence”) Award to Detective<br />

Sergeant Chris Abbott and Detective Erin Munro. Detective<br />

Sergeant Abbott and Detective Munro were recognized for their<br />

work in relation to a Faint Hope Clause Hearing. They served<br />

this organization with PRIDE.<br />

d) Year End Report — Hate Crime — 2010 (PSB 11-049)<br />

Deputy Chief Leendertse provided an introduction to PSB 11-<br />

049 — Year End Report — Hate Crime — 2010 and requested<br />

Detective Brian Ritchie and Staff Sergeant Chris Abbot to<br />

present the information to the Board<br />

(Item 2)<br />

Declarations of Interest<br />

None<br />

(Item 3)<br />

Adoption of Minutes — Moved by: Vice Chair Bratina<br />

March 21, 2011 Seconded by: Member Levy<br />

The minutes of the meeting held Monday, March 21, 2011,<br />

were adopted as printed.<br />

Carried.<br />

(Item 4)


<strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board Public Minutes April 18, 2011<br />

Page 3 of 6<br />

Update — Fees and<br />

As recommended by Chief DeCaire in Report PSB 11-051 dated<br />

Charges By-Law<br />

April18, 2011, the Board approved the following:<br />

Fees and Charges for<br />

<strong>Services</strong> provided by the Moved by: Member Morelli<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service Seconded by: Member Whitehead<br />

PSB 11-051<br />

(a)<br />

(b)<br />

That the Board approve amendments to the Fees and<br />

Charges as set out in this report.<br />

That the Board enact a new By-Law (11-001), consolidating<br />

the updated Fees and Charges set out in this report, in a<br />

form acceptable to legal counsel.<br />

(c) That By-Laws 96-002, 99-001 and 00-001 be rescinded<br />

upon enactment of the new By-Law.<br />

Carried.<br />

(Item 5)<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service<br />

Monthly Report<br />

As recommended by Chief DeCaire in Report PSB 11-040 dated<br />

April 18, 2011, the Board approved the following:<br />

Moved by: Member Kay<br />

PSB 11-040 Seconded by: Member Levy<br />

That the Board direct the Administrator of the Board to refer this<br />

report, in its entirety, to the City of <strong>Hamilton</strong>, for information.<br />

Carried.<br />

(Item 6)<br />

Information Items<br />

The Board approved the following recommendation:<br />

Moved by:<br />

Seconded by:<br />

Member Whitehead<br />

Member Morelli<br />

The Board receive the reports I correspondence as circulated.<br />

(a) Year End Report — Use<br />

of Force —2010 (PSB 11-053)<br />

(b) Year End Report —<br />

054)<br />

Active<br />

Rewards —<br />

2010<br />

(PSB 11-<br />

(c)<br />

Correspondence from Ms. Carolyn Biggs, Coordinator,<br />

Committee <strong>Services</strong> I Council I Budget with respect to<br />

the appointment of Mr. James Kay to the <strong>Police</strong><br />

<strong>Services</strong> Board for a term commencing on March 24,<br />

2011 and to expire with the current term of Council.


38 year veteran of the <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service<br />

(e) Correspondence from Glenn Murray, Assistant Deputy<br />

<strong>Police</strong> Leadership.<br />

selected as this year’s recipient of the Blue Line<br />

(d) Media Release with respect to Sergeant John Harris, a<br />

Trafficking Conference.<br />

with respect to the upcoming Justice and Human<br />

(m) E-mail from Liz Morelli dated Sunday, April 10, 2011<br />

Issues for Election.<br />

Canadian Association of <strong>Police</strong> Board with respect to<br />

(I) E-mails from Jennifer Lanzon, Executive Director,<br />

on Queen’s Park Day 2011.<br />

Boards with respect to the OAPSB Bulletin —<br />

Update<br />

(k) E-mail from the Ontario Association of <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong><br />

to look at providing a similar document for the citizens<br />

of <strong>Hamilton</strong>.<br />

Note: Member Morelli noted that the Board may want<br />

Quarterly Newsletter.<br />

<strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board with respect to the Ottawa PSB<br />

(1) E-mail from Wendy Fedec, Executive Director, Ottawa<br />

Agencies.<br />

<strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board with respect to Dedicating a<br />

Portion of 700 MHz Broadband to Public Safety<br />

(I) Correspondence from Eli El-Chantiry, Chair, Ottawa<br />

Regional Municipality of Peel <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board<br />

resolution.<br />

with respect to the 700 MHz Broadband report and<br />

(h) E-mail from Frederick Biro, Executive Director,<br />

700 MHz broadband Issue.<br />

Halton Regional <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board with respect to<br />

(g) E-mail from Dorothy McDonald, Executive Director,<br />

Provincial Strategy to Protect Children from Sexual<br />

Safety and Correctional <strong>Services</strong> with respect to the<br />

Abuse and Exploitation on the Internet for the 2010-<br />

Minister, Public Safety Division, Ministry of Community<br />

2011 fiscal year.<br />

(f) Correspondence from Glenn Murray, Assistant Deputy<br />

Safety and Correctional <strong>Services</strong> with respect to the<br />

Minister, Public Safety Division, Ministry of Community<br />

2011 —<br />

Policing Grant Program —<br />

Human<br />

Trafficking Initiatives.<br />

2012<br />

Proceeds of Crime (POC) Front-Line<br />

Page 4 of 6<br />

<strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board Public Minutes April 18, 2011


Rising Emergency <strong>Services</strong> Labour Costs and Ability to<br />

After discussion, the Board approved the following:<br />

Pay.<br />

Officer, Municipality of Chatham-Kent with respect to<br />

(n) E-mail from Rob Browning, Chief Administrative<br />

(Item 8)<br />

Carried.<br />

That a report be provided outlining best practices of the ‘Big 12’ with<br />

Service Budget.<br />

respect to the discussion, presentation and approval of a <strong>Police</strong><br />

Seconded by: Member Morelli<br />

Moved by: Member Whitehead<br />

After discussion the Board approved the following:<br />

transparency of this Board as it relates to the <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong><br />

best practices in the province.<br />

Member Whitehead brought forward discussion surrounding the<br />

Service Budget. He further suggested that the Board should review<br />

Budget<br />

thanks for the kindness and support from the <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service<br />

Member Morelli, on behalf of himself and his family, expressed<br />

and Board Members in dealing with the recent tragic event.<br />

Other Business Thanks<br />

(Item 7)<br />

Carried.<br />

<strong>Services</strong> Board website.<br />

That the responses be placed on the <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong><br />

<strong>Services</strong> Labour Costs and Ability to Pay to all the<br />

correspondence with respect to Rising Emergency<br />

candidates, and<br />

That the Board provide the questions provided in the<br />

Seconded by: Member Morelli.<br />

Moved by: Member Whitehead<br />

Page 5 of 6<br />

<strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board Public Minutes April 18, 2011


There being no further business, the public portion of the meeting<br />

(Item 9)<br />

Seconded by: Member Levy<br />

Carried.<br />

then adjourned at 4:50pm.<br />

Adjournment Moved by: Vice Chair Bratina<br />

lem:<br />

April 18,2011<br />

Administrator <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board<br />

Lois Morin Nancy DiGregorio, Chair<br />

Taken as read and approved<br />

The Board then met in camera to discuss matters of a private and confidential nature.<br />

************<br />

Page 6 of 6<br />

<strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board Public Minutes April 18, 2011


5.<br />

HAMILTON POLICE SERVICES BOARD<br />

- RECOMMENDATION<br />

-<br />

DATE: 2011 May 16<br />

REPORT TO:<br />

FROM:<br />

SUBJECT:<br />

Chair and Members<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board<br />

Glenn De Caire<br />

Chief of <strong>Police</strong><br />

Reward for Information<br />

Unsolved Missing Person — Sheryl Sheppard<br />

(PSB 98-113a; see also PSB 09-052)<br />

RECOMMENDATIONS:<br />

a) That the Board authorize the increase of a reward, from the amount of $10,000.00<br />

to the amount of $50,000.00, for information leading to the arrest and conviction<br />

of person(s) unknown, responsible for the death of Sheryl Sheppard.<br />

b) That 20% of the reward money offered be transferred to the <strong>Police</strong> Reward<br />

Reserve Account #112225, for a total of $10,000.00.<br />

Glenn De Caire<br />

Chief of <strong>Police</strong><br />

FINANCIAL/STAFF1NG/LEGA IMPLICATIONS:<br />

FINANTCIAL —<br />

STAFFING -<br />

LEGAL -<br />

See Recommendations above.<br />

n/a<br />

n/a<br />

?oce Servcvs i3oarc. epcrl r98- 3a May 16, 2011 Page 1 oF 2


this address.<br />

BACKGROUND:<br />

Sheryl Sheppard did not show-up at Union Station as arranged. The following day Ms.<br />

Fisher attended the police station to report her daughter as missing. A missing person<br />

have used other investigative techniques to ascertain what happened to Sheryl<br />

Sheppard. The investigators have been hampered and frustrated by the lack of co<br />

boyfriend, Michael Lavoie. Ms. Sheppard’s mother, Odette Fisher, was also living at<br />

Sheryl Sheppard was living at 851 Queenston Road # 701, Stoney Creek with her<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> Convention Centre with Mr. Lavoie. ON TV (now CHCH TV), were covering<br />

live on television, and she accepted his offer of marriage.<br />

On December 31, 1997, Sheryl Sheppard attended a New Year’s Eve party at the<br />

holidays visiting family in New Brunswick. Sheryl confirmed that she would pick Ms.<br />

the event and interviewed Sheryl Sheppard and Michael Lavoie as he proposed to her<br />

On January 1, 1998, Sheryl Sheppard telephoned her mother, who spent the Christmas<br />

Fisher up at Union Station in Toronto on Sunday January 4, 1998.<br />

Homicide Unit took over the investigation on January 6, 1998.<br />

investigation was initiated and it was immediately deemed suspicious and the<br />

To date, police have conducted numerous interviews, conducted several searches, and<br />

?oceSeis3car$ ecrt’98-3i \tay5,2Ci. 2age2cf2<br />

operation by the witnesses and past associates of Ms. Sheppard, including Mr. Lavoic<br />

It is the belief of the investigators, and Sheryl Sheppard’s family, that she has been<br />

proposed increase in the Reward wifi assist persons with knowledge in regards to<br />

murdered and that the person responsible has confided in someone. It is felt that the<br />

and his family, which has resulted in little progress being made in the investigation.<br />

Sheryl’s fate to come forward.<br />

GD/D. Kinsella<br />

cc: Depuv Chief Ken Leendertse, Commurrily Policing<br />

Staff Sergeart Steve I-Iahn, Chief’s Executive Officer<br />

Ted Mason, Chief Accountant<br />

Acting Superintendent Dan Kinseila, investigative <strong>Services</strong> Division


6.<br />

HAMILTON POLICE SERVICES BOARD<br />

- RECOMMENDATION<br />

-<br />

DATE: 2011 May 16<br />

REPORT TO:<br />

FROM:<br />

SUBJECT:<br />

Chair and Members<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board<br />

Glenn De Caire<br />

Chief of <strong>Police</strong><br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service Monthly Report<br />

(PSB 11-048)<br />

RECOMMENDATION:<br />

That the Board direct the Administrator of the Board to refer this report, iii its entirety,<br />

to the City of <strong>Hamilton</strong>, for information.<br />

IfiiDe Caire<br />

Chief of <strong>Police</strong><br />

FINANCIAL / STAFFING / LEGAL IMPLICATIONS:<br />

FINANCIAL —<br />

STAFFING -<br />

LEGAL -<br />

ri/a<br />

n/a<br />

n/a<br />

Po.ce Svce Boa:c Repori t-C4S ‘vTzy, 21. Page 1 jf 3


BACKGROLTI\TD:<br />

<strong>Police</strong> Week 2011<br />

Working Together for a Safer Community is the theme of this year’s <strong>Police</strong> Week,<br />

taking place May 12 — 20, 2011. The week is all about increasing the community’s<br />

awareness and recognition of policing services and strengthening the partnership<br />

between the police and the community.<br />

The <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service (HPS) has been celebrating <strong>Police</strong> Week for over 30 years.<br />

This year, HPS wifi be marking this special week with a number of activities and invites<br />

the citizens of <strong>Hamilton</strong> to join them.<br />

The highlights include:<br />

<strong>Police</strong> in the Park - Takes place on Wednesday, May 18 from 11:00 a.m. — 2:00 p.m.,<br />

Bayfront Park, 369 Bay Street, North at Strachan Street. The Mounted Unit, Canine<br />

Unit, <strong>Hamilton</strong> Fire, <strong>Hamilton</strong> Crime Stoppers, ACTION, Forensics — the real CSI and<br />

the Marine Unit wifi be showcased. There will also be a charity barbecue.<br />

Other activities taking place during <strong>Police</strong> Week include: Chief for a Day Contest<br />

Winners; Citizenship Court; North End Idol — In memory of Cathy Wever; Celebrating<br />

Landsdale; and a <strong>Police</strong> Basketball Challenge at St. Therese of Lisieux School.<br />

Commitment to Road Safety Leads to Impaired Arrests<br />

HPS is dedicated to reducing impaired drivers and the harm caused by drinking and<br />

driving.<br />

As of April 30, 2011, there have been 43,000 cars pulled over in RIDE lanes in <strong>Hamilton</strong>.<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> have charged 129 people with impaired driving. Operation Lookout<br />

continues to be successful. Citizens are encouraged to call 9-1-1 when they suspect an<br />

impaired driver. So far this year, there have been 52 people arrested for impaired as a<br />

result of the Operation Lookout program.<br />

During the Easter weekend holidays, patrol officers arrested a total of 15 impaired<br />

drivers. One of the arrests involved an impaired driver who pulled into a McDonald’s<br />

drive thru and passed out behind the wheel.<br />

Additional RIDE lanes wifi be conducted during the long weekend in May.<br />

PoRce Seorces Board Report Ji-O48 ‘Iay 16, 2011 Page 2 of 3


ACTION Firearms Initiative Nets 70 Guns<br />

As part of the Service’s ongoing commitment to public safety, ACTION officers were<br />

tasked to investigate 69 cases related to the registration, possession, use and safe storage<br />

of firearms.<br />

Over the course of a four (4) week period starting in mid-March, officers seized 70<br />

firearms -33 were long arms and 37 were handguns.<br />

There were various reasons provided for the failure of citizens to properly register the<br />

firearms or to renew their permits. <strong>Police</strong> discovered that in some cases the original<br />

owner was in a nursing home or deceased. Family members who took over possession<br />

had either misplaced the firearms, sold them without the appropriate documentation or<br />

just did not know they had possession.<br />

There were also two (2) cases where the firearms had been stolen and the owner failed<br />

to report the theft.<br />

If anyone has information on an ifiegal gun or a criminal act involving a gun in the<br />

commurilty, they can contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS.<br />

If anyone has questions regarding firearm possession, they can contact the <strong>Hamilton</strong><br />

<strong>Police</strong> Service’s Firearms Registration office at (905) 546-4978.<br />

GD/C. Martin<br />

• PoLice Seiices Board 1eport 1i-D48 Ay 16, 20J1 Page 3 of 3


HAMILTON POLICE SERVICES BOARD<br />

RECOMMENDATION<br />

7.<br />

DATE: May 16, 2011<br />

REPORT TO:<br />

FROM:<br />

SUBJECT:<br />

Chairman and Members, <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board<br />

Lois Morin, Administrator<br />

Information Items<br />

RECOMMENDATION:<br />

That the following reports I correspondence, be received:<br />

(a) Year End Report—Training 2010 (PSB 11-059)<br />

(b)<br />

(c)<br />

Correspondence from Chair Nancy DiGregorio to Office of the City Clerk with<br />

respect to the 2011 <strong>Police</strong> Budget.<br />

Correspondence from Mary Gallagher, Manager of Legislative <strong>Services</strong> I Deputy<br />

Clerk, City of <strong>Hamilton</strong> with respect to the 2011 <strong>Police</strong> Budget.<br />

(d) Correspondence from Debbie Logel Butler, Director of Development, Ronald<br />

McDonald House <strong>Hamilton</strong> expressing thanks for the generous donation from the<br />

Bunko Golf Classic to Ronald McDonald House <strong>Hamilton</strong>.<br />

(e)<br />

(f)<br />

(g)<br />

(h)<br />

Correspondence from Ron Dupuis, Chair, Greater Sudbury <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board<br />

with respect to the 700 MHz Broadband — Allocation to Public Safety Agencies.<br />

Correspondence from the Canadian Association of <strong>Police</strong> Boards with respect to the<br />

—<br />

Call for Nominations 22’ Annual General Meeting.<br />

Correspondence from the Canadian Association of <strong>Police</strong> Boards with respect to the<br />

22 rd Annual Conference.<br />

Correspondence from Barbara Hall, B.A, LL.B, Ph.D (hon.), Chief Commissioner,<br />

Ontario Human Rights Commission with respect to the new Policy on Preventing<br />

Sexual and Gender-based Harassment.<br />

May-Public Information Items.doc Page 1 of 1


7.(a)<br />

HAMILTON POLICE SERVICES BOARD<br />

- INFORMATION<br />

-<br />

DATE: 2011 May 16<br />

REPORT TO:<br />

FROM:<br />

Chairman and Members<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board<br />

Glenn De Caire<br />

Chief of <strong>Police</strong><br />

SUBJECT: Year End Report - Training 2010<br />

(PSB 11-059)<br />

BACKGROUND:<br />

Please find attached the annual Training Report for 2010. This report outlines the<br />

number of members trained in academic courses, as well as those members trained in<br />

Use of Force and ancifiary courses. The courses were delivered in compliance with<br />

Adequacy Standards, in-house Policies, emerging trends in police education and case<br />

law. The courses were either hosted and/or facffitated by the Training Branch.<br />

Glenn De Caire<br />

Chief of <strong>Police</strong><br />

GD/R. Auld<br />

Attachment: Training Statistical Summary 2010<br />

cc:<br />

Driy Clief Er:c Gi-, Field S1DDocl<br />

PcIice Sn,ices Board RepcrL L1-O59 \[av [6, 2Q1.. Page 1 oF 1


<strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service<br />

Annual Report<br />

Training Branch 2010


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY<br />

During 2010, the Training Branch provided training to sworn and civilian members, in a<br />

total of 30 different training formats. This report outlines the number of Members trained<br />

in academic courses — both sworn and civilian - as well as those Members trained in Use<br />

of Force and ancillary courses.<br />

The two largest training venues were Block Training and Use of Force re-certification. A<br />

total of 697 sworn Members and 156 civilian Members attended Block Training and 796<br />

Members attended their re-certification in Use of Force.<br />

E-Learning was introduced Service-wide during this training year. In the three E<br />

Learning courses delivered, General Investigative Techniques had 37 Officers take the<br />

course, Infectious Disease had 32 Members and Suspect Apprehension Pursuit had 669<br />

Officers.<br />

Within Use of Force, there were a number of courses hosted beyond the sworn re<br />

certification. The Use of Force team trained a total of 157 re-certifications for Special<br />

Constables, Auxiliaries and McMaster University Special Constables. Additionally, they<br />

trained 26 new recruits, 20 new Auxiliaries and 11 new Special Constables, including<br />

McMaster University Special Constables. The team also trained 129 Officers in shotgun,<br />

159 Officers in Conducted Energy Weapon, 150 Officers in plain clothes holster and 60<br />

Communicators in Excited Delirium. Finally, the team delivered the Dynamic Entry<br />

course, a course considered bench mark in the province, to 9 internal Officers and 15<br />

external Officers.<br />

The Training Branch hosted or facilitated a number of courses throughout 2010. We<br />

hosted the following OPC courses — Investigative Interviewing, Leading a Learning<br />

<strong>Police</strong> Organization, Ontario Major Case Management, Search Warrant, Sexual Assault<br />

and Suspect Apprehension Pursuit Trainers Course. In total, 49 external Officers<br />

attended these courses and 63 internal Officers attended. Additionally, we facilitated<br />

General Investigative Techniques, training 43 internal Officers and <strong>Police</strong> Bike Operators<br />

Course, training 36 internal Members.<br />

The OPC and CPC are the two locations where the majority of our Members attend for<br />

courses if they are not hosted internally. During 2010, a total of 222 Members attended<br />

for various courses at the OPC and CPC.<br />

Performance Leadership Training for Staff Sergeants was hosted 5 times during 2010.<br />

A total of 143 Members attended these sessions.<br />

In conclusion, during the 2009-2010 training year, the Training Branch was staffed with<br />

one Staff Sergeant, two Sergeants, one A/Sergeant and three Constables. In total,<br />

these seven Officers trained 2800 Members in 30 different training formats. This<br />

amounts to the Training Branch Officers training 400 Members each during 2010.<br />

Additionally, when all of the training hours are calculated, there were 21,221 hours<br />

dedicated to training HPS Members. When considering that a full time employee works<br />

2,080 hours, this would translate into 10 full time Trainers at a cost of $956,320 based<br />

on salaries alone. However, training is conducted or facilitated by HPS Training at a<br />

cost of $644,293, a savings of $312,207.<br />

Training Branch Annual Report - 2010 Page 2


BLOcK TRALNNG<br />

Block Training is annual training delivered to meet the requirements of the<br />

Adequacy Standards, internal Policies, new legislation and case law. The training<br />

takes place from September to May and is comprised of 4 X 10 hour days. Due<br />

to this scheduling and to be inclusive of completed training, this report for the<br />

Block Training component will feature the training from Sept 2009 to May 2010.<br />

Constables, Sergeants and civilian supervisors, were mandated to attend and<br />

other civilian staff were encouraged to attend. S/Sgts did not attend Block<br />

Training in 2009-2010, so as a result some of the mandated topics from Block,<br />

were covered during Performance Leadership Training (PLT). This will be<br />

highlighted later in this document.<br />

The following is a list of topics covered in Block Training 2009-2010:<br />

Stress in Policing — Awareness and Solutions, Priority Response<br />

System, Technology Training, Wellness Self-Health Check, Diversity,<br />

Human Rights,lssues and Applications, CPR and First Aid, Restorative<br />

Justice, Criminal Offences, Interviewing/Interrogation, HTA Updates<br />

and Impaired by Drug Investigations, Missing Persons, Investigative<br />

Detention, School Lockdown and IRD Video, IRD Practical, OPVTA<br />

Videos and E-Learning on Suspect Apprehension Pursuit.<br />

The success of Block Training is largely dependant on the commitment of both<br />

internal and external guest speakers. During this training year, the Training<br />

Branch thanked St.Joseph’s Hospital, Interim Director of <strong>Hamilton</strong> Centre for<br />

Civic Inclusion Pat Wright, Sisters in CPR, Cheryl Lisson, Bev Bain, Gary<br />

Goguen, Will Mason, Rick Arnold, Claus Wagner, Mark Cox, Mark Nicholls,<br />

Tyler Preston and Glenn Bullock.<br />

The following is a list of the Supervisor specific Block training during 2009-2010:<br />

Changes to Ontario’s Civilian Complaints System Against <strong>Police</strong>,<br />

Recruit Performance Management System, Injured on Duty and<br />

Absences — Best Practices, Active Supervision and a Leadership<br />

video.<br />

Training Branch Annual Report - 2010 Page 3


The following graph outlines the number of attendees to Block Training 2009-<br />

2010:<br />

Block 2009110 - # of Attendees<br />

Sworn<br />

DTotal Potential Attendees<br />

Incomplete Attendance<br />

Civilian<br />

•Complete Attendance<br />

Did NOT Attend<br />

The following graph outlines the number of empty seats on Block training<br />

during the year 2009-2010:<br />

Monthly Empty Seat Count on Block<br />

Sept- Oct - Nov - Dec- Jan- Feb- Mar- Apr May May-<br />

Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr June<br />

# Empty Seats Per Month<br />

Training Branch Annual Report - 2010 Page 4


components:<br />

The following are the number of Members who completed these E-Learning<br />

Training (SAP), General Investigative Techniques (GIT) and Infectious Disease.<br />

form of adult learning was introduced through Suspect Apprehension Pursuit<br />

A component introduced Service wide in 2009-2010, was E-Learning. This<br />

Training Branch Annual Report -<br />

2010<br />

Page 5<br />

• Empty Hands Technique Refresher —2 hours<br />

—<br />

• Aerosol Weapon Refresher<br />

—<br />

• Impact Weapons/Baton Re-qualification<br />

— • Firearms Academic<br />

• Judgment Development Training —<br />

1<br />

1 hour<br />

hour<br />

1.5<br />

hours.<br />

• Firearms Proficiency — 1.5 hours<br />

1<br />

hour<br />

A1-012. The province assigns an hour amount for each Use of Force option,<br />

<strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Act (PSA), Regulation 926 and the Policing Standards Manual<br />

Annually, each Member is required to re-certify in Use of Force, as per the<br />

for a total of 8 hours. The assigned amounts are:<br />

USE Q FoRce<br />

Disease<br />

GIT SAP Infectious<br />

E-Learning Courses<br />

ELERRNLN


# Sworn Employees Trained<br />

Manual.<br />

The following graph outlines the number of officers who attended Use of Force<br />

Source STraining Stats 2OlO<br />

re-qualification from September 2009-May 2010, as well as the compliance ratio.<br />

This graph depicts that 100% of the officers who are deployed on active duty, are<br />

These units are:<br />

in compliance with the requirements of the PSA and the Policing Standards<br />

of Force team also completed re-certification in Use of Force for other units.<br />

In addition to annual re-certification for sworn Members in Use of Force, the Use<br />

Training Branch Annual Report - 2010 Page 6<br />

• <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service (HPS) Special Constables,<br />

• McMaster University Special Constables.<br />

• <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service Auxiliary Officers, and<br />

Special Cst. Auxiliary McMaster<br />

Use of Force - Other


The HPS hired a number of new sworn and civilian Members and the following<br />

graph outlines the number of new Members trained in Use of Force during 2010:<br />

NEW Use of Force - Other<br />

New Recruits New Sp.Cst. New Auxiliary<br />

mci. McMaster<br />

There are two specialty areas within Use of Force, which the Use of Force team<br />

either trained new users or conducted the training for re-certification. These<br />

areas are in Shotgun and Conducted Energy Weapon (CEW). The sessions are<br />

outlined below:<br />

Shotgun & Conducted Energy Weapon (CEW)<br />

140<br />

120<br />

100<br />

80<br />

60<br />

40<br />

20<br />

Shotgun Safe Shotgun Practical CEW New CEW Re-cert<br />

Handling<br />

Finally, there were three additional course/training sessions conducted by the<br />

Use of Force team in 2010. They were:<br />

• Dynamic Entry/High Risk Vehicle Stops Course —24 Officers,<br />

• Plain Clothes Holster Training — 150 Officers, and<br />

• Excited Delirium Training for Communicators — 60 Members.<br />

Training Branch Annual Report - 2010 Page 7


5<br />

10<br />

0<br />

15<br />

.<br />

20<br />

Association.<br />

Introduction to Use of Force, Human Resources — Payroll and Benefits,<br />

Orientation/Tour, Ethics in Policing, Harassment and Discrimination,<br />

<strong>Police</strong> Protocol, Employee Assistance Program, Notebooks and HPS<br />

facilitated by the OPC as well as the number of attendees:<br />

courses. The following is a list of OPC Courses hosted in <strong>Hamilton</strong> and<br />

The Training Branch hosted a number of OPC Courses as well as internal<br />

external speakers.<br />

These 5 weeks of training are facilitated by the Training Branch.<br />

3 month time period, they return for 2 additional weeks of in-house training.<br />

Upon hire, new recruits have a week of internal training/orientation, prior to<br />

RECRUITS<br />

In 2010, we trained a total of 26 new recruits with 35 different internal and<br />

TRAiNING CuRsEs<br />

21<br />

C)<br />

C)<br />

C)<br />

C)<br />

0.<br />

Investigative Leading a Learning Ontario Major Case<br />

Interviewing <strong>Police</strong> Organization Management<br />

Internal Attendees C External Attendees<br />

Suspect Apprehension<br />

Pursuit Trainers<br />

Training Branch Annual Report - 2010 Page 8<br />

OPC Courses Hosted by HPS<br />

of training, the officers will ride along with their Coach for 3 months. During this<br />

training. Each recruit will be assigned a Coach Officer and after the three weeks<br />

Upon their return, they have three weeks of additional HPS Service specific<br />

attending the Ontario <strong>Police</strong> College for 12 weeks. The following is a list of<br />

topics covered in this pre-OPC week:


The following outlines the internal courses hosted by the Training Branch as well<br />

as the number of attendees:<br />

Other Courses Hosted by HPS<br />

.g o<br />

30<br />

II<br />

0<br />

0.<br />

• Internal Attendees<br />

C External Attendees<br />

QPCw GPO CvRsEs<br />

In compliance with the Adequacy Standards and in line with Professional<br />

Development, the following charts outline the number of employees who<br />

attended the OPC and CPC for courses.<br />

# Employees Trained - OPC<br />

Jan Feb Norch Apnl Jane Jor AUg Sept Ot Nov Den<br />

D # Employees Trained - not including Basic Constable Training<br />

• # Training Days<br />

Source Training Stats 2010<br />

# Employees Trained - CPC<br />

Jan Feb Maroh April June Ju Aog Sept Oct Nov Den<br />

C # Employees Trained<br />

• # Trairdng Days<br />

Source STraining Stats 201LT<br />

Training Branch Annual Report - 2010 Page 9


PERFQRMANQE LEALDRSHIP TRMNNG (PLT)<br />

The purpose of PLT is training specific to Staff Sergeants and in some cases,<br />

civilian middle managers. There are between 3-5 PLT sessions annually.<br />

Each session has 2 consistent components, that being the Chief’s address and<br />

a roundtable discussion for information sharing purposes.<br />

The following is a list of topics covered in 2010 as well as the number of<br />

attendees:<br />

Performance Leadership Training (PLT)<br />

(0<br />

C)<br />

C)<br />

0<br />

C<br />

PERFORMANQE LEADERSHIP TRAINING (PLT)<br />

Topics Covered:<br />

January 2010 — topics were<br />

• Impaireds — including DRE, Roadside and Blood<br />

• LGBTQ — Community Panel<br />

March<br />

.<br />

•<br />

•<br />

2010 — topics were<br />

Stress in Policing<br />

FVRU<br />

PSB, and<br />

New Recruit Workbook<br />

April 2010 — topics were<br />

• Crown Briefs<br />

• “Share the Road Cycling Coalition”<br />

• Victim Impacts Statements<br />

• CPR I First Aid training<br />

September 2010 — only one topic — “Crisis Communication Seminar”<br />

November 2010 —<br />

topics were<br />

Training Branch Annual Report - 2010 Page 10


• ACTION Team<br />

• Collision Reconstruction Unit<br />

• Pr0ACTION<br />

• Sheppel I FGI “People Leader Training”<br />

• PADPs<br />

EDUCATION BURSARY’<br />

In 2010 (for the 2009 Bursary Year), 60 Members applied to the education<br />

bursary offered by the Service. The members, both sworn and civilian, took a<br />

wide range of college, university and equivalent courses. In total, each<br />

member received 80% of reimbursement for their tuition fees, for a total of<br />

$43,347.03.<br />

Bursary Courses for 2009<br />

Training Branch Annual Report - 2010 Page 11


Training Statistical Summary 2010<br />

During 2010, the Training Branch provided training to sworn and civilian members, in a<br />

total of 30 different training formats. This report outlines the number of Members trained<br />

in academic courses — both sworn and civilian as well as those Members trained in Use<br />

of Force and ancillary courses.<br />

The two largest training venues were Block Training and Use of Force re-certification. A<br />

total of 697 sworn Members and 156 civilian Members attended Block Training and 796<br />

Members attended their re-certification in Use of Force.<br />

E-Learning was introduced Service-wide during this training year. In the three E<br />

Learning courses delivered, General Investigative Techniques had 37 Officers take the<br />

course, Infectious Disease had 32 Members and Suspect Apprehension Pursuit had 669<br />

Officers.<br />

Within Use of Force, there were a number of courses hosted beyond the sworn re<br />

certification. The Use of Force team trained a total of 157 re-certifications for Special<br />

Constables, Auxiliaries and McMaster University Special Constables. Additionally, they<br />

trained 26 new recruits, 20 new Auxiliaries and 11 new Special Constables, including<br />

McMaster University Special Constables. The team also trained 129 Officers in shotgun,<br />

159 Officers in Conducted Energy Weapon, 150 Officers in plain clothes holster and 60<br />

Communicators in Excited Delirium. Finally, the team delivered the Dynamic Entry<br />

course, a course considered bench mark in the province, to 9 internal Officers and 15<br />

external Officers.<br />

The Training Branch hosted or facilitated a number of courses throughout 2010. We<br />

hosted the following OPC courses — Investigative Interviewing, Leading a Learning<br />

<strong>Police</strong> Organization, Ontario Major Case Management, Search Warrant, Sexual Assault<br />

and Suspect Apprehension Pursuit Trainers Course. In total, 49 external Officers<br />

attended these courses and 63 internal Officers attended. Additionally, we facilitated<br />

General Investigative Techniques, training 43 internal Officers and <strong>Police</strong> Bike Operators<br />

Course, training 36 internal Members.<br />

The OPC and CPC are the two locations where the majority of our Members attend for<br />

courses if they are not hosted internally. During 2010, a total of 222 Members attended<br />

for various courses at the OPC and CPC.<br />

Performance Leadership Training for Staff Sergeants was hosted 5 times during 2010.<br />

A total of 143 Members attended these sessions.<br />

In conclusion, during the 2009-2010 training year, the Training Branch was staffed with<br />

one Staff Sergeant, two Sergeants, one A/Sergeant and three Constables. In total,<br />

these seven Officers trained 2800 Members in 30 different training formats. This<br />

amounts to the Training Branch Officers training 400 Members each during 2010.<br />

Additionally, when all of the training hours are calculated, there were 21,221 hours<br />

dedicated to training HPS Members. When considering that a full time employee works<br />

2,080 hours, this would translate into 10 full time Trainers at a cost of $956,320 based<br />

on salaries alone. However, training is conducted or facilitated by HPS Training at a<br />

cost of $644,293, a savings of $312,207.


7.(b)<br />

HAMILTON POLICE SERViCES BOARD<br />

Board Members<br />

Nancy DiGregorlo, Chair<br />

Bob Bratina, Vice Chair<br />

James Kay<br />

Madeleine Levy<br />

Bernie Morelli<br />

Irene Stayshyn<br />

Terry Whitehead<br />

12 April, 2011<br />

Lois Morin, Administrator<br />

Office of the City Clerk<br />

City Hall<br />

71 Main Street West, First Floor<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong>, Ontario L8P 4Y5<br />

Attention:<br />

Rose Caterini<br />

City Clerk<br />

Re:<br />

2011 <strong>Police</strong> Budget<br />

At its meeting of March 28, 2011, the City of <strong>Hamilton</strong> General Issues Committee resolved<br />

that the 2011 <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service Budget be referred back to the <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board<br />

requesting further consideration to meet the City’s target. Upon review of council’s request,<br />

the Board can advise as follows:<br />

The <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service’s 2011 Budget was approved by the <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board at its<br />

meeting of January 19, 2011 and was presented to the General Issues Committee on<br />

February 25, 2011. The 2011 Budget of $130,752,220 represents a 4.97% or $6.1 million<br />

increase over the 2010 Budget. As you are aware, the primary budget pressures for 2011<br />

include salary and benefits enhancements related to the settlement of the collective<br />

bargaining process ($3.5 Million, or 2.84%), the OMERS 1% pension contribution rate<br />

increase ($1.2 Million, or 0.99%), and recommended staffing increases resulting from the<br />

Chiefs restructuring review of the organization ($0.7 Million, or 0.57%), and increases in<br />

other expenditures such as fuel and insurance ($0.7 Million, or 0.57%).<br />

The <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service’s 2011 Budget process began in the early stages of 2010 with<br />

the Chief and Deputy Chiefs working with the management team to assess organizational<br />

priorities and to develop a budget to meet those priorities. The process of developing and<br />

deliberating the budget included a number of layers of review from the Divisional level up to<br />

the Chief. This review resulted in more than $500,000 in budget reductions from the original<br />

2011 budget submissions.<br />

After the Chiefs final approval, the budget was presented to the <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board where<br />

it was debated and approved. Upon the Board’s approval of the budget, the Chief engaged<br />

in a consultative process with the community by holding several town halt meetings.<br />

155 King William Street, P0 Box I 060, LCD I, <strong>Hamilton</strong>, ON L8N 4C1 Phone: 905-546-2727 Fax: 905-546-4720<br />

2


I<br />

From the Board’s point of view, the cost of policing is an ongoing issue, not an issue that is<br />

dealt with just once a year. Accordingly, the Board has a strong commitment to ensuring the<br />

• delivery of sustainable police budgets. This commitment is demonstrated by the consistency<br />

of the <strong>Police</strong> levy as a percentage of the total City budget over the past eight years. In 2003,<br />

the <strong>Police</strong> levy was 18.54% of the total City levy while comparatively, in 2010, the <strong>Police</strong> levy<br />

represented 18.51% of the total City levy. Over the period of 2003 to 2010, the <strong>Police</strong> levy<br />

ranged between 18.43% and 18.65% of the total City levy. This consistency speaks to the<br />

importance that the Board, the Chief, and staff, place on delivering fiscally responsible<br />

budgets.<br />

The <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board takes its governance role, including the oversight of the<br />

<strong>Police</strong> budget, very seriously. Section 31(1 )(b) of the <strong>Police</strong> Se,vices Act states that a board<br />

is responsible for the provision of adequate and effective police services in the municipality<br />

and shall generally determine, after consultation with the chief of police, objectives and<br />

priorities with respect to police services in the municipality. Notwithstanding this important<br />

governance role, section 31(4) of the Act is clear that the board shall not direct the chief of<br />

police with respect to specific operational decisions or with respect to the day-to-day<br />

operation of the police service. It is in the context of this statutory framework that the board<br />

and the chief of police work collaboratively to establish a fiscally responsible budget estimate.<br />

Members of the <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board met on Friday, April 8 and, upon due<br />

consideration, the Board unanimously stands by its recommendation for a 4.97% budget<br />

increase in 2011 as presented by Chief De Caire to the General Issues Committee at its<br />

meeting of February 25, 2011. As a result of a thorough review process, it is the opinion of<br />

the Board that the 2011 Budget addresses the statutory requirements set out in section 4 of<br />

the <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Act for the provision of adequate and effective police services in the City<br />

of <strong>Hamilton</strong>.<br />

As you know, the budget process is outlined in section 39 of the <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Act. Upon<br />

reviewing the budget estimates, the municipal council shall establish the overall budget and<br />

council is not bound to adopt the estimates submitted by the Board [section 39(3)]. However,<br />

if the Board is not satisfied that the budget established for it by council is sufficient to maintain<br />

an adequate number of police officers or other employees of the police service or to provide<br />

the police service with adequate equipment and facilities, the board may request that the<br />

Ontario Civilian <strong>Police</strong> Commission (O.C.P.C) determine the question after a hearing [section<br />

39(5)]. The <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board is committed to the maintenance of public safety<br />

through the delivery of the highest quality of policing services while maintaining financial<br />

stability and accountability.<br />

Yours verytruly,<br />

1’%lQ4%T’Nb’(<br />

Nancy DiGregorlo, Chair<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board<br />

cc.<br />

Members, <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board<br />

Chief Glenn DeCaire<br />

155 King William Street, P0 Box 1060, LCD 1, <strong>Hamilton</strong>, ON L8N 4C1 Phone: 905-546-2727 Fax: 905-546-4720


9<br />

City<br />

7.(c)<br />

of <strong>Hamilton</strong> City Clerk’s Office, Corpo ate S ices<br />

City Hall, 71 Main Street West<br />

Physical Address: 71 Main Street West, 1” floor<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong>, Ontario, Phone: 905.546-4408 Fax: 905.546-2095<br />

I iii<br />

Canada L8P 4Y5 Email: clerk@hamilton.ca<br />

www.hamilton.ca<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong><br />

Aprill4,2011<br />

.4<br />

Nancy DiGregorio, Chair<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board<br />

155 King William Street<br />

P.O. Box 1060, LCD I<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong>, ON L8N 4C1<br />

.,.<br />

Dear Ms DeGregorio:<br />

Re:<br />

2011 <strong>Police</strong> Budget<br />

At its meeting of April 13, 2011, City Council considered your letter dated April 12, 2011<br />

regarding the above matter.<br />

Please be advised that Council has received this correspondence.<br />

Yours truly,<br />

Mary GaIlh r,<br />

Manager of Legislative <strong>Services</strong>/Deputy Clerk<br />

MG:sr<br />

File C11-009


-<br />

Yh’)3incere1, )<br />

HAMILTON GCE<br />

APR1 32011<br />

RECEIVED<br />

7.(d)<br />

Ronald McDonald House <strong>Hamilton</strong><br />

1510 Main St., W. <strong>Hamilton</strong> ON L8S 1E3 Ph: 905-521-9983 Fax: 905-521-9515 www.rmhhamilton.ca<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> ON L9B 1 C2 Ronald McDonald House<br />

Thank you so much for your very generous donation from the Bunko Golf Classic to Ronald<br />

McDonald House <strong>Hamilton</strong>.<br />

Bunko Invitational Golf Classic<br />

April 07, 2011 CHIEF’S OFFC)<br />

Ms. Pat Cino Finance/Treasurer<br />

Dear Ms. Cino:<br />

do 400 Rymal Rd. E.<br />

providing a warm and compassionate home-like environment for families of seriously-ill children<br />

As you may know, Ronald McDonald House in <strong>Hamilton</strong> is a charitable organization committed to<br />

who are receiving treatment at area hospitals. We have made an enormous difference to thousands<br />

of sick children and their families since we opened in 1993. Time and again our families thank us<br />

have coped without our service.<br />

for the ‘kindness and support’ they receive at the House and say they can’t imagine how they would<br />

Through this donation, you have helped us to keep the lights on at this wonderful house that love<br />

built. For more information on Ronald McDonald House <strong>Hamilton</strong>, please visit our website at<br />

www.rmhhaniilton.ca.<br />

Director of Development<br />

/i \L’4 J<br />

e z. gel Buner ;1<br />

orized S atureautoisée<br />

Chrftable RgTsrratIon fl 3277 9836 RR0001<br />

HAMILTON


.12<br />

and<br />

April 26, 2011<br />

Ottawa ON<br />

K1AOA6<br />

<strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong><br />

Board du Grand Sudbury<br />

des services policiers<br />

Greater Sudbury - -<br />

Commission<br />

7.(e)<br />

_____<br />

Address all correspondence to the Seaetar <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board • Prière dadresser tout correspondance au Secretariat, Commission des services policiers<br />

the issue of the 700 MHz Broadband and its potential availability for dedication to Public<br />

Safety Agencies. The Board was also apprised of a resolution approved by the <strong>Police</strong><br />

<strong>Services</strong> Board Chairs of the twelve largest police services in Ontario which was passed<br />

Prime Minister Harper:<br />

RE: 700 MHz Broadband —<br />

House of Commons<br />

At their meeting of April 11, 2011, the Greater Sudbury <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board discussed<br />

at a meeting on March 22, 2011 as follows:<br />

The Honourable Prime Minister Stephen Harper<br />

190 rue Brady Street Sudbuiy, Ontario P3E 1C7 . Tel/tél: 705.67i.9171 ext./poste 6136 Fax: 705.674.7090<br />

possible use of some of this spectrum by public safety agencies for broadband data<br />

publicly stated it will be allocating 20 MHz of the 700 MHz for its public safety<br />

dedicated spectrum availablefor transmission purposes known as the 700 MHz band;<br />

regulatory body, Industry Canada, to determine use of this frequency, including the<br />

communications, and<br />

and loss oflife, and the economic impact ofemergency incidents; and<br />

has demonstrated that the lack of adequate voice communications capability and<br />

interoperabilily increases the number ofassociated casualties, the severity ofinjuries<br />

that of first responders, including police officers, paramedics and fire fighters,<br />

depends upon effective voice communications between public safety agencies, and<br />

safety agencies,<br />

agencies, therefore ensuring cross border interoperability;<br />

20 MHz of the 700 MHz band for mission critical broadband data use by public<br />

WHEREAS the 700 MHz band is being returned to the federal government through its<br />

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Big 12 Chairs of <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> in<br />

WHEREAS international studies and Canadian public safety responders experience<br />

Ontario call upon the federal and provincial governments to dedicate and reserve a<br />

WHEREAS the safety and security of Canadians affected by emergencies, as well as<br />

WHEREAS the United States government has recognized this issue as a priority and<br />

WHEREAS the conversion of television signals to digitalfrom analog hasfreed up a<br />

t’.._ r.....,...:,,. C,.- • I\T,,t,-,, ,.,iiinai,tj - M,,tro<br />

Allocation<br />

to Public Safety Agencies<br />

ono,iapnwnt


Ron Dupuis<br />

y/<br />

agencies.<br />

Minister ofCanada and the Premier ofOntario;<br />

provincial Ministers responsiblefor Public Safety, Industry Canada, and to the Prime<br />

FURTHER BE IT RESOLVED that this resolution be submitted to the federal and<br />

FURTHER BE IT RESOLVED that this resolution be circulated to the Ontario<br />

700 MHz Broadband Page 2<br />

Prime Minister Harper<br />

We ask for your support in ensuring an allocation of the 700 MHz Broadband to public<br />

safety agencies.<br />

unanimously endorsed the said resolution. The Board views it essential that a portion of<br />

Following discussion, by way of resolution the Greater Sudbury <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board<br />

the 700 MHz band be dedicated for mission critical broadband data use by public safety<br />

Yours truly,<br />

Letters also sent to:<br />

Chair, <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board<br />

Cc: Chairs, Big 12 <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board<br />

Association of<strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Boards, the Canadian Association of<strong>Police</strong> Boards,<br />

seeking their supportfor retaining 20 MfIz of the 700 MHz bandfor mission critical<br />

The Honourable Tony Clement, Minister of Industry, Government of Canada<br />

The Honourable Dalton McGuinty, Premier of Ontario<br />

The Holiourable Jim Bradley, Minister of Community Safety & Correctional<br />

the Ontario Association of Chiefs of <strong>Police</strong>, and the <strong>Police</strong> Association of Ontario<br />

broadband data public safetypurposes.<br />

Mr. William V. Baker, Deputy Minister of Public Safety, Government of Canada<br />

Mr. Richard Dicerni, Deputy Minister of Industry, Government of Canada<br />

The Honourable Vic Toews, Minister of Public Safety, Government of Canada<br />

Mr. Ian Davidson, Deputy Minister of Community Safety & Correctional<br />

Ontario Association of <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Boards<br />

<strong>Services</strong>, Province of Ontario<br />

Canadian Association of <strong>Police</strong> Boards<br />

<strong>Services</strong>, Province of Ontario


5/2/2011<br />

are:<br />

meeting;<br />

position<br />

To: CAPB Members<br />

Sent: Thursday, April 28, 2011 2:19 PM<br />

Subject: Call for Nominations<br />

From: Jennifer Lanzon fllanzon@capb.ca]<br />

Morin, Lois<br />

2<br />

An important part of each Annual Meeting of the CAPB is the election of the Board of<br />

Directors for the upcoming term. For the 2011/2012 term the vacancies on the Board<br />

from Ontario and Greg McArthur from Nova Scotia. Elections for the Board of Directors<br />

will be reviewed by the Nominations Committee. The Nominations Committee includes<br />

You are invited to submit a letter of interest that includes relevant bio, background and<br />

will take place in Regina, Saskatchewan on Friday, August 2011 as part of the<br />

endorsement of your board by Thursday, June 30th, 2011. All submissions<br />

Chair, Paul McKivett from British Columbia, Bob Dunster from Alberta, Pam McConnell<br />

CAPB’s 21st Annual General Meeting.<br />

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to get in touch with me.<br />

+ have the time to contribute fully in 2 face-to-face meetings a year (one in<br />

Board for the next 3 years.<br />

in Ottawa, theother at CAPB annual conference) including airfare<br />

+ are able to participate in a two-hour bi-monthly teleconference board<br />

and accommodation<br />

Ottawa and one at the annual conference);<br />

CAPB requires members who:<br />

Alberta —2 positions<br />

Ontario — I position<br />

British Columbia — 1 position<br />

First Nations <strong>Police</strong> Board —<br />

22nd ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING<br />

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS -<br />

*<br />

N<br />

I<br />

I<br />

+ have the support of their own board or provincial association to<br />

in the work of that committee; and<br />

+ have a reasonable expectation of being able to serve on the CAPB<br />

POUC I3OARD<br />

• are willing to sit on at least one working committee and actively participate<br />

finance the cost of their attendance at the two meetings a year (one<br />

7tf)°


Page 2 of 2<br />

Jennifer<br />

Jennifer Lanzon, Executive Director Canadian Association of <strong>Police</strong> Boards<br />

157 Gilmour Street, Suite 302, Ottawa, ON K2P 0N8<br />

Tel: 613-235-2272 Fax: 613-235-2275<br />

Email: jlanzon@capb.ca<br />

This transmission may contain confidential or privileged communications, and thesender does not waive any related rights and obligations. If you are not<br />

the intended recipient and have received this in error, you must immediately destroy it Unauthorized copying or distribution of any information herein is<br />

strictly prohibited and may constitute a criminal offence, a breach of provincial or Federal privacy laws, or may otherwise result in legal sanctions. We ask<br />

that you notify the Canadian Association of <strong>Police</strong> Boards immediately of any transmission received in error, by reply e-mail to the sender.<br />

5/2/2011


7()Of<br />

1<br />

Morin, Lois<br />

From: Jennifer Lanzon [jlanzon@capb.ca]<br />

Sent: Friday, April 29, 2011 3:33 PM<br />

To: CAPB Members<br />

Subject: Preliminary Program & Registration Form<br />

To: CAPB Members<br />

RE: 22nd Annual Conference<br />

We are pleased to send you the preliminary program and registration form for the 2011 conference in<br />

Regina. Information on the golf tournament and companion program will be sent in the next week. If you<br />

have any questions, please do not hesitate to get in touch with me.<br />

Seeyou in Regina!<br />

Jennifer Lanzon<br />

?., ::‘, C’<br />

This transmission may contain confidential or privileged communications, and thesender does not waive any related rights and obligations. If<br />

you are not the intended recipient and have received this in error, you must immediately destroy it. Unauthorized copying or distribution of<br />

any information herein is strictly prohibited and may constitute a criminal offence, a breach of provincial or Federal privacy laws, or may<br />

otherwise result in legal sanctions. We ask that you notify the Canadian Association of <strong>Police</strong> Boards immediately of any transmission received<br />

in error, by reply e-mail to the sender.<br />

5/9/2011


email: IIanzoncapb.ca www.capb.ca<br />

Canadian Association of PoHce Boards<br />

Phone: 613.235.CAPB (2272) Fax: 613.235.2275<br />

157 Gilmour Street, Ottawa, Ontario K2P 0N8<br />

OF POLICE BOARDS<br />

CANADIAN<br />

ASSOCIATION<br />

REGINA BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS<br />

REGINA POLICE FORCE<br />

CITY OF REGINA<br />

PRESENTING SPONSORS:<br />

CONFERENCE PROGRAM<br />

Augustl8-20, 2011<br />

‘ -<br />

‘ Future oFPolicin.<br />

ConFerence Regina, SK<br />

— .<br />

...<br />

.....<br />

2011..


l200hrs —<br />

l200hrs —<br />

O500hrs<br />

O500hrs<br />

GOLF TOURNAMENT — MURRAY GOLF COURSE<br />

Murray Golf Course<br />

OPTIONS FOR NON-GOLFERS —TO BE CONFIRMED<br />

was implemented along wit the challenges and opportunities encountered so that<br />

face of Calgary and increasingly challenging service issues that affect how the<br />

sought to “Review, Rethink and Refresh” Citizen Satisfaction and Employee<br />

other Commissions/Boards can achieve their goals.<br />

<strong>Police</strong> Commission, others TBC<br />

Engagement research to create a holistic, more in-depth and actionable research<br />

engagement. This session will outline the research and auctioning process that<br />

The Calgary <strong>Police</strong> Commission (CPC) knew it had to keep pace with the changing<br />

community is policed. In 2008, the CPC working with Illumina Research Partners<br />

program that would contribute to improved citizen satisfaction and employee<br />

l300hrs — 1345hrs REWEW, RETHINK & REFRESH: MEASURING POLICE SERVICE<br />

Presenters: Yvonne Brouwers, Illumina Research, Jennifer Freund, Calgary<br />

PERFORMANCE<br />

l200hrs —<br />

llOOhrs —<br />

lO3Ohrs — llOOhrs NETWORKING BREAK<br />

demands of Canadians work and family lives. There is a very large cohort of police<br />

services participating in the most recent survey. Results from the study will be<br />

compared to non-police employers, both in the public and private sector. This<br />

weilness programs, deliver impressive cost savings and positively influence<br />

WORK LIFE BALANCE IN A POLICE CULTURE<br />

productivity.<br />

session will highlight how some initiatives, such as comprehensive workplace<br />

Dr. Duxbury is a co-author of a massive federal study, to examine the conflicting<br />

O900hrs —<br />

O83Ohrs —<br />

—<br />

—<br />

O700hrs O83Ohrs Breakfast Saskatchewan, Regency Ballroom<br />

— O800hrs O83Ohrs Breakfast Presenter (sponsorIoptional)<br />

THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 2011— CAPB 22nd ANNUAL CONFERENCE - DAY I<br />

O83Ohrs Hospitality Suite — Hotel Saskatchewan, Oak Room<br />

O83Ohrs Buses depart from RCMP Depot Drill Hall to Hotels<br />

O63Ohrs —<br />

O63Ohrs<br />

O83Ohrs<br />

Hotel<br />

O900hrs<br />

lO3Ohrs<br />

l200hrs<br />

l300hrs<br />

LUNCH —<br />

OPEN MIKE DISCUSSION with Dr. Linda Duxbury<br />

OPENING KEYNOTE SPEAKER: DR. LYNDA DUXBURY<br />

Conference Opening Ceremonies<br />

O600hrs —<br />

Cocktails<br />

BBQ Dinner & Fundraising Raffle<br />

Depot Drill Hall For BBQ<br />

O500hrs Buses depart from Hotel Saskatchewan (and other hotels) to RCMP<br />

l000hrs Buses depart from Hotel Saskatchewan (and other hotels) to<br />

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2011 —<br />

CAPB<br />

22’ ANNUAL CONFERENCE


Medium <strong>Services</strong>, Saskatchewan Suite, Facilitator: Andrew Graham<br />

Small <strong>Services</strong>, Blue Lounge, Facilitator: Derek Johnston<br />

Large <strong>Services</strong>, Victoria Room, Facilitator: Tullio Caputo<br />

SERVICES (<strong>Police</strong> Complaints Models and other Burning Issues)<br />

l500hrs - l63Ohrs ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS FOR LARGE, MEDIUM & SMALL<br />

youth, youth violence, youth gangs, and multi agency, interdisciplinary community<br />

new ways to deliver effective policing services to their communities. This session<br />

O83Ohrs - O9l5hrs Plenary: The Future of Policing?<br />

changing face of policing, police leadership will need to think innovatively to find<br />

College in developing a future of strong leadership for police services. With the<br />

based initiatives. His experience also includes work with the Canadian <strong>Police</strong><br />

criminology and criminal justice police with a focus on marginalized and homeless<br />

Tuillo Caputo<br />

O700hrs -<br />

OB3Ohrs<br />

2012 KICK OFF BREAKFAST HOSTED BY VICTORIA POLICE BOARD<br />

SATURDAY, AUGUST 20, 2011— CAPB 22nd ANNUAL CONFERENCE - DAY 3<br />

around schedule to sign up for)<br />

(There will be a variety of organized tours and a dine<br />

AFTERNOON AND EVENING FREE<br />

the coming year in terms of the issues the Board of Directors will be pursuing with<br />

government officials. Tasks to be addressed include consideration of revisions to<br />

2011/2012 term, and receipt of the 2010 Financial Statement and Auditor’s Report.<br />

the CAPB by-laws, resolutions, the election of the Board of Directors for the<br />

delegates should attend. This is member’s opportunity to influence the agenda for<br />

The Annual General Meeting is a critical component of the Conference that all<br />

O93Ohrs —<br />

2010 resolutions; provide an update on areas affecting policing and community<br />

safety.<br />

The Minister of Public Safety has been invited to address the delegates on the<br />

O83Ohrs —<br />

O700hrs —<br />

(half-day)<br />

FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2011— CAPB 22nd ANNUAL CONFERENCE - DAY 2<br />

2lOOhrs —<br />

l800hrs —<br />

2200hrs<br />

2300hrs<br />

O83Ohrs<br />

O93Ohrs<br />

l200hrs<br />

A specialist in criminology and criminal justice policy, Dr. Caputo specializes in<br />

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING<br />

PANEL DISCUSSION/UPDATE FROM PUBLIC SAFETY CANADA<br />

Breakfast — Hotel Saskatchewan<br />

HOSPITALITY SUITE — Hotel Saskatchewan<br />

DINNER & ENTERTAINMENT AT THE CASINO REGINA<br />

1345hrs — l43Ohrs Q & A ON POLICE SERVICE PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT


lO45hrs —<br />

l000hrs —<br />

1045<br />

llOOhrs<br />

Coffee Break<br />

hrs Coalition on Sustainable Policing —<br />

What<br />

Lies Ahead?<br />

Federation of Canadian Municipalities, Canadian <strong>Police</strong> Association and<br />

Canadian Association of <strong>Police</strong> Boards<br />

091 5hrs — l000hrs GROUP DISCUSSION I Q & A: The Future of Policing?<br />

jeopardize the Board’s credibility.<br />

the hiring of a police chief. The media is often seen as a double-edged sword.<br />

words misappropriated. Maintaining consistent key messages is imperative, since<br />

any incomplete or incorrect information can create unjustified concern and<br />

This workshop will address the challenges of communicating effectively, explored<br />

Dealing with the media is a game of chance to many public and professional figures<br />

too little in an attempt to make the media go away or too much and then find their<br />

and very few get the balance right and when faced with a crisis. They either say<br />

issues that catch the attention of the public and are the responsibility of the Board.<br />

These include the effective functioning of the police service, the annual budget and<br />

not be called upon to speak on the day-to-day policing concerns, there are some<br />

such as crime, traffic accidents and emergencies. Although Board members may<br />

public. Policing in the news is often controversial and focuses on sensational issues<br />

watch out for and explain how Board members should address reporters and the<br />

how to work with the media to get the right message across, identified pitfalls to<br />

Derek Johnston, Face Value Communications (TB C)<br />

Workshop 3: Communicating in a Crisis<br />

arbitration and discipline.<br />

of the board and management in collective bargaining, grievance handling,<br />

complex and complicated world of policing. Topics touched on will include the role<br />

foundation. However, that isn’t necessarily always the case. Building on best<br />

surrounding the two sides of policing, and offer some solutions to surviving in a<br />

between police management and police unions should be part of a strong<br />

services are continuously faced with adapting to change and the cooperation<br />

practices in Canadian police services, this workshop will unravel the mysteries<br />

Who is responsible for reducing crime and working to make our cities safer? <strong>Police</strong><br />

Chief, Association & Board panel (TB C)<br />

Workshop 2: Organizing the Blues <strong>Police</strong> Labour Relations<br />

—<br />

Management<br />

Executive Committee of the RCMP as a guide to creating healthy workplaces<br />

address mental health issues. Wilkerson and a committee of RCMP employees<br />

these conditions.<br />

Economic Roundtable on Addiction and Mental Health, is helping the RCMP<br />

employers across Canada. Mr. Wilkerson, who founded the Global Business and<br />

environment plays in mental health and outlines the RCMP’s commitment to its<br />

developed the Principles of Well-being, a document agreed to by the Senior<br />

employees, along with the expectation that RCMP managers will work to promote<br />

Bill Wilkerson is credited with putting workplace mental health onto the agenda of<br />

Bill Wilkerson & RCMP Superintendent Rich Boughen (TBC)<br />

across the RCMP. The Principles acknowledge the crucial role that work<br />

Workshop 1: Mental Health for <strong>Police</strong>: What Employers Can Do<br />

llOOhrs- 1230 hrs CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS<br />

ahead.<br />

will explore the role of boards should take to ensure they are prepared for the road


which featured 22 recommendations falling under four categories: Prevention,<br />

business and industry, enforcement, and the general public. A report was produced<br />

consultation process including over 400 participants and sectors as diverse as<br />

mobilization and community development approach and involved a wide-ranging<br />

l33Ohrs —<br />

l23Ohrs —<br />

l33Ohrs<br />

l53Ohrs<br />

foundation. However, that isn’t necessarily always the case. Building on best<br />

surrounding the two sides of policing, and offer some solutions to surviving in a<br />

services are continuously faced with adapting to change and the cooperation<br />

between police management and police unions should be part of a strong<br />

practices in Canadian police services, this workshop will unravel the mysteries<br />

Who is responsible for reducing crime and working to make our cities safer? <strong>Police</strong><br />

Chief, Association & Board panel (TB C)<br />

—<br />

Workshop 2: Organizing the Blues<br />

Management<br />

address mental health issues. Wilkerson and a committee of RCMP employees<br />

across the RCMP. The Principles acknowledge the crucial role that work<br />

these conditions.<br />

employers across Canada. Mr. Wilkerson, who founded the Global Business and<br />

developed the Principles of Well-being, a document agreed to by the Senior<br />

employees, along with the expectation that RCMP managers will work to promote<br />

environment plays in mental health and outlines the RCMP’s commitment to its<br />

Economic Roundtable on Addiction and Mental Health, is helping the RCMP<br />

Executive Committee of the RCMP as a guide to creating healthy workplaces<br />

Bill Wilkerson & RCMP Superintendent Rich Boughen (TB C)<br />

Workshop 1: Mental Health for <strong>Police</strong>: What Employers Can Do<br />

REPEAT OF CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS<br />

LUNCH: Regency Ballroom<br />

local advisory committees as youth who would potentially benefit from involvement<br />

choices. The strategy focused primarily on providing recreational and social<br />

strategy was able to attract and sustain the participation of a core group of youth<br />

has the potential to influence youth risk-taking behaviours.<br />

involvement in offending, bullying, substance abuse, and other unhealthy lifestyle<br />

social programs in the past (City of Regina, 2001). The program showed promise in<br />

crime prevention efforts in Regina was a youth strategy which was developed in<br />

1998 to prevent and reduce youth risk-taking behaviour, including early<br />

youth and 32 youth-serving organizations. An evaluation concluded that the youth<br />

attention and has become a model for other cities developing drug strategies.<br />

strategically placed where required. Youth Strategy An important aspect of early<br />

programs to at-risk youth between 11 and 14 years of age who were identified by<br />

demonstration project in 2000 in three neighbourhoods and involved over 100<br />

terms of reducing involvement in criminal activities: police statistics indicate that<br />

registered but did not participate. The evaluation concludes that the youth strategy<br />

over a 12-month period, many of whom had not participated in recreational or<br />

priorities. The Regina and Area Drug Strategy has received national and provincial<br />

Healing Continuum, Capacity Building, and Community Justice. In 2004, strategic<br />

priorities were developed and workgroups created action plans to implement the<br />

youth who participated had less involvement with the police than youth who<br />

and Area Drug Strategy. This strategy was developed using a community<br />

In 2003 the City of Regina developed a municipal drug strategy, entitled the Regina<br />

in pro-social leisure activities. The youth strategy was implemented as a<br />

Bill Wilkerson is credited with putting workplace mental health onto the agenda of<br />

<strong>Police</strong><br />

Labour Relations<br />

Presenter: (TB C)<br />

Workshop 4: Regina’s Drug Strategy Focus on Youth


l53Ohrs — 1545<br />

l800hrs -<br />

hrs<br />

complex and complicated world of policing. Topics touched on will include the role<br />

of the board and management in collective bargaining, grievance handling,<br />

arbitration and discipline.<br />

Workshop 3: Communicating in a Crisis<br />

Derek Johnston, Face Value Communications (TB C)<br />

This workshop will address the challenges of communicating effectively, explored<br />

how to work with the media to get the right message across, identified pitfalls to<br />

watch out for and explain how Board members should address reporters and the<br />

public. Policing in the news is often controversial and focuses on sensational issues<br />

such as crime, traffic accidents and emergencies. Although Board members may<br />

not be called upon to speak on the day-to-day policing concerns, there are some<br />

issues that catch the attention of the public and are the responsibility of the Board.<br />

These include the effective functioning of the police service, the annual budget and<br />

the hiring of a police chief. The media is often seen as a double-edged sword.<br />

Dealing with the media is a game of chance to many public and professional figures<br />

and very few get the balance right and when faced with a crisis. They either say<br />

too little in an attempt to make the media go away or too much and then find their<br />

words misappropriated. Maintaining consistent key messages is imperative, since<br />

any incomplete or incorrect information can create unjustified concern and<br />

jeopardize the Board’s credibility.<br />

Workshop 4: Regina’s Drug Strategy Focus on Youth<br />

Presenter: (TB C)<br />

In 2003 the City of Regina developed a municipal drug strategy, entitled the Regina<br />

and Area Drug Strategy. This strategy was developed using a community<br />

mobilization and community development approach and involved a wide-ranging<br />

consultation process including over 400 participants and sectors as diverse as<br />

business and industry, enforcement, and the general public. A report was produced<br />

which featured 22 recommendations falling under four categories: Prevention,<br />

Healing Continuum, Capacity Building, and Community Justice. In 2004, strategic<br />

priorities were developed and workgroups created action plans to implement the<br />

priorities. The Regina and Area Drug Strategy has received national and provincial<br />

attention and has become a model for other cities developing drug strategies.<br />

strategically placed where required. Youth Strategy An important aspect of early<br />

crime prevention efforts in Regina was a youth strategy which was developed in<br />

1998 to prevent and reduce youth risk-taking behaviour, including early<br />

involvement in offending, bullying, substance abuse, and other unhealthy lifestyle<br />

choices. The strategy focused primarily on providing recreational and social<br />

programs to at-risk youth between 11 and 14 years of age who were identified by<br />

local advisory committees as youth who would potentially benefit from involvement<br />

in pro-social leisure activities. The youth strategy was implemented as a<br />

demonstration project in 2000 in three neighbourhoods and involved over 100<br />

youth and 32 youth-serving organizations. An evaluation concluded that the youth<br />

strategy was able to attract and sustain the participation of a core group of youth<br />

over a 12-month period, many of whom had not participated in recreational or<br />

social programs in the past (City of Regina, 2001). The program showed promise in<br />

terms of reducing involvement in criminal activities: police statistics indicate that<br />

youth who participated had less involvement with the police than youth who<br />

registered but did not participate. The evaluation concludes that the youth strategy<br />

has the potential to influence youth risk-taking behaviours.<br />

PRESIDENT of CAPB & MAYOR OF REGINA CLOSING REMARKS<br />

DINNER & EVENT AT THE RCMP HERITAGE CENTRE<br />

2lOOhrs — 2300hrs<br />

Hospitality Suite


CONFERENCE REGISTRATION FORM<br />

I<br />

I..<br />

I<br />

Conference Reghia, SR<br />

Aiao18-2O,2O11<br />

CAPB Members<br />

before June 1<br />

CAPB Members<br />

after June 1<br />

Non-Members<br />

before June 1<br />

Non-Members<br />

after June 1<br />

Conference Delegate $550.00 $575.00 $625.00 $650.00<br />

Conference Daily Rate* $200.00 $250.00 $225.00 $250.00<br />

DELEGATE<br />

Name:..<br />

First Name<br />

Last Name<br />

Position:<br />

(as you want it to appear on name badge) (i.e. Chair, Member, Chief, Mayor, Councilor)<br />

Board/Organization:<br />

Address:<br />

Telephone:<br />

Email:<br />

Fax:<br />

Dietary needs:<br />

Wednesday, August 17, I<br />

Golf: yes LI<br />

noLI<br />

PLEASE CLEARLY MARK ALL YOUR CHOICES:<br />

will:<br />

Attend the BBQ at RCMP Depot: yes LI no LI<br />

Thursday, August 18, I will attend the evening at the Regina Casino: yes<br />

Saturday, August 20, I will attend the evening at RCMP Heritage Centre: yes<br />

LI<br />

no<br />

LI<br />

LI<br />

no<br />

LI<br />

CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS<br />

Saturday, August 20, 2011<br />

llOOhrs—l23Ohrs I l33Ohrs—lSOOhrs<br />

Please indicate one workshop in each session you would like to participate in:<br />

Session 1<br />

llOOhrs — l23Ohrs<br />

LI Mental Health for <strong>Police</strong><br />

LI Labour Relations<br />

LI Communicating in a Crisis<br />

LI Youth Drug Strategy<br />

Session 2<br />

l33Ohrs — lSOOhrs<br />

LI Mental Health for <strong>Police</strong><br />

LI Labour Relations<br />

LI Communicating in a Crisis<br />

LI Youth Drug Strategy


Additional tickets can be purchased for<br />

Daily rate<br />

$______<br />

(includes three dinners, three breakfasts, two lunches, hospitality suite and all conference materials)<br />

Conference Delegate $<br />

_______<br />

______<br />

_________<br />

________<br />

FAX THIS FORM TO 613-235-2275<br />

*4 % surcharge for payments by credit card<br />

CALL 613-235-2272 TO PAY BY CREDIT CARD*<br />

VISA<br />

Full payment must be received by July 15, 2011. Refunds will not be given after July 30, 2011.<br />

Canadian Association of <strong>Police</strong> Boards, 157 Gilmour Street, Suite 302, Ottawa, ON K2P 0N8<br />

PLEASE RETURN THE FORM WITH YOUR CHEQUE MADE PAYABLE TO CAPB:<br />

DATE OFARRIVAL_____________________ FLIGHT NUMBER___________ TIME_________<br />

NUMBER AND ARRIVAL TIME. THERE WILL BE SOMEONE A VAILABLE TO PICK YOU UP AND BRING YOU TO<br />

YOUR HOTEL<br />

TO ACCOMMODATE OUR DELEGATES ARRIVALS, PLEASE INDICATE BELOW YOUR DATE OF ARRIVAL, FLIGHT<br />

TOTAL AMOUNT ENCLOSED: $<br />

$185 x no of packages___________ $_______<br />

PACKAGE (BBQJ REGINA CASINO EVENING & RCMP HERITAGE EVENING)<br />

$______<br />

RCMPHERITAGEEVENING ($75) x no of tickets<br />

REGINA CASINO EVENING ($75) x no of tickets<br />

$_______<br />

$_______<br />

BBQ ($40)x no of tickets<br />

(refer to first page for fee schedule)<br />

PAYMENT INFORMATION

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