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ROOTS<br />

Journal of the<br />

<strong>Historic</strong> <strong>Iris</strong> <strong>Preservation</strong> <strong>Society</strong><br />

Volume 23 Issue 1 Spring 2010


In This Issue. . .<br />

Cover: 'Painted Doll' (D. Boen 1964)<br />

HIPS 2010 Rhizome Sale Issue<br />

2 HIPS At Your Service<br />

3 Rhizome Sale note<br />

3 HIPS Bookstore Dorothy Stiefel<br />

4 From the President Paul Gossett<br />

4 Proposed Slate of officers<br />

4 2010 Convention Meetings May 31-June 5<br />

5 HIPsters -- officers & chairs listing<br />

6 <strong>Iris</strong> Gems on the World Wide Web, including<br />

AIS Bulletin #1-355 TOCs scanned! by Jack Finney<br />

7 Farewell to E. Roy Epperson<br />

8 <strong>Iris</strong>es in a Graveyard Nigel Service<br />

10 Mr. Marshal’s Flower Book -<br />

“The Florilegium” of Alexander Marshal<br />

reviewed by<br />

Jim Morris<br />

12 “Vanity, vanity, all is vanity” Keith Keppel<br />

13 HIPS 2010 Rhizome Sale! Janice Thompson<br />

14 Rhizome Sale list<br />

18 Photos of some Rhizome Sale iris Gesine Lohr<br />

20 The Pickel Barrel House <strong>Historic</strong> <strong>Iris</strong> Garden~<br />

How to develop a display/conservation-ofunknowns<br />

iris garden Nancy McDonald<br />

26 Cook-Williamson Memorial <strong>Iris</strong> Garden,<br />

Part II<br />

Jerry Oswalt<br />

28 Reader Rock Garden<br />

Call for Donations<br />

Janet Jones<br />

30 Commercial Sources Listing Jeff Walters<br />

31 HIPS Slide Sets! update Robert and Linda Karr<br />

32 HIPS <strong>Historic</strong> <strong>Iris</strong> Designation Survey<br />

Jean Richter<br />

33 Catalog corner<br />

35 In Retrospect descriptions<br />

35 From Your Editor Gesine Lohr<br />

36 In Retrospect<br />

Hi p s Me m b e r s h i p Ra t e s:<br />

Single annual $ 10.00 Single Triennial $ 24.00<br />

Dual annual $ 12.00 Dual Triennial $ 30.00<br />

Separate youth $ 5.00 Youth in add.adult $ 2.00<br />

Single Life $150.00 Dual Life $175.00<br />

Overseas – add $5.00 for postage<br />

TO JOIN, contact Judy Eckhoff, Membership <br />

EDITOR Gesine Lohr (510) 864-7962 1226 High<br />

Street, Alameda CA 94501 gesine.lohr@gmail.com<br />

Ro o t s, Jo u r n a l o f t h e <strong>Historic</strong> Ir i s Pr e s e r v a t i o n So c i e t y,<br />

is published biannually in Spring and Fall. Fall<br />

deadline is 15 September, Spring deadline is 15<br />

March. Ro o t s is paid for by a combination of HIPS<br />

membership dues, and HIPS' yearly Rhizome Sale.<br />

Any article appearing in Ro o t s may be reprinted<br />

unless specifically prohibited. Proper credit must<br />

accompany the reprint; please send a courtesy copy<br />

to Ro o t s Editor Gesine Lohr.<br />

Ph o t o Cr e d i t s: If not otherwise noted, graphics and<br />

photos by Gesine Lohr. Mike Unser contributed six<br />

photos on pages 18-19, Bonnie Petheram contributed<br />

two on page 19.<br />

2<br />

HIPS At Your Service!<br />

How do I join HIPS and subscribe to Ro o t s?<br />

See below left for HIPS membership rates. You<br />

can mail payment to Membership Judy Eckhoff 7911<br />

South Yoder Road, Haven, KS 67543-8114<br />

judy67543@gmail.com (620) 662-8083, or subscribe via<br />

the internet at www.hips-<strong>roots</strong>.com/visitors/v-shoppe.html<br />

What if I don’t receive an issue of Ro o t s?<br />

First, check with Judy Eckhoff to make sure your<br />

membership is current and that your address is correct<br />

on our mailing list. Then contact Editor Gesine Lohr<br />

(510) 864-7962 1226 High Street, Alameda CA 94501<br />

gesine.lohr@gmail.com<br />

What is the cutoff date for historics?<br />

<strong>Iris</strong> introduced 30 or more years ago is the<br />

definition used by HIPS. Some suggest calling pre-<br />

1950 iris, "heirloom", "antique", "old", "vintage";<br />

newer historics might be termed "classics". I'm leaning<br />

towards "heirloom historics". What are your thoughts?<br />

See <strong>Historic</strong> <strong>Iris</strong> Designation Survey, p. 32.<br />

Where can I buy historic iris?<br />

-- See Commercial Sources Listing in Ro o t s<br />

-- See HIPS Rhizome Sale list in Spring Ro o t s,<br />

& same list on HIPS website after Ro o t s is mailed<br />

-- Contact Jeff Walters, Sources Chair<br />

Where do I find historic iris on the Internet?<br />

www.hips-<strong>roots</strong>.com<br />

If you don’t have internet access at home, it’s<br />

worth a trip to the local library to see the photos on our<br />

website! (Librarians are usually helpful about finding<br />

such things).<br />

Who can help me locate old irises?<br />

Contact Carlos Ayento, DataBank<br />

and Carlos Ayento's Master <strong>Historic</strong> <strong>Iris</strong> List<br />

http://www.brightonparkiris.com/masterhistoriclist.xls<br />

What reference material is there?<br />

See list of HIPS Bookstore in Ro o t s & website<br />

See list of archives on website in reading room,<br />

or write for paper copy to Gesine Lohr<br />

See the many articles in reading room on website<br />

Where can I see historic iris displays?<br />

Display Gardens! see annual list on HIPS website<br />

(can also order printed copy from HIPS Bookstore)<br />

Who can help identify old irises?<br />

Website ID forum, & Phil Edinger, ID Chair<br />

Where can I rent slide sets of historic irises?<br />

Contact HIPS Slide Chairs -- $12.00 rental fee<br />

I live outside the U.S. How do I get iris information<br />

and/or plants? Contact Darlene Cook, International


2010 HIPS Rhizome Sale!<br />

See page 13 for how to order! pages 14-17<br />

for the huge list of cultivars offered this year!<br />

and pages 18-19 for photos of SOME of the<br />

offerings. Thank you, donors, for really coming<br />

forward! and thanks to the Rhizome Sale team<br />

for doing this huge project!<br />

Ordering deadline is June 15, 2010<br />

As always, Mike Unser will have the Rhizome<br />

Sale list up on HIPS' website shortly after this<br />

issue of Ro o t s is mailed out. He'll have links to<br />

photos of many of the iris offered.<br />

www.hips-<strong>roots</strong>.com<br />

As I've said many times, if you don't have<br />

a computer and internet access at home, it<br />

is WELL worth a trip to the library, to see<br />

the extensive photos and information on the<br />

website! Most librarians are quite happy to help<br />

you find www.hips-<strong>roots</strong>.com, even if you've<br />

never sat in front of a computer; and once you're<br />

at the site, it's very easy to get around and look<br />

at everything.<br />

The list on the website will also be updated<br />

with any last-minute additions -- the list here is<br />

current as of April 1st.<br />

The photos of 98 of the iris offered, on pages<br />

18-19, are a first time endeavor for me. There<br />

is NO correlation between an iris being pictured<br />

there, and how many rhizomes are available!<br />

Also, given my penchant for the earlier historics,<br />

my photos are slanted towards older iris (send<br />

me photos of more recent ones for next year!).<br />

We're working on having a list of<br />

descriptions up on the website, as was done the<br />

other year. -- Gesine<br />

HIPS Bookstore<br />

All items include postage<br />

HIPS Publications<br />

Dorothy A. Stiefel<br />

260 Michigan Hollow Rd.<br />

If you can only spend<br />

$24, get Cornell Bulletin<br />

112 & A Study of<br />

Pogoniris Varieties, both<br />

by A. W. W. Sand<br />

Spencer, NY 14883<br />

See note page 4, new edition Cornell Bulletin112!<br />

You can also order from the HIPS website, using Paypal,<br />

www.hips-<strong>roots</strong>.com<br />

3<br />

~ HIPS Bookstore ~<br />

(note new prices)<br />

Hi s t o r i c a l Ch r o n i c l e s: (p h o t o c o p i e s):<br />

1) History of <strong>Iris</strong>; 2) Caparne & Mitchell; 6) Goos &<br />

Koenemann; 16) Violet Insole; 17) Charles Wing --<br />

$6.00 Each<br />

3) Foster; 4) Millet; 5) Vilmorin & Andrieux; 7) Barr<br />

& Sons; 8) W.R. & K. Dykes; 9) Cayeux <strong>Iris</strong> Varieties;<br />

14) Fryer; 21) Florentina; 22) Albicans; 23) <strong>Iris</strong> in<br />

Medicine; 29) Poems & Songs; -- $8.00 Each<br />

11) E. B. Williamson; 13) Farr; 15) Orpington <strong>Iris</strong>; 19)<br />

Louisa Pesel; 20) B. Y. Morrison; 28) Jean Stevens; --<br />

$10.00 Each<br />

10) Lémon <strong>Iris</strong>es; 12) Sturtevant; 18) Perry; 24) Hort;<br />

30) The Sasses -- $12.00 Each<br />

26. Dwarfs; 33) Simonet Doc. Thesis I; 34) Simonet<br />

Doc. Thesis II -- $14.00 Each<br />

25) Hall -- $16.00 Each<br />

27) Bliss -- $20.00 Each<br />

AIS Bu l l e t i n s:<br />

#1 -- 27: photocopies $5.00 Each<br />

Re p r i n t AIS 50 t h An n i v e r s a ry Bu l l e t i n, Ja n u a ry<br />

1970 $10.00 Each<br />

Cata l o g Re p r i n t s:<br />

1922 R. Wa l l a c e & Co. Ir i s Cata l o g $6.00<br />

1951 Te l l’s Ir i s Ga r d e n s Cata l o g & Hy b r i d i z e r’s<br />

Ha n d b o o k $5.00<br />

ROOTS b a c k issues:<br />

Fa l l 1988 t h r o u g h Sp r i n g 2001 $4.00 e a c h<br />

Fa l l 2001 o n (c o l o r)<br />

$7.00 e a c h<br />

(some issues sold out)<br />

HIPS Di s p l ay Ga r d e n Di r e c t o ry, 2010 $10.00<br />

Re f e r e n c e Mat e r i a l:<br />

Co r n e l l Bu l l e t i n 112 b y Au s t i n W. W. Sa n d;<br />

“Th e b e s t o l d iris r e f e r e n c e in e x i s t e n c e” $12.00<br />

A St u d y o f Po g o n i r i s Va r i e t i e s b y Au s t i n W. W.<br />

Sa n d (Cornell University Memoir #100, July 1926)<br />

$12.00<br />

Ga r d e n Ir i s e s, U.S. De p t. o f Ag r i c u lt u r e<br />

Fa r m e r s Bu l l e t i n 1406 $8.00<br />

Re v. C. S. Ha r r i s o n Om n i b u s $25.00<br />

Lo u i s v i l l e Hy b r i d i z e r s o f t h e Pa s t –<br />

Ro b e rt St r o h m a n $6.00<br />

Co m p r e h e n s i v e Ch e c k l i s t o f Ar i l a n d Ar i l b r e d<br />

Ir i s. Softcover, 200+ pages $20.00<br />

De s c r i p t i o n s o f <strong>Historic</strong> Ar i l a n d Ar i l b r e d<br />

Cu lt i va r s: Su p p l e m e n t to a b o v e $5.00<br />

Note that prices for overseas orders are different -- see<br />

them at www.hips-<strong>roots</strong>.com/members/shoppe2.html


From the President ~<br />

WOW! Spring is here and we are in another<br />

<strong>Iris</strong> bloom season. This last year sure went by very<br />

quickly. I hope everyone will have an excellent 2010<br />

bloom season.<br />

I have been contacted by several people asking<br />

for assistance with locating historic irises for home<br />

gardens as well as public gardens, and identifying<br />

historic irises found. The latest request has come from<br />

the Reader Rock Garden in Calgary, Alberta Canada.<br />

You will find more information about the garden and<br />

the irises they are looking for in this issue of Ro o t s.<br />

Hopefully you are planning on attending<br />

the AIS Convention in Madison, WI from May 31,<br />

2010 through June 5, 2010. To help the <strong>Society</strong> For<br />

Siberian <strong>Iris</strong>es celebrate their 50th Anniversary as a<br />

society, Anne and Mike Lowe will be presenting a<br />

program on <strong>Historic</strong> Siberians at the HIPS General<br />

Membership Meeting/Program. I hope to see you<br />

there. CONGRATULATIONS to the <strong>Society</strong> For<br />

Siberian <strong>Iris</strong>es as they celebrate 50 years.<br />

I hope you will consider participating in the<br />

2010 Rhizome Sale by either donating rhizomes or<br />

purchasing rhizomes. The list is in this issue; you can<br />

also go to the HIPS Web Site at www.hips-<strong>roots</strong>.com<br />

for the list of irises or contact Janice Thompson at<br />

ciris03@yahoo.com or Barbara Jackson at jacksonb@<br />

mts.net for more information.<br />

On behalf of the HIPS Board of Directors and<br />

the HIPS Membership, I would like to extend our<br />

condolences and sympathy to the family of E. Roy<br />

Epperson and to the American <strong>Iris</strong> <strong>Society</strong> in the loss<br />

of Dr. E. Roy Epperson, President of the American <strong>Iris</strong><br />

<strong>Society</strong>.<br />

It would be interesting to hear from you about<br />

how historic irises are doing in your area whether it be<br />

in the garden or in a show. So, please write to me or<br />

Gesine Lohr, Ro o t s Editor.<br />

Please support the commercial gardens listed<br />

in Ro o t s and on the HIPS Web Site, under Sources, by<br />

ordering a catalog and buying some historic irises to<br />

add to your garden.<br />

As always, keep growing those <strong>Historic</strong> <strong>Iris</strong>es.<br />

If you have any questions about HIPS, please<br />

feel free to contact me at pwgossett@juno.com.<br />

Paul<br />

4<br />

Proposed Slate of Officers<br />

The slate of officers proposed by the Nominating<br />

Committee is:<br />

Treasurer Rita Gormley (2nd Term)<br />

Northwest Director Robert Karr (2nd Term)<br />

Southwest Director Susan Boyce (2nd Term)<br />

Nominating Committee:<br />

Judy Hunt, Chair judyhunt1@bellsouth.net<br />

Laetitia Munro<br />

Robert Strohman<br />

As always, a vote will be taken at the HIPS General<br />

Meeting at the 2010 Convention.<br />

New reprint of Cornell Bulletin #112<br />

Again available! Cornell Extension Bulletin<br />

#112, 'Bearded <strong>Iris</strong>, A Perennial Suited to All<br />

Gardens' by Austin W.W. Sand, first published<br />

in 1925. This high-quality reprint is archival<br />

paper, with a protective plastic cover. Spiral<br />

bound for easy opening and use in the garden!<br />

Our #1 seller in the quest for learning to see<br />

and recognize the details that help identify old<br />

irises. Price $12.00 postpaid in North America;<br />

$15.00 postpaid elsewhere. -- Dorothy A. Stiefel<br />

"Mad About <strong>Iris</strong>!"<br />

AIS 2010 Convention May 31-June 5<br />

Madison, Wisconsin<br />

www.irises.org/conventions.htm<br />

www.madisoniris.org/Convention/Welcome.htm<br />

I love the slogan, “Mad about iris”!<br />

HIPS BOARD MEETING<br />

Tuesday June 1, 2010<br />

12:00 pm - 1:30 pm<br />

HIPS GENERAL MEETING & PROGRAM<br />

Looks like their website is calling the section<br />

meetings “programs”<br />

Friday June 4, 2010<br />

5:30pm - 6:30pm HIPS Program (immediately<br />

before the Geek Dinner & Auction)<br />

Anne and Mike Lowe will be presenting a program<br />

on <strong>Historic</strong> Siberians<br />

(Rooms not yet listed)


President<br />

Paul Gossett<br />

Rhizome Sale Chair Janice Thompson<br />

(918) 853-6204 (new #) 129 E 33rd Place<br />

ciris03@yahoo.com 2970 Luella Road<br />

pwgossett@juno.com Tulsa, OK 74105-2542 (903) 893-9195 Sherman, TX 75090<br />

Vice President<br />

Gary White<br />

Rhizome Sale Co-chair Barb Jackson<br />

(402) 421-6394 701 Old Cheney Rd. jacksonb@mts.net 2421 McDonald Avenue<br />

in2iris@yahoo.com Lincoln, NE 68512<br />

(204) 725-4696 Brandon, MB R7B 0A6<br />

CANADA (Manitoba)<br />

Secretary<br />

Linda Sercus<br />

Rhizome Sale Co-chair Judy Eckhoff (see Membership)<br />

(973) 783-5974 474 Upper Mountain Ave.<br />

ls1124@aol.com Upper Montclair, NJ 07043<br />

Treasurer<br />

Rita Gormley<br />

Slides Co-chair Robert Karr<br />

Phone & fax (386) 277-2057 205 Catalonia Avenue Slides Co-chair Linda Karr<br />

cell 314-606-9709 P. O. Box 177<br />

(509) 671-1539 (Robert) 205 N. Craig Avenue<br />

gormleygreenery@aol.com DeLeon Springs, FL 32130 (509) 671-1540 (Linda) Newport, WA 99156<br />

iris@sprucecorner.com<br />

Imm. Past President Donna James (see NE Dir.) Variety ID Philip Edinger<br />

(707) 894-3225 P.O. Box 637<br />

oldflag@sonic.net Cloverdale, CA 95425<br />

Archive Gesine Lohr (see Editor) Webmaster Mike Unser www.hips-<strong>roots</strong>.com<br />

(360) 432-8900 PO Box 6308<br />

garden.of.mu@gmail.com Olympia, WA 98507<br />

Commercial Sources Jeff Walters<br />

(864) 594-6736 1175 Woodburn Rd<br />

iriscomsource@yahoo.com Spartansburg, SC 29302-3440<br />

Directors:<br />

Cultivar <strong>Preservation</strong> Jean Richter<br />

(510) 864-7962 1226 High Street<br />

richter@eecs.berkeley.edu Alameda CA 94501<br />

DataBank<br />

Carlos Ayento<br />

6108 S. Natchez Avenue<br />

brightonparkiris@yahoo.com Chicago, IL 60638<br />

Display Gardens Laetitia Munro<br />

(973) 208-8490 49 Hilltop Rd.<br />

sugarbean1@optonline.net Newfoundland, NJ 07435<br />

Editor<br />

Gesine Lohr<br />

(510) 864-7962 1226 High Street<br />

gesine.lohr@gmail.com Alameda, CA 94501<br />

International<br />

Darlene Cook<br />

0649-827-7386 20 Tane Street<br />

threesisters@woosh.co.nz New Lynn, Auckland 0600 NZ<br />

Honoraries & Awards Anne Lowe<br />

(804) 265-8198 12219 Zilles Road<br />

anne@worldiris.com Blackstone, VA 23824-9394<br />

Membership<br />

Judy Eckhoff<br />

(620) 662-8083 7911 South Yoder Road<br />

judy67543@gmail.com Haven, KS 67543-8114<br />

Publications Sales Dorothy Stiefel<br />

(607) 589-7465 260 Michigan Hollow Rd.<br />

<strong>Iris</strong>acher@aol.com Spencer NY 1488<br />

Northeast Donna James (R. 1, 2, 3, 19)<br />

(315) 598-3346 887 County Rte. 3<br />

ron2don@twcny.rr.com Hannibal, NY 13074<br />

North Central<br />

Barbara Jackson (see R. Sale)<br />

(R. 6, 8,9,11,16, 21)<br />

Northwest<br />

Robert Karr (see Slides)<br />

(Reg. 13, 14)<br />

Southeast Judy Hunt (Reg. 4, 5, 7, 24)<br />

(502) 267-5074 6701 Echo Trail<br />

judyhunt1@bellsouth.net Louisville, KY 40299<br />

South Central Joe Spears (R. 10, 17, 18, 22)<br />

(940) 464-3680 910 Pioneer Circle<br />

irises@argyleacres.com Argyle, TX 76226<br />

Southwest Susan Boyce (R. 12, 15, 20, 23)<br />

(801) 985-0255 5123 S. 3500 W.<br />

irisgal@hotmail.com Roy, Utah 84067<br />

5


Searchable PDFs of scans of<br />

AIS Bulletin Table of Contents<br />

for Bulletins #1-355 (!)<br />

From first bulletin, June, 1920 thru October 2009<br />

Jack Finney has done a labor of love --<br />

Dear Friends,<br />

I have just completed a project that has<br />

literally been years in the making. I scanned the tables<br />

of contents (TOCs) of all the American <strong>Iris</strong> <strong>Society</strong><br />

Bulletins with Optical Character Recognition<br />

software so that you can use the Search function in<br />

Microsoft Word to look for articles on a particular<br />

subject. The software wasn't very good, so some of<br />

the formats got weird, and I had to almost retype a<br />

lot of the first 80 or so TOCs because the paper had<br />

deteriorated so badly. It was a chore, and the result<br />

is not pretty, but it is serviceable. The scholar<br />

in me just couldn't stand for all the wisdom in the<br />

Bulletins not to be readily accessible to those who<br />

wanted to use it. Of course, the AIS's official indexing<br />

project continues, and someday it will offer<br />

much more than my work provides.<br />

John R. "Jack" Finney, PhD<br />

www.hips-<strong>roots</strong>.com/articles/ref-aisb-toc-downloads.html<br />

This is a huge amount of work, thank you<br />

so much, Jack! I've already had a lot of fun searching<br />

for various articles; quite easy to use.<br />

Royal Horticultural <strong>Society</strong> Color Charts -<br />

an approximation on the internet!<br />

www.azaleas.org/index.pl/rhsmacfan1.html<br />

www.azaleas.org/index.pl/azcolorsystems.html<br />

has information about a number of formal color<br />

description systems<br />

www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/RHS-Publications/RHScolour-charts<br />

"The RHS Colour Chart is the standard<br />

reference for plant colour identification. Used<br />

by the RHS, the chart is indispensable to gardeners<br />

who value accuracy in the identification of plant<br />

colours....It is because the chart has been specially<br />

developed to match nature's own colours that it<br />

has become such a useful tool. 76 new colours<br />

have been added to the existing 808. These fill<br />

gaps in the dark purple-black, green, grey, orangered<br />

and bright orange ranges providing colour<br />

references for previously difficult to match plants<br />

including dahlias, chrysanthemums and irises.<br />

How To Say It!<br />

www.finegardening.com/pguide/pronunciationguide-to-botanical-latin.aspx<br />

has a neat "how to pronounce botanical names"<br />

section -- scroll down thru the alphabet to <strong>Iris</strong>.....<br />

it'll show you phonetic pronunciation, and will<br />

speak the names you click on!<br />

www.botanicgardens.ie/educ/names3.pdf<br />

discusses nomenclature. Thanks to Patty Del<br />

Negro for finding this and mentioning it in the<br />

forum at HIPS website.<br />

<strong>Iris</strong> Gems on the World Wide Web<br />

A very helpful list of cultivars by vendor, is compiled<br />

each year by Carlos Ayento (thank you Carlos!) --<br />

MASTER HISTORIC IRIS LIST 2010<br />

www.brightonparkiris.com/masterhistoriclist.xls<br />

AIS Check List database -- <strong>Iris</strong> Register<br />

$10/year, well worth it! You can search by name,<br />

hybridizer. www.irises.org/irischecklist.htm<br />

Mike Lowe's site, the original HIPS website<br />

www.worldiris.com/public_html/Frame_pages/<br />

QFix.html Thank you, Mike, for keeping this<br />

available! I've spent many many happy hours here!<br />

HIPS' website www.hips-<strong>roots</strong>.com<br />

It's easy to read PDFs -- PDFs are<br />

"portable document format" files, just a way to<br />

put files that were made in many different programs,<br />

into a basket so anyone can read them<br />

using the free Adobe Reader. For example, I<br />

make my slideshow in PowerPoint, but send it<br />

out as a PDF document, which makes it accessible<br />

to anyone whether they have the PowerPoint<br />

program or not. This is neat! If your computer<br />

doesn't have Adobe Reader, get it free at http://<br />

get.adobe.com/reader/<br />

Free copy of combined "How to<br />

look at historic iris" slideshow<br />

If anyone would like a free copy of my combined<br />

"How to look at historic iris" slideshow, please<br />

let me know, I could mail you one on a CD if you<br />

send me postage. If you have an email account<br />

that can accept 15 MB size attachments (the free<br />

gmail does, sign up at www.google.com, see<br />

http://mail.google.com/mail/help/intl/en/about.<br />

html), I can email it to you very easily. -- Gesine<br />

6


Farewell to E. Roy Epperson<br />

We were sad to hear that our AIS President,<br />

E. Roy Epperson, had died. Below, he<br />

is smiling at ‘The Red Douglas’ ( J. Sass<br />

1937) at the HIPS planting at 2009 AIS<br />

Convention. He told me this iris was the<br />

first one he’d ever bought, ordering it from<br />

Sears & Roebuck about 60 years ago.<br />

above & below: 'Elmohr' (Loomis-Long 1942)<br />

7


<strong>Iris</strong>es In A Graveyard<br />

by Nigel Service (France)<br />

The unsophisticated magnificence of<br />

an iris I saw last spring, widespread across<br />

northeast Greece in Muslim cemeteries, put<br />

me in mind of other graveyards seen. The<br />

tradition of <strong>Iris</strong>es planted on tombs has been<br />

widespread, a mourning flower not confined<br />

to the white <strong>Iris</strong> albicans; forms of <strong>Iris</strong><br />

germanica are quite often used in European<br />

graveyards for planting.<br />

What about the graveyards of the<br />

USA? I cannot recall, though I could easily<br />

enough be wrong, mention of such places in<br />

Roots.<br />

But I have had one small experience<br />

myself which convinced me that interesting<br />

things might easily be found and anyone<br />

who does not like the idea of lifting bits<br />

of <strong>Iris</strong>es from graves would bear in mind<br />

8<br />

that a dead person could have no finer<br />

memorial than that the rediscovery of a lost<br />

<strong>Iris</strong> should be linked, in memory and in the<br />

records, with the name on their tombstone.<br />

I am thinking of one occasion in<br />

particular but there is no reason why it<br />

should be unique, as numerous small towns<br />

must have been founded and abandoned<br />

in the earlier days of the American west. It<br />

was in Colorado where I was looking for I.<br />

missouriensis and, as happens when you are<br />

looking for a wild iris, you tend to inquire<br />

of anybody around if they have seen such<br />

flowers anywhere. “Have you been to the<br />

cemeteries of the dead towns above Central<br />

City? Turn left in the town, there are plenty<br />

of <strong>Iris</strong>es up there,” advised a friend.<br />

Not quite the sort of irises I was<br />

thinking of perhaps, but a visit to Central<br />

City became a previously unplanned part of<br />

the expedition. The cemeteries were not that<br />

easy to find; left turns seemed rare. No, not<br />

easy unless you were lucky, and we were<br />

lucky.<br />

It was more a complex of graveyards,<br />

covering a large area and mostly quite<br />

sparsely furnished with tombs which were<br />

often highly imaginative. The sections were<br />

separated, each faith having its own space.<br />

Certainly the Roman Catholic burials were<br />

clearly distinct and a notice announced the<br />

fenced off space as this.<br />

All sign of the town, which must have<br />

been sizable to justify such a complex, had<br />

gone. Or was it a collective burial ground?<br />

he had said “dead towns” in the plural -- a<br />

burial center for several now abandoned<br />

townships? In that case, the sparseness of<br />

tombs is even more remarkable. Perhaps<br />

it did not work out well right from the<br />

beginning. Anyway, we are thinking of<br />

irises, not of settlements and their failure.<br />

And there were irises, or their foliage,<br />

left: Tall bearded<br />

<strong>Iris</strong> in a Muslim<br />

cemetery at Organi,<br />

northeast Greece,<br />

May 2009<br />

on a good number<br />

of the graves. The<br />

altitude was about<br />

9,000 feet and<br />

there was no sign of<br />

flowering, but foliage


above: Cemetery above Central City, Colorado,<br />

June 2006; the grave of Elizabeth A., died 1877, is<br />

in the middle with <strong>Iris</strong> leaves clearly evident<br />

in plenty was on and around numerous<br />

tombs. One of the first graves was that of<br />

the Jeffery family dying at the end of the 19 th<br />

century -- here was Fred’s grave and that of<br />

M.J. with iris plants growing around them.<br />

Not far away was the collective tomb area<br />

of the Martin family where a different iris<br />

grew, and more irises were further over at<br />

the grave of Elizabeth A., who had died, aged<br />

just over one year, in 1877.<br />

9<br />

So, as the place dates from the late 19 th<br />

century, it would not be unreasonable<br />

to suggest that the plants would be<br />

from that sort of period also. But I am<br />

afraid I noted no other dates; I was not then<br />

thinking of historic hybrids. I am glad to<br />

say, though, that I did find one patch of the<br />

species I was looking for, growing wild, not<br />

associated with a tomb but well within the<br />

boundaries of the cemetery.<br />

[Editor’s note: Did you dig up a little piece of<br />

any of the bearded iris you saw?]


Mr. Marshal’s Flower Book -<br />

“The Florilegium” of Alexander Marshal<br />

Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Inc. 2008<br />

Book Review by Jim Morris<br />

When you pick up<br />

a book copyrighted<br />

by the Queen of<br />

England (HM<br />

Queen Elizabeth<br />

II, 2008) one<br />

rather expects it to<br />

be something of<br />

substance. This book<br />

is that and more.<br />

The modern title<br />

of “Mr. Marshal’s<br />

Flower Book”<br />

means the same<br />

as “The Florilegium” of Alexander Marshal (c. 1620-<br />

1682). It is the only compilation of flower watercolors<br />

from seventeenth-century England. Marshal was a<br />

horticulturist and entomologist who was highly skilled<br />

as an artist, but he painted for his own pleasure – not for<br />

publication or to document scientific discoveries such as<br />

presented by Pierre Vallet, Jardin du Roy (Paris 1608) or<br />

Basil Besler, Hortus Eystettenis (Eichstatt 1613). Most<br />

florilegia of the age were part of the scientific desire<br />

to identify, classify and record the plants pouring into<br />

England, France, Germany and the Netherlands from<br />

all over the world. Marshal was different, he just liked<br />

flowers and the bugs and birds associated with them, and<br />

he painted them to his own exacting standards.<br />

Marshal’s masterpiece of watercolors took him<br />

thirty years to complete. This modern compilation<br />

of 140 illustrations is stunning in its beauty. House &<br />

Garden said, “Exquisitely beautiful, the flower paintings<br />

of Alexander Marshal have a timeless resonance that<br />

makes them look as fresh today as they did when they<br />

were first created more than 350 years ago.” What<br />

appears to be a totally distaff production, the abridged<br />

text is by Henrietta McBurney and Prudence Sutcliffe<br />

with Marshal’s illustrations gleaned from the Royal<br />

left: Picture of German Flag iris germanica<br />

(two forms)<br />

above: I. susiana L. Mourning <strong>Iris</strong><br />

Alexander Marshal, c.1650<br />

10


markings and in some species, the beard.”<br />

It goes on to report that the English Royal<br />

<strong>Society</strong> was so impressed by Marshal’s<br />

work that they asked him how he<br />

obtained the vivid colors in his paintings.<br />

His response was read to the members<br />

of the Royal <strong>Society</strong> on December 19,<br />

1667. He derived pigments from flowers,<br />

berries, gums and <strong>roots</strong> as well as verdigris<br />

and arsenic. His paint formulas give his<br />

paintings a unique vibrancy of color. This is a marvelous<br />

book for amateur and professional alike.<br />

above: I. pumila L Alexander Marshal, 1650<br />

left: Siberian Flag <strong>Iris</strong> Alexander Marshal,<br />

The Florilegium, c. 1670<br />

below: English <strong>Iris</strong> Alexander Marshal<br />

c.1650<br />

Collection (since King George IV).<br />

Marshal painted everything he grew and more,<br />

from snowdrops, squill, hyacinths and daffodils in the<br />

English “winter” to star anemones, tulips and irises in<br />

the spring. With sufficient means he acquired and grew<br />

exciting plants from the Near East, Virginia, Canada and<br />

all the British colonies. He grew them in all seasons out<br />

of doors and under glass, and painted them as well as<br />

any man or woman.<br />

Among the various genera depicted are irises<br />

such as I. susiana L. the mourning iris, I. pumila L.,<br />

I. persica L., the common German flags (two forms),<br />

English irises, Spanish irises and Siberian flag iris. The<br />

text reports, “The forms of irises in particular seem to<br />

have fascinated Marshal – the way the flower rises from<br />

its stem, the papery calyx, the contrast between the<br />

shapes of the drooping and upright petals, the flower’s<br />

11


"Vanity, vanity, all is vanity..." ~ <strong>Historic</strong>al Vanity<br />

by Keith Keppel<br />

The AIS Registrations system<br />

is noteworthy for its extent, both in<br />

numbers of cultivars recorded and<br />

the appropriate information per each.<br />

However, sleuthing can sometimes<br />

disclose inaccuracies or omissions. We<br />

might cite an example, The Case of the<br />

Missing Vanities.<br />

In 1928 B. Y. Morrison registered<br />

‘Vanity’ which is shown in the<br />

1939 Check List as having been introduced<br />

in 1930. It is also shown in<br />

1939 as superseded ($) and obsolete<br />

(*)! Earl Sheets, in his Treholme Gardens<br />

“<strong>Iris</strong> lover’s guide and descriptive<br />

catalogue” gives more information:<br />

“M.S. to L., 38” S. Lilac; F.<br />

Bishop’s purple to Madder purple. All<br />

habits good. A striking color resembling<br />

Leverrier but a flower of better<br />

form on stronger, low and widely<br />

branched stalks.”<br />

He gave ‘Vanity’ his personal<br />

quality ratings of Exhibition 87 (= fine)<br />

and Garden 90 (= extra fine).<br />

In 1945 Frances Horton introduced<br />

fourteen dwarf irises in her<br />

Elkhart, Indiana, <strong>Iris</strong>dale Gardens catalogue.<br />

“Parentage mixed in moving”,<br />

she noted. Twelve of the fourteen are<br />

shown as registered in the 1949 Check<br />

List, the exceptions being ‘Princeling’<br />

and ‘Vanity’. She described the latter as being an 11”<br />

clean light yellow self, falls slightly veined olive at the<br />

haft, with matching beards and semi-horizontal falls.<br />

Now back to a tall bearded. A few months later,<br />

in a Stevens Brothers catalogue issued in New Zealand,<br />

we find ‘Vanity’ to be:<br />

“A gay, rosy lilac blend, large and of good form.<br />

In the standards the lilac is shot with light bronze. Falls<br />

are a lovely blending of lilac and gold with a flash of<br />

heliotrope below the yellow beard. Flowers several times<br />

a year when established. Early. 3 ft.”<br />

From information in Jean Stevens’ notebooks we<br />

find it first bloomed in 1943 and was saved as seedling<br />

12<br />

6/P80. Its parentage is ‘Miss California’ X ((‘Rewa’ x<br />

‘New Dawn’) x (‘New Dawn’ x ‘Radiant Morn’)). We<br />

also know that it reached southern California, for plants<br />

were shipped to C. S. Milliken in December, 1947, and<br />

Tom Craig the following month. Did it receive further<br />

distribution in this country?<br />

Finally, in 1974 Ben Hager registered ‘Vanity’,<br />

which was introduced by Melrose Gardens in 1975<br />

and was awarded the Dykes Medal in 1982. It was the<br />

fourth ‘Vanity’….or were there more?<br />

{Editor's note -- One of these 'Vanities' is available in<br />

this year's HIPS Rhizome Sale}


HIPS 2010 Rhizome Sale!<br />

The Annual HIPS Rhizome Sale is the main fundraising event for our <strong>Society</strong>. Rhizomes are donated by<br />

our generous members and growers; the sale is open to both members and the public. HIPS is grateful for the<br />

generosity of our members and donors and the support of all who place orders.<br />

Sale conditions:<br />

-- The <strong>Iris</strong> listed below are on a first come, first served basis. Demand is such that we must set a limit of no<br />

more than one of each cultivar per order.<br />

-- Rhizomes are $5.50 each, with a minimum order of five.<br />

-- Postage charges are included in the price.<br />

-- Cut off date for orders is June 15, 2010. Shipment will begin the last week of July.<br />

-- Due to import restrictions shipping is limited to the US and Canada.<br />

-- Orders from Canada must come thru Paypal or Money Order in US funds.<br />

-- While we will do our best to see that you get the correct cultivar, HIPS cannot guarantee identity of<br />

sale rhizomes.<br />

Please note: Include in your order acceptable substitutions or a note indicating if you'd prefer a refund if one<br />

you want is not available; also any acceptable bonuses if wanted with your order.<br />

How to order: There are two ways to get your order in.<br />

1) The customary way -- mail a check/Money Order and your list with all shipping information to:<br />

Janice Thompson<br />

2970 Luella Road<br />

Sherman,Tx. 75090-5151<br />

2) Or order online using your Paypal account (you must be registered with Paypal to use this option). Go to<br />

Paypal at www.paypal.com and then follow these instructions<br />

-- Click on ’Send money’.<br />

-- In the ‘To' field use: hipsshop@gmail.com<br />

-- Enter the full amount of your order (Postage is included in the price).<br />

-- Select ‘Goods’, then click Continue<br />

-- On the next page in the subject line type: rhizome sale-member order (you MUST indicate MEMBER to get<br />

preference over non-member orders)<br />

-- Add your list of varieties you'd like in the message box and your mailing address as well.<br />

-- When complete simply click Send Money and your order is on its way!<br />

Please send questions about the sale or your order to Janice Thompson at: ciris03@yahoo.com. Please send<br />

questions about using Paypal or online ordering to Mike Unser at: garden.of.mu@gmail.com.<br />

Thank you for supporting HIPS!<br />

What a splendid bunch of possibilities for this year's Rhizome Sale! This is the largest list to date.<br />

Thank you, all, for donating! Those of you ordering by mail, if you're ordering a number of cultivars, might<br />

want to photocopy the list pages and circle or highlight your choices, rather than writing them all out. -- Editor<br />

Photo credits: The photos on pages 18-19 of 'Golden Majesty', 'Gypsy', 'Harvest Splendor', 'Klamath',<br />

'Marquita', and 'Rebellion' were taken by Mike Unser; the photos of 'Rhythm' and 'Sacramento" are by Bonnie<br />

Petheram; all other photos are by Gesine Lohr.<br />

13


HIPS 2010 Rhizome Sale!<br />

Abelard (Sass, H.P. 1933)<br />

Accent (Buss 1953)<br />

Acolyte (Taylor, JD 1963)<br />

Alcazar (Vilmorin 1910)<br />

Allegiance (Cook 1958)<br />

Alpine Glow (Kleinsorge 1944)<br />

Alta California (Mohr-Mitchell<br />

1931)<br />

Amas (Foster 1885)<br />

Amethyst Flame (Schreiners 1958)<br />

Amigo (Williamson 1934)<br />

Angels Robe (Williamson, B.<br />

1979)<br />

Apache Warrior (Brown, A. 1972)<br />

Aphrodite (Dykes 1922)<br />

Appleblossom Pink (Boushay<br />

1974)<br />

Arctic Night (Brown, A. 1966)<br />

Argus Pheasant (DeForest 1947)<br />

Arrangement (Goett 1963)<br />

Autumn Sunset (Lapham 1939)<br />

Avalon Bay (Hamner 1975)<br />

Az Ap (Ensminger 1980)<br />

Babbling Brook (Keppel 1965)<br />

Baby Blessed (Zurbrigg 1979)<br />

Baby Snowflake (Peterson 1963)<br />

Bali Rose (Sass, H. 1955)<br />

Banberry Ruffles (Schreiners<br />

1970)<br />

Barbara Walther (Casselman<br />

1959)<br />

Barrister (Meek 1980)<br />

Bashful Bride (Roderick 1980)<br />

Bayberry Candle (DeForest 1966)<br />

Beauty Mark (Schreiners 1979)<br />

Beaux Arts (Plough 1969)<br />

Beckon (Daling 1974)<br />

Bel Canto (Hager 1981)<br />

Belize (unregistered )<br />

Bella Mohr (Ohl 1955)<br />

Bengal Tiger (Maryott 1980)<br />

Beowulf (Schreiners 1936)<br />

Beverly Sills (Hager 1978)<br />

Big Brother (Tolman 1976)<br />

Black And Gold (Kleinsorge<br />

1943)<br />

Black Baby (Sass, H. 1955)<br />

Black Bart (Schmelzer 1969)<br />

Black Hope (Austin 1963)<br />

Black Market (Plough 1974)<br />

Black Swan (Fay 1960)<br />

Black Taffeta (Songer 1954)<br />

Black Watch (Rosenfels 1972)<br />

Blackberry Wine (Bledsoe 1976)<br />

Blanc De Chine (Moldovan 1978)<br />

Blazing Bonnet (Galer 1972)<br />

Blazing Fury (Smith, E. 1968)<br />

Blazing Saddles (Dyer 1978)<br />

Blessed Again (Jones, F. 1978)<br />

Blond Goddess (Shoop 1974)<br />

Bloodstone (Schreiners 1980)<br />

Blue Ace (Rosenfels 1964)<br />

Blue Denim (Warburton 1959)<br />

Blue Doll (Warburton 1958)<br />

Blue Luster (Brown, O. 1973)<br />

Blue Rhythm (Whiting 1945)<br />

Blue Ruffles (Barton by Maxwell<br />

1954)<br />

Blue Sapphire (Schreiners 1953)<br />

Blue Sparks (Welch 1964)<br />

Blue Staccato (Gibson 1977)<br />

Blue Theme (Palmer 1977)<br />

Blue Whiskers (Welch 1960)<br />

Blushing Pink (Rudolph 1977)<br />

Bold Accent (Brown, O. 1978)<br />

Bold Chase (Jones, B. 1971)<br />

Bonanza (Sass, J. 1939)<br />

Brahms' Lullaby (Spahn 1978)<br />

Brandy (McWhirter 1981)<br />

Breaking Dawn (Schreiners 1971)<br />

Bridal Wreath (Weiler 1979)<br />

Bride (Caparne 1901)<br />

Brides Halo (Mohr 1971)<br />

Brigantine (Tompkins 1966)<br />

Bright Reflection (Brown, O.<br />

1979)<br />

Brimmed Red Amo (Morgan<br />

1981)<br />

Bristol Gem (Leavitt 1965)<br />

British Blue (Willott 1979)<br />

Broadmeadow (Brown, O. 1962)<br />

Broadway Star (Schreiners 1957)<br />

Brook Flower (Schreiners 1973)<br />

Brown Heart (Dyer 1975)<br />

Brown Lasso (Buckles 1972)<br />

Bryce Canyon (Kleinsorge 1944)<br />

Bubbling Springs (Brown, O.<br />

1971)<br />

Buddha Song (Dunbar 1970)<br />

Buffy (Brown, O. 1968)<br />

Burgundy Splash (Craig 1948)<br />

Burnt Toffee (Schreiners 1977)<br />

Buto (Sass, H.P. 1926)<br />

Butterscotch Trim (Buckles by<br />

Niswonger 1972)<br />

Caldron (Schreiners 1957)<br />

Calendar Girl (Smith, E. 1973)<br />

California Blue (Essig 1929)<br />

California Gold (Mohr-Mitchell<br />

1933)<br />

Camelot Rose (Tompkins 1965)<br />

Can Can Red (Gibson 1978)<br />

Candy Apple (Hamblen 1972)<br />

Candy Shop (Corlew 1970)<br />

Canton Jewel (Galer 1973)<br />

Caprice (Vilmorin 1898)<br />

Caramba (Keppel 1975)<br />

Cardinal (Bliss 1922)<br />

Carnival Time (Schreiners 1976)<br />

Carolina Gold (Powell 1970)<br />

Carved Pink (Rudolph 1975)<br />

Cascade Splendor (Kleinsorge<br />

1944)<br />

Catalyst (Keppel 1980)<br />

Cathedral Bells (Wallace 1953)<br />

Celestial Snow (Bro. Charles<br />

1957)<br />

Chalk Talk (Thomkins 1970)<br />

Charcoal (Plough 1969)<br />

Chatterbox (Schreiners 1978)<br />

Cheerio (Ayres 1934)<br />

Cheers (Habge 1975)<br />

Cherie (Hall 1945)<br />

Cherished (Corlew 1973)<br />

Cherry Garden (Jones, B. 1966)<br />

Cherry Jubilee (Wood 1969)<br />

Cherry Smoke (Meek 1978)<br />

Cherub Tears (Boushay 1976)<br />

China Dragon (Shoop 1979)<br />

China Maid (Milliken 1936)<br />

Chinese Coral (Fay, R. 1962)<br />

Chivary (Wills 1943)<br />

Chocoleto (Deru 1959)<br />

Christmas Angel (DeForest 1960)<br />

Christmas Rubies (Hamblen 1978)<br />

Christmas Time (Schreiners 1965)<br />

Cindy Ellen (Brown, O. 1972)<br />

Cindy Mitchell (Palmer 1979)<br />

Cinnabar (Williamson 1928)<br />

Circus Stripes (Plough 1976)<br />

City of David (Boushay 1977)<br />

Clair de Lune (Wareham 1934)<br />

Clancy (Roach 1972)<br />

Clara Noyes (Sass, H.P. 1930)<br />

Cliffs Of Dover (Fay, R. 1953)<br />

Cloverdale (Brown, O. 1969)<br />

Colonel Candelot (Millet 1907)<br />

Color Carnival (DeForest 1949)<br />

Colorado Sunshine (Magee 1978)<br />

Columbia Blue (Schreiners 1978)<br />

Columbine (Murrell 1930)<br />

Condottiere (Cayeux 1978)<br />

Congo Magic (Hooker 1973)<br />

Copper Classic (Roderick 1977)<br />

Copy Cat (Ghio 1974)<br />

Coral Magic (Schreiners 1979)<br />

Coral Ribbon (Berndt 1974)<br />

Coralie (Ayres 1932)<br />

Corn Harvest (Wyatt 1977)<br />

Coronation (Moore 1927)<br />

Corsage (Watkins 1955)<br />

Cosmic Lady (Keppel 1980)<br />

Cotton Blossom (Jones, B. 1970)<br />

Country Manor (Kegerise 1973)<br />

Cozy Calico (Schreiners 1980)<br />

Cracken (Schreiners 1974)<br />

Cranberry Ice (Schreiners 1973)<br />

Crimson King (Barr 1893)<br />

Crinkled Lilac (Schreiners 1957)<br />

Crinoline (Schreiners 1965)<br />

Crown Point (Tompkins 1958)<br />

Crystal Dawn (Rudolph 1976)<br />

Cuban Cutie (Dyer 1977)<br />

Curtain Call (Schreiners 1967)<br />

Daisy (Palmer 1977)<br />

Dappled Dragon (Payne 1969)<br />

Dark Chocolate (Murray 1954)<br />

Dark Fairy (Brown, A. 1960)<br />

Dasher (Brown, O. 1977)<br />

Dauntless (Connell 1929)<br />

Dawn (Yeld 1911)<br />

Dazzelier (Hall by Bloese 1952)<br />

Dazzling Gold (Anderson 1977)<br />

Debby Rairdon (Kintz 1964)<br />

Decolletage (Hager 1970)<br />

Deep Pacific (Burger 1975)<br />

Demi-Deuil (Denis 1912)<br />

Dera (Craig 1962)<br />

Desert Echo (Meek 1980)<br />

Desert Song (Fay, O. 1946)<br />

Dignitary (Ghio 1976)<br />

Diligence (Brown, A. by Boushay<br />

1976)<br />

Disco Music (Williamson, B.<br />

1977)<br />

Discovery Bay (Brown, O. 1970)<br />

Distant Light (Plough 1976)<br />

Dogrose (Insole 1930)<br />

Doll Dear (Blodgett 1980)<br />

Dolly Madison (Williamson 1926)<br />

Dominion (Bliss 1917)<br />

Dorothy K. Williamson (Williamson<br />

1918)<br />

Dot And Dash (Hall 1960)<br />

Double Dip (Rawlins 1978)<br />

Double Rose Amo (Morgan 1979)<br />

Dove Wings (Roberts 1968)<br />

Dover Beach (Nearpass 1972)<br />

Dragonfly (Dykes 1923)<br />

Dream Affair (Gatty 1978)<br />

Dream Lover (Tams 1971)<br />

Dream Maiden (Smith, E. 1963)<br />

Dreamcastle (Cook 1943)<br />

Dualtone (Brown, O. 1977)<br />

Dusky Dancer (Luihn 1967)<br />

Dusky Evening (Schreiners 1971)<br />

Dutch Chocolate (Schreiners<br />

1970)<br />

Dutch Doll (Sass by Graham<br />

1957)<br />

Early Snowbird (Gibson 1971)<br />

Easter Bonnet (Maxwell-Norton<br />

1943)<br />

Eastertime (Schreiners 1980)<br />

Easy Grace (Tompkins 1976)<br />

Ecstatic Night (Cook 1963)<br />

Edenite (Plough 1959)<br />

El Capitan (Mohr-Mitchell 1926)<br />

Eleanor Roosevelt (Sass-McDade<br />

1933)<br />

Eleanor's Pride (Watkins 1956)<br />

Embroidery (Keppel 1971)<br />

Emerald Fountain (Brown, O.<br />

1961)<br />

14


Emma Louisa (Buckles 1969)<br />

Enchanted World (Schreiners<br />

1979)<br />

End Play (Spence 1976)<br />

English Cottage (Zurbrigg 1976)<br />

Erleen Richeson (Roderick 1979)<br />

Ermine Robe (Schreiners 1969)<br />

Eros (Mead-Reidel 1934)<br />

Esther, The Queen (Hunt 1967)<br />

Etched Apricot (Gibson 1967)<br />

Everlasting Love (Dyer 1979)<br />

Exotic Blue (Randolph 1957)<br />

Exotic Star (Plough 1975)<br />

Eyebright (Taylor 1979)<br />

Fairy Ballet (Sarro 1973)<br />

Fairy Carillon (Payne 1969)<br />

Fairy Magic (Schreiners 1969)<br />

Falbala (Cayeux 1977)<br />

Fancy Tales (Shoop 1980)<br />

Fantastic Blue (Palmer 1975)<br />

Far Corners (Moldovan 1978)<br />

Far Hills (Wills 1947)<br />

Fascination (Cayeux 1927)<br />

Fashion Fling (Hall 1965)<br />

Fashionable Pink (Schreiners<br />

1976)<br />

Faustine (Lemon 1859)<br />

Feminine Charm (Kegerise 1974)<br />

Festive Aire (Brown, O. 1976)<br />

Festoon (Hall 1958)<br />

Fiesta Sun (Schmelzer 1970)<br />

Fiji Dancer (Zurbrigg 1978)<br />

Fine Precedent (Blyth 1977/78)<br />

Fine Taste (Nicholls 1977)<br />

Fire Chief (Gaylon 1959)<br />

Fire Dance (Fay, O. 1947)<br />

Fire Power (Plough 1977)<br />

Firenze (Brown, O. 1958)<br />

Firewater (Keppel 1977)<br />

Firey Furnace (Niswonger 1971)<br />

First Edition (Lorenz 1970)<br />

First Violet (DeForest 1952)<br />

Five Star Admiral (Marsh 1974)<br />

Flamboyant Dream (Boushay<br />

1978)<br />

Flamenco (Flamenco 1977)<br />

Flaming Dragon (Fay 1966)<br />

Flaming Light (Brown, R. 1973)<br />

Flaming Star (Plough 1967)<br />

Flash Fire (Plough 1978)<br />

Flavescens (collected, DeCandolle<br />

1813)<br />

Flirty Mary (Rawdon 1977)<br />

Florentina (collected 1500)<br />

Flounced Premiere (Austin 1961)<br />

Flower Power (Plough 1969)<br />

Fluted Lime (Noyd 1966)<br />

Flutter-by (Sturtevant 1924)<br />

Focus (Keppel 1976)<br />

Footnote (Keppel 1969)<br />

Fragrant Too (Schmelzer by Baldwin<br />

1979)<br />

HIPS 2010 Rhizome Sale!<br />

Frank Adams (Lapham 1937)<br />

Fresno Calypso (Weiler 1978)<br />

Frivolity (Schreiners 1970)<br />

Frost And Flame (Hall 1957)<br />

Frosted Glass (Becherer 1943)<br />

Frosted Starlight (Ghio 1963)<br />

Frosted Sunbeam (Bakke-Messer<br />

1974)<br />

Full House (Meek 1976)<br />

Full Tide (Brown, O. 1972)<br />

Funtastic (Plough 1978)<br />

G. P. Baker (Perry 1930)<br />

Gala Madrid (Peterson 1967)<br />

Galatea Marx (Marx 1961)<br />

Galleon Gold (Schreiners 1977)<br />

Garden Magic (Griner 1936)<br />

Gay Geisha (Olson 1961)<br />

Gay Hussar (Williamson 1929)<br />

Gay Parasol (Schreiners 1973)<br />

Gay Paree (Plough 1956)<br />

Geisha Gown (Maddox 1963)<br />

Gemini (Knopf 1966)<br />

Gene Buckles (Buckles by Niswonger<br />

1975)<br />

Generosity (Keppel 1979)<br />

Gentle Grace (Boushay 1979)<br />

Gentle Rain (Keppel 1977)<br />

Gerald Darby (Darby by Coe<br />

1967)<br />

Giant Rose (Schreiners 1959)<br />

Gigglepot (Blyth 1980/81)<br />

Gingerbread Castle (Tompkins<br />

1967)<br />

Gingersnap (Schreiners 1965)<br />

Gizmo (Hager 1976)<br />

Glacier Magic (Plough 1977)<br />

Glazed Orange (Schreiners 1969)<br />

Glory Bound (Nelson 1978)<br />

Glowing Embers (Sturtevant<br />

1923)<br />

Going My Way (Gibson 1972)<br />

Gold Cadillac (Gaulter 1979)<br />

Gold Fever (Nichols 1979)<br />

Gold Galore (Schreiners 1978)<br />

Gold Smoke (Clarke 1952)<br />

Gold Soverign (Whiting 1949)<br />

Golden Delight (Smith, E. 1959)<br />

Golden Filigree (Gibson 1965)<br />

Golden Frost (Brown, A. 1972)<br />

Golden Garnet (Gibson 1980)<br />

Golden Knight (Pond 1974)<br />

Golden Lady (Combs 1956)<br />

Golden Majesty (Salbach 1938)<br />

Golden Spectator (Haney 1968)<br />

Golden Streaker (Bledsoe 1978)<br />

Golden Years (Hall 1957)<br />

Goldfish (Wareham 1925)<br />

Gracchus (Ware 1884)<br />

Gracie Pfost (Smith, E. 1961)<br />

Grand Canyon (Kleinsorge 1941)<br />

Grandma's Hat (Mahood 1957)<br />

Graphic Arts (Hager 1978)<br />

15<br />

Great Lakes (Cousins 1938)<br />

Green Smoke (Smith, E. 1959)<br />

Green Spot (Cook 1951)<br />

Greenan Castle (Beattie 1971)<br />

Grenadine (Gersdorff 1946)<br />

Guardian Gate (Moldovan 1979)<br />

Gypsy (Kleinsorge 1944)<br />

Gypsy Baron (Schreiners 1942)<br />

Gypsy Caravan (Moldovan 1978)<br />

Gypsy Fire (Smith, E. 1967)<br />

Gypsy Melody (Smith, E. 1966)<br />

Gypsy Prince (Hamblen 1974)<br />

Hagar's Helmet (Nichols 1977)<br />

Hammered Copper (Roberts 1974)<br />

Hanky (Magee 1988)<br />

Happy Mood (Brown, A. 1968)<br />

Harland K Riley (MacMillan<br />

1974)<br />

Harriet Thoreau (Cook 1944)<br />

Harvest Splendor (Kleinsorge<br />

1956)<br />

Hawaiian Holiday (Brown, T.<br />

1965)<br />

Hazel's Pink (Schmelzer by Baldwin<br />

1978)<br />

Heather Blush (Hamner 1977)<br />

Heaven's Best (Smith, E. 1972)<br />

Hee Haw (Innerst 1980)<br />

Helen Boehm (Schreiners 1977)<br />

Helen Collingwood (Smith, K.<br />

1949)<br />

Helen McGregor (Graves 1946)<br />

Helios (Cayeux 1928)<br />

Hell's Fire (Roberts 1976)<br />

Henna Stitches (Gibson 1961)<br />

Henri Riviere (Millet 1927)<br />

Henry Shaw (Benson 1959)<br />

Hey Looky (Brown, W. 1970)<br />

High Jinks (Williams 1970)<br />

High Life (Schreiners 1964)<br />

High Sierra (Gaulter 1967)<br />

Highland Chief (Gibson 1972)<br />

Hold That Tiger (Lauck 1957)<br />

Holy Smoke (Smith, E. 1958)<br />

Honest Pleasure (Plough 1979)<br />

Honey Chile (Salbach 1940)<br />

Horned Amethyst (Austin 1959)<br />

Horned Dragonfly (Austin 1965)<br />

Horned Flamingo (Austin 1963)<br />

Horned Royalty (Austin 1958)<br />

Horned Skylark (Austin 1957)<br />

Horned Sunshine (Noyd 1968)<br />

Howdy Folks (Nelson, J. 1979)<br />

Hula Doll (Brown, A. 1964)<br />

Humoresque (Keppel 1962)<br />

I Do (Zurbrigg 1974)<br />

I. albicans (Lange 1860)<br />

I. kochii (Kerner 1887)<br />

I. ochroleuca (Linnaeus 1771)<br />

I. pallida (Lamarck 1789)<br />

I. pallida argentea / Zebra (G&K<br />

1906)<br />

I. pallida aurea variegata (Krelage<br />

& sons 1930)<br />

Ice Fairy (Witt 1966)<br />

Image Maker (Williamson 1983)<br />

Imperial Blush (Sass, H.P. 1932)<br />

Indian Chief (Ayres 1929)<br />

Indian Hills (Grant 1935)<br />

Indigo Rim (Gibson 1974)<br />

Inferno (Schreiners 1975)<br />

Inner Circle (Ghio 1977)<br />

Inscription (Boushay 1978)<br />

Instant Charm (Brown, O. 1974)<br />

Instant Love (Hamblen 1977)<br />

Intensity (Ferguson 1968)<br />

Interpol (Plough 1972)<br />

<strong>Iris</strong>h Doll (Brown, A. 1963)<br />

Ishmael (Boushay 1977)<br />

Island Fiesta (Plough 1979)<br />

Ivory Plumes (Plough 1980)<br />

Ivy League (Nearpass 1969)<br />

Jacaranda (Gaulter 1980)<br />

Japanesque (Farr 1922)<br />

Java Charm (Plough 1975)<br />

Jean Cayeux (Cayeux 1931)<br />

Jean Sibelius (Benson 1959)<br />

Jeanne Price (Jones, B. 1977)<br />

Jesse's Song (Williamson, B.<br />

1979)<br />

Jet Fire (Tompkins 1964)<br />

Jewel (Whiting 1952)<br />

Jewel Tone (Schreiners 1966)<br />

Jeweled Starlight (Burch 1980)<br />

Joyance (Dykes, K. 1929)<br />

Joyce Terry (Muhlestein 1974)<br />

July Sunshine (Brown 1965)<br />

Junaluska (Kirkland 1934)<br />

June Prom (Brown, A. 1967)<br />

June Sunset (Niswonger 1980)<br />

Jungle Shadows (Sass by Graham<br />

1959)<br />

Kalahari (Plough 1972)<br />

Kaleidoscope (Katkamier 1929)<br />

Kayo (Niswonger 1980)<br />

Kentucky Bluegrass (Jones, B.<br />

1970)<br />

Kentucky Derby (Mohr, D. 1976)<br />

Kermesina (collected 1901)<br />

Key Lime (Zurbrigg 1977)<br />

Kharput (Barr 1895)<br />

Kilt Lilt (Gibson 1970)<br />

Kimberly (Schreiners 1960)<br />

King's Jester (Stevens 1945)<br />

Klamath (Kleinsorge 1929)<br />

Knick-Knack (Greenlee 1961)<br />

Knotty Pine (Goett, 1961)<br />

Koala (Mohr 1975)<br />

Kona Coast (Plough 1973)<br />

Kontiki (Plough 1966)<br />

L.Merton Gage (Lapham 1942)<br />

La Bohemienne (Millet et Fils<br />

1926)<br />

Laced Cotton (Schreiners 1978)


HIPS 2010 Rhizome Sale!<br />

Laced Lemonade (Warburton<br />

1970)<br />

Lacy Snowflake (Schreiners 1976)<br />

Lady Boscawen (Graves 1942)<br />

Lady Friend (Ghio 1980)<br />

Lady In Red (Willott 1973)<br />

Lady Marie (Muhlstein 1975)<br />

Lady Serena (Soults 1972)<br />

Ladyslippers (Suiter 1958)<br />

Land Of Oz (Brown, O. 1979)<br />

Last Dance (McWhirter 1979)<br />

Late Returns (Wright 1967)<br />

Late, Late Display (Nelson, J.<br />

1974)<br />

Latin Lover (Shoop 1969)<br />

Laurel Park (Gaulter 1978)<br />

Laurie (Gaulter 1976)<br />

Lavender Blue Lace (Schortman<br />

1978)<br />

Lavender Petticoat (Osbourne<br />

1975)<br />

Lavender Sparkle (Schreiners<br />

1965)<br />

Leda's Lover (Hager 1980)<br />

Lemon Brocade (Rudolph 1974)<br />

Lemon Duet (Smith, R.G. 1978)<br />

Lemon Lark (Seedon by Hanson<br />

1980)<br />

Lemon Mist (Rudolph 1972)<br />

Lemon Parfait (Soults 1972)<br />

Lent A. Williamson (Williamson<br />

1918)<br />

Licorice Stick (Schreiners 1961)<br />

Liebestraum (Spahn 1978)<br />

Light Fantastic (Brown, O. 1968)<br />

Lighted Within (Blodgett 1980)<br />

Lightning Ridge (Brown, O.<br />

1966)<br />

Lilac Mist (Luihn 1969)<br />

Lilac Thrill (Niswonger 1979)<br />

Lilac Treat (Niswonger 1970)<br />

Limelight (Hall 1952)<br />

Limerick (Keppel 1973)<br />

Little Champ (Brown, A. 1961)<br />

Little Chestnut (Brizendine 1971)<br />

Little Dandy (Riley 1976)<br />

Little Mark (Quadros 1966)<br />

Little Sunbeam (Brown, A. 1968)<br />

Little Susie (Quadros 1970)<br />

London Fog (Plough 1976)<br />

Loop The Loop (Schreiners 1975)<br />

Lord Baltimore (Nearpass 1969)<br />

Loreley (G&K 1909)<br />

Lothario (Schreiners 1942)<br />

Louvois (Cayeux 1936)<br />

Love Child (Knocke 1979)<br />

Love Note (Brown, A. 1972)<br />

Love With Lace (Plough 1971)<br />

Lustre (Dykes 1925)<br />

Lynn With Love (Boushay 1973)<br />

Madame Louis Aureau (Cayeux<br />

1934)<br />

Madison Cooper (Fryer 1919)<br />

Maestro Puccini (Benson 1972)<br />

Magenta Rose (Gibson 1977)<br />

Magic Man (Blyth 1979/80)<br />

Magic Memories (Clark by Nichols<br />

1973)<br />

Magnifique (Ghio 1978)<br />

Malaysia (Ghio 1974)<br />

Mandolin (Ghio 1977)<br />

Maraschino (Keppel 1979)<br />

Margarita (Schreiners 1968)<br />

Mark (Love 1973/74)<br />

Marquita (Cayeux 1931)<br />

Mary Frances (Gaulter 1971)<br />

Mary Geddes (Stahlman/Washington<br />

1931)<br />

Mary Randall (Fay 1951)<br />

Master Charles (Williamson 1943)<br />

Master Touch (Schreiners 1980)<br />

Matinata (Schreiners 1968)<br />

Matterhorn (Sass, J. 1938)<br />

Maumelle (Butler 1976)<br />

Melanie (Hill 1941)<br />

Melted Chocolate (Daling 1977)<br />

Mercedes (Reuthe 1938)<br />

Meredith Hues (Powell 1969)<br />

Metallic Blue (Niswonger 1980)<br />

Mexicali Rose (Spahn 1979)<br />

Mexicana (Salter 1859)<br />

Michael Paul (Jones, W. 1979)<br />

Michigan Pride (Berndt 1975)<br />

Mildred Presby (Farr 1923)<br />

Mini Dynamo (Brown, A. 1978)<br />

Mischief (Reinhardt 1955)<br />

Miss California (Salbach 1936)<br />

Miss Indiana (Cook 1961)<br />

Mission Ridge (Plough 1973)<br />

Missouri (Grinter 1933)<br />

Misty Watercolors (Niswonger<br />

1976)<br />

Mme. Chereau (Lemon 1844)<br />

Mme. De Sevigne (Denis 1916)<br />

Mohr Pretender (Rich 1977)<br />

Monsignor (Vilmorin 1907)<br />

Moon Madness (Smith, E. 1970)<br />

Moonlight (Dykes, W. R. 1923)<br />

Moonlit Sea (Sass, J. 1942)<br />

Moonstruck (Schreiners 1979)<br />

Morocco Rose (Loomis 1937)<br />

Mount Spokane (Smith, E. 1971)<br />

Mrs. Nate Rudolph (Rudolph<br />

1975)<br />

Mulberry Rose (Schreiners 1941)<br />

Mussolini (Dykes, K. 1932)<br />

Mystic Eye (Denny 1978)<br />

Mystique (Ghio 1975)<br />

Nassak (Sass, H.P. 1933)<br />

Navajo Blanket (Schreiners 1978)<br />

Navy Doll (Brown, A. 1968)<br />

Navy Strut (Schreiners 1972)<br />

Neglecta (collected, Horne 1813)<br />

Neon Magic (Brown, O. 1974)<br />

Neptune's Pool (Moldovan 1972)<br />

New Covenant (Boushay 1974)<br />

New Era (Sass Bros. 1949)<br />

New Moon (Sexton 1968)<br />

New Rochelle (Hamblen 1974)<br />

New Snow (Fay 1945)<br />

Nifty (Palmer 1975)<br />

Night Blizzard (Payne 1964)<br />

Night Deposit (Steinhauer 1974)<br />

Night Owl (Schreiners 1970)<br />

Night Time (Cook, P. by Cook, E.<br />

1969)<br />

Now And Later (Zurbrigg 1972)<br />

Odyssey (Babson 1971)<br />

Oklahoma Bandit (Nichols, H.<br />

1979)<br />

Ola Kala (Sass, J. 1942)<br />

Old Gold (Sass, H.P. 1929)<br />

Old Master (Ghio 1980)<br />

On Line (Schreiners 1980)<br />

On The Go (Plough 1974)<br />

One Desire (Shoop 1960)<br />

Opening Night (Gibson 1970)<br />

Orange Caper (Warburton 1964)<br />

Orange Empire (Hamner 1974)<br />

Orchid Cloud (Applegate 1974)<br />

Orchid Mist (Sass 1950)<br />

Orelio (DeForest 1947)<br />

Othello (Lemon 1848)<br />

Ovation (Tompkins 1969)<br />

P. T. Barnham (Meek 1979)<br />

Pacific Mist (Schreiners 1979)<br />

Pacific Panorama (Sexton 1960)<br />

Painted Desert (Milliken 1942)<br />

Paradise (Gatty 1980)<br />

Paradise Pink (Lapham 1949)<br />

Parthenon (Connell 1934)<br />

Patches (Gaulter 1979)<br />

Patina (Keppel 1978)<br />

Peach Bavarian (Willott 1978)<br />

Peach Frost (Schreiners 1972)<br />

Peach Sundae (Hamner 1978)<br />

Pearl Chiffon (Varner 1972)<br />

Peek A Boo (Brown, O. 1968)<br />

Penny A Pinch (Steinhauer 1977)<br />

Pepper Blend (Moores 1977)<br />

Perfume Counter (Zurbrigg 1972)<br />

Perique (Beattie 1960)<br />

Persian Berry (Gaulter 1976)<br />

Petite Posy (Schreiners 1975)<br />

Pharaoh's Gold (Brown, O. 1980)<br />

Picadilly (Bunyard 1939)<br />

Pinafore Pink (Persian Berry<br />

1977)<br />

Pink Bubbles (Hager 1980)<br />

Pink Cameo (Fay 1946)<br />

Pink Challenge (Brown, O. 1975)<br />

Pink Champagne (Lauer 2001)<br />

Pink Cheer (Plough 1969)<br />

Pink Confetti (Gibson 1976)<br />

Pink Formal (Muhlstein 1949)<br />

Pink Fringe (Rudolph 1967)<br />

Pink Horizon (Schreiners 1968)<br />

Pink Kitten (Wood 1977)<br />

Pink Magnolia (Brown, O. 1970)<br />

Pink Marble (Austin 1955)<br />

Pink Opal (Sass, J. 1934)<br />

Pink Pussycat (Tompkins 1969)<br />

Pink Sleigh (Rudolph 1970)<br />

Pink Swirl (Wedow 1974)<br />

Pink Taffeta (Rudolph 1968)<br />

Pink Tiger (El Dorado Gardens<br />

1965)<br />

Pink Unicorn (Austin 1960)<br />

Pinwheel (Schreiners 1962)<br />

Piute Pass (Daling 1975)<br />

Pixie (Sass, H.P. 1928)<br />

Playgirl (Gatty 1977)<br />

Pleasure Faire (Gatty 1974)<br />

Pleated Gown (Roderick 1981)<br />

Plicutie (Brown, A. 1967)<br />

Popcorn (Hager 1977)<br />

Porta Villa (Gibson 1973)<br />

Portrait Of Larrie (Gaulter 1979)<br />

Post Time (Schreiners 1971)<br />

Potpourri (Hamblen 1976)<br />

Powder Peach (Kegerise 1974)<br />

Prairie Sunset (Sass, H.P. 1936)<br />

Praise The Lord (Boushay 1972)<br />

President Pilkington (Cayeux<br />

1931)<br />

Pretender (Cook 1951)<br />

Pretty Pansy (Sass Bros. 1946)<br />

Priceless Pearl (Schreiners 1972)<br />

Pride Of Ireland (Noyd 1970)<br />

Prospector (Kleinsorge 1950)<br />

Prosper Laugier (Verdier 1914)<br />

Puppy Love (Hager 1980)<br />

Purissima (Mohr-Mitchell 1927)<br />

Purple Haven (Reynolds 1957)<br />

Pussycat (Schmelzer 1967)<br />

Quaker Lady (Farr 1909)<br />

Queen In Calico (Gibson 1980)<br />

Queen Of May (Salter bef. 1859)<br />

Quiet Isle (Plough 1972)<br />

Quiet Kingdom (Boushay 1977)<br />

Quietude (Keppel 1972)<br />

Quilting Party (Kavan by Ennenga<br />

1977)<br />

Quivering Flame (Zurbrigg 1960)<br />

Radiant Apogee (Gibson 1966)<br />

Radiant Smile (Danielson 1968)<br />

Rain Dance (Jones, B. 1979)<br />

Rain Shadow (Plough 1971)<br />

Rainbow Bridge (Moldovan 1970)<br />

Rainbow Room (Sass, J. 1946)<br />

Rainy Pass (Plough 1978)<br />

Rameses (Sass, H.P. 1928)<br />

Ramona S (Smith, E. 1971)<br />

Rare Edition (Gatty 1980)<br />

16


HIPS 2010 Rhizome Sale!<br />

Raspberry Blush (Hamblen 1975)<br />

Raziza (Plough 1975)<br />

Rebellion (Kleinsorge 1937)<br />

Red Cloud (Farr 1913)<br />

Red Heart (Brown, A. 1966)<br />

Red Polish (Craig 1967)<br />

Red Ruler (Craig 1969)<br />

Regents' Row (Denney 1979)<br />

Returning Glory (Smith, R.G.<br />

1972)<br />

Reva (Plough 1974)<br />

Rhages (Mead-Reidel 1934)<br />

Rhea (Williamson 1928)<br />

Rheinfels (G&K 1928)<br />

Rheingauperle (G&K 1924)<br />

Rhythm (Ballard 1950)<br />

Right On (Nelson, J. 1974)<br />

Ringo (Shoop 1979)<br />

Rippling Waters (Fay 1961)<br />

Ritz (Schreiners 1968)<br />

Rival (Shoop 1976)<br />

River Hawk (Plough 1979)<br />

Rocket Thruster (Plough 1978)<br />

Ron (Hamblen 1981)<br />

Rondo (Schreiners 1973)<br />

Rose Unique (Farr 1910)<br />

Rosy Veil (Sass, H. E. 1953)<br />

Rosy Wings (Gage 1935)<br />

Roustabout (Brown, A. 1976)<br />

Royal Ballet (Mohr, K. 1978)<br />

Royal Cape (Mayberry 1973)<br />

Royal Contrast (Brown, A. 1962)<br />

Royal Touch (Schreiners 1967)<br />

Ruffled Ballet (Roderick 1973)<br />

Russet Wings (Wills 1945)<br />

Sable (Cook 1938)<br />

Sable Night (Cook 1952)<br />

Sacramento (Mohr-Mitchell 1929)<br />

Saddle Shoes (Plough 1971)<br />

Saint Teresa (Nichols 1977)<br />

San Francisco (Mohr-Mitchell<br />

1927)<br />

Sans Souci (Van Houtte 1854)<br />

Santa Cruz (Mitchell 1945)<br />

Santana (Keppel 1978)<br />

Sapphire Gem (Schmelzer 1975)<br />

Sapphire Hills (Schreiners 1971)<br />

Saramohr (Loomis by Gates 1961)<br />

Saturday Night Fever (Nichols<br />

1979)<br />

Saucy Sue (Gibson 1968)<br />

Sayonara (Spahn 1980)<br />

Scandal (Beattie 1962)<br />

Séance (Ghio 1969)<br />

Seaside (Brown, O. 1967)<br />

Sentry (Noyd 1970)<br />

Seventh Heaven (Lapham 1955)<br />

Shaft Of Gold (Sexton 197)<br />

Shaman (DuBose 1980)<br />

Shasta (Mohr-Mitchell 1927)<br />

Shawano (Williamson, M. 1939)<br />

Sheriffa (White, C.G. 1941)<br />

Shipshape (Babson 1969)<br />

Show Biz (Gatty 1980)<br />

Showcase (Schreiners 1975)<br />

Sierra Blue (Essig 1932)<br />

Silent Majesty (Hamblen 1977)<br />

Silkie (Hager 1969)<br />

Silver Heather (Niswonger 1978)<br />

Silver Peak (DeForest 1962)<br />

Silver Skies (Corlew 1966)<br />

Silver Years (Hager 1980)<br />

Sindjkha (Sturtevant 1918)<br />

Sing Again (Plough 1966)<br />

Singing Rain (Daling 1973)<br />

Skip Stitch (Rawdon 1977)<br />

Sky Gem (Leavitt 1973)<br />

Sky Hooks (Osborne 1980)<br />

Skyfire (Schreiners 1980)<br />

Skylab (Sexton 1974)<br />

Skywatch (Benson 1964)<br />

Sleepytime Gal (Spahn 1978)<br />

Smoke Rings (Gibson 1971)<br />

Smoky Mountain (Smith, E. 1964)<br />

Sneak Preview (Nelson, J. 1980)<br />

Snow Cloud (Schreiners 1970)<br />

Snow Flurry (Rees 1939)<br />

Snow Goddess (Becherer 1955)<br />

Snowy Wonderland (Brown, O.<br />

1979)<br />

So Rare (Shoop 1980)<br />

Social Butterfly (Denney 1980)<br />

Soft Air (Warburton 1973)<br />

Solid Gold (Kleinsorge 1951)<br />

Solid Mahogany (Sass, J. 1944)<br />

Son Of Star (Plough 1969)<br />

Song Of Erin (Roach 1971)<br />

Song Of Norway (Luihn 1979)<br />

Songster (Corlew 1975)<br />

Sophisticated Lady (Spahn 1979)<br />

Sostenique (Blyth 1975/76)<br />

Soul Music (Meek 1978)<br />

Sound Of Music (Brown, O. 1966)<br />

Southland Grape (Burch 1978)<br />

Space Dream (Smith, E. 1970)<br />

Spanish Peaks (Loomis 1946)<br />

Sparkling Sunrise (Schreiners<br />

1970)<br />

Spartan (Schreiners 1972)<br />

Spinning Wheel (Nearpass 1976)<br />

Spirit Of Memphis (Zurbrigg<br />

1977)<br />

Spring Bride (Brown, O. 1976)<br />

Spring Butterfly (Hobbs by<br />

Hanson 1978)<br />

Spun Gold (Glutzbeck 1939)<br />

Square Dance (Mohr, K. 1979)<br />

Stage Door (Corlew 1979)<br />

Stained Glass (Wilhelm 1939)<br />

Star At Midnight (Rich 1964)<br />

Starring Role (Palmer 1973)<br />

Staten Island (Smith, K. 1947)<br />

Steppin Hi (Neubert 1972)<br />

Stepping Out (Schreiners 1964)<br />

Storm Center (Schreiners 1979)<br />

Storm Warning (Schreiners 1953)<br />

Storybook (Corlew 1980)<br />

Strange Child (Brown, A. 1974)<br />

Study In Black (Plough 1967)<br />

Sultans Palace (Schreiners 1977)<br />

Summer Olympics (Smith, R.G.<br />

1976)<br />

Summer Storm (Marx 1955)<br />

Summer Sunshine (Gibson 1972)<br />

Sun Fire (Hamblen 1977)<br />

Sun Worshiper (Hager 1972)<br />

Sunday Brunch (S. Stevens 1981)<br />

Sunday Chimes (Hamblen 1978)<br />

Sunday Punch (Crandall 1977)<br />

Sunlit Charm (Rosenfels 1964)<br />

Sunol (Mohr-Mitchell 1933)<br />

Sunrise (Cook, F. 1939)<br />

Sunset Blaze (Kleinsorge 1948)<br />

Sunset Sky (Roe 1969)<br />

Sunset Sonata (Hamblen 1980)<br />

Super Frill (Austin 1964)<br />

Super Indiglow (Shortman 1974)<br />

Superstition (Schreiners 1977)<br />

Susan Bliss (Bliss 1922)<br />

Suzette (Knowlton 1943)<br />

Swahili (Plough 1965)<br />

Swan Ballet (Muhlestein 1955)<br />

Swazi Princess (Schreiners 1978)<br />

Sweetwater (Woodside 1974)<br />

Swerti (collected 1612)<br />

Swift River (Niswonger 1974)<br />

Symphonette (Noyd 1969)<br />

Tahiti Sunrise (Ernst 1963)<br />

Tangerine Sky (Schreiners 1976)<br />

Tarn Hows (Randall 1955)<br />

Taste The Wine (Plough 1979)<br />

Tea Apron (El Dorado Gard. 1961)<br />

Temple Gold (Luihn 1978)<br />

Tenino (Plough 1978)<br />

Tequila Sunrise (McWhirter 1978)<br />

Thai Silk (Smith, C & K 1970)<br />

The Black Douglas (Sass, J. 1934)<br />

The Mad Hatter (Lyon 1951)<br />

The Red Douglas (Sass, J. 1937)<br />

Thick And Creamy (Weiler 1978)<br />

Think Pink (Hamner 1972)<br />

This I Love (Chowning 1976)<br />

Tiburon (Gaulter 1971)<br />

Tickled Pink (Tomkins 1958)<br />

Timmie Too (Wolff 1962)<br />

Tinkerbell (Douglas 1954)<br />

Tinted Porcelain (Brown, G. P.<br />

1952)<br />

Toast An' Honey (Kleinsorge<br />

1953)<br />

Toll Gate (Cook 1959)<br />

Torch Parade (Bledsoe 1979)<br />

Touch Of Coral (Daling 1975)<br />

Touch Of Sky (Schreiners 1980)<br />

Touch Of Spice (Plough 1973)<br />

Treasure Island (Kleinsorge 1937)<br />

Tres Elegante (Michel 1979)<br />

Tropical Butterfly (Carstensen<br />

1963)<br />

Trudy (Tompkins 1964)<br />

True Delight (Sturtevant 1924)<br />

Truly Yours (Fay 1949)<br />

Trump Card (Palmer 1977)<br />

Tulip Tree (Morgan 1972)<br />

Turkish Topaz (Austin 1962)<br />

Tut's Gold (Schreiners 1979)<br />

Ultra Shadow (Craig 1966)<br />

Unicorn (Austin 1954)<br />

Valvouche (Hamblen 1977)<br />

Vanity (Hager 1974)<br />

Vaudeville (Keppel 1969)<br />

Victor Herbert (Benson 1977)<br />

Victoria Falls (Schreiners 1977)<br />

Victorine (Lemon 1840)<br />

Villa Shimmer (Gibson 1969)<br />

Violet Harmony (Lowry 1952)<br />

Virginia Moore (Shull 1920)<br />

Vitafire (Schreiners 1968)<br />

Voodoo (Kleinsorge 1948)<br />

W. R. Dykes (Dykes-Orpington<br />

1926)<br />

Wabash (Williamson, M. 1936)<br />

Warbler (Williamson 1935)<br />

Warm Embrace (Dyer 1980)<br />

Well Endowed (Ghio 1979)<br />

West Coast (Knopf 1968)<br />

Western Spring (Luihn 1978)<br />

White City (Murrell 1939)<br />

White Goddess (Nesmith 1936)<br />

White Lightning (Gatty 1974)<br />

White Smoke (Rees 1949)<br />

White Unicorn (Austin 1962)<br />

Whole Cloth (Cook 1958)<br />

Whoop Em' Up (Brady 1974)<br />

Wild Apache (Gibson 1965)<br />

Wild Berry (Hamner 1978)<br />

William A. Setchell (Brehm 1938)<br />

William Mohr (Mohr 1925)<br />

Wine And Roses (Hall 1963)<br />

Winter Olympics (Brown, O.<br />

1963)<br />

Woodland Rose (Brown, O. 1970)<br />

Words Of Love (Williamson, B.<br />

1971)<br />

Wyomissing (Farr 1909)<br />

Youth Dew (Zurbrigg 1980)<br />

Yo-Yo (Schreiners 1978)<br />

Yves Lassailly (Cayeux 1928)<br />

Zantha (Fay 1947)<br />

Zipper (Sindt 1979)<br />

Zowie (Boushay 1980)<br />

Zwanenburg (Denis 1912)<br />

17


Alcazar<br />

Alta California<br />

Aphrodite<br />

Black Hope<br />

Blue Rhythm<br />

Bryce Canyon<br />

Burnt Toffee<br />

Camelot Rose<br />

Caprice<br />

China Maid<br />

Circus Stripes<br />

Crimson King<br />

Crinkled Lilac<br />

Dauntless<br />

Dawn<br />

Dogrose<br />

Dominion<br />

Easter Bonnet<br />

Eleanor Roosevelt<br />

Eros<br />

Faustine<br />

Flounced Premiere<br />

Flutter-by<br />

Frank Adams<br />

Frosted Starlight<br />

Full House<br />

Gay Geisha<br />

Gingerbread Castle<br />

Golden Majesty<br />

Goldfish<br />

Grand Canyon<br />

Great Lakes<br />

Gypsy Baron<br />

Gypsy<br />

Harvest Splendor<br />

Helen Collingwood<br />

Henna Stitches<br />

Holy Smoke<br />

Horned Dragonfly<br />

Horned Skylark<br />

Horned Sunshine<br />

I. kochii<br />

Indian Chief<br />

Indian Hills<br />

Jean Cayeux<br />

King's Jester<br />

Klamath<br />

Lent A. Williamson<br />

Loreley<br />

18


Madison Cooper<br />

Marquita<br />

Master Charles<br />

Mildred Presby Miss California<br />

Missouri<br />

Monsignor<br />

Mulberry Rose<br />

Mussolini<br />

Neglecta<br />

Orelio<br />

Pink Unicorn<br />

Prairie Sunset<br />

Pretty Pansy<br />

Quaker Lady<br />

Queen of May<br />

Rameses<br />

Rebellion<br />

Red Cloud<br />

Rheingauperle<br />

Rhythm<br />

Rose Unique<br />

Rosy Veil<br />

Rosy Wings<br />

Sable<br />

Sacramento<br />

San Francisco<br />

Sheriffa<br />

Sierra Blue<br />

Sindjkha<br />

Snow Flurry<br />

Staten Island<br />

Super Frill<br />

Susan Bliss<br />

Swerti<br />

The Black Douglas<br />

The Red Douglas<br />

Tinted Porcelain<br />

Toll Gate<br />

Tropical Butterfly<br />

True Delight<br />

Victorine<br />

W.R. Dykes<br />

Wabash<br />

White Unicorn<br />

Whoop 'Em Up<br />

William A. Setchell<br />

Wyomissing<br />

Yves Lassailly<br />

19


The Pickle Barrel House <strong>Historic</strong> <strong>Iris</strong> Garden<br />

How to develop a display/conservation-of-unknowns iris garden<br />

by Nancy McDonald<br />

photos by Nancy McDonald unless otherwise noted<br />

Old bearded irises gone wild in Cathy’s field<br />

Unidentified iris – study name Austin Healey, named<br />

after the owner’s dog, who was named after the car<br />

Our town sits at the end of a 25-mile<br />

driveway, in the middle of blessed nowhere on<br />

the shore of Lake Superior. Built for the lumber<br />

industry in the 1880s, it was a boomtown for a<br />

couple of decades. When timber played out in the<br />

early 1900s, pretty well everyone upped and left.<br />

The last train went south, and railroad workers<br />

pulled up the tracks behind them.<br />

When the white settlers had come – and<br />

especially, I imagine, the women – they brought<br />

their favorite flowers with them. I suppose that<br />

when they left, they took some away. But you<br />

don’t dig a whole clump of irises when you’re<br />

packing your trunk, you just tuck in a toe or two,<br />

so they left a lot of irises behind. We find them<br />

now in fields, at old home sites, in the woods, in<br />

forgotten corners, and in gardens.<br />

20<br />

Trudy, my mother-in-law, always wanted<br />

to plant a garden full of these beautiful old<br />

bearded irises. She thought it would be fun to<br />

collect them and their stories; she always did like<br />

a good story. We never got around to it, and now<br />

she is gone. But last summer, when the chance<br />

came to plant such a garden, I did.<br />

The Pickle Barrel House, in Grand Marais,<br />

Michigan, is a fascinating little building that’s<br />

on the National Register of <strong>Historic</strong> Places. (You<br />

can find out more about its history at http://<br />

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pickle_Barrel_House.)<br />

Now owned and operated as a museum by the<br />

Grand Marais <strong>Historic</strong>al <strong>Society</strong> (http://historicalsociety.grandmaraismichigan.com),<br />

the Pickle<br />

Barrel House sits on a 1/8-acre corner lot, surrounded<br />

by a wooden rail fence, right downtown.<br />

A small garden of Michigan native plants<br />

grows behind the building.<br />

This summer I volunteered to work on the<br />

little garden there with my friend Cathy, who is<br />

a member of the <strong>Historic</strong>al <strong>Society</strong>. One day, as<br />

we weeded, I told her of Trudy’s dream, and how<br />

the Old House Gardens catalog (www.oldhousegardens.com),<br />

which has just begun carrying old<br />

irises, had reminded me of the project. Cathy<br />

said, “Why not plant them here?” Why not, indeed?<br />

We quickly obtained permission from


The Pickle Barrel House (photo: Cathy Egerer)<br />

the members of the <strong>Historic</strong>al <strong>Society</strong>, and plans<br />

began.<br />

When the bearded irises bloomed around<br />

town, I put a small article in the Grand Marais<br />

Gazette requesting pups of any older irises people<br />

might have – and did people ever respond!<br />

Over the next few weeks, I photographed dozens<br />

of irises and took measurements and notes,<br />

securing promises for plants later on. I asked the<br />

international <strong>Historic</strong> <strong>Iris</strong> <strong>Preservation</strong> <strong>Society</strong><br />

(HIPS) for help in identifying the old treasures<br />

we found. From them I learned how to photograph<br />

the flowers for identification, and what<br />

plant parts to measure. The history of the irises,<br />

their provenance, is vital information, too, and<br />

this I carefully recorded for every iris photographed.<br />

Delay followed delay in the construction<br />

of the garden, but in the end<br />

we got the space prepared. The new<br />

garden sits on the former site of the<br />

warehouse for Hill’s Store, torn down<br />

in 1975. The soil is essentially glorified<br />

beach sand, plentifully larded with<br />

broken glass, old nails, and odd bits<br />

and pieces of junk. A friend came with<br />

his excavator and removed the sod,<br />

such as it was. Another kind person<br />

donated a dump truck load of topsoil.<br />

My neighbor owns a former sawmill,<br />

with a mountain of 30-year-old, partially<br />

decomposed sawdust out back.<br />

We shoveled one trailer load after<br />

another of this brown gold onto the<br />

garden. Two wonderful men with tillers<br />

ground it all in for us.<br />

above: The garden under construction<br />

below: The garden ready to plant<br />

left: The<br />

garden<br />

site,<br />

with<br />

Grand<br />

Marais<br />

Harbor<br />

in the<br />

background<br />

21


Meanwhile, the friendly folks at HIPS had<br />

a proposal for us. Would we like to become an<br />

official HIPS Display Garden? All we’d need is a<br />

minimum of 15 positively identified, labeled, historic<br />

irises, in addition to however many as-yet<br />

unidentified irises we cared to grow. (Unidentified<br />

irises have no ID; therefore they are called<br />

“noids.”)[or "unknowns" -- Editor]. The garden<br />

must also be open to the public; this one certainly<br />

is, all the time, and it’s free. Incredibly generous<br />

donations from HIPS members allowed us to<br />

far exceed the 15-named-variety minimum. We<br />

bought a few others from the Tennessee nursery<br />

<strong>Iris</strong> City Gardens (www.iriscitygardens.com/<br />

frame2.html). We’re well on our way to officialdom.<br />

above: The grid system<br />

above: <strong>Iris</strong>es for Pickle Barrel garden<br />

In a display garden, people should be able<br />

to get an intimate view of the flowers. Therefore<br />

the large corner bed is divided by two L-<br />

shaped paths, each wide enough for a walker or<br />

a stroller. The planting beds are only 3 feet wide,<br />

so no iris is too far off the path to see and smell.<br />

Because of these narrow beds, the space allotted<br />

each variety is only 15″x15″, so we’ll have to stay<br />

right on top of dividing the irises as they grow.<br />

Pups, carefully labeled, will be sold at fund-raising<br />

events for the <strong>Historic</strong>al <strong>Society</strong>.<br />

Mapping and labeling are vital in a<br />

display garden. With string and tent pegs we<br />

marked out a grid, so each plant could be accurately<br />

placed and mapped. At planting time,<br />

we buried a label northwest of every iris. Large<br />

display labels set out in the spring will be taken<br />

in for the winter. For noids, we’ll show the study<br />

name (that is, the name we’re using until we can<br />

identify the iris; e.g., Linnamaki Purple) and<br />

where the plant was found. For identified irises,<br />

we’ll give the cultivar name, the breeder, and the<br />

date of introduction.<br />

We’re keeping careful computer records of<br />

every plant, with its history, measurements, and<br />

digital photos. A print-out of this ever-expanding<br />

Reference Book will be available for use by Pickle<br />

Barrel House visitors. We plan a tri-fold brochure<br />

about the garden that visitors may have for free,<br />

and a larger, more detailed brochure costing a<br />

nominal buck or two.<br />

Many people around town are finding<br />

that “that old thing” is actually an exciting bit of<br />

living history, and perhaps of some value after<br />

all. Here we have Argie’s iris, that she found<br />

22


elow: Linnamaki Purple – study name of an iris from<br />

the old Linnamaki farm<br />

above: Planted at last!<br />

more than 50 years ago down by the railroad<br />

tracks. below: Argie's iris<br />

We have the Baker Grade iris, found at the site<br />

of the switchman’s cabin, at the foot of the Baker<br />

Grade on the old railroad line (below) [looks like<br />

possibly 'Monsignor' (Vilmorin 1907)? -- Editor]<br />

23


We have Judy’s grandpa John Krempa’s little<br />

gold iris (below)<br />

We have Sal’s irises, and Dick & John’s, and<br />

Eva Mae’s.<br />

below: Dick & John’s soft gold iris<br />

We have pale yellow irises, probably ‘Flavescens’<br />

(De Candolle 1813, from the old Webb farm.<br />

Is that little variegata-type from the old Linnamaki<br />

place ‘Sans Souci’ (Van Houtte 1854)<br />

or ‘Honorabile’ (Lemon 1840) or something else<br />

again? How about the one from Abrahamson’s<br />

old house? Are all the tall, small-flowered, superfragrant<br />

lavender irises the same variety of <strong>Iris</strong><br />

pallida, or are they each a little different?<br />

The first round of irises has been planted; a few<br />

await transplanting after next summer’s bloom.<br />

We planned space for about 130 irises, so there’s<br />

room for more as we find them.<br />

Other plants in the garden include a<br />

young Preston hybrid lilac ‘Minuet’, Rosa glauca,<br />

peonies ‘Mikado’ and ‘Chestine Goudy’, and<br />

my favorite historic Siberian iris, ‘Summer Sky’<br />

(Mrs. Frances Cleveland 1935). A generous donor<br />

bought us many spring bulbs from Old House<br />

Gardens, and Scott Kunst, owner of that wonderful<br />

bulb company, very kindly donated some<br />

extras for us.<br />

Spring bulbs will give us early bloom,<br />

beginning with snowdrops (Galanthus nivalis),<br />

tiny <strong>Iris</strong> reticulata ‘Cantab’, and white Anemone<br />

24


elow: Siberian iris ‘Summer Sky’ (Cleveland 1935)<br />

blanda, followed by a troupe of glorious daffodils.<br />

Then the bearded irises will bloom, with<br />

the peonies and lilac. And will the garden then<br />

be a restful green for the rest of the year? No,<br />

that won’t do at all. Even now we pore over seed<br />

catalogs, seeking annuals popular in the Pickle<br />

Barrel Era, the 1920s and 1930s. We’ve discovered<br />

a curious thing: although there are many lists of<br />

antique annual species, it’s remarkably difficult<br />

to find introduction dates for cultivars of those<br />

species. Our best resources so far have been seed<br />

catalogs from those decades, and great fun we’ve<br />

had collecting them. The next challenge will be to<br />

find modern sources. Many catalogs claiming to<br />

carry seeds of heirloom plants offer mostly modern<br />

cultivars of old favorites. Finding the older<br />

cultivars is a pleasant winter game, a fine pursuit<br />

for snowy days.<br />

[This piece originally appeared at<br />

www.gardeninggonewild.com/?p=10949; thanks<br />

to Joe Spears (former HIPS president) for suggesting<br />

we print it in Roots. I look forward to<br />

seeing more bloom photos from Nancy later!]<br />

A note on starting your own<br />

display/conservation iris garden<br />

Nancy's article describes very excellent<br />

rigorous methods of starting a conservation iris<br />

garden. But please don't think you must gather<br />

the same level of resources in order to conserve<br />

unknown iris! After my Da died in 1992 and I<br />

couldn't save the 1848 house, I dug up some of<br />

my late Ma's iris. The only place I had to put<br />

them was in 12" and 14" plastic pots on the second<br />

floor walkway outside my little apartment,<br />

so that's where they went. Since I didn't know<br />

anything, no one told me "bearded iris don't grow<br />

well in pots", and apparently the iris hadn't heard<br />

this either, as they did very well (you must use a<br />

planting mix like Supersoil, not regular garden<br />

dirt, which is far too heavy for use in pots unless<br />

you amend it with a lot of stuff)(and I had to use<br />

Supersoil because I had no garden dirt).<br />

Mapping and labeling ARE things that anyone<br />

can do, no matter how tiny their iris empire<br />

is. I numbered the plastic pots with Sharpie pens,<br />

and buried a copper garden tag with that pot<br />

number in each pot. I kept lists of who was in<br />

each pot, in a notebook. When I started to collect<br />

unknown iris from other people, I recorded<br />

everything they could tell me about them, which<br />

was often nothing! but I'd record where I got them<br />

from, and info such as "from backyard of a house<br />

where a little old lady lived, in X town".<br />

So far, my favorite adventure of finding<br />

unknowns is finding 'Sindjkha' (Sturtevant 1918)<br />

in the compost pile of a friend's backyard. She'd<br />

bought the house from an older couple, who'd<br />

bought from an elderly woman. She'd dug up the<br />

existing old iris and put them in the big city compost<br />

bin, planting all 'Indian Chief' (Ayres 1929),<br />

who I'd given her and who had gloriously multiplied,<br />

there; she told me this after the fact. Oy<br />

vey, I cried! wait, there were some neat looking<br />

oldies in the photos we took. Nope, too late, gone,<br />

she said. Well, I couldn't stand it, I took the bus<br />

there and upended her compost bin, and dragged<br />

home a bunch of rhizomes who were a bit the<br />

worse for wear after over a week in a closed compost<br />

bin. (No one would sit near me on the bus).<br />

And one was 'Sindjkha'! And I would've loved<br />

her even if we never found out she had a human-<br />

25<br />

given name. -- Gesine


Cook-Williamson Memorial <strong>Iris</strong> Garden,<br />

Part II<br />

How I got started researching Bluffton iris<br />

history<br />

by Jerry Oswalt, Bluffton, Indiana<br />

In 1958, I was a boy of 16 years of age and had<br />

a small flower garden behind our house in town. Just<br />

around the corner from our house was a large iris field.<br />

I saw an ad in the paper where the iris garden was going<br />

out of business and that you could dig your own iris for<br />

$1.00 a bag. I walked around the corner to the iris field<br />

and through a small grove of trees at the entrance to<br />

what years later I learned was Longfield <strong>Iris</strong> Farm.<br />

Standing in the shade was a beautiful lady with<br />

blonde hair and beautiful sparkling light blue eyes, and a<br />

warm smile. She handed me a large paper sack and said<br />

‘dig all you want. There are some real expensive ones, but<br />

they all have to go.’ I remember she had such a gentle<br />

and warm personality, I felt as if I were in the presence of<br />

an angel. I took the bag and headed into the field, and,<br />

needless to say, had the bag full in the first two rows.<br />

I’ve always wondered, had I ventured into this vast sea of<br />

color, what I might have found.<br />

Years later, I saw Mary, and informed her I’d<br />

lost most of the iris due to neglect; then twice later, she<br />

called me when she was dividing her iris in her garden,<br />

and both times gave me about 20 sacks of iris. The last<br />

time I was there we walked around her yard talking<br />

about flowers, trees, shrubs, etc. She showed me how<br />

to hybridize an iris. In her conversation, she mentioned<br />

her dad had hybridized an iris so unique, he wanted to<br />

patent it, but never did. She mentioned it was black.<br />

Her dad died in 1933 and she still had this iris in her<br />

garden.<br />

In 1987, I heard Mary’s health was failing and I<br />

went to see her. At 78, she was still a beautiful lady. A<br />

week later, Mary passed away. Mary never married, so<br />

two nieces came and took things pertaining to family<br />

from the home.<br />

Mary and I both volunteered at the local<br />

<strong>Historic</strong>al Museum, and every once in a while we’d<br />

talk iris. Knowing the museum kept history of local<br />

businesses, I wanted to put something into the museum<br />

about the iris field and preserve its history. Still<br />

knowing nothing of the history of the iris field, or<br />

Mary’s father E.B. Williamson, or of Paul and Emma<br />

Cook, I went to Mary’s estate sale hoping to retrieve<br />

anything that would preserve the history of the iris<br />

field. There wasn’t very much as far as personal material,<br />

mostly household, books, and records. I purchased<br />

2 copper watering cans of Mary’s and an iron trivet<br />

made of two letters “M and W “ and a box of gardening<br />

books, one of which was her 1929 iris check list. I<br />

didn’t know what it was at the time. Feeling let down<br />

that I hadn’t found anything related to the iris field, I<br />

made one last bid on two cardboard boxes of table trash<br />

-- papers, junk mail and a few magazines, looking like<br />

stuff that should have been burned. I paid 50¢ each for<br />

these boxes and came home. I let the boxes set for 2 or 3<br />

days, then decided to go through them. Under the junk<br />

mail and magazines at the bottom of the box, I found 4<br />

small pages of the family genealogy Mary had worked on<br />

Below it, I found Mary’s typed history of the Longfield<br />

<strong>Iris</strong> Farm, history of Edward Bruce Williamson, and<br />

history of Paul Cook.<br />

I’m not a religious person by any means, but of<br />

all the people at that sale, I was the only one looking<br />

to preserve the iris field history, and it came home with<br />

me in two boxes of trash paper. I felt Mary had to be<br />

looking down on me that day and guided me to those<br />

two boxes that normally I wouldn’t have bought. I<br />

contacted Mary’s niece and sister about the genealogy .<br />

They had looked for it and couldn’t find it so I sent it to<br />

them and asked if they could send me family pictures or<br />

anything of the iris fields. Soon, I received two boxes<br />

of family history and clippings relating to Bruce and<br />

Mary, and the iris field, plus pictures and a few of the<br />

awards they had won with their iris. Reading this and<br />

Mary’s history, I learned this wasn’t just a flower garden,<br />

it was one of the first large scale iris businesses in the<br />

country; prominent iris people came from all over the<br />

country each year to help evaluate and select seedlings<br />

to be registered. As many as 70,000 iris seedlings were<br />

26<br />

planted one year. <strong>Iris</strong> were sent all over the world from<br />

Longfield <strong>Iris</strong> Farm.<br />

Eighteen years after receiving the Williamson<br />

history, I heard a niece of Emma Cook was living here<br />

in Bluffton Indiana. I showed her what I’d collected on<br />

Longfield and the Williamsons. I asked if they would<br />

share any history of Paul and Emma Cook. They gave<br />

a beautiful frame of 8 or 10 of Paul’s medals, Emma’s<br />

scrapbook, and a few other items. This rounded out the<br />

Cook-Williamson history.<br />

Thinking this was all being forgotten, I began<br />

copying [as the voice in the wilderness], and sending<br />

this information to the AIS and HIPS and anyone else


I thought would be interested. I soon received a big<br />

surprise -- the world knew about the Williamsons and<br />

the Cooks. There was collected history on them, as I<br />

found Clarence Mahan was writing a book on early<br />

hybridizers, and was including them. My worries were<br />

over, the world knew them and they weren’t going to be<br />

forgotten.<br />

Since I had a few of the iris from Mary’s yard,<br />

I decided to search for more and create a Memorial <strong>Iris</strong><br />

Garden to keep the history alive here in Bluffton where<br />

it originated. Many of the older people here remember<br />

the iris field but almost no one remembered the history<br />

that took place here. Now people are excited about the<br />

iris returning to Bluffton, and the story behind them and<br />

their hybridizers.<br />

The Memorial Garden is a work in progress, and<br />

hopefully in two or three years will be a beautiful little<br />

garden to visit. //<br />

You can contact him via email at Jerry Oswalt<br />

, or by mail at<br />

Jerry Oswalt<br />

PO Box 131<br />

Bluffton, Indiana 46714<br />

'Decennial' (Williamson R. 1929) TB-MLa-Y9M.<br />

From the Royal <strong>Iris</strong> Gardens, 1933: A striking variegata<br />

of a new type of rounded and finished flower of firm<br />

substance. S. bright picric yellow; F. dahlia carmine with<br />

a narrow yellow margin. At the center of the falls, is an<br />

overdash of brilliant electric blue, a feature which makes<br />

this a very unusual iris. Longfield <strong>Iris</strong> farm 1930. Named<br />

for the 10 th anniversary of AIS.<br />

www.worldiris.com/public_html/Frame_pages/QFix.<br />

html , scroll down to see 'Decennial' photo.<br />

Part I was previously printed in American <strong>Iris</strong> <strong>Society</strong><br />

Region 6 Newsletter, Spring 2009.<br />

Part II was previously printed in American <strong>Iris</strong> <strong>Society</strong><br />

Region 6 Newsletter, Summer 2009.<br />

Jerry Oswalt sends this update in March 2010 --<br />

Larry McFarren, who had worked for Mary as<br />

a teenager, was fighting lung cancer, the day we planted<br />

iris at the Memorial Garden in August 2008. He’d<br />

just gotten out of the hospital. I’d wanted Longfield<br />

workers, and family, to plant the first iris in the bed, and<br />

he wanted to be there for the planting. When I received<br />

the Ro o t s edition of the article on the garden, I went out<br />

to have it copied to give him the copy, but he had passed<br />

away that day, February 10, 2010.<br />

Emma Cook’s niece planted Paul’s ‘Allegiance’<br />

(Cook 1958), the first iris planted in the bed. Then<br />

another worker, Jerry Christianson, planted Mary’s<br />

‘Wabash’ (M. Williamson 1936). E.B.’s grandson<br />

and great grandson planted ‘Lent A. Williamson’<br />

(Williamson 1918) and ‘Wabash’. The grandson, David<br />

Wilkins, Sr., son of Jane (Williamson) Wilkins, Mary’s<br />

sister, planted ‘Lent A. Williamson’ which was named<br />

after his great grandfather, L.A.W. (E.B.’s dad).<br />

above: 'Sunol' (Mohr-Mitchell 1933)<br />

below: 'Zingara' (Williamson 1928)<br />

Jerry is particularly looking for four cultivars:<br />

‘E. B. Williamson’ (P. Cook, R. 1937)<br />

‘Progenitor’ (P. Cook, R. 1951)<br />

‘Decennial’ (E. B. Williamson 1930)<br />

‘Ethel Peckham’ ( E. B. Williamson 1932)<br />

27


Call for donations -- <strong>Iris</strong> Wish List for the Reader Rock Garden,<br />

Calgary, Alberta, Canada<br />

The Reader Rock Garden is one of Calgary's most unique built cultural landscapes. This Provincial <strong>Historic</strong> Resource<br />

is one of a very few remaining historic gardens in western Canada.<br />

The garden is a tribute to one man's passion for plants and beauty. William Roland Reader was the Superintendent<br />

for Calgary Parks from 1913 - 1942. He actively collected plants and seeds both locally and from distant countries,<br />

trialing over 4000 different plant species over the years. He transformed a bare hillside into an internationally-acclaimed<br />

garden as he demonstrated the horticultural potential of the chinook region of Alberta to Calgary’s citizens.<br />

Since the re-opening of the garden in 2006, Calgary gardeners have been working to reintroduce Reader’s many<br />

plant collections. They are seeking the iris listed below; they have a budget of $500.00, and are also seeking donations of<br />

iris. If you can help, please contact Janet Jones, Gardener, City of Calgary Parks, Reader Rock Garden, at<br />

403.221.3578 or Janet.Jones@calgary.ca .<br />

Jean Richter vetted D-Z of the list, Carlos Ayento vetted A-C, and Phil Edinger and Joe Spears contributed helpful comments.<br />

Synonyms of names are shown in [brackets] after the listing.<br />

<strong>Iris</strong> germanica:<br />

Afterglow (Sturtevant 1917) TB<br />

Aika (Lemon 1848)<br />

Albert Victor (Barr 1885)<br />

Alcazar (Vilmorin 1910)<br />

Amas (coll. Foster 1855)<br />

Ambassadeur (Vilmorin 1920)<br />

Amber (W.R. Dykes 1924)<br />

Anne Leslie (Sturtevant 1918)<br />

Aphrodite (W.R. Dykes 1922)<br />

Archeveque (Vilmorin 1911)<br />

Argynnis (E. Williamson 1925)<br />

Arnols (Barr 1874)<br />

Asia (Yeld 1920)<br />

Askabadensis (coll. Van Tubergen-Dykes 1914)<br />

[Askabad]<br />

Assuerus (Lemon bef. 1859)<br />

Aurea (Jacques 1830)<br />

Autumn King (H.P. Sass 1924)<br />

Azure (Bliss 1918)<br />

Ballerine (Vilmorin 1920)<br />

Benbow (Bliss 1917)<br />

Berchta (Goos & Koenemann bef. 1909)<br />

Black Prince (Perry 1900)<br />

Blue Boy (Foster 1913)<br />

Bluejay (Farr 1913)<br />

Boismilon (Lemon 1840)<br />

Britannicus (Van Houtte 1864)<br />

Bronze Beauty (Barr 1884)<br />

Bruno (Bliss 1922)<br />

Buriensis (De Bure 1820)<br />

Canary (Caparne 1901)<br />

Canary Bird (Perry 1903)<br />

Candelabre (Vilmorin 1909)<br />

Caprice (Vilmorin 1898)<br />

Cardinal (Bliss 1919)<br />

Carthusian (J.W. Marshall abt. 1906)<br />

Castor (George Bunyard & Co. 1923)<br />

Caterina (Foster 1909)<br />

Cecil Minturn (Farr 1922)<br />

Celia (Yeld 1902)<br />

Charmant (Caparne 1901)<br />

Chester J. Hunt (Farr 1913)<br />

Citrea (Goos & Koenemann 1899)<br />

Citronella (Bliss 1922)<br />

Clarence Wedge (Willis E. Fryer 1919)<br />

Clarissa (Van Houtte 1867)[ Clarissima]<br />

Cluny (Vilmorin 1920)<br />

Colias (E.B. Williamson 1925)<br />

Corrida (Millet & Fils 1914)<br />

Cynthia (R.E. Allen 1944)<br />

Dalmarius (Goos & Koenemann 1907)<br />

Dalmatica (coll. bef. 1600)<br />

Darby (Dropmore 1940)<br />

Darius (Brown 1873)<br />

Dawn (Yeld 1911)<br />

Donna Maria (Lemon 1840)<br />

Dorothea (Caparne 1901)<br />

Drake (Bliss 1919)<br />

Dr. Bernice (Hooper 1867)<br />

Dream (Sturtevant 1918)<br />

Eburna (Goos & Koenemann 1899)<br />

Eden Philpotts (Perry 1921)<br />

Edouard Michel (Eugene Verdier 1904)<br />

Etta (Caparne 1901)<br />

Fairy (Kennicott 1905)<br />

Flavescens (De Candolle 1813)<br />

Florence Barr (Barr 1876)<br />

Florentina (coll. abt. 1500)<br />

Frederick (R. Wallace & Co. 1896)<br />

Fritjof (Goos & Koenemann 1910)<br />

Fro (Goos & Koenemann 1909)<br />

George Yeld (Perry 1923)<br />

Gloire de Hillegom (Krelage & Son bef. 1907)<br />

Glow (Sturtevant 1919)<br />

Gold Crest (W.R. Dykes 1914)<br />

Gold Imperial (Sturtevant 1924)<br />

Gypsy Queen (Salter bef. 1859)<br />

Halfdan (Goos & Koenemann 1908)<br />

Harmony (W.R. Dykes 1923)<br />

Harriet Presby (Presby 1922)<br />

Her Majesty (Perry 1903)<br />

Hiawatha (Farr 1913)<br />

Hochelaga (Morgan 1931)<br />

Honorabile (Lemon 1840)<br />

Hugo (Farr 1913)<br />

Ignacite (Salter 1859)<br />

Imperator (Cayeux et LeClerc 1922)<br />

Ingeborg (Goos & Koenemann 1908)<br />

28<br />

Innocenza (Lemon 1854)<br />

I. germanica (Linnaeus 1753)<br />

I. kochii (Kerner 1887)<br />

I. pallida (Lamarck 1789)<br />

<strong>Iris</strong> King (Goos & Koenemann 1907)<br />

Iroquois (Farr 1909)<br />

Isoline (Vilmorin 1904)<br />

Ivorine (Caparne 1901)<br />

Jacquesiana (Lemon 1948)[Concience]<br />

James Boyd (Farr 1915)<br />

Jeanne d’Arc (Eugene Verdier 1907)<br />

Jenny Lind (Van Houtte 1854)<br />

Jungfrau (Phipps bef. 1920)<br />

Juniata (Farr 1909)<br />

Justinian (Salter 1878)<br />

Kastor (Goos & Koenemann 1914)<br />

Kathleen (Barr 1910)<br />

Kharput (coll. Barr 1895)<br />

Lady Seymour (Van Houtte 1854)<br />

La Neige (Eugene Verdier 1912)<br />

Lavandulacea (Van Houtte 1854)<br />

[Agnes Sorrel]<br />

Lent A. Williamson (E.B. Williamson 1918)<br />

Le Pactole (Lemon 1848)<br />

Lohengrin (Goos & Koenemann 1910)<br />

Lord of June (Yeld 1911)<br />

Loreley (Goose & Koenemann abt. 1909)<br />

Loute (Vilmorin 1897)<br />

Macrantha (M. Van Waveren & Sons 1907)<br />

Madam X (Tharp 1932)<br />

Magnifica (Vilmorin 1919)<br />

Majestic (Bliss 1923)<br />

Ma Mie (Cayeux et LeClerc 1906)<br />

Mandraliscae (Todaro 1861)<br />

Maori King (Reuthe 1890)<br />

Marion Cran (Perry 1921)<br />

Marsh Marigold (Bliss 1919)<br />

Mary Garden (Farr 1913)<br />

Mary Gibson (Perry 1922)<br />

Massasoit (Farr 1916)<br />

Medrano (Vilmorin 1920)<br />

Mercedes (Eugene Verdier 1905)<br />

Mildred Presby (Farr 1923)<br />

Miranda (Hort 1919)<br />

Mithras (Goos & Koenemann 1910)


Mlle. Schwartz (Denis 1916)<br />

Mme. Chereau (Lemon 1844)<br />

Mme. Cheri (Sturtevant 1918)<br />

Mme. Chobaut (Denis 1916)<br />

Moa (Bliss 1919)<br />

Moliere (Vilmorin 1920)<br />

Monsignor (Vilmorin 1907)<br />

Moonstone (Cleveland 1920)<br />

Morning Splendor (Shull 1923)<br />

Mount Penn (Farr 1909)<br />

Mount Royal (Morgan 1929)<br />

Mozart (Van Houtte 1854)<br />

Mrs. Alan Gray (Foster 1909)<br />

Mrs. Horace Darwin (Foster 1888)<br />

Mrs. Marion Cran (Perry 1923)<br />

Mrs. Neubronner (Reuthe bef. 1898)<br />

Mrs. Reuthe (Ware 1899)<br />

Mrs. Smith (Willis E. Fryer 1917)<br />

Nancy Lea (Simpson 1925)<br />

Nibelungen (Goos & Koenemann 1910)<br />

Opera (Vilmorin 1916)<br />

Oriflamme (Vilmorin 1904)<br />

Othello (Lemon 1848)<br />

Pacquita (Lemon 1848)<br />

Pallida dalmatica (1600)<br />

Pallida Perfecta (Farr 1912)<br />

Parc de Neuilly (Eugene Verdier 1910)<br />

Perfection (Barr 1880)<br />

Pioneer (Bliss 1924)<br />

Prairie Gold (H.P. Sass 1926)<br />

Princess Beatrice (Barr 1898)<br />

Prinzess Viktoria Luise (Goos & Koenemann<br />

1910)<br />

Prosper Laugier (Eugene Verdier 1914)<br />

Purple King (Wallich 1830)<br />

Quaker Lady (Farr 1909)<br />

Queen Alexandra (Barr 1910)<br />

Queen Caterina (Sturtevant 1918)<br />

Queen of May (Salter bef. 1859)<br />

Red Cloud (Farr 1913)<br />

Regina (Barr 1876)<br />

Rhein Nixe (Goos & Koenemann 1910)<br />

Rose Unique (Farr 1910)<br />

Ruberrima (Barr 1875)<br />

Sapho (Lemon 1840)<br />

Seminole (Farr 1920)<br />

Shekinah (Sturtevant 1918)<br />

Shelford Chieftan (Foster 1909)<br />

Sherwin-Wright (Kohankie 1915)<br />

Sirius (Bunyard 1923)<br />

Souv. De Mme. Gaudichau (Millet & Fils<br />

1914)<br />

St. Clair (Lemon 1854)[Compte de St. Claire]<br />

Standard Bearer (Ware 1904)<br />

Sunset (Bliss)<br />

Susan Bliss (Bliss 1922)<br />

Sweet Lavender (Bliss 1919)<br />

Taj Mahal (Sturtevant 1921)<br />

Tamerlan (Vilmorin 1904)<br />

Tecumseh (Farr 1910)<br />

Titan (Bliss 1919)<br />

Tom Tit (Bliss 1919)<br />

Trautleib (Goos & Koenemann 1899)<br />

Victorine (Lemon 1840)<br />

Violacea Grandiflora (coll. DeBarry abt. 1856)<br />

Virginia Moore (Shull 1920)<br />

Walhalla (Goos & Koenemann 1908)<br />

Walneriana (Lemon 1840)<br />

Wedgwood (W.R. Dykes 1923)<br />

White Knight (Arthur Percy Sanders 1916)<br />

White Nymph (McKinney 1920)<br />

Wyomissing (Farr 1909)<br />

Zouave (Vilmorin 1922)<br />

Zua (Crawford 1914)<br />

<strong>Iris</strong> pumila:<br />

Bride (Caparne 1901)<br />

Eburna (Goos & Koenemann 1899)<br />

Floribunda (Goos & Koenemann 1910)<br />

Pumila Atroviolacea (Todaro 1856)<br />

<strong>Iris</strong> latifolia:<br />

Almona (Krelage 1892)<br />

Duke of Clarence (Van Tubergen 1914)<br />

Duke of York (Tegelaar Bros. Ltd. 1927)<br />

Grand Lilas (Perry 1910)<br />

King of the Blues (Barr 1898)<br />

Montblanc (Van Tubergen 1883)<br />

Prince Albert (Floricultural Cabinet and Florists<br />

Magazine (1842))<br />

Sunset (Backhouse 1902)<br />

<strong>Iris</strong> latifolia hispanica: (I. xiphium)<br />

Blue King (Hubert 1904)<br />

Bronze King (Krelage 1898)<br />

Cajanus (General Bulb Co. 1896)<br />

Golden King (Barr 1898)<br />

King of the Whites (Krelage 1906)<br />

La Nuit (Barr 1908)<br />

L’Unique (Krelage 1906)<br />

Queen Wilhelmina (Van Tubergen 1909)<br />

Snowball (Kelway & Sons 1906)<br />

<strong>Iris</strong> sibirica:<br />

Emperor (coll. Barr 1916)<br />

Madawaska (Preston 1932)<br />

Sibirica Alba (Van Houtte 1879)<br />

Snow Queen (coll. Barr 1900)<br />

above: 'Pink Tiger' (El Dorado 1964)<br />

below: 'Swan Ballet' (Muhlestein 1955)<br />

below: 'Flounced Marvel' (Austin 1961)<br />

29


2010 Commercial Sources Listing<br />

The Commercial Source Listing is in each<br />

issue of ROOTS and on the HIPS web site and is<br />

updated annually. The information is from the sources<br />

themselves; please contact them directly for more<br />

info. While HIPS will not offer listing privileges to<br />

any nursery known to give poor service, we cannot<br />

guarantee your satisfaction.<br />

We have a three-part process for finding<br />

historic iris --<br />

1) Ask the Commercial Source Chair<br />

2) If not found that way, refer to Databank Chair<br />

3) If not found that way, send request to ROOTS for<br />

insertion in the Locator.<br />

Anyone desiring commercial sources of a<br />

particular iris for the current year should contact the<br />

Source Chairman by July 1, as many growers have<br />

a limited supply of rhizomes and may not fill orders<br />

received late in the season. E-mail inquiries are gladly<br />

accepted. If writing please include a stamped, selfaddressed<br />

envelope and address your request to:<br />

Jeff Walters, HIPS Commercial Sources Chair<br />

1175 Woodburn Rd.<br />

Spartanburg, SC 29302-3440<br />

iriscomsource@yahoo.com<br />

Argyle Acres <strong>Iris</strong> Gardens<br />

Joe & Donna Spears<br />

910 Pioneer Circle East, Argyle, TX 76226<br />

(940) 464-3680<br />

FAX: (866) 320-IRIS (toll-free)<br />

E-mail: irises@argyleacres.com<br />

Website: www.argyleacres.com<br />

On-line catalog. No Export. Specializing in Texashardy,<br />

heat & drought tolerant irises.<br />

Bluebird Haven <strong>Iris</strong> Garden<br />

Mary Hess<br />

6940 Fairplay Rd., Somerset, CA 95684<br />

(530) 620-5017<br />

E-mail: mhess1863@innercite.com<br />

Website: www.bluebirdhavenirisgarden.com<br />

On-line catalog now includes all; click on a letter<br />

to see list (some not available for sale yet); printed<br />

catalog extensive but less complete. Printed catalog:<br />

$1.00. No Export. Extensive historic iris. Large<br />

selection of Tall-Bearded, 1930’s-1970’s; we<br />

specialize in Lloyd Austin introductions.<br />

30<br />

<strong>Historic</strong>s & Rarities<br />

Bruce Filardi<br />

P.O. Box 18124<br />

Portland, OR 97218-0124<br />

[no phone # provided by source]<br />

E-mail: bfilardi@comcast.net<br />

Website: www.internationaliris.com/contact.html<br />

List available as e-mail attachment or with stamped,<br />

self-addressed large envelope; No export at present.<br />

Many extremely rare varieties. Guaranteed true-toname.<br />

Chuck Chapman <strong>Iris</strong><br />

Chuck Chapman<br />

R.R. #1, 8790 WR124, Guelph, ON<br />

CANADA N1H6H7<br />

(519) 856-0956<br />

E-mail: chuck@chapmaniris.com<br />

Website: www.chapmaniris.com On-line catalog.<br />

Catalog: US$3.00 (refundable with order). Export to<br />

All. Canadian <strong>Historic</strong>s, including good selection of<br />

Preston Siberians; large Median list.<br />

Dowis Ranch<br />

Janell & Eric Denham<br />

P.O. Box 124, Marseilles, IL 61341<br />

(815) 795-5681<br />

E-mail: pollen@mtco.com<br />

Catalog upon Request. No Export.<br />

<strong>Historic</strong> Tall Bearded irises; Modern, Reblooming,<br />

and Space Age TBs<br />

<strong>Iris</strong> City Gardens<br />

Macey & Greg McCullough<br />

7675 Younger Creek Rd., Primm Springs, TN 38476<br />

(615) 799-2179<br />

E-mail: info@iriscitygardens.com<br />

Website: www.iriscitygardens.com On-line catalog.<br />

Catalog $3.00 (refundable with order). No Export.<br />

Primarily Beardless and antique & modern Bearded .<br />

Lakeside Gardens<br />

Winona Stevenson<br />

8280 Entrada Blvd., Lake Isabella, CA 93240<br />

(760) 378-3841<br />

E-mail: lakesideiris@aol.com<br />

List: $3.00 (refundable with order). No Export.<br />

<strong>Historic</strong> Tall Bearded irises, including all American<br />

Dykes Medal winners.


Newport Naturals At Spruce Corner<br />

Robert and Linda Karr ~ <strong>Iris</strong> and Alpaca Farm<br />

205 N. Craig Avenue<br />

Newport, WA 99156<br />

(509) 671-1539 (Robert)<br />

(509) 671-1540 (Linda)<br />

www.sprucecorner.com<br />

Newburn’s <strong>Iris</strong> Gardens<br />

Gene Newburn<br />

1415 Meadow Dale Dr., Lincoln, NE 68505<br />

(402) 464-7232<br />

E-mail: EUGMARN@aol.com<br />

Catalog upon request. No export.<br />

Beautiful Tall-bearded and Median irises, 1940 -1970.<br />

Ozark <strong>Iris</strong> Gardens<br />

Tammy & Tom Skahan<br />

25 Wembly Dr., Bella Vista, AR 72715<br />

(479) 685-5004 or (479) 685-4323<br />

E-mail: ozarkirisgardens@cox.net<br />

Website: Available this Fall with on-line catalog.<br />

<strong>Historic</strong> Median, Tall Bearded, and Louisiana <strong>Iris</strong>es.<br />

Superstition <strong>Iris</strong> Gardens<br />

Rick Tasco & Roger Duncan<br />

2536 Old Highway, Dept. H9, Cathey’s Valley,<br />

CA 95306<br />

(209) 966-6277<br />

E-mail: randrcv@sierratel.com<br />

Internet Photo Album: http://community.webshots.<br />

com/user/rickt103<br />

Catalog $1.50 ($1.00 to HIPS members)<br />

Export to all, except New Zealand, Ukraine, & EU<br />

countries. A unique assortment featuring selections<br />

for both the beginner and advanced collector.<br />

Ever Seen A <strong>Historic</strong> <strong>Iris</strong> You Didn’t<br />

Love/Want/Need?<br />

HIPS Slide Shows now available as<br />

CDs!<br />

-- Robert and Linda Karr, HIPS Slide<br />

Co-Chairs<br />

The HIPS Slide Co-Chairs now have<br />

Slide Show Sets 1, 3, 4, 5, and 6 available in<br />

CD format. Each picture includes the name<br />

of the iris, the hybridizer, and date, thereby<br />

reducing reliance on the written script.<br />

Slide Set 2 is also available on CD, but the<br />

quality of the pictures is poor. If anyone<br />

has good photographs of the iris in Set 2<br />

(see list in the Fall 2009 Roots) that could<br />

be scanned or has slides to loan to remake<br />

this show, please contact the HIPS Slide Co-<br />

Chairs.<br />

CDs may be rented for $12.00 and will<br />

include a written script. CDs may be purchased<br />

for $15.00 and will include a written<br />

script. All HIPS Slide Show sets are being<br />

converted to DVD as well.<br />

Robert and Linda Karr,<br />

205 N. Craig Avenue, Newport, WA 99156;<br />

509.671.1540; iris@sprucecorner.com<br />

below: 'Truly Yours' (Fay 1949)<br />

Wildwood Gardens<br />

Will Plotner<br />

P.O. Box 250, Molalla, OR 97038<br />

(503) 829-3102<br />

E-mail: gardens@molalla.net<br />

Website: http://wildwoodgardens.net On-line catalog.<br />

Printed Catalog: $5.00 (refundable with order).<br />

Export: contact owner. Featuring <strong>Historic</strong> bearded &<br />

beardless irises & species.<br />

31


2010 HIPS <strong>Historic</strong> <strong>Iris</strong> Designation<br />

Survey<br />

Background<br />

At the request of a HIPS member (and AIS<br />

board member), the HIPS board was asked to consider<br />

a revision of the current designation of historic iris<br />

as iris which were introduced 30 years ago or longer.<br />

It is a matter of concern to some AIS board members<br />

(and some HIPS members) that many recent historic<br />

iris are quite similar in appearance to modern iris, and<br />

that this may cause confusion among the public at iris<br />

exhibitions. There was also concern expressed at the<br />

fact that the HIPS 30-year designation is out of step<br />

with the Department of Interior historic designation<br />

of 50 years. After considerable discussion, and the<br />

formation of a separate committee to study the issue,<br />

the board has decided to poll the membership of HIPS<br />

to get their opinions on this issue. This is an important<br />

decision - there has been no change to the historic iris<br />

designation in the 20+ year existence of HIPS. We<br />

value your opinion as a HIPS member, and request<br />

that you complete the following survey on this topic.<br />

Procedure<br />

You can respond to the survey in one of three ways.<br />

1. You can respond in writing to <strong>Historic</strong> <strong>Iris</strong><br />

Designation Committee chair Jean Richter, 1226 High<br />

Street, Alameda, CA 94501.<br />

2. You can respond via email to<br />

hist.designate@gmail.com<br />

3. You can respond to the survey on the HIPS<br />

web site: www.hips-<strong>roots</strong>.com<br />

Whichever way you choose to respond, please<br />

indicate your name in your response, so we can verify<br />

your membership in HIPS. This will also allow us to<br />

prevent any member from voting more than once.<br />

Question I: What is your opinion on changing the<br />

30-year rolling designation of historic iris (i.e. designating<br />

iris which have been introduced 30 years<br />

ago as historic):<br />

Note - the effect of changing the rolling designation to,<br />

say, 50 years would be as follows: no new iris would<br />

be designated as historic until the year 2031 (the point<br />

at which iris introduced in 1981 would be 50 years<br />

from introduction). If the designation were changed<br />

to 40 years, a similar “freeze” in historic designation<br />

would occur until 2021.<br />

_____ Option 3: Remove the rolling designation - no<br />

iris introduced beyond a certain date would be considered<br />

historic. This date will be:<br />

_____ a. 1959 _____ b. 1969 _____ c. 1979<br />

This would mean there would be no more iris (newer<br />

than the given introduction date) designated as historic.<br />

If you prefer this option, do you want iris introduced<br />

beyond this date but introduced more than 30 years<br />

ago to be:<br />

_____ a. Classified in a separate class<br />

(say, "Collectible"), or<br />

_____ b. Just be considered modern iris?<br />

Question II. Do you support using fixed introduction<br />

years to separate various eras of historic iris?<br />

This would enable iris of similar appearance to be<br />

shown as a group in iris exhibitions. Please choose as<br />

many or as few classifications (including none) as you<br />

feel are appropriate, but choose only one date for each<br />

classification.<br />

_____ Antique iris: iris introduced before<br />

_____ a. 1900 _____ b. 1910 _____ c. 1920<br />

_____ Heirloom iris: iris newer than antique iris, but<br />

introduced before<br />

_____ a. 1950 _____ b. 1960<br />

_____ Option 1: Do nothing - leave the 30-year rolling<br />

designation as is.<br />

_____ Option 2: Change the rolling designation to:<br />

_____ a. 50 years _____ b. 40 years<br />

_____ Contemporary historic iris: iris introduced after<br />

_____ a. 1949 _____ b. 1959 _____ c. 1969<br />

_____ d. 1979<br />

Thank you very much for giving us your opinion on<br />

this important issue! Jean Richter<br />

32


Catalog Corner<br />

‘Clara Noyes’ (H.P. Sass 1930) An unusual<br />

new variety with colors blended much as<br />

in a Talisman rose. Low growing, but so distinct<br />

that it is entirely different from any other iris.<br />

Standards tan, flushed heliotrope; falls reddish<br />

bronze, lined deeper bronze. yellow beard and<br />

haft undertone of the same color.<br />

Decidedly popular. Should be ordered<br />

early, as the demand is heavy. A.M., AIS, 1932.<br />

Rhizomes naturally small. Mid-season. 22-inch.<br />

[1937 <strong>Iris</strong> - Carl Salbach]<br />

‘Dauntless’ (Connell 1929) The Dykes<br />

Medal <strong>Iris</strong> of America for 1929. A Cardinal x<br />

Rose Madder seedling. A plant imported in August<br />

1931, produced a spike three feet six inches<br />

tall of great sturdiness and well branched. The<br />

flowers are beautifully carried and are of excellent<br />

form with almost horizontally-held falls.<br />

The colour effect is red bronze. At the time of the<br />

award I can well understand that this <strong>Iris</strong> marked<br />

a very great advance in regard to both colour and<br />

all-round excellence, but in the light of newer<br />

American “reds", I would suggest that the falls<br />

might be more velvety in appearance, which<br />

would considerably brighten up the flower. Still<br />

we can’t “have it all ways,” and I have not yet<br />

seen a “red” touch it for real aristocratic bearing.<br />

[The <strong>Iris</strong> Year Book, 1932, The (British) <strong>Iris</strong> <strong>Society</strong>]<br />

‘El Capitan’ (Mohr-Mitchell 1926) One of<br />

the largest iris grown, supreme in its color class,<br />

graceful and well proportioned, this magnificent<br />

giant is an iris of dignity and grandeur. Striking<br />

for garden effect, and each of the candelabrum<br />

type stalks carry a large number of the immense<br />

blooms, giving it signal value as a cut flower. No<br />

garden should be without this most outstanding<br />

long-blooming, light violet blue iris. A sell-out<br />

for the past two seasons, so early ordering is<br />

advisable this season. H.M., AIS, 1929. Early.<br />

Mid-season. 38-inch. [1937 <strong>Iris</strong> - Carl Salbach]<br />

‘Eros’ (Mead-Reidel 1934) Considered<br />

the “pinkest” iris. A fine flower characterized by<br />

iridescent shades of near-pink with warm yellow<br />

haft and beard, giving a definite garden effect of<br />

salmon pink. Silky texture, and reported with as<br />

many as 12 flowers on a 42-inch stem. Color by<br />

33<br />

Ridgway -- “Vinaceous.” A.M., AIS, 1936. Midseason.<br />

36-inch. [1937 <strong>Iris</strong> - Carl Salbach]<br />

‘Fire Dance’ (O. Fay 1947) M. ((Elsa Sass<br />

x Orloff) x (sister sdlg.)). Lovely, heavily marked,<br />

red plicata. Would like to see seedlings from this<br />

and Rare Marble. H.M. ’47. [1951 Tell’s <strong>Iris</strong> Gardens]<br />

‘Harriet Thoreau’ (P. Cook 1944) M.<br />

(Sister to Dreamcastle.) Clean orchid-pink. Fine<br />

parent. H.M. ’45. [1951 Tell’s <strong>Iris</strong> Gardens]<br />

‘Indian Chief’ (Ayres 1929) M. 38”. Still<br />

one of the most outstanding irises in any list. S.<br />

pinkish red; F. velvety red; the huge flower is of<br />

exceptionally heavy substance and holds its color<br />

well. A rampant grower and prolific bloomer.<br />

Should be in every collection. [1936 Quality Gardens]<br />

Well named, for while classed as one of<br />

our superior reds, it carries a bronzy overcast,<br />

being regarded by some as a red blend. At any<br />

rate, Indian Chief is one of the most popular of<br />

the newer things, and a credit to Dr. Ayres, its<br />

introducer. The velvety falls are deep bloodred,<br />

blended with bronze, and the standards are<br />

considerably lighter in tone. A large flower, quite<br />

tall, and very well branched. [1937 Cooley’s]<br />

‘Jean Cayeux’ (Cayeux 1931) Beautiful<br />

blending of Havana or coffee brown, with golden<br />

glint. Considered one of the finest iris ever imported<br />

from France, including among its many<br />

laurels the W. R. Dykes medal. Mid-season. 34-<br />

inch. [1937 <strong>Iris</strong> - Carl Salbach]<br />

'Klamath' (Kleinsorge 1929). 40 in.<br />

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<strong>Historic</strong> and Modern Bearded <strong>Iris</strong>es<br />

For Catalog: send two first class stamps and your address


Catalog Corner, continued...<br />

Dauntless or Desert Gold, its parents. Produced<br />

from a cross definitely planned for pinks, Miss<br />

FOR $50.00 FOR A SINGLE PLANT. In fact I California was easily the choice from among a<br />

paid that price for my original stock. It is just as number of pink-toned seedlings, and coming<br />

fine to-day as it was then and is one of the largest from two hardy parents, its own hardiness is assured.<br />

Growth vigorous, flowers very large, and<br />

and finest <strong>Iris</strong>es we have. The flowers are of huge<br />

size, perfect form, and heavy substance, with lobelia<br />

violet standards and rich velvety mulberry season. 48-inch. [1937 <strong>Iris</strong> - Carl Salbach]<br />

of perfect form and excellent substance. Mid-<br />

falls, with a border the color of the standards. A ‘Paradise Pink’ (Lapham 1950) L. 33<br />

gift at the present low price. [1940 Rare <strong>Iris</strong>es and in. This is the deepest colored of all the famous<br />

Peonies -- Robert Wayman]<br />

flamingo-pinks. A clear flamingo-pink, nicely<br />

‘Lady Boscawen’ (Graves 1946). E.- formed flowers and a vigorous grower. A plant<br />

M. (Purissima x Cloud Castle.) Large white of soon makes a clump, so thrifty is its growth and<br />

quality. Sister of Helen McGregor. Can’t miss profusion of bloom. Nor does it pale out and it<br />

as a parent for blues and whites. A.M. ’48. [1951 withstands wind and rain. A most meritorious<br />

Tell’s <strong>Iris</strong> Gardens]<br />

development. H.M., 1950. [1958 Gilbert H. Wild<br />

‘Marquita’ (Cayeux 1931) One of the and Son Peonies-<strong>Iris</strong>-Daylilies]<br />

finest French iris ever produced -- a remarkable<br />

‘Prospector’ (Kleinsorge 1950). M. Lovely<br />

flaring yellow with light area in falls which<br />

variety which should eventually find its way into<br />

the gardens of all iris lovers.<br />

surely harks back to its progenitor Treasure<br />

Overlooked in the awarding of the French Island. [1951 Tell’s <strong>Iris</strong> Gardens]<br />

Dykes Medal because it was so late of bloom that ‘Rainbow Room’ (J. Sass 1946) M. 34”.<br />

most of the judges missed it. perhaps the largest<br />

of all variegatas, but so distinctly different in creamy, mellow yellow, which blends into lilac<br />

Standards and bordering of the falls are rich,<br />

coloring from the average variegata that it hardly on the falls, punctuated by a blaze of metallic<br />

seems to belong under the same classification. blue below the yellow beard. [1958 Edenwald Gardens<br />

<strong>Iris</strong> and Daylilies]<br />

Simply huge blooms, standards of clear creamy<br />

yellow, frostily lustrous, and with falls of cream, ‘Rosy Veil’ (H. E. Sass 1953) M. 38”. One<br />

but so heavily lined rose pink that it seems more of the loveliest of iris, a cleanly marked plicata of<br />

like a suffusion than a lining at the end of the glistening white with delicately applied stitching<br />

petals. Late. 42-inch. A.M., AIS, 1936. [1937 <strong>Iris</strong> of rosy heliotrope. Fairly large flowers of graceful<br />

form on a well-branched stalk; this is a quality<br />

- Carl Salbach]<br />

A Spanish dance in a flower. Something iris of first rank. [1958 Edenwald Gardens <strong>Iris</strong> and<br />

entirely different that is so striking that it immediately<br />

attracts your attention. The standards are ‘Sable’ (Cook 1938) E.M. 37 in. Almost<br />

Daylilies]<br />

a very clear ivory flushed with yellow and the black, a uniform shade of deepest blue-blackviolet<br />

with blue beard. Has every attribute that<br />

falls are the same color, evenly veined with brilliant<br />

ruby lines. The petals are stiff and round, a fine <strong>Iris</strong> should possess -- large size, tall stalks,<br />

giving a very trim appearance to the flower. If thick substance; a wonderfully lustrous sheen.<br />

you wish to light up a spot in your garden with [1964 Gilbert H. Wild and Son Peonies-<strong>Iris</strong>-Daylilies]<br />

gay colors, try a clump of Marquita. over 3 feet<br />

"Suzette' (Knowlton 1945). M. (Seduction<br />

x Tiffany.) Delicately marked light yellow<br />

tall and a strong grower. [1939 Milliken <strong>Iris</strong><br />

Gardens]<br />

plicata. H.M. '45. [1951 Tell’s <strong>Iris</strong> Gardens]<br />

‘Miss California’ (Salbach 1937). At last, 'White Smoke' (C. Rees 1950). M.-L.<br />

a beautiful and entirely distinct tone of pink in a (Snow Flurry x "Big Dipper".) Very large, beautifully<br />

formed white with blue-smoke cast. One<br />

fine, upstanding iris. The color, lilac pink (Tyrian<br />

pink to amaranth pink by Ridgway) was most of the last to fade at the end of the tall bearded<br />

popular and certainly marvelled at by our garden season. We think it has promise as a white and<br />

visitors this season. The flowers were of Dauntless<br />

form, but larger, and it is taller than either<br />

blue parent. [1951 Tell’s <strong>Iris</strong> Gardens]<br />

34


In Retrospect . . .<br />

{note -- these cultivars are available in our<br />

2010 Rhizome Sale}<br />

'Santa Cruz' (Mitchell 1945)<br />

A striking new type variegata<br />

that always catches<br />

the visitor’s eye as it is so<br />

different from ordinary<br />

<strong>Iris</strong>. Standards clear yellow;<br />

falls yellow, gaily<br />

decorated with heavy red<br />

veining. Colorful and<br />

intriguing, as may be seen<br />

from my new true-to-life<br />

photo. EM 38”. [1950<br />

Rainbow Offerings, Lloyd<br />

Austin]<br />

'Sable Night' (P. Cook 1950) A rich blackviolet<br />

with a claret undertone. The uniformity of<br />

coloring, coupled with a harmonious dark brown<br />

beard, makes this one of the most sensational of<br />

all new dark <strong>Iris</strong>. The flowers are large and full<br />

petaled and with heavy substance and a smooth<br />

finish.<br />

(Captain Wells x Indiana Night) x ((Modoc<br />

x Black Wings) x Sable), HM 1952, AM 1954,<br />

Dykes Medal 1955. [1952 Marble <strong>Iris</strong> Gardens]<br />

'Demi-Deuil' (Denis 1912) We are told<br />

this French name means 'half-mourning' so you<br />

must not expect this <strong>Iris</strong> to contain bright colors.<br />

S. pansy-violet shaded copper; F. red-violet with<br />

white markings; yellow beard stippled brown.<br />

[1926 Descriptive List, <strong>Iris</strong>es, Bonnewitz]<br />

'Mexicana' (Salter pre-1859) Color effect<br />

a brilliant light yellow, maroon veined bicolor. S.<br />

pinard yellow, brown dotted and reticulated on<br />

claw. F. velvety Hay's maroon, veined the same<br />

on the lavender-white outer haft, which bronzes<br />

toward the center.<br />

The edge of the narrow fall is brightly<br />

tinted and bronzed yellow. The plant is of moderate<br />

growth, and has stiff, slender, deep glaucousgreen<br />

foliage. The flowers are rather flat in carriage,<br />

with spread segments. The unusual color<br />

contrasts are interesting in mass. Gold Bound is<br />

very close to this if not identical with it. [Bearded<br />

iris - A Perennial Suited to All Gardens, by Austin W.<br />

W. Sand, Cornell Extension Bulletin 112, June, 1925]<br />

35<br />

From your Editor<br />

Thank you to the people who have<br />

sent me articles for Ro o t s! and to the people<br />

who have articles in process. It feels to me<br />

as if we're starting to wake up the garden<br />

spirits.<br />

I hope you will all take a few moments<br />

to respond to the HIPS <strong>Historic</strong> <strong>Iris</strong> Designation<br />

Survey on page 32 -- the HIPS board has<br />

been asked to consider revising the current<br />

definition of historic iris as "iris which were<br />

introduced 30 years ago or longer". This of<br />

course speaks to the heart of HIPS, and our<br />

definition of "what is a historic iris" affects<br />

many aspects, including conservation and<br />

availability. Let us hear from you!<br />

Thank you's go as always to Jean Richter,<br />

Bonnie Petheram, and Phil Edinger.<br />

"Imperative necessity"! Gesine Lohr<br />

above: 'Malibran' (Cayeux 1938)<br />

with mountain


In Retrospect . . .<br />

above: 'Santa Cruz' (Mitchell 1945)<br />

below: 'Demi-Deuil' (Denis 1912)<br />

above: 'Sable Night' (P. Cook 1950)<br />

below: 'Mexicana' (Salter pre-1859)<br />

36

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