Annual Report 2009 - Institute of Hydrobiology

hbu.cas.cz

Annual Report 2009 - Institute of Hydrobiology

ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE CZECH REPUBLIC

BIOLOGY CENTRE, v.v.i., INSTITUTE OF HYDROBIOLOGY

ČESKÉ BUDĚJOVICE

50 th ANNUAL REPORT

For the Year 2009

ISSN 1210 – 9649


CONTENTS

THE INSTITUTE, SCIENTIFIC COUNCIL 5

INSTITUTE STAFF AND FIELD OF WORK 6

1 INTRODUCTION

1.1 Director‟s preface 9

1.2 Projects 10

1.3 Consultancies 11

1.4 Report on finances 12

1.5 Presentations of IHB members at international conferences 13

1.6 Stays abroad 14

1.7 Foreign visitors to Institute of Hydrobiology 16

1.8 Students‟ theses finished in 2009 17

2 50 th BIRTHDAY OF ANNUAL REPORT OF THE "HYDROBIOLOGICAL

LABORATORY" by Viera Straškrábová

18

3 RESERVOIRS

3.1 Regular monitoring of the reservoirs Slapy and Římov: dissolved

and dispersed substances in 2009

3.2 Regular monitoring of the reservoirs Slapy and Římov: microbial

characteristics, chlorophyll and zooplankton biomass in 2009

23

24

3.3 Regular monitoring: fish stock composition in the Římov Reservoir in 2009 25

3.4 Age-0 fish predation and the midsummer decline of Daphnia in the Římov

Reservoir

26

3.5 Macrophytic vegetation in the littoral of Lipno Reservoir (Czech Republic) 26

3


4 LAKES

4.1 Aggregate formation in a freshwater bacterial strain induced by growth state

and conspecific chemical cues

4.2 Trends in aluminium export from a mountainous area to surface waters, from

deglaciation to the recent: effects of vegetation and soil development,

atmospheric acidification, and nitrogen-saturation.

30

31

4. 3 Canopy leaching of nutrients and metals in a mountain spruce forest 32

5 SPECIAL INVESTIGATIONS

5.1 New isolated strains from the R-BT cluster of Betaproteobacteria 33

5.2 Broad habitat range and ecophysiological traits of the membersof

phylogenetically narrow R-BT065 cluster of Betaproteobacteria

5.3 Are fatty acid profiles and secondary metabolites good chemotaxonomic

markers of genetic and morphological clusters of Dolichospermum spp.

and Sphaerospermopsis spp. (Nostocales, Cyanobacteria)?

5.4 Importance of dissolved organic carbon for phytoplankton nutrition

in a eutrophic reservoir

35

37

40

6 PUBLICATIONS 42

4


Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic

BIOLOGY CENTRE, v.v.i.,

INSTITUTE OF HYDROBIOLOGY

Na Sádkách 7 telephone: (++420) 385310262

CZ-370 05 České Budějovice fax: (++420) 385310248

Czech Republic

e-mail: hbu@hbu.cas.cz

http://www.hbu.cas.cz

DIRECTOR: Doc. RNDr. Josef Matěna, CSc.

SCIENTIFIC COUNCIL:

Chairperson:

RNDr. Martin Čech, Ph.D.

Members:

External Members:

RNDr. Karel Horňák, Ph.D.

RNDr. Jiří Kaňa, Ph.D.

Prof. Ing. Jiří Kopáček, Ph.D.

Doc. RNDr. Jan Kubečka, CSc.

RNDr. Jiří Nedoma, CSc.

Prof. RNDr. Šimek Karel, CSc.

Doc. RNDr. Jaroslav Vrba, CSc.

RNDr. Petr Znachor, Ph.D.

RNDr. Martin Černý, Ph.D.

Faculty of Science, Charles University, Prague

Doc. RNDr. Jan Helešic, CSc.

Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno

Prof. Ing. Otomar Linhart, DrSc.

Research Institute of Fish Culture and Hydrobiology,

University of South Bohemia, Vodňany

Prof. Ing. Pavel Pitter, DrSc.

Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague

Doc. RNDr. Martin Rulík, Ph.D,

Faculty of Science, Palacký University, Olomouc

5


INSTITUTE STAFF AND FIELD OF WORK

(visit www.hbu.cas.cz/staff.php for more information, email addresses and contacts)

SCIENTIFIC STAFF:

Department of Plankton and Fish Ecology:

Doc. RNDr. Jan Kubečka, CSc.

(Head)

RNDr. Martin Čech, Ph.D.

RNDr. Vladislav Draštík, Ph.D.

Ing. Jaroslava Frouzová, Ph.D.

Doc. RNDr. Jaroslav Hrbáček,

DrSc. (Scientific Consultant)

RNDr. Jiří Macháček, CSc.

Doc. RNDr. Josef Matěna, CSc.

RNDr. Tomáš Mrkvička, Ph.D.

RNDr. Jiří Peterka, Ph.D.

RNDr. Marie Prchalová, PhD

RNDr. Jaromír Seďa, CSc.

Mgr. Mojmír Vašek, PhD.

Fish population dynamics and scientific sonar techniques

Fish behaviour in the open water

Fish behaviour and community structure

Hydroacoustics and fish behaviour

Limnology of artificial

especially Daphnia

water bodies, zooplankton,

Fish-zooplankton interactions, ecology of Daphnia

Feeding biology of fish, ecology of chironomids

Statistical analyses

Fish feeding ecology; uw photo and video techniques

Fish spatial distribution and gillnet selectivity

Zooplankton, especially seasonal dynamics of Cladocera

and fish-zooplankton interactions

Fish feeding and spatial distribution, recruitment dynamics

Department of Aquatic Microbial Ecology:

Prof. RNDr. Karel Šimek, CSc.

(Head)

Mgr. Martina Čtvrtlíková

RNDr. Karel Horňák, Ph.D.

RNDr. Jan Jezbera, Ph.D.

RNDr. Jitka Jezberová, Ph.D.

(from September maternity leave)

RNDr. Jaroslava Komárková,

CSc.

Prof. Ing. Miroslav Macek, CSc.

(11 months UNAM México)

RNDr. Jiří Nedoma, CSc.

Aquatic microbiology, bacteria-protozoa interactions,

bacterial community composition

Ecobiology of Isoëtes in acidified lakes

Bacterioplankton community composition and activity

Protozoan-bacterial interactions

Identification of cyanobacterial picoplankton

Plankton primary production, phytoplankton analyses,

taxonomy of algae

Protozoa-bacteria interactions, freshwater ciliates,

biological waste water treatment

Microbial biochemistry, image analysis

6


RNDr. Klára Řeháková, Ph.D.

Phytoplankton analyses, polyphasic aproach of taxonomy

of Nostocales

Mgr. Dagmar Sirová

(maternity leave)

RNDr. Viera Straškrábová, DrSc.

Doc. RNDr. Jaroslav Vrba, CSc.

Mgr. Eliška Zapomělová, PhD

Benthic cyanobacterial mats, ecology of rootless

carnivorous plants

Aquatic microbiology, BOD, interactions with phyto- and

zooplankton, long-term research

Aquatic microbiology, extracellular enzyme activity

Morphology of cyanobacteria

RNDr. Petr Znachor, Ph.D. Phytoplankton and reservoir ecology, fluorescence

techniques, microphotography

Department of Hydrochemistry and Ecosystem Modelling:

Doc. Ing. Josef Hejzlar, CSc.

(Head)

RNDr. Jakub Borovec, Ph.D.

RNDr. Jiří Kaňa, Ph.D.

Prof. Ing. Jiří Kopáček, Ph.D.

Ing. Petr Porcal, Ph.D.

Reservoir limnology and eutrophication

Reservoir limnology, chemistry of sediments

Water and soil chemistry

Analytical chemistry, soil-water interactions

Aquatic dissolved organic matter

TECHNICAL STAFF:

Jindra Bučková

Alena Fiktusová

Alena Hartmanová

Ing. Vladimíra Hejzlarová

Vladimír Jirák

Martina Kaňová

Ing. Jitka Kroupová

Alena Kubátová

Marie Kupková

Václava Lavičková

RNDr. Blanka Macháčková

Cleaner

Chemical analyses

Bacteriological analyses, cultivation

Chemical analyses

Building maintenance, electrician

Secretary, laboratory analyses

Chemical analyses

Cleaner

Phytoplankton analyses

Documentalist

Zooplankton analyses

7


Ing. Radka Malá

Bacteriological analyses, cultivation of microbes

Ing. Petr Mautschka Technical and financial management, computer

maintenance, network administration

Mgr. Karel Murtinger

Ing. Josef Polívka

Zdeněk Prachař

Mgr. Kateřina Soukalová

(from April)

Soňa Smrčková, DiS.

(maternity leave)

Dagmar Šrámková

Marie Štojdlová

MUDr. Jana Zemanová

RNDr. Jiří Ţaloudík, CSc.

Analytical chemistry

Hydrochemistry

Field assistance, zooplankton analyses

Fish biology

Bacteriological analyses, data processing

Secretary, accountant

Biochemical analyses, image analysis

Zooplankton analyses and culture maintenance

GIS in hydrology and landscape ecology

Ph.D. STUDENTS:

Mgr. Kateřina Bernardová

Mgr. Jiří Jan

Mgr. Martin Jankovský

(from August)

Mgr. Tomáš Jůza

Mgr. Vojtěch Kasalický

Mgr. Michal Kratochvíl

Mgr. Monika Krolová

Mgr. Milan Muška

Mgr. Pavel Rychtecký

Mgr. Milan Říha

Mgr. Jan Turek

Mgr. Michal Tušer

Mgr. Ivana Vaníčková

Molecular biology of cyanobacteria

sediment chemistry

Fish biology

Fish sampling and community structure

Bacterial-algal interactions

Ecology of larval and juvenile fish, electrofishing

Macrophyta in reservoirs

Fish distribution and scientific echosounder techniques

Phytoplankton ecology

Fish sampling and development of fish populations

Hydrology and water chemistry

DIDSON-based Fish Assessment

Zooplankton ecology and molecular taxonomy

8


1 INTRODUCTION

1.1 Directors’ preface

The basic staff of the Institute has remained unchanged as well as the research orientation

of the Institute despite the change of legal status to a public research institution. Regular longterm

monitoring with some special investigations has continued in the Slapy and Římov

reservoirs, and so has the research on lakes in the Bohemian Forest and in the Slovakian and

Polish High Tatra Mts. Recently the Institute continued the investigation of flooded coal

mining pits in North-West Bohemia – they offer unique possibility to follow the biological

succession in newly created lake like freshwater ecosystems. Field research has been

supplemented by focused laboratory experiments.

The Institutional Research Plan “Structure, functioning and development of aquatic

ecosystems”, approved for the years 2005–2010, was prolonged to the end of 2011. The

“Support Program for targeted research in the AS CR” continued in the Institute of

Hydrobiology (IHB) through another project “Limnological basis of sustainable management

of reservoirs”, which was successfully finished in 2009.

IHB is responsible for two sites in the global LTER (long-term ecological research) and

GTOS (global terrestrial observing system) networks – “Reservoirs in the Vltava River

Watershed”. More details can be found on the website: http://www.ltereurope.net/networks/czech-rep

Close cooperation of the IHB with the Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of South

Bohemia, has continued under similar conditions as in preceding years. Institute members

have also been actively engaged supervising students‟ theses, lecturing and training students

at other Faculties (Agriculture and Pedagogical) of the University of South Bohemia and at

other Universities (Charles University, Prague, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague).

2 Bachelor‟s and 3 MS theses supervised by staff members were completed in 2009 (see list

at the end of chapter). Most staff members work part-time for the University of South

Bohemia and vice-versa. Students are active in the IHB as student helpers and part-time staff

members (see list of staff).

Josef Matěna

9


1.2 Projects

Institutional project

2005–2010 Reg. code AV0Z60170517, Structure, functioning and development of aquatic

ecosystems (J. Matěna)

Program "Support of targeted research in the Academy of Sciences of the Czech

Republic"

2005–2009 Reg. code 1QS600170504, Limnological basis of sustainable management of

reservoirs (J. Matěna)

European Communities R&D program (6 th framework)

2004–2009 Reg. code GOCE-CT-2003-505298, ALTER-NET, A long-term Biodiversity,

Ecosystem and Awareness Research Network (V.Straškrábová, coordinated by Natural

Environment Research Council, UK)

2004–2009 Reg. code GOCE-CT-2003-505540, EURO-LIMPACS, Integrated Projects to

Evaluate the Impacts of Global Change on European Freshwater Ecosystems (J. Kopáček,

coordinated by University College London)

Project supported by the "Norwegian financial mechanism"

2007–2011 Reg. code EEA NFM CZ0051, The assesment of impact of the Gothenburg

Protocol on acidified and eutrophied soils and waters (J. Kopáček, J. Matěna, coordinated

by Czech Geological Survey, Praha)

2008–2011 Reg. code EEA NFM CZ0091, Monitoring of the fish stock of Czech Reservoirs

(J. Kubečka, J. Peterka)

Project sponsored by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of CR

2008–2009 Reg. code MEB 040803, Assessment of the fish stock in the Lake Balaton and

other shallow reservoirs using acoustic methods (J. Frouzová)

2008–2010 Reg. code OC08040, Nutrient sources in catchments with complex land use and

impacts on the aquatic ecosystems of reservoirs (J. Hejzlar)

Projects sponsored by the Ministry of Agriculture of CR

2008–2012 Reg. code QH81046, Optimalisation of the biomanipulative effect of predatory

fish in the ecosystems of water reservoirs. (J. Kubečka)

2008–2011 Reg. code QH82078 (NAZV), Water retention in floodplains and measures of its

increase (J. Ţaloudík)

2008–2011 Reg. code QH81012, The use of aeration technologies in the reduction of

cyanobacterial resting stages and nutirent bioavalilability in reservoir sediments

(J. Borovec)

Projects sponsored by the Grant Agency of the Academy of Sciences of CR

2007–2009 Reg. code KJB600960703, Application of combined morphological, ecological

and molecular approach in the classification of planktonic representatives of the genus

Anabaena (Cyanobacteria) (E. Zapomělová)

2008–2010 Reg. code KJB600960810, Effect of food quantity and quality on the reverse in

competitive success between 0+ perch and roach (J. Peterka)

10


Projects sponsored by the Grant Agency of CR

2007–2010 Reg. code 206/07/1392, Horizontal acoustic surveys and fish behaviour in the

open water (J. Kubečka)

2007–2011 Reg. code 206/07/1200, Constraints and limits of biological recovery from acid

stress: What is the future of headwater ecosystems in the Bohemian Forest? (J. Vrba)

2007–2009 Reg. code 206/07/P407, Mixotrophic nutrition of summer phytoplankton species

in the Římov Reservoir (P. Znachor)

2008–2012 Reg. code 206/08/0015, Ecophysiological traits and grazing- and virus-induced

mortality of bacterial strains representing major bacterioplankton groups in a reservoir (K.

Šimek)

2009–2012 Reg. code 206/09/1325, Cyclical parthenogenesis in vertically diversified

environment: genetic differentiation and reproductive segregation in population of Daphnia

galeata (J. Macháček)

2009–2012 Reg. code 206/09/1764, Controlling factors of phosphorus sorption in lake and

reservoir sediments (J. Hejzlar)

2009–2011 Reg. code 206/09/P266, Predator avoidance strategies in early life stages of

percid fishes (M. Čech)

2009–2013 Reg. code 206/09/0309, Conpetition mechanisms in Cyanobacteria affecting

phytoplankton species composition (K. Řeháková)

2009–2013 Reg. code GA526/09/0567 The integrated impact of climate change, air quality,

and forest management on water ecosystem in headwater catchments. (J. Kopáček,

coordinated by Faculty od Science UK, Praha)

International projects

2008–2010 Interreg IV, Cross-Border Water Conservation in the Drachensee Catchment

(J. Ţaloudík)

2009–2010 Reg. Code 09-14, Estimation of fish yield potential in lakes - Institut für

Binnenfescherei e.V. Postdam, Germany (J. Kubečka)

2009–2010 Calibration of sampling methods for spanish fish populations in reservoirs,

Spanish Ministry of Environment, Spain (J. Kubečka)

2009–2010 Reg. Code A/CZ0046/2/0029, Monitoring the environment of man-made lakes:

what can fisheries data and models tell us? Norwegian Education Fund, Norway

(J. Kubečka)

1.3 Consultancies

2008–2009 Reg. code 300/7085, Complex assessment of the fish communities of the Lucina,

Rimov Reservoirs (J. Kubečka, J. Matěna), Povodí Vltavy

2008–2009 Reg. code OŢPP/Ra/257/2008 Complex assessment of fish community of the

Chabařovice post-mining in 2008 (J. Peterka, J. Kubečka) Mining authority, Ustí nad

Labem

2008–2009 Reg. code 1091/2008 Amount of bioavailable phosphorus in sediments of Karhov

reservoir (J. Hejzlar, J. Matěna) Povodí Vltavy

2008–2009 Reg. code 200146 Assessment of the fish stock of the Biesbosch reservoirs,

according to attached agreement (J. Kubečka, J. Frouzová) EVIDES, WATERBEDRIJF,

Rotterdam - Netherlads

2009–2010 Complex assessment of the fish stock of Nyrsko, Zelivka and Rimov Reservoir.

(J. Kubecka et al.) Vltava Rivers Authority.

2009 Survey of ecological potential of 10 Czech Reservoirs, Water Research Institute,

Prague

11


1.4 Report on finances

(in thousands CZK)

SALARIES & CONSUMABLES

Income

Support by Academy of Sciences incl. the "Priority research programme". 19 396

Conference 123

Grants from Grant Agency AS CR 1 680

Grants from Grant Agency CR 6 695

Grants - blance from 2008 102

Other domestic grants 1 412

Foreign grants 4 127

Consultancies excluding VAT 6 096

Depreciation 7 907

Saving for the next year 1 023

Total 48 561

Expenses

Salaries 19 262

Health and social insurance social funds 6 424

Energy 1 002

Gasoline 316

Maintenance and equipment 1 583

Postage, telephone, internet 274

Books journals 729

Travelling and conference fees 1 988

Other consumables and small equipment 4 612

Depreciation 7 907

Miscellaneous 4 464

Total 48 561

EQUIPPMET

Income

Reserve for investment 808

Grants from Grant Agency CR 124

Support by Academy of Sciences 1541

Support by Academy of Sciences for expensive equippment 1700

Grants from "Norwegian funds" 4525

Transfer from Salaries & consumables 610

Total 9308

Expenses

Research ship "Thor Heyerdal" 4184

Pelagic thral 546

CNS analyser 2463

Gas piping reconstruction 150

Winch 118

Lab remodelling 220

Deep freezer 310

Centrifuge 355

Van VW Caddy 485

Software 124

Miscellaneous 353

Total 9308

12


1.5 Presentations of institute members at international conferences

11 th Symposium on Aquatic Microbial Ecology, Piran, Slovenia, 29 Aug – 5 Sep 2009.

Šimek, K., Kasalický, V., Hahn, M.W., Horňák, K. Weinbauer, M.G.: Niche separation

in coexisting Limnohabitans strains (the R-BT065 cluster of Betaproteobacteria) inferred

from their biotic interactions with a competitor and major bacterial mortality factors

(lecture), Jezbera, J., Jezberová, Brandt, U., Hahn, M.W.: Ubiquity of Polynucleobacter

necessarius subsp. asymbioticus in lentic freshwater habitats of a heterogenous 2000

km2 area (poster), Horňák, K., Zeder, M., Blom, J. F., Van den Wyngaert, S., Loher, E.,

Posch, T., Pernthaler, J.: Light-induced changes in leucine and glucose incorporation by

Planktothrix rubescens and bacteria in Lake Zürich (poster), Kasalický, V., Jezbera, J.,

Hahn, M.W., Jezberová, J., Šimek, K.Genetic and phenotypic diversity of R-BT cluster

(lecture).

6th Symposium for European Aquatic Sciences (European Federeation for Freshwater

Sciences), Romania, 16–23 Aug 2009. Straškrábová V., Seďa J., Bredemeier M. :

Aquatic ecosystems as indicators of climate and land use changes (poster), Znachor, P.

and Nedoma, J.: Effect of glucose addition on glucose addition on silica deposition

kinetics of natural diatom population (poster), Vrba J., Novotná J., Nedbalová L.,

Kopáček J., Nedoma J.: Variations in cell-specific extracellular phosphatase activity of

natural dinoflagellate populations: effects of phosphorus deficiency versus light

deficiency (poster).

9th International Phycological Congress, Japan, 27 Jul – 12 Aug 2009. Znachor, P. and

Nedoma, J.: Effect of glucose addition on glucose addition on silica deposition kinetics

of natural diatom population (poster).

ALTER-Net final conference - Inter-disciplinary Challenges for Biodiversity and

Ecosystem Research, Germany, 3–6 Mar 2009. Říha M., Kubečka J., Vašek M., Seďa

J., Mrkvička T., Prchalová M., Matěna J., Hladík M., Čech M., Draštík V., Frouzová J.,

Hohausová E., Jarolím O., Jůza T., Kratochvíl M., Peterka J. & Tušer M. : Fish diversity

in reservoirs and lakes – methodical approach and long-term changes (poster).

Aqua-PNRF Assessment of aquatic ecosystems Quality Using Acoustic, Inland Fisheries

Institute, Olsztyn, Poland and University of Oslo, Department of Physics, Oslo,

Norway, Polsko, 28 May –5 Jun 2009. V. Draštík: Horizontal beaming (invited

lecture).

COST Action 869, Working Group 4: Evaluation of projects in example areas: The

Swiss Midland Lakes, Nottwil, Switzerland, 24–26 Jun 2009. Josef Hejzlar: The

effect of fertilization rate and proportion of arable land/grassland areas on nitrate

concentration in the catchments of four drinking water reservoirs in the Czech Republic

(poster).

Sediments of rivers and reservoirs, Slovakia, 13–14 May 2009. J. Borovec, Z. Jarolímová,

J. Jan: Vyuţití gelových minipeeperů při sledování sloţení pórové vody (lecture),

The 139th Annual Meeting of the American Fisheries Society, USA, 25 Aug – 5 Sep

2009. Peterka J., Matěna J.: Foraging behaviour as the key factor determining outcome

of the competition between European perch (Perca fluviatilis) and roach (Rutilus rutilus)

(lecture), Čech, M., Peterka, J., Říha, M., Jůza, T., Kratochvíl, M., Draštík, V., Muška,

M., Kubečka, J.: The deeper the better? Depth spawning preference of European perch

(Perca fluviatilis L.) in ad libitum spawning substrate condition (lecture), Čech, M.,

Čech, P., Kubečka, J., Prchalová, M., Draštík, V.: Size Selectivity in Summer and Winter

Diets of Great Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo): Does it Reflect a Season-Dependent

Difference in Foraging Efficiency? (poster), Čech, M., Kubečka, J., Draštík, V.,

13


Frouzová, J., Kratochvíl, M., Peterka, J., Jůza, T., Prchalová, M., Říha, M., Vašek, M.,

Hohausová, E.: Are diel vertical migrations of young-of-the-year European perch (Perca

fluviatilis L.) under direct control of light intensity? Evidence from the large field

experiment (poster), Čech, M., Kalous, L., Petrtýl, M., Kuchta, R., Scholz, T.: Do they

differ? Sorting sympatric communities of European perch (Perca fluviatilis L.) fry using

genetics, RNA/DNA ratio and parasites (poster), Kratochvíl, M, Vašek, M., Peterka, J.,

Kubečka, J., Čech, M., Matěna, J., Draštík, V. Habitat use in littoral 0+ fish assemblages

in a canyon shaped reservoir (lecture), Kratochvíl, M., Čech, M., Vašek, M., Kubečka, J.,

Matěna, J., Seďa, J. Diel vertical migrations and feeding of 0+ percids in a shallow, wellmixed

reservoir (poster).

The 6th International Symposium on Ecosystem Behavior - BIOGEOMON 2009,

University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland, 29 June – 3 July 2009. Kopáček J., Hejzlar

J., Kaňa J., Norton S.A.: Long-term trends in aluminium export from acidified, nitrogensaturated,

forest catchments and its impact on phosphorus cycling in lakes (invited

lecture), Norton S.A., Kopáček J., Navrátil T., Fernandez, I.J., Amirbahman A.:

Evolution of controls on phosphorus availability in aquatic ecosystems: peri-glacial to

recent times (lecture), Šantrůčková H., Tahovská K., Kopáček J.: Microbial N

transformations in N loaded spruce forest soils: fluxes and pools (poster).

Underwater Acoustic Measurements, Foundation for Research and Technology,

Heraklion, Greece, 21 Jun – 6 Jul 2009. Michal Tušer, Helge Balk, Jaroslava

Frouzová, Jan Kubečka, Milan Muška, Tomáš Mrkvička: Fish Detection and accuracy of

length measurement with DIDSON acoustic camera (invited lecture), Jan Kubečka,

Jaroslava Frouzová, Helge Balk, Martin Čech, Vladislav Draštík, Marie Prchalová:

Regressions for target strength and fish length conversions for horizontal acoustic

surveys (lecture), Helge Balk, Torfinn Lindem, Jan Kubečka: New Cubic Cross filter

detector for multi beam data recorded with DIDSON acoustic camera (elcture).

1.6 Stays & visits of Institute members abroad

M. Čech, Lake Hallstattersee, Austria, 21–25 Sep 2009 (Lake Hallstattersee survey)

V. Draštík, University of Sevilla, Dr. Lourdes Rodriguez, Spain, 9–13 Jul 2009 (consultation,

planning of experimental design), Balaton Limnological Research Institute of the

Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Tihany, Dr. István Tátrai, Hungary, 15–28 Jul 2009

(acoustic fish survey). University of Sevilla, Dr. Lourdes Rodriguez, Dr. A. Monteoliva,

Ecohydros, Spain, 28 Sep – 11 Oct 2009 (demonstration of fish survey using different

methods), Lake Werbellinsee, Germany, 10–16 Sep 2009 (Lake survey), Lake

Hallstattersee, Austria, 21–25 Sep 2009 (Lake Hallstattersee survey)

J. Frouzová, University of Sevilla, Dr. Lourdes Rodriguez, Spain, 9–13 Jul 2009

(consultation, planning of experimental design), Balaton Limnological Research Institute

of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Tihany, Dr. István Tátrai, Hungary, 15–28 Jul

2009 (acoustic fish survey), University of Sevilla, Dr. Lourdes Rodriguez, Dr. A.

Monteoliva, Ecohydros, Spain, 28 Sep – 11 Oct 2009 (demonstration of fish survey using

different methods), Lake Werbellinsee, Germany, 10–16 Sep 2009 (Lake survey), Lake

Hallstattersee, Austria, 21–25 Sep 2009 (Lake Hallstattersee survey), University of

Sevilla, Spain, 20–24 Jan 2009 (Kick-off meeting of the Project:ECI08002_Acoustical

investigation of spanish reservoirs)

J. Hejzlar, IGB, Muggelseedam, Berlin, Ute Mischke, Dieter Opitz, Horst Behrendt,

Germany, 5–6 Jan 2009 (implementation of the model MONERIS)

14


K. Horňák Institute for Limnology, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Dr. Martin W. Hahn,

Mondsee, Austria, 16.-18 Jan 2009 (winter bacterioplankton analysis)

J. Jezbera, Institute for Limnology, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Dr. Martin W. Hahn,

Mondsee, Austria, 16.-18 Jan 2009 (winter bacterioplankton analysis)

T. Jůza, University of Sevilla, Dr. Lourdes Rodriguez, Dr. A. Monteoliva, Ecohydros, Spain,

28 Sep – 11 Oct 2009 (demonstration of fish survey using different methods), Institute of

Marine Research, Bergen, Olav Rune Godo, Norway, 21–26 Mar 2009 (planning of

experiments), Marine Institute of Memorial University of Newfoundland, St John`s,

Harold Delouche, Paul Winger, Canada, 5–13 Mar 2009 (equipment testing), Lake

Werbellinsee, Germany, 10–16 Sep 2009 (Lake survey), Lake Hallstattersee, Austria,

21–25 Sep 2009 (Lake Hallstattersee survey)

J. Kaňa, Štátné Lesy TANAP, Tatranská Lomnica, Slovakia, 13–23 Sep 2009, (Tatra

mountain lakes sampling), Ukraine, 2–30 May 2009 (Soil samples sampling).

V. Kasalický, Observatoire Océanologique de Villefranche sur Mer, Markus G. Weinbauer,

France, 15–20 Dec 2009 (stage, aquatic virology)

K. Řeháková, Laboratoire d'Ecologie Alpine, Universite Joseph Fourier, Dr. Roberto

Gérémia, France, 25–29 Oct 2009 (planning of cooperatioon, presentation of results)

J. Kopáček, Štátné Lesy TANAP, Tatranská Lomnica, Slovakia, 13–23 Sep 2009, (Tatra

mountain lakes sampling).

M. Kratochvíl, University of Sevilla, Dr. Lourdes Rodriguez, Dr. A. Monteoliva, Ecohydros,

Spain, 28 Sep – 11 Oct 2009 (demonstration of fish survey using different methods).

J. Kubečka, Lake Hallstattersee, Austria, 21–25 Sep 2009 (Lake Hallstattersee survey), Lake

Werbellinsee, Germany, 10–16 Sep 2009 (Lake survey), University of Sevilla, Spain,

20–24 Jan 2009 (Kick-off meeting of the Project:ECI08002_Acoustical investigation of

spanish reservoirs)

J. Macháček, Institute for Ecology, Evolution and Diversity, Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt

am Main, Dr. Klaus Schwenk, Germany, 1–3 Mar 2009 (planning of cooperation),

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Evolutionsökologie, Dr. Justyna Wolinska, München,

Germany, 21–23 Jan, 6–7 Nov 2009, (transport of samples, planning of field sampling)

J. Peterka, University of Sevilla, Dr. Lourdes Rodriguez, Dr. A. Monteoliva, Ecohydros,

Spain, 28 Sep – 11 Oct 2009 (demonstration of fish survey using different methods).

Z. Prachař, University of Sevilla, Dr. Lourdes Rodriguez, Dr. A. Monteoliva, Ecohydros,

Spain, 28 Sep – 11 Oct 2009 (demonstration of fish survey using different methods), Lake

Hallstattersee, Austria, 21–25 Sep 2009 (Lake Hallstattersee survey)

M. Prchalová, University of Sevilla, Dr. Lourdes Rodriguez, Dr. A. Monteoliva, Ecohydros,

Spain, 28 Sep – 11 Oct 2009 (demonstration of fish survey using different methods),

Lajas Research Station, J. W. Neal, Ph.D, Lajas, Puerto Rico, 20–31 Jan 2009 (working

stay)

M. Říha, University of Sevilla, Dr. Lourdes Rodriguez, Dr. A. Monteoliva, Ecohydros, Spain,

28 Sep – 11 Oct 2009 (demonstration of fish survey using different methods), Lake

Hallstattersee, Austria, 21–25 Sep 2009 (Lake Hallstattersee survey)

J. Seďa, Institute for Ecology, Evolution and Diversity, Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am

Main, Dr. Klaus Schwenk, Germany, 1–3 Mar 2009 (planning of cooperation), Ludwig-

Maximilians-Universität, Evolutionsökologie, Dr. Justyna Wolinska, München, Germany,

21–23 Jan, 6–7 Nov 2009, (transport of samples, planning of field sampling)

K. Šimek, Institute for Limnology, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Dr. Martin W. Hahn,

Mondsee, Austria, 16.-18 Jan 2009 (winter bacterioplankton analysis), University of

15


Vienna, Dep. of Freshwater Ecology, (P. Peduzzi), Vienna, Austria 18–19 Jun 2009 (PICS

project preparation), Laboratoire d'Océanographie de Villefranche, M. Weinbauer,

Villefranche-sur-mer, France, 15–24 Sep 2009 (publication preparation)

J. Turek, Štátné Lesy TANAP, Tatranská Lomnica, Slovakia, 13–23 Sep 2009, (Tatra

mountain lakes sampling).

M. Tušer, University of Oslo, Department of Physics, Helge Balk, Oslo, Norway, Norsko,

5–11 Oct 2009 (data analysis, paper preparation), Lake Hallstattersee, Austria, 21–25 Sep

2009 (Lake Hallstattersee survey)

I. Vaníčková, Institute for Ecology, Evolution and Diversity, Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt

am Main, Dr. Klaus Schwenk, Germany, 1–3 Mar 2009 (of cooperation), J.W. Goethe-

University, Dr. Klaus Schwenk a Dr. Mathilde Cordellier, Germany, 1 Nov – 4 Dec 2009,

(microsatelite analysis)

L. Veselý, Lake Hallstattersee, Austria, 21–25 Sep 2009 (Lake Hallstattersee survey)

J. Vrba, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland, (Invited lecture: Activities of extracellular

hydrolases – their sources and ecological role in freshwaters).

J. Ţaloudík, Amt für Landwirtschaft und Forsten (Ingeborg Bauer, Jana Finze), Regierung

der Oberpfalz, Sachgebiet Wasserwirtschaft (Dr. Hans Juergen Seibold), Regensburg,

Germany, 16 Mar 2009 (project coordination meeting), Drachensee Reservoir, Furth im

Wald, Germany, 29 May 2009 (reservoir opening)

1.7 Foreign visitors to Institute of Hydrobiology

Michail Bazarov, Russia, Institute of Biology of Inland Waters, Borok.

Martin Hahn: Austria, Institute for Limnology, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Mondsee.

Niels Olav Handegaard, Norway, Institute of Marine Research, Bergen.

Terje Hemnes, Norway, Akrehamn Tarlboteri A.S.

Hubert Keckeis, Austria, University of Wien.

Alexander Kopylov, Russia, Institute of Biology of Inland Waters, Borok.

Dmitryi Kosolapov, Russia, Institute of Biology of Inland Waters, Borok.

Michail Malin, Russia, Institute of Biology of Inland Waters, Borok.

John Malala Odoyo, Kenya, Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute.

Kenneth Ouma, Kenya, Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute.

Thomas Posch, Switzerland, Limnological Station, Institute of Plant Biology, University of

Zurich.

Télesphore Sime-Ngando, France, Lab. 'Microorganismes: Génome & Environnement',

UMR CNRS 6023, Université Blaise Pascal.

Markus Weinbauer, France, Microbial Ecology & Biogeochemistry Group, Universite

Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, CNRS, Laboratoire d'Oceanographie de Villefranche,

Villefranche-sur-Mer.

Erick Werimo, Kenya, Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute.

16


1.8 Students’ theses finished in 2009

Mgr.

(M.Sc.)

Bc.

(B.A.)

Oldřich Jarolím: Pelagic behaviour of reservoir fishes: sinusoidal swimming

and associated behaviour (Faculty of Science, University of South Bohemia in

České Budějovice, supervised by Jan Kubečka).

Petra Mošnerová: Diurnal changes of Phosphorus fractions in the vertical

profile of a microbial mat: the effect of oxygen and pH (Faculty of Science,

University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice,, supervised by Jakub

Borovec).

Pavel Rychtecký: Spatial heterogeneity and seasonal succession of

phytoplankton on a longitudinal gradient in the Římov Reservoir (Faculty of

Science, University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice,, supervised by Petr

Znachor).

Marie Nováková: Aluminium in the catchments of the Bohemian Forest lakesmobility,

toxicity and determination (Faculty of Science, University of South

Bohemia in České Budějovice,, supervised by Jiří Kaňa).

Kateřina Pěchotová: Factors influencing the abundance and ecology of

bacterial group Limnohabitans sp. in eutrophic environment (Faculty of

Science, University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice,, supervised by

Vojtěch Kasalický).

17


2 50 th BIRTHDAY OF THE ANNUAL REPORT OF THE “HYDRO-

BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY”

In 2009, unbelievably, the annual report of the "hydrobiological group" in the Academy of

Sciences celebrated its 50th birthday. Since I have been there from the very beginning up to

now, I have volunteered to describe some zigzags we went through during this long period,

mostly affected by political and economic changes and fluctuations, as well as by the

development of the science of limnology in the world and, last but not least, by the ageing not

only of reservoirs, but also of people. And by their substitution by young staff!!

How we started in Prague with reservoir research (1959–1968)

The hydrobiological group which began to produce annual reports each year starting in 1960

was founded by Jaroslav Hrbáček when, in 1959, the Czechoslovakian "Communist party

and government" decided to develop a laboratory in the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences

(CAS) for promoting the research of aquatic ecosystems in reservoirs (dam lakes).

Before 1959, there had only been a small hydrobiological department of the Biological

Institute of CAS, which was located in the South Bohemian town of Třeboň and was headed

by prof. Šrámek-Hušek. It was principally focused on the diversity of aquatic organisms in

fish-ponds.

Fig. 1: First visit to future field station (before reconstruction) at Slapy Reservoir in 1958. From left

to right: Marta Esslová (later Hrbáčková), Viera Prokešová (later Straškrábová), J. Růţička,

Václav Hruška (that time in military service), Jiří Komárek, Lidmila Procházková,

Pavel Blaţka.

Jaroslav Hrbáček, before his nomination to lead the Hydrobiological department of the

Biological Institute of CAS, focused on reservoir research, had worked as head of the

hydrobiological group at the Biological Faculty of Charles University in Prague and was

already well-known and respected in international limnological circles. The new department

18


was to start work in Prague, 40 km from the first big step of the Vltava river cascade – the

Slapy Reservoir. In 1960, it had 16 staff members: 7 scientists, 3 CSc students (i.e. PhD

students, including myself) and 6 technicians (laboratory assistants, drivers, a secretary, etc.).

Highly unusually and surprisingly at the time, the new department was given the go-ahead by

the authorities despite the fact that neither J. Hrbáček, nor any other member of staff were

Communist party members.

Actually in those years, Czechoslovakian rivers were being dammed and reservoir

cascades were being constructed for hydropower generation and as drinking water sources.

You should be aware of the fact that Czechoslovakia was a country with almost no natural

lakes (with the exception of small lakes in the mountains) and without large rivers (except for

a short stretch of the Danube river at the border between Slovakia and Hungary). There were

good and experienced water engineers in the country, but they had all been oriented towards

rivers. It was recognized at the time that, while reservoirs were artificial ecosystems, after

impoundment they would behave more or less like natural water bodies and development of

tools to manage their water quality was nedeed. Not much was known about the mechanisms

of the functioning of their ecosystems (and how they differed from those known from lakes).

In 1959, the department founded a field station on the shore of the Slapy Reservoir (near

the village of Nebřich, 10 km upstream from the dam). It was originally a simple building

without electricity and water, and had to be refurbished to serve the hydrobiologists´ needs.

Regular long-term investigations of the Slapy Reservoir started in 1959 and continue up to

this day. Simultaneously, regular sampling was begun in another Czech reservoir, Klíčava (a

drinking water source).

In Prague, the Department was located in a small 3-storey building, which again needed

reconstruction (originally it had belonged to a private butcher who then lost it in 1948 during

the mass nationalisation process. In the following years the building had been used by

“ASANA” - a state-owned company producing poisoned sausages for killing rats. After a

reorganisation at the Biological institute of CAS, the Department was independent for several

years and called itself the Hydrobiological Laboratory of CAS. It increased slightly in staff

size ( a total of 27, including 12 scientists), and even in equipment thanks to the

“International Biological Programme” (IBP) of the United Nations where Czechoslovakian

limnologists worked intensely in the Freshwater Productivity Section. It was the time of the

Prague Spring – the period of “socialism with a human face” (under the leadership of

Alexandr Dubček), we had more freedom, we could travel to the West more easily,

limnologists from many European countries (East and West) visited us and we co-operated

with them. Moreover, we managed to obtain some equipment from the West – you should be

aware that our currency was not convertible and purchase of anything for dollars was

extremely difficult.

The Hydrobiological Laboratory collected a lot of valuable data from the reservoirs and the

importance of residence time for the functioning of their ecosystems was elucidated. In the

Klíčava Reservoir (with residence time of more than 500 days) intense observations of the

ecosystem were performed in 1967 as a part of IBP.

What could happen under Communism: the story of Marta

In 1958, Marta Hrbáčková (the wife of Jaroslav Hrbáček) also joined the hydrobiological

team. She was an embryologist by training, and her story, almost unbelievable today, is an

interesting illustration of the political system we lived under. Marta had finished her doctoral

(then known as “candidate”) thesis. Her task had been to repeat, broaden and elucidate the

results of the Soviet "scientist" Olga Lepeshinskaya. Lepeshinskaya had purportedly

19


described the development of living cellular structures from amorphous egg yolk and her

"discovery" (of the origin of life) had been celebrated in the Soviet Union as one of the great

achievements of Soviet scientists. However, although Marta had worked hard and skillfully in

a good quality laboratory for three years, she was not able to replicate the experiments by

Lepeshinskaya. Her conclusion was that the experiments in the Soviet laboratory had not been

executed correctly and had lacked both sterility and precision. Needless to say, Marta was not

allowed to submit her thesis for defense for political reasons. She was understandably

desperate when her three years' effort turned out to have been in vain. She was then offered a

place at the Hydrobiological Laboratory and started a new career working on Daphnia

embryology.

Fig. 2: Sampling at Slapy reservoior

in 1958: horizontal survey,

Jaroslav Hrbáček.

Fig. 3: Winter sampling at Klíčava Reservoir

(standard station) in 1963: Milan Straškraba

measuring vertical temperature profile.

The “normalization” period (1968–1980)

Unfortunately, the promising trend started under “socialism with human face”, was abruptly

terminated by the invasion of the armies of the Soviet Union and other countries of the

Warsaw Pact in August 1968 and subsequent “normalization”, i.e. strengthening of the

political oppression and loss of freedom. The Hydrobiological Laboratory lost its

independence and was transferred to the Institute of Botany of the Czechoslovak Academy of

Sciences to become one of its sections. We continued working on our programme and our

head was still doc. J. Hrbáček. We terminated the long-term research in the Klíčava Reservoir

in 1970, since by then it was quite altered by the input of waters from mining. But we

continued with the Slapy Reservoir. I must confess that I and some other colleagues protested:

„Why investigate the same ecosystem for such a long time?“ And J. Hrbáček answered:

„Look at the West – what the progress of limnology is like there! And they have everything –

chemicals, literature, equipment.... And what do we have to do good science and to be able to

cooperate or compete with them? Just our dirty field work with slowly working apparatuses

developed by ourselves, this is the only thing we can do well.“ I must say now that he was

right!

20


Up until 1979 the Section of Hydrobiology was part of the Botanical Institute of CAS.

However, it was decided in the late seventies (by the “Communist Party and Government”)

that too many scientific institutions of the Academy (= too many intellectuals) are

concentrated in Prague and this must be changed. “Divide et impera!” as the old Romans used

to say. So the academic institutes dealing with the environment were ordered to move to

South Bohemia – to České Budějovice. One of them was the Institute of Landscape Ecology.

And in 1980, the Hydrobiological Laboratory (its name changed to “Section of Hydrobiology)

was demerged from the Institute of Botany and subsumed under the Institute of Landscape

Ecology. This meant we had to move to České Budějovice. It was decided that in addition to

the long-term investigations in the Slapy Reservoir, another newly impounded reservoir

would be studied – the Římov Reservoir – a drinking water source for the whole South

Bohemian region. Our research of Římov began in 1979, at the very beginning of the

impoundment.

Moving from Prague proved impossible for some employees and most especially for

skilled technicians. It was then very difficult to get an apartment in České Budějovice, with

some exceptions, (i.e. scientists, but not technicians, were given cheap co-operative

apartments in new housing developments). We had to find new technicians and train them, to

furnish new labs etc. The only advantage of all these events was some possibility to expand

the scientific staff, especially with young students. We managed to find young doctoral

students (then called “aspirants”) for research in microbial ecology and on phytoplankton,

zooplankton and fish, who partly took the place of the scientists who could not move from

Prague.

Moving to České Budějovice (1981–1989)

The period of “transfer” was finished in 1985 when no hydrobiological institution remained

in Prague. The director of the Institute of Landscape Ecology nominated Ing. Petr Dolejš as

head of the Section of Hydrobiology, instead of J. Hrbáček who remained in Prague as senior

scientist. (He remained in touch with “hydrobiology in Č. Budějovice“, visiting seminars,

consulting with staff members and working at the Slapy Reservoir field station. This activity

was interrupted by a short and severe illness and terminated by death at 89 years´ age in July

2010.) The specialization of the new head, P. Dolejš, was water treatment and sewage

treatment and he tried to include these topics into the work of the hydrobiological group.

Optimistic and unrealistic plans of the development of the academic institutions in České

Budějovice were projected. The Section of Hydrobiology was to grow and to have more than

100 staff members in the future (and to create an independent institute with more Party

members in the staff). In 1989, there were 42 staff members, of these 21 were scientists.

After the “Velvet revolution” (from 1989 up to now)

In November 1989 with the “Velvet revolution”, the regime changed abruptly. It was a period

of enthusiasm. The scientists in the Section of Hydrobiology all voted for separation from the

Institute of Landscape Ecology and suggested that an independent Institute of Hydrobiology

of CAS be founded. We succeeded in 1990 and I was selected and nominated as Director (in

accordance with the rules, I was director for 8 years up to 1998). We then had 40 staff

members (23 scientists, 3 PhD students and 14 technicians, lab assistants, drivers and others).

Another important event occurred in 1990 – the University of South Bohemia in České

Budějovice was founded. Previously, there had been no University, only two indpendent

institutions of higher learning, specialising in agriculturte and teacher-training. Thanks to the

initiative of the Academic Institutes (Entomology, Parasitology, Molecular Biology of Plants,

Soil Biology and Hydrobiology), the medical doctors from the hospital and others,

21


the University was founded and approved with new Faculties: Biological (“the baby” of the

Academic Institutes), Theology, Health and Social Studies, Pedagogical and Agriculture.

Scientists from the Academic Institutes started to teach and supervise students. Some staff

members even joined the University on a full-time basis. This “symbiosis” between the

University and the Academy has continued to be fruitful and useful.

In spite of the optimism and euphoria after the “revolution”, not all was peaches and

cream. It is difficult to establish a democracy after so many years of Communist government

and to avoid sudden and unexpected changes. A lot was done for the “democratization” of the

CAS headquarters, but nothing of the kind occurred at the Universities. There was animosity

against the Academy on the side of some Universities and some politicians (this has been

repeated in waves since then). In December 1992, the budget of the CAS prepared for the year

1993 was suddenly slashed (in parliament from the initiative of the Prime Minister Václav

Klaus) by 30% (!!!). This severe cut meant that all institutes had to be evaluated within two

months, December and January, according to scientific results, and “rated”. All institutes

suffered reductions, but some were abolished. In České Budějovice, all the Institutes, except

for the Institute of Landscape Ecology, remained more or less as they were, with some 5 to

15% budget reductions. This meant not only a decrease of funds, but also a reduction of the

staff by the same percentage. The Hydrobiological Institute was rated as II a, this translated

into a 10% reduction and 3 staff members had to be made redundant. This was not an easy

decision to make.

On the other hand, the development of the Institute during the last 15 years was enormous

– here I mean quality rather than quantity, though they both increased. We learned to submit

grant proposals – first to the Grant Agency of the CAS and later to the Grant Agency of the

Czech Republic (since the Czech and Slovak Republics split peacefully in 1992 we have an

Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic – AS CR). The Hydrobiological Institute also

was successful in attracting funding for large EU projects. New techniques and approaches

have been developed and laboratories get equipped simultaneously (though lagging behind a

little bit) with the development in world science.

The staff today is difficult to “count”: there are many part-time staff members (such as

PhD students, people who simultaneously work for the University and senior scientists) . And

there are many paid by “soft” (i.e. grant) money. Approximately, there are about 40 staff

members (full-time persons equivalent), of these 22 are scientists, both on institutional and on

soft money.

Since 2006, another profound change in organization has occurred. All the academic

institutes in České Budějovice merged into one Biology Centre of AS CR (BC ASCR). We

lost our independence again. We are not a legal entity anymore. Whether it is better or worse

is difficult to judge. We stay together with our own staff, our own equipment and own

projects. From 1999 onwards, Josef Matěna has been the director of the Institute of

Hydrobiology. He remains director and retains some rights, but is subordinated to the Director

of BC ASCR (prof. F. Sehnal).

I finish here.

Just a small postscript: there are regular evaluations of the Institutes in the AS CR, each

five years. It is an internal evaluation with reviewers from abroad. We await such an

evaluation in the year 2010.

Viera Straškrábová

22


3 RESERVOIRS

3.1 Regular monitoring of the reservoirs Slapy and Římov: dissolved and dispersed

substances in 2009

Annual and summer (April–September) mean concentrations of chemical constituents

dissolved and dispersed in the surface layers of the Slapy and Římov Reservoirs (Table 1)

were obtained by J. Hejzlar and J. Kopáček. Samples were taken from 0.1 to 0.4 m depth at

the deepest points of the reservoirs in three-week intervals, pre-filtered through a 200- m

polyamide sieve to remove large zooplankton, stored in the dark at 4 o C, and analysed within

48 h after sampling. Dissolved constituents were analysed in samples filtered through a glass

fibre filter with 0.4 m nominal pore size. Abbreviations in Table 1 are: TON, total organic

nitrogen; DON, dissolved organic nitrogen; TN total nitrogen; TP, total phosphorus; TDP,

total dissolved phosphorus; COD, chemical oxygen demand; DOC and POC, dissolved and

particulate organic carbon, respectively.

Table 1: Annual (n = 17) and summer (n = 8) mean composition of the surface waters of the Slapy

and Římov reservoirs in 2009.

VARIABLES UNIT MEAN VALUES

Slapy

Římov

Annual Summer Annual Summer

NO 3 -N g l -1 1806 2115 1388 1252

NO 2 -N g l -1 17 31 10 14

NH 4 -N g l -1 47 49 70 77

TON g l -1 722 856 595 660

DON g l -1 653 728 516 558

TN g l -1 3245 3779 2063 2003

TP g l -1 49.2 37.6 34.4 27.7

TDP g l -1 37.7 20.3 23.6 17.5

COD mg l -1 19.6 20.9 18.2 19.5

DOC mg l -1 7.18 7.41 6.02 6.40

POC mg l -1 0.71 1.25 0.50 0.59

Ca 2+ mg l -1 19.4 19.6 11.4 10.7

Mg 2+ mg l -1 5.3 5.3 2.7 2.4

Na + mg l -1 10.3 10.6 5.9 5.2

K + mg l -1 3.9 3.9 2.2 2.1

2-

SO 4 mg l -1 23.2 24.4 14.4 14.1

Cl - mg l -1 14.0 15.3 5.5 4.6

Alkalinity (Gran titration) meq l -1 0.92 0.89 0.50 0.45

Conductivity at 25 o C S cm -1 206 210 117 108

23


3.2 Regular monitoring of the reservoirs Slapy and Římov: microbial characteristics,

chlorophyll and zooplankton biomass in 2009

Annual and summer mean concentrations of bacteria, protozoans, microzooplankton, BOD 5

(total and after separating algae by filtration) as well as chlorophyll concentrations and

zooplankton biomass in the reservoirs (and inflows to Římov Reservoir), based on data by

Z. Brandl, M. Macek, R. Malá, A. Hartmanová, Z. Prachař, J. Seďa, K. Šimek, M.

Štojdlová, V. Straškrábová, M. Vožechová and P. Znachor are shown in Table 2.

Table 2: Mean values of microbial characteristics, zooplankton, chlorophyll and BOD in the

Slapy and Římov Reservoirs and inflows. "Summer": April to September.

Sites: S-Slapy and R-Římov Reservoirs, C-Černá and M-Malše rivers – inflows to

Římov Reservoir. Zooplankton in Římov was not sampled in January – February.

SITE VARIABLE LAYER UNIT MEAN VALUE

Annual Summer

S BOD 5 0 m mg l –1 O 2 2.31 3.17

BOD 5 filtered 0 m mg l –1 O 2 – 2.08

bacteria DAPI 0 m 10 6 ml –1 5.21 7.65

bact. beef-pept. agar 0 m CFU ml –1 148 105

ciliates 0–3 m per ml 5.9 11.1

het. nanoflag. 0 m 10 3 ml –1 1.49 2.65

chlorophyll a

total 0–3 m mg m -3 14.45 29.49

40µm 0–4 m mg m -3 5.63 8.53

zooplankton biomass, protein N

Cladocera herbiv. 0–40 m mg m –2 65.0 75.6

Copepoda 0–40 m mg m –2 29.5 36.5

total zooplankton 0–40 m mg m –2 94.5 113.9

C BOD 5 0 m mg l –1 O 2 1.70 1.56

chlorophyll a 0 m mg m –3 3.58 4.36

M BOD 5 0 m mg l -1 O 2 2.24 2.31

chlorophyll a 0 m mg m -3 5.88 7.44

24


3.3 Regular monitoring: fish stock composition in the Římov Reservoir in 2009

The fish stock of the Římov Reservoir was traditionally monitored in the inshore area by

night seining and electrofishing. Open water and deeper benthic habitats were studied by

split-beam echosounder, gillnets and pelagic fry and adult trawls. The inshore area was fished

quantitatively according to Říha et al. (2008) [1].

Field work was carried out by J. Kubečka, P. Blabolil, J. Čech, V. Draštík, J. Frouzová,

T. Jůza, L. Kočvara, M. Kratochvíl, K. Maier, J. Peterka, Z. Prachař, M. Prchalová,

G. Rakowitz, J. Richta, M. Říha, Z. Sajdlová, K. Soukalová, M. Šmejkal, M. Tušer,

M. Vašek, L. Vejřík, L. Veselý, and J. Wanzenböck. Analysis of the catch was done by

M. Říha (riha.milan@centrum.cz) and J. Kubečka. Sampling was done during the fourth

week of August 2009. The total area of 1.54 hectares was fished in 10 hauls with 200 m long

net. The species composition of the night catches of the beach seine net is given in Table 3.

Table 3: Composition of the fish stock of the Římov Reservoir in 2008 according to night

shore seining estimate.

Common Latin name Abundance Biomass % %

name ind ha –1 kg ha –1 Abundance Biomass

Perch Perca fluviatilis 28.10 1.33 2.08 1.55

Roach Rutilus rutilus 412.73 29.54 30.55 34.55

Bream Abramis brama 458.39 41.24 33.93 48.23

Chub Leuciscus cephalus 4.25 0.16 0.31 0.18

Rudd Scardinius

13.43 0.17 0.99 0.20

erythrophthalmus

Pike Esox lucius 3.89 1.99 0.29 2.33

Asp Aspius aspius 6.37 0.75 0.47 0.87

Dace Leuciscus leuciscus 1.12 0.01 0.08 0.01

Bleak Alburnus alburnus 102.22 4.26 7.57 4.98

Ruffe Gymnocephalus 297.83 2.10 22.04 2.46

cernua

Pikeperch Sander lucioperca 15.55 1.73 1.15 2.03

Gudgeon Gobio gobio 1.56 0.01 0.12 0.01

Hybrid Abramis x Rutilus 3.07 0.43 0.23 0.50

Carp Cyprinus carpio 0.99 0.71 0.07 0.82

Eel Anguilla anguilla 0.51 1.00 0.04 1.17

White bream Blicca bjoerkna 1.12 0.08 0.08 0.09

Total 1351.12 85.50 100.00 100.00

In 2009, the littoral fish community of the Římov Reservoir was dominated by common

bream Abramis brama, roach Rutilus rutilus, ruffe Gymnocephalus cernua and bleak

Alburnus alburnus. This composition was very similar as in previous years and it is

characteristic for the cyprinid dominance phase. The total fish biomass reached 85.5 kg ha -1 .

25


It was more by 27.5 kg.ha -1 than in the previous year 2008. This dramatic increase was caused

by increase of abundance of dominant species such as bream and roach. However, these

fluctuations were expected for both species because synchronized periodical fluctuations were

characteristic for them in the past [2]. The cyprinid phase is considered as a climax for the

reservoir although the cyclical changes of dominant species well illustrated the dynamics of

the state. It is also possible that sampling error contributed to the difference of biomass

between 2008 and 9 and that the true value were less distant from each other. If this

assumption is correct we can say that the results fit well with long-termed development of the

fish stock of Římov Reservoir [2].

[1] Říha, M., Kubečka, J., Mrkvička, T., Prchalová, M., Čech, M., Draštík, V., Frouzová, J.,

Hladík, M., Hohausová, E., Jarolím, O., Jůza, T., Kratochvíl, M., Peterka, J., Tušer M.,

and Vašek, M., (2008): Dependence of beach seine net efficiency on net length and diel period.

Aquatic Living Resources, 21: 411–418.

[2] Říha, M., Kubečka, J., Vašek, M., Seďa, J., Mrkvička, T., Prchalová, M., Matěna, J., Hladík, M.,

Čech, M., Draštík, V., Frouzová, J., Hohausová, E., Jarolím, O., Jůza, T., Kratochvíl, M.,

Peterka, J. and Tušer, M. (2009): Long-term development of fish populations in the Římov

Reservoir. Fisheries Management and Ecology 16: 121–129.

3.4 Age-0 fish predation and the midsummer decline of Daphnia in the Římov Reservoir

M. Vašek (mojmir.vasek@seznam.cz) evaluated the predation impact of age-0 fish on

population development of Daphnia galeata in the Římov Reservoir during late spring and

early summer of two successive years, 2006 and 2007. Age-0 fish and zooplankton were

sampled from the pelagic habitat in the upstream and downstream reaches of the reservoir.

The quantitative samples of age-0 fish were obtained by means of night trawling. Daily

consumption rates of daphnids by age-0 fish between late May and July were estimated using

a balanced bioenergetic model. In both years, a high abundance of daphnids was observed in

June, followed by a decline in July. In 2006, the daily uptake of daphnids by the age-0 fish

community during late spring/early summer was less than 0.3 % of the Daphnia galeata

standing stock in both the upstream and downstream areas of the reservoir. In 2007, the daily

consumption rates of age-0 fish in the upstream region accounted for a maximum of 3–5 % of

the standing stock of daphnids. In the downstream region, the consumption of daphnids by

age-0 fish community was less than 0.4 % of the Daphnia standing stock per day. With the

exception of the situation in the upstream area in 2007, the predatory impact of age-0 fish

community on the population of Daphnia galeata was very low, indicating that other factors

besides age-0 fish predation were involved in the midsummer decline of daphnids in the

Římov Reservoir.

3.5 Macrophytic vegetation in the littoral of Lipno Reservoir (Czech Republic)

M. Krolová (krolova@seznam.cz), J. Hejzlar, and H. Čížková (University of South Bohemia

in České Budějovice, Faculty of Agriculture) analyzed macrophytic vegetation in the littoral

zone of Lipno Reservoir with the aim of explaining which factors influence the occurrence

and diversity of littoral vegetation in reservoirs with a storage function that results in a

significant water level fluctuation. The Lipno Reservoir is situated on the upper Vltava River

in the mountain ranges of Šumava in South Bohemia and is one of the largest water bodies in

26


the Czech Republic (water volume 306 mil. m 3 , surface area 47 km 2 , perimeter 115 km). The

main purposes of this reservoir include hydropower and regulation of downstream water flow,

but the reservoir also serves as an important centre of recreation for water sports, swimming,

and fishing.

The vegetation was screened at 115 localities in the littoral of the Lipno Reservoir was

realized during the vegetation season of 2006. The localities were selected along the perimeter

of the reservoir at distances of one kilometer from each other. Each locality was defined as a

50 m stretch of the shore and was described in detail in terms of vegetation cover, site

morphology, character of substrate, and anthropogenic impacts.

Fig. 4: Map and histograms showing the cover of macrophytes in the monitored localities in the littoral

zone of Lipno Reservoir: A) woody plants, B) macrophytes. (The legend is the same for woody

plants and macrophytes.)

A total of 53 macrophyte species (25 terrestrial, 16 emergent, 2 floating-leaved,

4 submerged and 5 amphibious) and 31 tree and shrub species (woody plants) were detected

during the examination of the littoral zone. The macrophyte cover of the littoral zone (Fig. 4)

ranged mostly from 0 to 10% with higher values (up to 40%) registered only in coves. These

coves were often marked by the presence of inflows or infiltrations of ground water along

their shores. Dominant macrophyte species included mainly emergent species, e.g. Phalaris

arundinacea, Eleocharis acicularis, Carex acuta, and Glyceria fluitans. Trees and shrubs

were represented mainly by the genus Salix and their cover was often lower than 1% (Fig. 4).

27


The roots of these woody plants grew in the supralittoral zone and did not markedly interfere

in the littoral zone.

The characteristics of the littoral morphology and substrate varied at different locations

(Fig. 5). The areas of the main inflow and the coves typically had a smaller shore slope (1.5–

3°), a low erosion scar at the reservoir perimeter (up to 5 cm), and a relatively short effective

length of wind action (up to 2 km). These areas typically featured a substrate containing

mostly sand and silt fractions (>60% and 6–20%, respectively) and a substantial organic

fraction (4–20%). The middle part of the reservoir also featured low shore slopes (4 km)), and gravel was the major fraction of

the substrate (>40%). The lower parts of the reservoir adjacent to the dam typically had a high

shore slope (>6°) and a high erosion scar (>80 cm), with gravel as the major fraction of the

substrate (>40%). Anthropogenic impacts in the littoral zone were evident at 52% of the

localities (Fig. 5). The left shore of the reservoir was more influenced by human impacts than

the right one due to the presence of municipalities (Horní Planá, Černá v Pošumaví, Dolní

Vltavice, Frymburk, Lipno nad Vltavou) and recreation facilities (cottages, camps, beaches,

wharfs for boats and yachts).

Fig. 5: Maps showing the size of selected morphology factors at the monitored localities in

the littoral zone of the Lipno Reservoir: (A) human impact: 0 – not evident,

1 – present; (B) height of erosion step; (C) effective length of wind action; (D) shore

slope.

28


Correlation analysis showed relationships between the occurrence of macrophytes

(macrophyte cover and biodiversity) in the littoral zone, littoral morphology characteristics

(shore slope, erosion scar, effective length of wind action), grain size distribution of substrate,

and antropogenic impacts. Apparently, the main controlling factor of the occurrence of

macrophytes in Lipno Reservoir was relatively low water transparency (max. 1.5 to 2 m)

together with water level fluctuation (up to 3.5 m in the period 1991–2005) and erosion

activity of the waves that caused degradation of the substrate in a wide belt along the shore

and consecutively resulted in the inability of submerged species to colonize the shallow parts

of the shores. The occurrence of macrophytes was restricted to the eulittoral zone, where

mainly emergent and amphibious macrophytes could be found. Only few locations of the

Lipno Reservoir had a real infralittoral zone (zone of submerged and free-floating

macrophytes) and all of them were situated at the inflow reaches of the reservoir, i.e. in the

side channels and blind arms within the mouth of the Vltava River into the reservoir where

the water column was permanently maintained due to river inflows and was independent on

the impoundment fluctuations.

29


Green Fluorescence (530 nm)

4 LAKES

4.1 Aggregate formation in a freshwater bacterial strain induced by growth state and

conspecific chemical cues

K. Horňák (hornak@hbu.cas.cz) and K. Šimek in cooperation with J. Blom and J. Pernthaler

(Limnological station, Institute of Plant Biology, University of Zürich, Switzerland)

investigated the induction of aggregate formation in the freshwater bacterium Sphingobium

sp. strain Z007 (Alphaproteobacteria, isolated from the oligo-mesotrophic Lake Zürich,

Switzerland) by growth state and protistan grazing. Dialysis bag batch culture experiments

were conducted in which these bacteria were grown spatially separated from bacteria or from

co-cultures of bacteria and predators. Numbers of single cells and aggregates of Sphingobium

sp. strain Z007 were enumerated by flow cytometry (Fig. 6).

microspheres

aggregates

(AGG)

AGG

single cells (SC)

90° Light Scatter

SC

Fig. 6: Left panel: Example of a cytogram (90° light scatter vs. green fluorescence, after staining with

SYTO 13) of cells inside the dialysis bag after 72 h of exposure to flagellate grazing. The 3

polygons (gates) define the populations of aggregates (AGG) and single cells (SC) of

Sphingobium sp. strain Z007 and microspheres (1 µm diameter, internal standard). Right

panels: Micrographs of aggregates and single cells from the same treatment after sorting and

DAPI staining. Bar = 20 µm.

In pure cultures of Sphingobium sp. strain Z007, the concentrations of single cells and

aggregates inside and outside the dialysis membranes developed in a similar manner over 3

days of incubation, and the proportions of aggregates were highest during the exponential

growth phase. Cell production of Sphingobium sp. strain Z007 was enhanced in the presence

of another isolate, Limnohabitans planktonicus (the R-BT065 lineage of Betaproteobacteria,

isolated from the meso-eutrophic Římov Reservoir, Czech Republic) outside the bags, and

30


even more so if that strain was additionally grazed upon by the bacterivorous flagellate

Poterioochromonas sp. However, the ratios of single cells to aggregates of Sphingobium sp.

strain Z007 were not affected in either case. By contrast, the feeding of flagellates on

Sphingobium sp. strain Z007 outside the dialysis bags led to significantly higher proportions

of aggregates inside the bags. This was not paralleled by an increase in growth rates, and all

cultures were in a comparable growth state at the end of the experiment. We conclude that

two mechanisms, growth state and the possible release of infochemicals by the predator, may

induce aggregate formation of Sphingobium sp. strain Z007. Moreover, these infochemicals

only appeared to be generated by predation on cells of the same species.

4.2 Trends in aluminium export from a mountainous area to surface waters, from

deglaciation to the recent: effects of vegetation and soil development, atmospheric

acidification, and nitrogen-saturation.

J. Kopáček (jkopacek@hbu.cas.cz), J. Hejzlar, J. Kaňa, P. Porcal, J. Turek, and S. A.

Norton (Department of Earth Sciences, University of Maine, Orono, USA) reconstructed the

history of terrestrial export of aluminium (Al) to Plešné Lake (Czech Republic) since the

lake‟s origin ~12,600 yr BC, and predicted Al export for 2010–2050 on the basis of mass

budget studies, palaeolimnological data, and MAGIC modelling (Table 4). They focused on

three major Al forms; ionic Al (Al i ), organically bound Al (Al o ), and particulate Al hydroxide

[Al(OH) 3 ]. In early post-glacial time, Plešné Lake received high terrestrial export of Al, but

with a minor proportion of Al(OH) 3 (4–25 µmol l –1 ), and concentrations of Al i and Al o were

negligible (Table 1). After forest and soil development (~9,900–9,000 yr BC), erosion

declined and soil organic acids increased the export of Al o from the soils. The terrestrial Al o

leaching (~7.5 µmol l –1 ) persisted throughout the Holocene until the industrial period. During

the industrial era, Al i concentrations continuously increased (up to 28 µmol l –1 in the mid-

1980s) due to atmospheric acidification; the Al i leaching was mostly associated with sulphate.

The proportion of Al i associated with nitrate has been increasing since the beginning of lake

recovery from acidification after ~1990 due to reduction in sulphur deposition and nitrogensaturation

of the catchment, leading to persistent nitrate leaching. Currently, nitrate has

become the dominant strong acid anion and the major Al i carrier. Al o (5.5 µmol l –1 ) is

predicted to dominate Al concentrations around 2050, but the predicted Al i concentrations (~4

µmol l –1 ) are uncertain because of uncertainty associated with future nitrate leaching and its

effect on soils.

Table 4: Summary of development of pH and Al concentrations (µmol l –1 ) in Plešné Lake.

Post glacial

period

Pre-industrial

Holocene

Acidification era (1950–2008)

pH ~7 ~6.5 4.4–5 ~5.6

Al i


4. 3 Canopy leaching of nutrients and metals in a mountain spruce forest

J. Kopáček (jkopacek@hbu.cas.cz), J. Turek, J. Hejzlar, and H. Šantrůčková (Faculty of

Science, University of South Bohemia, České Budějovice, Czech Republic) used precipitation

and throughfall fluxes of major ions, nutrients (C, N, P), and metals (Al, Fe, Mn), and the

chemical composition of litter fall and living plant tissue in Norway spruce stands (the

Bohemian Forest; Czech Republic), to evaluate how microbial processes and decay of plant

tissue in canopies influence canopy leaching (CL) of elements. Proton exchange for Mg 2+ ,

Ca 2+ , and K + in decaying biomass and co-transport of Ca 2+ and K + out of plant cells with

organic acid anions were the most likely processes contributing to CL of base cations. The CL

of total P and N (and also NO – 3 ) was minor. Important proportions of the N and P mineral

forms were transformed to organic forms by microbial processes (primary and bacterial

production), with the respective CL of –13.9 and 16.4 mmol m –2 yr –1 for NH + 4 and organic N,

and –0.33 and 0.22 mmol m –2 yr –1 for dissolved reactive P (DRP) and organic P. Most of the

+

particulate P and N in throughfall (~90%) originated from microbial DRP and NH 4

transformations, but particulate C mostly came from the fragmentation of plant tissue (58%).

Among metals, CL was not observed for Al, was small for Fe (0.3 mmol m –2 yr –1 ), and

greatest for Mn (0.9 mmol m –2 yr –1 ) due to leaching from decaying tissue by acidic

precipitation.

32


5 SPECIAL INVESTIGATIONS

5.1 New isolated strains from the R-BT cluster of Betaproteobacteria

Betaproteobacteria belong to the most abundant and cosmopolitan members of the freshwater

bacterioplankton. Recent investigations [1] have revealed that the "R-BT cluster"

(Římov-BeTaproteobacteria) [2] comprises a highly abundant (5–20 % of all bacteria) and

metabolically active (50–100 % of active cells) segment of bacterioplankton in the Římov

Reservoir. However, this cluster has been missing a validly described species.

Therefore, V. Kasalický (kasalicky@hbu.cas.cz), J. Jezbera, K. Šimek, K. Pěchotová and

M. Hahn (Institute for Limnology, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Mondsee) have put a large

effort into the isolation of bacterial strains affiliated with the R-BT cluster as a prerequisite

facilitating new species description. Our effort has resulted in the isolation of several R-BT

strains (positive hybridized with R-BT065 oligonucleotide probe [2]) that are currently

maintained in our culture collection. Four of these were analyzed for fatty acids composition

(in cooperation with Dana Elhottová, Biology Centre AS CR, Institute of Soil Biology) and

for GC content of their genome, polar lipids composition and respiratory quinones type. We

also performed the phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene of our isolates to confirm

their taxonomic affiliation. Based on the results, we are proposing a new bacterial genus

Limnohabitans within the family Commamonadaceae (Betaproteobacteria) with two new

species closely related to the R-BT cluster [3]. Moreover, we have prepared the description of

another two new Limnohabitans species (Fig. 7) affiliated directly with this so far uncultured

cluster [4].

Table 5: Selected substrate utilization tests illustrating the growth differences of two isolated strains

from the R-BT cluster. The assimilation tests were performed by comparison of optical

density (OD) established in a liquid one-tenth-strength NSY medium (0.3 g l -1 ) with and

without 0.5 g l -1 of the test substance (pH 7.2). OD differences of 50% of the OD established on the medium without the test substance were scored as no

assimilation, weak assimilation and assimilation, respectively. +, positive growth;

–, no growth.

Acetate Fructose Histidine (L-) Oxaloacetate Phenylalanine (L-) Serine (L-)

II-B4 – + – – – –

II-D5 + – + + + +

Surprisingly, we found the ecophysiological and morphological diversity within the R-BT

cluster greater than one can deduce from the environmental data and the 16S rRNA gene

phylogeny. For this reason, we performed a set of experiments with different carbon sources -

commercially available (Table 5) and naturally produced (e.g. algal exudates or lysates,

Table 6) substrates. We found that closely related strains differed in their growth rates and in

the maximum biomass achieved when growing on the same substances. In regard to the

occurrence of the R-BT cluster in many types of freshwater habitats, we propose that the

ecological success of this narrow cluster might be explained by its large ecophysiological

plasticity indicated by laboratory substrate utilization tests.

33


Table 6: Growth characteristics of two isolated strains from the R-BT cluster on naturally produced

substrate sources (algal exudates). Data from whole phytoplankton < 200 µm community

incubation, and from co-cultivation of the bacteria with axenic algae of the genus

Cryptomonas. Cell numbers and morphologies of both strains were studied on DAPI-stained

preparations by using an Olympus BX 60 microscope with semiautomatic image analysis

system LUCIA D (Lucia 3.52, Laboratory Imaging, Prague, Czech Republic).

Treatment

Biomass yield

[10 5 µm 3 ml –1 ]

Maximal cell abundance

[10 6 ml –1 ]

Growth rate

[day -1 ]

II-B4 phytoplankton 3.75 ± 0.16 3.02 ± 0.38 0.453

II-D5 phytoplankton 5.13 ± 0.89 2.12 ± 0.24 0.546

II-B4 Cryptomonas n.d. 77.39 ± 0.48 0.097

II-D5 Cryptomonas n.d. 73.76 ± 10.85 0.166

A

B

C

D

Fig. 7: Basic morphologies of bacteria from the R-BT cluster. A + B, strain II-B4, C + D, strain II-D5

isolated from Římov Reservoir that have been proposed for descriptions of new species. A + C,

photographs from transmission electron microscope JEOL JEM-1010, B + C, photographs

from fluorescence microscope Olympus BX 60.

34


Literature cited:

[1] Šimek, K., Horňák, K., Jezbera J., Nedoma, J., Vrba, J., Straškrábová, V., Macek, M., Dolan, J. R.

and Hahn M.W. (2006). Maximum growth rates and possible life strategies of different

bacterioplankton groups in relation to phosphorus availability in a freshwater reservoir. Environ

Microbiol 8, 1613–1624.

[2] Šimek, K., Pernthaler, J., Weinbauer, M.G., Horňák, K., Dolan, J.R., Nedoma, J., Mašín, M., and

Amann, R. (2001). Changes in bacterial community composition, dynamics and viral mortality

rates associated with enhanced flagellate grazing in a meso-eutrophic reservoir. Appl Environ

Microbiol 67: 2723–2733.

[3] Hahn, M.W., Kasalický, V., Jezbera, J., Brandt, U., Jezberová, J., and Šimek K. Limnohabitans

curvus gen. nov., sp. nov., and Limnohabitans australis gen. nov., sp. nov., planktonic bacteria

isolated from freshwater habitats (in press)

[4] Kasalický, V., Jezbera, J., Šimek K. and Hahn, M.W., Limnohabitans planktonicus sp. nov., and

Limnohabitans parvus sp. nov., two novel planktonic Betaproteobacteria isolated from a

freshwater reservoir (in press)

5.2 Broad habitat range and ecophysiological traits of the members

of phylogenetically narrow R-BT065 cluster of Betaproteobacteria

K. Šimek (ksimek@hbu.cas.cz), V. Kasalický, K. Horňák, J. Jezbera, M. Hahn,

M. Weinbauer and J. Hejzlar collaborated on a research project dealing with the factors

shaping occurrence and ecophysiological traits of the members of the R-BT065 cluster that

represents a core group of the betaproteobacterial genus Limnohabitans [1-5]. These

investigations followed three major lines:

1. We conducted an extensive survey of the occurrence of these bacterial phylotypes in

various freshwater ecosystems [1]. In 102 freshwater lakes, reservoirs, and various ponds

located in central Europe we quantified the abundance of the R-BT065-positive bacteria by

using a cluster-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization probe. These habitats differed

markedly in pH, conductivity, trophic status, surface area, altitude, bedrock type, and other

limnological characteristics. Despite the broad ecological diversity of the habitats

investigated, the cluster was detected in most of the systems, and its occurrence was not

restricted to a certain habitat type. However, the relative proportions of the cluster in the total

bacterioplankton were significantly lower in humic and acidified lakes than in pH-neutral or

alkaline habitats. On average, the cluster accounted for 9.4% of the total bacterioplankton

(range, 0 to 29%).

The relative abundance and absolute abundance of these bacteria were significantly and

positively related to higher pH, conductivity, and the proportion of low-molecular-weight

compounds in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and negatively related to the total DOC and

dissolved aromatic carbon contents. Together, these parameters explained 55.3% of the

variability in the occurrence of the cluster. Surprisingly, no clear relationship of the R-BT065

bacteria to factors indicating the trophic status of habitats (i.e., different forms of phosphorus

and chlorophyll a content) was found. Based on our results and previously published data, we

concluded that the R-BT065 cluster represents a ubiquitous, highly active segment of

bacterioplankton in non-acidic lakes and ponds and that alga-derived substrates probably form

the main pool of substrates responsible for its high growth potential and broad distribution in

freshwater habitats [1].

2. The second research line focuses on isolation of bacterial strains from the R-BT065

cluster, their sequencing and refinements of their taxonomical affiliation. This work enabled

35


the establishing of a new genus - Limnohabitans [2], with four so far described species

affiliated with this genus [2, 3, 4]. For updated information about the cluster diversity see

Kasalický et al. (AR–2008 and AR-2009).

3. The third research line intends to asses niche separation among coexisting

Limnohabitans strains through interactions with a bacterial competitor, viruses, and a

protozoan bacterivore [5]. We investigated potential niche separation in two closely related

(99.1% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity) syntopic bacterial strains affiliated with the R-

BT065 cluster, which represents a subgroup of the genus Limnohabitans. The two strains,

designated B4 and D5, were isolated concurrently from the Římov Reservoir (South Bohemia,

CZ). Differences between the strains were examined through monitoring interactions with a

bacterial competitor, Flectobacillus sp. (FL), and virus- and predator-induced mortality.

Batch-type cocultures, designated B4+FL and D5+FL, were initiated with a similar biomass

ratio among the strains. The proportion of each cell type present in the cocultures was

monitored based on clear differences in cell sizes. Following exponential growth for 28 h, the

cocultures were amended by the addition of two different concentrations of live or heatinactivated

viruses concentrated from the reservoir. Half of virus-amended treatments were

inoculated immediately with an axenic flagellate predator, Poterioochromonas sp. The

presence of the predator, of live viruses, and of competition between the strains significantly

affected their population dynamics in the experimentally manipulated treatments. While

strains B4 and FL appeared vulnerable to environmental viruses, strain D5 did not. Predatorinduced

mortality had the greatest impact on FL, followed by that on D5 and then B4. The

virus-vulnerable B4 strain had smaller cells and lower biomass yield, but it was less subject to

grazing. In contrast, the seemingly virus-resistant D5, with slightly larger grazing-vulnerable

cells, was competitive with FL. Overall; our data indicated contrasting ecophysiological

capabilities and partial niche separation in two coexisting Limnohabitans strains [5].

Cited references supported by the ongoing project 206/08/0015:

[1] Šimek, K., Kasalický, V, Jezbera J., Jezberová J., Hejzlar, J., Hahn, M. W. 2010: Broad habitat

range of the phylogenetically narrow R-BT065 cluster representing a core group of the

betaproteobacterial genus Limnohabitans. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 76: 631–639.

[2] Hahn, M. W., Kasalický, V., Jezbera J., Brandt U., Jezberová J., Šimek, K. 2010: Limnohabitans

curvus gen. nov., sp. nov., a planktonic bacterium isolated from a freshwater lake. Int. J. Syst.

Evol. Microbiol. (in press).

[3] Kasalický V., Jezbera, J., Šimek, K., Hahn M. W. 2010: Limnohabitans planktonicus sp. nov., and

Limnohabitans parvus sp. nov., two novel planktonic Betaproteobacteria isolated from a

freshwater reservoir. Int. J. Syst. Evol. Microbiol. (in press).

[4] Hahn, M. W., Kasalický, V., Jezbera J., Brandt U., Šimek, K. 2010: Limnohabitans australis sp.

nov., isolated from a freshwater pond. Int. J. Syst. Evol. Microbiol. (in press).

[5] Šimek, K., Kasalický, V., Horňák, K., Hahn, M. W., Weinbauer M. G. 2010: Assessing niche

separation in coexisting Limnohabitans strains through interactions with a competitor, viruses, and

a bacterivore. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 76: 1406–1416.

36


5.3 Are fatty acid profiles and secondary metabolites good chemotaxonomic markers of

genetic and morphological clusters of Dolichospermum spp. and Sphaerospermopsis

spp. (Nostocales, Cyanobacteria)?

E. Zapomělová (eliska.zapomelova@ seznam.cz), J. Jezberová, K. Řeháková, J. Komárková

(BC AS CR, Institute of Hydrobiology), P. Hrouzek, T. Řezanka and D. Hisem (Institute of

Microbiology AS CR) investigated the taxonomic value of fatty acids and secondary

metabolites for the classification of the genera Dolichospermum and Sphaerospermopsis

(cyanobacteria) at subgeneric level.

Dolichospermum (Ralfs ex Bornet et Flahault) Wacklin et al. 2009 and Sphaerospermopsis

Zapomělová et al. 2009 represent a highly diversified group of planktonic nostocacean

cyanobacteria that have been recently separated from the traditional genus Anabaena Bory ex

Bornet et Flahault 1888 [1–3].

In this study, morphological diversity, phylogeny of 16S rRNA gene, production of fatty

acids and secondary metabolite profiles were compared among 33 strains of 14

morphospecies isolated from the Czech Republic. Fatty acid production was evaluated using a

gas chromatograph modified for glass-capillary work and a HP-GC mass selective detector.

HPLC-MS analysis was performed in order to determine the content of secondary

metabolites. The similarities of fatty acid profiles and of secondary metabolite profiles among

the strains studied were visualized by Cluster analyses (Euclidean distance, complete

linkage).

Clustering of the strains based on 16S rRNA gene sequences (Neighbor Joining tree)

corresponded to wider groups of species in terms of morphology (Fig. 8). On the other hand,

the overall secondary metabolite (Fig. 9) and fatty acid profiles (Fig. 10) were neither

correlated to each other, nor to 16S rRNA gene phylogeny and morphology of the strains

suggesting that these compounds are not good chemotaxonomic tools for the cyanobacterial

genera studied. Nevertheless, a minor part of the detected secondary metabolites (19% of all

compounds) were present solely in the closest relatives and can thus be considered

autapomorphic features.

[1] Wacklin, P., Hoffmann, L., Komárek, J., 2009. Nomenclatural validation fo the genetically revised

cyanobacterial genus Dolichospermum (Ralfs ex Bornet et Flahault) comb. Nova. Fottea 9: 59–64.

[2] Zapomělová, E., Jezberová, J., Hrouzek, P., Hisem, D., Řeháková, K., Komárková, J., 2009.

Polyphasic characterization of three strains of Anabaena reniformis and Aphanizomenon

aphanizomenoides (cyanobacteria) and their re-classification to Sphaerospermum gen. nov. (incl.

Anabaena kisseleviana). J. Phycol. 45: 1363–1373.

[3] Zapomělová, E., Jezberová, J., Hrouzek, P., Hisem, D., Řeháková, K., Komárková, J., 2010a.

Polyphasic characterization of three strains of Anabaena reniformis and Aphanizomenon

aphanizomenoides (cyanobacteria) and their re-classification to Sphaerospermum gen. nov. (incl.

Anabaena kisseleviana). Nomenclatural Note. J. Phycol., in press.

37


Fig. 8: (a) Neighbour-joining tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences (1392 bp) showing the

clustering of cyanobacterial strains from which secondary metabolites were analyzed. Symbols

represent the most frequent randomly distributed compounds (RD) and compounds exhibiting

correlation with 16S rRNA phylogeny (CC): • (m/z=685.2, RT=11.6'), ◦ (m/z=715.3,

RT=21.6'), • (m/z=701.3, RT=11.2'), (m/z=256.3, RT=21.7'), (m/z=569.4, RT=20.4'),

anabaenopeptin B (m/z=837.4, RT=13.1'), (m/z=727.4, RT=12.6'), (m/z=534.4,

RT=12.2'), (m/z=714.4, RT=7.2'), (m/z=756.3, RT=9.6'), (m/z=731.3, RT=19.4'),

unknown variant of anabaenopeptin (m/z=842.4, RT=20.1'), anabaenopeptin A (m/z=844.4,

RT=17.1') , anabaenopeptin D (m/z=828.5, RT=19.6').

(b) Neighbour-joining tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences (1419 bp) showing the

clustering of cyanobacterial strains from which fatty acid profiles were analyzed. Numbers

near nodes indicate bootstrap values over 50%. Drawings demonstrate general morphologies

of single genetic clusters. D., Dolichospermum, S., Sphaerospermopsis.

38


Fig. 9: Complete linkage cluster analysis dendrogram showing the similarities (Euclidean distances)

of MS spectra of secondary metabolites among planktonic Dolichospermum spp. and

Sphaerospermopsis spp. strains of various morphospecies. The capitals indicate the type of the

original localities: F, fishpond, R, reservoir.

Fig. 10: Complete linkage cluster analysis dendrogram showing the similarities (Euclidean distances)

of fatty acid profiles among planktonic Anabaena sp., Dolichospermum spp. and

Sphaerospermum spp. strains of various morphospecies. The capitals indicate the type of the

original localities: F, fishpond, R, reservoir.

39


5.4 Importance of dissolved organic carbon for phytoplankton nutrition in a eutrophic

reservoir

This study was supported by the Grant Agency of the Czech Republic (Project

No. 206/07/P407)

In summer 2007, Petr Znachor (znachy@hbu.cas.cz) and Jiří Nedoma investigated the

importance of dissolved organic carbon for phytoplankton nutrition in the eutrophic Římov

Reservoir. Along with primary production measurement, samples from surface and euphotic

depth were incubated at in situ depths in light and dark bottles arrangement with 3 H labelled

amino acid mixture and glucose in nanomolar concentrations. Moreover, silica deposition and

chlorophyll content in diatom cells were measured without and with glucose addition

(100 mol l –1 ). Phytoplankton uptake of both glucose and amino acids was low regardless of

the incubation depth.

Fig. 11: Mean contributions of distinct size fractions to the overall glucose and amino acid mixture

uptake at surface and Z eu . Average values from four independent summer experiments were

used in graphs.

The major portion of incorporated organic carbon was found in fraction < 2 µm (Fig. 11)

indicating that bacteria are superior competitors for organic substrate than phytoplankton.

Additionally, direct visualization of organic carbon uptake using microautoradiography

showed that bacteria attached on the phytoplankton accounted for the activity in large size

fractions (Fig. 12). Thus, mixotrophic nutrition of the phytoplankton was of low importance

40


Fig. 12: Microphotographs of

3 H labelled DOC uptake visualized by autoradiography.

Phytoplankton cells (A – Anabaena sp., B – Fragilaria crotonensis, C – Chroococcus sp.)

are not substantially labeled. Arrows indicate active bacteria attached on phytoplankton cell

surface or inhabiting mucilaginous sheaths. Background structures are oval pores in the

filter.

under natural conditions. However, glucose addition in micromolar concentrations resulted in

a significant increase in diatom silification rates in the light bottle variants. Interestingly, in

both light and dark bottles, chlorophyll fluorescence in diatom cells markedly decreased after

the glucose addition indicating a potential restructuring of cell metabolism to benefit from a

remarkably high concentration of available organic carbon in the environment [1].

[1] Znachor P. and Nedoma J. (2010): Importance of dissolved organic carbon for phytoplankton

nutrition in a eutrophic reservoir. Journal of Plankton Research 32: 367–376.

41


5 PUBLICATIONS

(visit www.hbu.cas.cz/papers.php for the Institute bibliography 1993–2009)

(* authors from other institutions)

A: Papers in international periodicals

1870 Camarero, L.*, Rogora, M.*, Mosello, R.*, Anderson, N.J.*, Barbieri, A.*, Botev,

I.*, Kernan, M.*, Kopáček, J., Korhola, A.*, Lotter, A.F.*, Muri, G.*, Postolache,

C.*, Stuchlík, E.*, Thies, H.*, Wright, R.F.*, 2009: Regionalisation of chemical

variability in European mountain lakes. Freshwater Biology, 54 (12): 2452–2469.

1871 Cao, X.*, Song, C.*, Zhou, Y.*, Štrojsová, A., Znachor, P., Zapomělová, E., Vrba, J.,

2009: Extracellular phosphatases produced by phytoplankton and other sources in

shallow eutrophic lakes (Wuhan, China): taxon-specific versus bulk activity.

Limnology, 10 (2): 95–104.

1872 Čech, M., Peterka, J., Říha, M., Jůza, T., Kubečka, J., 2009: Distribution of egg

strands of perch (Perca fluviatilis, L.) with respect to depth and spawning substrate.

Hydrobiologia, 630 (1): 105–114.

1873 Čtvrtlíková, M., Vrba, J., Znachor, P., Hekera, P.*, 2009: Effects of aluminium

toxicity and low pH on the early development of Isoëtes echinospora. Preslia, 81 (2):

135–149.

1874 Draštík, V., Kubečka, J., Čech, M., Frouzová, J., Říha, M., Jůza, T., Tušer, M.,

Jarolím, O., Prchalová, M., Peterka, J., Vašek, M., Kratochvíl, M., Matěna, J.,

Mrkvička, T., 2009: Hydroacoustic estimates of fish stocks in temperate reservoirs:

day or night surveys? Aquatic Living Resources, 22 (1): 69–77.

1875 Duhamel, S.*, Gregori, G.*, Van Wambeke, F.*, Nedoma, J., 2009: Detection of

extracellular phosphatase activity at the single-cell level by enzyme-labeled

fluorescence and flow cytometry: The importance of time kinetics in ELFA labeling.

Cytometry Part A, 75A (2): 163–168.

1876 Hejzlar, J., Anthony, S.*, Arheimer, B.*, Behrendt, H.*, Bouraoui, F.*, Grizzetti,

B.*, Groenendijk, P.*, Jeuken, M.H.J.L.*, Johnsson, H.*, Lo Porto, A.*, Kronvang,

B.*, Panagopoulos, Y.*, Siderius, C.*, Silgram, M.*, Venohr, M.*, Ţaloudík J.,

2009: Nitrogen and phosphorus retention in surface waters: an inter-comparison of

predictions by catchment models of different complexity. Journal of Environmental

Monitoring, 11 (3): 584–593.

1877 Iluz, D.*, Dishon, G.*, Capuzzo, E.*, Meeder, E.*, Astoreca, R.*, Montecino, V.*,

Znachor, P., Ediger, D.*, Marra, J.*, 2009: Short-term variability in primary

productivity during a wind-driven diatom bloom in the Gulf of Eilat (Aqaba).

Aquatic Microbial Ecology, 56 (2–3): 205–215.

1878 Jezbera, J., Sharma, A.K.*, Brandt, U.*, Doolittle, W.F.*, Hahn, M.W.*, 2009:

„Candidatus Planktophila limnetica‟, an actinobacterium representing one of the

most numerically important taxa in freshwater bacterioplankton. International Journal

of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, 59 (11): 2864–2869.

42


1879 Jůza T., Vašek, M., Kubečka, J., Seďa, J., Matěna, J., Prchalová, M., Peterka, J.,

Říha, M., Jarolím, O., Tušer, M., Kratochvíl, M., Čech, M., Draštík, V., Frouzová, J.,

Hohausová, E., Ţaloudík, J., 2009: Pelagic underyearling communities in a canyonshaped

reservoir in late summer. Journal of Limnology, 68 (2): 304–314.

1880 Kernan, M.*, Brancelj, A.*, Clarke, G.*, Lami, A.*, Raddum, G.*, Straškrábová, V.,

Stuchlík, E.*, Velle, G.*, Ventura, M.*, 2009: Environmental and biological

characteristics of high altitude lochs in Scotland. Advances in Limnology, 62: 379–

417.

1881 Klementová, Š.*, Kříţ, D.*, Kopáček, J., Novák, F.*, Porcal, P., 2009: UV

photoinitiated changes of humic fluorophores, influence of metal ions.

Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences, 8 (5): 582–586.

1882 Kopáček, J., Hejzlar, J., Kaňa, J., Norton, S.A.*, Porcal, P., Turek, J., 2009: Trends

in aluminium export from a mountainous area to surface waters, from deglaciation to

the recent: Effects of vegetation and soil development, atmospheric acidification, and

nitrogen-saturation. Journal of Inorganic Biochemistry, 103 (11): 1439–1448.

1883 Kopáček, J., Turek, J., Hejzlar, J., Šantrůčková, H.*, 2009: Canopy leaching of

nutrients and metals in a mountain spruce forest. Atmospheric Environment, 43 (34):

5443–5453.

1884 Kronvang, B.*, Behrendt, H.*, Andersen, H.E.*, Arheimer, B.*, Barr, A.*,

Borgvang, S.A.*, Bouraoui, F.*, Granlund, K.*, Grizzetti, B.*, Groenendijk, P.*,

Schwaiger, E.*, Hejzlar, J., Hoffmann, L.*, Johnsson, H.*, Panagopoulos, Y.*, Lo

Porto, A.*, Reisser, H.*, Schoumans, O.*, Anthony, S.*, Silgram, M.*, Venohr, M.*,

Larsen, S.E.*, 2009: Ensemble modelling of nutrient loads and nutrient load

partitioning in 17 European catchments. Journal of Environmental Monitoring, 11

(3): 572–583.

1885 Kubečka, J., Hohausová, E., Matěna, J., Peterka, J., Amarasinghe, U.S.*, Bonar,

S.A.*, Hateley, J.*, Hickley, P.*, Suuronen, P.*, Tereschenko, V.*, Welcomme, R.*,

Winfield, I.J.*, 2009: The true picture of a lake or reservoir fish stock: A review of

needs and progress. Fisheries Research, 96 (1): 1–5.

1886 Kuchta, R.*, Čech, M., Scholz, T.*, Soldánová, M.*, Levron, C.*, Škoríková, B.*,

2009: Endoparasites of European perch Perca fluviatilis fry: role of spatial

segregation. Diseases of Aquatic Organisms, 86 (1): 87–91.

1887 Kuchta, R.*, Scholz, T.*, Vlčková, R.*, Říha, M., Walter, T.*. Yuniar, A.T.*, Palm,

H.W.*, 2009: Revision of tapeworms (Cestoda: Bothriocephalidea) from lizardfish

(Saurida: Synodontidae) from the Indo-Pacific region. Zootaxa, 1977: 55–67.

1888 Macek, M., Alcocer, J.*, Lugo Vázquez, A.*, Martínez-Pérez, M.E.*, Peralta

Soriano, L.*, Vilaclara Fatjó, G.*, 2009: Long term picoplankton dynamics in a

warm-monomictic, tropical high altitude lake. Journal of Limnology, 68 (2): 183–

192.

1889 Peterka J., Matěna, J., 2009: Differences in feeding selectivity and efficiency

between young-of-the-year European perch (Perca fluviatilis) and roach (Rutilus

rutilus) – field observations and laboratory experiments on the importance of prey

movement apparency vs. evasiveness. Biologia, 64 (4): 786–794.

43


1890 Porcal, P., Amirbahman, A.*, Kopáček, J., Novák, F.*, Norton, S.A.*, 2009:

Photochemical release of humic and fulvic acid-bound metals from simulated soil

and streamwater. Journal of Environmental Monitoring, 11 (5): 1064–1071.

1891 Prášil, O.*, Bína, D.*, Medová, H.*, Řeháková, K., Zapomělová, E.*, Veselá, J.*,

Oren A.*, 2009: Emission spectroscopy and kinetic fluorometry studies of

phototrophic microbial communities along a salinity gradient in solar saltern

evaporation ponds of Eilat, Israel. Aquatic Microbial Ecology, 56 (2–3): 285–296.

1892 Prchalová, M., Kubečka, J., Čech, M., Frouzová J., Draštík, V., Hohausová, E., Jůza,

T., Kratochvíl, M., Matěna, J., Peterka, J., Říha, M., Tušer, M., Vašek, M., 2009: The

effect of depth, distance from dam and habitat on spatial distribution of fish in an

artificial reservoir. Ecology of Freshwater Fish, 18 (2): 247–260.

1893 Prchalová, M., Kubečka, J., Říha, M., Mrkvička, T., Vašek, M., Jůza, T., Kratochvíl,

M., Peterka, J., Draštík, V., Kříţek, J.*, 2009: Size selectivity of standardized

multimesh gillnets in sampling coarse European species. Fisheries Research, 96 (1):

51–57.

1894 Rakowitz, G.*, Kubečka, J., Fesl, C.*, Keckeis, H.*, 2009: Intercalibration of

hydroacoustic and mark – recapture methods for assessing the spawning population

size of a threatened fish species. Journal of Fish Biology, 75 (6): 1356–1370.

1895 Řeháková, K., Zapomělová, E., Prášil, O.*, Veselá, J.*, Medová, H.*, Oren, A.*,

2009: Composition changes of phototrophic microbial communities along the salinity

gradient in the solar saltern evaporation ponds of Eilat, Israel. Hydrobiologia, 636

(1): 77–88.

1896 Říha, M., Kubečka, J., Vašek, M., Seďa, J., Mrkvička, T., Prchalová, M., Matěna, J.,

Hladík, M., Čech, M., Draštík, V., Frouzová, J., Hohausová, E., Jarolím, O., Jůza, T.,

Kratochvíl, M., Peterka, J., Tušer, M., 2009: Long-term development of fish

populations in the Římov Reservoir. Fisheries Management and Ecology, 16 (2):

121–129.

1897 Šantrůčková, H.* , Tahovská, K.*, Kopáček, J., 2009: Nitrogen transformations and

pools in N-saturated mountain spruce forest soils. Biology and Fertility of Soils, 45

(4): 395–404.

1898 Sharma, A.K.*, Sommerfeld, K.*, Bullerjahn, G.S.*, Matteson, A.R.*, Wilhelm,

S.W.*, Jezbera, J., Brandt, U.*, Doolittle, W.F.*, Hahn, M.W.*, 2009:

Actinorhodopsin genes discovered in diverse freshwater habitats and among

cultivated freshwater Actinobacteria. The ISME Journal, 3 (6): 726–737.

1899 Sirová, D., Borovec, J., Černá, B.*, Rejmánková, E.*, Adamec, L.*, Vrba, J., 2009:

Microbial community development in the traps of aquatic Utricularia species.

Aquatic Botany, 90 (2): 129–136.

1900 Sørensen, K.*, Řeháková, K., Zapomělová, E., Oren A.*, 2009: Distribution of

benthic phototrophs, sulfate reducers, and methanogens in two adjacent saltern

evaporation ponds in Eilat, Israel. Aquatic Microbial Ecology, 56 (2–3): 275–284.

1901 Straškrábová, V., Bertoni, R.*, Blaţo, M.*, Callieri, C.*, Forsström, L.*, Fott, J.*,

Kernan, M.*, Macek, M., Stuchlík, E.*, Tolotti, M.*, 2009: Structure of pelagic

microbial assemblages in European mountain lakes during ice-free season. Advances

in Limnology, 62: 19–53.

44


1902 Štrojsová, A., Vrba, J., 2009: Short-term variation in extracellular phosphatase

activity: possible limitations for diagnosis of nutrient status in particular algal

populations. Aquatic Ecology, 43 (1): 19–25.

1903 Štrojsová, M., Ahlrichs W.H.*, 2009: Differentiation between activity of digestive

enzymes of Brachionus calyciflorus and extracellular enzymes of its epizooic

bacteria. Journal of Limnology, 68 (2): 409–412.

1904 Štrojsová, M., Suga, K.*, Hagiwara, A.*, Vrba, J., 2009: Effect of food quantity and

quality on population growth rate and digestive activity in the euryhaline rotifer

Brachionus plicatilis MÜLLER. International Review of Hydrobiology, 94 (6): 706–

719.

1905 Tanaka, T.*, Thingstad, T.F.*, Gasol, J.M.*, Cardelús, C.*, Jezbera, J., Sala, M.M.*,

Šimek, K., Unrein, F.*, 2009: Determining the availability of phosphate and glucose

for bacteria in P-limited mesocosms of NW Mediterranean surface waters. Aquatic

Microbial Ecology, 56 (1): 81–91.

1906 Tarao, M.*, Jezbera, J., Hahn, M.W.*, 2009: Involvement of cell surface structures in

size-independent grazing resistance of freshwater Actinobacteria. Applied and

Environmental Microbiology, 75 (14): 4720–4726.

1907 Turicchia, S.*, Ventura, S.*, Komárková, J., Komárek, J.*, 2009: Taxonomic

evaluation of cyanobacterial microflora from alkaline marshes of northern Belize. 2.

Diversity of oscillatorialean genera. Nova Hedwigia, 89 (1–2): 165–200.

1908 Tušer, M., Kubečka, J., Frouzová, J., Jarolím, O., 2009: Fish orientation along the

longitudinal profile of the Římov reservoir during daytime: Consequences for

horizontal acoustic surveys. Fisheries Research, 96 (1): 23–29.

1909 Vagstad, N.*, French, H.K.*, Andersen, H.E.*, Behrendt, H.*, Grizzetti, B.*,

Groenendijk, P.*, Lo Porto, A.*, Reisser, H.*, Siderius, C.*, Stromquist, J.*, Hejzlar,

J., Deelstra, J.*, 2009: Comparative study of model prediction of diffuse nutrient

losses in response to changes in agricultural practices. Journal of Environmental

Monitoring, 11 (3): 594–601.

1910 Van Wambeke, F.*, Ghiglione, J.-F.*, Nedoma, J., Mével, G.*, Raimbault, P.*,

2009: Bottom up effects on bacterioplankton growth and composition during

summer-autumn transition in the open NW Mediterranean Sea. Biogeosciences, 6

(4): 705–720.

1911 Vašek, M., Kubečka, J., Čech, M., Draštík, V., Matěna, J., Mrkvička, T.*, Peterka, J.,

Prchalová, M., 2009: Diel variation in gillnet catches and vertical distribution of

pelagic fishes in a stratified European reservoir. Fisheries Research, 96 (1): 64–69.

1912 Zapomělová, E., Jezberová, J., Hrouzek, P.*, Hisem, D.*, Řeháková, K., Komárková,

J., 2009: Polyphasic characterization of three strains of Anabaena reniformis and

Aphanizomenon aphanizomenoides (cyanobacteria) and their reclassification to

Sphaerospermum gen. nov. (incl. Anabaena kisseleviana). Journal of Phycology, 45

(6): 1363–1373.

45


1922 Macháček, J., Seďa, J., 2009: Morfologie filtračního aparátu jako druhově specifický znak a

jako indikátor vývoje populace u perlooček rodu Daphnia [Morphology of filtering apparatus

as a species specific trait and as an indicator of population development in Daphnia]. In:

Kröpfelová, L., Šulcová, J. (eds.), Sborník příspěvků 15. konference ČLS a SLS, Třeboň, June

22–26, 2009. ČLS, Praha, ISBN 978–80–254–4698–0: pp. 175–177.

1923 Nedoma, J., Šimek K., Hejzlar, J., 2009: Přísun a transformace znečištění v podélném profilu

vltavského ramene nádrţe Orlík [Pollution input and transformation along the longitudinal

profile of the Vltava stretch in the Orlík]. In: Sborník příspěvků Revitalizace Orlické nádrţe

2009, odborná konference, Písek, October 6–7, 2009. VŠTE, Č. Budějovice, ISBN 978–80–

87278–29–1: pp. 31–36.

1924 Peterka, J., Čech, M., Frouzová, J., Draštík, V., Vašek, M., Prchalová, M., Matěna, J.,

Kubečka, J., Jůza T., Kratochvíl M., 2009: Monitorování rybích obsádek údolních nádrţí

v České republice – výsledky prvního roku sledování [Monitoring of the fish stock of Czech

reservoirs - preliminary results]. In: Kröpfelová, L., Šulcová, J. (eds.), Sborník příspěvků 15.

konference ČLS a SLS, Třeboň, June 22–26, 2009. ČLS, Praha, ISBN 978–80–254–4698–0:

pp. 209–211.

1925 Richtr, J.*, Hejzlar, J., Semančíková, E.*, 2009: Koncentrace a formy fosforu v odtoku z

malých zemědělských povodí v povodí nádrţe Orlík [Concentrations and forms of

phosphorus in the runoff from small agricultural catchments in the catchment of Orlík

Reservoir]. In: Sborník příspěvků Revitalizace Orlické nádrţe 2009, odborná konference,

Písek, October 6–7, 2009. VŠTE, Č. Budějovice, ISBN 978–80–87278–29–1: pp. 65–74.

1926 Straškrábová, V., 2009: Dlouhodobý ekologický výzkum jezer a nádrţí – k čemu je dobrý?

[Long– term ecological research of lakes and reservoirs – is it useful?]. In: Kröpfelová, L.,

Šulcová, J. (eds.), Sborník příspěvků 15. konference ČLS a SLS, Třeboň, June 22–26, 2009.

ČLS, Praha, ISBN 978–80–254–4698–0: pp. 242–245.

1927 Straškrábová, V., 2009: Vliv nádrţe Orlík na kvalitu vody ve Slapské nádrţi [The effect of

Orlík Reservoir on water quality in the Reservoir Slapy]. In: Sborník příspěvků Revitalizace

Orlické nádrţe 2009, odborná konference, Písek, October 6–7, 2009. VŠTE, Č. Budějovice,

ISBN 978–80–87278–29–1: pp. 148–152.

1928 Vrba, J., Fott, J.*, Kopáček, J., Nedbalová, L.*, Čtvrtlíková, M., Šantrůčková, H.*: Deset let

komplexního výzkumu zotavování šumavských jezer a jejich povodí z acidifikace [Ten–year

complex research of recovery of the Bohemian Forest and their catchments from acid stress].

In: Kröpfelová, L., Šulcová, J. (eds.), Sborník příspěvků 15. konference ČLS a SLS, Třeboň,

June 22–26, 2009. ČLS, Praha, ISBN 978–80–254–4698–0: pp. 282–285.

1929 Znachor, P., 2008: Rozsivky – podivuhodné řasy v krabičce [Diatoms – algae in the box].

Ţiva, 2008 (1): 10–11.

1930 Znachor, P., Hejzlar, J., Nedoma, J., Rychtecký, P., 2009: Vliv povodní a přívalových dešťů

na sezónní vývoj fytoplanktonu nádrţe Římov [Effect of floods and extreme rainfalls on

phytoplankton seasonal succession in the Římov Reservoir]. In: Kröpfelová, L., Šulcová, J.

(eds.), Sborník příspěvků 15. konference ČLS a SLS, Třeboň, June 22–26, 2009. ČLS Praha,

ISBN 978–80–254–4698–0: pp. 295–298.

47


Biology Centre of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i.

INSTITUTE OF HYDROBIOLOGY

50 th ANNUAL REPORT

For the Year 2009

ISSN 1210 – 9649

48 pages

Edited by Jiří Nedoma

Assistant Editors: N. Johanisová (language revision), V. Lavičková

Published by Biology Centre of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Institute of

Hydrobiology, České Budějovice (founded 1955 as Hydrobiological Laboratory, Czechoslovak

Academy of Sciences, Prague)

Printed in Czech Republic by Typodesign, České Budějovice

© Biology Centre AS CR, v.v.i, Institute of Hydrobiology, 2010

48

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines