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CANNES

DAILY

MAY 18, 2013

№4

THR.COM/CANNES

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MARKET

SCREENING

SCREENING TODAY

Directed by

Kieran Evans

Cast

Antonia Campbell-Hughes, Julian Morris

Saturday 18th May | 12.00 | Palais I

SXSW

FILM FESTIVAL

2013

BFI LONDON

FILM FESTIVAL

2012

“DRIVEN WITH SUCH PASSION AND COMMITMENT THAT

IT CRIES OUT FOR ATTENTION” Screen Daily

MARKET

SCREENING

SCREENING TODAY

Directed by

Cameron and Colin Cairnes

Cast

Damon Herriman, Angus Sampson, Anna McGahan,

Oliver Ackland, Jamie Kristian

MELBORNE

INTERNATIONAL

FILM FESTIVAL

BIFFF

2013

Saturday 18th May | 20.00 | Star 3

“FOR LOVERS OF ORIGINAL HORROR THIS IS A MUST

AND I HIGHLY RECOMMEND IT” Twitchfilm

Directed by

Matt Wolf

Featuring the voices of: Jena Malone, Ben Whishaw,

Julia Hummer, Jessie Usher

MARKET

PREMIERE

Sunday 19th May | 09.30 | Star 3

HOT DOCS

2013

TRIBECA

FILM FESTIVAL

2013

“MESMERISING” Variety

Directed by

Amit Gupta

Cast

Amara Karan, Harish Patel, Kulvinder Ghir,

Tom Mison, Madhur Jaffrey

MARKET

PREMIERE

Sunday 19th May | 12.00 | Olympia 8

KULINARISCHES

KINO BERLINALE

2013

“FUNNY, ENGAGING AND FULL OF LIFE. AN INDIE GEM!”

Cosmopolitan

Directed by

Youssef Delara and Victor Teran

Cast

Jake Hoffman, Nikki Reed, Scott Bakula,

Thomas Dekker, Jason Priestley

MARKET

PREMIERE

Sunday 19th May | 20.00 | Star 3

SXSW

FILM FESTIVAL

2013

“ONE OF THE BEST PSYCHOLOGICAL THRILLERS OF

THE PAST DECADE” Popmatters.com

Directed by

Morgan Matthews

BAFTA Award Winning Director of ‘The Fallen’

MARKET

PREMIERE

HOT DOCS

2013

“TRULY HILARIOUS” Thedocumentaryblog.com

The Works in Cannes: Apt C12 Relais de la Reine, 42/43 La Croisette Tel: +33 (0) 4 93 39 47 19

In attendance: Clare Crean May 15 - 23 T: +44 7900 212 207 E: clare.crean@theworksfilmgroup.com

Steve Bestwick: May 15 - 23 T: +44 7739 020 006 E: steve.bestwick@theworksfilmgroup.com


MAY 18, 2013

THR.COM/CANNES CANNES №4

CANNES

WEATHER

AND HIGH

TEMPS

TODAY

61° F

16° C

TOMORROW

67° F

19° C

A Real-Life

Bling Ring

Rocks Cannes

By Gary Baum and Rhonda Richford

In a scene out of To Catch a

Thief, Chopard jewels worth

more than $1 million have

been stolen during the festival,

though from a less glamorous

setting than in the classic film,

which took place at the Carlton.

They were taken from the Suite

Novotel Cannes Centre far from

the Croisette. Thieves broke

into the room of an American

employee of Chopard late Thursday

or early Friday; police believe

the entrance was made through

an unoccupied adjoining room.

Cannes police tell THR the

value of the stolen jewelry was

about $1.4 million, and that an

entire safe was taken. The police

CONTINUED ON PAGE 2

Weinstein Hawks

His Contenders

By Gregg Kilday

It might as well have been

the unofficial start of the

2013 Oscar race. In what has

become an annual Cannes ritual,

impresario Harvey Weinstein summoned

a crowd full of press and

buyers Friday night to the Majestic

for a show-and-tell spotlighting

upcoming features from The

Weinstein Co.

Admitting that when he and his

brother Bob first tried to re-create

the success they had enjoyed at

Miramax by founding TWC seven

years ago, they hit a rocky patch,

Chaos erupted shortly after 8 p.m.

on Friday in front of the Martinez

when a man fired a pellet gun

while also carrying a suspicious

device in the midst of a crowd

gathered to watch a live Canal

Plus TV interview between

well-known French host Michel

Denisot and Christoph Waltz.

The 1 Percent’s New

Hot Investment: Film

As the rich get richer, they flood Cannes looking for better returns

on their millions with at least four new financing companies:

‘You’ll get 5 … 10 percent’ By Pamela McClintock and Scott Roxborough

A

flurry of new film financing

ventures are being

announced in Cannes this

year as the rich get richer and

realize the independent film business

can provide a better return

than traditional investment routes.

On Friday, former indie agent

Cassian Elwes, who has become a

prolific financier and producer,

and Robert Ogden Barnum (who

did gigs at Benaroya Pictures and

Annapurna Pictures) announced

the launch of e2b Capital. Working

with producers, talent agen-

cies and foreign sales companies,

e2b will arrange equity financing,

gap financing and other debt

solutions for 10 to 12 titles a year.

The L.A.-based venture will be

backed by five yet-to-be revealed

production companies with access

to equity, Elwes and Barnum tell

The Hollywood Reporter. The duo

have collaborated on a number

of films in the past several years

and are in Cannes to celebrate the

world premiere of J.C. Chandor’s

All is Lost, starring Robert Redford,

CONTINUED ON PAGE 2 CONTINUED ON PAGE 2

IN THIS ISSUE

The Chic Life of

Fest ‘It’ Girl

Fan Bingbing ......................17

How Major

Players Fight

Major Jet Lag ....................28

Secrets of

the Call Girl

Economy

at Cannes ...................................32

Dining:

Where to Be Seen

& Where to Hide ..........38

LOIC VENANCE/AFP/GETTY IMAGES; INSET: RAPHAEL LASKI/THE HOLLYWOOD REPORT

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5/15/13 11:50 AM

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 1


theREPORT

HEAT INDEX

DONNIE YEN

In addition to the actor’s four projects

in the Cannes market, it was recently

announced the Hong Kong superstar

just landed the lead in the sequel to

Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon.

1 Percent

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

and Ain’t Them Bodies Saints.

Elwes says financing a film through a combination

of equity, tax incentives and foreign pre-sales

provides a “guaranteeable return.” Combined

with the powerful allure of the movie business,

that makes the film an attractive investment for

the superrich.

“If you’re a rich person or a private company looking

to invest and you go to the bank, you’ll get 1 percent

interest or less,” Elwes said. “If you are a debt

investor in the independent film business, you’ll get

5 percent back. And if you’re an equity player, you’ll

get 10 percent.”

On Friday in Cannes, wealthy Russian-born actor

and producer Arcadiy Golubovich and longtime

Hollywood producer Tim O’Hair launched their

new production and financing company, Primeridian

Entertainment. The first film will be a biopic

of famed Soviet dissident Alexander Solzhenitsyn

directed by Cyrus Nowrasteh.

British private equity sources, including highnet-worth

individuals are the cash behind Wentworth

Media & Arts, a new production group

headed by former EMI chairman Eric Nicoli that

also launched here Friday. The venture plans to

develop, produce and fund projects with budgets

of up to $15 million.

The fourth and final new financing vehicle

announced Friday was a joint venture between

Bruno Wu’s Seven Stars Entertainment and French

film mogul and producer Pierre-Ange Le Pogam

(Grace of Monaco) and his company Stone Angels to

form Angel Storm, which will develop and produce

action-based European-Chinese co-productions.

The first two projects identified are Shanghai, which

will start production early next year, and Triangle.

Another new face this year is Ivan Orlic of Siene

Films, aPeruvian investor whose family’s fortune

comes from fishing and real estate industries. Orlic

is financing Pele, the $15 million to $20 million drama

based on the life of the Brazilian soccer star, which

Brian Grazer and Imagine are producing and Exclusive

Media International is selling in Cannes.

SOFIA COPPOLA

The day after Gatsby got polite

applause at the Palais, Bling Ring

received an equally tepid response.

DEV PATEL

In a casting announced at Cannes,

Slumdog Millionaire’s star returns

to film as the star of”smarthouse”

movie The Man Who Knew Infinity: A

Life of the Genius Ramanujaton, to be

directed by Matthew Brown, playing a

famed Indian mathematician.

Chopard

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

believe the burglary to be an

inside job. Hotel employees are

being questioned.

At an afternoon press conference,

Chopard’s international

communications director Raffaella

Rossiello confirms a staffer was

robbed but insists the value of the

pieces stolen is “far lower than

the figures circulating.” Contradicting

earlier reports, she says

they are “not part of the collection

of jewels worn by actresses

during the Cannes Film Festival.”

The brand, which creates the

Palme d’Or trophy, is a major

Suite

Novotel

corporate presence during the

festival, having been an official

sponsor for years. On Thursday

night it organized its annual

Trophee Chopard at the Martinez,

with Colin Firth handing

out awards to rising stars Blanca

Suarez and Jeremy Irvine. On

Friday, as news broke midday,

Chopard held a lunch — also at

the Martinez — with Marion Cotillard

in attendance.

Suite Novotel Cannes Centre is a

non-glitzy, business-oriented hotel

situated along the far less-touristy

Boulevard Carnot, a 20-minute

stroll from the Croisette. A spokesperson

for the hospitality company

declined comment.

The theft, which followed the

Thursday night premiere of teen

heist movie The Bling Ring by just

a few hours, had the town talking,

including the biggest-name

star of the film. “I promise I’m

innocent,” jokes Emma Watson to

THR. “I can have someone vouch

for my whereabouts at the time of

the robbery.”

KNOW YOUR DEALMAKER

Jasna Vavra

Universum Film, head of

theatrical entertainment

With southern Europe struggling, the

still-healthy German market is more

important than ever for the international

sales business and Vavra is one of the few

German buyers who can commit to huge

projects. Universum’s pre-buy of Ron

Howard’s Rush was key to getting that film

made and its recent buys include McG’s

Three Days to Kill and Robert Rodriguez’

Machete Kills.

Weinstein

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

he celebrated their turnaround, saying, “Last year

was as good a year as we ever had at Miramax.”

Django Unchained and Silver Linings Playbook,

which Weinstein first trumpeted at last year’s

Cannes, broke through at the box office and also

took home Oscars. And as Weinstein introduced

trailers and clips from TWC’s 2013 slate, it looks

as if his cupboard again is bursting with potential

awards contenders. There’s The Butler, Lee Daniels’

portrait of a long-serving White House butler, starring

Forest Whitaker and Oprah Winfrey and featuring

a host of celebrity cameos, coming to theaters

Aug. 16; August: Osage County, the John Wellsdirected

adaptation of Tracy Letts’ Pulitzer Prizewinning

play about a dysfunctional family starring

Meryl Streep and Julia Roberts, set for a Nov. 8

release; Grace of Monaco, starring Nicole Kidman as

the actress-turned-monarch, which is scheduled

for an awards-qualifying run beginning Dec. 27;

and Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom, with Idris Elba

as Nelson Mandela and Naomie Harris as his wife,

Winnie, produced by Anant Singh.

To further sweeten the pot, TWC concluded a

$6.5 million deal Thursday, picking up U.S., Canada

and Spain rights to Stephen Frears’ Philomena, starring

Judi Dench in the true story of an Irishwoman

searching for the son she gave up for adoption.

Friday night, Weinstein lavished special attention

on Grace, noting it was the seventh movie he has

made with Kidman, who skipped out from her jury

duties for a moment to attest, “I got to know Grace

very, very well, researched her and fell in love with

her.” With that she headed off to a jury meeting,

“hopefully,” cracked Weinstein, “to decide which

movie of mine wins the Palme d’Or — I’ve certainly

given [jury head] Steven [Spielberg] enough money

over the years.”

AP PHOTO/LIONEL CIRONNEAU

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 2


TOM SCHILLING

WINNER

GERMAN ACADEMY AWARDS

oh

BOY

BEST FILM

BEST DIRECTOR

BEST SCRIPT

BEST ACTOR

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

BEST MUSIC

A film by JAN OLE GERSTER

“a love-letter to the city of Berlin”

(TWITCHFILM.COM)

“a delightfully unforced comedy with a sure grasp of

character and setting… brings to mind vintage Woody Allen”.

(THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER)

SCREENING

TODAY | May 18th | 6:00 p.m. | Palais I

Tuesday | May 20th | 11:30 a.m. | Arcades 3

CANNES OFFICE Grand Hotel Cannes, bâtiment le Goeland (ground floor), right hand side to the Grand Hotel entrance, +33 (0)4 9399 5580

HEAD OFFICE Gruenwalder Weg 28d / D-82041 Oberhaching / Phone +49 89 673469 - 828 / beta@betacinema.com / www.betacinema.com


theREPORT

OUI,

I DID

SAY

THAT!

A look at who’s saying what

in entertainment

“Omg! The power went out

in my hotel half way thru

getting my hair curled.

This is a nightmare.”

PARIS HILTON

The socialite, tweeting about electricity

issues at her hotel

“Red carpet

pink shirt !!

I know … Sorry”

DAVID HASSELHOFF

The Knight Rider star on

his fashion choice for Thursday’s

Jeune et Jolie premiere

“For a complete alien in the

midst of Cannes to be

acknowledged, is the proudest

moment for me as an Indian.”

AMITABH BACHCHAN

The Bollywood veteran and Gatsby co-star, who

opened the festival with Leonardo DiCaprio, on the fest

celebrating 100 years of Indian cinema

“Cannes hit

by $1 million

jewelry heist.

All jewelry is

real; only the

boobs are fake.”

BETTE MIDLER

The singer-actress, commenting

on the Chopard heist

Competition Entries

From Iran and China

Stir Censorship Debate

Jia Zhangke’s A Touch of Sin challenges

restrictions bluntly, while Asgar Farhadi’s

The Past takes a more subtle approach

By Scott Roxborough and Patrick Brzeski

Censorship — both state-run and selfimposed

— was the focus in the Cannes

competition Friday with the screenings

of two films already tipped as Palme d’Or contenders:

A Touch of Sin from Chinese director

Jia Zhangke and The Past from Iranian Oscarwinner

Asgar Farhadi.

Touch of Sin has already stunned audiences

with its bracingly violent and direct depiction

of contemporary social ills in China. So bru-

tal, in fact, many are questioning how

the film can get by China’s censors. It was

violence that recently derailed Django

Unchained’s hopes for a lucrative Chinese run.

In addition to the blood, Jia’s film also directly

confronts the very same hot-button political

issues, including widespread political corruption

in China, that are often censored in

Chinese social media. In China, where censors

tightly control the topics addressed onscreen,

touching such topics is unheard of in a mainstream

release.

Following the film’s press screening, many

Chinese reviewers noted A Touch of Sin didn’t

carry the so-called “dragon stamp,” the official

seal of approval from China’s film regulators.

That set off discussion on Chinese social media

that Jia screened a version of the movie in

Cannes that wasn’t preapproved.

The Past

Speaking to The Hollywood Reporter,

Jia denies that: “Many people have been

asking, and the answer is: Yes, it will be

released in China.”

Jia insists the version of the film showing

in Cannes has already been approved for

release back home. Many are skeptical, but if

this turns out to be true, it would mark a sea

change for the country’s media climate.“In

the past, because of the censorship system, a

lot of directors play along and self-censor,”

Jia says. “I refuse to do that. I want to follow

my impulses and tell the stories that I feel

are important.”

While A Touch of Sin pushes the boundaries

of what is allowed under China’s state censors,

the situation is reversed in the case of The Past.

After making all his previous films under the

strict eye of Tehran’s censors, Farhadi had

complete freedom for his new movie, which was

made in France. But Farhadi says after years

under the Iranian system, he has internalized

their restrictions.

“It would be a lie if I said that because I work

in a country without state censorship that I am

suddenly free. I think I may have assimilated

many of the restrictions,” Farhadi says.

The Past has not been banned in Iran nor was

Farhadi’s last film, the Oscar-winning A Separation.

But in recent years Iran has been brutal

in its crackdown on local filmmakers. Last year

Tehran shut down the country’s independent

director’s guild the House of Cinema, claiming

it was a front for foreign governments wanting

to destabilize the regime.

Despite the difficulties censorship poses,

Farhadi remains optimistic. “I try and see it

not as an obstacle but as an asset, to use the

censorship as a tool for creativity.”

MIDLER: GETTY IMAGES

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 4


theREPORT

Koch Media

Takes Action

Thriller Drop

By Scott Roxborough

Koch Media has picked

up German rights for

Drop, an in-development

action thriller from Mukunda

Michael Dewil, whose last feature

was the Paul Walker starrer

Vehicle 19 from sales group K5

International. Silke Wilfinger

and Moritz Peters of Koch Media

negotiated the deal with K5’s

Daniel Baur. Koch bought the

project solely based on Dewil’s

screenplay, which sets the action

in Cape Town, South Africa, and

whose plot involves terrorists who

kidnap the U.S. vice president.

“We knew from the moment

we read it that we had to come

onboard such a pure piece of

guilt-free entertainment,” said

Wilfinger and Peters in a statement.

“Mukunda has delivered an

edge-of-your-seat thriller script

that will have German audiences

in its grip from beginning to end.”

Dewil and K5 currently are casting

the film.

James Gray Sets Up Secretive Sci-Fi Thriller

The Cannes regular, back in competition this year with The Immigrant tackles his first genre film

By Pamela McClintock

Filmmaker James Gray,

who is returning this year

to the Cannes Film Festival

with his latest directing effort,

is set to direct a sci-fi thriller for

RT Features.

The logline is being kept

under strict wraps, but it is

known that the We Are the Night

helmer will direct from a script

he co-wrote with Ethan Gross

(Fringe). CAA brokered the

deal and is representing domestic

rights.

RT founder and CEO Rodrigo

Teixeira will serve as producer,

with the company’s Sophie Mas

and Lourenco Sant Anna executive

producing. The Brazil-based RT

Features recently produced Noah

Baumbach’s Frances Ha, starring

Greta Gerwig, Mickey Sumner and

Adam Driver, and Kelly Reichardt’s

Night Moves, starring Jesse Eisenberg

and Dakota Fanning. Gray is

represented by CAA.

Gray’s upcoming film The

Immigrant, a period piece starring

Jeremy Renner, Joaquin Phoenix,

and Marion Cotillard, will screen

in competition at Cannes May 24.

The Weinstein Co. will distribute

the film in the U.S.

Gray also co-wrote the script to

another competition title, Blood

Ties, a crime drama from French

filmmaker Guillaume Canet which

stars Zoe Saldana, Mila Kunis and

Marion Cotillard.

The Immigrant, explores many

of the same themes of crime and

Gray’s The Immigrant

screens May 24.

honor seen in Gray’s previous

work, but in his new film, the

action is set on the mean streets

of Manhattan, circa 1920.

The film is Grey’s third directing

effort to play in competition

in Cannes, following The Yards,

We Own the Night and Two Lovers.

The only one of his films that

hasn’t graced the Croisette was

his debut, Little Odessa, which

premiered in Venice in 1994.

The Smiths

performing

in 1984.

Radiant Grabs International

Rights to Wild By Rebeeca Ford

L.A. Thriller

to Get Smiths

Soundtrack

By Stuart Kemp

A

contemporary film noir

set to a soundtrack of

covers by L.A. bands of

legendary British group The

Smiths that has Mark Boone Junior

(TV’s Sons of Anarchy) and Sam

Hazeldene (The Monuments Men)

attached to star is tuning up.

It tells the story of a surveillance

contractor who drifts

through Los Angeles at night

photographing cheating couples,

then falls for a jilted wife and

unwittingly photographs her

husband burying the body of a

dead girl.

L.A.-based British filmmaker

Trevor Miller directs with London

music impresario Sean McLusky

producing through the pair’s

U.K.-based production banner

1234 Films. U.S.-based Brink

Films will co-produce.

Radiant Films has picked

up international rights

to the comic drama Wild,

which marks Vivienne DeCourcy’s

feature film directorial debut.

Emma Greenwell (Shameless) will

star as Mary Reynolds, a garden

designer who aims to compete

in the Chelsea Flower show,

a.k.a the Olympics of gardening.

Tom Hughes has been cast as an

environmentalist who helps Mary

pursue garden gold.

CEO Mimi Steinbauer of Radiant

Films, which is shopping

the project at Cannes, calls

DeCourcy’s script “fun and

quirky” and “a great antidote to

today’s toils and troubles.” Gersh

Agency’s Jay Cohen is handling

U.S. rights.

The film will be produced

jointly by Green Earth in the U.S

and Treasure Entertainment and

Crowe’s Nest in Ireland. Rebecca

O’Flanagan and Rob Walpole will

produce from Treasure, and Sarah

Johnson and Chloe Kassis Crowe

will executive produce.

Funded by Green Earth, the

Irish Film Board, RTE and

the Broadcasting Authority of

Ireland, Wild will shoot in both

Ireland and Ethiopia in the

upcoming months.

Newcomer Greenwell currently

plays Mandy Milkovich on

Showtime’s Shameless and has

previously appeared on HBO’s

True Blood. She’s repped by

WME, Troika and Thruline

Entertainment.

British actor Hughes has

appeared on several U.K. TV

shows, and recently wrapped war

thriller I Am Soldier. He’s repped

by UTA and Gordon and French.

Radiant’s slate includes William

H. Macy’s directorial debut Rudderless,

thriller Take Down, Claire

Danes and James Marsden-starrer

As Cool As I Am and Lullaby,

starring Garrett Hedlund, Richard

Jenkins and Amy Adams.

SMITHS: PETER CRONIN/REDFERNS/GETTY IMAGES. GRAY: FRAZER HARRISON/GETTY IMAGES.

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 6


For sales enquiry contact

Email: info@kamasutra3d.in | Phone: +91 8129081090 | Website: www.kamasutra3d.in


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theREPORT

CANNESDEALS

Stephen Frears’

Philomena Picked Up

by Weinstein Co.

The Weinstein Co. has inked a

deal for Stephen Frears’ Philomena,

paying $6.5 million for rights

in the U.S., Canada and Spain.

The film stars Judi Dench as

Philomena Lee, an Irishwoman

who searches for the son she was

forced to give up for adoption as

a teenager, and is based on BBC

correspondent Martin Sixsmith’s

2009 nonfiction book The Lost

Child of Philomena Lee.

British comedian Steve Coogan

stars opposite Dench in the film,

which he co-wrote with J e ff Pope.

Coogan plays a journalist who

helps Lee search for her son.

The title is being shopped to

distributors at the Cannes Film

Market by Pathe International

and BBC Films, the standalone

movie making unit of the U.K.

public broadcaster.

The film is produced by Coogan,

Gabrielle Tana and Tracey Seaward,

and executive produced by

Baby Cow’s Henry Normal, BBC

Films chief Christine Langan

and Pathe’s Francois Ivernel and

Cameron McCracken.

KA-CHING!

WHO’S INKING

ON THE DOTTED LINE

AT THE FESTIVAL

Peter Mullan Soccer Pic Stirs Early Buzz

By Stuart Kemp

Writer-director Peter

Mullan’s Paradise, a movie

about the founding of

legendary Scottish soccer

team Celtic Football Club by

a priest in 1887, is creating a

buzz among buyers.

The movie, billed as Gangs

of New York meets Field of

Dreams in Victorian Glasgow,

is being shopped in Cannes

by movie director and producer

Peter Broughan.

Mullan

Broughan, whose directing résumé includes Rob Roy,

tells THR he is exceptionally busy because he has a “project

that everyone wants.”

The movie details the true story of an Irish priest, Brother

Walfrid, who founded the soccer club at a Catholic church

Natascha Wharton oversaw

the film for the BFI’s Film Fund.

It marks a return to the big

screen for Frears after Lay

the Favorite last year. The director’s

Muhammad Ali’s Greatest

Fight for HBO will unspool

May 22 at a special screening

at the festival.

Image Entertainment

Takes Last Love

Starring Michael Caine

Image Entertainment has

picked up North American rights

to Last Love, the drama from

Mostly Martha director Sandra

Nettlebeck starring Oscar winner

Michael Caine.

Image plans to bow the film,

which Global Screen is selling in

Cannes, theatrically this fall.

Global Screen already has locked

up multiple pre-sales on the title,

with deals for Germany (Senator),

Spain (A Contracorriente)

and Benelux (A-Film) signed

ahead of Cannes and new territories

including Hong Kong (Edko

Communications) and Turkey

(MIR Productions) recently

boarding the project. The German

sales agent says it expects

in Glasgow on Nov. 6, 1887.

Buyers have been keen to

talk, and market insiders

are abuzz with reports that

Daniel Day-Lewis has been

linked to the role of Walfrid.

While nothing is signed,

Mullan reportedly is

expected to reach out to

Day-Lewis as the actor is

perceived as the perfect

Day-Lewis

choice to portray the soccerloving

priest.

Celtic became the first British club to win the European

Cup in 1967. It is one of the most popular sporting entities

in the world and is estimated to have more than a million

fans in the U.S. alone. Broughan is a lifelong fan of the team,

nicknamed the Hoops.

to sell out Last Love worldwide

before the end of the market.

Clemence Poesy, Jane Alexander

and Anne Alvaro co-star

in Last Love alongside Caine’s

lonely American widower in Paris

who learns to love life again after

a chance encounter with a beautiful

young woman.

Women’s Audio

Visual Network

Launches in Cannes

EWA, the newly established

European Women’s Audio Visual

Network opens for membership

at Cannes with the launch of its

website and a series of networking

events and strategy meetings.

The network will be overseen by

Spanish director Isabel Coixet,

who is Cannes’ Golden Camera

jurist this year. New Zealand-born

director Jane Campion is due to

add her support with a Cannes

meeting planned during the festival

with EWA’s executive director,

Francine Raveney.

In a letter to the EWA, Campion,

who won a Palme d’Or in

1993 for The Piano, wrote: “Film

is an extremely competitive

industry for everybody. In my

Jane Campion

Judi Dench

takes on the role

of a real-life

Irishwoman in

Philomena

Michael Caine

experience it is always best to

focus on the work. Just be your

brilliant self.”

Arab Film Power

Players to Partner on

Road Movie A to B

Some of the hottest Arab filmmakers

are ready to make an impact

outside their region with a road

movie unveiled here on Friday.

Emirati filmmaker Ali Mostafa

(City of Life), Saudi producer

Mohammed Al Turki (Arbitrage,

What Maisie Knew) and others

announced plans for feature film

A to B, which will mark the first

time that several people considered

to be the Arab movie industry’s

top pioneers will collaborate

on a major release.

A to B is about three young

Arab expats who go on a road

trip from Abu Dhabi to Beirut.

Mostafa will direct the film

based on a script from up-andcoming

Egyptian writer-producer

Mohamed Hefzy (My Brother the

Devil). The other producers are

Al Turki and the Lebanese Paul

Baboudjian, whose feature Here

Comes the Rain won the Black

Pearl award at the 2010 Abu

Dhabi Film Festival.

The team behind the project,

which will begin production in

the UAE in October, says the film

will be designed to “entertain

audiences in the Arab world and

beyond.” The news comes at a

time when Middle East filmmakers

increasingly are looking to

also make an impact overseas.

Abu Dhabi’s TwoFour54, which

supports local media and entertainment,

is an investor in the

project. Mostafa tells THR he

would love to premiere the film at

Cannes next year.

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 10


Meet

the Germans

in Cannes

MANY THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS DURING THE CANNES FILM FESTIVAL

FFP New Media GmbH, Köln

wtp international GmbH, Geiselgasteig

Focus Germany & German Films

German Pavilion | International Village Phone: +33 4 92 59 00 04 www.focusgermany.de

Stand 125 Phone: +33 4 92 59 01 80 www.german-films.de


theREPORT

THR at Cannes

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Janice Min | janice.min@thr.com

DEPUTY EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Mark Miller | mark.miller@thr.com

PHOTO & VIDEO DIRECTOR

Jennifer Laski | jennifer.laski@thr.com

ART DIRECTOR

Peter Cury | peter.cury@thr.com

THE 2013 CANNES POSTER AWARDS

THR pays tribute to the most, um, distinctive posters at the market

Wedding

Edition

NEWS

Kevin Cassidy

kevin.cassidy@thr.com | +1 213 840 1896

Gregg Kilday

gregg.kilday@thr.com | +1 310 528 3395

Gary Baum

gary.baum@thr.com | +1 213 840 1661

Patrick Brzeski

patrick.brzeski@thr.com | +33 6 24 74 04 98

Merle Ginsberg

merle.ginsberg@thr.com | +1 917 862 4453

Stuart Kemp

stuart.kemp@thr.com | +44 79 7712 5676

Pamela McClintock

pamela.mcclintock@thr.com | +1 323 627 0670

Rhonda Richford

rhonda.richford@gmail.com | +33 6 52 23 93 34

Scott Roxborough

scott.roxborough@thr.com | +49 173 260 3692

Georg Szalai

georg.szalai@thr.com | +44 777 137 0103

REVIEWERS

Todd McCarthy | todd.mccarthy@thr.com

Deborah Young | dyoung@mclink.it

David Rooney | drooney@nyc.rr.com

Neil Young | neil@jigsawlounge.co.uk

Stephen Dalton | wetlabrador@yahoo.com

Jordan Mintzer | jpmintzer@mac.com

THR.COM

Rebecca Ford | rebecca.ford@thr.com

PHOTO & VIDEO

Stephanie Fischette

stephanie.fischette@thr.com

Moira Haney | moira.haney@thr.com

BEST WARDROBE DESIGN

Girl on a Bicycle (Germany)

Ah, Paree! The City of Love! The perfect place

for a romantic wedding! But beware — the

groom’s head might be turned by one of those

famously stylish Parisian girls in crop tops and,

yes, orthopedic shoes.

BEST DECOR

Wedding Day (USA)

Don’t you just hate it when you spend all that money

on wedding photos — not to mention Ikea frames

— and then some jerk goes and shoots holes in

them? It’s like, OK, I’m sorry I didn’t invite you to the

wedding, but you’re totally overreacting.

ART & PRODUCTION

Amélie Cherlin | amelie.cherlin@thr.com

Emily Johnson | emily.johnson@thr.com

Kelly Jones | kelly.jones@thr.com | +1 818 359 9747

PUBLISHER

Lynne Segall | lynne.segall@thr.com

SALES & MARKETING

Alison Smith

alison.smith@thr.com | +44 7788 591 781

Jonathon Aubry

jonathon.aubry@thr.com | +1 323-397-3725

Tyler DelVento

tyler.delvento@thr.com | +1 646 369 6818

Debra Fink

debra.fink@thr.com | +1 213 448-5157

Tommaso Campione

tommaso.campione@thr.com | +44 7793 090 683

Ivy Lam

ivy.lam@thr.com | +852 617 692 72

Anna Magzanyan

anna.magzanyan@thr.com | +1 818 261-0815

POOR POSTURE AWARD

The Wedding Pact (USA)

As the type at the bottom reveals, the groom takes

10 years to land that bride. Talk about taking it

slow! And based on her awkward stance, she might

need a few more years to make up her mind.

BEST USE OF A HEADLOCK

Wedding Scandal (South Korea)

You’d probably have to go back to the days of

Hepburn and Tracy to find banter as witty as this.

We’re pretty sure “Since when did you get laid?” is

going to be the catchphrase of 2013.

— MICHAEL RUBINER

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 12


Adapted From The Game:


Riviera - Booth#C14 - 02

Worldwide Sales - All Rights Entertainment

Mail: acd@allrightsentertainment.com www.allrightsentertainment.com


TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX

AND THE FILMMAKERS OF

PROUDLY CONGRATULATE

FAN BINGBING

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER’S

INTERNATIONAL ARTIST OF THE YEAR


THR will honor Fan as

International Artist of the Year at a

private party at the Mouton Cadet

Wine Bar atop the Palais des

Festivals on May 18.

THE CHIC

LIFE

OF CANNES

‘IT’ GIRL

Fan Bingbing is a fashion icon, and now,

in Iron Man 3 and the next X-Men, gatekeeper

to China’s luxury and film market

BY REBECCA SUN

In Elie Saab Couture

— and Chopard

diamonds — at Rust

and Bone’s 2012

Cannes premiere.

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 17

FAN BINGBING REALLY KNOWS HOW TO

make an entrance. For the opening ceremony

of the 2010 Cannes Film Festival, the

Chinese actress chose a one-sleeved, imperial

yellow silk gown embroidered with

dragons and cascading ocean waves, instantly declaring

her proud heritage (no more shouts of “Where are you

from?” on the red carpet) and flooring the fashion press

even more than usual. The Laurence Xu creation was

no fluke: Shifting fluently between indie designers and

European haute couture, Fan already had established

herself as one of fashion’s most intriguing figures with

her bold, flamboyant choices. But her Cannes debut

launched her into the style stratosphere.

American audiences finally will see Fan on the big

screen in summer 2014’s X-Men: Days of Future Past as

the teleporting mutant Blink. She’s “extremely focused,”

says director Bryan Singer. “She inhabits the screen like

a true star.” (Fan also appears in the Chinese version

of Iron Man 3, which scored a

$63.5 million opening weekend.) At

home, Fan has been an A-lister for

much of her 15-year film and television

career. And as her acclaimed

films such as Lost in Beijing and

Chongqing Blues made the festival

circuit, Fan built a reputation for her

chameleon-like and dramatic looks.

In Louis Vuitton

at the LV-hosted

Bling Ring

party Thursday.

“My style depends on my mood,”

says Fan, 31, of her sartorial philosophy.

“Having something to say is the

most important part.” (The star, who

grew up in a middle-class family in

Shandong province before attending

Shanghai Theater Academy, is studying

English; THR interviewed her in

her native Mandarin.) Her fearlessness

has attracted top designers, particularly

those seeking a foothold in China’s

$50 billion luxury market — the world’s

largest, according to Brian Buchwald, CEO of Bomoda, a

website focused on Chinese luxury consumers.

“She has this interesting duality,” notes Buchwald of

Fan, who has been a L’Oreal brand ambassador for three

years and signed with Chopard and Louis Vuitton this

year (she’s attending Cannes for L’Oreal and Chopard).

“She represents products that a Chinese consumer

would want to buy because she wears them, but also she

represents a girl’s individuality and ability to stand out.”

Beijing-based Fan had no problem standing out

when she attended the 2013 Oscars with producer

Bill Mechanic and Chopard’s Caroline Scheufele. Having

arrived in L.A. undecided on what to wear, Fan fell for

photos of a Marchesa gown that was in New York. Her

friend Harvey Weinstein (they met at the 2010 amfAR

dinner in Cannes) called his wife, label co-founder

Georgina Chapman, who sent the dress on a private plane.

Fan’s hair and makeup were done before the gown

arrived, and she slipped it on just in time for the red carpet.

“I loathe fittings,” she says. “When you do a fitting,

it’s because your heart has no plan.”

Marchesa isn’t the only brand eager to dress Fan.

Later that night, she hit the Vanity Fair fete in a blackand-white

Oscar de la Renta and the Elton John AIDS

Foundation party in beaded Elie Saab Couture. She isn’t

sure what she’ll choose for this year’s Cannes kickoff.

DIAMOND EARRING: DAVE J HOGAN/GETTY IMAGES. RUST AND BONE: VALERY HACHE/AFP/GETTY IMAGES. VUITTON: DOMINIQUE CHARRIAU/WIREIMAGE/GETTY IMAGES.


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SPECIAL FEATURE

LAURENCE XU

Fan wore Cartier earrings with

her Cannes 2010 “dragon robe.”

If you think Cannes is just about movies,

you’ve been hiding under the

Croisette. While the Oscars and Met

Ball were the fashion ne plus ultras for

years, Cannes now gives those sartorial

tentpoles a run for their euros. “Cannes

is like two weeks of the Oscars,” says

Sahar Sanjar of La Chambre, which

represents Palais-steps mainstay Elie

Saab. Adds Carlos Souza of Valentino:

“Red carpets now rule the day — and

the red carpet at Cannes is truly for the

entire world.”

MARCHESA

The dress was flown to L.A. on

the morning of the 2013 Oscars.

VALENTINO

For a L’Oreal dinner at Cannes 2012,

Fan chose floral chiffon.

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 20

Up to now, she’s worn a Chinese-style gown — the most

recent two designed by her stylist, Christopher Bu — but

her X-Men schedule might not allow time for an original

creation. “The designers are good to me,” she says of her

access to the festival fashion suites. “The clothes I want,

they’ll hold on to them.”

“[Compared to other Asian stars], Fan seems to

have the most fun with fashion,” says Catherine Kallon,

founder of the U.K.-based blog Red Carpet Fashion

Awards. “She’s more of a risk-taker.” Fan understands

her influence — she recently was named No. 1 on Forbes

China’s Celebrity 100 — but says luxury brands can’t

take Chinese consumers for granted. “There was a

period when China was very label-conscious. But now I

think Chinese women will use more of their creativity,”

says the star, who once showed up in the front row at

Elie Saab with one of the designer’s beaded cardigans

wrapped around her head like a turban. “There are more

people who really know fashion as a lifestyle, an attitude.

China is catching up.”

Fan’s expanding film career — she founded her own

production studio in 2007, signed with WME in 2012 and

has just been cast opposite Jackie Chan in the upcoming

action comedy Skiptrace — will only amplify her voice

as the unofficial Chinese ambassador to the fashion and

beauty realms. But her off-duty look is T-shirts, jeans,

flats and no makeup: “When I wear makeup, it’s to go out

and make money,” she jokes. “Otherwise, no way.”

MOVIES, WHAT MOVIES? AT CANNES, FASHION HOGS THE SPOTLIGHT

The film festival has become a key global marketing platform for high-end designer labels: ‘All brands want to be there’ By MERLE GINSBERG

Gucci creative

director Frida

Giannini (left) and

Watts at 2012’s

Vanity Fair party

at Hotel du Cap.

More than even the Oscars, the fest

connects brands to a global audience

— including the Asian retail market

— with ambassadors such as China’s

Fan Bingbing and Li Bingbing and

India’s Aishwarya Rai, Sonam Kapoor

and Freida Pinto. To reach a broad

swath of markets, brands like L’Oreal,

a festival sponsor, send as many multiculti

ambassadors as they can; Fan, Rai,

Pinto and Ines de la Fressange went to

the festival last year.

Wearing the best beads and ball

gowns on the Palais steps, these stars

cause the cameras to go wild, contributing

to a riviera of fashion impressions,

which can include coverage of the

luxury brand suites at Hotel Martinez.

Says Sanjar: “There are actually more

requests this year from international

journalists to cover fashion suites” —

by Gucci, Armani, Louis Vuitton, Dior,

Jimmy Choo and Bulgari. Actresses and

their stylists circulate among them to

make selections for soirees and photo

ops. Saab, who in 2011 dressed Dutch

model Doutzen Kroes, will be taking a

larger suite this year.

The list of fashion parties grows

longer than the gown trains: Giorgio

Armani throws one nearly every year,

including its 2012 black-tie blowout

in honor of Sean Penn’s Haiti charity.

Gucci throws major parties with

Martin Scorsese’s Film Foundation,

and for two years running, Calvin Klein

has hosted its Women in Film soiree,

attended last year by Jessica Chastain

and Naomi Watts.

The annual amfAR ball on the fest’s

final night brings out the most eyepopping

displays of posh pulchritude.

“It’s the ultimate international fashion

spectacle,” says Sandra Choi, Jimmy

Choo creative director. “There is such a

wealth of talent in one place, making it

a platform to showcase dynamic looks”

— as well as scout for ambassadors

who can make your stilettos look todie-for

for buyers in China.

The fashion presence hit a pinnacle

From left: Shailene

Woodley, Chastain,

Watts, French

actress Ludivine

Sagnier, Kruger

and Independent

Filmmaker Project’s

Joana Vicente

at 2012’s Women

in Film fete.

last year with Jean Paul Gaultier

sitting on the Cannes jury. This year,

Raf Simons will show the Dior 2013

resort collection in nearby Monaco

on May 18, which will bring out

Marion Cotillard (who stars in partner

Guillaume Canet’s Blood Ties,

showing at the fest) and likely her

fellow Dior faces Charlize Theron and

Natalie Portman. Add in 10 days’ and

nights’ worth of spectacular wardrobes

for Cannes jurors Uma Thurman,

Diane Kruger and Nicole Kidman in

2011, 2012 and 2013, respectively, and

you’ve got a veritable fashion circus.

“Not only does Cannes create worldwide

awareness, it actually affects

sales. Trust me on that,” says Sanjar.

“All the brands want to be there.”

DRAGON ROBE: MICHAEL BUCKNER/GETTY IMAGES. DRAGON ROBE EARRING: SEAN GALLUP/GETTY IMAGES. OSCARS & L’OREAL DINNER: PASCAL LE SERETAIN/WIREIMAGE/GETTY IMAGES. WOODLEY: DAVE M. BENETT/GETTY IMAGES. WATTS: DANIELE VENTMELLI/GETTY IMAGES FOR GUCCI.


Congratulations

FAN BINGBING

on being recognized as

The Hollywood Reporter’s

International Artist of the Year

from all of us at

Exclusive Media and

Talent International

We are so proud to be

collaborating with you

on the new film

SKIPTRACE


STYLE

FASHTR ACK

What to buy, wear

and know now

by Merle Ginsberg

Mulligan and Mumford

Arrival Chic

Fisher

Those celebs-arriving-bleary-at-the-airport shots right after they

get off the plane have become ubiquitous: “Stars! They’re just like

us!” — but not really. Many arrive on private planes and have their

hair and makeup done on the journey. Others just don’t care.

Nicole Kidman turned up for the Cannes Film Festival at the Nice airport

looking like the total glamour pro she is: in a tight sparkly Dior dress and

heels, with perfectly straight hair and some very nicely applied makeup.

Emma Watson also made a rather glamorous entrance, but in casualwear:

a tight white dress with short sleeves, black flat boots and her hair up.

Carey Mulligan’s was a lot less planned: She and hubby Marcus Mumford

were photographed wheeling their own bags on a cart, she in a bland black

top, pants and glasses. (But who could forget her entrance at her first

Cannes, when she and Shia LeBeouf boated into the fest, hair flying back

and all smiles?) Isla Fisher’s look was in deep contrast with her Gatsby

getup: a striped top, sweater and jeans, and no makeup, but it still was

chic. Fan Bingbing, on the other hand, was prepared. The fashion superstar

was decked out in a blue Louis Vuitton skirt suit with matching hat,

and of course, a chic LV bag and the French brand’s luggage. These airport

pics get nearly as much play as the red-carpet nighttime ones do, so if a

star wants to maintain an image, as Kidman clearly does, it’s best to be

prepared. Casual is fine; bleary, jet-lagged and in sweatpants is not. Oh the

agony of being famous!

TOE-TAL NIGHTMARE!

Rule No. 1 in Fashion: Never wear anything that

doesn’t fit perfectly, particularly shoes. Julianne

Moore must have really loved these unidentified

silver sandals a lot (Dior, which made her

gown, did not take credit for them) because the

obviously borrowed

samples clearly didn’t

fit her feet. Now the

star’s overhanging toes

are being wildly circulated

on the web. Don’t

you hate when your

toes don’t cooperate?

Fan

Majestic

Suites

Go Full

Upscale

EMMA WATSON

in Chanel couture

The Bling Ring star seems not to

make any wrong moves, fashion-wise:

Her choice of a black-and-white

streamlined Chanel couture gown

for her film’s premiere nicely matched

her director Sofia Coppola’s chic

Louis Vuitton simplicity. Of course,

having a great face never hurts.

THR visited two of the most upscale and private luxury brand suites

in Cannes on Thursday: Dior Beaute and Chanel. Dior’s luxe manychambered

suite had all the Majestic’s furniture removed in favor of

Dior’s gray Parisian decor. The brand has been taking the suite for

seven years now, and has done makeup for Berenice Bejo, Melanie

Laurent, Charlotte Gainsbourg and even Ryan Gosling and Pedro Almodovar. One

floor down, the Chanel suite contains at least 30 to 40 of the label’s couture gowns

while a secondary room holds ready-to-wear day looks, plus hats and nail polish. The

bathroom is a tableau: The tub is filled with faux pearls (well, we assume they’re faux),

with mannequins modeling Chanel black mesh monokinis in the shower.

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 24

Chanel 2013

DRESS

DU

JOUR

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: GIGI IORIO/SPLASH NEWS/CORBIS; JACOPO RAULE/FILMMAGIC/GETTY IMAGES (2); VALERY HACHE/AFP/GETTY

IMAGES; KARL PROUSE/CATWALKING/GETTY IMAGES; DOMINIQUE CHARRIAU/WIREIMAGE/GETTY IMAGES; TODD WILLIAMSON/INVISION/AP


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About Town

1

6

1 Leonardo DiCaprio (left)

joined his Departed

director at Martin

Scorsese’s formal

announcement of his

next project, Silence,

hosted by John Walker &

Sons Voyager Yacht.

5

2 From left: Young &

Beautiful’s Geraldine

Pailhas, Francois Ozon,

Marine Vacth and Fantin

Ravat arrived at the

screening of their

competition title.

3 From left: Skiptrace

director Sam Fell hammed

it up with his stars Fan

Bingbing (in Elie Saab

Couture) and Jackie

Chan. Exclusive Media

and Beijing-based Talent

International Film Co.

are co-producing

the action comedy.

4 Carey Mulligan and

Calvin Klein creative

director Francisco Costa

at the brand’s party in

celebration of women in

independent film.

5 Harvey Weinstein and

Rooney Mara made the

trek to the Calvin Klein

party at the Ecrin Plage.

On Friday the actress was

named the face of Calvin

Klein’s new fall fragance.

6 Sofia Coppola (left)

and her Bling Ring star

Emma Watson chatted

with festival artistic

director Thierry Fremaux

at their film’s premiere.

9

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 26

10


4

2

3

7

8

7 Paris Hilton signed

autographs outside the

Bling Ring party atop the

JW Marriott. The celebutante

has a cameo in the film.

1

8 David Hasselhoff (with

girlfriend Hayley Roberts)

was in town to promote the

Cannes market title Killing

Hasselhoff, about a celebrity

death pool.

9 From left: Fruitvale

Station’s Ahna O’Reilly,

Octavia Spencer, Melonie

Diaz and Michael B. Jordan

at the Fruitvale premiere.

10 Un Certain Regard

jury member Zhang Ziyi

accessorized her black-andsilver

Carolina Herrera ball

gown with a Chanel necklace

at the Bling Ring premiere.

11 Lars Ulrich officially opened

the American Pavilion next to

the Palais. The heavy-metal

rocker is presenting Metallica:

Through the Never, a

drama set at one of the

band’s concerts.

12 Spanish actress Paz Vega

wore Calvin Klein to the

brand’s party.

11

12

HILTON: AP PHOTO. SCORCESE, OZON, ZIYI, SPENCER, WEINSTEIN, FREAMUX: GETTY IMAGES. MULLIGAN, HASSELHOF,

ULRICH: WIREIMAGE/GETTY IMAGES. CHAN: COURTESY OF EXCLUSIVE. VEGA: GETTY IMAGES FOR CALVIN KLEIN.

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 27


About Town

RAMBLING REPORTER

By Gary Baum & Merle Ginsberg

Some Like Reese Rough

Irish-born director Brian Kirk

(Game of Thrones), in town for the

Reese Witherspoon-Keanu Reeves

sci-fi romantic epic Passengers

(which Exclusive Media is shopping),

didn’t seem concerned

about the actress’ April 19 arrest

for disorderly conduct in Atlanta.

He and Wayfare Entertainment,

which is financing the film, were

in the midst of talking to Witherspoon

about taking the role when

the incident happened. “One of

the things that I really like about

her is that she’s really feisty and

that she’s not a prize or a trophy,”

says Kirk, adding that he wanted

a strong, confident woman to play

the role. Anyway, says Kirk, “if

that’s the worst thing she’s ever

done, she’s better than me.”

Family Man Marty

Martin Scorsese was feted by Johnnie

Walker on its yacht in honor of

Silence, his long-gestating passion

project based on the novel by

Japanese novelist Shusaku Endo.

(It was recently announced that

Andrew Garfield will star.) But

the director admitted to guests,

Mocca

Left: Witherspoon.

Above: DiCaprio with

his mother, Irmelin

Indenbirken, in 2010.

including producers Lawrence

Bender and Melita Toscan du Plantier,

that he was eager to return

home from Cannes because he

was missing his family (wife Helen

and 13-year-old daughter,

Francesca). Indeed, he told

THR that while working

on the upcoming Wolf of

Wall Street, “I put the editing

machines in my house,

because a lot gets done at night.

If I have to go to the editing room

I miss the little one and Helen.

We moved her dining room out,

and she wasn’t happy about that.

I said, ‘Me or the furniture!’ ”

Parties du Soir

The cold, wet rain didn’t deter

Cannes partiers the second night

of the fest. Still, the crowds that

descended on the Louis Vuittonand

W magazine-sponsored Bling

Ring afterparty at Albane at the

top of the JW Marriott, and the

Calvin Klein party at Ecrin Plage,

were more covered up — with

not an open-toed shoe in sight.

Despite Albane’s dim lighting,

it was hard to miss Sofia Coppola

in her black Louis Vuitton

Mulligan

short dress, surrounded as she

was by well wishers, and husband

Thomas Mars to boot. Emma

Watson was gracious to everyone

who approached her, which

included Berenice Bejo and Michel

Hazanavicius. Bryan Ferry made an

entrance, even in the dark, and

others on hand included Bling’s

Katie Chang, Taissa Farmiga, Claire

Julien and Israel Broussard as well

as Russian billionaire Roman

Abramovich’s paramour, Dasha

Zhukova. The Calvin Klein party,

hosted by IFP’s Joanne Vicente

and CK designer Francisco Costa,

all the way at Port-Pierre Canto

was hard to get to, but worth the

Uber (car service) wait, as there

was much gawking at A-listers

Nicole Kidman and her CAA

agent Chris Andrews, Rooney

Mara, Carey Mulligan —

who stayed for all of five

minutes — Skyfall’s Naomie

Harris, director Lynne Ramsay

and, of course, Harvey Weinstein

right in the middle of it all.

Leo’s Parent Posse

Leonardo DiCaprio’s gone positively

wholesome, at least by

the looks of it. Notoriously the

leader of the “pussy posse” of his

youth, perpetually out looking

for ladies with longtime friends

like his Great Gatsby co-star Tobey

Maguire, these days he’s traveled

to Cannes with a parent posse

constantly in tow: His mother,

Irmelin Indenbirken, her boyfriend,

and his father, George DiCaprio

(the pair were divorced when he

was a year old). They attended

the Gatsby premiere with Leo,

then Scorsese’s yacht soiree the

following evening.

On May 17, Michel Hazanavicius

lunched at Mocca Brasserie, across the

PowerLunch

Croisette from the Palais, where his

wife Berenice Bejo’s movie The Past premiered earlier in the morning. … Lionsgate CEO Jon

Feltheimer and Lionsgate Motion Picture Group co-president Patrick Wachsberger visited

Fouquet’s at the Majestic, where the studio has adorned the outside with a huge Hunger

Games: Catching Fire installation. … FilmDistrict CEO Peter Schlessel broke bread with Nu

Image/Millennium Films chairman Avi Lerner at Millennium’s Cannes office. (All the big sales

companies bring in chefs to cook meals since there’s no time to go out.) … Robin Wright took

to a corner of the JW Marriott restaurant. … Producer Jason Blum did business on the Carlton

terrace. A short while later, uber-publicist Peggy Siegal was chatting with a friend nearby about

how she brought five trunks of clothes to accommodate her social calendar during the festival.

… Sierra/Affinity’s Nick Meyer was at the Carlton but left once the rain started coming down.

How the Jet Set

Fights Jet Lag

Surviving the slew of cocktails and

red carpets of Cannes requires

near-athletic-level stamina. And

with glitterati arriving from the

four corners of the world, it can

take a little something extra to

make it through. How to cope?

“This year, I popped two Midnights

[melatonin] for the flight,”

says The Help producer Brunson

Green, who also made a stop in

London a few days early in order

to adjust to the time change. Others

take more drastic measures

with sometimes unfortunate side

effects. One exec popped an Ambien

on the flight over. Upon landing

a man told him how nice it had

been to meet him. The exec didn’t

remember ever speaking to him

and later was stunned when the

man sent a bottle of wine to his

hotel. Then there’s the tale of the

film exec who likewise hit the Ambien

only to find himself awoken

by a flight attendant asking him to

kindly put his shirt back on. The

Weinstein Co. COO David Glasser

says he’s heard tales of people

sleepwalking through the Carlton

(though he’s quick to point out

he’s not one of them). Still others

abstain entirely. James Toback,

director of the doc Seduced and

Abandoned, screening at the fest,

enjoys jet lag. “Since I have not

consumed a mind-altering drug

since my LSD-blowout as a Harvard

sophomore, my only circuit

to approximating that weirdly

intriguing state of disoriented

consciousness is jet lag,” he says.

“As a result, I not

only don’t resist but

rather relish it with

perverse anticipation,

much as I used

Toback

to revel in the

discombobulating effects of the

Cyclone at Coney Island. I’m often

amused by the unexpected things

I — or more precisely, the altered

I — say and do after landing.”

WITHERSPOON: EVAN AGOSTINI/INVISION/AP. DICAPRIO: WILLI SCHNEIDER/REX/REX USA. MULLIGAN, GLASSER, GREEN: GETTY IMAGES. MOCCA: TODD WILLIAMSON/INVISION/AP. PILL, PLANE: ISTOCK.

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 28


east HOLLYWOOD

355 West 16th Street, New York City

Reservations 646.625.4847 dreamdowntown.com

2013 Dream Hotels ® dreamhotels.com


at the Cannes International Film Festival 2013 – part one*

Since 2000 European Film Promotion (EFP) has been offering support and guidance to European producers during the Cannes International Film Festival.

This year, the members of EFP have chosen 29 outstanding up-and-coming producers from 29 European countries to participate in the networking platform

PRODUCERS ON THE MOVE. A highly focused working environment involves project pitching, one-to-one meetings and social events.

Viktor Tauš

Czech Republic

Fog‘n‘Desire Films

Voroněžská 24

CZ – 101 00 Prague 10

cell +420 775 204 809

email viktor@fogndesirefilms.com

www.fogndesirefilms.com

A proud member of what Cahiers du Cinéma

calls the do-it-yourself generation, Viktor

Tauš co-founded the production company

Fog‘n‘Desire Films with film-maker Michal

Kollár. He produced Zuzana Liová‘s awardwinning

House and currently has several

films in postproduction, including Jan

Hřebejk‘s Honeymoon and his own film, the

international co-production Clownwise.

Viktor is also developing new projects by

Michal Kollár and Juraj Nvota.

Selected Films

The Red Captain (Rudý kapitán) 2014,

by Michal Kollár (in a final development stage)

Clownwise (Klauni) 2013,

by Viktor Tauš (in postproduction)

Honeymoon (Líbánky) 2013,

by Jan Hřebejk (in postproduction)

House (Dům) 2011,

by Zuzana Liová

© Lasse Leckilin

Jussi Rantamäki

Finland

Aamu Filmcompany Ltd.

Hiihtomäentie 34

FIN – 00800 Helsinki

cell +358 40 7355 977

email rantamaki@aamufilmcompany.fi

http://aamufilmcompany.wordpress.com

During his studies in Cultural Management,

Jussi Rantamäki worked as a freelance

assistant director and location manager

in various companies. In 2008, he joined

Aamu Filmcompany and saw his first two

productions, the short Whispering In A

Friend‘s Mouth and Juho Kuosmanen‘s The

Painting Sellers, premiering in Berlin and

Cannes in 2010, respectively. This year, his

production of Matti Ijäs‘ Things We Do For

Love had its world premiere in Gothenburg.

Selected Films

The Boxer

by Juho Kuosmanen (in development)

Heidi (working title)

by Hannaleena Hauru (in development)

Things We Do For Love 2013,

by Matti Ijäs

The Painting Sellers (Taulukauppiaat) 2010,

by Juho Kuosmanen

Zaza Rusadze

Georgia

Zazarfilm LTD

Arsena Street # 29

GE – 0108 Tbilisi

phone +995 599 68 90 03

cell D +49 179 19 62 154

email zaza@zazarusadze.com

www.zazarusadze.com

Zaza Rusadze graduated in Directing

from HFF Babelsberg in 2003 and founded

his company Zazarfilm in 2007, debuting

with the short Folds And Cracks which

received the Discovery Award in Cottbus

in 2009. Zaza then produced his feature

debut A Fold In My Blanket, the opening

film of the Panorama in Berlin 2013. He is

currently developing two feature and two

documentary projects for himself as well as

an animation feature by Nika Machaidze.

Selected Films

Negative Numbers, by TBA,

screenplay by Uta Beria (in development)

Doll On A Music Box,

by Zaza Rusadze (in development)

A Bear Over Our Heads,

by Zaza Rusadze

(documentary, in development)

Ulayah Saba,

by Nika Machaidze

(animation, in development)

Jochen Laube

Germany

teamWorx TV & Film GmbH

Alleenstrasse 2

D – 71638 Ludwigsburg

phone +49 7141 979 210

cell +49 151 504 674 48

email jochen.laube@teamworx.de

www.teamworx.de

During his studies at the Film Academy

Baden-Württemberg, Jochen Laube worked as

assistant producer on Peter Greenaway‘s The

Tulse Luper Suitcases, was involved in the

UNESCO’s The Magic Lantern children‘s project,

and founded his company summerhouse.

He has also worked for teamWorx since 2010,

producing award-winning films by Florian

Cossen, Christian Schwochow and Stefan

Schaller, and is now producing Burhan Qurbani‘s

second feature We Are Young. We Are Strong.

Selected Films

Coconut Hero 2013,

by Florian Cossen (in preproduction)

Zapped 2013,

by Thorsten Schütte

(documentary, in production)

Five Years 2013,

by Stefan Schaller

Cracks In The Shell 2011,

by Christian Schwochow

Giorgos Karnavas

Greece

Heretic

Promitheos 18

GR – 152 34 Halandri, Athens

cell +30 69 4567 6069

email giorgos@heretic.gr

www.heretic.gr

Giorgos Karnavas began working in film

production in 2010 and has collaborated

with some of Greece‘s biggest directing

talents. He has produced such films as Boy

Eating The Bird’s Food and The Eternal

Return Of Antonis Paraskevas, and is now

developing new features by Elina Psykou (Ivo

& Sofia) and Wasted Youth director Argyris

Papadimitropoulos (Hungry Mouth). Giorgos

has just established Heretic with his partner

Konstantinos Kontovrakis.

Selected Films

in development

Ivo & Sofia (shooting in 2014)

by Elina Psykou

Hungry Mouth (shooting in autumn 2013)

by Argyris Papadimitropoulos

completed

Boy Eating The Bird’s Food 2012,

by Ektoras Lygizos

The Eternal Return Of Antonis Paraskevas 2013

by Elina Psykou

with the support of the EU MEDIA Programme

EFP is supported by

project partners

E u r o p e a n F i l m P r o m o t i o n F r i e d e n s a l l e e 1 4 – 1 6 2 2 7 6 5 H a m b u r g , G e r m a n y i n f o @ e f p - o n l i n e . c o m w w w. e f p - o n l i n e . c o m


Selected Films (all documentaries)

New Hands 2014/15 (in production),

by Örn Marinó Arnarsson, Thorkell Hardarson

Trend Beacons 2014 (in production),

by Örn Marinó Arnarsson, Thorkell Hardarson

The North Atlantic Miracle 2011,

by Örn Marinó Arnarsson, Thorkell Hardarson,

Arnar Thorisson

Feathered Cocaine 2010,

by Thorkell Hardarson, Örn Marinó Arnarsson

Selected Films

Zurich

by Sacha Polak (in financing)

Leones 2012,

by Jasmin Lopez

Taking Chances 2011,

by Nicole van Kilsdonk

(through Lemming Film)

My Joy 2010,

by Sergei Loznitsa

(through Lemming Film)

Selected Films

Red Spider 2014,

by Marcin Koszałka (in production)

Kebab & Horoscope 2014,

by Grzegorz Jaroszuk (in production)

In The Name Of 2013,

by Małgośka Szumowska

Baby Blues 2012,

by Kasia Rosłaniec

Selected Films

as writer/director/producer

(in development)

Bernarda – Frogs With No Tongues

Dad‘s Record

as director / co-producer

My Dog Killer (Môj pes Killer) 2013

as director

Foxes (Líštičky) 2009

Selected Films

For This Is My Body

by Paule Muret (in development)

Body

by Halima Ouardiri (in development)

In Art We Trust

by Benoît Rossel (documentary, shooting

starts in July 2013)

Aisheen, Still Alive In Gaza 2010,

by Nicolas Wadimoff

(documentary, through Akka Films)

Thorkell Hardarson is one half of

the Markell Brothers with director Örn

Marinó Arnarson. They started out with

rockumentaries such as Punk In Iceland

and then turned to the issues of geopolitics

and terrorism for Feathered Cocaine about

the true location of Osama bin Laden. Since

then, they made The North Atlantic Miracle

about the lifespan of the Atlantic Salmon and

are now working on two new projects Trend

Beacons and New Hands.

Marleen Slot founded Viking Film in 2011,

having already completed the co-production

Leones and preparing several other films

like Zurich from director Sacha Polak and

Gabriel Mascaro‘s Bull Down!. She worked

as a producer at Lemming Film for many

years with such productions as Mischa

Kamp‘s Tony 10, Nicole van Kilsdonk‘s Taking

Chances, Meral Uslu‘s Snackbar and Hans

van Nuffelen‘s Oxygen, which won the

European Film Academy Discovery Award.

Agnieszka Kurzydło has been working in

the film industry since 1992 and managed

Zentropa International Poland which

was launched in 2008 and co-produced

Antichrist and Elles, among others. In 2011,

she established her own company Mental

Disorder 4 and has produced such films as

Kasia Rosłaniec‘s Baby Blues and Małgośka

Szumowska‘s In The Name Of. She is now

preparing films by Marcin Koszałka and

Grzegorz Jaroszuk.

A graduate from Prague‘s FAMU and the UK‘s

NFTS, Mira Fornay‘s debut feature Foxes

premiered in the International Film Critics‘

Week Venice IFF 2009. She not only wrote and

directed, but also co-produced her second

feature My Dog Killer which won the Hivos

Tiger Award at the 2013 Rotterdam International

Film Festival. Mira‘s company Mirafox is currently

developing three new projects for her, including

the drama Bernarda – Frogs With No Tongues

and the absurd drama Cook, F**k, Kill.

A graduate from the film school INSAS in

Brussels in 1999, Joëlle Bertossa worked on

several films as a first director‘s assistant before

being hired by Nicolas Wadimoff at Akka Films

in 2003 where she produced such films as

his Aisheen, Still Alive In Gaza. Last year,

Joëlle founded Geneva-based Close Up Films,

completed Michele Pennetta‘s documentary

Mal Della Luna and is currently developing

international co-productions with France,

Germany and Canada.

Thorkell Hardarson

Iceland

Markell Productions

Langholtsvegur 171

IS – 104 Reykjavik

phone +354 777 0842 / +354 777 8340

cell +49 176 7546 2751

email falkasaga@gmail.com

http://digitusdei.info

Marleen Slot

The Netherlands

Viking Film

Lindengracht 17

NL – 1015 KB Amsterdam

phone +31 20 625 4788

email marleen@vikingfilm.nl

www.vikingfilm.nl

Agnieszka Kurzydło

Poland

MD4 Sp. z o.o.

ul. Narbutta 25 A

PL – 02-536 Warsaw

phone +48 22 646 55 93

fax +48 22 646 34 80

email agnieszka@md4.eu

www.md4.eu

Mira Fornay

Slovak Republic

Mirafox

Majakovskeho 19

SK – 902 01 Pezinok

cell SK +421 910 176 857

cell CZ +420 603 745 519

email mira.fornay@mirafox.sk

www.mirafox.sk

Joëlle Bertossa

Switzerland

Close Up Films

20 rue du Clos

CH – 1207 Geneva

cell +41 78 665 0512

email joelle@closeupfilms.ch

www.closeupfilms.ch

* part two on May 19

*part three on May 20

Estonia, Kiur Aarma

Hungary, Andrea Taschler

Ireland, Conor Barry

Republic of Kosovo**, Valon Jakupaj

Luxembourg, Gilles Chanial

EFP contact in Cannes +49 160 440 9595

Montenegro, Sehad Čekić

Norway, Hans-Jørgen Osnes

Romania, Anca Puiu

Spain, Maria Zamora

United Kingdom, Andrea Cornwell

**This designation is without prejudice to position on status, and is in line with UNSCR 1244 and the ICJ Opinion on the Kosovo declaration of independence.

Belgium, Anton Iffland Stettner

Bulgaria, Konstantin Bojanov

Croatia, Zdenka Gold

Denmark, Mikael Chr. Rieks

France, Mathieu Robinet

Italy, Viola Prestieri

FYR of Macedonia, Labina Mitevska

Portugal, João Matos

Sweden, Erika Wasserman

www.efp-online.com

Associated EFP members: Baltic Films, British Council, Bulgarian National Film Centre, Croation Audiovisual Centre, Czech Film Center, Danish Film Institute, EYE International /

Netherlands, Film Fund Luxembourg, Finnish Film Foundation, Georgian National Film Center, German Films, Greek Film Centre, ICA I.P. / Portugal, ICAA / Spain, Icelandic Fim Centre, Irish

Film Board, Istituto Luce Cinecittà / Italy, Kosova Cinematography Center, Macedonian Film Fund, Magyar Filmunió / Hungarian National Film Fund, Ministry of Culture of Montenegro,

Norwegian Film Institute, Polish Film Institute, Romanian Film Promotion, Slovak Film Institute, Swedish Film Institute, Swiss Films, Unifrance films, Wallonie Bruxelles Images


SECRETS OF THE

CALL GIRL ECONOMY

AT CANNES

Despite a major prostitution ring bust in 2007, sex for money still flourishes

on the Croisette during the festival, with women descending from all over the world for

yacht parties and hotel encounters in exchange for envelopes marked ‘gift’

BY DANA KENNEDY

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 32

LIKE BRAD PITT, ANGELINA JOLIE AND

Diane Kruger, Lebanese businessman Elie

Nahas was once a regular at the Cannes

Film Festival.

But since his bust in 2007 for his part in

the most explosive prostitution scandal in the history of

the festival, Nahas, 48, can’t leave his native Lebanon. He

hopes that his eight-year prison sentence, slapped on him

in absentia by a French judge after a trial in Marseilles in

October, will be overturned on appeal this year, but he’s

not overly optimistic. In fact, he also is fearful that if he

leaves Lebanon, he’ll be picked up by Interpol.

Nahas, who owns a Beirut-based modeling agency,

used to work as a right-hand man for Moatessem

Gadhafi, the playboy son of Libyan strongman

Muammar Gadhafi, Nahas’ longtime pal. It was during

this time that Nahas was arrested on charges of running

a prostitution ring that supplied more than 50 women

“of various nationalities” to the younger Gadhafi and

other rich Middle Eastern clients during the festival.

Moatessem was killed with his father in Libya in 2011.

The women ran the gamut, from full-time escorts

to models to beauty queens, and they serviced men in

hotels, on yachts and in the palatial villas in the hills

above Cannes, police said. Philippe Camps, a lawyer for

a Paris-based anti-prostitution organization that was

a civil plaintiff in the trial, tells THR that some of the

women were brought to Cannes under false pretenses

and coerced into prostitution.

Police broke into Nahas’ room at the city’s famed

Carlton hotel in August 2007 and arrested him after a

lengthy investigation involving wiretaps, which helped

them identify Nahas and seven others as key members

of the vice ring. (Prostitution is legal in France, but

soliciting, whether with advertising or on a street corner,

is not.)

Nahas remains bitter about his arrest and subsequent

conviction and denies he was running a prostitution

ring. He says he was unfairly singled out in a sea of

rich players who move in and around the Cannes Film

Festival’s second-biggest business after movies: sex.

“Why me?” asks Nahas during a phone interview with

THR from Beirut. “The police know what goes on during

the film festival, and they turn a blind eye. But they went

after me. Why? Because I worked for Gadhafi.”

They Can Make up to

$40,000 a Night’

Every year, women ranging from what the French call

putes de luxes (high-priced call girls), who charge an

ILLUSTRATIONS BY IKER AYESTARAN


SPECIAL FEATURE

average of $4,000 a night, to local streetwalkers, who

normally get little more than $50 or $75 an hour turning

tricks in nearby Nice, converge on Cannes for what one

Parisian hooker calls “the biggest payday of the year.”

The influx is hard not to notice, even just strolling the

Croisette. “Hookers stand out in Cannes. They’re the

ones who are well-dressed and not smoking,” tweeted

Roger Ebert in 2010.

“We all look forward to it,” says a local prostitute in

Cannes who goes by the name of Daisy on her website

but declined to give her surname. Daisy is one of many

independent escorts who have their own websites and

usually avoid going to hotels and bars — except during

the festival. “There’s a lot of competition because there

are so many girls, but the local ones have an advantage.

We know the hotel concierges.”

The local prostitutes, says Daisy, routinely drop cash

off with concierges at the town’s top hotels. In return, if

they are lucky, concierges sometimes steer clients their

way. During the 10-day festival, an estimated 100 to

200 hookers stroll in and out of the big hotels every day,

according to hotel sources.

Nahas says the money can be bigger than most people

realize. The most beautiful call girls, he says, know to

target the high-end hotels “where all the Arabs stay.”

They can make up to $40,000 a night,” says Nahas.

“Arabs are the most generous people in the world. If they

like you, they will give you a lot of money. At Cannes,

they carry money around in wads of 10,000 euros. To

them, it’s just like paper. They don’t even like to count it.

They’ll just hand it to the girls without thinking. I know

the system.”

The serious action starts after 10 p.m., he says. Call girls

sit in the lobby, and prospective clients check them out.

“It’s all done with hand signals,” he says. “The guys

signal their room numbers with their hands and the girls

follow them.”

The Organized Rings

Some of the “luxury prostitutes” come as part of an

organized ring, the type of operation that police said

Nahas ran, and others fly in small groups on their

own, mainly from Paris, London, Venezuela, Brazil,

Morocco and Russia. Still others take advantage of the

other big event taking place on the Cote d’Azur, the

Monaco Grand Prix, and rent hotel rooms in the town of

Beausoleil, just behind Monaco, and commute between

there and Cannes, a 40-minute drive.

Nahas denies he was running a prostitution ring but

admits he arranged for women to come to Cannes during

the festival. His job, he says, was to pick them up at Nice

International Airport, bring them to the port at Cannes

and place them on small boats that took them out to

Gadhafi’s yacht, the Che Guevara, and other luxury vessels.

“I was not party to anything else,” insists Nahas. “I

don’t know what took place between any of them. I had

no part of it. They may have just been there to talk and

have fun.”

Until his 2007 arrest, Nahas was best known for

throwing a $1 million birthday party for Moatessem

Gadhafi in Marrakesh in 2004. He paid Enrique Iglesias

$500,000 to attend and flew in Carmen Electra for

$50,000, he says. Kevin Costner also attended.

“Gadhafi never touched Carmen,” says Nahas. “In

fact, she was a little angry because she felt he didn’t pay

enough attention to her. But Gadhafi was shy, believe it

“Please. There

are 30 or 40

yachts in the

bay, and every

boat has about

10 girls on it;

they are usually

models, and

they are usually

nude or half

nude. ... It’s been

going on there

for 60 years.”

ELIE NAHAS

Cannes

Loves Call Girls

in Film Too

The Mother and

the Whore

Palme d’Or nominee (1973)

Jean Eustache’s suicidally

downbeat movie about a

menage-a-trois gone sour

caused a furor, with French

newspaper Le Figaro calling it

“an insult to the nation.”

▲ Taxi Driver

Palme d’Or winner (1976)

Robert De Niro’s mad cabbie

hunts Manhattan for “whores,

skunk pussies, buggers,

queens,” and finds instead

12-year-old hooker, Iris (Jodie

Foster), who needs rescuing.

Mona Lisa

Palme d’Or nominee (1986)

Though it didn’t win the Palme,

Bob Hoskins took best actor

honors as the exasperated,

emotionally entangled chauffeur

for a standoffish call girl

(Cathy Tyson) who needs him,

but not in the way he wants.

Moulin Rouge!

Palme d’Or nominee (2001)

As courtesan Satine,

Nicole Kidman is the belle

of the Belle Epoque in Baz

Luhrmann’s musical spectacle.

Young & Beautiful

Palme d’Or nominee (2013)

Marine Vacth plays a scholarly,

shy 17-year-old who startles

her bourgeois folks by cutting

class to service men in

hotels for 300 euros a pop.

— TIM APPELO

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 34

or not. Women had to make the first move.” (A spokesperson

for Electra could not be reached for comment.)

Nahas — who was jailed for 11 months after his arrest

in France then released for lack of proof — says the

younger Gadhafi sent him $25,000 a month to live on

after his reputation was ruined in Lebanon and he no

longer could work. Since Gadhafi’s death, the money has

dried up. “I cry blood for him every day,” says Nahas.

When Nahas was arrested, police confiscated an

address book that contained dozens of names and contact

information for some of the richest princes and potentates

in the Middle East. Nahas admits that he knew them

all but denies that he procured hookers for them.

But even if he did, says Nahas, there are plenty more

like him all over Cannes during the festival.

“Please,” says Nahas. “Every year during the festival

there are 30 or 40 luxury yachts in the bay at Cannes,

and every boat belongs to a very rich person. Every boat

has about 10 girls on it; they are usually models, and

they are usually nude or half nude. It’s drugs and drink

and beautiful women. Go out on one and you’ll see. The

girls are all waiting for their envelopes at the end of the

night. It’s been going on there for 60 years.”

The Envelope, Please

A “gift” contained in an envelope, according to Nahas

and a number of veteran Cannes escort women interviewed

by THR, is how prostitutes get paid at the festival.

“It’s always a gift,” says a Russian woman who oversees

a Paris-based escort agency with branches in London

and Dubai. “Clients are told to put the money in an

envelope and write ‘gift’ on the outside of it.”

Women installed on yachts in Cannes during the film

festival are called “yacht girls,” and the line between

professional prostitutes and B- or C-list Hollywood

actresses and models who accept payment for sex with

rich older men is sometimes very blurred, explains one

film industry veteran.

“You’d definitely recognize more than a few names from

Hollywood,” he says. “These are actresses who made bad

career choices and fell off the radar. They tell themselves

what they’re doing at Cannes is OK, that they’re just on

dates with rich men, when the reality is they’re doing

what prostitutes do. But they like the money.”

Carole Raphaelle Davis — a longtime French-

American film and TV actress (2 Broke Girls, Angel) who

grew up in international circles in Paris, London and

Thailand — says few people realize that some prominent

and moneyed society women spent many years as highpriced

prostitutes.

Davis, who is married to TV comedy writer Kevin

Rooney and divides her time between France and

Beverly Hills, says she has two acquaintances who used

to work the Cannes Film Festival as well as other exotic

locales around the world. “I could never understand

how they could do what they did,” says Davis.

Davis says she has been propositioned by some of the

richest men in the world but could never imagine sleeping

with them for money.

She says the women she knew “traveled the world like

jet-setters,” and one of them eventually ended up marrying

one of the richest men in France.

“This woman didn’t even enjoy sex, she told me,” says

Davis. “But she didn’t mind it, either. She didn’t mind

sleeping with men who were repulsive. She said it never

lasted more than five minutes, so it wasn’t that bad.”


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STYLE

THE CANNES

DINING

PLAYBOOK

The South of France has a restaurant to suit every agenda,

whether it’s to discuss a deal away from prying eyes — or to

celebrate a must-have acquisition over $150 tasting menus

By Dana Kennedy

IF YOU WANT:

PLATS DU JOUR AND

PEOPLE WATCHING

The splashiest venue, literally, is

the seaside 1 Z PLAGE (73 boulevard

de la Croisette), across the

street from the Hotel Martinez.

Stars from Jessica Chastain to

Jodie Foster are drawn to its rows

of square white umbrellas to sip

signature Moet mimosas and tuck

into roast fish. Just up the street

and framed by floor-to-ceiling

windows is the Michelin onestarred

2 PARK 45 (45 boulevard

de la Croisette), where Jude Law

has been seen among diners eating

the sea bass with pistachio

nuts and other light Med fare.

Situated just up the coast on the

way to Antibes is Brad Pitt and

Angelina Jolie’s favorite spot,

3 CHEZ TETOU (8 avenue des Freres

Roustan, Golfe Juan). Once a

beach shack, it’s still got a homey

vibe that dissipates once you

see the menu: $100 for bouillabaisse.

Cash only, please. Director

and The Bling Ring producer

Roman Coppola recommends

ordering the beignets for dessert,

which are served with huge pots

of jam. “Whenever we’ve been

to Cannes, my family and I have

always made a stop here,” he says.

For those who want to get out

of town but still make their

whereabouts known, the famed

4 COLOMBE D’OR (1 place General

de Gaulle) in the artsy hillside

town of St.-Paul de Vence is

beloved by the likes of Hugh Grant

and producer Jerry Weintraub.

They have very good food,” says

Weintraub. “If you can’t eat good

food in France, you can’t eat good

food anywhere.” The grand, woodpaneled

dining room is stocked

with paintings by Matisse and

Picasso. The can’t-miss dessert is

the Grand Marnier souffle.

Inland along the Riviera, the

still-celebrated 5 LE MOULIN DE

MOUGINS (1028 avenue Notre-

Dame de Vie), situated in a 16th

century mill in Mougins, is

where top toques Alain Ducasse

and Daniel Boulud got their start.

Further afield but worth the

schlep is Nice’s legendary 6 LA

PETITE MAISON (11 rue St.-Francois

de Paule), where Elton John and

Madonna famously bumped into

each other last year and reconciled

after their latest feud. Enjoy

Nicoise specialties like the zucchini

blossom fritters.

IF YOU WANT:

FEASTING FAR FROM

THE PALAIS

The closest option to town that’s

just far enough for an undisturbed

business dinner is the

famed 7 RESTAURANT MANTEL (22

rue Ste.-Antoine) in Cannes’ hilly,

historic district, Le Suquet. Try

the starter of white bean cream

soup with white summer truffles.

For an adventure, hop a ferry and

5

Mougins

1 2 7

Cannes

FRANCE

E80

Golfe Juan

3

8

10

4

St.-Paul

de Vence

9

Biot

Ile St.-Honorat

Vence

A8

alight 20 minutes later for lunch

on the Ile St.-Honorat, where

Cistercian monks still live and

work in the ninth century

Abbey Lerins. They also run

8 LA TONNELLE, a seafront bistro

with wine from the abbey’s own

vineyards. A bit inland in the

otherwise pedestrian village of

Biot is the Michelin-starred

9 LES TERRAILLERS (11 Chemin

Neuf). Chef Michael Fulci, who

apprenticed with Ducasse, offers

a €110 (around $150) tasting

menu. The reward for heading to

the hills of Vence not only is the

extraordinary food at the two-star

10 CHATEAU SAINT-MARTIN AND SPA

(2490 avenue des Templiers) but

the panoramic view of the Cote

d’Azur stretching from the Italian

border to St. Tropez. Look away

6

Nice

The Most Expensive

Dish on the Riviera?

Prepare to pay $205 for an order

of the San Remo Gamberoni, or prawns,

served with rock fish gelee and caviar,

in the ornate dining room of the Hotel

de Paris’ Louis XV restaurant in Monaco.

11

Monaco

often enough to enjoy restaurant

specialties like the pigeon with

flakes of chocolate macaroon.

Finally, for those who want to

trade movie royalty for the real

thing, indulge in the fantastically

over-the-top 11 LOUIS XV restaurant,

an homage to the monarch

at the Hotel de Paris (place du

Casino) in Monaco. “Take a seat

close to the French doors, which

will most likely be open, so that

with your left eye you savor the

gold and glitz and with your

right eye [the scene outside the]

casino,” says French Rivierabased

producer Miodrag Certic.

Emblematic of Louis XV’s selfstyled

“haute couture of taste”

approach is the dish of roasted

Pyrenean baby lamb, seasoned

with Espelette pepper.

From left: The seafront La Tonnelle

on Ile St.-Honorat, run by Cistercian monks,

serves up such dishes as gnocchi with

mussels and Mediterranean sea bass grilled

with herbs; a wok-cooked entree at Z Plage,

across from Cannes’ Hotel Martinez.

LOUIS XV RESTAURANT, DISH: T. DHELLEMMES (2). WOK: COURTESY OF GRAND HYATT CANNES. LA TONNELLE: COURTESY

OF ABBAYE DE LERINS. FOSTER: KEVORK DJANSEZIAN/GETTY IMAGES. COPPOLA: TODD WILLIAMSON/INVISION/AP.

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 38


FILMING

IN CROATIA

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SPECIAL

FEATURE

SOUTH

KOREA

Park Chan-wook made

his Hollywood debut

this year with the

thriller Stoker, starring

Nicole Kidman.

THE SOUTH KOREAN

NEW WAVE EXPANDS

It isn’t all about Psy: With box office booming and a seemingly endless supply of film

talent, the peninsula is ready to take on Hollywood (with China next) BY HYO-WON LEE

PSY MAY HAVE BEEN ONE OF THE

biggest stories of the past year, but beyond

the Gangnam Style craze that swept the

globe, South Korea also enjoyed a recordbreaking

year through its film sector. In

2012 the country moved up to No. 7 in box office (from

No. 9 in 2011), taking in $1.3 billion. With domestic admissions

cracking the 100-million mark for the first time, two

local releases acheived blockbuster status: Masquerade,

which earned $80 million globally, and The Thieves, which

grossed $83.5 million. In March Lee Hwan-kyung’s Miracle

in Cell No. 7 became the eighth Korean movie to join

the 10-million admissions club, with a worldwide gross of

$81 million; it even outperformed the mighty Iron Man 3.

Now Korean filmmakers are beginning to think the

unthinkable in terms of global expansion by aiming for

the two biggest targets: first the U.S., and then China.

“Korean cinema is no longer limited solely to niche

fans of Asian films, but is beginning to appeal more to

general American audiences,” says Lee Byung-hun, 42,

who enjoys superstar status in South Korea and has been

called the Brad Pitt of Korea (a sentiment loudly echoed

by the 50,000 screaming women

who greeted him at a fan event in a

Tokyo stadium). Cast in Red 2 over

Jackie Chan and Chow Yun Fat,

Lee notes that his hit Masquerade

premiered at the increasingly

film-centric Los Angeles County

Museum of Art, which will

welcome the Academy of Motion

Picture Arts and Sciences museum

to its campus in 2017.

Elsewhere, Park Chan-wook,

director of Byung-hun’s 2000 hit JSA: Joint Security

Area, made his U.S. debut this year with the Nicole Kidman

thriller Stoker; Korea’s noir gangster thriller New

World, which sold more than 4.5 million tickets in Korea,

was picked up for six figures by Sony for remake rights;

and Bong Joon-ho’s eagerly anticipated sci-fi epic Snowpiercer,

starring Chris Evans and Tilda Swinton, will be

released worldwide this summer.

“We’ve already had a lot of winners at festivals like

Cannes and Berlin and Venice,” says Kang Woo-suk,

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 42

Bae Doo-na, who had

a featured role in

Cloud Atlas, next will

be seen opposite

Channing Tatum in

Jupiter Ascending.


· The internet’s top English resource for all things Korean cinema

· Available across all mobile platforms and on SNS

· Free online screening platform for film professionals (screening.koreanfilm.or.kr)

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MEET ME at the

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Ryan Werner

Marian Koltai-Levine, PMK-BNC

Michael Benaroya, CEO, Benaroya Pictures

Lisa Perkins, VP, International Marketing & Publicity, Exclusive Media

Moderated by Dana Harris, Editor-in-Chief, Indiewire

3:00 PM | INDUSTRY IN FOCUS:

DIGITAL HOLLYWOOD

Col Needham, Founder & CEO, IMDb

Jonathan Marlow, Co-founder/Chief Content Officer, Fandor

Steve Beckman, FilmBuff

Amy McGee, ZEFR/Movieclips.com

Moderated by Kevin Winston, Digital LA

TOMORROW, MAY 19

3:00 PM | IN CONVERSATION:

AMERICAN DIRECTORS

IN CANNES

Jim Mickle, We Are What We Are

David Lassiter, The Opportunist

David Lowery, Ain’t Them Bodies Saints

James Toback, Seduced and Abandoned

Moderated by Aaron Hillis,

Video Free Brooklyn

MONDAY, MAY 20

11:00 AM | INDUSTRY IN FOCUS:

FINANCING A FILM IN 2013

Nick LoPiccolo, Paradigm

Peter Trinh, ICM Partners

Deborah McIntosh, WME

Paul Miller, Film Financing, Doha Film Institute

Bill Lischak, Co-President of OddLot

Entertainment

Moderated by Pamela McClintock,

The Hollywood Reporter

3:00 PM | INDUSTRY IN FOCUS:

STATE OF THE INDIE

FILM INDUSTRY

Tom Quinn, Radius-TWC

Michael Sugar, Anonymous Content

Rena Ronson, UTA

Jim Berk, Participant Media

John Cooper, Sundance Institute

Moderated by Pete Hammond,

Deadline Hollywood

TUESDAY, MAY 21

2:00 PM | INDUSTRY IN FOCUS:

AMERICAN PRODUCERS

IN CANNES

David Lancaster, Only God Forgives

Nick Schumaker, We Are What We Are

Jay Van Hoy and Lars Knudsen,

Ain’t Them Bodies Saints

Emily Wachtel, Shepard & Dark

Moderated by Scott Macaulay,

Filmmaker Magazine, @FilmmakerMag

3:00 PM | INDUSTRY IN FOCUS:

MUSIC IN FILM

Cliff Martinez, Composer, Only God Forgives

Gingger Shankar, Composer,

Monsoon Shootout

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 22

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3:30 PM | IN CONVERSATION:

WILL FORTE (NEBRASKA)

Moderated By Kyle Buchanan, Vulture

THURSDAY, MAY 23

3:00 PM | SPECIAL FILM

CRITICS PANEL:

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Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

Kenneth Turan, LA Times

Eric Kohn, IndieWire

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SOUTH KOREA SPECIAL FEATURE

whose Fists of Legend received a limited release in the

U.S. in April, “but now Hollywood is watching the Korean

film industry. It’s amazing that a Korean director, Kim

Ji-woon, directed Schwarzenegger in The Last Stand.”

Since more than 80 percent of Korean films rely on

digital release for revenue, most U.S. theaters don’t

clamor for foreign product, and American advertising

costs are sky-high, Kang is thrilled at the growing VOD

market offered by Netflix, Hulu, Amazon and YouTube.

“Digital has made it easier for us to find all kinds of

audiences,” he says. “Two years ago it was a dream, now

it’s an ordinary day, business as usual.”

When Netflix began accepting 20 titles from Choi

Joon-hwan, CEO of CJ Entertainment, Korea’s biggest

studio, he asked all his employees to click on at least five

to 10 Korean films a day to add more to Netflix numbers.

It turned out he didn’t have to: “I thought 100 clicks a

day would help! Tens and twenties of thousands came

up. Even Netflix was surprised.”

Choi has bigger plans still for China, where CJ has

patiently navigated its notoriously tricky film bureaucracies.

“We’ve been working with China for 10 years,” says

Choi. “We have theaters, production companies, home

shopping in China. They have a lot of money, so it’s hard

to compete with them sizewise. So we focus on a kind of

niche market, concentrating on high-level films.”

CJ’s latest Chinese co-production is the comedy

A Wedding Invitation, in Mandarin with English subtitles,

produced by CJ and five Chinese companies and distributed

by China Lion Film Distribution. The film opened

April 12 in China and already has grossed $35 million.

It bows May 24 in the U.S. “It’s not our first Chinese coproduction,”

says CJ svp of marketing Angela Killoren,

“but it’s our first to hit number one there.”

China’s cap on foreign films is an obstacle to Korean

exports, and co-production with China is a dicey art. In

an effort to streamline negotiations, the Korean Film

Council (KOFIC), has ramped up efforts to showcase

1

Korean film talent overseas, particularly China. Last

year KOFIC spent about $1.5 million launching an International

Co-production Team, a highlight of which was

setting up the Korean Film Business Center in Beijing in

April. KOFIC has sponsored trips to the Chinese capital

so South Korean film talent can meet with local producers

to establish the all-important relationships that are

necessary for doing business in China.

This year the organization has allotted just over $1 million

to support international collaborations in China,

the U.S., France and Japan. “KOFIC has been supporting

international co-productions since five, six years ago,

but it is now much more systematic, and meetings are

held every three months,” says Kim Young-gu, manager

of the International Coproduction Team.

Whether or not the South Korean expansion succeeds

as planned, Lee — one of the first Asian actors to leave

hand and footprints in front of TCL Chinese Theatre

(formerly Grauman’s) — admits to being a bit starstruck

about more collaborations with Hollywood in the future.

“It still feels new to me,” he says. “To be working

alongside these big Hollywood stars I grew up watching

in the movies, I can’t believe it.”

3

1 Kim Ji-woon on the set of The

Last Stand. 2 Snowpiercer director

Bong Joon-ho. 3 Lee Byung-hun,

the “Brad Pitt of Korea.”

2

THE DICAPRIO OF SOUTH KOREA SAYS NO THANKS TO HOLLYWOOD

Superstar Jung Woo-sung says filmmaking in Asia is so hot he has no desire to cross over in the West

The “Leonardo DiCaprio of Korea” has

been expanding his horizons in Asia, and

says the region has matured so much that

for established stars like himself, the lure

of Hollywood is not what it once was.

Early in his career Jung Woo-sung drew

comparisons to James Dean thanks to

his breakout role in the coming-of-age

blockbuster Beat in 1997, but his career

increasingly has drawn comparisons to

that of DiCaprio.

Like the Great Gatsby star, Jung —

once known primarily as a heartthrob

— has delivered on his early promise by

taking on a challenging array of roles,

from romantic leads to action heroes, to

There definitely seems to be more

demand for Asian actors in Hollywood,

but I think debuting there just for the

sake of debuting there would be wrong.”

dynamic character studies. But his next

part — in the upcoming thriller Cold

Eyes — is sure to give his loyal, pan-Asian

female fan base a bit of a shock: For the

first time Jung will play an unambiguously

evil character, carrying out several

disturbingly violent acts.

“In the past I’ve played romantic assassin

types, but this time he really is a bad

guy — he does some horribly violent

things that are definitely going to earn the

film an R rating,” the 40-year-old actor

says. “Quite a few mainstream Korean

movies are experimenting with new types

of characters, especially those that are

not so typical.”

Although Jung’s recent work has given

him increasing exposure to non-Asian

audiences — most notably the John Woodirected

Reign of Assassins, Asia’s answer

to Mr. and Mrs. Smith, in which he appears

John Woo’s

Reign of

Assassins

(2010)

opposite Michelle Yeoh — Jun says he’s

not particularly interested in attempting

the risky high-wire act of a Hollywood

crossover, as some of his A-list Korean

contemporaries have recently pursued,

such as Lee Byung-hun (G.I. Joe 1 and 2,

Red 2).

There definitely seems to be more

demand for Asian actors in Hollywood,

but I think debuting there just for the

sake of debuting there would be wrong,”

he says. “Besides, there are so many

intriguing projects here in Asia right now,

I don’t necessarily feel compelled to

look beyond.” — H.L.

SOUTH KOREA CREDIT: GI JOE: ©PARAMOUNT/COURTESY EVERETT COLLECTION

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 46


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PRESENTS

FILM BAZAAR

20 - 24 NOVEMBER 2013, MARRIOTT RESORT, GOA

SOUTH ASIA’S GLOBAL FILM MARKET

Celebrates

The Lunchbox

Ritesh Batra

Semaine De La Critique

(Film Bazaar Screenwriters’ Lab 2011)

&

Monsoon Shootout

Amit Kumar

Festival de Cannes - Midnight Screenings

(Film Bazaar Co-production Market 2008)


Q&A

DIRECTOR

PROLIFIC,” “CONTROVERSIAL” AND “BAD

boy of Japanese cinema” are some of the

tags often attached to Takashi Miike.

With more than 70 productions to his

credit, there’s no doubting his work ethic, but

categorizing a director who has made horror,

gangster flicks, fantasy, action, comedies and

a 3D samurai drama is not quite so simple. His

2003 Gozu, a yakuza-horror movie, was the

first straight-to-video production selected for

Cannes’ Directors’ Fortnight section, while

in 2011 Hara-kiri: Death of a Samurai became

the first 3D film in the main competition. This

year, Shield of Straw (based on the book Wara

no Tate by Kazuhiro Kiuchi) sees Miike back in

contention for the Palme d’Or. The film follows

a special police unit’s 750-mile trek across

Japan protecting a suspect with a 1 billion yen

($10 million) bounty on his head offered by the

wealthy grandfather of the 7-year-old girl he

murdered. The single Miike, 52, spoke to THR

in Tokyo about the film, his unrelenting schedule,

why making comedies is even tougher

than making horror and how Japanese cinema

has become too safe.

Shield of Straw is an action-thriller and quite

different from a lot of the films usually found in

competition at Cannes. Were you surprised when it

was announced?

Yeah, very surprised. And not just me. I think

everyone was like, “Really, in competition?”

And it’s a Japanese action film, which is a genre

that has been largely forgotten. Now, if you

think of action, it’s Hollywood or Korean films.

But Cannes selects a wide range of films: That

is one of the great things about the festival. But

even an action film, it’s not just about showing

action, it’s the characters involved and the

sequence of events that leads to those happenings.

The thousands of people that come to the

theater have a lot of different reasons to watch a

movie, so if I can hold their attention and keep

them all entertained, then I’m satisfied.

How did the idea for Shield of Straw come about?

The producers at Warner asked me about it,

but I looked at it and thought it was full of

parts that were impossible to film in Japan.

You basically can’t get permission to film on

the bullet train or the highways. We looked

into building a full set for the bullet train, but

that was too expensive. So we decided to try

and go to Taiwan and shoot on the high-speed

trains there, but they hadn’t let anyone film

on those before either. But after a lot of hard

negotiations, the authorities in Taiwan gave us

permission. When I was making straight-tovideo

yakuza gangster films at the beginning

of my career, I shot a few of them in Taiwan.

I got back in touch with some of the producers

I’d worked with back then, and they really

helped us out.

Takashi Miike

The bad boy of Japanese

cinema discusses his

unexpected return to Cannes

and why he thinks restrictions

on violence in movies ‘is

good for business, but not

filmmaking’ By Gavin J. Blair

When you were doing those straight-to-video

movies, you naturally made a lot of films every year.

Most directors slow down after they move out of

that world, but you’ve pretty much kept going at

the same rate. Why?

If there’s an opportunity to make a film and

my schedule allows it, I don’t see a reason

not to do it. Of course there are directors

who choose not to make so many films, and

that may be right for them, and stops them

from making mistakes. But for me, being on

set and solving problems of how to shoot a

scene, that’s everyday life and what I need to

be doing. Even when there

seems to be things that can’t

be done — like with Shield of

Straw — until you try, you

don’t know.

You’ve said that you don’t think

about how a film will be seen by

audiences when you’re making

it. Is that really the case?

Even if you think about

how people will see a film,

VITAL STATS

Nationality Japanese

Born Aug. 24, 1960

Festival Entry Shield of Straw

(Wara no Tate)

Selected Filmography

Audition (1999), Ichi the Killer (2001),

Gozu (2003), Sukiyaki Western

Django (2007), 13 Assassins (2010),

Hara-kiri: Death of a Samurai (2011)

Notable awards KNF award, 2000

Rotterdam International Film Festival

(Audition); jury prize, 2004 Sitges

International Film Festival (Gozu)

I don’t think that’s possible. For example, if

you think this is the kind of film that will go

down well with salarymen [Japanese office

workers], there are a hundred different types

of salarymen working for a hundred different

companies and with a hundred different personalities.

So I think it’s rude to think that “an

audience” that comes to the theater whom I’ve

never met and don’t know will like this part

or this film. I can only concentrate on getting

the best performances and shooting the best

scenes possible.

You’ve made films across such a wide range of

genres. Do you have a favorite?

Firstly I made horror, and that’s tough. Always

thinking how to scare and shock people,

it’s almost like bringing a curse on yourself.

Though there’s a strange kind of pleasure in

that too. Actually the hardest films to make

are comedies. In normal life, funny things happen

by accident; to re-create those by design

in a film takes real technique. If you take

those two out, then for me, it’s gangster films.

I don’t want to be involved with the yakuza in

real life, but they can do in an evening what

politicians take 10 years to do. The yakuza are

straight-up beings, they want what they want;

if they betray people — it’s absolute betrayal.

Japanese of my generation try to get through

life without stepping on anyone’s toes; in

some ways that’s unnatural and stressful. The

yakuza are different: They live short lives but

live and die on their own terms — it’s exciting

to portray that.

Talking of horror and yakuza films, you’re famous

for shockingly violent and grotesque scenes.

Do you ever worry about the effect it might have

on people?

Regarding the responsibility that a director

has to society, first of all, there are ratings.

There’s freedom to make films, and freedom

to watch them or not. It’s not like I take those

films to a school and force kids to watch them.

In Japan now, films are very safe. When I was

young and went to old cinemas, they had a

distinctive feel, an adult smell about them.

As you got in your seat and the lights went

down, there was a feeling of excitement: What

if the film is scarier than I thought it’s going

to be? You’re taken into that

world. Nowadays, you can

sit in the theater and know

it’s going to be safe. That’s

good for business, but not

for filmmaking. I have lines

in my mind about what is

too violent or shocking to

show. It’s a difficult issue. I

don’t think a film that has no

effect on people or society is

a good film.

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 50


MultiVisionnaire’s Market Premiere

Action • Sci-Fi • Horror

Action Comedy / 129 min. / Potugual / 2012

Horror / 100 min. / Philippines / 2013

For full lineup, visit www.MultiVisionnaire.com/cannes

Sci-Fi Action / 85 min. / Canada / 2013

Horror Thriller / 89 min. / USA / 2013

MultiVisionnaire Pictures • www.MultiVisionnaire.com

Stand Phone: +33 (0)4.92.99.32.07 • Mobile: +33 (0)6.18.88.27.85

Los Angeles: +1 626.737.8357 • Email: Market@MultiVisionnaire.com

MultiVisionnaire at Cannes

Stand: RIVIERA D2


REVIEWS

Zhou San (Wang)

is more menacing

than he first

appears.

A Touch of Sin

China returns to the Cannes competition with Jia Zhang-ke’s

sobering view of festering discontent as the gap between the

country’s rich and poor expands BY DAVID ROONEY

THE WIDENING CHASM OF SOCIAL INEQUALITY

separating the moneyed powerbrokers from the struggling

masses — not to mention the despair and violence bred

by that disparity — is a subject of saddening universality.

Exploring those thematic lines in A Touch of Sin (Tian Zhu

Ding), Chinese auteur Jia Zhang-ke only occasionally strikes chords

that resonate, despite having distinguished himself as one of the most

perceptive chroniclers of his country’s transition into 21st century

nationhood in films like Platform and The World.

The English-language title of his seventh narrative feature is a play

on King Hu’s 1971 martial-arts epic, A Touch of Zen. And while that

seems more an homage than a significant structural inspiration, there

certainly are genre elements here that are new to Jia’s work. But tonal

inconsistency, lethargic pacing and a shortage of fresh insight dilute

the storytelling efficacy of this quartet of loosely interconnected episodes

involving ordinary people pushed over the edge.

As always, the visual compensations are considerable thanks to

regular cinematographer Yu Lik-wai, whose eye for arresting detail is

equally sharp whether trained on natural landscapes, assembly-line

industrial communities, bleak mining towns or the crumbling remnants

of China’s past.

While the distinctions among the four far-flung principal settings

and their various dialects will mean little to audiences unversed in

Chinese geography and linguistics, a strong sense does emerge of a

rootless populace displaced by sweeping cultural change and economic

necessity. When one character living paycheck-topaycheck

responds to the suggestion of trying his luck

abroad by saying that the rest of the world is broke, and

that’s why so many are descending on China, the sardonic

edge to Jia’s observation will be lost on nobody.

The film opens with a punchy bout of bloodshed as

three kids brandishing hatchets hold up passing motorcyclist

Zhou San (Wang Baoqiang). But they are foiled

when he pulls out a gun and dispatches them. That

drifter resurfaces later in the least focused of the film’s

four narrative strands.

More satisfying is the story of coalmining company

employee Dahai (Jiang Wu), a disgruntled former classmate

of the corporate boss, who, along with the village

officials, has forgotten his promises of profit sharing

while whizzing around on his private jet. Having failed

to convince the firm’s accountant to expose its financial

inequities, Dahai disrupts the media moment of the

chief’s return to town, met by a committee of ceremonial

drummers and workers incentivized to look happy.

In one of the film’s more startling bursts of violence, he

gets reprimanded with a metal spade to the head.

The other compelling section has frequent Jia muse

Zhao Tao as Xiao Yu as a receptionist in a sauna. Jia

sets up the knife in her rucksack a little too pointedly.

But there’s a captivating momentum to the accumulation

of frustrations that lead her to use it on an arrogant

massage customer who refuses to accept that she’s

strictly front desk-only.

The fourth and final chapter concerns Xiao Hui (Luo

Lanshan), a feckless young man who inadvertently

causes an accident and is to be docked for the salary of

his injured co-worker for the duration of his hospitalization.

This prompts him to flee to a succession of shortlived

jobs — including one as a greeter at a sex club called The Golden

Age, featuring hostesses in sexy versions of Chinese military uniforms.

In that concluding section, glimpses of tech factories in the international

free-enterprise town of Dongguan inevitably conjure associations

with the controversial plants where Apple products are manufactured.

Jia emphasizes the dehumanizing aspect of these environments by

showing a grim worker-housing complex called Oasis of Prosperity. The

fact that wealth and influence are accessible only to the privileged few

is acknowledged throughout the film with a borderline heavy hand.

The four fictionalized plot strands have their roots in real-life tabloid

cases involving three murders and a suicide. But as assembled here,

they make for a schematic narrative patchwork with scant emotional

involvement. Many similar points about the growing discontent in postreform

China have been made more trenchantly by Jia in his other

films, and the use of traditional opera as a mocking counterpoint to

contemporary experience now seems somewhat pat.

Despite solid performances and haunting images, there’s a disappointing

banality to the film. Either the Dahai or the Xiao Yu story might have

benefited from more robust development to make a standalone drama.

But incorporated into this too-diffuse examination of escalating violence

in a recklessly modernized society, their impact is dulled.

In Competition

Cast Zhao Tao, Jiang Wu, Wang Baoqiang, Luo Lanshan

Director-screenwriter Jia Zhang-ke // 133 minutes

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 53


REVIEWS

The Major

Filmmaker Yury Bykov’s second feature, starring

Denis Shvedov and Irina Nizina, takes a gritty look at

Russian police corruption BY JORDAN MINTZER

Like an episode of The Shield

transplanted to the snow-swept

Russian countryside, writerdirector

Yury Bykov’s The Major

is a tense, handheld police thriller

filled with dirty cops, abrupt

violence and a relentless, overriding

sense of nastiness. It’s also

rather heavy-handed in parts and

not necessarily original in the

story department, but its rapid

pacing and potent performances

should make it a viable pickup for

distributors specializing in exotic

genre fare.

Premiering in competition in

the Critics’ Week sidebar, Bykov’s

second feature, following 2010’s

Live!, is also a one-man-band

affair, with the filmmaker credited

as writer, editor and composer, as

well as playing a character who

Sobolev (Shvedov) makes one mistake after another.

gets an, er, major ass-whipping

from various members of the local

police force. So while there’s no

doubt that the 32-year-old Bykov

is committed to his art, he also

overreaches in places — especially

with the film’s excessive score —

but otherwise shows a knack for

building intense set pieces, including

a nail-biting shootout that

makes strong use of off-screen

space and vivid sound design.

Set within 24 hours, the action

kicks off quickly enough with

commander Sergey Sobolev

(Denis Shvedov) racing his SUV

across icy country roads to join his

wife, who’s giving birth at a clinic

in nearby Ryazan, a small city

southeast of Moscow. Along the

way, his car skids into a 7-yearold

boy, killing him instantly. But

rather than calling an ambulance

or doing anything remotely

reasonable, Sobolev takes the

kid’s wailing mother, Irina (Irina

Nizina), hostage and phones a fellow

officer, Pasha (Ilya Isaev), to

come and clean up the mess.

What follows is a very long day

of unethical policing, as Sobolev

and Pasha try to cover up the

accident. The bloody chain of

events spirals further and further

out of control, until Sobolev takes

stock of his actions, leading to a

denouement that pits him against

the corrupt unit he has so desperately

been trying to protect.

Filmed with lots of gritty,

over-the-shoulder camerawork,

The Major is mostly a well-paced

affair, even if Bykov misses some

plot points (whatever happened

to the wife?) and resorts to dramatic

overkill in order to prove his

point — basically that Russian law

enforcement is one big drunken

motherload of corruption.

Alongside the solid, if rugged,

tech credits, the performances are

keyed up all the way through, with

Nizina particularly explosive as

the tormented mom and Isaev —

who looks like a Slavic Matthias

Schoenaerts — slick and scary as

the ruthless, ball-busting Pasha.

Critics’ Week

Cast Denis Shvedov, Irina Nizina

Director-screenwriter

Yury Bykov

99 minutes

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Joe Oppenheimer (BBC Films), Ben Roberts (the BFI Film Fund)

and representatives from Film4 in discussion.

Join director Clio Barnard, producer

Tracy O’Riordan, Lila Rawlings (story development),

plus film funders Lizzie Franke (BFI) and

Katherine Butler (Film4) in discussion.

Laurence Sargent from Sargent-Disc chairs a panel of experts

talking international film finance opportunities. Panel includes

Joseph Chianese (EP Financial Solutions), producers Pippa Cross

(Leave To Remain) and Chris Curling (Last Station), Christian Baute

from Headline Pictures (The Invisible Woman), Dominique Malet

(Cofiloisirs), James Bramsden (Saffery Champness) and

Milan Popelka (Film Nation).

Angus Finney, PFM project manager, focuses on

the financial landscape, budgeting and packaging.

Director Ruairi Robinson and members of the

cast and crew discuss re-defining the sci-fi genre.

UK Film Council D4 051813.indd 1

5/15/13 11:51 AM


FILMS THAN CAPTIVATE THE AUDIENCE

MARKET SCREENINGS

16/05/2013

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19/05/2013

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REVIEWS

Marie (Bejo) and

her boyfriend, Samir

(Rahim), feel the

tension once her

estranged husband

resurfaces.

The Past

Berenice Bejo shines in a superbly lensed in-competition

drama from A Separation’s Asghar Farhadi

BY DEBORAH YOUNG

Iranian filmmaker Asghar Farhadi

pursues his exploration of

guilt, choice and responsibility

in a superbly written, directed

and acted drama that commands

attention every step of the way.

As in his previous work, the

story is set within a family, and

children once again are the main

victims. Here, however, Farhadi’s

nearly flawless screenplay forgoes

the explosive shocks that electrified

Fireworks Wednesday and

About Elly and drove A Separation

on to win the best foreign

language Oscar. The Past plays

like a low-key adagio in the hands

of a masterful pianist, who knows

how to give every note its just

nuance and how every single

phrase affects all the rest. A

surprisingly dynamic, unsentimental

central performance from

The Artist’s charming Berenice

Bejo should help audiences

relate to the tale, which co-stars

Ali Mosaffa and Tahar Rahim in

fine performances.

Though set in France, the story

unfolds entirely in interiors, specifically

a rambling house on the

outskirts of Paris that is as full of

doors and windows as the Tehran

apartment of A Separation. At

the request of his wife, Marie

(Beho), from whom he’s been

separated for four years, Ahmad

(Mosaffa) returns from Iran to

finalize their divorce. He doesn’t

know what a hornet’s nest he’s

walking into. Viewers are kept

on their toes trying to figure out

the tangle of adult relationships,

which have left a trail of insecure

children in their wake.

Throughout most of the film,

Ahmad is the calm, balanced

observer who sees everything

that’s going on with Marie, her

new boyfriend, Samir (Tahar

Rahim), and the three kids they

live with. But even the good

psychologist Ahmad holds some

surprises in reserve. The children

themselves are not innocent, not

“free from stain” one might say,

to touch on a major plot point.

But from Farhadi’s POV they are

always the losers in their parents’

battles.

When Marie picks Ahmad up

at the airport, their awkward distance

instantly is defined by them

talking through a thick wall of

glass. The fact that she’s driving a

borrowed car tips Ahmad off that

there’s another man in her life,

a fact soon confirmed by little

Lea (Jeanne Jestin) and Fouad

(Elyes Aguis). Instead of booking

him into a hotel, Marie insists

he stay in their house, quite an

awkward thing with the handsome,

morose Samir around. The

two men do their best to shuffle

civilly through their first meeting

at breakfast. The tension in the

household, however, gradually

rises as ugly truths will out.

Samir runs a dry cleaner not

far from the pharmacy where

Marie works. Fouad is his son

by Celine, his French wife who

has been in a coma for eight

months. Fouad likes living at

Marie’s house with his playmate

Lea, despite the fact that Marie

is nervous and fiery-tempered,

going overboard with the kids

when they misbehave. Ahmad,

who turns out not to be anybody’s

father, meanwhile has a wonderfully

persuasive way with them, a

talent that will draw him deeply

into a hidden family drama worthy

of Michael Haneke.

He’s particularly close to

the 16-year-old Lucie (Pauline

Burlet), who has been acting very

strangely lately, staying away

from the house and brimming

over with hostility for her already

edgy mom. Marie charges him

with finding out what’s wrong

with the girl. Reluctantly, but

with the skill of a TV detective,

Ahmad investigates. There are

a few red herrings, like Marie’s

sprained wrist, which coupled

with her violent temper strongly

suggests child beating. Worse

than physical violence, however,

is the poisonous climate of adult

secrets of which the teenage

Lucie seems to be a part: Why

is Samir’s wife in the hospital in

a seemingly irreversible coma,

for instance, and what is the role

played by each of the characters

in her tragedy?

The most fascinating thing

about the script is the way it

gradually unpeels motivation

without taking sides; in fact,

neither Bejo’s unbridled mother

and lover, Mosaffa’s distanced

outsider who has abandoned the

family, nor Rahim’s morose adulterer

act outside normal social

mores. At the same time, the

drama — which in other respects

could have been performed as a

play — is brilliantly heightened by

the camerawork of D.P. Mahmoud

Kalari, lending an intimate

intensity and symbolic punch to

virtually every scene.

In Competition

Cast Berenice Bejo, Tahar Rahim,

Ali Mosaffa, Pauline Burlet

Director-screenwriter

Asghar Farhadi

130 minutes

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 56


TOMORROW

13:00 9:30 Palais Cubix B 5

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BIRTHISTLE

CHARITY

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DAY OF

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CARLOS

ACOSTA

FLOWERS

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JOHN ROBERTS

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DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY VERNON LAYTON BSC EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS JONATHAN RAE JOHN ROBERTS WRIT TEN BY EIRENE HOUSTON PRODUCED BY JONATHAN RAE DIRECTED BY JOHN ROBERTS

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2013

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REVIEWS

Stranger by the Lake

Writer-director Alain Guiraudie’s latest is a murderous love

story whose serene setting hides a darker purpose

BY JORDAN MINTZER

Switching gears after several

surrealist comic features and

medium-length works, French

filmmaker Alain Guiraudie delivers

a dark and, at times, absorbing

contemplation on love, sex,

desire and murder with minimalist

homoerotic drama Stranger

by the Lake (L’Inconnu du Lac).

Set entirely in one summery

location, this story of a man’s

infatuation with a local killer is

at once lighthearted and gloomy,

and despite some longueurs, it

provides a powerful critique on

the dangers of social isolation and

carefree living.

A veteran of the Cannes Directors’

Fortnight with such films

as No Rest for the Brave and The

King of Escape, Guiraudie’s been

upgraded to Un Certain Regard

this time, which could give

this more somber effort better

international exposure. Still, the

story’s tricky subject matter and

Franck

(Deladonchamps)

seeks male

company.

numerous sex scenes — some

of them downright hardcore —

may make it a tough sell beyond

the LGBT fest and art house

circuit, along with the usual

Francophone outlets.

Establishing the film’s breezy,

lethargic tone (which may be

too lethargic for some viewers)

from the get-go, the action begins

with a simple overhead shot of

cars parked in the woods — a

shot Guiraudie returns to several

times, in varying degrees

of meaning and intensity. Eventually,

we’re introduced to a

secluded beachfront beside a

beautiful lake, which is occupied

by a handful of men swimming,

sunbathing in the buff, and then

disappearing into the adjacent

forest to engage in anonymous

hookups and humping.

One of them, Franck (Pierre

Deladonchamps) reveals himself

to be a particularly sweet and

romantic guy, especially when

it comes to his infatuation with

Michel (Christophe Paou), a

brawny Tom Selleck lookalike

who spends his days doing laps

around the pond. When Franck’s

not gawking at Michel, he makes

small talk with a lonely husband,

Henri (Patrick D’Assumcao),

who’s less interested in exploring

his lakeside libido than in finding

simple companionship with the

other men.

But the tranquil atmosphere

quickly dissipates when, one

evening, Franck sticks around

later than usual and witnesses

a young man’s drowning at the

hands of Michel. The scene — a

lengthy sundown sequence shot

entirely from Franck’s point of

view — is altogether transfixing,

accompanied only by the sounds

of flowing water and rustling

leaves. It’s as if Guiraudie were

suggesting that such an act could

hold its own bizarre appeal, and

indeed, instead of running to the

cops, Franck decides to keep his

mouth shut and soon strikes up a

relationship with Michel.

Shifting from coldblooded murder

to carnal desire, the movie

then focuses on the burgeoning

relationship between the two

men — one marked by several

explicit lovemaking scenes, and

Michel’s growing suspicion that

Franck may be onto him. Meanwhile,

nobody else at the lake

seems to care much that one of

its regulars has disappeared, and

when a detective (Jerome Chappatte)

starts snooping around, he

observes their insouciant attitudes

and at one point remarks

aloud: “You have a funny way of

loving each other.”

It’s a strong indictment of a

lifestyle that Guiraudie seems

to both lionize and condemn,

highlighting the bucolic beauty

of the men’s nonchalant couplings

while at the same time

revealing how cut off from reality

they truly are. Franck is clearly

aware of this, but so caught up in

his passion for Michel that he’s

willing to keep up appearances,

until the story shifts to a thrillerlike

denouement which, with its

knife-wielding finale, is strangely

reminiscent of William Friedkin’s

Cruising — another movie about

gay decadence and serial killers,

albeit one with a different agenda.

Featuring pristine cinematography

by Claire Mathon (Three

Worlds) and delicately layered

sound design by Nathalie Vidal

(Beau Travail), Stranger by the

Lake invites you into its alluring

and peaceful world, only to

gradually uncover the darkness

beneath it. Likewise, the naturalistic

performances are extremely

calm, even friendly, which makes

the events depicted all the more

unsettling. As Henri, the sole

outsider in this cloistered world,

relative newcomer D’Assumcao

provides the film’s most moving

turn, serving as a silent watcher

to a place whose moral compass

has subtly spun out of control.

Un Certain Regard

Cast Pierre Deladonchamps,

Christophe Paou

Director-screenwriter

Alain Guiraudie

100 minutes

Coldwater Canyon

Estate

Spectacular Panoramic Views

of the Hollywood Hills

4 Bedrooms and 4 Baths

For information and private showings contact

Elizabeth Jones

tel: 714-403-4480

fax: 714-459-8317

e-mail: djfoundation@yahoo.com


REVIEWS

The Selfish Giant

Teen newcomers Conner Chapman and Shaun Thomas

star in writer-director Clio Barnard’s effective addition to

Britain’s social-realism tradition BY NEIL YOUNG

Oscar Wilde may seem an

unlikely inspiration for British

writer-director Clio Barnard’s

second feature, a grimy tale of

youngsters growing up fast in 21st

century urban Yorkshire, but as

Wilde famously wrote, “We are all

in the gutter, but some of us are

looking at the stars.”

An absorbing and moving tale

loosely inspired by Wilde’s fable

of the same title, it premiered in

competition at the Directors’ Fortnight,

where strong early reactions

foretell a healthy life on the

festival circuit. Limited British

art house play will be buoyed by

enthusiastic critical support, with

overseas prospects perhaps strongest

in France where audiences

frequently are drawn to depictions

of the U.K.’s working class

Arbor (Chapman)

steals copper

from the national

power grid.

a la Ken Loach. While Barnard

seldom strays from the subgenre’s

well-established template, she

finds a fresh angle involving the

theft of copper from public places

including railway lines. The soaring

price of such metals in recent

years has sparked a lucrative illicit

trade revolving around scrapyards

where such materials can

be “fenced” with few questions

asked. One such dealer is “Kitten”

(Sean Gilder), into whose insalubrious

orbit are drawn pals Arbor

(Conner Chapman) and Swifty

(Shaun Thomas), both around 13.

Pint-sized motormouth Arbor

and bigger, more reflective Swifty

make for an unlikely but effective

brain/brawn duo, and it’s apparent

that each has skills that the

rigidity of formal education isn’t

able to harness.

Forsaken opportunities and

wasted resources, both human

and otherwise, are the underlying

themes of Barnard’s story,

which relies for drama on the

increasing hazardousness of

Swifty and Arbor’s hunt for the

near-ubiquitous precious metals.

Relentlessly foul-mouthed in a

manner that would make even

David Mamet blush, both lads

quickly emerge as entirely believable

characters whose friendship

rings consistently true on every

level. Downton Abbey devotees will

enjoy seeing Siobhan Finneran,

devious maid Miss O’Brien, in a

rather more sympathetic turn as

Swifty’s mother.

The Press notes’ reference

to Gilder’s Kitten as the “selfish

giant” of the title, however,

doesn’t really tie in with Wilde’s

fairy-tale at all. Indeed, the

whole Wilde connection is at

best unhelpful and at worst

distracting. Then again, Barnard

couldn’t really have gone down

the traditional route of naming

the movie after her protagonist,

since livewire Arbor evidently was

named by Barnard in honor of

her own debut, the 2010 documentary

The Arbor. That has to

count as another needlessly

perplexing touch in a film whose

most consistent strength is its

unvarnished directness.

Directors’ Fortnight

Cast Conner Chapman,

Shaun Thomas

Director-Screenwriter

Clio Barnard

91 minutes

Melinda Sue Gordon/Warner Bros.

Thank you

Warner Bros. for choosing

Tucson locations for The Hangover III

filmTucson.com

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Tucson Film Office D4 051813.indd 1

5/15/13 5:16 PM


REVIEWS

We Are What We Are

A refreshingly mature genre entry about

teen cannibal sisters tempers its gruesome bloodshed

by wrapping it in serious-mindedness

BY DAVID ROONEY

In the deliciously seasoned genre

treat We Are What We Are, director

Jim Mickle and his screenwriting

partner Nick Damici take the

bones of the 2010 Mexican film of

the same name, about a family of

cannibals, and reassemble them

into an entirely different creature.

Exchanging impoverished urban

anxiety for rural creepiness in

upstate New York, this reimagining

serves up chilling American

Gothic that slowly crescendoes

into an unexpected burst of gloriously

pulpy Grand Guignol. You

may never look at a bowl of beef

stew the same way again.

Picked up for U.S. release soon

after its Sundance premiere by

eOne Distribution, the film is that

rare modern horror movie that

The Parker kids

contemplate dinner.

doesn’t fabricate its scares with

the standard bag of postproduction

tricks. Instead it builds them

via a command of traditional

suspense tools — foreboding

atmosphere, methodical plotting,

finely etched characters and

a luscious orchestral score that

effectively plays against the ominous

tone of some scenes while

heightening the tension of others.

One of Mickle and Damici’s

smartest moves is to flip the

gender of the surviving family

figurehead. Instead of losing their

father at the start of the movie, it’s

the Parker kids’ mother (Kassie

Depaiva) who dies in an accident

while picking up groceries.

That shifts the film’s dynamics

to center on teenage sisters Iris

(Ambyr Childers) and Rose (Julia

Garner), who are expected to

continue the woman’s role of preparing

the family meal. Staging

the most macabre element of the

story in scenes that evoke classic

American family tradition makes

it all the more disturbing.

Making the family a part of

the community and not the usual

isolated weirdos adds an interesting

layer. This is particularly so

with the girls, whose blond hair

and alabaster skin give them an

angelic appearance. Childers’ Iris

shows the internal struggle of a

girl who can picture a normal life,

even if she somehow knows that

prospect has been bred out of

her nature. Garner — memorable

in Martha Marcy May Marlene

— has a watchful intensity that

foreshadows her resourceful

behavior when the situation grows

more dangerous.

The film was shot in locations

still recovering in the wake of

widespread flooding following

Hurricane Irene in 2011. Cinematographer

Ryan Samul casts a

subtle graveyard gloom over the

exteriors, bringing muted tones

and a malevolent eye even to

some gorgeous scenic shots.

We Are What We Are sustains

not only suspense, but also internal

logic. Mickle and his collaborators

have taken one of the more

lurid horror subgenres, the predatory

cannibal movie, and treated

it with stylistic restraint, narrative

integrity and even moments

of gentle lyricism.

Directors’ Fortnight

Cast Bill Sage, Ambyr Childers,

Julia Garner

Director Jim Mickle

105 minutes

Off Camera D4 051813.indd 1

5/10/13 5:24 PM


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REVIEWS

Taiwan’s Singing

Chen and South

Korea’s Jero Yun

collaborated on

short film The Pig.

Taipei Factory

This collective shorts project unites young Taiwanese

directors with filmmakers from across the globe

BY STEPHEN DALTON

A portmanteau project designed to help propel young Taiwanese

film talent onto the world stage, Taipei Factory is bookending the

Directors’ Fortnight program this year. A joint enterprise between

the Taipei Film Commission and the Fortnight section organizers,

this feature-length patchwork is composed of four short films, each

co-directed by a Taiwanese filmmaker in partnership with a collaborator

from outside the island. The intentions are noble enough, but

the results are highly uneven, with little parity between the films in

tone, theme or quality. This kind of collective promotional vehicle is

tailor-made for festivals dedicated to new talent and Asian cinema,

but commercial prospects outside Taiwan will be very limited.

The opening and closing sections provide more or less conventional

dramatic narratives, while the middle two are more experimental.

A collaboration between Taiwan’s Singing Chen and South

Korea’s Jero Yun, The Pig depicts the shared despair of an ageing

showgirl and an impoverished farmer forced to sell his prize pig just

as his neighborhood is being demolished for redevelopment. Silent

Asylum by Taiwanese-Burmese filmmaker Midi Zhao and French

actor-artist-director Joana Preiss combines harrowing docudrama

testimony describing state oppression in Burma with Preiss reading

somber poetry about Hiroshima. An important subject, but a bad

fit for such an arty and mannered format. Equally underwhelming

is A Nice Travel by Taipei director Shen Ko-shang and Chilean Luis

Cifuentes, a jumble of episodes in the life of young woman as she

prepares to leave Taiwan to get married in Chile.

The best of the quartet is the closing chapter, Mr Chang’s New

Address, by Taiwanese director Chang Jung-chi and his Iranian collaborator

Alireza Khatami. This Kafkaesque fable follows a middleaged

professional thrown into existential meltdown when his house

disappears, leaving just a door at the end of his street. Layered with

dark humor, this is the only film of the four likely to leave viewers

wanting more. There unquestionably is budding talent on show

here, but overall Taipei Factory feels like a cross-cultural experiment

that gets lost in translation.

Directors’ Fortnight

Directors Singing Chen, Jero Yun, Midi Zhao, Joana Preiss, Shen Koshang,

Luis Cifuentes, Chang Jung-chi, Alireza Khatami // 75 minutes

NFVF D4 051813.indd 1

5/15/13 11:50 AM


REVIEWS

Ain’t Them Bodies Saints

An exceptionally beautiful, if a bit fuzzy-headed, romantic

Texas outlaw saga that announces a considerable talent in

writer-director David Lowery BY TODD MCCARTHY

A beautiful, densely textured

elegy for outlaw lovers separated

by their misdeeds, Ain’t Them

Bodies Saints will serve most decisively

to put director-writer David

Lowery on the map as one of the

foremost young standard-bearers

of the Malick and Altman schools

of impressionistic mood-drenched

cinema. This poetically told Texas

crime saga is deeply and, to be

honest, naively sentimental at its

core, which creates something

of a drain on its seriousness. But

it’s a constant pleasure to watch

and listen to, and stars Rooney

Mara and Casey Affleck both have

strong scenes. To be sure, this is

an out-and-out art film, one that

looks to enjoy a measure of success

on the festival circuit and in

specialized release.

Ruth (Mara) and Bob (Affleck) are

separated by Texas lawmen.

Saints begins with a messy

shootout, after which the criminal

team of Bob Muldoon (Affleck)

and Ruth Guthrie (Mara) are led

off, with Bob destined for prison

and the pregnant Ruth let go.

Set in the Texas hill country,

probably in the very early 1970s

based on the models of the cars,

the film evokes a number of

sympathetic outlaw classics made

around that time, specifically Terrence

Malick’s Badlands and Robert

Altman’s McCabe & Mrs. Miller.

Far more attention is given to

the couple’s intense bond than to

clarifying the nature of what just

went down; piecing together tiny

snippets of information discreetly

released here and there, it would

seem that a robbery led to a police

raid for which Bob took the rap

for a cop actually shot by Ruth.

Lowery might parcel out key

plot elements with great reluctance,

but he manages to keep

things interesting and even moderately

gripping, partly because

of the managed uncertainty over

where everyone stands in relation

to others.

It all inevitably ends in gunplay

and a measure of tragedy, but of

the kind that literally and figuratively

bleeds into the history

and mythology of the West. This

sort of fate has been idealized,

poeticized, beautified and canonized

countless times before in all

manner of popular art forms, and

Lowery buys into its lyric potential

wholeheartedly.

But that said, and for all its

derivative poetics — as many

exteriors as possible were shot

during or just after magic hour,

a la Malick — the film is a lovely

thing to experience and possesses

a measure of real power.

Having played a really, really

bad Texas bad guy in The Killer

Inside Me three years ago, Affleck

delivers a milder variation on

one here, to stronger effect; one

monologue he delivers to himself

in a mirror is particularly striking.

Pretty quiet through most of

the film, Mara has a gravitas that

makes her rewarding to watch

no matter what, or how little,

she’s doing.

Critics’ Week

Cast Rooney Mara, Casey Affleck,

Ben Foster, Keith Carradine

Director-screenwriter

David Lowery

104 minutes

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24-27 JUNE • 2O13

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2013 CANNES FESTIVAL SCREENING GUIDE

TODAY

8:30 Lumiere, Jimmy P.,

Competition, Ticket Required,

France, 114 mins., Wild Bunch;

Miramar, The Dismantling,

Critic’s Week, Festival

Badge, Canada, 111 mins.,

Entertainment One

Films International

9:00 Theatre Croisette,

Blue Ruin, Directors Fortnight,

Festival Badge, USA,

95 mins., Memento Films

International (MFI)

11:00 Debussy, Grand

Central, Un Certain Regard,

Festival Badge, France,

90 mins., Elle Driver

11:30 Miramar, For Those in

Peril, Critic’s Week, Festival

Badge, United Kingdom,

90 mins., Protagonist Pictures;

Theatre Croisette, La Danza

de la Realidad, Directors

Fortnight, Festival Badge,

France, 130 mins., Pathe

International (FR); Theatre

Croisette, La Danza de la

Realidad, Directors Fortnight,

Festival Badge, France,

130 mins., Pathe International

(UK); Lumiere, Like Father,

Like Son, Competition,

Ticket Required, Japan,

120 mins., Wild Bunch;

Arcades 1, The Selfish Giant,

Directors Fortnight, Festival

Badge, United Kingdom,

95 mins., Protagonist Pictures

12:00 Salle du 60ème,

The Past, Competition,

Festival Badge, France,

130 mins., Memento Films

International (MFI)

14:00 Debussy, Bends,

Un Certain Regard, Festival

Badge, Hong Kong (China), 92

mins., Distribution Workshop;

Miramar, Programme Courts

Metrages 1, Critic’s Week,

Festival Badge, 90 mins.,

Semaine de la Critique

14:30 Theatre Croisette,

L’assemblée des Cineastes,

Directors Fortnight, Festival

Badge, 110 mins., Quinzaine

des Realisateurs

15:00 Bazin, L’Inconnu du Lac,

Un Certain Regard, Festival

Badge, France, 105 mins., Les

Films du Losange

15:30 Lumiere, Jimmy P.,

Competition, Ticket Required,

France, 114 mins., Wild Bunch

16:30 Bunuel, The Lonely

Wife, Cannes Classics, Festival

Badge, India, 117 mins., RDB

Entertainments Pvt. Ltd.

16:45 Theatre Croisette,

Blue Ruin, Directors Fortnight,

Festival Badge, USA,

95 mins., Memento Films

International (MFI)

Flora Lau’s

Bends

17:00 Miramar,

For Those in Peril, Critic’s

Week, Festival Badge,

United Kingdom, 90 mins.,

Protagonist Pictures;

Debussy, Grand Central,

Un Certain Regard, Festival

Badge, France, 90 mins.,

Elle Driver; Salle du 60ème,

Stop the Pounding Heart,

Out of Competition, Festival

Badge, USA, 101 mins.,

Doc & Film International

17:15 Bazin, Miele,

Un Certain Regard, Festival

Badge, Italy, 100 mins.,

Cité Films

19:00 Lumiere, Jimmy P.,

Competition, Ticket Required,

France, 114 mins., Wild

Bunch; Theatre Croisette,

Jodorowsky’s Dune, Directors

Fortnight, Festival Badge, 83

mins., Snowfort Pictures, Inc.

19:15 Salle du 60ème,

The Last Emperor 3D, Cannes

Classics, Festival Badge,

United Kingdom, Hanway Films

19:30 Bunuel, The Big Feast,

Cannes Classics, Festival

Badge, France, 125 mins.,

Roissy Films

20:00 Miramar, Ain’t Them

Bodies Saints, Critic’s Week,

Festival Badge, USA, 90 mins.,

The Weinstein Company

21:30 Theatre Croisette,

La Danza de la Realidad,

Directors Fortnight, Festival

Badge, France, 130 mins.,

Pathe International (FR);

Theatre Croisette, La Danza

de la Realidad, Directors

Fortnight, Festival Badge,

France, 130 mins., Pathe

International (UK)

22:00 Miramar, For

Those in Peril, Critic’s

Week, Festival Badge,

United Kingdom, 90 mins.,

Protagonist Pictures;

Lumiere, Like Father,

Like Son, Competition,

Ticket Required, Japan,

120 mins., Wild Bunch

22:15 Debussy, Bends, Un

Certain Regard, Festival Badge,

Hong Kong (China), 92 mins.,

Distribution Workshop

22:30 Salle du 60ème,

A Touch of Sin, Competition,

Festival Badge, China, 133

mins., MK2 S.A; Arcades 1,

The Congress, Directors

Fortnight, Festival

Badge, Israel, 122 mins.,

The Match Factory

24:30 Lumiere, Monsoon

Shootout, Out of Competition,

Ticket Required, India, 88

mins., Fortissimo Films

TOMORROW

8:30 Lumiere, Borgman,

Competition, Ticket Required,

Netherlands, 113 mins.,

Fortissimo Films; Miramar,

For Those in Peril, Critic’s

Week, Festival Badge,

United Kingdom, 90 mins.,

Protagonist Pictures

9:00 Theatre Croisette,

Ilo Ilo, Directors Fortnight,

Festival Badge, Singapore,

96 mins., Memento Films

International (MFI)

11:00 Debussy,

The Missing Picture,

Un Certain Regard, Festival

Badge, France, 90 mins.,

Films Distribution

11:30 Arcades 1, Ain’t

Misbehavin, Festival Badge,

France, 106 mins., Wide

House; Arcades 1, Ain’t

Misbehavin, Directors

Fortnight, Festival Badge,

France, 106 mins., Wide

House; Lumiere, Inside

Llewyn Davis, Competition,

Ticket Required, USA, 110

mins., Studiocanal; Salle du

60ème, Like Father, Like Son,

Competition, Festival Badge,

Japan, 120 mins., Wild Bunch;

Miramar, The Lunchbox,

Critic’s Week, Festival Badge,

India, 104 mins., The Match

Factory; Theatre Croisette,

Tip Top, Directors Fortnight,

Festival Badge, France,

106 mins., Rezo

13:00 Bazin, Bends, Un Certain

Regard, Festival Badge,

Hong Kong (China), 92 mins.,

Distribution Workshop

14:00 Debussy,

Death March, Un Certain

Regard, Festival Badge,

Philippines, 110 mins.,

Versatile; Salle du 60ème,

Monsoon Shootout,

Out of Competition, Festival

Badge, India, 88 mins.,

Fortissimo Films

14:15 Theatre Croisette,

Stop Over, Directors

Fortnight, Festival Badge,

Switzerland, 100 mins.,

Doc & Film International

14:30 Lumiere, Borgman,

Competition, Ticket Required,

Netherlands, 113 mins.,

Fortissimo Films

15:00 Miramar,

Ain’t Them Bodies Saints,

Critic’s Week, Festival

Badge, USA, 90 mins.,

The Weinstein Company

16:00 Bunuel,

Fedora - Remastered,

Cannes Classics, Festival

Badge, Germany, 110 mins.,

Global Screen GMBH

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 70


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FESTIVAL SCREENING GUIDE

16:30 Salle du 60ème,

Bite The Dust, Out of

Competition, Festival Badge,

Russia, 101 mins., Versatile;

Debussy, The Missing Picture,

Un Certain Regard, Festival

Badge, France, 90 mins.,

Films Distribution

17:00 Theatre Croisette,

Ilo Ilo, Directors Fortnight,

Festival Badge, Singapore,

96 mins., Memento Films

International (MFI); Miramar,

The Lunchbox, Critic’s Week,

Festival Badge, India, 104

mins., The Match Factory

19:00 Lumiere, Inside

Llewyn Davis, Competition,

Ticket Required, USA,

110 mins., Studiocanal

19:15 Salle Du 60Eme,

Bombay Talkies, Out Of

Competition, Festival

Badge, 130 mins., Viacom18

Motion Pictures

19:30 Bunuel, Queen

Margot, Cannes Classics,

Festival Badge, France,

160 mins., Pathe International

(FR); Bunuel, Queen

Margot, Cannes Classics,

Festival Badge, France,

160 mins., Pathe International

(UK); Theatre Croisette,

Tip Top, Directors Fortnight,

Festival Badge, France,

106 mins., Rezo

20:00 Miramar, Programme

Courts Metrages 1, Critic’s

Week, Festival Badge, 90

mins., Semaine De La Critique

21:30 Bazin, Grand

Central, Un Certain Regard,

Festival Badge, France,

90 mins., Elle Driver

22:00 Lumiere,

Borgman, Competition,

Ticket Required, Netherlands,

113 mins., Fortissimo Films;

Salle Du 60Eme, Jimmy P.,

Competition, Festival Badge,

France, 114 mins., Wild Bunch;

Theatre Croisette, Stop Over,

Directors Fortnight, Festival

Badge, Switzerland, 100 mins.,

Doc & Film International;

Miramar, The Lunchbox,

Critic’s Week, Festival

Badge, India, 104 mins.,

The Match Factory

22:30 Arcades 1, Ugly,

Directors Fortnight,

Festival Badge, India,

100 mins., Elle Driver

24:30 Lumiere,

Blind Detective, Out Of

Competition, Ticket

Required, Hong Kong (China),

130 mins., Media Asia Film

MONDAY 5/20

8:30 Bunuel,

Les Rencontres D’apres

Minuit, Critic’s Week,

Festival Badge, France,

Guillaume Canet’s

Blood Ties

90 mins., Films Boutique;

Lumiere, Shield Of Straw,

Competition, Ticket Required,

Japan, 116 mins., Celluloid

Dreams/Nightmares;

Miramar, The Lunchbox,

Critic’s Week, Festival

Badge, India, 104 mins.,

The Match Factory

9:00 Theatre Croisette,

The Summer Of Flying

Fish, Directors Fortnight,

Festival Badge, Chile, 110

mins., Alpha Violet

11:00 Debussy, Omar,

Un Certain Regard, Festival

Badge, Palestine, 98 mins.,

The Match Factory; Bunuel,

The Last Of The Unjust,

Out Of Competition,

Festival Badge, France,

225 mins., Le Pacte

11:30 Lumiere, Blood

Ties, Out Of Competition,

Ticket Required, USA,

44 mins., Wild Bunch; Arcades

1, Blue Ruin, Directors

Fortnight, Festival Badge,

USA, 95 mins., Memento

Films International (MFI);

Theatre Croisette, Me

Myself And Mum, Directors

Fortnight, Festival Badge,

85 mins., Gaumont;

Miramar, The Owners,

Critic’s Week, Festival

Badge, Argentina, 95 mins.,

The Match Factory

11:45 Salle du 60ème,

Borgman, Competition,

Festival Badge, Netherlands,

113 mins., Fortissimo Films

14:00 Debussy, As I Lay

Dying, Un Certain Regard,

Festival Badge, USA, 120 mins.,

Nu Image/Millennium Films;

Miramar, Programme Courts

Metrages 2, Critic’s Week,

Festival Badge, 90 mins.,

Semaine De La Critique;

Bazin, The Missing Picture,

Un Certain Regard, Festival

Badge, France, 90 mins.,

Films Distribution

14:15 Salle du 60ème,

Inside Llewyn Davis,

Competition, Festival Badge,

USA, 110 mins., Studiocanal

14:30 Theatre Croisette, The

Last Days On Mars, Directors

Fortnight, Festival Badge,

United Kingdom, Focus

Features International

15:00 Bunuel, Talents Cannes

2013, Festival Badge, 90 mins.,

Festival De Cannes

16:00 Lumiere, A Castle In

Italy, Competition, Ticket

Required, France, 103 mins.,

Films Distribution; Palais K,

New Chinese Film Talents,

Festival Badge, 90 mins.,

Champs Lis International Ltd.

16:30 Debussy, Omar,

Un Certain Regard, Festival

Badge, Palestine, 98 mins.,

The Match Factory

16:45 Salle du 60ème,

Blind Detective, Out Of

Competition, Festival Badge,

Hong Kong (China), 130 mins.,

Media Asia Film

17:00 Bazin, Death March,

Un Certain Regard, Festival

Badge, Philippines, 110 mins.,

Versatile; Bunuel, Gruppo Di

Famiglia In Un Interno,

Cannes Classics, Festival

Badge, 90 mins., Festival De

Cannes; Miramar, The Owners,

Critic’s Week, Festival Badge,

Argentina, 95 mins., The Match

Factory; Theatre Croisette,

The Summer Of Flying Fish,

Directors Fortnight,

Festival Badge, Chile, 110

mins., Alpha Violet

19:00 Lumiere, Blood Ties,

Out Of Competition,

Ticket Required, USA, 144

mins., Wild Bunch

19:30 Theatre Croisette,

Me Myself And Mum,

Directors Fortnight, Festival

Badge, France, Gaumont;

Salle du 60ème, Seduced

And Abandonned, Out Of

Competition, Festival Badge,

USA, 95 mins., Hanway Films

20:00 Bunuel,

Hiroshima My Love,

Cannes Classics, Festival

Badge, 92 mins., Festival

De Cannes; Miramar,

Les Rencontres D’apres

Minuit, Critic’s Week,

Festival Badge, France,

90 mins., Films Boutique;

Debussy, As I Lay Dying, Un

Certain Regard, Festival Badge,

USA, 120 mins., Nu Image/

Millennium Films; Theatre

Croisette, The Last Days

On Mars, Directors Fortnight,

Festival Badge, United

Kingdom, Focus Features

International; Miramar,

The Owners, Critic’s Week,

Festival Badge, Argentina,

95 mins., The Match Factory

22:30 Arcades 1,

Jodorowsky’s Dune,

Directors Fortnight, Festival

Badge, 83 mins., Snowfort

Pictures, Inc.; wLumiere,

Shield Of Straw, Competition,

Ticket Required, Japan,

116 mins., Celluloid

Dreams/Nightmares

TUESDAY 5/21

8:30 Lumiere, Behind

The Candelabra,

Competition, Ticket

Required, USA, 118 mins.,

HBO (Home Box Office);

Miramar, The Owners,

Critic’s Week, Festival Badge,

Argentina, 95 mins.,

The Match Factory

9:00 Theatre Croisette,

A Strange Course Of

Events, Directors Fortnight,

Festival Badge, France,

98 mins., MK2 S.A

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 74


STUDIO BABELSBERG

OUR REFERENCES TELL THE STORY

20 SOUND STAGES • EXCEPTIONAL PRODUCTION SERVICES • HIGH-QUALIT Y

SET CONSTRUCTION • INTERNATIONALLY EXPERIENCED CREWS • VARIOUS

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Currently in Production:

The Monuments Men

(directed by George Clooney)

The Grand Budapest Hotel

(directed by Wes Anderson)

The Book Thief

(directed by Brian Percival)

The Voices

(directed by Marjane Satrapi)


MARKET SCREENING GUIDE

TODAY

8:30 Olympia 4, Default, No

Press, Buyers Only, USA, 87

mins, Wild Bunch

9:15 Star 2, Trustnordisk

Promo Screening, No

Press, Buyers Only, 30 mins,

Trustnordisk

9:30 Palais B, A Lucky Man,

South Africa, 87 mins, 7 &

7 Producers’ Sales Service

Ltd.; Palais I, A Touch of

Sin, Competition, China, 133

mins, Mk2 S.a; Gray 2, Ass

Backwards, USA, 90 mins,

Premiere Entertainment

Group; Riviera 4, Ate Ver

a Luz, Directors Fortnight,

No Press, Buyers Only,

Switzerland, 95 mins,

Udi - Urban Distribution

International; Star 3, Back

in Crime, France, 100 mins,

Memento Films International

(Mfi); Gray 4, Gallowwalkers,

United Kingdom, 90 mins,

Vmi Worldwide; Arcades 1,

How I Live Now, Invite Only,

United Kingdom, 95 mins,

Protagonist Pictures; Olympia

7, Jappeloup, France, 130

mins, Pathe International (Fr);

Arcades 3, Jesus Loves Me,

Germany, 100 mins, Global

Screen Gmbh; Star 1, Mood

Indigo, France, 130 mins,

Studiocanal; Palais J, Scatter

My Ashes at Bergdorf’s, USA,

90 mins, Fortissimo Films;

Lerins 1, Suzanne, Critic’s

Week, France, 90 mins,

Films Distribution; Star 4,

The Anderssons in Greece,

Sweden, 95 mins, Sola Media

Gmbh; Palais D, The Film

to Come, France, 83 mins,

Wide; Palais F, The Ganzfeld

Experiment, USA, 86 mins,

Bleiberg Entertainment LLC;

Riviera 2, The Good Lie,

Canada, 90 mins, Filmoption

International

9:45 Palais G, Finding

Mr. Right, USA, 90 mins,

Vision Films

10:00 Riviera 3, 3D Knight

Rusty, Germany, 85 mins,

Sola Media Gmbh; Palais C,

A Chair on the Plains, Japan,

139 mins, Toei Company, Ltd.;

Palais K, Beta Cinema Promo

Reel, Germany, 110 mins, Beta

Cinema; Gray 1, Capturing

Dad, Japan, Fortissimo Films;

Olympia 9, Emanuelle and the

Truth About Fishes, USA, 95

mins, Myriad Pictures; Riviera

1, Family Matters, France, 80

mins, Other Angle Pictures;

Palais E, Let Me Survive,

United Kingdom, 95 mins,

Filmsharks Int’l; Gray 5, Mona,

Iceland, 94 mins, Princ Films;

Star 2, Paris Countdown (Le

Jour Attendra), France, 90

mins, Gaumont ;Olympia 6,

Patrick, Australia, 100 mins,

Bankside Films; Olympia 8,

Pour une Femme, No Press,

France, 111 mins, Europacorp;

Olympia 5, Space Warriors,

USA, 100 mins, Content

Media Corporation; Gray 3,

The Evolution of Stem Cell

Research, USA, 90 mins, Red

Sea Media Inc.; Olympia 3,

Too Late, USA, 110 mins,

Tf1 International

10:15 Olympia 4, Haunter, No

Press, Buyers Only, USA, 97

mins, Wild Bunch

11:30 Lerins 1, A Stranger

in Paradise, USA, 82 mins,

Cinema Management

Group LLC; Riviera 4, App,

Netherlands, 80 mins, High

Point Media Group; Gray 4,

Carmina or Blow Up, Spain,

71 mins, Cinema Republic;

Palais J, Cerro Torre — A

Snowball’s Chance in Hell,

Austria, 94 mins, Red Bull

Media House; Gray 2, Dragon

Girls, Germany, 93 mins,

Attraction Distribution; Palais

B, Echo of Fear, Mexico, 90

mins, Dc Medias ;Star 4, Heli,

Competition, Mexico, 105

mins, Ndm; Palais H, Hidden

Beauties, France, 100 mins,

Other Angle Pictures ;Riviera

3, Holiday, Ecuador, 100

mins, Consejo Nacional De

Cinematografía Del Ecuador;

Palais F, Inside Tennessee,

110 mins, Acting International;

Palais D, Last Call, Mexico, 92

mins, Latinofusion; Arcades 3,

The Famous Five 2, Germany,

92 mins, Beta Cinema; Star

3, The Motel Life, USA, 87

mins, Independent

12:00 Gray 3, 5 Senses of

Fear, USA, 110 mins, Screen

Media; Olympia 5, An End

to Killing, China, 110 mins,

Fortissimo Films; Gray 5, Ana’s

Film, Austria, 94 mins, Icaic

- Productora Internacional;

Palais G, Big Sur, USA, 81

mins, Visit Films; Arcades 2,

Bright Days Ahead, France,

94 mins, Le Pacte; Olympia

3, Cheap Thrills, USA, 85

mins, Films Distribution;

Palais E, Everything for Sale,

Iran, 90 mins, Farabi Cinema

Foundation; Palais I, Kelly and

Victor, United Kingdom, 90

mins, The Works International;

Palais K, Mariah Mundi

and the Midas Box, Spain,

99 mins, Dreamcatchers;

Riviera 3, Pyramide Private

Screening, 110 mins,

Pyramide; Lerins 2, Run &

Jump, Ireland, 102 mins,

Global Screen Gmbh; Riviera

1, The Man Behind the Mask,

Mexico, 108 mins, Mexican

Film Institute (Imcine)

12:10 Olympia 4, Smart Ass,

No Press, Buyers Only, France,

88 mins, Wild Bunch

12:30 Palais C, Osamu

Tezuka’s Buddha 2-Promo,

Japan, 70 mins, Toei

Company, Ltd.

13:30 Palais J, Bottled Up,

USA, 85 mins, Film Sales

Company; Gray 4, Brecha

En el Silencio, Venezuela,

90 mins, Centro Nacional

Autonomo De Cinematografia

(Cnac); Lerins 1, Cavemen,

USA, 100 mins, Lightning

Entertainment; Arcades 1,

Celluloid Private Screening,

Invite Only, 116 mins, Celluloid

Dreams / Nightmares; Palais

F, Le Groupe Esra, 110 mins,

Esra - Cote D’azur; Riviera 4,

Lifelong, Turkey, 103 mins,

Films Boutique; Star 4, May

in the Summer, USA, 100

mins, Elle Driver; Palais B, My

Stuff, Finland, 80 mins, Rise

And Shine World Sales; Riviera

2, Puppy Love, Belgium, 85

mins, Latido; Gray 2, Scenic

Route, USA, 90 mins, Premiere

Entertainment Group; Palais D,

The Last Death, Mexico, 104

mins, Multivisionnaire Pictures;

Palais H, The Returned, Invite

Only, Spain, 100 mins, Filmax

International; Arcades 3,

Vampire Sisters, Germany,

98 mins, Arri Worldsales;

Star 3, We Are What We Are,

No Press, Buyers Only, USA,

100 mins, Memento Films

International (Mfi)

14:00 Olympia 4, A Strange

Course of Events, Directors

Fortnight, No Press, Buyers

Only, France, 98 mins, Mk2 S.a;

Palais E, A Cradle for Mother,

Iran, 80 mins, Farabi Cinema

Foundation; Palais I, A Pride

of Lions, Canada, 100 mins,

Visit Films’

Big Sur

Moonstone Entertainment

/ Prestige Films; Riviera 1,

A Song for Mama, France,

90 mins, Snd - Groupe M6;

Olympia 7, Almost Christmas,

97 mins, Hanway Films; Gray

5, Bipolar, Buyers Only, USA,

81 mins, Guildhall Pictures;

Riviera 3, Combustion,

Spain, 102 mins, Film Factory

Entertainment; Lerins 2,

Duran Duran: Unstaged,

USA, 112 mins, Arclight Film;

Arcades 2, Event 15, United

Kingdom, 84 mins, Bankside

Films; Olympia 5, Floating

Skyscrapers, Poland, 93 mins,

Films Boutique; Gray 3, In the

Name of Sherlock Holmes,

Hungary, 99 mins, Hungarian

National Film Fund; Olympia

6, Nothing Left to Fear, No

Press, USA, 100 mins, Content

Media Corporation; Gray 1,

Open Grave, USA, 102 mins,

Speranza13 Media; Star 2, Pop

Redemption, France, 110

mins, Gaumont; Olympia 3,

Salvo, Critic’s Week, Italy, 105

mins, Films Distribution; Palais

K, Streetdance All Stars,

United Kingdom, 96 mins,

Protagonist Pictures; Palais

C, Tenderness, Belgium, 80

mins, Doc & Film International;

Palais G, Waylands Song,

United Kingdom, 95 mins,

Yellow Affair Oy

15:00 Riviera 2, Inferno 3D,

No Press, Hong Kong, 5 mins,

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 76


GermanFilms18May_THR_THR_German-Films 24.04.13 11:05 Seite 1

NEW GERMAN FILMS

IN CANNES 2013

SATURDAY, 18 MAY

09:30 h ARCADES 3

JESUS LIEBT MICH

JESUS LOVES ME

Florian David Fitz

102 min

Sales: Global Screen

……………………………

11:30 h ARCADES 3

FÜNF FREUNDE 2

THE FAMOUS FIVE 2

Mike Marzuk

93 min

Sales: Beta Cinema

……………………………

13:30 h ARCADES 3

DIE VAMPIRSCHWESTERN

VAMPIRE SISTERS

Wolfgang Groos

98 min

Sales: ARRI Worldsales

……………………………

15:30 h ARCADES 3

ZUM GEBURTSTAG

A PACT

Denis Dercourt

85 min

Sales: Global Screen

……………………………

17:15 h ARCADES 3

SCHUTZENGEL

GUARDIANS

Til Schweiger

128 min

Sales: Action Image

……………………………

19:30 h ARCADES 3

ON AIR

Carsten Vauth & Marco J. Riedl

95 min

Sales: PPP On Air Pictures

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MARKET SCREENING GUIDE

Universe Films Distribution Co. Ltd;

Riviera 2, The White Storm, No Press,

Hong Kong, 5 mins, Universe Films

Distribution Co. Ltd

15:30 Arcades 3, A Pact, Germany,

90 mins, Global Screen Gmbh; Palais

F, Actor? A Documentary, USA, 77

mins, Db Rich Productions; Arcades

1, Bite the Dust, Out Of Competition,

Russia, 101 mins, Versatile; Gray 4,

Hansel and Gretel & the 420 Witch,

USA, 86 mins, Jinga Films; Palais B,

Riot on Redchurch Street, United

Kingdom, 90 mins, Moviehouse

Entertainment; Palais D, Snails in the

Rain, Israel, 85 mins, Wide; Palais

J, The Domino Effect, Netherlands,

96 mins, Arri Worldsales; Star 4, The

Hidden Child, No Press, Buyers Only,

Sweden, 109 mins, Trustnordisk;

Lerins 1, The International Criminal

Court, Germany, 100 mins, Global

Screen Gmbh; Riviera 2, The Summer

of Flying Fish, Directors Fortnight, No

Press, Buyers Only, Chile, 110 mins,

Alpha Violet; Riviera 4, The Third Half,

Macedonia, 90 mins, The Little Film

Company; Gray 2, There Will Come a

Day, Italy, 90 mins, Elle Driver; Palais

H, Thesis on a Homicide, Spain, 102

mins, Latido

16:00 Olympia 3, 21 Ways to Ruin a

Marriage, Finland, 89 mins, Yellow

Affair Oy; Riviera 1, 3X3D, Critic’s

Week, No Press, Buyers Only, Portugal,

100 mins, Udi - Urban Distribution

International; Arcades 2, African

Safari 3D, Belgium, 110 mins,

Studiocanal; Olympia 6, Asphalt

Playground, France, 99 mins, Tf1

International; Palais K, Code Red,

Bulgaria, 100 mins, Outsider Pictures;

Lerins 2, Contracted, USA, 80 mins,

Arclight Films; Olympia 8, Deepsea

Challenge 3D, No Press, USA, 40

Alpha Violet’s

The Summer of

Flying Fish

mins, Panorama; Riviera 3, Films

Distribution Promo, France, 110

mins, Films Distribution; Palais G, Five

Thirteen, USA, 95 mins, Lightning

Entertainment; Olympia 2, Legends of

Oz: Dorothy’s Return, No Press, USA,

110 mins, Summertime Entertainment;

Palais I, Love Love Love, France, 90

mins, Les Mures Sauvages; Olympia 5,

Marius, 94 mins, Pathe International

(Fr); Palais E, Musth, Mexico, 95 mins,

Canibal Networks; Star 2, Short Term

12, USA, 96 mins, Memento Films

International (Mfi); Palais C, Steins;

Gate Déjà Vu in the Load Area, Japan,

89 mins, Kadokawa Shoten Co., Ltd;

Gray 1, Stranded, Canada, 90 mins,

Cinemavault; Olympia 4, The Boy Who

Smells Like Fish, Canada, 91 mins, 6

Sales; Star 1, The Last Days, No Press,

Buyers Only, Spain, 101 mins, Wild

Bunch; Olympia 7, The Machine, United

Kingdom, 100 mins, Content Media

Corporation; Gray 3, The Noble Family,

Mexico, 102 mins, Filmsharks Int’l; Gray

5, Under the Nagasaki Sky, Japan, 98

mins, Open Sesame Co, Ltd

17:15 Arcades 3, Guardians, Germany,

128 mins, Action Concept Gmbh

17:30 Palais D, Ain’t Misbehavin,

France, 106 mins, Wide House; Palais

F, And They Call It Summer, Italy,

97 mins, Reel Suspects; Gray 2, Evil

Feed, Canada, 101 mins, Wtf; Palais B,

In the Name of the Son, Belgium, 80

mins, Intramovies; Star 3, Life Deluxe,

No Press, Buyers Only, Sweden, 120

mins, Trustnordisk; Star 4, Michael H.

Profession: Director, Austria, 90 mins,

Films Boutique; Palais J, Milo, USA, 85

mins, Aldamisa; Lerins 1, Montage,

South Korea, 125 mins, Finecut Co. Ltd.;

Riviera 4, Much Ado About Nothing,

USA, 109 mins, Kaleidoscope Film

Distribution Ltd; Gray 4, The Perfect

German Films D4 051813.indd 1

5/15/13 11:49 AM


MARKET SCREENING GUIDE

SCREENING TODAY

3:30PM GRAY 4

SCREENING TOMORROW (SUNDAY)

5:30PM GRAY 4

WWW.JINGAFILMS.COM

JINGA FILMS

RIVIERA E - 7

INFO@JINGAFILMS.COM

TEL: 00 44 7765 398 742

Wave, South Africa, 90 mins, American

Cinema International; Riviera 2, The

Pin, Canada, 83 mins, Scythia Films Inc.

17:45 Star 2, The Past, Competition,

France, 130 mins, Memento Films

International (Mfi)

18:00 Star 1, 11.6, France, 100 mins,

Wild Bunch; Palais C, Detective in the

Bar, Japan, 120 mins, Toei Company,

Ltd.; Olympia 5, Fanny, 102 mins,

Pathe International (Fr); Palais K,

Frankenstein’s Army, Netherlands,

84 mins, Mpi Media Group; Lerins 2,

Go for Sisters, USA, 122 mins, Cinema

Management Group LLC; Riviera

3, Harmony Lessons, Kazakstan,

120 mins, Films Distribution; Palais

E, Headsome, USA, 82 mins, Nova

Automatics Production; Palais G,

Johnny Christ, France, Cinemavault;

Gray 1, Metro, Russia, 126 mins,

Planeta Inform Film Distribution; Palais

I, Oh Boy, Germany, 85 mins, Beta

Cinema; Riviera 1, Pororo: The Racing

Adventure, South Korea, 77 mins, CJ

E&M Corporation / CJ Entertainment;

Gray 3, Rock N Roll Over, France, 86

mins, Giallo Queens Pictures; Olympia

3, The Battle of the Sexes, USA, 87

mins, Goldcrest Films International;

Palais H, The Europa Report, USA,

90 mins, Sierra / Affinity; Gray 5, Time

Scoop Hunter, Japan, 102 mins, Gaga

Corporation; Olympia 6, Zarra’s Law,

No Press, Buyers Only, USA, 80 mins,

Snapper Films Oy

19:30 Arcades 3, On Air, Germany, 95

mins, Ppp Onair Pictures Gmbh

20:00 Star 3, 100 Bloody Acres,

Australia, 92 mins, The Works

International; Arcades 1, 2 Automnes

3 Hivers, Acid, France, 90 mins, Acid;

Palais F, Berlin -7, Iran, 98 mins, Visual

Media Institute; Riviera 4, Big Bad

Wolves, Israel, 104 mins, 6 Sales; Palais

J, Jan Dara: The Finale, Thailand, 138

mins, Sahamongkolfilm International

Co. Ltd.; Riviera 2, Redemption, China,

110 mins, G.w Pictures Co., Ltd; Palais

D, Sweet 16, Canada, 76 mins, Id

Communications Inc.; Palais H, Viva la

Liberta, 94 mins, Rai Trade

20:30 Riviera 3, I’m Going to Change

My Name, Armenia, 104 mins, Reflexion

Films; Riviera 1, In Their Skin (A.k.a

Replicas), Canada, 95 mins, Celluloid

Dreams / Nightmares; Arcades 2, Media

Asia Promo Reel, 59 mins, Media Asia

Film; Palais E, Vulture, Poland, 133 mins,

New Europe Film Sales

22:30 Riviera 1, Antisocial, Canada, 90

mins, Breakthrough Entertainment Inc.

TOMORROW, 5/19

9:00 Star 4, A Touch of Sin,

Competition, China, 133 Mins., Mk2 S.A

9:15 Lerins 1, A Boy Called H, Japan,

122 Mins., Toho Co., Ltd.; Gray 2, The

Devil’s Path, Japan, 128 Mins., Nikkatsu

Corporation

9:30 Palais B, Day of the Flowers,

United Kingdom, 100 Mins., Imagina

International Sales; Palais F, Left

Over, France, 82 Mins., Wide; Palais D,

Memories They Told Me, Brazil, 100

Mins., Imovision; Palais D, Memories

They Told Me, Brazil, 100 Mins., Cinema

Do Brasil; Star 3, Teenage, USA, 90

Mins., The Works International; Palais H,

The Boy Who Smells Like Fish, Canada,

91 Mins., 6 Sales; Star 1, The Congress,

Directors Fortnight, Israel, 122 Mins., The

Match Factory; Riviera 2, Three Hours,

Germany, 100 Mins., Arri Worldsales;

Arcades 3, Uvanga, Canada, 90 Mins.,

Kunuk Cohn Productions; Riviera 4,

Yugo and Lala, China, 80 Mins., Golden

Network Asia Ltd

9:45 Palais G, Ask This of Rikyu, Japan,

123 Mins., Toei Company, Ltd.; Olympia

4, Celluloid Private Screening, 116

Mins., Celluloid Dreams / Nightmares;

Olympia 5, Jimmy P., Competition,

France, 114 Mins., Wild Bunch

10:00 Riviera 3, 60 Going On 12, France,

89 Mins., Pyramide; Olympia 3, A Whole

Lott More, USA, 90 Mins., Goldcrest

Films International; Palais K, Allez,

Eddy!, Belgium, 97 Mins., Global Screen

Gmbh; Arcades 2, Death March, Un

Certain Regard, Philippines, 110 Mins.,

Versatile; Lerins 2, Dirty Weekend,

United Kingdom, 90 Mins., The Little Film

Company; Gray 5, For Sale, Cuba, 95

Mins., Icaic - Productora Internacional;

Palais I, La Jaula de Oro, Un Certain

Regard, No Press, Buyers Only, Mexico,

102 Mins., Films Boutique; Palais E,

Let Me Survive, United Kingdom, 95

Mins., Filmsharks Int’l; Gray 4, Longing

Nights, Spain, 70 Mins., The Open Reel;

Olympia 6, Oggy and the Cockroaches,

France, 80 Mins., Films Distribution;

Riviera 1, Shopping Tour, Russia, 73

Mins., Dc Medias; Olympia 7, The Big

Bad Wolf, France, 97 Mins., Other Angle

Pictures; Gray 1, The Mysterious Boy,

Croatia, 88 Mins., Croatian Audiovisual

Centre; Palais C, Wajma, An Afghan

Love Story, Afghanistan, 85 Mins., Doc &

Film International

Jinga Films D4 051813.indd 1

5/16/13 2:25 PM


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3:00 PM | INDUSTRY IN FOCUS:

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Moderated by Kevin Winston, Digital LA

TOMORROW, MAY 19

3:00 PM | IN CONVERSATION:

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Jim Berk, Participant Media

John Cooper, Sundance Institute

Moderated by Pete Hammond,

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TUESDAY, MAY 21

2:00 PM | INDUSTRY IN FOCUS:

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IN CANNES

David Lancaster, Only God Forgives

Nick Schumaker, We Are What We Are

Jay Van Hoy and Lars Knudsen,

Ain’t Them Bodies Saints

Emily Wachtel, Shepard & Dark

Moderated by Scott Macaulay,

Filmmaker Magazine, @FilmmakerMag

3:00 PM | INDUSTRY IN FOCUS:

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Monsoon Shootout

Moderated by Thom Powers, TIFF

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3:30 PM | IN CONVERSATION:

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8 Decades of The Hollywood Reporter

The most glamorous and memorable moments from a storied history

As an explanation for her

behavior, a French friend said

Adjani (here in May 1983)

was in a “state of panic

at the crowds and especially

the camera lenses. Her

fragility became tangible.”

It was Isabelle Adjani vs. the shutterbugs at the 1983 fest

THE 1983 PREMIERE

of Merry Christmas,

Mr. Lawrence, a POW

drama starring David

Bowie, “began under virtual

siege,” wrote The Hollywood

Reporter, “as armed riot police

used dogs, billy clubs and tear

gas” against a group of about

300 medical students protesting

proposed changes in their school

system. More subtle was the protest

photographers made against

Isabelle Adjani. The actress, who

had been honored at Cannes in

1981 for her roles in Quartet and

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 84

Possession, declined to attend

both the press conference and

the photocall for competition

entry L’Ete Meurtrier (One Deadly

Summer), in which she starred as

a woman seeking revenge for the

rape of her mother. In response,

Cannes’ photographers laid

their cameras at their feet when

Adjani, then 27, arrived for the

film’s premiere. It wouldn’t be

Adjani’s last run-in with the

press. An absence from the

public eye in the late 1980s led

the French media to speculate

the actress had AIDS; rumors

that she had died began to circulate.

In 1987 she appeared on

television to prove she was alive

and well. A tempestuous liaison

with the equally reclusive Daniel

Day-Lewis followed. Their sixyear

relationship (which the

Lincoln Oscar winner reportedly

ended by fax) produced a son,

Gabriel-Kane Day-Lewis, now 18.

All the drama didn’t hamper her

career, however. She was nominated

twice for Academy Awards,

returned to Cannes as jury president

in 1997 and won five French

Cesar awards, including most

recently in 2010 for La Journee

de la Jupe, about a teacher who

takes her students hostage.

— BILL HIGGINS

FRANCOIS LOCHON/GAMMA-RAPHO VIA GETTY IMAGES


DUBAI

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LOCATIONS

IN ONE CITY

VISIT US AT CANNES FILM FESTIVAL 2013

TO LEARN ABOUT DUBAI’S UNIQUE INCENTIVES

FIND US AT THE UAE PAVILION – 136 INTERNATIONAL VILLAGE

info@dubaifilmcommission.ae • Tel: +971 4 360 2022 • Fax: +971 4 391 6648 • P.O. Box 53777 • Dubai, UAE

Dubai Film and TV Commission

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