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The 2008 Report.pdf - Hamilton Police Services

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<strong>2008</strong><br />

ANNUAL REPORT<br />

Saluting our Past - Promoting our Future<br />

Celebrating 175 years


VISION<br />

MISSION<br />

VALUES & ETHICS<br />

VISION<br />

To be recognized by all our communities as the<br />

best and most progressive police service.<br />

Our vision statement, our aspiration, describes<br />

what we want to be and guides us in setting high<br />

standards to work towards achieving our desired<br />

outcomes.<br />

MISSION<br />

To be leaders with our communities in the<br />

achievement of public safety and security.<br />

Our mission refl ects the leadership role that<br />

the police will undertake when working with<br />

the community in achieving public safety and<br />

enforcement goals.<br />

VALUES & ETHICS<br />

In pursuit of our mission, we believe:<br />

• In the prevention, detection and the suppression of crimes and the<br />

relentless pursuit of offenders<br />

• In providing continuous improvement of quality service<br />

• In recognizing the commitment, contribution and importance of all<br />

our members, volunteers and community partners<br />

• In open, constructive communication that promotes teamwork<br />

• In the respect for, value of and equitable treatment to all individuals<br />

in our diverse organization and communities<br />

• In being sensitive to the needs of victims of crime and other<br />

circumstances<br />

• In using only the minimum force required in carrying out our duties<br />

• In leading and educating others by the example we set<br />

• In a commitment to innovation, improvement and life-long learning<br />

• In performing our duties with integrity and accountability


TABLE OF CONTENTS<br />

4<br />

<strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board<br />

Chairman’s Message<br />

5<br />

<strong>Police</strong> Chief’s Message<br />

6<br />

Service Profile<br />

6 – Organization Chart<br />

7 – Patrol Divisions<br />

7 – Authorized Strength<br />

8<br />

History<br />

12<br />

Highlights of <strong>2008</strong><br />

15<br />

Statistical Highlights<br />

19<br />

Joint forces operations and<br />

internal task forces<br />

21<br />

Performance <strong>2008</strong><br />

21 – <strong>Report</strong> on the Chief’s Strategic<br />

Objectives<br />

22 – <strong>Report</strong> on the business plan<br />

strategic directions<br />

22 – Public safety enforcement<br />

24 – Community problem solving<br />

25 – Resource management<br />

27 – Internal and external communication<br />

27 – Technology<br />

27 – Facilities<br />

29<br />

Awards Promotions Retirements<br />

30<br />

Financial report<br />

<strong>2008</strong> Annual <strong>Report</strong><br />

3


CHAIR’S<br />

MESSAGE<br />

BOARD MEMBERS<br />

Bernie Morelli<br />

CHAIR<br />

As Chair of the <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board, I<br />

welcome this opportunity to comment on some<br />

of the achievements and highlights of the Board<br />

and <strong>Police</strong> Service in <strong>2008</strong>.<br />

<strong>The</strong> year marked a special time in our city’s history<br />

– the 175th anniversary of policing in <strong>Hamilton</strong><br />

and the 50th anniversary of women in <strong>Hamilton</strong><br />

policing. Along with my fellow <strong>Police</strong> Service Board<br />

members, I joined the Service in its celebration of<br />

these two remarkable milestones.<br />

One of the outstanding events was the<br />

Consecration of the Colour and I was gratified to<br />

not only have been involved in the process of the<br />

granting of a Colour but to see it come to fruition.<br />

This Colour represents our history and it is important to remember that today and everyday<br />

we are still contributing to that history.<br />

<strong>The</strong> 50th anniversary of women in <strong>Hamilton</strong> policing provided the opportunity to look at<br />

our past, and to acknowledge and celebrate how far the Service has come. This was an<br />

exceptional endeavour that culminated in the development of a video and photo library<br />

amongst other highlights.<br />

My sincerest thanks to all Board members, current and retired members of the Service,<br />

volunteers, partners and citizens for participating in our anniversary events, and by<br />

extension sharing and celebrating the <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service.<br />

During the year, the Board embraced several opportunities for improvement, particularly<br />

with respect to governance practices. This followed an inspection of the Board’s policies<br />

and the Service’s practices carried out by <strong>The</strong> Ontario Ministry of Community Safety<br />

and Correctional <strong>Services</strong>. <strong>Report</strong>s and progress on the Ministry recommendations will<br />

continue to be made at future <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board meetings.<br />

In <strong>2008</strong>, there was a host of presentations at the <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board meetings - all with<br />

the intention of providing the public with information on the safety and security of our city.<br />

As part of the Board’s commitment to maintain an open dialogue with the community,<br />

eight townhall meetings were held in <strong>2008</strong> for our business planning process. We remain<br />

committed to finding out, through a variety of means, what concerns residents have about<br />

crime and policing, and will continue to reach out to community members.<br />

On behalf of the Board members, sincere thanks to all of our uniformed and civilian staff<br />

for their professionalism, caring and commitment to ensuring and continuing to be focused<br />

on responding to the policing needs of our community.<br />

Mr. Mark Nimigan<br />

VICE CHAIR<br />

Provincial Appointment<br />

May 21, 2003 - May 20, 2009<br />

Mrs. Nancy Di Gregorio<br />

MEMBER<br />

Provincial Appointment<br />

Sept. 5, 2006 - Sept. 4, 2012<br />

Ms. Karen Cimba<br />

MEMBER<br />

Provincial Appointment<br />

April 21, 2004 - April 20, 2010<br />

Bruce Pearson<br />

MEMBER<br />

Citizen Appointment<br />

Feb. 15, 2007 - Nov. 30, 2010<br />

Mayor Fred Eisenberger<br />

MEMBER<br />

Municipal Appointment<br />

Dec. 1, 2006 - Nov. 30, 2010<br />

Coun. Terry Whitehead<br />

MEMBER<br />

Municipal Appointment<br />

Dec. 1, 2006 - Nov. 30, 2010<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service is committed and dedicated to being a hard-working, smart-working, innovative and effective police<br />

service. We have and will continue to actively engage our communities and respond to their advice.<br />

In closing, I look forward to the <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board and the <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service working together, to the<br />

highest standards in the provision of police services to the residents of the City of <strong>Hamilton</strong>.<br />

Bernie Morelli<br />

Chair<br />

Ms. Lois Morin<br />

ADMINISTRATOR<br />

4 Saluting our Past - Promoting our Future


CHIEF’S<br />

REPORT<br />

EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP<br />

am pleased to present this <strong>2008</strong> Annual <strong>Report</strong>.<br />

I <strong>The</strong> <strong>Report</strong> provides a snapshot of police activities,<br />

major initiatives and crime statistics. It also sums up<br />

the <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service’s efforts toward meeting<br />

the objectives set out in its business plan.<br />

Brian J. Mullan<br />

CHIEF OF POLICE<br />

<strong>The</strong> year <strong>2008</strong> saw our Service mark the 175th<br />

Anniversary of our police service. One of the<br />

commemorative events that took place was the Grant<br />

of Arms and the Consecration and Trooping of our<br />

first-ever Colour. <strong>The</strong>se are a national recognition of<br />

our incredible 175 years of continuous service. As<br />

Chief, it was a very proud moment to see hundreds<br />

of our members participating.<br />

Ken Leendertse<br />

DEPUTY CHIEF<br />

Community Policing<br />

Eric Girt<br />

DEPUTY CHIEF<br />

Field Support<br />

As a Service, we also celebrated 50 years of women in <strong>Hamilton</strong> policing. <strong>The</strong> anniversary<br />

event in June and the video tribute which you will read about in this <strong>Report</strong> were as<br />

remarkable as they were lasting.<br />

Anniversaries such as these are significant milestones but what is truly remarkable are the<br />

men and women of our Service, past and present, who brought us to where we are today.<br />

As we marked both anniversaries, we celebrated the outstanding individuals who keep our<br />

community safe.<br />

As a police service, our core responsibilities are responding to emergencies, enforcing the<br />

laws, investigating crime, maintaining public order and assisting victims. With the efforts of<br />

the men and women of <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong>, we continue to have a decline in the crime rate in<br />

our City.<br />

Community partnerships also play a key role in keeping our City safe. From our schools,<br />

social service agencies, parents, business owners, BIAs, and councilors, our community is<br />

willing to partner with us in crime prevention strategies.<br />

I would also like to recognize the hundreds of individuals who volunteer thousands of hours<br />

with our Service. Our Auxiliary <strong>Police</strong>, Community Policing Centre and Victim Service<br />

volunteers are really an extension of our Service and contribute significantly.<br />

This publication is filled with content of individual and team efforts to make <strong>Hamilton</strong> a<br />

better place – what better tribute to our 175th anniversary of service to the community.<br />

Yours truly,<br />

Bill Stewart<br />

SUPERINTENDENT<br />

Division One<br />

Ken Bond<br />

SUPERINTENDENT<br />

Division Three<br />

Debbie Clark<br />

SUPERINTENDENT<br />

Division Two<br />

Michael Shea<br />

SUPERINTENDENT<br />

Corporate <strong>Services</strong><br />

Brian J. Mullan<br />

Chief of <strong>Police</strong><br />

John Petz<br />

SUPERINTENDENT<br />

Investigative <strong>Services</strong><br />

Paul Morrision<br />

SUPERINTENDENT<br />

Support <strong>Services</strong><br />

<strong>2008</strong> Annual <strong>Report</strong><br />

5


SERVICE PROFILE<br />

ORGANIZATIONAL CHART<br />

6 Saluting our Past - Promoting our Future


POPULATION OF THE CITY OF HAMILTON:<br />

518,181<br />

(Source: City’s OMBI (Ontario Municipal<br />

Benchmarking Initiative) Database<br />

AREA OF THE CITY OF HAMILTON:<br />

112,710 hectares<br />

(1,113 square kilometres)<br />

PATROL<br />

DIVISIONS<br />

POLICE OFFICERS 2007 <strong>2008</strong><br />

Chief of <strong>Police</strong> 1 1<br />

AUTHORIZED<br />

STRENGTH<br />

Deputy Chief of <strong>Police</strong> 2 2<br />

Superintendents 6 6<br />

Inspectors 8 8<br />

Staff Sergeants & Detective Sergeants 32 32<br />

Sergeants / Detectives & Detective Constables 209 209<br />

Constables 520 529<br />

Total <strong>Police</strong> Officers 761 787<br />

CIVILIAN MEMBERS 2007 <strong>2008</strong><br />

Senior Offi cer Association 10 10<br />

Special Constables 54 58<br />

Technical/Clerical & Other 203 204<br />

Total Civilian Members 267 272<br />

TOTAL PERSONNEL 1,028 1,059<br />

<strong>2008</strong> Annual <strong>Report</strong><br />

7


HISTORY<br />

<strong>The</strong> <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service – 175th Anniversary<br />

Saluting Our Past, Promoting Our Future<br />

A YEAR OF CELEBRATION,<br />

<strong>2008</strong> MARKED THE 175TH<br />

ANNIVERSARY OF POLICING<br />

IN HAMILTON AS WELL AS<br />

THE 50TH ANNIVERSARY<br />

OF WOMEN IN HAMILTON<br />

POLICING. THE SERVICE’S<br />

PROUD HISTORY<br />

WAS HIGHLIGHTED<br />

THROUGHOUT THE YEAR.<br />

• 175 years of Policing in<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong><br />

No one starts out to make history. History<br />

is usually made up of ordinary people<br />

setting about their daily lives, doing the<br />

things they do. Years later, someone<br />

comes to realize that history was made<br />

“way back when”.<br />

So it was on March 4th, 1833. <strong>The</strong><br />

brand new “Town of <strong>Hamilton</strong>” was<br />

governed by a Board of <strong>Police</strong>. <strong>The</strong> Act<br />

of Incorporation allowed town officials to<br />

hire a “…Bailiff or Bailiffs…” as an officer<br />

of the corporation along with clerks, and<br />

not knowing they were making history,<br />

the Board hired the town’s fi rst full-time<br />

law enforcement offi cial. John Ryckman,<br />

well-known in the town, was hired as<br />

High Bailiff.<br />

<strong>The</strong> <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service has<br />

grown signifi cantly since then. Four<br />

Great Western Railway detectives were<br />

absorbed in the mid 1800’s. <strong>The</strong>n the<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> Beach police. In 1963 the<br />

Parks <strong>Police</strong> came in when their Chief<br />

retired.<br />

<strong>The</strong> Regional Municipality of <strong>Hamilton</strong>-<br />

Wentworth came into existence<br />

on January 1st 1974. <strong>The</strong> police<br />

departments of <strong>Hamilton</strong>, Stoney Creek,<br />

Dundas, Ancaster, and Saltfleet Township<br />

merged into the <strong>Hamilton</strong>-Wentworth<br />

Regional <strong>Police</strong> Force, later named<br />

Service. <strong>The</strong> rural districts of Glanbrook<br />

and Flamborough and the small town of<br />

Waterdown came in over the next two<br />

years. In 1987, the Harbour <strong>Police</strong> was<br />

taken in.<br />

On January 1st, 2000, the amalgamated<br />

City of <strong>Hamilton</strong> was born and the<br />

Region vanished after only 26 years. <strong>The</strong><br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service was created, with<br />

a new, modern badge as the visible sign<br />

of the change.<br />

Today, <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> is a Service of<br />

787 sworn members, 272 civilians and<br />

65 auxiliary officers, making it the 11th<br />

largest in Canada. Offi cers patrol 1,113<br />

square kilometers of diverse territory<br />

surrounding the west end of Lake<br />

Ontario, with a population of 518,000.<br />

<strong>The</strong> Service incorporates three Patrol<br />

Divisions which includes detectives.<br />

Investigative <strong>Services</strong> encompasses the<br />

major investigative functions, all backed<br />

up with the Corporate <strong>Services</strong> and<br />

Support <strong>Services</strong> Divisions.<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> maintain a full-time<br />

Emergency Response Unit.<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> have sent three offi cers<br />

on United Nations missions – two<br />

in Bosnia-Herzegovina and one to<br />

Guatemala, lost seven officers in the<br />

course of duty and respond to about<br />

80,000 calls for service annually.<br />

In the 1980s, the-then <strong>Hamilton</strong>-<br />

Wentworth Regional <strong>Police</strong> Service<br />

underwent an epiphany. <strong>Hamilton</strong>, like<br />

most forces, had become a motorized<br />

service and was becoming isolated from<br />

the people. Reaction-based policing was<br />

the norm.<br />

<strong>Police</strong> scholars recognized this and<br />

lobbied for what, in effect, was a return to<br />

the basic precepts of policing developed<br />

by Sir Robert Peel in 1829. <strong>Hamilton</strong><br />

was among the fi rst to move to this<br />

“Community-Based Policing”. A servicewide,<br />

all-member, year-long effort was<br />

inaugurated with such then-radical things<br />

as community consultation, store-front<br />

8 Saluting our Past - Promoting our Future


offi ces and “park’n’walk”. An outgrowth<br />

of this was its award-winning Victim<br />

<strong>Services</strong> Unit, established in 1992 as one<br />

of the few in Ontario.<br />

However, the Service found that they<br />

couldn’t just ask the people what the<br />

problems were – they had to be an<br />

integral part of the solution. <strong>Hamilton</strong><br />

<strong>Police</strong> developed an “intelligencelead,<br />

all-agency” model to work on<br />

the prevention leg of the “prevention,<br />

detection, apprehension” crime triangle,<br />

to fi x the cause of a problem, not just the<br />

symptoms.<br />

Intelligence from all sources, including<br />

the public, is widely disseminated. It<br />

is uncommon now to fi nd an unknown<br />

criminal and when they do, they are<br />

usually rapidly identified. Offi cers<br />

seconded to work with the provincial and<br />

federal parole offices have also proven<br />

remarkably effective in its preventive<br />

intelligence efforts.<br />

<strong>The</strong> new paradigm is constant change.<br />

<strong>The</strong> key is the mission, not the methods.<br />

<strong>The</strong> newest example of this is the<br />

award-winning Neighbourhood Safety<br />

Project. NSP is a policing model that’s<br />

quickly building an impressive resume<br />

of success and versatility. NSP involves<br />

a cultural change, moving the <strong>Hamilton</strong><br />

<strong>Police</strong> Service from time-based squad<br />

deployment to a geographic-based<br />

deployment.<br />

<strong>The</strong> future is wide open. Recognizing that<br />

criminals cross municipal boundaries,<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> has built a reputation as a<br />

collaborative service, working with<br />

national and international agencies.<br />

Today, <strong>Hamilton</strong> is a leading-edge,<br />

intelligence-lead, community-based fullfunction<br />

modern police service.<br />

A 175th anniversary is quite a milestone.<br />

But what is truly remarkable is the men<br />

and women of the Service, past and<br />

present, who have brought the Service to<br />

where it is today.<br />

<strong>The</strong>ir commitment to the community is<br />

without parallel.<br />

<strong>2008</strong> Annual <strong>Report</strong><br />

9


HAMILTON POLICE SERVICE<br />

• Consecration and Trooping of<br />

the Colours<br />

It was on May 12 that a special event<br />

was planned to unveil the <strong>Hamilton</strong><br />

<strong>Police</strong> Service Grant of Arms and the<br />

Consecration and Trooping of the<br />

<strong>Services</strong> fi rst-ever <strong>Police</strong> Colour. <strong>The</strong><br />

Grant of Arms, more commonly known as<br />

a Coat of Arms incorporates symbolism<br />

refl ecting the 175 years of history and<br />

heritage of the <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service.<br />

A ‘Colour’ is a ceremonial fl ag, with a<br />

specific registered design, awarded to<br />

the <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service by the Queen<br />

through the Governor-General and the<br />

Canadian Heraldic Authority. <strong>The</strong> design<br />

incorporates very specifi c symbolic<br />

features.<br />

To consecrate a fl ag is to ceremonially<br />

dedicate it to the service of the men<br />

and women, offi cers and civilians,<br />

of the <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service. <strong>The</strong><br />

consecration making the flag a visible<br />

symbol of the 175 years which have<br />

passed since the Service has created,<br />

and emblematic of the years to come. It<br />

is meant to serve as an inspiration for the<br />

future, and is a silent challenge to the<br />

future members to meet and exceed the<br />

achievements of those who have come<br />

before them. In a ceremony steeped in<br />

protocol and pageantry, the colour was<br />

consecrated by a drumhead service.<br />

• From Novelty to Narcotics,<br />

Matron to Major Investigations,<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> mark 50th<br />

Anniversary of Women in<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> Policing<br />

With a skirt and a purse for their gun, the<br />

fi rst three women hired as police offi cers<br />

by <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> reported for duty –<br />

desk job that it was five decades ago.<br />

Whether it was being mistaken as postal<br />

workers because of their hats or having<br />

bar fi ghts stop because a female offi cer<br />

responded, it has been quite a journey.<br />

Women in <strong>Hamilton</strong> policing have<br />

recorded a number of fi rsts. In 1962,<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> hired the first east Asian<br />

female police officer in North America.<br />

Also, a recently opened <strong>Hamilton</strong> public<br />

elementary school was named in honour<br />

of Cathy Wever, a <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong><br />

constable – this is believed to be the fi rst<br />

time a school has ever been named after<br />

a female offi cer.<br />

Today, the <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service has<br />

148 female offi cers, 19 percent of the<br />

total uniform complement. Female<br />

offi cers are now fully integrated, with<br />

all positions open to them including<br />

Emergency Response, Homicide and<br />

Forensic Units. Women have held all<br />

positions in the Service from Constable<br />

through to Deputy Chief.<br />

To mark this signifi cant milestone, a<br />

celebration event was held in June. <strong>The</strong><br />

only remaining officer from 1958, Helen<br />

Andreef (Toth) who resides in California,<br />

was in attendance along with many<br />

current serving offi cers as well as many<br />

who had left the Service.<br />

<strong>The</strong> evening also featured the debut of<br />

a specially created video tribute. This<br />

was an exceptional exercise that resulted<br />

in the compilation of an extensive and<br />

complete pictoral of women in <strong>Hamilton</strong><br />

policing – a legacy product for the<br />

Service. <strong>The</strong> result? A powerful sixminute<br />

video that through photos and<br />

interviews told the story of women in<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> Policing.<br />

A copy of the video was provided to<br />

every female offi cer in the Service and<br />

was posted on the <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> and<br />

the Ontario Women in Law Enforcement<br />

website.<br />

10 Saluting our Past - Promoting our Future


TODAY, THE HAMILTON<br />

POLICE SERVICE HAS<br />

148 FEMALE OFFICERS,<br />

19 PERCENT OF THE<br />

TOTAL UNIFORM<br />

COMPLEMENT<br />

• Arrested in Time – the exhibit<br />

In November, Fieldcote Memorial<br />

Park and Museum, with support from<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong>, launched a new exhibit<br />

called Arrested in Time which explored<br />

the history of policing in Ancaster and<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> and celebrated <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong><br />

Service’s 175th anniversary and 50 years<br />

of women in policing in <strong>Hamilton</strong>.<br />

Visitors learned about forensics by using<br />

evidence such as bloodstain pattern<br />

analysis to solve a crime and made their<br />

own fi ngerprints. Guests saw an original<br />

Studebaker police vehicle, Louis Riel’s leg<br />

irons, the revolver from the famed Evelyn<br />

Dick case, vintage uniforms and the last<br />

”call box” used in <strong>Hamilton</strong>. Highlights<br />

included an interactive witness line-up<br />

activity and re-creation of a murder crime<br />

scene.<br />

Hundreds of citizens and students from<br />

area schools toured the exhibit which<br />

demonstrated the Service’s reach out<br />

to the community. Additionally, many<br />

members of the Service had their families<br />

and friends visit the exhibit to learn more<br />

about the history of police.<br />

<strong>2008</strong> Annual <strong>Report</strong><br />

11


HIGHLIGHTS<br />

• <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> present Taxi<br />

Cab Forums<br />

Three educational forums geared towards<br />

the cab industry were held in April and<br />

May in <strong>Hamilton</strong>. <strong>The</strong> forums were for<br />

all persons engaged in the industry<br />

including drivers, owners, and brokers.<br />

<strong>The</strong>ir focus was primarily on crime<br />

prevention and personal safety tactics.<br />

<strong>The</strong> sessions provided an opportunity for<br />

the industry to learn about the resources<br />

available to them from within the<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong>.<br />

Topics covered included an<br />

announcement on a new and improved<br />

version of Cab Watch, a police / cab<br />

partnership program, and a presentation<br />

from <strong>Hamilton</strong> Crime Stoppers. <strong>The</strong>se<br />

forums were designed to stimulate an<br />

environment of learning and information<br />

sharing between the police and the<br />

ground transportation industry.<br />

CRIME STOPPERS HAS<br />

AN OUTSTANDING<br />

NATIONAL AND<br />

INTERNATIONAL<br />

REPUTATION WITH TOP<br />

LAW ENFORCEMENT<br />

AGENCIES<br />

• Thousands of arrests and tens<br />

of millions of dollars in recovered<br />

illegal drugs as <strong>Hamilton</strong> Crime<br />

Stoppers marks its quarter<br />

century<br />

<strong>The</strong> multi-award winning <strong>Hamilton</strong> Crime<br />

Stoppers program marked its quarter<br />

century by hosting the 22nd Annual<br />

Ontario Association of Crime Stoppers<br />

Training Conference. Taking place at<br />

Mohawk College on May 31, close to<br />

200 delegates from across Canada and<br />

the United States attended the annual<br />

session to learn and network.<br />

Crime Stoppers was launched in<br />

Albuquerque, New Mexico in 1976<br />

when a local detective used the power<br />

of media, a reward, and anonymous<br />

information to gather tips about an<br />

unsolved murder. With this system, the<br />

murder was solved within 24 hours and<br />

Crime Stoppers was born.<br />

In 1983, a group of like minded citizens,<br />

led by the then Regional Chair of<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong>-Wentworth, Reg Whynott, saw<br />

in the Crime Stoppers program, a way to<br />

make our city a safer place to live and<br />

work. With several other business people,<br />

he paved the way for Crime Stoppers<br />

of <strong>Hamilton</strong> Inc. as the fi rst program in<br />

Ontario.<br />

“Crime Stoppers has an outstanding<br />

national and international reputation<br />

with top law enforcement agencies<br />

such as the FBI, RCMP, New Scotland<br />

Yard and many others”, said OACS<br />

President Pat Gillie. “We have over 1,200<br />

programs working with media, police and<br />

community leaders in the collection and<br />

dissemination of information that leads<br />

to solving and prevention of crimes and<br />

terrorism”.<br />

Crime Stoppers brings law enforcement<br />

agencies, citizens, and businesses<br />

together in a united crime prevention<br />

partnership. <strong>The</strong> need and ability to share<br />

accurate information quickly has become<br />

of paramount importance.<br />

Michael Moore, Chair of <strong>Hamilton</strong> Crime<br />

Stoppers stated recently “While our<br />

police and government has a signifi cant<br />

role in addressing our nation’s safety,<br />

each one of us is also responsible for<br />

securing our families, our homes, and our<br />

communities against both local crimes<br />

and acts of terrorism.”<br />

HAMILTON CRIME<br />

STOPPERS STATISTICAL<br />

UPDATE<br />

<strong>2008</strong><br />

Criminal Arrests<br />

year end total 58<br />

total to date 4351<br />

Cases Cleared<br />

year end total 96<br />

total to date 8718<br />

Property Recovered<br />

year end total $70,720<br />

total to date $14,787,546<br />

Hydro <strong>The</strong>ft<br />

year end total $250,000<br />

total to date $250,000<br />

Drugs Seized<br />

year end total $4,094,331<br />

total to date $66,002,130<br />

Web Tips<br />

year end total 141<br />

total to date 213<br />

Calls to Tip Line<br />

year end total 928<br />

total to date 39,415<br />

Arsons Solved<br />

year end total —<br />

total to date $2,312,000<br />

Rewards Approved<br />

year end total $17,700<br />

total to date $667,895<br />

Firearms Seized<br />

year end total 9<br />

total to date 95<br />

12 Saluting our Past - Promoting our Future


OFF THE WALL WAS<br />

THEIR BATTLE CRY<br />

• Centre Mall Community Policing<br />

Centre Re-locates to Ottawa St.<br />

Forced to move as a result of extensive<br />

renovations, the <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service’s<br />

(HPS) Centre Mall Community Policing<br />

Centre (CPC) found a new home at 204<br />

Ottawa St.N. It also found new partners<br />

as it shares a store front with the Ottawa<br />

BIA and Ottawa St. Farmers Market.<br />

<strong>The</strong> HPS has 11 Community Policing<br />

Centres throughout the City of <strong>Hamilton</strong>,<br />

which is part of its commitment to<br />

community and intelligence-led policing<br />

initiative.<br />

<strong>The</strong> Ottawa St. CPC has over 50<br />

volunteers and is involved in a number<br />

of activities that include: Speed Watch,<br />

stolen auto callbacks, citizen crime<br />

reporting, school presentations, reading<br />

buddies program, assistance with infant<br />

car seat installations and ChildFind<br />

fi ngerprinting.<br />

• Graffiti Prevention Off the Wall<br />

with Focus on Education and<br />

Sustainability<br />

Off the wall was their battle cry as the<br />

Graffi ti Prevention Strategy (GPS) team<br />

worked in lockstep community members,<br />

volunteers and students as they mark<br />

the third year of the Graffiti Prevention<br />

Strategy (GPS) in the City of <strong>Hamilton</strong><br />

with a graffiti clean-up at Cathy Wever<br />

Elementary School.<br />

A partnership between <strong>Hamilton</strong> Safe<br />

Communities Coalition (HSCC), the City<br />

of <strong>Hamilton</strong> and <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service<br />

(HPS), this activity highlights the key<br />

goal of this year’s GPS program which<br />

is educating the community to eliminate<br />

and prevent graffiti.<br />

A three-year project now in its final year,<br />

GPS is funded through a $125,558 grant<br />

from the federal government’s National<br />

Crime Prevention Centre and Crime<br />

Prevention Action Fund and $109,700 in<br />

services in kind from the City of <strong>Hamilton</strong>.<br />

<strong>The</strong> program is unique as it is both<br />

community and police-centred making<br />

it the fi rst broad-based graffi ti program<br />

involving sustainable partnerships in<br />

Ontario.<br />

Similar to many urban centres, the City<br />

of <strong>Hamilton</strong> has seen a proliferation of<br />

graffi ti.<br />

<strong>The</strong> other main goals of the GPS are to<br />

reduce the amount of visible graffiti in<br />

various neighbourhoods and to educate<br />

citizens on graffi ti related issues such<br />

as the perception of fear of crime and<br />

property reporting mechanisms.<br />

<strong>The</strong> GPS team is documenting graffiti<br />

which is then input to a database that<br />

is utilized by <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong>. Once the<br />

graffi ti has been documented, the GPS<br />

team, equipped with gallons of Goofoff<br />

and a power washer, will assist in<br />

mobilizing the community in fi ghting<br />

graffi ti.<br />

Paint over days, monitoring of a Rapid<br />

Removal Wall, and Adopt-a-block are<br />

some of the other activities the GPS team<br />

will be involved with.<br />

• Operation Midnight Express -<br />

Emergency Preparedness Exercise<br />

Here’s the scenario: Armed extremists<br />

hijack a train and a boat in a busy<br />

Canadian port city. <strong>The</strong> train sets off<br />

for Toronto with a chemical weapon on<br />

board. <strong>The</strong> boat, stocked with explosives,<br />

heads for a major bridge during rush<br />

hour. Other extremists hole up in a<br />

warehouse at the pier, guns, hostages<br />

and bombs at the ready.<br />

Could it happen? It did on May 27, <strong>2008</strong>,<br />

in <strong>Hamilton</strong>, Ontario.<br />

It was all part of Operation Midnight<br />

Express, a day-long emergency response<br />

exercise co-ordinated by <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong><br />

and involving over 110 first responders<br />

from the <strong>Hamilton</strong>, Halton and Niagara<br />

municipal police services; the RCMP;<br />

Canadian Pacifi c Rail; the City of<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong>; <strong>Hamilton</strong> fi re and emergency<br />

services; and <strong>Hamilton</strong> hospitals.<br />

“We wanted to test interoperability, to<br />

further develop partnerships,” says Supt.<br />

Paul Morrison, who chaired the exercise<br />

planning committee.<br />

<strong>The</strong> exercise was designed to occur in<br />

real-time, with participants having little<br />

<strong>2008</strong> Annual <strong>Report</strong><br />

13


“IT WAS A CHANCE<br />

FOR YOUTH TO SEE<br />

POLICE OFFICERS<br />

AS MORE THAN<br />

JUST A UNIFORM,”<br />

or no prior knowledge of the situation.<br />

Events escalated from a seemingly<br />

routine single-vehicle collision to a<br />

full-blown extremist incident spanning<br />

multiple sites, with a joint incident<br />

command team headed by HPS Deputy<br />

Chief Ken Leendertse.<br />

As the day progressed, those systems<br />

and synergies were put to the test.<br />

Tactical teams from <strong>Hamilton</strong>, Halton<br />

and Niagara synched up with the RCMP<br />

Marine Security Emergency Response<br />

Team to conduct simultaneous assaults<br />

on the train, warehouse and vessel.<br />

Municipal forces practised using a radio<br />

interoperability system provided by the<br />

RCMP — ironing out some kinks along<br />

the way. Transport Canada provided<br />

crucial information on how to safely<br />

divert marine traffic during the marine<br />

assault. And <strong>Hamilton</strong> medical services<br />

performed a casualty triage, testing the<br />

lines of communication between first<br />

responders and hospital staff.<br />

AS THE DAY<br />

PROGRESSED, THOSE<br />

SYSTEMS AND<br />

SYNERGIES WERE PUT<br />

TO THE TEST<br />

• A Christmas Miracle as Missing<br />

Ancaster Woman found Alive<br />

Just before Christmas Day, <strong>Hamilton</strong><br />

<strong>Police</strong> Search and Rescue Team<br />

launched a search for an area resident<br />

who went missing during a snow storm.<br />

On the third day of the search, the<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Search and Rescue<br />

Team found the resident alive, in a<br />

conscious, hypothermic state. She was<br />

located within 200 metres of her found<br />

vehicle, in deep snow. She was found<br />

by one of the <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Search and<br />

Rescue’s volunteer rescue dogs, Ace,<br />

and his handler, Ray Lau.<br />

• <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> and Aboriginal<br />

Youth Journey on the Grand<br />

A group of 40 aboriginal youth and<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Offi cers participated in a<br />

‘Journey’ on the Grand River.<br />

A cooperative program of <strong>Hamilton</strong> Native<br />

Centre and <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong>, each youth<br />

was paired with a <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Offi cer<br />

to work together as a team to navigate the<br />

Grand in a canoe.<br />

<strong>The</strong> fi rst of what is expected to be an<br />

annual event, the day also included a<br />

barbecue and a Native Teaching.<br />

“It was a chance for youth to see police<br />

offi cers as more than just a uniform,”<br />

said <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Youth Coordinator,<br />

Sgt. Will Mason. “<strong>The</strong> idea was to help<br />

break down some of the traditional<br />

barriers we all might experience.”<br />

<strong>The</strong> students were from area secondary<br />

schools. Funding for <strong>The</strong> Journey has<br />

been made possible in part by ProAction,<br />

Cops and Kids.<br />

14 Saluting our Past - Promoting our Future


STATISTICAL<br />

HIGHLIGHTS<br />

OFENCE TYPE<br />

OFFENCE AND CLEARANCE RATE COMPARISONS<br />

2007 & <strong>2008</strong><br />

2007<br />

Offences<br />

Number<br />

Cleared<br />

Clearance<br />

Rate<br />

<strong>2008</strong><br />

Offences<br />

Number<br />

Cleared<br />

Clearance<br />

Rate<br />

Offence<br />

% Change<br />

Number<br />

Cleared<br />

% Change<br />

Violent Crimes 4,660 2,977 63.9% 4,950 3,216 65.0% 6.2% 8.0%<br />

Homicide 10 9 90.0% 6 8 133.3% -40.0% -11.1%<br />

Attempt Murder 4 3 75.0% 4 3 75.0% 0.0% 0.0%<br />

Abductions 8 1 12.5% 3 3 100.0% -62.5% 200.0%<br />

Sexual Offences 403 178 44.2% 357 166 46.5% -11.4% -6.7%<br />

Assault 3,474 2,509 72.2% 3,814 2,728 71.5% 9.8% 8.7%<br />

Robbery 761 277 36.4% 766 308 40.2% 0.7% 11.2%<br />

Property Crimes 17,498 3,075 17.6% 17,026 3,340 19.6% -2.7% 8.6%<br />

Business 1,015 125 12.3% 1,002 244 24.4% -1.3% 95.2%<br />

Housebreaking 2,254 298 13.2% 1,696 349 20.6% -24.8% 17.1%<br />

Other B&E 253 19 7.5% 148 5 3.4% -41.5% -73.7%<br />

<strong>The</strong>ft Motor Vehicle 2,999 97 3.2% 2,748 158 5.7% -8.4% 62.9%<br />

<strong>The</strong>ft Over $5,000 251 33 13.1% 253 32 12.6% 0.8% -3.0%<br />

<strong>The</strong>ft Under $5,000 8,526 1,381 16.2% 9,018 1,466 16.3% 5.8% 6.2%<br />

Pos. Stolen Goods 812 777 95.7% 707 676 95.6% -12.9% -13.0%<br />

Fraud 1,388 345 24.9% 1,454 410 28.2% 4.8% 18.8%<br />

Other Criminal Code 10,284 4,311 41.9% 9,832 3,989 40.6% -4.4% -7.5%<br />

Prostitution 87 84 96.6% 86 81 94.2% -1.1% -3.6%<br />

Poss. Weapons 210 132 62.9% 175 102 58.3% -16.7% -22.7%<br />

Other Criminal Code 9,987 4,095 41.0% 9,571 3,806 39.8% -4.2% -7.1%<br />

Total Criminal Code (excl. Traffic) 32,442 10,363 31.9% 31,808 10,545 33.2% -2.0% 1.8%<br />

Drugs 924 869 94.0% 1,189 1,098 92.3% 28.7% 26.4%<br />

Other Federal Statutes 190 163 85.8% 182 156 85.7% -4.2% -4.3%<br />

TOTAL INCIDENTS 33,556 11,395 34.0% 33,179 11,799 35.6% -1.1% 3.5%<br />

2007 Offence and Clearance numbers and percentages from CCJS verified data (May 5, <strong>2008</strong>)<br />

<strong>2008</strong> Offence and Clearance numbers and percentages from CCJS verified data (May 13, 2009)<br />

<strong>2008</strong> Annual <strong>Report</strong><br />

15


FATAL MOTOR VEHICLE COLLISIONS<br />

2003 - <strong>2008</strong><br />

MOTOR VEHICLE COLLISIONS 2003 - <strong>2008</strong><br />

PERSONAL INJURY & PROPERTY DAMAGE<br />

30<br />

3,000<br />

PERSONAL INJURY<br />

PROPERTY DAMAGE<br />

25<br />

24<br />

2,500<br />

2,534<br />

FREQUENCY<br />

20<br />

15<br />

10<br />

21<br />

17<br />

20<br />

23<br />

21<br />

16<br />

FREQUENCY<br />

2,000<br />

1,500<br />

1,000<br />

1,987<br />

1,859<br />

1,595<br />

1,828<br />

1,624<br />

1,561<br />

1,357<br />

1,561<br />

1,562<br />

1,759<br />

1,734<br />

1,539<br />

1,455<br />

5<br />

500<br />

0<br />

2003<br />

2004<br />

2005<br />

2006<br />

2007<br />

5yr<br />

avg<br />

<strong>2008</strong><br />

0<br />

2003<br />

2004<br />

2005<br />

2006<br />

2007<br />

5yr<br />

avg<br />

<strong>2008</strong><br />

Source: <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service Traffic Branch<br />

Source: <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service Traffic Branch<br />

YOUTH CHARGED AND NOT CHARGED WITH OFFENCES 1996 - <strong>2008</strong><br />

3,000<br />

3,115<br />

FEMALES CHARGED<br />

MALES CHARGED<br />

YOUTHS NOT CHARGED<br />

FREQUENCY<br />

2,500<br />

2,000<br />

1,500<br />

1,000<br />

1,766<br />

2,175<br />

1,784<br />

2,620<br />

1,488<br />

2,283<br />

1,463<br />

2,699<br />

1,479<br />

2,744<br />

1,473<br />

1,286<br />

2,424<br />

1,124<br />

2,245<br />

899<br />

1,985<br />

907<br />

2,081<br />

914<br />

1,948<br />

2,309<br />

2,359<br />

500<br />

0<br />

510<br />

1996<br />

581<br />

1997<br />

432<br />

1998<br />

409<br />

1999<br />

441<br />

2000<br />

401<br />

2001<br />

319<br />

2002<br />

269<br />

2003<br />

190<br />

2004<br />

164<br />

2005<br />

215<br />

2006<br />

218<br />

756<br />

2007<br />

187<br />

640<br />

<strong>2008</strong><br />

Source: <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service Youth Crime <strong>2008</strong> Annual <strong>Report</strong><br />

16 Saluting our Past - Promoting our Future


TRAFFIC INCIDENTS & RATES<br />

2007 & <strong>2008</strong><br />

TRAFFIC INCIDENT<br />

2007<br />

Incidents<br />

Rate per<br />

100,000<br />

<strong>2008</strong><br />

Incidents<br />

Rate per<br />

100,000<br />

Rate per<br />

100,000<br />

Variance<br />

% Change<br />

over 2007<br />

Motor Vehicle Collisions 9,358 1,805.9 10,903 2,100.3 16.3% 16.5%<br />

Personal Injury 1,561 301.2 1,539 296.5 -1.6% -1.4%<br />

Property Damage 1,562 301.4 1,455 280.3 -7.0% -6.9%<br />

Citizen’s <strong>Report</strong>s 6,211 1,198.6 7,893 1,520.5 26.9% 27.1%<br />

Fatalities 24 4.6 16 3.1 -33.5% -33.3%<br />

RIDE PROGRAM<br />

Vehicles Checked 89,536 17,278.9 132,508 25,526.0 47.7% 48.0%<br />

Persons Charged 24 4.6 18 3.5 -25.1% -25.0%<br />

12-hour Suspensions 110 21.2 101 19.5 -8.3% -8.2%<br />

Impaired Drivers 4 0.8 10 1.9 149.6% 150.0%<br />

Criminal Code Driving Offences 1,231 237.6 1,385 266.8 12.3% 12.5%<br />

Dangerous Operation 83 16.0 99 19.1 19.1% 19.3%<br />

Alcohol Related 340 65.6 495 95.4 45.3% 45.6%<br />

Fail to Stop or Remain 750 144.7 739 142.4 -1.6% -1.5%<br />

Drive MV while Prohibited 58 11.2 52 10.0 -10.5% -10.3%<br />

Highway Traffi c Act Offences 43,388 8,373.1 47,636 9,176.5 9.6% 9.8%<br />

Careless Driving 786 159.8 828 159.5 -0.2% 5.3%<br />

Speeding 30,537 5,878.6 30,462 5,868.1 -0.2% -0.2%<br />

Disobey Traffi c Light 721 148.8 771 148.5 -0.2% 6.9%<br />

Disobey Stop Sign 1,449 313.2 1,623 312.7 -0.2% 12.0%<br />

Turn Violations 535 111.5 578 111.3 -0.2% 8.0%<br />

Licence Violations 1,432 303.9 1,575 303.4 -0.2% 10.0%<br />

Permit/Plate 3,938 973.4 5,044 971.7 -0.2% 28.1%<br />

Insurance Violations 2,054 574.1 2,975 573.1 -0.2% 44.8%<br />

Seat belt 1,113 182.6 946 182.2 -0.2% -15.0%<br />

Other HTA Offences 823 546.9 2,834 545.9 -0.2% 244.3%<br />

Source: HPS Traffic Branch<br />

2007 CC Driving Offences from CCJS verified data (May 5, <strong>2008</strong>)<br />

<strong>2008</strong> CC Driving Offences from CCJS verified data (May 15, 2009)<br />

<strong>2008</strong> Annual <strong>Report</strong><br />

17


COMPLAINTS 2003 - <strong>2008</strong><br />

COMPLAINT TYPE 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 5YR AVG <strong>2008</strong><br />

Public Complaints 115 135 110 105 141 121.2 129<br />

Service Complaints 12 6 14 12 8 10.4 2<br />

Internal Complaints 43 20 31 33 50 35.4 24<br />

Harassment Complaints 0 3 4 2 5 2.8 2<br />

Pursuits 75 66 65 49 52 61.4 77<br />

S.I.U. Investigations 9 8 8 10 7 8.4 8<br />

Total 254 238 232 211 263 239.6 242<br />

Source: <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service Professional Standards Branch Year-End <strong>2008</strong> <strong>Report</strong><br />

CALLS-FOR-SERVICE 2003-<strong>2008</strong><br />

NET BUDGET GROWTH (2000 - <strong>2008</strong>)<br />

100,000<br />

$140,000,000<br />

$120,000,000<br />

$100,000,000<br />

$80,000,000<br />

$60,000,000<br />

$40,000,000<br />

$75,900,060<br />

$81,664,230<br />

$85,142,010<br />

$91,878,360<br />

$98,218,270<br />

$102,478,370<br />

$107,107,830<br />

$111,062,560<br />

$116,051,430<br />

FREQUENCY<br />

80,000<br />

60,000<br />

40,000<br />

20,000<br />

0<br />

88,173<br />

2003<br />

84,860<br />

2004<br />

87,028 87,028<br />

84,444<br />

2005 2006<br />

78,549<br />

78,549<br />

78,549<br />

80,198<br />

2007 <strong>2008</strong><br />

$20,000,000<br />

$0<br />

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006<br />

Source: 2009 Propsed Budget to Council<br />

2007<br />

<strong>2008</strong><br />

• Criminal 35,449 33,976 35,300 35,952 33,052 34,346<br />

• Non-criminal 43,305 42,243 42,181 39,230 36,148 36,453<br />

• Traffi c 9,319 8,525 9,411 9,126 9,251 9,311<br />

• Other 100 116 136 136 98 88<br />

Source: 2009 <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service Budget Presentation<br />

Priorty 0 - 0.17%<br />

CALLS-FOR-SERVICE<br />

BY PRIORITY <strong>2008</strong><br />

Priorty 4<br />

21.86%<br />

Priorty 1<br />

17.07%<br />

Source: 2009 Propsed Budget to Council<br />

Priorty 3<br />

21.00%<br />

Priorty 2<br />

39.89%<br />

18 Saluting our Past - Promoting our Future


OPERATIONS &<br />

TASK FORCES<br />

JOINT FORCES OPERATIONS<br />

& INTERNAL TASK FORCES<br />

IN <strong>2008</strong>, THE HAMILTON POLICE SERVICE PARTICIPATED IN MANY JOINT FORCES OPERATIONS AND<br />

INTERNAL TASK FORCES. THE FOLLOWING ARE HIGHLIGHTS OF SOME OF THESE INITIATIVES:<br />

1<br />

2<br />

3<br />

PROJECT HARDWOOD<br />

GOAL: To identify those persons responsible for a series of<br />

marihuana grow houses located throughout<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> and execute CDSA Search Warrants at the<br />

identified residences.<br />

COST: Staffi ng only<br />

RESULTS: Executed 9 search warrants; seized 844 marihuana<br />

plants (street value - $844,000), 7.7 pounds of<br />

processed marihuana (street value - $30,800);<br />

25 g of cocaine (street value - $2,500); $4,000<br />

cash; 1 sawed-off rifl e and shoulder holster; arrested<br />

15 people and numerous drug-related charges.<br />

PROJECT RUGGED<br />

GOAL: To investigate the importation of a large amount of<br />

cannabis resin destined from the Caribbean to Nova<br />

Scotia by boat in conjunction with the <strong>Hamilton</strong> and<br />

Nova Scotia RCMP.<br />

COST: Staffi ng only<br />

RESULTS: Obtained 7 search warrants and executed on 6<br />

addresses in <strong>Hamilton</strong> and 1 in Burlington. Seized<br />

1,800 lbs of cannabis resin (street value $18<br />

millions); 3 boats valued at over $200,000; 3<br />

vehicles; $90,000 cash; laid numerous drug related<br />

charges. 12 people arrested and charged.<br />

PROJECT “REPRISE”<br />

GOAL: To minimize the criminal activities (robberies and<br />

property crime) in Division 1 through dedicated<br />

enforcement in conjunction with Division 1 HEAT,<br />

Core Patrol and Intelligence.<br />

COST: Staffi ng only for the 3 week project duration<br />

RESULTS: 41 arrests; 39 CDSA charges; 22 Criminal Code<br />

charges; 7 undercover buys; executed 5 search<br />

warrants; shut down 7 crack houses; executed 8<br />

warrants and 4 robbery arrests.<br />

4<br />

5<br />

6<br />

PROJECT SABOT<br />

GOAL: To locate and seize marihuana that was being grown<br />

outdoors in the Niagara and <strong>Hamilton</strong> area in<br />

partnership with the RCMP, OPP, Brantford <strong>Police</strong>,<br />

DND and the Niagara Regional <strong>Police</strong>.<br />

COST: Staffi ng only<br />

RESULTS: Seized 1,659 marihuana plants, 4 drug-related<br />

arrests, seized house valued at $380,000 as Offence<br />

Related Property.<br />

SEX TRADE TASK FORCE<br />

GOAL: To increase services, health and safety for all<br />

individuals in sex work in <strong>Hamilton</strong> by partnering<br />

with community agencies and community members.<br />

COST: Staffi ng only<br />

RESULTS: Inspected over 80 licensed establishments;<br />

identifi ed over 140 violations/infractions; 3 bar<br />

closures (Calabash, Remedy and Jam Rock); over<br />

113 prostitution arrests; inspected 15 massage<br />

parlours which resulted in 25 bylaw charges and<br />

closed down 1 massage parlour (Pink Planet);<br />

seized 2 guns and 1 prohibited weapon; seized<br />

marihuana, crack, cocaine and cannabis resin.<br />

PROJECT ASSET INVESTIGATIONS<br />

GOAL: To conduct investigations and seize properties by<br />

using the Offence Related Property legislation.<br />

COST: Staffi ng only<br />

RESULTS: 11 homes (total value of $3.5 millions) were<br />

restrained as a result of drug investigations;<br />

2 properties valued in excess of $1 million<br />

forfeited to the Crown; 9 vehicles seized.<br />

<strong>2008</strong> Annual <strong>Report</strong><br />

19


7<br />

8<br />

PROJECT REACT<br />

GOAL: To investigate stolen autos jointly with municipal<br />

police agencies in the Golden Horseshoe, Six<br />

Nations <strong>Police</strong> and Ontario Provincial <strong>Police</strong>.<br />

COST: 1 Detective for 8 months<br />

RESULTS: 20 arrests, 50 criminal charges, 180 vehicles<br />

seized, 1 kg of cocaine and $70,000 proceeds of<br />

crime.<br />

PROJECT 170<br />

GOAL: To ensure pawnbrokers and second-hand stores<br />

within the City of <strong>Hamilton</strong> were in compliance with<br />

the Pawnbrokers Act of Ontario and City of <strong>Hamilton</strong><br />

Bylaw 07-170 which regulates second-hand stores.<br />

COST: 4 Detective Constables for 1 week<br />

RESULTS: 17 charges laid against 2 pawnbrokers, 4 secondhand<br />

stores and 3 unlicensed stores.<br />

12<br />

13<br />

PROJECT SWITCHBLADE<br />

GOAL: To address downtown street robberies and target<br />

violent offenders.<br />

COST: Staffi ng Only<br />

RESULTS: 30 Arrests and over 70 Charges ranging from<br />

Robbery, <strong>The</strong>ft, Break and Enter and CDSA charges.<br />

PROJECT S.A.F.E STUDENTS<br />

GOAL: To address the high speeds in and around<br />

Central School located at 75 Hunter St W.<br />

COST: Staffi ng Only<br />

RESULTS: Positive feedback from community, staff at the<br />

school, students and officers involved. It was a<br />

project created to combat the speeding and get<br />

the kids involved to send a stronger message. <strong>The</strong><br />

students had a great time and enjoy the interaction<br />

with police when attending the school. Students and<br />

parents were very enthusiastic about project.<br />

9<br />

10<br />

11<br />

PROJECT LATE NIGHT<br />

GOAL: To target a group of known parties who were<br />

engaging in roof top entries under cover of night.<br />

COST: 1 Detective and 5 Detective Constables for 2 months<br />

RESULTS: 4 arrests, 21 charges, 16 clearances.<br />

PROJECT EXPEDITE<br />

GOAL: To investigate internal theft of high-end items<br />

(laptops and Blackberries) and drugs from incoming<br />

fl ights.<br />

COST: 1 Detective and 8 Detective Constables for 2 weeks<br />

PROJECT SPRING AWAKENING<br />

GOAL: To target wanted parties and repeat offenders.<br />

COST: 1 Detective Constable and Div. 1 H.E.A.T. and<br />

Uniform Patrol<br />

14<br />

15<br />

PROJECT PURGE<br />

GOAL: To suppress the escalation of crack cocaine<br />

use/traffi cking in Division One through proactive<br />

checks of identified Crack Houses.<br />

COST: Staffi ng Only<br />

RESULTS: 18 Crack Houses targets, 30 Proactive Checks<br />

conducted, Arrested 10 persons (3 Warrant<br />

Executions, 7 CDSA charges, 3 CCC charges), 4<br />

Crack Houses shut down, 7 CI reports generated.<br />

PROJECT CU<br />

GOAL: To identify and arrests persons responsible for<br />

committing break and enters to steal copper.<br />

COST: Staffi ng Only<br />

RESULTS: <strong>The</strong> primary suspect was identifi ed and arrested<br />

committing a copper theft. <strong>The</strong> arrest lead to the<br />

clearance of 71 other copper theft entries.<br />

RESULTS<br />

20 Saluting our Past - Promoting our Future


PERFORMANCE<br />

<strong>2008</strong><br />

REPORT ON THE CHIEF’S<br />

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES<br />

EVERY YEAR, THE CHIEF OF POLICE SETS ANNUAL STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES FOR THE SERVICE.<br />

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES ARE ISSUES THAT HAVE BEEN GIVEN SPECIAL PRIORITY AND MUST BE FAST<br />

TRACKED IN THE IMMEDIATE YEAR. IN <strong>2008</strong>, CHIEF BRIAN MULLAN COMMITTED THE SERVICE TO<br />

THE ACHIEVEMENT OF THE FOLLOWING FOUR STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES. THE RESULTS OF THE<br />

OBJECTIVES ARE SUMMARIZED IN BULLET POINTS BELOW:<br />

1 3<br />

To implement creative workforce planning<br />

strategies in order to ensure adequate staffing<br />

level at the front line.<br />

• Developed and initiated our part-time policing initiative.<br />

• Pre-hiring of recruits to fill into retirement gaps more<br />

quickly.<br />

2To implement innovative technology strategies<br />

designed to efficiently and effectively address<br />

end-user needs.<br />

• Launched a major business practice review with focus<br />

on end-users.<br />

• NICHE enhanced and training delivered to frontline on<br />

43 occasions to improve knowledge and ease of use.<br />

• During <strong>2008</strong>, NICHE Resource Team has launched 8<br />

projects to enhance end-user usage of NICHE.<br />

• Research has now been completed in reducing the<br />

number of screens users need to access in 80%<br />

of our occurrence reports. <strong>The</strong> number of screens<br />

needed to be complete will be reduced by 96%.<br />

Recommendations going forward for action during first<br />

quarter of 2009.<br />

• In order to achieve a greater level of efficiency, a fourth<br />

dispatch station was added to the Communications<br />

Branch. <strong>The</strong> station will allow for easier access to<br />

frontline in emergency situations.<br />

• This year, we installed GPS into all frontline cruisers.<br />

<strong>The</strong> install was to assist in the locating of officer and a<br />

more timely dispatch of units in emergency situations.<br />

• A new TTD machine was installed into the<br />

Communications Branch, thereby making it easier for<br />

individuals with hearing diffi culties to access police<br />

services.<br />

4<br />

To improve the effectiveness and efficiency of<br />

our front-line service delivery by developing and<br />

implementing an appropriate active supervision<br />

model.<br />

• In <strong>2008</strong>, we undertook a review of active supervision.<br />

• We created a new training plan for supervisors on this<br />

subject.<br />

• This plan also included service expectations on the<br />

subject.<br />

• <strong>The</strong> training is being developed in our Block Training.<br />

To implement prevention and enforcement<br />

strategies to reduce drug crimes and improve<br />

quality of life in affected neighbourhoods.<br />

• Increased intelligence-led enforcement campaigns took<br />

place across the city.<br />

• <strong>The</strong> efforts facilitated frontline offi cers with an<br />

opportunity to work on crack houses and low-level<br />

dealers.<br />

• Initiated a drug court pilot with service providers.<br />

<strong>2008</strong> Annual <strong>Report</strong><br />

21


REPORT ON BUSINESS PLAN<br />

STRATEGIC DIRECTIONS<br />

1<br />

PUBLIC<br />

SAFETY<br />

ENFORCEMENT<br />

EMERGENCY RESPONSE<br />

We have started to work on our 2009 goals to develop<br />

and implement a priority response standard based upon<br />

geographical areas and to educated internal members and<br />

community members about the capabilities of our emergency<br />

response system.<br />

• P E R F O R M A N C E F A C T S •<br />

• A Priority Response System Review Committee with a cross<br />

section of members, including Communications, Patrol<br />

Officers, Corporate Planning and Senior Management is<br />

reviewing the current standards.<br />

• A sector-based dispatch model is being considered to more<br />

adequately refl ect urgency of response versus geographical<br />

location in order to enhance public satisfaction with the<br />

police response to calls for service.<br />

• Information sharing sessions with sworn supervisors and<br />

with the public were held. <strong>The</strong>se included Emergency<br />

Preparedness Day, Participation House, <strong>Police</strong> Week,<br />

Rotary Clubs and School Visits.<br />

PROPERTY CRIME<br />

In <strong>2008</strong>, we achieved our goal to dedicate resources in a<br />

way that effectively targets property crime offenders and<br />

continued our 2009 goal to dedicate resources to target<br />

property crime offenders and reduce property crime through<br />

intelligence-led policing.<br />

• P E R F O R M A N C E F A C T S •<br />

• In <strong>2008</strong>, we dedicated our resources effectively to target<br />

property crime offenders.<br />

• <strong>The</strong> BEAR Unit has been very successful in tracking down<br />

repeat offenders.<br />

• Forensic <strong>Services</strong> has worked diligently on analyzing<br />

forensic and DNA evidence from Break and Enter and<br />

Robbery crime scenes.<br />

• <strong>The</strong> Bait Car and Autoview Programs were specifically<br />

designed to target property crime offenders.<br />

• Crime Managers met on a regular basis to identify trends<br />

and offenders who are actively involved in property crimes.<br />

• In <strong>2008</strong>, the total number of actual property crimes has<br />

decreased 2.44% from 2007.<br />

• Clearance rate of property crimes has increased from<br />

17.2% in 2007 to 19.6% in <strong>2008</strong>.<br />

COMMUNITY SATISFACTION<br />

Our goal to educate our members on community expectations<br />

has been achieved in <strong>2008</strong> through increased interaction by<br />

holding a number of community safety forums, partnership<br />

with HCCI to reach out to diverse communities, Block<br />

Training that featured presentations on our business planning<br />

process and a decrease of complaints against our offi cers.<br />

• P E R F O R M A N C E F A C T S •<br />

• In <strong>2008</strong>, we educated our members on community<br />

expectations by increasing the number of Community<br />

Safety Forums and problem-solving initiatives.<br />

• Between October and December, nine external Forums<br />

were held to gather input about policing priorities and to<br />

educate the public about police services and programs.<br />

Due to low attendance, we changed the format of the seven<br />

Forums to be held in 2009.<br />

• Throughout <strong>2008</strong>, several initiatives were undertaken to<br />

increase Problem Oriented Policing (POP) Projects and<br />

increase community participation in problem-solving<br />

initiatives.<br />

• <strong>The</strong>se included education, training and recognition<br />

mechanisms. Total number of POP Projects increased<br />

100%, from 10 in 2007 to 20 in <strong>2008</strong>.<br />

• <strong>The</strong> Ministry Inspection on business planning, traffic<br />

management, care and handling of prisoners and use of<br />

force identifi ed areas that required improvement.<br />

• At year end, 25% of public complaints were resolved<br />

informally.<br />

22 Saluting our Past - Promoting our Future


EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT<br />

We have started to work on our 2009 goal to establish<br />

an overall emergency management plan. An emergency<br />

management plan was created.<br />

• P E R F O R M A N C E F A C T S •<br />

• Reviewed Adequacy Standards, the Ministry Emergency<br />

Plan and the City of <strong>Hamilton</strong> Emergency Plan.<br />

• Reviewed several police agency plans both nationally and<br />

internationally.<br />

• A Planning Team was formed to carry out a multijurisdictional<br />

real-time exercise to test our emergency<br />

preparedness and our adherence to the Counter-terrorism<br />

Plan, to enhance collaboration among emergency partners<br />

and to provide a learning and training opportunity.<br />

• On May 27, a successful large scale real-time exercise was<br />

held. This involved the <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service, Halton<br />

Regional <strong>Police</strong>, Niagara Regional <strong>Police</strong>, Peel Regional<br />

<strong>Police</strong>, the RCMP, <strong>Hamilton</strong> Fire <strong>Services</strong>, <strong>Hamilton</strong> Health<br />

Sciences, the <strong>Hamilton</strong> Port Authority, Canadian Pacifi c<br />

Railway, <strong>Hamilton</strong> Spectator, CHCH-TV and RCMP Gazette.<br />

• As a result of the Operation Midnight Express Exercise, a<br />

planning and evaluation model for a large scale exercise<br />

has been established.<br />

VIOLENT CRIME<br />

In <strong>2008</strong>, we continued to improve upon existing strategies<br />

relating to High Risk Offenders and work on reducing violent<br />

crime.<br />

• P E R F O R M A N C E F A C T S •<br />

• In <strong>2008</strong>, Intelligence Branch re-established the High Risk<br />

Committee.<br />

• <strong>The</strong>y have successfully dealt with 13 high risk offenders<br />

who were released into our community.<br />

• <strong>The</strong> Parole and Probation Liaison Officers and the Sex<br />

Offender Registry Detective are monitoring 210 federal<br />

parolees, 480 persons on provincial probation and 511 sex<br />

offenders.<br />

• During <strong>2008</strong>, the Central West R.O.P.E. Team has<br />

apprehended 118 repeat offenders. Of these, 81 or 69%<br />

were offenders located in the <strong>Hamilton</strong> area.<br />

• <strong>The</strong> Fugitive Apprehension Unit has apprehended 69<br />

wanted individuals and executed 221 warrants.<br />

• Divisional Youth Offi cers have increased STOP checks by<br />

147%.<br />

• BEAR Unit had prepared and executed 12 operational<br />

plans to target high risk and serial incidents.<br />

ASSISTANCE TO VICTIMS<br />

Our goal to respond effectively to victims issues both<br />

internally and externally has been achieved in <strong>2008</strong> with<br />

great success.<br />

• P E R F O R M A N C E F A C T S •<br />

• In <strong>2008</strong>, concerted efforts were made to ensure effective<br />

response to victims’ issues internally and externally.<br />

• Initiatives include increased training for various sectors<br />

of the Service in regards to Sudden Deaths, suicide<br />

prevention and counselling.<br />

• Homicide investigators ensured that every victim they<br />

interact with is advised of the availability and services of<br />

Victim <strong>Services</strong>.<br />

• HPS website was evaluated and updated to include fraud<br />

prevention tips for victims.<br />

• Presentations have been provided to new recruits, Staff<br />

Sergeants, GIT course, Citizens <strong>Police</strong> College, Domestic<br />

Violence Investigators Course, Catholic Children’s Aid<br />

Society, Golden Horseshoe Committee for Children’s Aid<br />

Society Lawyers and Superior Court Judges, High Intensity<br />

Probation Offi cers at OPC, <strong>Hamilton</strong> School Board and<br />

Women Abuse Working Committee.<br />

ROAD SAFETY<br />

In <strong>2008</strong>, we continued our goals to identify and implement<br />

innovative strategies to decrease aggressive and inattentive<br />

driving, to promote safe driving through enforcement and to<br />

address traffi c fatalities through education and enforcement.<br />

• P E R F O R M A N C E F A C T S •<br />

• In partnership with the City of <strong>Hamilton</strong> Traffic Engineering<br />

and Operations and Public Health, a company was<br />

selected to develop a new traffic plan.<br />

• <strong>The</strong> Traffic Plan will replace our annual plan but<br />

maintained Adequacy Regulation requirement.<br />

• Chronic traffi c disorder locations at the three patrol<br />

divisions were identifi ed and enforcement initiatives were<br />

implemented at these locations.<br />

• Divisional Community Response Branches conducted<br />

safety lanes / RIDE lanes throughout the year to check for<br />

Highway Traffic Act, Compulsory Automotile Insurance Act<br />

and Criminal Code violations.<br />

• Centralized Breath Technician conducted presentations on<br />

impaired driving both internally and externally.<br />

• Traffic Branch members assisted with media interviews and<br />

supported federal and provincial safe driving campaigns.<br />

PERFORMANCE<br />

<strong>2008</strong> Annual <strong>Report</strong><br />

23


DRUG CRIME<br />

In <strong>2008</strong>, much work has begun to reduce the availability and<br />

use of illegal drugs in the community and to collaborate with<br />

the community to address drug-related issues which include<br />

education and enforcement.<br />

• P E R F O R M A N C E F A C T S •<br />

• In <strong>2008</strong>, the total number of actual drug charges (1,189)<br />

has increased over 2007 (924) by 28.67% as a result of<br />

our Service-wide focus on drug enforcement.<br />

• Numerous projects such as Project Hardwood, Project<br />

Rugged, Project Reprise, Project Spring Awakening, Project<br />

Internet Safety and Project Sabot have seized thousands of<br />

marijuana plants and netted a large number of arrests.<br />

• Divisions have implemented intelligence-led policing<br />

strategies and POP Projects to close down crackhouses.<br />

• Vice and Drugs delivered drug lectures to Children’s Aid<br />

Society, Rotary Clubs, Real Estate Board, elementary<br />

schools, high schools and <strong>Hamilton</strong> Health Sciences.<br />

2<br />

COMMUNITY<br />

PROBLEM SOLVING<br />

CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION<br />

In <strong>2008</strong>, we continued to enhance collaborative intelligenceled<br />

policing. Further, we have achieved our goal to increase<br />

investigator effi ciency and effectiveness.<br />

• P E R F O R M A N C E F A C T S •<br />

• One of the goals of the 2007-2009 Business Plan was to<br />

increase investigators effi ciencies and effectiveness in light<br />

of the signifi cant changes with the retirement of dedicated<br />

and well-trained investigators.<br />

• To ensure we maintain the knowledge, skills and abilities,<br />

we reviewed best practices and considered innovative<br />

strategies.<br />

• <strong>The</strong> use of the new F.T.R. (For the Record) software<br />

facilitated more effi cient interviewing techniques and allows<br />

for better vetting for Courts.<br />

• This software streamlines court procedure disclosure<br />

issues and improves investigative efficiency by 20% and<br />

yields a cost saving of 1.2 staffing years in overtime in the<br />

fi rst year of service.<br />

• As well, our Homicide and Victims of Crime investigators<br />

are provided with digital recorders to maintain better<br />

record keeping of audio statements, for better disclosure<br />

and more effective way to conduct investigations. Our<br />

Investigative <strong>Services</strong> Division (ISD) Commanders, along<br />

with Divisional Commanders are looking to mentor and<br />

transfer members to ensure that we maintain valuable<br />

knowledge, skills and abilities in ISD with staff development<br />

opportunities.<br />

• Project Roundup is a frontline-based initiative where<br />

frontline offi cers get to investigate and apprehend parties<br />

wanted on outstanding warrants.<br />

• This has reduced the amount of warrants as well as<br />

improved our frontline effectiveness by learning basic<br />

fundamentals on investigations and bringing offenders to<br />

justice.<br />

YOUTH CRIME<br />

Our strategies to develop and implement crime<br />

prevention, education and early intervention strategies<br />

for young persons in partnership with our communities<br />

have been achieved in <strong>2008</strong>.<br />

• P E R F O R M A N C E F A C T S •<br />

• A variety of youth programs where there was police<br />

involvement and educational strategies for parents and<br />

youth was initiated in <strong>2008</strong>.<br />

• <strong>The</strong>se included 44 Drug Sweeps, 38 Pre-charge<br />

Diversions, Strategic Approach to Youth Crime, 45 Strategic<br />

Targeted Offender Program (STOP) targets, 322 STOP<br />

checks, the Middle School Officer Program, 597 school<br />

visits, 152 calls for service, the Safe Schools Contest and<br />

434 presentations.<br />

24 Saluting our Past - Promoting our Future


COMMUNITY PATROL<br />

Our two <strong>2008</strong> goals to increase police visibility and to<br />

foster community ownership at the frontline and encourage<br />

collaborative problem-solving have been achieved.<br />

• P E R F O R M A N C E F A C T S •<br />

• Throughout <strong>2008</strong>, our patrol divisions and Support<br />

<strong>Services</strong> have planned a number of strategies to increase<br />

police visibility within our communities and foster<br />

community ownership at the front line to encourage<br />

collaborative problem solving.<br />

• Chief among these were the Alarm Reduction Program,<br />

the Summer Safe Program, our Core Patrol schedule,<br />

<strong>Police</strong> Week events, the Graffi ti Prevention Strategy and the<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> Bullying Coalition.<br />

• A 3-month Pilot Project using the Segway on James Street<br />

North was concluded as ineffective. Public awareness<br />

target was a success.<br />

• Our Labour Relations Offi ce proactively monitored 27<br />

potential or actual labour disputes with limited use of front<br />

line offi cers.<br />

INVESTIGATE<br />

PATROL<br />

PREVENT<br />

CRIME PREVENTION<br />

Our goals to mobilize all our communities in crime prevention<br />

and to decrease crime in problem areas have been achieved<br />

in <strong>2008</strong>.<br />

• P E R F O R M A N C E F A C T S •<br />

• Two goals to mobilize our communities in crime prevention<br />

and to decrease crime in problem areas were concluded in<br />

<strong>2008</strong>.<br />

• Newly mobilized communities included the James Street<br />

North Community Mobilization, middle schools in the<br />

Middle School Offi cer Program, high school students in the<br />

Safe Schools Challenge, our Community Policing Centre<br />

volunteers with CPTED audits, fraud presentations and<br />

bicycle safety, the taxi cab drivers in the new Cab Watch<br />

Program, the City Departments and community groups<br />

such as Westdale and Concession Street in the Graffiti<br />

Prevention Strategy and the large number of citizens who<br />

attended the Citizens <strong>Police</strong> College in each Division.<br />

• Numerous crime prevention programs were initiated by our<br />

Crime Managers with the help of our Crime Analysts and<br />

tools such as BEAT Tracker, Crack Tracker, POP Projects,<br />

Multi-Agency Task Force and Strategic Approach to Youth<br />

Crime.<br />

• As a result of the concerted efforts, crime in problem areas<br />

has been decreased.<br />

3<br />

RESOURCE<br />

MANAGEMENT<br />

WORKLOAD / DEPLOYMENT<br />

Our 2009 goals to improve the civilian staffi ng ability to<br />

support the organization and to complete the Neighbourhood<br />

Safety Project evaluation and implement recommendations<br />

have commenced in 2007 and continued into <strong>2008</strong>.<br />

• P E R F O R M A N C E F A C T S •<br />

• 2006-<strong>2008</strong> Collective Agreement modified to allow for the<br />

selection of the most qualifi ed candidate at salary bands<br />

11E and higher.<br />

• A Patrol Workload Study was conducted using 2006 and<br />

2007 CAD data.<br />

• An NSP Review Team is being planned to evaluate our new<br />

policing model.<br />

VOLUNTEERS<br />

In <strong>2008</strong>, we achieved our goal to develop and implement<br />

a consistent, comprehensive strategy for all aspects of<br />

volunteer assistance. Also, we have begun work on a strategy<br />

to use volunteers to assist in appropriate areas of policing.<br />

• P E R F O R M A N C E F A C T S •<br />

• <strong>The</strong> goal to develop and implement a consistent,<br />

comprehensive strategy for all aspects of volunteer<br />

assistance has been completed.<br />

• <strong>The</strong> three volunteer recruiting areas met to discuss<br />

recruiting. <strong>The</strong> needs are too diverse to create one system.<br />

However, the application and background processes are<br />

now the same.<br />

RECRUITING<br />

We have initiated many strategies towards our 2009 goals<br />

to ensure our organization refl ects our diverse communities,<br />

to continue to explore and implement effective methods of<br />

outreach to meet hiring needs and to explore alternative<br />

strategies to access and employ resources.<br />

• P E R F O R M A N C E F A C T S •<br />

• We understand that the growth of the labour force in<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong> is in our diverse communities and we know that<br />

immigration accounts for about 85% of <strong>Hamilton</strong>’s total<br />

population growth.<br />

• We continue to strive to meet challenges through our<br />

recruiting strategies and we are becoming more diverse.<br />

• 25% of the 165 frontline officers hired in the last three<br />

years have been drawn from our diverse communities.<br />

• Recruiting champions have been identified and they<br />

assisted in Recruiting Information Sessions.<br />

<strong>2008</strong> Annual <strong>Report</strong><br />

25


FLEET/ EQUIPMENT/ UNIFORMS<br />

Our goal to ensure that our members have effective and<br />

effi cient resources to perform their duties has been achieved.<br />

• P E R F O R M A N C E F A C T S •<br />

• Throughout <strong>2008</strong>, we ensured that our members have<br />

effective and efficient resources to perform their duties.<br />

• <strong>The</strong> Fleet Restructuring Pilot Program has been approved<br />

and a permanent part-time Fleet Technician has been<br />

hired in October.<br />

• All cruisers were received and equipped with new blue<br />

emergency lights.<br />

• Conversion completed on 95% of the fleet.<br />

• Our marine vessels had singifi cant rebuilding over the<br />

winter months as a preventative measure.<br />

• Excellent purchasing strategies at auctions resulted in<br />

about $100,000 savings towards the purchase of additional<br />

and needed replacement vehicles.<br />

• Audits of equipment are being done on a regular basis.<br />

• New equipment such as a new software called FTR, video<br />

computers and digital recorders were purchased for our<br />

investigators.<br />

TRAINING<br />

In <strong>2008</strong>, we worked on a formal mentoring and formal career<br />

coaching processes. We have started on our 2009 goals to<br />

better use internal member resources and to develop and<br />

deliver innovative training to all our members.<br />

• P E R F O R M A N C E F A C T S •<br />

• Throughout <strong>2008</strong>, our Human Resources Section has<br />

worked hard to develop and implement a formal mentoring<br />

and career coaching processes.<br />

• A Training Investigators Program (TIP) was developed<br />

for mentoring of patrol officers and Detective Constables.<br />

Mentors will be Detectives in Investigative <strong>Services</strong> and the<br />

Divisional Investigative Branches.<br />

• Block Training includes training on how to be a mentor.<br />

• A program to mentor ISD and CID personnel will be<br />

implemented in 2009.<br />

• Formal Coach Offi cer training was provided in early <strong>2008</strong>.<br />

Refresher training is planned for 2009.<br />

• Twenty-fi ve external community members have been<br />

trained to be HPS recruiters within their own communities.<br />

• Seven internal recruit champions have been mentoring<br />

community members who are interested in a police career.<br />

• A new buddy system was implemented to assist new<br />

recruits. New recruits are partnered with the previous class<br />

of recruits prior to going to OPC so they have a mentor.<br />

MENTORING<br />

ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT<br />

In <strong>2008</strong>, we continued to implement a succession strategy<br />

and have accomplished our 2009 goals to strengthen active<br />

supervision through training and mentoring, to develop a new<br />

civilian promotional process and to explore and implement<br />

adaptive organizational strategies.<br />

• P E R F O R M A N C E F A C T S •<br />

• Pre-hiring of police officers in May or September for<br />

confi rmed year-end vacancies help to ensure we have fully<br />

trained offi cers on the street when a retirement occurs.<br />

• Three-year projection of turnover of positions was<br />

completed. A list of knowledge, skills and abilities is being<br />

developed.<br />

STAFF WELLNESS<br />

Our <strong>2008</strong> goals to improve the work environment and to<br />

improve job satisfaction for civilians have been achieved. As<br />

well, the 2009 goal to improve staff wellness and encourage<br />

self development have been activated.<br />

• P E R F O R M A N C E F A C T S •<br />

• <strong>The</strong> goals to improve the work environment and improve<br />

the job satisfaction for Civilians have been completed.<br />

• <strong>The</strong> Family Issues and Wellness Committee continued to<br />

address wellness issues.<br />

• A Family Orientation Night for new employees was held in<br />

May.<br />

• A new Women’s Issues Committee was created in <strong>2008</strong>.<br />

• A two-hour wellness session was developed and delivered<br />

at Block Training for Sworn and Civilian staff.<br />

• A Reception area was created to provide customer service<br />

and security for third floor staff.<br />

• A new work out area has been added to the Courts for<br />

courts personnel.<br />

• A new Records Counter with passive protection and<br />

ergonomically correct work stations has been installed.<br />

• Workstations in the Records Area have been realigned and<br />

additional personal storage space was provided.<br />

• Command staff sent notes to officers for exemplary<br />

performance on a daily basis.<br />

• Commendations are reviewed and signed on the day they<br />

were received.<br />

• Short and long-term accommodated offi cers were used in<br />

case preparation, reception, core and custody functions to<br />

maintain street numbers.<br />

• Offi cers were moved from support areas during summer<br />

months or staffi ng shortages to supplement Squads that<br />

had lost offi cers to injury, illness and retirement.<br />

• To increase Civilian job satisfaction, strategies included<br />

more inclusion on committees and attendance at Block<br />

Training and Performance Leadership Training sessions.<br />

• Civilian Communications Operators are attending Use of<br />

Force training to gain an understanding of excited delirium.<br />

26 Saluting our Past - Promoting our Future


5 TECHNOLOGY<br />

Our goal to implement innovative technology strategies<br />

designed to effi ciently and effectively address the<br />

complexities of service delivery has been achieved in <strong>2008</strong>.<br />

We continue to work on the 2009 goal to upgrade and<br />

expand our technological resources.<br />

INTERNAL/EXTERNAL<br />

COMMUNICATION<br />

4In <strong>2008</strong>, we continued our 2007 goals to ensure that our<br />

internal communication process provides adequate, effective<br />

and effi cient methods of information flow. We also achieved<br />

our goal to improve the collection, sharing and dissemination<br />

of information for collaborative intelligence-led policing, and<br />

to network with community partners.<br />

• P E R F O R M A N C E F A C T S •<br />

• In early 2009, the Intelligence-led Policing Strategy<br />

Committee tabled a report with the goal of improving the<br />

collection, sharing and dissemination of information.<br />

• We also established networking and working relationships<br />

with a number of community partners.<br />

• <strong>The</strong>se include the organization of Hindu Samaja Memorial<br />

Event, United Nations Day, <strong>The</strong> Gathering and an exhibit<br />

“Arrested In Time” at the Fieldcote Museum.<br />

• As well, regular meetings are held with our community<br />

partners (GLBT Task Force, Diversity Advisory Committee<br />

and Aboriginal Advisory Committee) to discuss issues and<br />

solutions.<br />

• To further enhance our communication process, a new<br />

Community Blog and the Chief’s Blog have been set up on<br />

our website.<br />

• P E R F O R M A N C E F A C T S •<br />

• An external DVD burner and Trilevan software were<br />

installed to expedite disclosure responsibilities and<br />

streamline investigations.<br />

• A new policy on Global Positioning and AVL Systems was<br />

completed.<br />

• Communications Trainer developed training plan and<br />

trained Communicators to retrieve and interpret GPS data<br />

obtained from an independent mapping software for the<br />

MISS Program.<br />

6 FACILITIES<br />

Our goals to identify and prioritize our current and long-term<br />

facility needs and to identify and implement a new Marine<br />

Station have been completed in part in <strong>2008</strong>.<br />

• P E R F O R M A N C E F A C T S •<br />

• Many long term and short term solutions are being<br />

evaluated to address our long-term facilities needs.<br />

• A detailed list of space needs was completed based on<br />

internal surveys, reports and building inspections.<br />

• A number of internal moves have been undertaken to<br />

accommodate needs. <strong>The</strong>se include NICHE, Division 1<br />

Classroom, Computer <strong>Services</strong> Section and Staff Sergeant’s<br />

Offi ce in Division 1. A fi nal report is expected in 2009.<br />

<strong>2008</strong> Annual <strong>Report</strong><br />

27


PROMOTIONS,<br />

AWARDS, RETIREES<br />

PROMOTIONS & AWARDS<br />

RETIREES<br />

• Sergeant<br />

Shawn BLAJ<br />

Greg DOERR<br />

Phil FLEMING<br />

Bob HILL<br />

Jason LEEK<br />

Mark NICHOLS<br />

Dave OLENIUK<br />

Stuart OXLEY<br />

Phil PECKFORD<br />

George PREOCANIN<br />

Daryl REID<br />

Chris ZAFIRIDES<br />

• Staff Sergeant<br />

Dave BEECH<br />

Bob GAUVIN<br />

Chris KIRIAKOUPOLOS<br />

Maggie SCHOEN<br />

• Inspector<br />

David DOEL<br />

Scott RASTIN<br />

• Superintendent<br />

Debbie CLARK<br />

• 30 Year Bar Recipients<br />

Frank BOGDAN<br />

Michael Ross MARTIN<br />

Michael COLE<br />

Bernie MUELLER<br />

Dean CURTIS<br />

Steve PACEY<br />

James GREENWOOD Raymond RIKIC<br />

Glenn JARVIE<br />

John RITUMS<br />

Steve KOVACH<br />

Brad ROBINSON<br />

Jorge LASSO<br />

Cam RUMPEL<br />

• 20 Year Medal Recipients<br />

Don ABBOTT<br />

Steven HAHN<br />

Troy ASHBAUGH<br />

David INGRASSIA<br />

Tom BENNETT<br />

Myra JAMES<br />

Tim BOWER<br />

Art LENTERS<br />

Stephen BULL<br />

Ian MATTHEWS<br />

David CALVERT<br />

Michael MCCLORY<br />

John CANARIS<br />

Douglas MCMILLAN<br />

Michael CATHCART Robert MOELLER<br />

Debbie CLARK<br />

Adrian MYRA<br />

Alan DRENNAN<br />

George NAROZNIAK<br />

David DUNBAR<br />

Timothy O’KEEFE<br />

• Civilian<br />

Twenty Year<br />

Sandra BENNING<br />

Gary GOGUEN<br />

Jeff GOWLAND<br />

Susan KANE<br />

Carlene MCDOWELL<br />

Christine VAN GEEST<br />

Linda WALSH<br />

• Thirty Year<br />

Service Recognition<br />

Award<br />

Pat CRUSE<br />

Cindy MCISAAC<br />

• Leonard G.<br />

Lawrence Award<br />

Cathy WALLACE<br />

• Thomas J.<br />

Fitzgerald<br />

Memorial Award<br />

Massimo GIULIANI<br />

Annette HUYS<br />

Michael SPENCER<br />

Stuart OXLEY<br />

Pankaj PATEL<br />

Anna PELLIZZARI<br />

Bryan PETERS<br />

Brian RITCHIE<br />

Michael SENCHYSHAK<br />

Paul STAATS<br />

Harold TRAFFORD<br />

Glenn TYRRELL<br />

Sandra WALTERS<br />

Gregory ZAFIRIDES<br />

Rick ABLESON<br />

Gil AGIS<br />

Norma BAGSHAW<br />

Jenifer BALL<br />

Chuck BEASLEY<br />

Wayne BENNETT<br />

Richard BOUCHER<br />

Bill CAMPBELL<br />

Michael CAMPBELL<br />

Pieter CIERE<br />

Joseph CONNORS<br />

Bill CUMBER<br />

David CUMMINS<br />

Paul DEMPSEY<br />

Enneth ENGELBRECHT<br />

Roy FRIGHT<br />

Bill GENT<br />

Edward HALL<br />

Cheryl HENDERSON<br />

David HOPE<br />

Ian JAMES<br />

Patrick KELLER<br />

Mary KYLE<br />

Elisabeth LATNER<br />

Rodney LATNER<br />

John LEWINGTON<br />

Michael MULLALEY<br />

Bob NORRIE<br />

Robert PRECIOUS<br />

Victor REES<br />

Donald ROSCOE<br />

Alan SMETHURST<br />

Fausto SORBA<br />

Daniel WELSH<br />

Lloyd WILLIAMS<br />

Rick WILLS<br />

Larry WOODS<br />

28 Saluting our Past - Promoting our Future


MEMBERS OF<br />

THE MONTH<br />

BY MONTH<br />

• January<br />

Det. Paul HAMILTON<br />

MEMBERS OF THE YEAR<br />

Cst. Mark MORELLI<br />

Cst. Brent SALMON<br />

• February<br />

Cst. Kerrie DUENCH<br />

• March<br />

Sgt. Paul JOHNSTON<br />

Constable Cathy LOCKLEY<br />

Constable Paul MALLEN<br />

• May<br />

Sgt. Gary THOMPSON<br />

Cst. Katrina SABATINI<br />

• June<br />

Cst. John HEIDE<br />

• July<br />

Cst. Stephen WELTON<br />

Cst. Peter FOULDS<br />

• August<br />

Cst. Jennifer CURRIE<br />

• September<br />

Cst. Andrew POUSTIE<br />

Cst. Francis SANTOS<br />

• October<br />

Cst. Cleon WILLIAMSON<br />

• November<br />

A/Sgt. Barry MUNGAR<br />

• December<br />

Cst. Chris ELLIOT<br />

On Sunday, April 13th at approximately 11:00 p.m., the <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong><br />

officers were headed to the Huntsville OPP detachment to apprehend a man<br />

who was wanted by <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong>. <strong>The</strong> officers were driving north on Hwy.<br />

11 when they noticed flames coming from the roof of a building that was just<br />

off the highway.<br />

Rather than proceeding to the OPP detachment, the officers exited the<br />

highway and located the source of the fire. <strong>The</strong> officers discovered a<br />

retirement home with the roof on fire. <strong>The</strong>y charged through the front door<br />

and activated the fire alarm just as the staff in the home recognized there<br />

was a problem.<br />

Officer Salmon and Morelli jumped into action and assisted the three staff<br />

members with the evacuation of the 56 residents. All of the residents were<br />

removed from the building without serious injury.<br />

<strong>The</strong> officers are being hailed as heroes. <strong>The</strong> Huntsville Fire Chief says,”the<br />

officer’s were instrumental in saving lives last night. <strong>The</strong>ir quick actions<br />

changed the end result of this fire from being a tragic one”.<br />

<strong>2008</strong> Annual <strong>Report</strong><br />

29


FINANCIAL<br />

REPORT <strong>2008</strong><br />

EXPENDITURE BY PROGRAM<br />

Field Support<br />

$31,152,120<br />

(25.40%)<br />

<strong>2008</strong> ESTIMATE<br />

($122,652,560)<br />

<strong>Police</strong> <strong>Services</strong> Board<br />

$165,680<br />

(0.14%)<br />

Sick Leave,<br />

Retirees & WSIB<br />

$4,271,720<br />

(3.48%)<br />

Community<br />

Policing<br />

$84,626,670<br />

(69.00%)<br />

Offi ce of<br />

the Chief<br />

$2,436,370<br />

(1.99%)<br />

Source: <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service <strong>2008</strong> Operating Budget<br />

EXPENDITURES BY OBJECT<br />

<strong>2008</strong> ESTIMATE<br />

($122,652,560)<br />

<strong>2008</strong> ACTUAL<br />

($123,825,150)<br />

Insurance & Legal<br />

estimate $1,374,430 - (1.12%)<br />

actual $1,391,989 - (1.12%)<br />

Purchased Goods & <strong>Services</strong><br />

estiamte $13,776,250 - (11.23%)<br />

actual $13,599,422 - (10.98%)<br />

Capital Financing<br />

estimate $1,163,810 - (0.95%)<br />

actual $1,154,269 - (0.93%)<br />

Salaries & Benefi ts<br />

estimate $106,338,070 - (86.70%)<br />

actual $107,679,470 - (86.96%)<br />

Source: <strong>Hamilton</strong> <strong>Police</strong> Service <strong>2008</strong> Operating Budget<br />

30 Saluting our Past - Promoting our Future


HAMILTON<br />

POLICE<br />

DIRECTORY<br />

• CENTRAL STATION<br />

(STATION 10)<br />

155 King William St.,<br />

P.O. Box 1060,<br />

LCD 1, <strong>Hamilton</strong>, ON L8N 4C1<br />

tel 905.546.4925<br />

HAMILTON POLICE STATIONS<br />

• EAST END STATION<br />

(STATION 20)<br />

2825 King St. E.,<br />

(between Greenhill & Centennial Pkwy.)<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong>, ON L8G 1J6<br />

tel 905.546.2929<br />

• MOUNTAIN STATION<br />

(STATION 30)<br />

400 Rymal Rd. E.,<br />

(between Up. Wellington & Up. Wentworth)<br />

<strong>Hamilton</strong>, ON L9B 1C2<br />

tel 905.546.4930<br />

COMMUNITY POLICING CENTRES<br />

DIVISION ONE (CENTRAL)<br />

JACKSON SQUARE POLICING CENTRE<br />

2 King St. W., <strong>Hamilton</strong>, ON L8P 1A1<br />

tel 905.546.4936<br />

hours Monday - Friday 12 pm - 4 pm<br />

Thursday 5 pm - 9 pm<br />

Saturday 10 am - 2 pm<br />

LANDSDALE-STINSON POLICING CENTRE<br />

471 King St. E., <strong>Hamilton</strong>, ON L8N 1E1<br />

tel 905.546.4420<br />

905.546.4415 * voicemail<br />

hours Monday 9 am - 12 pm<br />

Tuesday 9 am - 3 pm<br />

Wednesday - Friday 9 am - 12 pm<br />

Saturday 12 pm - 3 pm<br />

ROBERT LAND POLICING CENTRE<br />

460 Wentworth St. N., <strong>Hamilton</strong>, ON L8L 5W8<br />

tel 905.546.2825<br />

hours Call for availability<br />

DIVISION TWO (EAST END)<br />

OTTAWA STREET POLICING CENTRE<br />

204 Ottawa St., <strong>Hamilton</strong>, ON<br />

tel 905.540.6022<br />

905.540.6021 * voicemail<br />

hours Monday - Saturday 10 am - 3 pm<br />

STONEY CREEK POLICING CENTRE<br />

777 Hwy #8, Stoney Creek, ON L8G 5B9<br />

(Former Stoney Creek City Hall)<br />

tel 905.643.4143<br />

905.643.2306<br />

hours Monday & Wednesday 9 am - 8 pm<br />

Tuesday & Thursday 9 am - 5 pm<br />

Friday 9 am - 4:30 pm<br />

Saturday 10 am - 2 pm<br />

DIVISION THREE<br />

(MOUNTAIN/DUNDAS)<br />

ANCASTER POLICING CENTRE<br />

300 Wilson St. E., Ancaster, ON L9G 3B9<br />

tel 905.648.6404<br />

905.648.3632 * voicemail<br />

hours Monday - Saturday 10 am - 2 pm<br />

Thursday - Friday 6 pm - 9 pm<br />

BINBROOK POLICING CENTRE<br />

2640 Hwy. #56, Binbrook, ON<br />

tel 905.692.3165<br />

hours Monday - Friday 8:30 am - 4:30 pm<br />

CONCESSION STREET POLICING CENTRE<br />

516 Concession St. <strong>Hamilton</strong>, ON L8V 1A6<br />

tel 905.540.6699<br />

905.540.6695<br />

hours Monday - Saturday 12 pm - 4 pm<br />

DUNDAS POLICING CENTRE<br />

2 King St. W., Dundas, ON L9H 6Z1<br />

tel 905.628.0992<br />

905.628.5809<br />

hours Monday - Friday 8:00 am - 4:00 pm<br />

Saturday 10 am - 2 pm<br />

WATERDOWN POLICING CENTRE<br />

163 Dundas St. E., <strong>Hamilton</strong>, ON L0R 2H1<br />

tel 905.689.1554<br />

905.689.2683<br />

hours Monday - Saturday 10 am - 2 pm<br />

Thursday - Friday 6 pm - 9 pm<br />

LIME RIDGE MALL POLICING CENTRE<br />

999 Upper Wentworth St., <strong>Hamilton</strong>, ON L9A 4X5<br />

tel 905-546-3163<br />

905-546-3239<br />

hours Monday - Friday 10 am - 9 pm<br />

Saturday 10 am - 6 pm

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