Information for Parents Junior School 2011/2012 - Silcoates School

silcoates.org.uk

Information for Parents Junior School 2011/2012 - Silcoates School

Silcoates School

Information for Parents

Junior School

2011/2012


Welcome From The Headmaster

Dear Parents

I hope you find this Information Handbook a useful guide for you and your son/daughter

at Silcoates School. We have tried to give you as much information as we can in the

pages that follow, but inevitably we cannot cover every eventuality or circumstance

without ending up with a booklet that becomes too long to be of any value.

We believe the successful education of your son/daughter relies on a three-way,

triangular relationship between the child, the parents and the school. If you are aware of

our expectations, guidelines and routines then we are sure you have a better chance of

understanding what we are trying to do and thereby to be able to offer the support you

need to give, both to your child in his/her education and to us as a school.

The Ethos and Aims set out below give a clear indication of what we are trying to achieve.

We would be most grateful if you support us as best you can in our aims for the duration

of your child’s education with us. We, in turn, will do our best to work with you and your

child to ensure that all of his/her potential is maximised, because there is nothing more

frustrating than a talent that goes unrealised.

The school website – www.silcoates.org.uk – is updated almost every day during termtime,

with news stories highlighting the huge variety of achievements and successes of

the school community. Please try to check the site regularly, because we want to use it

more and more each year to communicate with you and to keep you up to date with

developments.

Please keep this Information Handbook as a reference guide. An updated version is

published every year, either in hard copy or on the website. If you have any feedback

about the information provided – positive or otherwise – please do not hesitate to contact

me to let me know. Please note that this Information Handbook should be read alongside

the school website and the Form of Acceptance (Terms and Conditions) that was sent out

when your son/daughter joined the school.

I would encourage you never to hesitate to contact a member of staff at the school –

Form Tutor, Subject Teacher, Head of Department, Head of Year, Deputy Head, Bursar or

Headmaster – if you have any concerns. Hopefully, your child’s educational career with

us will be universally positive, but, even with the best will in the world, there will be times

when you need to highlight an issue or raise a concern with us. It is much better that you

do this sooner rather than later and we will always do our best to help you. As a famous

advertising campaign once put it, ‘If you are not happy, tell us; if you are happy, tell

everyone else!’

I wish your child every success at Silcoates School and I look forward to a long and

rewarding relationship with all the families that go to make up the ‘Silcoates Family’ in

this happy, positive and successful school.

With all best wishes

Darryl Wideman

1


Welcome From The Head of Junior School and All The Staff

Dear Parents

Welcome to Silcoates Junior School. You are about to join a very special learning

community.

The Junior School staff have prepared a booklet which we hope will give you plenty of

information you will need, ranging from uniform to activities, pocket money to academic

advice. The information in this handbook, however, at its best, can only provide an

outline of the Junior School and its aims. Please do not hesitate to contact the appropriate

member of staff if you have any queries or need any further information. Alongside our

Junior School we have our Senior School for 11–18 year olds, and Silcoates Sunny Hill for

2-5 year olds, allowing Silcoates to offer a rounded and fulfilling continuous education for

pupils from 2–18 year olds in a single school. In addition, as part of our school’s

foundation, St Hilda’s school in Horbury educates pupils from 0-7.

Many opportunities exist for you to visit Silcoates and we look forward to meeting you on

these occasions to develop the important home-school understanding and partnership

which will contribute so much to your child’s well-being and progress.

I wish your child every success and happiness in the Junior School and hope that this

marks the beginning of a long and productive association with Silcoates for your family.

Best Wishes

Adrian Boyer

Head of Junior School

2


Contents

Page

Page

Absence of Parents 30 Parents’ Complaints Procedure 11

Activities 77 Parents’ Evenings 53

Academic & Curriculum Information 36 Pastoral Care 60

Anti-Bullying 62 Pastoral Information 60

Appearance of Pupils 16 Pastoral Organisation 61

Assemblies 61 Payment of Fees 34

Attendance 29 Personal and Social Development 61

Behaviour 69 Personal Music Systems 68

Chapel 10 Planned Absence 29

Charity 10 Pupils’ Complaints Procedure 13

Child Protection 10 Pupils Staying at School after 4.15pm 31

Classroom Code of Practice 74 Reception 25

Curriculum 36 Registration 31

Cyber-Bullying 63 Reports 53

Delivery/Collection of Pupils

30 Rewards & Sanctions 69

and Car Parking

Drama 77 Safeguarding of Property 35

Drugs 66 School Councils 13

Equal Opportunities 10 School Day 28

Equipment 53 School Nurse 11

Ethos & Aims 9 School Rules 65

Extra-Curricular Information 75 School Shop 23

Extra-Curricular Programme 75 School Transport 32

Foundation Parents’ Association 13 Second Hand Shop 23

General Information 5 Signing In and Out 30

Home/School Communication &

24 Snow Routine 33

Telephone Numbers

Home Reading 52 Special Educational Needs 59

Homework 50 Sport 76

Homework Diary/Record Book 25 Sports Club 78

House Competitions 75 Staff List 4

Information Technology 54 Term Dates 8

Insurance 35 Texts and E-mails and ClarionCall 25

Meals and Food 14 The Silcoates School Foundation 9

Mobile Phones 68 Trips & Visits 53

Music 76 Uniform 17

Other Communication 27 Unplanned Absence 29

Outdoor Pursuits 77 Wearing Seatbelts In Vehicles 33

3


The Junior School Staff – 2011/12

Mr Adrian Boyer

Mr John Clewarth

Mrs Naomi Chambers

Miss Cathryn Powell

Mrs Lynne Burdekin

Mr Jo Piggott

Miss Liz McLoughlin

Mrs Anne Clewarth

Mrs Jemma Senadhira

Mrs Helen Drayson

Miss Gaynor Walker

Mr Graham Wetherop

Mrs Lorrie Sugden

Mrs Alison Dix

Mrs Lisa Boyer

Mrs Tracy Casey

Miss Michelle Claven

Mrs Nicola Ferry

Mrs Joanne Kelly

Mrs Cheryl Milnes

Mrs Janet Burnell

Miss Lily Haughton

Mrs Pauline Hoile

Head of Junior School

Deputy Head of Junior School

Year 6 Class Teacher

Year 1 Class Teacher

Year 2 Class Teacher

Year 3 Class Teacher

Year 3 Class Teacher

Year 3 Class Teacher

Year 4 Class Teacher

Year 4 Class Teacher

Year 5 Class Teacher

Year 5 Class Teacher

Year 6 Class Teacher

Junior School Learning Support

Head of Junior School’s PA

Junior School Teaching Assistant

Junior School Teaching Assistant

and After-School Care

Junior School Teaching Assistant

and Pre-School Care

Junior School Teaching Assistant

and Pre-School Care

Junior School Teaching Assistant

and Pre-School Care

Junior School Teaching Assistant

and After-School Care

Midday Supervisor and After-School Care

After-School Care

After-School Care

4


General Information

Staff List 2011/12

Headmaster:

Deputy Heads:

Darryl Wideman, M.A., History

Pastoral: David Curran, B.Sc., Geography

Staff: Steve Fox, M.A., Modern Languages, Latin

Curriculum: Helen Wren, B.A., M.A., Religious Studies

Head of Junior School: Adrian Boyer, B.Ed., Junior Subjects

Chaplain: Revd Janet Lees, PhD, M.Phil, M.Th, MRCSLT

Malcolm Affleck, B.A., Religious Studies*

Lynne Burdekin, Cert. Ed., Junior Subjects

Naomi Chambers, B.A., Junior Subjects

Ann Clewarth, Junior Subjects

John Clewarth, B.Ed., M.Ed., Deputy Head of Junior School

Dan Coll, B.Ed., Psychology, Sixth Form*

Sandra Coll, B.A., Modern Languages, Latin*

John Cooling, B.Sc., M.Med.Sci., PhD., Biology

David Coulson, B.Sc., Biology, PSHCE*

Helen Crompton, B.Mus., M.Mus., L.T.C.L., Music*

Rebecca Dews, B.Eng., Mathematics, Year 8*

Helen Drayson, Cert.Ed., Junior Subjects

Angela Eckersley, M.A., B.Sc., I.C.T.*

Bob Elliston, B.A., English

Laura Featherstone, B.A., Art

Richard Fenn, B.Ed., Geography, Year 11*

Paul Franks, B.A., P.G.Dip., History, Careers*

Marilyn Hayes, Dip.A.D., S.I.A.D., Art*

Laura Hoyland, B.A., Design & Technology, Yonge’s House*

Cale Hugill, B.Sc., Mathematics

Nigel Jackson, B.Sc., Biology, Outdoor Pursuits*

Mark Jeanes, B.Sc., Mathematics, Evans’ House*

Amy Knowles, B.A., Physical Education

John Lee, B.A., English*

Stacey Loren, B.A., English#

Kathy March, B.Ed., Physical Education, Girls’ Games*

Carol Marsh, B.Ed., Religious Studies, Year 9*

Jennifer Masters, B.A., M.A., History*

Liz McLoughlin, B.Sc., Junior Subjects

Joanne McManus, B.A., Modern Languages, PSHCE

Terry Mills B.Ed., Learning Support

Anand Mistry B.A., Design & Technology, Sixth Form#

Jonathan Newell B.Sc., C.Phys., M.Inst.P., Physics*, Science*

Jenny Newell, B.A., English

Liz Nuttall, B.A., Physical Education

Steve Ogden, B.Sc., Physics, Chemistry

Nigel Owen, B.A., Geography*

Alex Paling, B.Sc., I.C.T.

Hilary Peach, B.A., Physical Education*, Moore’s House*

Jo Piggott, B.Sc., Junior Subjects

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Rachel Platt, B.A., L.T.C.L., Music

Andy Potter, B.Ed., Physical Education, Year 7*

Cathryn Powell, B.A., Junior Subjects

Brian Pye, B.Ed., Design & Technology, Year 10*

David Raggett, B.Sc., Mathematics*

Paul Richards, B.Sc., Chemistry*

Glenn Roberts, B.Ed., Physical Education, Boys’ Games*

Tim Roberts, M.A., Theatre Studies*, English

Sam Rodgers, B.Sc., Physical Education

Chris Rowe, B.A., Design & Technology*

Simon Scholfield, B.A., Physical Education, Junior Subjects, Junior Boys’ Games*

Jemma Senadhira, B.Sc., Junior Subjects

Barbara Shaw, B.A., Modern Languages*

Susan Snow, B.A., Economics, Business Studies

Tom Sprott, B.Sc., Psychology*

Helen Stalker, B.A., Modern Languages

Lorrie Sugden, B.Sc., M.Sc., Learning Support

Diane Townsend, B.Sc., Mathematics

Alex Twiddy, B.A., Design & Technology

Tom Verinder, B.A., Politics*, History

Gaynor Walker, B.Sc., Junior Subjects, Junior Girls’ Games*

Margaret Ward, Cert.Ed., Cert. Dyslexia & Literacy, Learning Support*

Simon Wardle, B.A., English

Pat Watkin, B.Sc., Biology*

Tilly Watson, B.A., Economics*, Business Studies*

Graham Wetherop, B.A., Junior Subjects

Graham Wickstead, B.Sc., Mathematics#

Fiona Wideman, M.A., History

Nicola Widnall, B.A., Modern Languages, Spencer’s House*

Amy Wray, B.A., Music

Peter Wright, M.Sci., PhD., Chemistry

Brian Capps: Head Porter

Lisa Boyer: Teaching Assistant

Tracey Casey: Teaching Assistant

Michelle Claven: Teaching Assistant

Michael Cole, B.Sc: Chemistry Technician

Michael Collinson: Systems Manager

Louise Cotterill, R.G.N., R.S.C.N., E.N.B. 998: School Nurse

John Dickson, M.A., M.A. (Oxon.): Bursar

David Dinmore, M.B.E., D.L., M.C.I.P.D., M.C.M.I: Clerk to the Governors

Alison Dix: Junior School Secretary

Lisa Druce: Deputy Heads’ P.A.

Nicola Ferry: Teaching Assistant

Gary Ferguson: Catering Manager

Dave Forrester: Head Groundsman

Simon Gibson: Design Technician

Andy Gracie: Finance Manager

Alyson Harris: ICT Support Assistant/Assistant Exams Officer

Rachael Hills: Receptionist

Diana Kaye: Swimming Coach

Joanne Kelly: Teaching Assistant

Louise Leach: Development Co-ordinator

Karen Lingard: Assistant Librarian

Maureen Mills: Reprographics

6


Cheryl Milnes: Teaching Assistant

John Nelmes: Biology Technician

Linda Nutbrown: Senior School Secretary

George Pearson: Physics Technician

Fiona Reed: Bursar’s P.A.

Sharron Taylor: Bursar's Assistant (Fees & Salaries)

Kath Thackray: Development Assistant

Eileen Varley: Examinations Officer

Christine Wade: Senior School Secretary

Helen Wardlaw: Accounts Assistant

Teresa Watkin: Sixth Form Supervisor

Paul Webb: ICT Technician

Carol Woodhead: Headmaster's P.A./Admissions

*Denotes Head of Department, Year or House

#Denotes Deputy Head of Department

7


Term Dates 2011 – 2013

Autumn Term 2011

Half Term

Foundation Holiday

Term Ends

Monday 5 th September – 8.35am

(Staff Inset Days Thursday 1 st & Friday 2 nd )

Friday 21 st October – 4.00pm to

Monday 31 st October – 8.35am

Monday 21 st November

Friday 16 th December – 12.30pm

Spring Term 2012

Half Term

Term Ends

Monday 9 th January – 8.35am

Friday 10 th February – 4.00pm to

Monday 20 th February – 8.35am

Friday 30 th March – 12.30pm

(Easter Sunday – 8 th April)

Summer Term 2012

May Bank Holiday

Half Term

Term Ends

Wednesday 18 th April – 8.35am

(Staff Inset Day Tuesday 17 th )

Monday 7 th May

Friday 1 st June – 4.00pm to

Monday 11 th June – 8.35am

(Diamond Jubilee Holiday 4 th & 5 th )

Friday 6 th July – 12.30pm

Autumn Term 2012

Half Term

Term Ends

Monday 3 rd September – 8.35am

(Staff Inset Days Thursday 30 th & Friday 31 st August)

Friday 19 th October – 4.00pm to

Monday 5 th November – 8.35am

Friday 14 th December – 4.00pm

Spring Term 2013

Half Term

Term Ends

Monday 7 th January – 8.35am

Friday 15 th February – 4.00pm to

Monday 25 th February – 8.35am

Thursday 28 th March – 4.00pm

Summer Term 2013

May Bank Holiday

Half Term

Term Ends

Monday 15 th April – 8.35am

Monday 6 th May

Friday 24 th May – 4.00pm to

Monday 3 rd June – 8.35am

Friday 5 th July – 12.30pm

8


The Silcoates School Foundation

The Silcoates School Foundation consists of three schools:

Silcoates Schoolfor boys and girls from 5-18 (Junior School from 5-11 and Senior

School from 11-18), located on one self-contained site in Wrenthorpe, near Wakefield.

The postal address is: Silcoates School, Wrenthorpe, Wakefield, WF2 0PD and the

telephone number is 01924 291614.

Silcoates Sunny Hill – for boys and girls from 2-5, located just down the road from

Silcoates. The postal address is: Sunny Hill House School, Wrenthorpe, Wakefield, WF2

0QB and the telephone number is 01924 291717.

Silcoates St Hilda's – for boys and girls from 0-7, housed in a former convent at Horbury,

just four miles from Silcoates. The postal address is St. Hilda’s School, Dovecote Lane,

Horbury, Wakefield, WF4 6BB and the telephone number is 01924 260706.

All three schools share the same Board of Governors. The Chairman of the Governors

is Mrs Mary Chippendale. Any correspondence for her should be sent via Silcoates

School and it will be forwarded without delay.

Each school has its own Head, but the Headmaster of Silcoates School is also Principal of

the Silcoates School Foundation and he has the role of ensuring that all the Foundation

schools deliver an effective and consistent education, within the following Ethos and

Aims.

Our ethos:

Ethos & Aims

We provide an all-round education with an academic edge, encouraging positive

relationships, strong friendships and core values of tolerance and understanding, arising

from our Christian foundation.

We promote the highest standards of learning and a commitment to personal discovery,

with an expectation of excellence from our pupils and our staff.

We celebrate the breadth of talents that pupils and staff bring to the Silcoates School

Foundation.

Our aims:

For our pupils: to meet their educational needs in the 21 st century through a traditional

but ever-developing curriculum, both within and beyond the classroom; to help them

develop their skills and attributes to the best of their ability; to encourage them to

explore new activities and cultivate new talents; to help them become ambitious,

energetic, committed, and considerate adults.

For our parents: to build a mutually rewarding partnership in which we share in the

successes of our pupils; to listen, respond effectively and learn from each other in order

to build and maintain strong bridges of communication and support.

For our staff: to carry on the long-standing practice of being highly motivated, wellqualified,

caring staff, who place the well-being of the individual and the quality of

relationships at the centre of the learning experience.

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Chapel

Silcoates is a Christian foundation and the Chapel lies at the heart of the school. In

addition to morning assemblies, services are held in the Chapel on Sundays at regular

intervals throughout the year, and details are published in the school calendar. These

opportunities to meet together and to share in worship are a very valuable aspect of a

Silcoates education. They are family occasions and all parents, pupils and friends of the

school are warmly invited to join in any or all of the services.

Charity

Silcoates School, through its foundation and ethos, is committed to acts of charity

through service to others and fundraising for appropriate causes. There are therefore

occasions during the year when pupils are asked to contribute time and/or money to help

others less fortunate than themselves. We ask that parents support their children as best

they can if charitable requests are made, for example: Own Clothes Days, where pupils

pay not to wear their school uniform; supplying a shoe box of small items at Christmas

for children overseas who would not otherwise receive gifts; cake sales and coffee

mornings; sponsored events such as the Junior School annual swim; or national events

such as Children in Need or Red Nose Day. Details of all such events are sent to parents

by letter, text or postings on the website.

Equal Opportunities

The school aims to prepare children for life in the wider community. We seek to promote

positive attitudes and behaviour in a society where no one should suffer discrimination

on issue of gender, ability, disability, race, religion, cultural background, linguistic

background, or sexual orientation.

Child Protection

The school works in close conjunction with the Social Services Department and the

Wakefield and District Safeguarding Children Board to ensure that the requirements of the

Children Act are complied with. The Senior Designated Person is Mr Curran, with Mrs

Hayes as his assistant, both of whom are trained appropriately. Their equivalents in the

Junior School are Mr Boyer and Miss McLoughlin. Regular training for all staff takes place,

and key senior staff and governors are trained in Safer Recruitment Procedures and

Responding to Allegations against Staff.

The school has a detailed policy with regard to Child Protection. Below is a summary of

the rationale and aims of the policy only. A copy of the Child Protection Policy is posted

on the school website. The policy is updated annually. Further details are available on

request from Mr Curran, the Deputy Head (Pastoral).

Although incidents requiring the implementation of the Child Protection Policy are very

rare at Silcoates, it is vital that all staff, both teaching and support staff, are fully aware of

the school's policy and of the action they should take if a child protection situation arises.

The aims of the Child Protection Policy are:

• To create a happy, well-ordered and caring community;

• To raise awareness among all staff, both teaching and support staff, about issues

relating to child protection;

• To inform staff about the actions they should take if a child protection situation

arises.

10


School Nurse

The school has a well-qualified and experienced nurse, Mrs Louise Cotterill, who operates

from a well-resourced clinic. She is available from Monday to Friday, 8.30am to 4.00pm,

and is present for home rugby fixtures on Saturdays. Her role in the school is varied as

she deals with medical issues, assists with the PSHCE programme and is also available to

pupils for counsel and confidential advice.

All medication must be handed to the School Nurse for safety and she oversees the

administration of the medication. In the event of an accident she contacts parents and

where necessary accompanies pupils to hospital. She ensures that the necessary forms

are completed.

Pupils must not be sent to school unwell, but if a pupil is taken ill at school the School

Nurse contacts parents. She then looks after the pupil in the Clinic until such time as

parents are able to come to school.

No pupil should contact parents over illness, without reference to the School Nurse or

Reception.

Alongside the nurse there are a high number of staff who are qualified in first aid.

Introduction

Parents’ Complaints Procedure

Silcoates School has long prided itself on the quality of the teaching and pastoral care

provided to its pupils. However, if parents do have a complaint, they can expect it to be

treated by the School in accordance with this policy. The School is obliged to keep a

written record of complaints. For this purpose, the definition of a complaint is any

communication in writing to the Headmaster of parental dissatisfaction.

Stage 1 – Informal Resolution

It is hoped that most complaints and concerns will be resolved quickly and informally.

If parents have a complaint they should normally contact their son/daughter’s Class

Teacher (Junior School) or Form Tutor (Senior School). In many cases, the matter will be

resolved straightaway by this means to the parents’ satisfaction. If the Class Teacher or

Form Tutor cannot resolve the matter alone, it may be necessary for him/her to consult

the Head of Junior School, a Head of Department, a Head of Year, one of the Deputy

Heads or the Headmaster.

Complaints made directly to the Head of Junior School, a Head of Department, a Head of

Year, one of the Deputy Heads or the Headmaster will usually be referred to the relevant

Class Teacher or Form Tutor unless he/she deems it appropriate for him/her to deal with

the matter personally.

The Class Teacher or Form Tutor will make a written record of all concerns and

complaints and the date on which they were received. Should the matter not be resolved

within two weeks or in the event that the Class Teacher or Form Tutor and the parent fail

to reach a satisfactory resolution then parents will be advised to proceed with their

complaint in accordance with Stage 2 of this procedure.

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Stage 2 – Formal Resolution

If the complaint cannot be resolved on an informal basis, then the parents should put

their complaint in writing to the Headmaster. The Headmaster will decide, after

considering the complaint, the appropriate course of action to take.

In most cases, the Headmaster will meet or speak to the parents concerned, normally

within five working days of receiving the complaint, to discuss the matter. If possible, a

resolution will be reached at this stage.

It may be necessary for the Headmaster to carry out further investigations.

The Headmaster will keep written records of all meetings and interviews held in relation

to the complaint.

Once the Headmaster is satisfied that, so far as is practicable, all of the relevant facts

have been established, a decision will be made and parents will be informed of this

decision in writing. The Headmaster will also give reasons for his decision.

If parents are still not satisfied with the decision, they should proceed to Stage 3 of this

procedure.

Stage 3 – Panel Hearing

If parents seek to invoke Stage 3, following a failure to reach an earlier resolution, they

will be referred to the Chairman of Governors, who has been appointed by the Governors

to call hearings of the Complaints Panel.

The matter will then be referred to the Complaints Panel for consideration. The Panel will

consist of at least three persons not directly involved in the matters detailed in the

complaint, one of whom shall be independent of the management and running of the

School. Each of the Panel members shall be appointed by the Board of Governors. The

Chairman of Governors, on behalf of the Panel, will then acknowledge the complaint and

schedule a hearing to take place as soon as practicable and normally within ten working

days.

If the Panel deems it necessary, it may require that further particulars of the complaint or

any related matter be supplied in advance of the hearing. Copies of such particulars shall

be supplied to all parties not later than three working days prior to the hearing.

The parents may be accompanied to the hearing by one other person. This may be a

relative, teacher or friend. Legal representation will not normally be appropriate.

If possible, the Panel will resolve the parents’ complaint immediately without the need for

further investigation.

Where further investigation is required, the Panel will decide how it should be carried out.

After due consideration of all facts they consider relevant, the Panel will reach a decision

and may make recommendations, which it shall complete within ten working days of the

Hearing. The Panel will write to the parents informing them of its decision and the

reasons for it. The decision of the Panel will be final. The Panel’s findings and, if any,

recommendations will be sent in writing to the parents, the Headmaster, the Governors

and, where relevant, the person complained of. A copy of the Panel’s findings will be

available for inspection on the school premises by the Chairman of Governors and the

Headmaster.

12


Parents can be assured that all concerns and complaints will be treated seriously and

confidentially. Correspondence, statements and records relating to individual

complaints will be kept confidential except to the extent required by paragraph 6(2)(j) of

the Education (Independent School Standards) (England) Regulations 2003, by the

Secretary of State for Education, or where disclosure is required in the course of the

school’s inspection or under other legal authority.

Pupils' Complaints Procedure

If a pupil has a suggestion, comment or complaint about an aspect of his/her treatment

at Silcoates then he/she should speak to his/her Class Teacher in the first instance.

Alternatively, the pupil can speak to the Head of Junior School, the Deputy Head of the

Junior School or indeed the Headmaster.

All complaints will be taken seriously and action taken to resolve the problem as soon as

possible. If a complaint cannot be satisfactorily resolved a pupil should contact Mr Boyer.

School Councils

Pupils at Silcoates are given regular opportunities to express their views on school

matters. There are separate School Councils for the Senior School and the Junior School,

which include representatives from all year groups as appropriate. Pupils are chosen by

their peers and they are encouraged to submit items for the agenda.

Minutes of meetings are circulated and action is taken, wherever reasonably possible to

do so, in follow up to points made by pupils. The School Council meetings are held each

half-term throughout the school year.

Foundation Parents’ Association (FPA)

The FPA was formed to organise social events to encourage parents to become more

involved in the life of the school, whilst raising funds to purchase special items. It aims

to make a profit on every event organised, but the social benefits to parents and pupils

are regarded as equally important.

The FPA Committee usually meets at least twice a term. The Committee is supplemented

by a number of volunteers who are keen to help set up and run the various events, but

who do not wish to be involved in committee work.

Throughout the year the FPA holds several events, some for the children and some for

parents. These include a family picnic, family fun night, discos, Christmas fairs, spring

and summer balls, and refreshments and raffles at most events, whether sporting,

musical or drama.

The funds raised by the FPA have been used to enhance all areas of school life, and

include donations to sports tours, choir robes, music band banners, stage blocks, textiles

club, cookery club, a flagpole, display cabinets, boxed games, chess club, amateur radio

club, a PA system, picture frames, the photographic club and many more.

The FPA is always keen to welcome new committee members and volunteers, and greatly

appreciates all the help and ideas it receives. Please contact the Headmaster’s P.A. if you

require any further information and/or would like to get involved with this important

aspect of school life.

13


Meals and Food

At lunchtime a wide selection of meals is provided for all pupils. Special diets and/or

vegetarians are catered for. Please contact the Catering Manager, Mr Gary Ferguson, on

01924 885217, if you have any specific dietary request or if your son/daughter is on a

special diet for medical reasons. Please also inform the School Nurse and your child’s

Class Teacher.

All pupils are expected to attend lunch in the Dining Hall at their designated time and the

importance of healthy eating is stressed through both academic subjects and in the

Personal, Social, Health and Citizenship Education programme. The school tries to ensure

that a balanced range of meals is available to pupils and we have introduced healthy

options wherever possible. Drinking water machines are located at various points around

the school and pupils are allowed to bring water bottles to school if they wish.

Junior School pupils should also bring a healthy snack for morning break, such as a piece

of fruit or a cereal bar. If they forget to bring anything into school, please note that a

selection of fruit is offered. All children must bring in a drinks bottle that they then can

use during the day. It is expected that they should have water in these; please note that

fizzy drinks are not allowed. Sweets and chocolate are also not allowed to be brought into

school unless permission has been sought from the Class Teacher, usually only for the

child’s birthday treat. Please ensure you do not send in any nut products.

Dining Room rules:

• Table manners should always be observed

• Meals should be collected in an orderly way

• Pupils should clear their own plates

• Pupils should try to eat a balanced meal

• Pupils should be polite and show respect for all staff present in the dining area

For school trips, a packed lunch is provided for all pupils by the Catering Department. We

ask that parents do not supply children with their own packed lunches for school trips.

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Sample Lunch Menu

Main Courses

Roast Turkey

Sage & Onion Stuffing

Lasagne

Roast Potatoes & New Potatoes

Baton Carrots

Buttered Cabbage

Jacket Potatoes

Gravy

Vegetarian Option

Vegetarian Lasagne

Vegetable Curry & Rice

Salad Bar

Roast Beef

Roast Ham

Tuna Mayonnaise

Grated Cheese

Potato & Chive Salad

Mediterranean Pasta

Ham Pasta Salad

Apple & Celery

Coleslaw

Tomatoes & Cucumber

Mixed Leaf Salad

Sandwiches

Selection of White & Wholemeal Sandwiches

Sweet

Apple Pie and Whipped Cream

Cheese & Biscuits

Fresh Fruit

Yoghurts

15


Appearance of Pupils

Pupils should look tidy, clean and smart in school and when travelling to and from

school. We consider the appearance of pupils to be of the highest importance.

Extremes of fashion are not allowed. Pupils must wear the correct uniform with top

buttons fastened, ties properly done up and shirts tucked in.

Jewellery – No jewellery is allowed, with the exception that girls may wear single

symmetrical plain ear studs. These should be removed, along with watches, for all sports

lessons and fixtures.

Make-up – No make-up is allowed in the Junior School.

Hair – This must be clean, tidy and neatly cut. Dyed, streaked or highlighted hair is not

allowed. Hairstyles must be reasonable, for example very short ‘skin-head’ cuts or boys

having long hair in ponytails, or with an overuse of hair products, are clearly not

acceptable. For girls, long hair must be tied back. Junior girls’ hair bands, ribbons, etc.,

must be either black or dark green with winter uniform. When wearing summer uniform,

girls may have green/white checked to match their school dress. Boys’ hair should be

collar length and the fringe above the eyebrows.

There should be no transfer tattoos or nail varnish.

The school requests parents to ensure that their child attends school in the correct uniform.

A uniform list is published separately in this booklet. It is hoped that parents will cooperate

in encouraging their children to develop a sense of pride in their own appearance

with regard to hair, tidiness, etc. If items of uniform worn are non-regulation, an

appropriate letter will be sent home.

We believe our uniform and appearance guidelines offer a common sense approach and

we ask parents to support us in upholding these guidelines. However, please note that

in all circumstances it is the school that decides what constitutes reasonable

standards. Any pupil who attends school unsuitably dressed or with an unacceptable

hairstyle may be sent home

For school visits, letters are sent to parents that give details of the required dress code. If in

doubt, pupils are expected to check with the member of staff leading the trip.

We hope parents will help the school in emphasising the importance of maintaining these

standards which reflect upon the school, the child and their family.

Please note:

Winter uniform: compulsory for the second half of the autumn term and first half of the

spring term.

Summer uniform: compulsory for the whole of the summer term

Either uniform: may be worn in the first half of the autumn term and second half of the

spring term.

IMPORTANT:

Please ensure all items of clothing are clearly named

(Woven tapes/name buttons advised)

16


Uniform for 2011/2012 – Year 1 & Year 2

Boys – Winter

School Grey Trousers – mid-grey of formal design (children have the option also to wear

shorts)

School Grey Socks (knee length when wearing shorts)

White Shirt

*School Tie (Silcoates)

Green School V-necked Pullover

*Blazer with Silcoates School Badge

*Black School Coat (wearing of coat compulsory from autumn half-term to spring halfterm)

*School Briefcase with Silcoates School Badge

Black Shoes (not suede and no laces)

*School Ski Hat

Bottle Green Scarf

Boys – Summer

School Tailored Grey Shorts – mid-grey of formal design

Grey Ankle Socks

Short Sleeved White Shirt

*School Tie (Silcoates)

Green School V-necked Pullover

*Blazer with Silcoates School Badge

*School Briefcase with Silcoates School Badge

Black Shoes (not suede and no laces) or Black Closed-toe Sandals

*Green School Sun Legionnaires Cap

Girls – Winter

*School Tunic (plain grey)

School Grey Tights (thick) or Grey knee length socks

White Shirt

*School Tie (Silcoates)

Green School V-necked Cardigan

*Blazer with Silcoates School Badge

*Black School Coat (wearing of coat compulsory from autumn half-term to spring halfterm)

*School Briefcase with Silcoates Badge

Black Shoes (not ballet slipper style, no laces and flat)

*School Ski Hat

Bottle Green Scarf

Girls – Summer

*Green School Sun Cap – Silcoates logo

*School Summer Dress – Green and white checked dress from Marks and Spencers only

Green School V-necked Cardigan

White Ankle Socks

*Blazer with Silcoates School Badge

*School Briefcase with Silcoates School Badge

Black Shoes (not ballet slipper style, no laces and flat) or Black Closed-toe Sandals

*Green School Sun Legionnaires Cap

17


PE Uniform:

Boys & Girls:

*School Tracksuit

*School White Polo Shirt

*School Green PE Shorts

White Ankle Socks

Plain Black Sports Bag

*School Ski Hat

Trainers (no laces) for both indoors (clean and non-marking) and outdoors

*School Swim Rucksack

*School Swimming Cap

*School Trunks / Costume

* = ONLY available from the School Shop

18


Uniform for 2010/2011 – Years 3-6

Boys – Winter

School Grey Trousers – mid-grey of formal design

School Grey Socks

White Shirt

*School Tie (Silcoates)

Grey School V-necked Pullover

*Blazer with Silcoates School Badge

*Black School Coat (wearing of coat compulsory from October half-term to spring halfterm)

Plain Black School Bag (*School Briefcase with Silcoates Badge an option for Year 3)

Black Shoes (not suede and no laces)

*School Ski Hat

Bottle Green Scarf

Boys – Summer

School Grey Trousers – optional long or short (shorts would be mid-grey of formal design)

School Grey Socks (grey ankle socks if wearing shorts)

Short Sleeved White Shirt

*School Tie (Silcoates)

Grey School V-necked Pullover

*Blazer with Silcoates School Badge

Plain Black School Bag (*School Briefcase with Silcoates Badge an option for Year 3)

Black Shoes (not suede and no laces)

*Green School Sun Cap – Silcoates logo

Girls – Winter

*Grey Box Pleat Skirt. (Grey tunic optional for Years 3 & 4; grey A-line skirt optional for

Years 5&6) – all available from the school shop

School Grey Tights (thick) or Grey Knee Length Socks

White Shirt

*School Tie (Silcoates)

Grey School V-necked Pullover and/or Green School V-necked Cardigan

*Blazer with Silcoates School Badge

*Black School Coat (wearing of coat compulsory from October half-term to Easter)

Plain Black School Bag (*School Briefcase with Silcoates Badge an option for Year 3)

Black Shoes (not ballet slipper style, no laces and flat)

*School Ski Hat

Bottle Green Scarf

Girls – Summer

School Summer Dress – Green and white checked dress from Marks and Spencers only

Green School V-necked Cardigan

White Ankle Socks

*Blazer with Silcoates School Badge

*Plain Black School Bag (*School Briefcase with Silcoates Badge an option for Year 3)

Black Shoes (not ballet slipper style, no laces and flat)

*Green School Sun Cap – Silcoates logo

19


PE Uniform:

Boys:

*Navy blue shorts for rugby

*White shorts for PE and athletics

*School white polo shirt with school emblem

*Reversible green jersey for rugby/football

*School tracksuit

*Emerald green socks for rugby

White short socks for PE and athletics

*Cricket sweater (V-necked white with school emblem)

*School swimming hat

*School swimming trunks

Swimming goggles

Swimming towel

• Sports shoes:

rugby/football boots (moulded studs or RFU safety studs essential for replaceable

studs)

• white trainers with non-marking soles

• cricket shoes (optional)

Plain Black Sports Bag

Gum Shield and shin pads (we strongly recommend that all pupils have these for all

games lessons and fixtures – a boil in the bag gum shield would be sufficient for all

pupils)

When kit will be required:

Autumn & Spring Term:

Rugby & Football :

Reversible green rugby/football jersey

Navy rugby shorts

Plain emerald green socks

Rugby/football boots

School tracksuit

Summer Term:

Cricket:

School white polo shirt or cricket shirt

White or predominantly white trainers or cricket shoes

School Cricket hat/cap (optional)

Members of the U11 cricket team MUST wear white cricket trousers and school cricket

shirt.

Pupils in Years 3-5 do not need white cricket trousers. Pupils who have cricket in games,

but do not represent a team, wear white shorts.

Athletics:

School white polo shirt

White shorts

White socks

Trainers (spikes may be worn for fixtures)

20


Throughout the year:

Swimming kit required

Tracksuits required

PE lessons:

School white polo shirt

White shorts

White socks

Clean white indoor footwear (non-marking soles)

PE Uniform

Girls:

*Bottle green PE skirt

*Bottle green cycling shorts

*School white polo shirt with school emblem

*School tracksuit

*Emerald green socks for hockey

White short socks for PE and athletics

*School swimming hat

*School swimming costume

Swimming goggles

Swimming towel

Sports shoes:

Football/hockey boots

White trainers with non-marking soles or strong trainers

Plain Black Sports Bag

Gum Shield and shin pads (we strongly recommend that all pupils have these for all

games lessons and fixtures – a boil in the bag gum shield would be sufficient for all

pupils)

When kit will be required:

Autumn & Spring Term:

Netball & Hockey:

School white polo shirt

Green PE skirt

Green cycling shorts

White socks

White trainers

School tracksuit

Emerald green socks for hockey

Football / hockey boots

Shin Pads

Gum shield

21


Summer Term:

Rounders & Athletics:

School white polo shirt

Green PE skirt

Green cycling shorts

White socks

White trainers

School tracksuit

Trainers (spikes may be worn for athletic fixtures)

Throughout the year:

Swimming kit required

Tracksuits required

PE lessons:

Bottle green PE skirt

Bottle green cycling shorts

School white polo shirt

White socks

Clean white indoor footwear (non-marking soles)

* = ONLY available from the School Shop

22


School Shop

The School Shop is located at the back of the Administration Building. Please leave your

car in the main car park and enter the school grounds by the second black gate on

Silcoates Lane – please do not park in the restricted area.

Certain items of school clothing and equipment, such as blazers (marked in italics in the

clothing list) can be obtained only from the School Shop. Please note that all uniform

must be paid for at point of sale. The School Shop accepts cheques, cash, debit and

credit cards (except American Express). It is not possible to put the cost of uniform on to

the school fees account.

Cheques should be made payable to “Rawcliffes”. If pupils come to the shop by

themselves, they should bring cash or a signed cheque made payable to “Rawcliffes”, with

the amount left blank and with full card details on the reverse of the cheque.

As well as visiting the School Shop, parents can shop on-line via the internet at

www.schoolwear-centre.co.uk. On the home page, you need to enter ‘Silcoates’ as the

school and ‘Green’ as the password.

Woven name tapes are available through the School Shop. They are cheaper and more

quickly supplied than through many retail outlets.

The shop inevitably gets busiest towards the end of the school holidays. Parents are

therefore advised, if possible, to try to visit the shop at other times to avoid a long delay.

From Monday 11 th July to Saturday 17 th September 2011, the School Shop opening hours

are Mondays and Thursdays 12.30pm-4.30pm and Saturdays 9.30am-1.00pm. During

school term-time the opening hours are Monday 12.30pm-4.30pm. The School Shop

does not open on a Bank Holiday or on the Foundation Day holiday.

Second Hand Shop

There is also a Second Hand Shop where uniform can be bought at reduced prices. It is

run by Mrs Ann Chamberlain and located to the right of the Bursar’s Office.

If parents have any good quality regulation uniform items that they no longer require,

please donate them to the Second Hand Shop so that others can benefit.

The Second Hand Shop opening hours are available via the school website or by

telephoning the school’s main office on 01924 291614.

23


Home/School Communication

We believe that education is a partnership between home and school. The following

section outlines the ways in which we seek to promote this partnership and, in particular,

how we seek to achieve clear lines of communication between home and school.

Telephone Numbers

All numbers are for Wakefield and have the area code 01924:

291614 the main school number, with extensions to many

departments;

885202 the Headmaster’s P.A/Admissions, Carol Woodhead;

885235 the P.A. to the Deputy Heads, Lisa Druce;

885276 the Junior School Secretary, Alison Dix;

885252 the Bursar’s P.A. (& Sports Club), Fiona Reed;

885255 the Bursar’s Assistant (Fees), Sharron Taylor;

885254 the Accounts Office;

885201/885203 the Senior School Secretaries, Christine Wade &

Linda Nutbrown;

886245 the Examinations Officer, Eileen Varley;

885219 the School Nurse, Louise Cotterill;

885217 the Catering Manager, Gary Ferguson;

07774 773340: Senior School mobile, emergency contact with member

of staff on duty after 4.30pm

07922 119976 Junior School (late-stayers):

368693 School Fax

E-mail

Website

head@silcoates.org.uk

www.silcoates.org.uk

There is a telephone available for pupils in reception to make private calls. It does not

take incoming calls.

Making Contact

.

The first and main point of contact for you on any matter concerning your son or

daughter is normally the Class Teacher, who takes direct responsibility for his or her

academic and pastoral care. It may be that it is more appropriate to get in touch with the

Deputy Head of Junior School, Mr John Clewarth, the Head of Junior School, or the

Headmaster, but in general the Class Teacher should always be contacted first.

24


Reception

The Junior School Reception is open from 8.00am to 4.00pm. A message can be left on

the answer machine if no one is available to answer the phone. Between 4.00pm and

6.00pm, the Junior School ‘late-stayers’ & ‘late, late-stayers’ supervisors can be contacted

on 07922 119976.

Homework Diary (Years 3-6) and Homework Record Book (Years 1 & 2)

Every pupil in Years 3-6 has a homework diary. These are used by pupils daily and

information is written in the diary about the homework that needs to be completed. We

therefore ask parents to look at the diary every day. Messages may also be written in the

diary for parents by the Class Teacher and vice versa, including, for example, details

regarding a dental trip or hospital appointment, where a pupil might miss a section of the

school day.

At the weekend we ask that all diaries are checked by parents and signed, thereby

indicating to the child’s Class Teacher that parents have viewed the information for

that week. The Class Teacher will also sign the diary to indicate they have seen the

parent’s signature.

It is also helpful at the beginning of each day if a collection time is written in the diary.

This helps the Class Teacher to know when each pupil is due to be going home and it

also helps the late class team.

Pupils in Years 1 & 2 have a Homework Record Book and this is used in a similar manner

to the homework diary. Again, it is an important channel for communication between

parents and their child’s Class Teacher.

We ask parents to check their child’s bag daily.

ClarionCall

Texts and E-mails

As a school we are always looking for ways to improve our arrangements for contacting

parents quickly and efficiently in the event of sudden changes to the school day. Until

quite recently we relied on calling each family directly, which proved time-consuming and

unreliable. Moreover, if we had to leave a message, we could not be sure that the

information actually reached parents.

We now use a system, ClarionCall, through which we can send text messages to your

individual phones, record voice messages that you can pick up, or send e-mails to your

preferred address.

ClarionCall in Action

A simple text message might read something like this:

The forecast is for better weather in the afternoon! Sports Day will go ahead at the later

time of 1.30pm and we intend to run a full programme of events.

25


When the school records a voice message for you, you will first receive a text alert with

instructions. For example:

Message for Silcoates School U10 rugby team. Please call 0131 5146111.

When you ring the number, your mobile number will be recognised and you will be played

the appropriate message. For example:

The Under 10 match against Pocklington School has been cancelled.

The fact that you have dialled in and listened to the message is registered on our system,

enabling us to call those parents who have not received the message directly. This

includes parents who do not regularly use or carry a mobile phone.

Benefits of ClarionCall

ClarionCall is a very useful tool when there are significant changes to the normal school

day. More importantly, however, it is an invaluable and efficient method of contacting

parents quickly in the case of a real school emergency. In addition, communications that

have previously relied on hard copies being delivered to you by your children can now be

transmitted by text or e-mail. In some instances it may simply be an alert to let you know

that a letter or document is newly available on the school website. We hope you will

agree that this is a more efficient and cost-effective way of communicating with you as

parents.

Action Required

Please ensure that the school has your current mobile phone numbers and e-mail

addresses and please inform us immediately if either of these changes.

26


Other Communication

A school calendar is published at the end of each term, in order to give parents as much

notice as possible of events in the following term. We make every effort to ensure this

calendar is accurate. However, please be aware that sometimes changes need to be

made, particularly for fixtures, after the calendar is published. A printed copy of the

calendar is sent to parents and an electronic version is posted on the website.

For additional sporting fixtures and any trips that are not finalised when the calendar is

published, further letters are sent to parents in advance of the fixture/trip taking place.

Other letters may be sent by post but they may also be sent home by hand via

registration periods. Increasingly, we aim to publish communications with parents on the

website.

'The Silcoatian' is the school's annual magazine, published at Christmas each year,

providing a review of the previous school year. ‘The Clarion’ is published three times

each year, highlighting the achievements of current and former pupils. ‘Times Up’ is a

Sixth Form magazine, also published three times each year. All these publications are

available as hard copies, but they can also be downloaded from the website –

www.silcoates.org.uk

27


School Day

Monday to Friday

Time Junior School (3-6)

8.35am

Registration

8.45am

Assembly/Chapel

9.05am Period 1

9.45am Period 2

10.25am

Break

10.45am Period 3

11.25am Period 4

12.05pm

Lunch & Activities

1.15pm Registration & Period 5

2.00pm Period 6

2.40pm Period 7

3.20pm

End of Teaching Day

3.25 – 4.00pm Late-stayers in the

Dining Hall

4.00 – 6.00pm Extra-curricular Activities

Supervision in Late Lates for

all children

6.00pm

End of School Day

Time

Junior School (1&2)

8.35am

Registration

8.45am

Assembly/Chapel

9.05am Period 1

9.45am Period 2

10.25am

Break

10.45am Period 3/4

11.50am

Lunch & Activities

1.00pm Registration & Period 5

2.00pm

Afternoon Break

2.20pm Period 6

3.20pm

End of Teaching Day

3.25 – 4.00pm Late-stayers in the

Classrooms

4.00 – 6.00pm Extra-curricular Activities

Supervision in Late Lates for

all children

6.00pm

End of School Day

Saturday – Matches and activities as shown in the school calendar.

Sunday – Chapel services and activities as shown in the school calendar.

28


Attendance

Attendance is compulsory:

• during the working day – 8.35am-3.20pm;

• at team practices, etc., which, with due notice, take place after 3.20pm;

• at all school representative sports fixtures where selected, including reserves,

touch judges and scorers (team lists will be published 48 hours in advance);

• on all occasions when a commitment undertaken by a pupil (e.g. acting in a play,

opting for a school trip) involves pre-arranged attendance out of normal school

hours;

• at special events published in the calendar or with due notice.

Attendance at games is excused only on presentation of a note, signed by a parent or the

School Nurse, to the member of staff concerned.

Any pupil who becomes ill during the school day will be sent to the Clinic (or Junior

Reception). Contact with parents will be through the School Nurse or Reception. Direct

communication between the pupil and parent is not acceptable.

For pupils arriving late in the morning on a regular basis, parents will be contacted by the

Junior School Deputy Head. Trains and school buses are late from time to time, which of

course constitutes a valid excuse, but in other circumstances contact from parents is

required.

Because of last-minute injury or illness, pupils may be called upon at short notice to play

in a team. We would be most grateful if you would do all that you can to enable us to

field the best available teams, although we understand that it may not always be possible

for other arrangements to be changed at short notice.

Unplanned Absence

Absence from school is normally acceptable only for medical reasons, in which case

parents are asked to notify Junior School Reception on the first day of absence

(telephone 01924 885276) between 8.30am and 9.00am and to send a written note,

addressed to the Class Teacher, on the pupil's return or an email to Mrs Dix at

alisondix@silcoates.org.uk. It is normal practice for the school to contact parents if a

child is absent without notification.

Planned Absence

We strongly recommend that parents refrain from disturbing their child's education

by taking them out of school during the term. You are therefore asked not to make

plans for holidays, excursions, routine medical or dental appointments, etc., which clash

with your son's or daughter's school commitments.

In exceptional circumstances, if parents wish their child to be away from school at any

time during term, they should write to the Head of Junior School well in advance to

request leave of absence. For routine matters, such as a dental appointment, a letter to

the Class Teacher is sufficient. Pupils must follow the procedures for signing in and out

at Junior School Reception, as outlined below.

29


Absence of Parents

When both parents are absent from a pupil's home overnight or for a twenty-four hour

period or longer, the Head of Junior School must be told in writing the name, the

address, and telephone number for twenty-four hour contact with the adult who has the

care of the pupil.

Signing In and Out

There will be occasions during the school day when a pupil arrives at or leaves the school

at times other than those scheduled. In order to ensure that our monitoring of the

whereabouts of pupils is as complete as possible, we operate a signing in and out

system.

The book for this system is kept in Junior School Reception. If a pupil arrives after

registration or if he/she comes into school once the school day has begun then he/she

must report to Reception to sign in. We ask parents to escort children who are late to

the Junior School Reception, in case no one is there and/or the child’s class is

working elsewhere in the school. Likewise, if a pupil leaves the campus before 3.20pm

then he/she must inform Junior School Reception before departing, and must be

collected by parents.

There will be other occasions when a pupil needs to leave the campus during the school

day. Parents are asked to ensure that the Head of Junior School is informed of these

absences so that he can give the appropriate permission.

Delivery/Collection of Pupils and Car Parking

In the interests of pupil safety and in order to minimise congestion, please comply with

the following arrangements:

• Observe the one-way system which is clearly marked.

• Do not wait or park on Silcoates Lane. It is an offence to park or wait where there

are double white lines and the police make periodic checks, imposing fixed

penalties on offenders. Do not annoy our neighbours by parking in the nearby culde-sacs

or by blocking driveways.

• Ensure that you do not obstruct the parking area designated for the school

coaches.

• The roads inside the school grounds must not be obstructed. They are used by

delivery vehicles and coaches and must be kept clear for emergency vehicles.

Arrival

The school considers punctuality to be very important. Pupils must be in school by 8.35

am.

Two members of the Junior School staff are on duty at the school gate (Drop Off Zone)

each morning from 8.00am. Any Year 1 or 2 pupil dropped off here is escorted to the

playground where they will wait for school to begin. Any older pupils wishing to use the

service may do, but it is not compulsory.

In order to ensure that pupils are not left unsupervised we ask parents not to bring

children before 8.00am.

30


From 8.00am, pupils in Years 1 and 2 leave their bags outside their classroom and

assemble in the Middle Playground where they are supervised by a member of staff.

Pupils in Years 3, 4, 5 and 6 leave their bags outside their classroom and assemble in the

Upper Playground where they are supervised by a member of staff. Pupils are collected

from the playground by the Class Teacher and taken to their classroom for registration.

In the event of bad weather, pupils in Years 1-3 are supervised in their classroom, while

pupils in Years 4-6 are supervised in the Junior Hall until collected by their Class Teacher

for registration.

Registration

The registration of pupils, both in the morning and in the afternoon, is a legal

requirement. All parents and pupils need to be aware that attendance at registration is

compulsory.

Morning registration takes place between 8.35-8.45am. It is essential that all pupils

attend this registration punctually.

Afternoon registration takes place at 1.15pm in the Junior School. There may, however,

be occasions where pupils have permission to leave before this time or where sports

fixtures or examinations mean that pupils are away. In these cases, Class Teachers must

be informed about absences so that the registers can be marked appropriately.

Collection of Pupils

For the benefit of pupils and convenience of parents, there are a number of options

available at the end of the school day and these are outlined below.

Although these arrangements can be rather confusing at first, most children soon

become familiar with the routines. It is extremely helpful for staff and reassuring for

children to know exactly what they are supposed to do after school as this may vary from

day to day. To assist your child, we would suggest that, at least for the first few weeks of

term, you put a reminder in your child’s homework diary of what he or she should do at

the end of the school day so that the Class Teacher can make a note of this at registration

each morning.

Years 1 and 2

At the end of normal lessons at 3.20pm, pupils return to their form rooms from where

they will be dismissed by their Class Teacher.

At that point, pupils can be collected by a parent from outside the chapel. Any child not

collected by that time is escorted to Late Stayers in classroom A6. Those attending an

after-school club are notified about where and when they should be collected. Pupils

remaining in school after a club are escorted to Late Stayers.

Although this facility exists for the convenience of parents at no additional charge, we

would advise that pupils should be collected as soon as possible after school and not

remain in Late Stayers any longer than necessary. You are asked to collect your child from

classroom A11 and sign the register before 6.00pm.

If, in exceptional circumstances, you are unable to collect your child before 6.00pm,

please notify duty staff on 07758 843380. Your child will be taken to the Headmaster’s

House.

31


Years 3, 4, 5 and 6

At the end of normal lessons at 3.20pm, pupils return to their form rooms from where

they are dismissed by their Class Teacher

At that point, pupils can be collected by a parent from outside the chapel. Any child not

collected by that time will be escorted to Late Stayers (see below). Alternatively, the

children go to the Junior Playground where they assemble in different groups, namely

those who are going to clubs and activities, those being escorted to the Car Park and

those being escorted to after-school care. Those attending an after-school club will be

notified about where and when they should be collected. Pupils remaining in school after

a club are escorted to Late, Late stayers.

Late Stayers is a supervised homework period from 3.20-4.00pm and takes place in the

school dining hall (except when there are fixtures in which case classrooms are used). At

4.00pm children, including those using the bus service, are escorted to the Car Park by

the duty member of staff. Children not collected from the Car Park by 4.10pm are

escorted to Late, Late Stayers.

Late, Late Stayers is an extended homework session for pupils remaining in school

beyond 4.00pm that takes place in the single storey block (classrooms A10, A11 and

A12). A small snack is provided for the children.

Year 3 pupils join pupils in Year 1 and Year 2 in classroom A6 shortly after 4.15pm, when

they have had a snack and done their homework.

Although this facility exists for the convenience of parents at no additional charge, we

would advise that pupils should be collected as soon as possible after school and not

remain in Late, late Stayers any longer than necessary. You are asked to collect your child

from classroom A11 and sign the register before 6.00pm

If, in exceptional circumstances, you are unable to collect your child before 6.00pm,

please notify duty staff on 07922 119976. Your child will be taken to the Headmaster’s

House.

School Transport

There are several buses which provide a service to Silcoates from outlying districts, i.e.

Barnsley, Huddersfield, Holmfirth, Skelmanthorpe, and Sherburn. These are organised by

the school or local transport companies with the support of the school. The school also

operates a mini-bus service from Westgate Station for pupils who travel by train. Parents

who wish to take advantage of these services should contact Mrs Christine Wade, School

Secretary, for further information.

A Code of Conduct for the school coaches is sent to parents when a pupil starts to use

the service. This must be signed by both parents and pupil, explained by the parent and

followed. Mr Curran deals with any behavioural problems on school transport. A copy of

the Code of Conduct is available on request.

32


Wearing Seatbelts in Vehicles

In order to ensure that all journeys by Silcoates pupils are undertaken in the safest

possible manner, it is the school’s policy that seatbelts must be worn at all times by all

staff and pupils in cars (including taxis), minibuses and coaches. All staff and pupils

are made aware of this and are asked to adhere to the policy strictly. We will do

everything we reasonably can to enforce this policy.

Members of staff do not travel on the school buses to and from school each day so it is

not possible for us to guarantee that seatbelts are worn by pupils. Depending on the age

of the passengers, the current law does not insist that the coach driver is responsible for

ensuring that everyone is wearing a seatbelt. We have asked the coach companies to

make sure that all their drivers are aware of the school's policy, but ultimately each pupil

is responsible for ensuring that he/she is wearing a seatbelt at all times.

We therefore ask parents to help us to reinforce this message about the use of seatbelts

to pupils, so that we can continue to ensure their safety when they travel in vehicles.

Snow Routine

Every effort is always made to keep the school open, but in extreme weather, for example

if there is heavy snow, it may be necessary to close the school. Details about the school’s

opening and closure are sent out by text message and posted on the website.

If parents living in outlying areas wish their child to leave school early, they must

telephone Reception to give details. Pupils are only allowed to leave school once parental

permission has been granted and all pupils must sign out at Reception before they leave.

It is expected that pupils who live near to the school or in areas with good road and rail

communications would only need to leave school early in exceptional circumstances and

parents are asked to support the school with this matter.

In the event of extreme weather, the Deputy Head (Pastoral) contacts the bus companies

and the relevant pupils are notified of revised departure times.

In the event that pupils cannot be collected until after 6.00pm, arrangements are made

for their care and supervision.

33


Payment of Fees

A fees bill is produced for each pupil at the end of each term. There are two main

elements on the bill:

1) Tuition Fees – These are payable in advance for the following term, and are shown

separately on the bill. All meals, stationery, books and normal tuition expenses are

included in the fee. Textbooks are also included, except for some set books for A Level

study which pupils retain when they leave school.

Please note that all public examination charges and any additional charges incurred

by the Foundation in providing for the special educational needs of your child are

charged as supplemental to the fees.

Details about examination charges, which apply for GCSEs, AS Levels and A2 Levels, are

updated annually and are published on the website.

2) Personal Incidental Expenses – All items other than tuition fees are charged in

arrears for the term just completed. This includes music tuition fees, school bus fees

and all other items of a personal nature, such as the cost of any school trips.

You receive your first fees bill at the beginning of the term in which your son or daughter

enters a Foundation school. Subsequently, the account is sent to you at the end of each

term.

Methods of Payment

The school’s preferred method of payment of fees is by Direct Debit. You are urged to

adopt this method of payment if possible and to complete and return the Direct Debit

Instruction to the Accounts Office by Friday 1 st July 2011.

If, and only if, you agree to pay by Direct Debit, you have the following options:

You may pay the full balance due, as stated in the fees account sent to you at the end of

term, in a single instalment on or about the first day of the following term. This is the

due date for payment which you agreed to when you signed the Form of Acceptance of a

place at the Foundation for your son or daughter.

You may pay the termly amount due, as stated in the fees account sent to you at the end

of term, in three equal, or approximately equal, instalments. Instalments are collected on

or about 16 th August, September and October in the autumn term; 16 th December, January,

and February in the spring term; and 16 th April, May and June in the summer term.

All you have to do is to complete and sign the instruction form and return it to the

school. You will be able to pay by Direct Debit with effect from the beginning of the next

term, provided you inform us accordingly by the first day of term (but sooner if possible).

Please ensure that you indicate whether you wish to pay in a single instalment or three

instalments.

Payment may be made by debit or credit card (Visa and Mastercard only). You may make

payments by these methods by contacting the Accounts Department or by completing the

payment slip attached to the fees account. Please note that there will be an

administration charge of 2.5% per transaction for credit card payments (no charge for

debit cards).

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Payment of fees, other than by Direct Debit, must be made on or before the first day of

term. If you do not have a UK bank account, please make arrangements for payment by

any suitable method, in full, by the first day of term.

Fees are kept under constant review by the Foundation's Governors. Inevitably, rising

costs have to be reflected by increases in fees, but the Governors strive to keep such

increases to the minimum. Normally there is an increase each September.

Parents of prospective pupils are as welcome as those of boys and girls already at the

Foundation to approach the Headmaster or the Bursar at any time to discuss fees. If you

have any queries on the payment of fees, please call at the Accounts Office, or telephone

01924 885255 during normal school hours.

Insurance

Personal Accident Insurance. All pupils are covered by this insurance. The premium is

paid by the Foundation. The scheme produces a guaranteed scale of benefits for

permanent disabilities, irrespective of legal liability and payable without prejudice to

other remedies available. The cover is worldwide, 365 days a year, and is not restricted

to school activities. Parents who wish to cover their sons and daughters for temporary

injury should take out individual policies.

Possessions and Property. All Foundation property is, naturally, covered by insurance.

Cover is also included for clothing and personal effects of staff and pupils, but this cover

is very limited. To qualify, loss or damage must involve normal risks such as fire or

flood, or theft involving forcible entry. Thus, a sports bag stolen from a locked locker

should be covered in most circumstances: if removed from a bench in a changing room or

from a classroom, it would not be. Parents should carefully check their household

policies, ensuring that they have cover under the All Risks section, which should cover

items temporarily removed from the home. Note that these items are not normally

included in the Contents section. There should be no additional premium charges for

cover under All Risks rather than Contents.

Safeguarding of Property

Pupils must not bring expensive possessions such as valuable watches to school. They

should be constantly reminded of their own responsibilities for safeguarding their

possessions.

All items must be clearly and indelibly marked and losses must be reported promptly to a

member of staff. We ask only Junior School pupils who travel by bus/train to and from

school to bring a mobile phone to school. For all other ‘gadgets’ permission should be

sought from the Deputy Head of the Junior School.

Class Teachers impress on pupils the importance of naming and labelling property. Each

year large quantities of unnamed items end up in lost property. Lost property is

administered by Mrs Cotterill, in the Clinic. Any enquiries are dealt with by her. At the

end of each term unclaimed items are put on sale and the proceeds are donated to a

worthy cause.

The Governors feel that all reasonable steps are taken to encourage pupils to safeguard

their property, and they therefore cannot be held responsible for losses. Unless

Foundation employees have been negligent, the Foundation cannot accept claims for

compensation or replacement of lost or damaged property.

35


Academic and Curriculum Information

We aim to help pupils develop their gifts and talents: spiritual and social; intellectual and

emotional; aesthetic and physical through the provision of a broad and balanced

curriculum, which is responsive to, and supportive of, their needs and aspirations, fosters

intellectual curiosity and academic achievement, and motivates them to grow to their full

potential. It is our aim that this broad base of skills and knowledge upon which future

learning can be soundly built.

Aims of the Curriculum

To be compatible with the requirements of the National Curriculum at Key Stages 1 & 2,

but enhanced.

To be broad and balanced throughout each Key Stage.

To allow progression between and throughout the Key Stages.

To provide for the personal, social, health and citizenship education of pupils, including

the preparation of pupils for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of adult

life.

To enable all pupils to learn and make progress.

To provide a programme of activities appropriate to the needs of pupils.

Implementation

Each Key Stage has a curriculum plan, which outlines:

• the curriculum followed

• the lesson allocation

• the organisation, including the number of teaching groups

• arrangements for pupils with Special Educational Needs and/or English as an

Additional Language (EAL).

Staffing and resources are deployed effectively to meet the aims of the curriculum.

Schemes of work exist which provide subject matter appropriate for the ages and

aptitudes of pupils, including those with Special Educational Needs, and so enable all

pupils to have the opportunity to learn and make progress.

An activities programme, published at the start of each term, supports the curriculum

aims.

The School Development Plan includes targets which support curriculum aims.

Curriculum Arrangements

The Junior School follows a timetable where there are 35 lessons (following a Week A and

Week B timetable), but the length varies according to the age of the pupils.

The National Curriculum is followed, but is enhanced.

The following subjects are taught:

English (Literacy)

Mathematics (Numeracy)

Science

Religious Studies

Information Communication Technology

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History

Geography

Art & Design

PE & Games

Swimming

Foreign Languages

Music

PSHCE

Routine assessment is used to monitor the progress of pupils.

Pupils with specific learning difficulties are given an Individual Education Plan and offered

the opportunity of specialist tuition (for which there is an additional charge).

All pupils in Years 1-6 receive specialist teaching in games, PE, swimming and music.

Pupils in all years are taught by some specialist teachers from the Senior School, to

promote continuity and progression with the Senior School.

All classes in the Junior School are mixed ability. However, pupils are separated into

ability groups in Year 5&6 for the core subjects; in Years 1-4, children work in ability

groups for Literacy and Numeracy.

Lesson Allocation

Subject timetabling within the Junior School is predominantly based on the recommended

time allocations as set out in the QCA Document ‘Designing and Timetabling the Primary

Curriculum’. The amount of time spent on each subject is based on the programmes of

study in the National Curriculum. For English and Mathematics, times are based on

fulfilling the requirements of both the National Literacy and Numeracy strategies.

However, more time is allocated to areas of the curriculum such as Physical Education. In

addition, PSHCE and languages are taught across all year groups, ensuring for everyone

that we have a broad and balanced curriculum programme.

Class Teachers formulate their own timetable based on guidelines provided by the Head

of Junior School.

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Specific Year Group Work:

Year One (5-6 Year Olds)

Literacy and Numeracy are based on the National Strategies.

In Literacy pupils follow the ‘Read, Write, Inc.’ programme. This is a comprehensive

programme that incorporates reading, writing, spelling, comprehension and speaking and

listening.

The children have a daily lesson that lasts for an hour. They are split into four groups

appropriate to their ability. The children are assessed every six weeks and move groups

accordingly.

Throughout the lessons the children work collaboratively with a partner. They help and

support each other. Discussions and feedback are also used frequently through the

lesson.

The children are only given texts to read that they can do successfully, spellings that they

are able to encode and writing tasks that are appropriate to their ability.

Praise is an essential aspect of the lesson and this comes from the teacher constantly and

from partner work.

The children succeed in every lesson and progress in their reading and writing quickly.

Aspects of the Numeracy Strategy are covered by teaching a daily Numeracy lesson.

All children follow the Abacus Evolve programme – designed to deliver the National

Strategy in a fun and motivating way.

We encourage the development of mental strategies and have regular tests, along with

the opportunity for children to complete extension tasks if appropriate.

In addition the following topics are covered:

Science

Ourselves

Growing plants

Sorting and using materials

Light and dark

Pushes and pulls

Sound and hearing

Religious Studies

Belonging

Celebrations

Belonging in Christianity

Beliefs and practices

A Church

Jewish beliefs and practices

38


ICT

Introduction to modelling

Using a word bank

The information around us

Understanding instructions and making things happen

Representing information graphically: pictograms

Labelling and classifying

History

How are toys different from those in the past?

What where homes like a long time ago?

What was it like to live in the past?

Geography

Around our school

How can we make our local area safer?

Where in the world is Barnaby Bear?

Design Technology

Moving pictures

Playgrounds

Eat more fruit and vegetables

Homes

Art

Self portraits

Investigating materials

What is sculpture?

Other Subjects

Personal, Social, Health & Citizenship Education; Languages; Music and PE/Swimming.

39


Year Two (6-7 Year Olds)

Literacy and Numeracy are based on the National Strategies.

In Literacy pupils follow the Read Write Inc Programme. This is a comprehensive

programme that incorporates reading, writing, spelling, comprehension and speaking and

listening.

The children have a daily lesson that lasts for an hour. They are split into four groups

appropriate to their ability. The children are assessed every six weeks and move groups

accordingly.

Throughout the lessons the children work collaboratively with a partner. They help and

support each other. Discussions and feedback are also used frequently through the

lesson.

The children are only given texts to read that they will do successfully, spellings that they

will be able to encode and writing tasks that are appropriate to their ability.

Praise is an essential aspect of the lesson and this comes from the teacher constantly and

from partner work.

The children succeed in every lesson and progress in their reading and writing quickly.

Aspects of the Numeracy Strategy will be covered by teaching a daily Numeracy lesson.

All children follow the Abacus Evolve programme – designed to deliver the National

Strategy in a fun and motivating way.

We encourage the development of mental strategies and have regular tests, along with

the opportunity for children to complete extension tasks if appropriate.

In addition the following topics are covered:

Science

Health and growth

Using electricity

Grouping and changing materials

Forces and movement

Plants and animals in the local environment

Variation

Religious Studies

Jewish people and the Torah

Christmas

Why did Jesus tell stories?

Easter

Celebration

Visiting a place of worship

40


ICT

Creating pictures

Writing stories

Finding information

Questions and answers

Routes – controlling a turtle

Project

History

Remembrance Day

Florence Nightingale

The Great Fire of London

Geography

An island home

Where in the world is Barnaby Bear?

Going to the seaside

Design Technology

Vehicles

Christmas crafts

Puppets

Easter crafts

Winding up

Joseph’s coat

Art

Picture this

Mother nature

Can buildings speak?

Other Subjects

Personal, Social, Health & Citizenship Education; Languages; Music and PE/Swimming.

41


Year Three (7-8 Year Olds)

In Literacy, pupils continue to follow elements of the ‘Read, Write, Inc,’ programme. This

programme will incorporate reading, writing, spelling, comprehension and speaking and

listening.

The children continue to have lessons where they are placed in groups appropriate to

their ability. The children are assessed regularly and move groups accordingly if deemed

appropriate.

Mathematics

Aspects of the Numeracy Strategy are covered, by teaching a daily Numeracy lesson. All

children follow the Abacus Evolve programme – designed to deliver the National Strategy

in a fun and motivating way.

Areas covered include:

• Read, write and order whole numbers to at least 1000; know what each digit

represents

• Count on or back in tens or hundreds from any two or three-digit number

• Recognise unit fractions and use them to find fractions of shapes and numbers

• Know by heart all addition and subtraction facts for each number to 20

• Add and subtract mentally a ‘near multiple of 10’ to or from a two-digit number

• Know by heart facts for the 2, 5 and 10 multiplication tables

• Understand division and recognise that it is the inverse of multiplication

• Use units of time and know the relationship between them (second, minute, hour,

day, week, month, year)

• Understand and use ‘£, p’ notation

• Choose and use appropriate operations (including multiplication and division) to

solve word problems, explaining methods and teaching

• Identify right angles

• Identify lines of symmetry in simple shapes and recognise shapes with no lines of

symmetry

• Solve a given problem by organising and interpreting numerical data in shape lists,

tables and graphs

• Children are given opportunities to use and apply mathematical rules and

concepts.

Science

Healthy eating

Light and shadows

Properties of materials

Rocks and soils

Plants

Springs to magnets

Religious Studies

Creation stories

Old testament characters

Early life of Jesus

Islam – Shahadah, Salat and Mosque

Jesus the helper

42


ICT

Combing text and graphics

Manipulating sound

Introduction to databases

Exploring simulations

Email

Project

History

History of Silcoates

Ancient Egypt

History of Wakefield

Geography

Improving our window view

Investigating the local Aarea

Weather around the world

What’s in the news?

Connecting to the world

Passport to the world

Design Technology

Sandwiches

Packaging

Photo frames

Art

Portraying relationships

Investigating pattern

Can we change places?

Other Subjects

Personal, Social, Health & Citizenship Education; Languages; Music and PE/Swimming.

43


Year Four (8-9 Year Olds)

English Reading

• Children follow a structured reading scheme in class, if necessary.

• They also bring a reading book home each evening to read with you.

• The teacher looks for improvements in word recognition, fluency and, more

importantly, understanding.

• Children who complete the reading scheme move on to free reading. They choose

their own books and continue to read at their own pace.

• Children read daily from a range of texts during literacy lessons.

• Children use a range of non-fiction resources to support learning across the

curriculum.

• Use of reference books is encouraged for finding topic linked information.

English Writing

• Children produce creative and factual pieces of writing on a regular basis, in

accordance with work covered in the National Literacy Strategy. Different forms of

poetry are also covered.

• Children are taught to write in different ways for a varied audience.

• Themes include: play scripts, stories about imagined worlds, news reports and

magazine articles.

• Exercises covering punctuation and grammar are completed, along with

comprehension based activities.

• Handwriting - children continue to follow the Handwriting Scheme.

• Spelling - through the literacy work covered during the year, children are

encouraged to develop spelling strategies and to learn how to spell new words

correctly.

• Lists of words may be sent home for children to learn.

English Speaking and Listening

• Children are given many opportunities to speak clearly, fluently and confidently to

both peers and adults.

• During class discussions children are encouraged to participate at all times.

They are involved in class assemblies, along with productions, where they have to

speak in front of a larger audience.

Mathematics

Aspects of the Numeracy Strategy are covered, by teaching a daily Numeracy lesson. All

children follow the Abacus Evolve programme – designed to deliver the National Strategy

in a fun and motivating way.

Areas covered include:

• Use symbols correctly, including less than (), equals (=)

• Round any positive integer less than 1000 to the nearest 10 or 100 Recognise

simple fractions that are several parts of a whole and mixed numbers; recognise

the equivalence of simple fractions

• Use known number facts and place value to add or subtract mentally, including any

pair of two-digit whole numbers

• Carry out column addition and subtraction of two integers less than 1000 and

column addition of more than two such integers

• Know by heart facts for the 2, 3, 4, 5, and 10 multiplication table

• Derive quickly division facts corresponding to the 2, 3, 4, 5, and 10 multiplication

tables

• Find remainders after division

• Know and use the relationship between familiar units of length, mass and capacity

44


• Classify polygons, using criteria such as number of right angles, whether or not

they are regular, and symmetry properties

• Choose and use appropriate number operations and ways of calculating (mental,

mental with jottings, pencil and paper) to solve problems

• Children are given opportunities to use and apply mathematical rules and

concepts.

Science

Moving and growing

Keeping warm

Mixing and separating

Friction

Habitats

Electricity

Religious Studies

Parables

Holy books and Christmas

Passover

Holy week and Easter

Food and fasting

Friends and enemies

ICT

Writing for different audiences

Developing images using repeating patterns

Branching databases

Collecting and presenting information

Modelling effects on screen

Junior touch-type

History

Romans

Anglo-Saxons

Vikings

Geography

Settlements

The environment around us

Contrasting UK locality – Village in India

Design Technology

Moving pictures

Wallets

Lamps and electricity

Art

Viewpoints

Take a seat

Journeys

Other Subjects

Personal, Social, Health & Citizenship Education; Languages; Music and PE/Swimming.

45


Year Five (9-10 Year Olds)

English Reading

• Children continue to follow a structured reading scheme in class, if necessary.

• They also bring a reading book home each evening to read with you.

• The teacher looks for improvements in word recognition, fluency and, more

importantly, understanding.

• Children who do complete/have completed the reading scheme move on to free

reading. They choose their own books and read at their own pace.

• Children read daily from a range of texts during literacy lessons.

• Children use a range of non-fiction resources to support learning across the

curriculum.

• Use of reference books is encouraged for finding topic linked information and for a

child’s own interest.

English Writing

• Children produce creative and factual pieces of writing on a regular basis, in

accordance with work covered in the National Literacy Strategy. Different forms of

poetry are also covered.

• Children are taught to write in different ways for a varied audience. Themes will

include play scripts, traditional stories and stories from a variety of cultures,

including myths, legends and fables.

• Exercises covering punctuation and grammar are completed, along with

comprehension based activities.

• Handwriting - children continue to follow the Handwriting Scheme.

• Spelling - through the literacy work covered during the year, children are

encouraged to develop spelling strategies and to learn how to spell new words

correctly.

• Lists of words may be sent home for the children to learn.

English Speaking and Listening

• Children are given many opportunities to speak clearly, fluently and confidently to

both peers and adults.

• During class discussions children are encouraged to participate at all times.

• They are involved in class assemblies, along with productions, where they have to

speak in front of a larger audience.

Mathematics

Aspects of the Numeracy Strategy are covered, by teaching a daily Numeracy lesson. All

children follow the Abacus Evolve programme – designed to deliver the National Strategy

in a fun and motivating way.

Areas covered include:

• Multiply and divide any positive integer up to 10,000 by 10 or 100 and understand

the effect

• Order a given set of positive and negative integers

• Use decimal notation for tenths and hundredths

• Round a number with one or two decimal places to the nearest integer

• Relate fractions to division and to their decimal representations

• Calculate mentally differences, such as 8006 – 2993

• Carry out column addition and subtraction of positive integers less than 10,000

• Know by heart all multiplication facts up to 10 x 10

• Carry out short multiplication and division of a three-digit by a single-digit integer

• Carry out long multiplication of a two-digit by a two-digit integer

46


• Understand area measured in square centimeters (cm2); understand and use

formulae in words, e.g. ‘length x breadth’ for the area of a rectangle

• Recognise parallel and perpendicular lines and properties of rectangles

• Use all four operations to solve simple word problems involving numbers and

quantities, including time, explaining methods and reasoning

• Children are given opportunities to use and apply mathematical rules and

concepts.

Science

Keeping healthy

Life cycles and plants

Gases around us

Changing state

Earth in space

Changing sounds

Religious Studies

Harvest and thankfulness

Friendship and family

Islam and Zakat

Judaism and Purim

Pentecost

Sikhism

ICT

Graphical modelling

Analysing data and asking questions

Evaluating, checking and questioning information

Introduction to spreadsheets

Controlling devices

Monitoring environmental conditions and changes

History

Tudor Britain

Ancient Greece

Geography

Water around the world

Mapping skills

Closing high street to traffic

Contrasting UK locality – Llandudno

Traffic flow survey – rat runs

Design Technology

Cams and cranks – toys

Bridges and shelters

Art

Objects and meanings

Containers

Talking textiles

Other Subjects

Personal, Social, Health & Citizenship Education; Languages; Music and PE/Swimming.

47


Year Six (10-11 Year Olds)

English Reading

• Children continue to follow a structured reading scheme in class, if necessary.

• They also bring a reading book home each evening to read with you.

• The teacher looks for improvements in word recognition, fluency and, more

importantly, understanding, through good use of inference and deduction.

• Children who do complete/have completed the reading scheme move on to free

reading. They choose their own books and read at their own pace.

• Children read daily from a range of texts during literacy lessons.

• Children use a range of non-fiction resources to support learning across the

curriculum.

• Use of reference books is encouraged for finding topic linked information and for a

child’s own interest.

English Writing

• Children produce creative and factual pieces of writing on a regular basis, in

accordance with work covered in the National Literacy Strategy. Different forms of

poetry are also covered.

• Children are taught to write in different ways for a varied audience.

• Themes include play scripts, traditional stories, stories by significant writers and

persuasive writing.

• Exercises covering punctuation and grammar are completed, along with

comprehension based activities.

• Handwriting - children continue to follow the Handwriting Scheme.

• Spelling - through the literacy work covered during the year, children are

encouraged to develop spelling strategies and to learn how to spell new words

correctly.

• Lists of words may be sent home for the children to learn.

English Speaking & Listening

• Children are given many opportunities to speak clearly, fluently and confidently to

both peers and adults.

• During class discussions children are encouraged to participate at all times.

• They are involved in class assemblies, along with productions, where they have to

speak in front of a larger audience.

Mathematics

Aspects of the Numeracy Strategy are covered, by teaching a daily Numeracy lesson. All

children follow the Abacus Evolve programme – designed to deliver the National Strategy

in a fun and motivating way.

Areas covered include:

• Multiply and divide decimals mentally by 10 or 100 and integers by 1000 and

explain the effect

• Order a mixed set of numbers with up to three decimal places

• Reduce a fraction to its simplest form by cancelling common factors

• Use a fraction as an operator to find fractions of numbers or quantities

• Understand percentage as the number of parts in every 100 and find simple

percentages of small quantities

• Solve simple problems involving ratio and proportion

• Carry out column addition and subtraction of numbers involving decimals

• Derive quickly division facts corresponding to multiplication tables up to 10 x 10

• Carry out short multiplication and division of numbers involving decimals

48


• Carry out long multiplication of a three-digit by two-digit integer

• Use a protractor to measure acute, obtuse and reflex angles, to the nearest degree

• Calculate the perimeter and area of simple compound shapes that can be split into

rectangles & read and plot co-ordinates in all four quadrants

• Identify and use the appropriate operations (including combinations of operations)

to solve word problems, involving numbers and quantities, and explain methods

and reasoning

• Solve a problem by extracting and interpreting information presented in tables,

graphs and charts

• Children are given opportunities to use and apply mathematical rules and

concepts.

Science

Interdependence and adaptation

Forces in action and changing circuits

More about dissolving

How we see things

Micro-organisms

Reversible and irreversible changes

Religious Studies

Special places

Christmas

Islam- Hajj

The Jewish jome

Rites of passage

ICT

Multimedia presentation

Spreadsheet modelling

Control and monitoring

Using the internet to produce a project

History

Victorian Britain

World War 2

Geography

Mapping skills

Mountains

Rivers

Design Technology

Textiles

Fairgrounds

Art

People in action

What a performance

A sense of place

Other Subjects

Personal, Social, Health & Citizenship Education; Languages; Music and PE/Swimming.

49


Homework

Homework is given throughout the Junior School and is always set in good faith by the

teacher, feeling that pupils will be able to complete the task in the times suggested.

Homework is seen as an integral part of the academic curriculum. Pupils are given a

homework diary. In Years 3-6, homework should be recorded in a pupil’s homework

diary before the end of each lesson where the homework is given. If no homework is set

for a particular reason then ‘none set’ should be recorded in the homework diary.

Homework must represent a pupil’s own work and should always be completed on time.

In the Junior School, the amount of homework increases as the child progresses through

the school. If a pupil is not able to complete all homework set, we expect a written note

in the homework diary or on the piece of homework from parents explaining why. If an

activity is taking too long, leave it at a suitable point. It is more important that your child

has a go, rather than struggling on too long to complete an activity. If a pupil does not

bring a note in from home, then he or she may be asked to stay in during a playtime to

complete the work, under teacher supervision.

Therefore, if your child has made a good attempt at completing the activity but time has

elapsed, please write an accompanying note to inform the Class Teacher in the diary.

Staff keep a record of pupils who are consistently unable in some way to complete

homework satisfactorily, without receiving any communication from parents. Where we

feel this is becoming a serious problem, parents are contacted to discuss their child's

work.

Organisation

In Year 1 & Year 2 pupils receive reading work on a regular basis – this is independent to

the school’s ‘Read, Write, Inc.’ programme. The reading books are chosen by the pupils

and can be read over as many evenings as you and your child require. Once the book has

been completed, it can be returned to school and pupils are given an opportunity to

choose their next book.

Pupils in Year 1 receive homework in their own Homework File twice a week. On Monday,

the work is Literacy based and on Friday it links with the Numeracy work they have been

doing during the week.

Pupils in Year 2 receive homework, again in their Homework File, three times a week. On

Monday it is Literacy based, Wednesday links in to the topic work being covered within

another one of the core subjects and Friday consolidates the Numeracy work they have

learnt throughout the week.

For both Year 1 and Year 2 this work is to be done at home under the guidance of parents

and take approximately 15 minutes. Homework is to be returned the next day unless

otherwise stated, but if it cannot be completed parents are asked to place a note in their

child’s Homework Record Book and then complete and return it as soon as possible.

In Years 3-6 focus is mainly on the core subjects and an outline plan of what your child

does, is given to them at the start of the academic year.

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If children are working on a particular project or need to finish off work started in class in

subjects other than the core subjects they may be asked to take additional work home,

particularly at the weekend. This, however, should not be burdensome and is likely to

occur mainly in Years 5 and 6. A more detailed timetable of homework is given to pupils

in September by their class teacher.

Specific homework information for each year group

Year 3 should receive up to 20 minutes homework plus reading. There may also be

spelling, times tables and instrumental practice (if appropriate)

Year 4 should receive up to 30 minutes homework plus reading / spelling, times tables

and instrumental practice (if appropriate)

Year 5 should receive up to 40 minutes homework plus reading / spelling, times tables

and instrumental practice (if appropriate)

Year 6 should receive between 45-60 minutes homework plus reading / spelling, times

tables and instrumental practice (if appropriate)

Management

Homework is planned, and any sheets or resources needed are prepared prior to the

lesson. Teachers seek to ensure that all instructions regarding homework have been

understood by all pupils before they leave the classroom.

Children have the responsibility to complete and hand in homework on time. Teachers

mark homework promptly upon its receipt in class.

Differentiation

Teachers differentiate homework either by task, time or outcome expected. Homework

tasks should be achievable by each child within the specified time.

Monitoring

Class Teachers inspect the homework diaries at regular intervals and sign them on a

weekly basis. Parents are asked to sign the homework diary at the end of each week, but

we ask that this is checked daily.

Subject Teachers, where appropriate, keep a note of homework not handed in and liaise

with Class Teachers to guide the child on personal organisation.

Any major concerns regarding homework, from any party, are raised with the Deputy

Head of Junior School and, from there, with the Head, so that effective evaluation of the

system can take place.

In summary, the aims in setting homework are to foster good personal study habits and

either reinforce or practise concepts learned in lessons or investigate or discover new

information.

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Home Reading

In addition to the homework activities, pupils are given home reading to try to do each

day. We want to encourage all pupils to read a little every night, and to record the pages

they have read in their reading record book. Reading at home each night is really

important for every year group, in particular during the early years (Years 1-4).

Parents can help at every stage of reading, from children who are just beginning to read

at a joining age to children who are reading further up the school. Your child may bring

home a variety of books, including storybooks, non-fiction books, poetry books and

plays. We try to make sure that all our books are of a good quality, reflect our diverse

society, and have appropriate content. We ask all children to try and make sure that the

books remain in good condition. Please make sure that books are treated well at home

and that your child brings the books back to school each day.

How Can You Help Your Child with their Reading?

Beginning Readers

• Read the story to your child.

• Read the story together.

• Let your child read to you.

• Talk about the story and the pictures.

Independent Readers

• Let your child read to you.

• Ask questions about the story, during and after reading,

e.g.

1. Who is in the story?

2. Where are they?

3. What happens next in the story?

4. Can you tell me what has happened in the story?

5. Ask whether the story was enjoyable and why.

Fluent Readers

• Let your child read the book themselves.

• You may like to listen to parts of the story.

• Ask questions about the story, encourage the child to talk about what they have read.

Top Tips For Reading

If your child gets stuck on a word:

• Look at the picture for clues;

• Encourage him/her to guess the word;

• Say the beginning sound if it helps;

• Sound the word out;

• Give encouragement, even when the child goes wrong.

Encourage your child to read each evening. Reading can happen at any time – although it

is preferable to have a quiet time to read, you can listen to your child when you are

preparing the meals, washing up or in any other area of home life!

Remember: we want to make reading a fun activity.

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Reports & Parents’ Evenings

You are kept informed about your son’s or daughter’s academic progress through a

formal end-of-year report and parents’ evenings throughout the year.

Parents receive one formal report towards the academic year, and there are three parents’

evenings; an additional ‘optional’ parents’ evening is available following receipt of the

end of year report. In addition, you are always welcome to discuss your son's or

daughter's academic progress with any member of the staff. Matters should be raised

with the Class Teacher in the first instance. The Class Teacher contacts you if matters of

concern arise during the course of the term.

There is also a ParentsInformation Evening for each year group in the summer term in

preparation for your child going to the following year’s class. The dates of Parents'

Evenings are published in the calendar.

Assessment

All pupils are assessed regularly throughout the year. Diagnostic tests are administered in

each year group. Pupils in Year 6 may sit the Senior School entrance examinations, if

trying to obtain a Scholarship for entry to Year 7, at the same time as external candidates

at the start of the spring term. Parents of all Year 6 pupils are written to, to give further

details of the examinations.

School Trips

Throughout the academic year, each year group has the opportunity to experience topic

related excursions. These may be day trips or longer residential visits (Years 4-6). Where

applicable, the cost of these trips is added to the termly fees. Parents are notified of

forthcoming trips and visits as far in advance as possible.

All trips and visits require prior parental permission. Trips abroad or those in the United

Kingdom involving an overnight stay require appropriate medical forms and contact

details to be completed.

The school has a Trips and Visits Policy, in line with the Department for Education

guidelines, to ensure that all pupils who leave the school campus do so as safely as

possible. The Head of Junior School is the Educational Visits Co-ordinator (EVC) for Years

1-6. Parents are asked to contact him if they have any questions or comments regarding

school trips and visits.

Equipment (Years 3-6)

During their time in the Junior School, pupils require the following equipment, marked

with their name where possible.

Pencil case – soft rather than a tin

HB pencils and a pencil sharpener

Rubber

15cm and 30cm ruler

Coloured pens and pencil crayons (in a separate pencil case)

Glue (preferably the solid variety in a stick, e.g. Pritt)

Pair of safe scissors

Primary school calculator (Years 3-6)

Fountain pen / Rollerball (Year 4 and above)

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Years 5 and 6 require a geometry set and it would be desirable to have 2 x A4 ringbinder

files (Year 6 only), a plastic folder (for letters, certificates, etc), a pack of highlighters and

a small simple dictionary and thesaurus.

*Equipment is provided for Years 1 & 2*

Information Technology

The school encourages the use by pupils of the rich information resources available on

the Internet, together with the development of appropriate skills to analyse and evaluate

such resources.

Access to on-line resources enables pupils to explore thousands of libraries, databases

and bulletin boards, as well as exchanging messages with people throughout the world.

The school believes that the benefits to pupils of access to information resources and

increased opportunities for collaboration outweigh the disadvantages. Ultimately,

however, parents and guardians of minors are responsible for setting and conveying the

standards that their children should follow when using media and information sources.

A copy of the school’s Code of Conduct can be found on the following pages of this

booklet. We would be grateful if you could spend time with your son/daughter reading

through this and if you could sign the consent form enclosed with this booklet and return

it to the school. Access to the Internet is only given to those pupils who complete this

form.

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Code of Conduct for the Use of

ICT Facilities at Silcoates School

Below is the policy and code of conduct for the use of ICT facilities by pupils at Silcoates

School. These rules apply to the use of all ICT facilities, including e-mail and the Internet,

that are provided by Silcoates School.

Procedures for using the school computers and accessing the Internet and e-mail:

• The school has the technology and the right to audit any aspect of the system in

order to preserve its security and integrity.

• Pupils are responsible for good behaviour when using the school computers or

accessing the Internet, just as they are in a classroom. General school rules apply.

• The school computers and the Internet/e-mail are provided for pupils to conduct

research, communication and support learning. Parental permission is required.

Pupils should remember that access is a privilege and not a right and that access

requires responsibility. Pupils must only enter a computer room with a member of

staff present and must observe the whole-school policy of a ban on food and drink

from ICT areas.

• Individual users of the computers, Internet and e-mail are responsible for their

behaviour and communications over the school network. It is expected that users

comply with school standards and honour the agreements they have signed.

• Staff may review files and communications held on the school’s computer network

areas and any flash disks to ensure that users are using the systems responsibly.

Users should not expect files stored on servers or disks to be private. Only files

relating to learning must be accessed in school. Personal video clips or music files

are not allowed and will be automatically deleted.

• Pupils must keep backups (either a hard copy or on a memory stick) of any work

that is saved on the school computers, especially coursework. The school accepts

no responsibility for work that is lost or deleted from the school computers and

does not accept loss or deletion of work as a reason for non-completion of

classwork, homework or coursework.

• During school, teachers guide pupils towards appropriate materials. Outside

school, parents bear the responsibility for such guidance.

• Use of e-mail is restricted to that provided by the school, in the format of the

pupil’s “firstnamesurname”, followed by “@silcoates.org.uk”, e.g.

johnsmith@silcoates.org.uk

• The school filters all e-mails for undesirable content and care should be taken to

ensure that no inappropriate words are contained within the e-mail itself, which

will be subsequently blocked by the e-mail server. Attachments to e-mails will be

scanned for viruses and randomly checked for content.

• Pupils must not abuse the school computers, hardware or software in any way and

must not attempt to access unsuitable or inappropriate materials. Pupils must

keep their own password secret from all other users and accept that all use of their

password/user name/user area will be attributed to them.

• Pupils must recognise that it is illegal to produce, display, circulate and/or store

other offensive material, which would include objectionable material in the context

of race, gender or religion.

• Pupils must assume that the information and software available are subject to

copyright and should be used only for their proper purpose.

• Pupils must report any problems or the discovery of any offensive material to their

teacher, or, failing that, to the ICT Support Staff.

• Pupils must not attempt to reconfigure the computer, or to corrupt the system in

any other way.

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• Pupils must not engage in any activities which result in a waste of people’s time,

paper or disk space, nor play games or misuse the system in any other way.

Social Networking

The following rules apply to the use of social networking sites on the Internet,

whether access is from home or school:

• Pupils must not publicly discuss other pupils, parents or members of staff or

criticise school policies or personnel.

• Pupils must not make public any posts which are likely to bring the school’s name

into disrepute.

Disciplinary Procedures

• Violations of the above rules will result in a temporary or permanent ban from the

school computers and Internet/e-mail use.

• Additional disciplinary action may be taken on inappropriate language, postings on

social networking sites, content or behaviour.

• Damage caused to equipment through misuse may be invoiced to parents to cover

the cost of repair or replacement.

• When applicable, police or local authorities may be involved.

Responsibility

Silcoates School endeavours to maintain the security, integrity and viability of its

systems. However, it cannot accept responsibility for the malfunction of its ICT

facilities, nor for any consequential losses. Material is ‘backed up’ at frequent

intervals but pupils are responsible for independently maintaining any copies of

valuable data.

Publishing on the Web

• The school is appropriately registered under the Data Protection Act.

• Names are not linked to pictures or individual e-mail addresses.

• Photographs do not identify individual pupils, if parents expressly wish them not

to do so.

• Full names of pupils are not used anywhere on the school’s web site, except in

straightforward matters of public record.

• Wherever possible published information is kept up to date.

• No copyright material is published without the copyright owner’s permission.

• Links are not made to web sites that contain material deemed to be unsuitable.

• Access to web space is restricted to ensure that only those with appropriate

authority can publish to the school web site.

Specific Factors Related to the Junior School

ICT use is now an integral part of everyday life and is now embedded within our

curriculum in all subject areas. As new technologies develop, so does our curriculum.

Use of the internet, video, photos and sound recordings are now embedded within the

new Primary Framework.

The use of these technologies, rather than detracting from their Literacy skills, actually

improves the children’s reading, communication skills and ability to understand and

follow instructions.

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Silcoates Junior School

ICT Code of Conduct

The aim of this Code of Conduct is to ensure that pupils will benefit from learning

opportunities offered by the school’s ICT network in a safe and effective manner. Access

to such resources will be based on trust and responsibility.

Before signing to acknowledge acceptance, pupils and parents should read this guide

carefully, making sure the conditions are fully understood.

• I will only use ICT for school purposes.

• I will only enter an ICT room with a teacher present.

• I will be responsible for my behaviour when using ICT in school or at home

because I know these rules keep me safe.

• I will only open / delete my own files.

• I will never eat or drink in the ICT suites.

• I will not tell anyone else my passwords.

• I will only use my school email address when emailing other pupils.

• I will only open email attachments from people I know or who my teacher has

approved.

• I will make sure that all ICT related contact with other pupils and teachers is polite

and appropriate.

• I will not deliberately look for, send or save anything that could offend others.

• If I accidently find anything inappropriate on the Internet, I will tell my teacher

immediately.

• I understand that this agreement is designed to keep me safe and that if not

followed, school sanctions will be applied.

Internet and Email

We have taken positive steps to prevent the pupils having access to undesirable materials.

Our internet access operates a filtering system which blocks access to inappropriate

content. All of our screens are in public view and access is supervised. We also have

monitoring software which allows us to block access to individual computers or user

accounts.

Email is taught throughout the school to enable pupils to use the internal mail system on

our own computer network within school. From Year 3, our pupils use systems that look

and respond in the same way as standard email such as Hotmail.

Photographs, Video and Sound Recordings

Photos are taken regularly around school for a variety of reasons.

In many lessons where there is no written price of work, photos may be used as evidence.

In ICT, photos are taken by pupils for use in image editing or in their own projects and

presentations.

We quite often take photos to appear around school on displays, e.g. extra curricular

clubs, sport squad members, etc.

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Parents are allowed to video and take photos of performances and events which feature

their own children. This is a legal right set out in the Data Protection Act, provided any

images are intended only for private use or within the family. Parents should not publish

these photos on the internet, without first obtaining written permission from the parents

of all the other children featured in the photos or video.

Parental Permission

On the pupil’s admission to Silcoates, or prior to the start of an academic year,

parents are asked to sign the following consent forms (these will be considered

valid during the duration of the pupil’s attendance at Silcoates, unless otherwise

informed):

• Off-site travel

• Confidential Health Record

• Medication in school

• Permission to use photographs and other images

• Code of Conduct for the use of ICT facilities

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Special Educational Needs

The school aims to identify Special Educational Needs and respond to enable children to

make good progress and achieve their potential: in so doing, we help to nurture their

sense of dignity and self-worth in accordance with our ethos and aims.

The school will do all that is reasonable in the case of each pupil to detect and deal

appropriately with a learning difficulty which amounts to a Special Educational Need. Our

staff are not, however, qualified to make a diagnosis of conditions such as those

commonly referred to as dyslexia, dyspraxia or of other learning difficulties.

Pupils with a Specific Learning Difficulty are allowed special arrangements for entrance

examinations and extra time is arranged for internal examinations as appropriate.

Pupils undergo various assessments on entry, the results of which can be used to identify

the likelihood of a Specific Learning Difficulty. However, the screening tests available to

the school are indicative only: they are not infallible. Parents are notified if a screening

test indicates that the pupil may have a learning difficulty. A formal assessment can be

arranged by the school at the parents' expense or by the parents themselves.

For pupils identified as 'at risk', follow-up testing takes place and consultation with

parents, as appropriate. Outside agencies are involved, as necessary, in the process of

identification of need. When a child is identified as having a Special Educational Need,

their name is included on the Special Needs Register. Assessment reports are circulated

to the Head of Junior School, the pupil’s file and the Head of Learning Support.

Learning Support is offered wherever there are concerns about a child coping with the full

curriculum on the grounds of his/her Special Educational Needs. The decision to offer

such an amended curriculum follows discussion between the Head of Junior School and

the Head of Learning Support, and consultation with parents.

Parents must recognise that the school may not always be able to meet all of the specific

requirements to support a pupil with a Special Educational Need. However, once a Special

Educational Need has been identified, the school will endeavour to meet the needs of a

pupil in so far as it reasonably can. A pupil's Individual Education Programme (IEP) will

therefore outline the strategies that can reasonably be put in place to support a pupil’s

Special Educational Need. Arrangements for the provision of learning support for an

individual are reviewed at least annually; changes at any other times are made following

progress reports.

Where pupils have been formally assessed and identified as having a Specific Learning

Difficulty, following consultation with parents, Learning Support may be offered through

specialist tuition, usually one lesson per week, which carries an additional charge to

parents. Such arrangements are reviewed at least annually in consultation with parents.

Parents who wish to discuss their child’s Special Educational Needs should contact Mrs

Margaret Ward, Head of Learning Support, or Mrs Lorrie Sugden who oversees work in the

Junior School, Sunny Hill and St Hilda’s.

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Pastoral Information

Pastoral Care

The pastoral care at Silcoates has the following aims:

• To give all pupils the experience of school as a well ordered, caring community

where relationships are open and friendly, warm and supportive, so enabling

pupils to develop their potential;

• To safeguard and promote the welfare, health and safety of pupils in school and in

activities outside of school;

• To ensure that every individual is known and valued; that achievement, widely

defined, is encouraged and rewarded as a means of promoting self-image and a

sense of worth;

• To encourage self-discipline and good behaviour and to prevent poor discipline

through vigilance, understanding and encouragement; to correct indiscipline with

justice and compassion;

• To attempt to live by and promote the teaching of the United Reformed Church

concerning faith and moral living through collective and individual prayer and

worship, and the example of the whole school community.

This section gives details of the ways in which the school puts the aims of its Pastoral

Care Policy into practice.

• The school implements, monitors and reviews the following policies which

contribute to the welfare, health and safety of everyone in the school:

o Anti-Bullying

o Child Protection

o Trips and Visits

o Rewards and Sanctions

o Health and Safety including

o Fire Safety

o Medical & First Aid

• Each section of the school has a pastoral structure appropriate to the age of the

pupils.

• Each pupil is under the supervision of a Class Teacher with whom they can make a

personal contact and form an appropriate relationship, so that the member of staff

can listen to and understand their experiences, and monitor their progress.

• Good behaviour is promoted among pupils through a system of rewards, and

pupils are made aware of sanctions that are adopted in the event of misbehaviour.

• Staff are appropriately deployed to ensure proper supervision of pupils.

• Pupils are given support and guidance through a co-ordinated approach in a range

of settings: subject teaching, tutorial meetings, and other specialist guidance (e.g.

including PSHCE) by Class Teachers.

• All staff and pupils are allocated to one of four Houses, which give an identity to

the pupils across year groups and encourage involvement in activities and

competitions.

• Pupils can put forward their views at meetings of the Junior School Council, where

representatives chosen by their peers are invited to submit items to the agendas.

• A pupil complaint procedure exists when difficulties cannot readily be resolved by

normal Class Teacher routes.

• Relevant information regarding pupils is provided for teachers by the Registrar

(new pupils), the Head of Learning Support, and Head of Junior School. This

information is circulated to the appropriate teaching staff, as required.

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• All Class Teachers have responsibilities for monitoring the academic progress of

pupils.

• The spiritual, moral, social and cultural development of pupils is provided through

the pastoral structure, the work of the Chaplain, the PSHCE programme,

assemblies and teaching subjects.

• Staff new to the school are given guidance on pastoral care as part of their

induction programme. Detailed information concerning pastoral care, including

whole school policies, is contained in the Staff Handbook which is distributed to all

staff. Non-teaching staff are made aware of the Anti-Bullying Policy and the Child

Protection Policy.

• Staff are given the opportunity for professional development in pastoral care.

Pastoral Organisation

Each pupil is allocated to a Class Teacher with whom they register twice a day. The Class

Teacher is the pupil's first and most effective personal contact, and should therefore be

the first person to whom a pupil would turn for help and advice. The Class Teacher

oversees the welfare, behaviour and academic progress of pupils in their class.

School Assemblies

Junior School Assemblies follow a rich and varied programme. There are two assemblies

during the week led by the Head of Junior School / Deputy Head of Junior School, a form

time, a music based assembly, and a special assembly led by the Chaplain in the Chapel.

Through this varied approach, pupils are able to receive and share thoughts that arise

within worship and also discuss pastoral matters. Although Silcoates is linked to the

United Reformed Church, acts of worship based on a Biblical theme are open to those of

any denomination or of none.

Personal and Social Development

The school has a Personal, Social, Health and Citizenship Education (PSHCE) programme,

which supports the school's ethos and aims in the following ways:

• It raises the self-esteem of pupils, valuing and building upon the ideas of the young

people themselves. It accepts that we are all different, yet all are equally valued: it

encourages young people to consider the consequences of their own actions.

• It ensures that pupils develop the skills, knowledge and attitudes which enable them

to take control of their own lives and remember their responsibility to others.

• It is reflected not only through the taught curriculum but also through our

expectations; code of behaviour; relationships between pupils, between staff and

between staff and pupils; the physical environment; and a wide range of extracurricular

experiences.

Personal, social and citizenship learning occurs in the curriculum through:

• Subject programmes

• The school’s arrangements for pastoral care and pupil guidance

• Assemblies

School Councils

• Planned learning opportunities in off-timetable activities

• Timetabled PSHCE lessons

• Extra-curricular activities

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Anti-Bullying

Rationale

Although incidents of bullying do not occur very often at Silcoates, it is vital that all

pupils feel safe and free from harassment in the school environment. It is equally

important that pupils, parents and staff feel secure in the knowledge that any report of an

incident of bullying is treated with the utmost seriousness by the school.

Statement of Intent

The Silcoates School community is based upon respect, good manners and fair play. We

are committed to providing a safe and caring environment that is free from disruption,

violence and any form of harassment so that every one of our pupils can develop his/her

full potential. We expect our pupils to treat members of staff with courtesy and cooperation

so that they can learn in a relaxed, but orderly, atmosphere. All pupils should

care for and support each other.

Silcoates School prides itself on its respect and mutual tolerance. Ours is a diverse

community, with pupils from a variety of cultural, religious and ethnic backgrounds.

Some pupils require additional support and help. Parents have an important role in

supporting us in maintaining high standards of behaviour. It is essential that school and

homes have consistent expectations of behaviour and that they co-operate closely

together. Acceptance of this policy forms part of our standard terms and conditions.

Bullying, harassment and victimisation and discrimination will not be tolerated. We treat

all our pupils and their parents fairly and with consideration, and we expect them to

reciprocate towards each other, the staff and the school. Any kind of bullying is

unacceptable. Where necessary, we will apply the sanctions described in our Rewards and

Sanctions Policy for behaviour that constitutes bullying or harassment of any kind.

Aims

The aims of the school’s Anti-Bullying Policy are as follows:

• To create a happy, well-ordered and caring community;

• To raise awareness among pupils, parents and staff as to what constitutes bullying

behaviour;

• To communicate to pupils, parents and staff why bullying is unacceptable, that it

will not be tolerated and that victims will be supported;

• To reduce incidents of bullying through the implementation of appropriate

strategies, preventative and proactive as well as reactive;

• To ensure that pupils have knowledge of, and access to, a support structure within

the school so they can share worries and seek help;

• To implement strategies for treating bullies and victims which affect appropriate

behaviour changes.

Definition of Bullying

Bullying may be defined as the intentional hurting, harming or humiliating of another

person. It can take the form of racial, religious, cultural, sexual, sexist, homophobic,

special educational needs and disability related bullying. It could involve physical

(including sexual) intimidation, verbal, cyber (including chat room, e-mail, e-photos and

SMS messages), and emotional means (by excluding, tormenting or spreading malicious

rumours). It can involve manipulating a third party to tease or torment someone. It can

involve complicity that falls short of direct participation. Bullying is often hidden and

subtle. It can also be overt and intimidatory.

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Bullying may involve actions or comments that are racist, homophobic, and/or which

focus on disabilities or other physical attributes (such as hair colour or body shape).

Bullying can happen anywhere and at any time. It can cause serious and lasting

psychological damage and even suicide. Harassment and threatening behaviour are

criminal offences. We always treat it very seriously. It conflicts sharply with the school’s

policy on equal opportunities, as well as with its social and moral principles.

Cyber-Bullying

Cyber-bullying is the use of information and communication devices and services to bully,

harass or intimidate an individual or group, for example:

• Bullying by texts, messages or calls on mobile phones;

• Using mobile phone cameras to cause distress, fear or humiliation, e.g. ‘Happy

Slapping’;

• Posting threatening, abusive, defamatory or humiliating material on websites;

• Deliberately excluding others from friends’ lists on social networking sites.

The school regards incidents of cyber-bullying as it does bullying in any other form and

the school’s Anti-bullying Policy will be applied in the same way.

Informing Principles

The principle underlying the Anti-bullying Policy is that a pupil who is a victim of bullying,

or who witnesses an incident of bullying, should feel free to approach any member of

staff for help. The member of staff is expected to act in accordance with school policy.

All staff have a vital part to play in making it clear that bullying is not tolerated, in being

vigilant and proactive if they note what may be developing into a bullying relationship

and in being approachable and willing to offer help and support to any pupil who feels

the need to discuss an incident.

Prevention

• Opportunities to reinforce the school’s values are taken through school and year

assemblies, teaching subjects, the PSHCE programme and class/tutor time;

• Appropriate opportunities are taken within the curriculum to consider issues

relating to bullying;

• Incidents of bullying are reflected upon and discussed when they occur so that

lessons can be learned;

• Through appropriate training and induction, all staff are made aware of the

school’s Anti-bullying Policy, including new staff and support staff;

• Teaching staff, ancillary staff, prefects and monitors contribute to a suitably

deployed supervisory presence around the school;

• All staff are asked to be vigilant and to be willing to take appropriate action if they

suspect that a pupil is being bullied;

• All pupils are encouraged to tell a member of the teaching or pastoral staff at once

if they know that bullying is taking place;

• All reported incidents are recorded and investigated at once. We always monitor

reported incidents;

• We have a strong and experienced pastoral team of Class Teachers, Form Tutors

and Heads of Year who support the Deputy Head (Pastoral), who are trained in

handling any incidents as an immediate priority and who are alert to possible signs

of bullying;

• Our pastoral team gives support and guidance to other staff on handling and

reporting incidents, and on the follow-up work with both victims and bullies;

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• The School Chaplain gives support and guidance to pupils of all faiths who are able

to refer themselves to her, perhaps at a time of family break-up, sickness or

bereavement. The Chaplain provides confidential advice and seeks to encourage

the development of tolerance, understanding and respect for others in a multi-faith

community;

• The School Nurse gives support and guidance to pupils who are able to refer

themselves to her when they are struggling, either physically or emotionally. The

Clinic displays advice on where pupils can seek help, including details of

confidential help lines and web sites connecting to external specialists, such as

Childline;

• We operate a peer mentoring scheme, whereby trained older pupils are encouraged

to offer advice and support to younger pupils;

• We provide leadership training to our Head Boy/Head Girl and their team of

prefects which specifically covers the importance of offering support and

assistance to younger and to vulnerable pupils;

• We reserve the right to investigate incidents that take place outside school hours,

on school visits and trips and that occur in the vicinity of the school, involving our

pupils;

• We welcome feedback from parents on the effectiveness of our preventative

measures;

Information for pupils about what to do if they are being bullied is displayed

around the school, including telephone numbers for other organisations that can

help.

Follow Up

It is important to note that not all incidents will require use of all of the following steps.

In many cases, a quiet word of warning is sufficient to modify behaviour. In all cases, the

level of response is determined by the facts that emerge from an investigation into an

incident.

• The Head of Junior School, Heads of Year and/or the Designated Person (as

appropriate) take responsibility for initial investigations of any reported incidents;

• Pupils are interviewed in order to ascertain what happened;

• Written statements may be required from all parties involved, signed and dated;

• If it is decided that further action is required, the Deputy Head (Pastoral) is

informed;

• The pupils involved (both bully and bullied) may be brought together with a

member of staff present to try to talk it through, with the aim of apology and

reconciliation, if this is appropriate;

• Clear guidelines for future behaviour are issued to both parties and a code of

conduct agreed. Pupils should know that the situation will be monitored and know

of consequences for the bully if bullying continues. The sanctions which might be

applied are set out in the Rewards and Sanctions Policy;

Parents of bully and bullied should be kept informed, where necessary, at

appropriate times during an investigation;

• Class Teachers, Form Tutors and Heads of Year monitor the situation;

• if no improvement is seen then the Deputy Head (Pastoral) or the Head of Junior

School implements further sanctions;

• A pupil who persistently makes life unhappy for others may face suspension from

school or being asked to leave the school in extreme cases.

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School Rules

School Rules

All organisations require rules if they are to function effectively. School rules cannot

necessarily cover every contingency but the following rules apply in order to maintain a

safe and well-ordered environment.

The school rules flow from the principle that living in a community at Silcoates requires

politeness, common sense and consideration for others. They also enable the school to

fulfil its legal and moral responsibilities regarding the care and well-being of its pupils.

Therefore anything that contravenes safety, common sense, the law of the land and

normal civilised behaviour is automatically forbidden, as is any action that may harm the

good name of Silcoates School.

School rules apply at all times – during the term, including when travelling on school

buses, during holidays for any pupils who are on the school campus, and on all schoolorganised

trips, whether in term time or during holiday times.

A list of basic school rules is as follows:

• The school day begins at 8.35am. All pupils must be in assembly areas by this

time, and for afternoon registration at 1.15pm (for Years 3-6) and 1.00pm (for

Years 1&2). While timetabled lessons end at 3.20pm, many activities are

scheduled to take place between 3.20pm/4.15pm and 6.00pm when the school

day may be said formally to end.

• Pupils are not allowed to leave the school grounds during the day without the

permission of the School Nurse or the Head of Junior School as appropriate.

• After school, pupils must be collected only from the car park or from the Junior

School and must not wait to be collected at the main road at the entrance to the

school. In bad weather, and when it gets dark, pupils must wait in school until

their parents arrive.

• No pupils are allowed on the school premises after 6.00pm, except for supervised

activities or in the event of an emergency.

School uniform must be worn smartly for school each day, including on the journey

to and from school.

• When moving about the school, pupils must walk quietly and never run. They

must keep to the right on staircases and in corridors. They must queue in an

orderly fashion for lessons and lunch.

• Bags must not be carried around during the school day except for games, and

coats must not be worn when inside the school building.

• All clothing, sports kit, books and personal possessions must be clearly marked

with the pupil’s name.

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• Out of bounds areas (unless in use for official activities) include: the hall and

chapel, all laboratories, the music school (and external areas next to it), the sports

hall, the swimming pool, the kitchen back door and kitchens; all cricket squares,

net areas, tennis courts (unless for supervised activity), the former golf course and

the copse; lawns, the island field, biology area and pond, the lower playing fields

at the end of the car park, and the car park itself; the junior areas to senior pupils

and visa versa.

• The following are forbidden on the school premises at all times: drugs, tobacco,

alcohol, chewing gum, knives, BB guns, fireworks, aerosols, Tippex, eraser pens

and laser pens, Dictaphones, skateboards and roller blades. Any electrical items

which depend on a mains connection are also forbidden, with the exception of a

laptop computer being used for educational purposes.

• Mobile phones must not be carried around school between 8.35am and 4.00pm. If

these items are brought to school, they must be clearly named and given to a

Junior School member of staff. Pupils abusing these guidelines will have the items

confiscated and may be subject to withdrawal of this privilege. Repeat offenders

will have the item confiscated and put in the school safe for a period of one week.

Please remember however, that we ask only Junior School pupils who travel by

bus/train to and from school to bring a mobile phone to school. For all other

‘gadgets’ permission should be sought from the Deputy Head of the Junior School.

Rationale

Drugs

The drugs policy at Silcoates School reflects the school’s Ethos and Aims in that it seeks

to educate young people and to nurture their talents and potential so that each one may

become a confident, responsible and useful member of society. It also seeks to send a

clear moral message to pupils that drugs are dangerous and involvement with drugs is

wrong.

The school considers that the use of drugs is likely to undermine a pupil’s health, safety,

independence, opportunities and respect for the law. The use of drugs will also damage

the integrity of the school community by exposing other pupils to temptation and to the

risk of criminal proceedings. We strongly and actively discourage the use of drugs and a

drugs ‘culture’.

A continuing and progressive programme of education about drugs is maintained

throughout the school, both as part of the PSHCE programme and as part of the academic

curriculum. The drugs education programme also provides pupils with information about

drugs, including their effects and dangers, and details of the law concerning drugs.

A pupil found to have supplied or used or been in possession of drugs must expect

to be required to leave the school immediately.

If any pupil comes to a member of staff for help or advice over drugs, we will do our best

to respond sympathetically. At the same time, our prime duty is to protect other pupils

and the reputation of the school. No one has the right to conceal evidence that the law is

being broken. The police will be informed of any pupil who is believed to be breaking the

law.

The Headmaster reserves the right to send any pupil suspected of drug abuse for testing.

However, random tests will not be administered.

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Aims

• To reinforce and safeguard the health, safety and welfare of each pupil and of the

school community;

• To ensure legal compliance where it is unlawful for any person to possess, use,

supply or sell controlled drugs;

• To provide pupils with accurate information about drugs and other harmful

substances and to make them aware of the consequences of drugs and substance

misuse;

• To promote a healthy lifestyle through informed judgements;

• To help develop the moral courage to reject peer group pressures which may lead

to experimentation with, and thereby use of, drugs;

• To actively discourage the use of drugs and to treat cases of drugs usage by pupils

as serious misconduct which will be investigated and which, if proven, will result in

serious sanctions being imposed;

• To ensure that all staff, both teaching and support staff, are fully aware of the

school’s policy towards drugs and that they have received appropriate training and

guidance to help them to implement the policy in a consistent manner.

Responsibilities

Headmaster – draws up, implements and reviews the drugs policy and ensures that staff

are aware of the content of the policy.

Personal, Social, Health and Citizenship Education (PSHCE) Co-ordinator – draws up,

implements and reviews the drugs education programme to respond to the needs of

pupils and external influences.

Deputy Head of Junior School ensure that the drugs policy is appropriately known to

pupils.

Class Teachers – deliver the school’s drugs education programme through the PSHCE

curriculum and give feedback to the PSHCE co-ordinator about the effectiveness of the

programme.

School Nurse – supports and advises staff and pupils by providing appropriate up to date

information about medical issues relating to drugs.

All Staff – Drugs prevention and education are whole school issues. All staff, both

teaching and support, must be aware of the school’s policy and how it relates to them

should they have to deal with a drugs related incident. The staff must be committed to

putting into practice the school’s Ethos and Aims.

Implementation

• All pupils in the school receive a progressive and age-appropriate programme of

drugs education. This is delivered through the PSHCE programme and through

academic subjects where appropriate.

• The school is vigilant with regard to drugs related issues, which includes teaching

and support staff being alert to warning signs of drugs or other abuse. Staff

receive appropriate training to recognise evidence of drugs abuse and to deal with

drugs related issues should they arise.

• If any suspicion of drugs use arises, it is reported immediately to the Headmaster

who decides if further investigation is warranted. If it is confirmed that there are

reasonable grounds for suspecting that a pupil may have been using drugs, further

investigations are conducted, which may require a pupil to take a drugs test

should it be considered necessary.

• The school reserves the right to request testing for drugs if appropriate. If a pupil

or his/her parent/s refuses to consent to a test the school is able to draw

inferences as may be appropriate in the circumstances and which may result in the

pupil being required to leave the school.

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• The school’s policy applies directly whenever the pupil is in the care of the school

or on school premises or wearing school uniform or associated with the school

within or outside school hours, including during educational trips and visits away

from the school.

Mobile Phones

The school recognises the communication advantages to parents, pupils and staff provided

by mobile phones. However, the potential disturbance caused by mobile phones in a school

environment is the overriding principle in formulating our policies. We are also mindful of

security issues arising when mobile phones are brought into school. In case of emergency,

pupils have access to phones via Reception at school and messages from parents to pupils

are passed via Class Teachers. For all these reasons we recommend that pupils do not bring

mobile phones into school, but they are allowed to do so within the following guidelines:

• Mobile phones must be turned off once on school premises and given to a member

of staff at the beginning of the school day.

• A member of staff will return the phone to your child at the end of the school day.

• The sending or recording of obscene or threatening messages is illegal, as are 999

calls when there is no emergency.

• Possession of another person's mobile phone, without permission, will be considered

as theft.

• The school cannot be held responsible for the security of mobile phones unless they

have been handed in to staff for safekeeping.

• Failure to adhere to these guidelines, or any misuse of a mobile phone, is likely to

result in confiscation or loss of permission to bring a mobile phone to school for a

specified period of time.

• Serious misconduct involving the use of a mobile phone will result in further

sanctions being imposed. We are aware that the technology with regard to mobile

phones is changing rapidly and the school reserves the right to amend these

guidelines as appropriate.

Please remember we ask only Junior School pupils who travel by bus/train to and from

school to bring a mobile phone to school.

Personal Music Systems / Game-Consoles

Although Personal Music Systems / Game-Consoles are not banned in school, pupils are

strongly discouraged from bringing them in.

All personal music systems / Game-Consoles are brought to school at the owner's risk

(see section above about personal property). Parents are strongly advised not to allow

pupils to bring these items to school.

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If a pupil wishes to bring something to school, permission should be sought from the

Deputy Head of the Junior School. If permission has been granted, all equipment should be

given to the child’s Class Teacher at the beginning of the school day. The item will be given

back to the child at the end of the school day.

If a child is remaining at school for ‘Late Lates’ they should give their item to a member of

staff at the beginning of the session, who will return it to them when they are collected by

their parents between 4.00pm and 6.00pm.

Aims and Expectations

Behaviour in Silcoates Junior School

To promote good relationships with peers and staff so everyone works together in an

effective, considerate and supportive way.

To promote good patterns of behaviour, rather than merely deterring anti-social ones.

All staff have positive contributions to make, setting high standards and applying the rules,

rewards and sanctions fairly and consistently. Relationships are important – staff take the

initiative and communicate positively, treating everyone as an individual and with respect.

Pupils are expected to behave with consideration and courtesy towards others at all times.

Teachers are fair and consistent in the system of rewards, so that pupils understand that

excellent work and behaviour will result in commendation. The special atmosphere and

ethos within Silcoates Junior School have been created through this approach of combining

firm discipline with encouragement, praise and motivation; this combination is essential in

order that children and staff can work together in a happy, positive environment. Our aim is

to encourage self-discipline but when required we have a range of sanctions at our disposal.

Rewards and Sanctions

There is a whole school approach to positive behaviour, where all staff (teaching and nonteaching),

pupils and parents are aware of our aims and expectations.

The school operates a positive learning programme, which encompasses a system of

rewards. If a child chooses to let himself/herself and the school down by behaving in an

undesirable way, the Junior School has a policy of adopting several complementary

strategies for dealing with such discipline problems.

Rewards

The Junior School rewards good behaviour, believing pupils will develop an ethos of

kindness and cooperation. We do this in a variety of ways:

• Teachers congratulate pupils

• Pupils receive House Points

• Pupils receive Presentations

• Pupils receive Commendations in recognition for a special achievement or

contribution to school life

House Points (HP) - are given for outstanding work/contributions in class, special effort

(including within homework), service to others, for representing the school with distinction

and for any behaviour worthy of praise. These are beyond what is normally expected from

the individual pupil.

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As the pupils collect house points, they receive a certificate:

For 50HP (Years 1-3 only) in one school year -

a house colour achievement certificate

For 100 HP in one school year -

a bronze achievement certificate

For 200HP in one school year -

a silver achievement certificate

For 300HP in one school year -

a gold achievement certificate

For 400HP in one school year –

a platinum achievement certificate

A cup is given at the Junior School Speech Day for the highest points earner.

Presentations – are given for a ‘golden’ piece of work from a child – a combination of very

good effort and achievement for that child. These are awarded sparingly and are held up as

a very special award. The child with the highest number of presentations in each year group

wins an award each week, which is presented in assembly.

Commendations – are another reward in the form of a special certificate which is given for

outstanding work/effort, continued exemplary behaviour or some other special reason.

They are not given out each week in each class, but will be awarded when special

recognition is needed.

In addition to all of the above:

• Individual pupils may receive certificates of good behaviour or stickers from midday

supervisors/Late Class Staff.

• Within a class, each Class Teacher also has their own rewards in place, and these are

awarded at the teacher’s discretion.

• The school also acknowledges all the efforts and achievements of pupils out of

school and due praise is given accordingly.

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Sanctions

The Junior School also employs a number of sanctions, in line with school rules, to help

ensure a safe and positive learning environment. We employ each sanction appropriately to

each individual situation.

In the first instance, a problem is dealt with by the Class Teacher, but is referred to the

Deputy Head and ultimately the Head of Junior School if necessary. When appropriate or

necessary, parents are informed and appropriate action is taken.

Within any system there needs to be flexibility and staff use their professional judgement in

the case of pupils with special needs/medical conditions, home pressures/problems and

where initial punishments fail to effect improvement.

The progressive system of sanctions is as follows;

Initial Sanctions

Below are examples of inappropriate behaviour and the initial sanctions which they would

attract.

• We expect pupils to listen carefully to instructions in lessons. If they do not do so, we

ask them either to move to a place nearer to the teacher, or to sit on their own.

• We expect pupils to try their best in all activities. If they do not do so, we may ask

them to redo a task. This is at the teacher’s discretion, and is administered in respect

of the clear objectives given and the pupil’s individual ability. If a pupil is disruptive

in class, or outside the classroom, the teacher in charge reprimands him or her. If a

pupil misbehaves repeatedly, we isolate the pupil from the rest of the class until

he/she is ready to behave and join in with an activity.

• The Class Teacher discusses the school rules with each class. In addition to the

school rules, each class also has its own classroom code, which is agreed by the

pupils and displayed on the wall of the classroom. In this way, every pupil in the

school knows the standard of behaviour that we expect. If there are incidents of ‘antisocial

behaviour’, the Class Teacher discusses these with the whole class during

PSHCE time.

• The safety of the pupil is paramount in all situations. If there is a case where a pupil’s

behaviour endangers the safety of others, the Class Teacher stops the activity and

prevents the pupil from taking part for the rest of that session. If behaviour has upset

someone else, then the child apologises, and again has time out.

In the event of homework or classwork not being completed, ‘catch up’ sessions are held

during break times and are regarded as providing help and support for pupils who need it.

They are not recorded as part of the disciplinary procedure and are for all children from

Year 2 to Year 6. This is, however, monitored by the Subject/Class Teacher and parents are

contacted if it is deemed appropriate, in order to offer support and guidance for the child.

School Warning Book – Warning Cards

In addition to the above, children who are disruptive anywhere in or around the school to

the detriment of other pupils, adults or staff around them will be dealt with immediately by

the member of staff present.

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If there is evidence of repeated misdemeanours, the child may have their name entered

into the school’s warning book. This would be for misdemeanours such as:

• Breaches of uniform rules, including PE/Games

• Lateness to lessons

• Behaviour which interferes with the learning of others

• Talking at inappropriate times, e.g. lessons, assemblies

• Failure to bring the appropriate equipment, e.g. books, pencils, pens

• Failure to get homework diary signed

• Failure to give a fair and accurate account of events

• Low level disorderly behaviour in the lunch queue or the dining hall

• Low level anti-social behaviour

A blue ‘warning card’ explaining the misdemeanour is sent home to parents to sign and

return to school.

Yellow Card

If the poor behaviour continues, and the child receives three entries into the warning book,

they are issued with a ‘Yellow Card’ from the Junior School Deputy Head. The child also has

to meet with the Deputy Head of Junior School during lunch time where their

misdemeanour(s) are discussed and a ‘Yellow Card’ will be put into their diary for parents to

sign and return, and/or parents are contacted by phone.

In addition, misdemeanours that warrant a straight Yellow Card (and will amass the

equivalent of three warning cards) could include:

• Aggressive behaviour

• Deliberate or careless damage to property

• Serious disorderly behaviour

• Serious anti-social behaviour

• Serious Intimidation of others

• Rudeness/disrespect to staff

• Lying

• Accumulation of three entries into the warning book over a half term

Red Card

If the poor behaviour continues, and the child receives three further entries into the

warning book or a straight Yellow Card (i.e. a total of six), they are issued with a ‘Red Card’

from the Junior School Deputy Head. The child has to meet with the Deputy Head, along

with the Head of Junior School, during lunch time where their misdemeanour(s) are

discussed and a ‘Red Card’ is put into their diary for parents to sign and return, and/or

parents are contacted by phone.

If the poor behaviour continues, and the child receives three further entries into the

warning book (i.e. a total of nine), they will be called to a meeting with Deputy Head, along

with the Head of Junior School.

This would be after school and parents would also have to attend.

All warnings/yellow and red cards are set to zero each new half-term.

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For more serious offences (or after other sanctions have proved ineffective):

• Suspension: a pupil may be suspended from school by the Headmaster for a fixed

duration, either internally or externally.

During an internal suspension the pupil carries out additional academic work in

isolation under the school’s supervision.

During an external suspension the pupil carries out additional academic work at

home under the supervision of parents.

In the absence of the Headmaster, the Head of Junior School has the power to impose a

suspension, but this will be subject to official ratification by the Headmaster on his

return.

• Expulsion or Withdrawal from the School: in exceptional circumstances, or after

a series of other measures have been implemented without success, a pupil may

be required by the Headmaster to leave the school.

Corporal Punishment: corporal punishment is not used at Silcoates. Physical restraint

would only ever be used under the specific guidelines set out in the Staff Handbook and

the Child Protection Policy.

Please also note: Lower School Year 1 and Year 2

In the initial stages -

There is a half-term target i.e. good manners, which is changed each half-term. This focus is

also discussed during PSHCE lessons.

Rewards

- The class has an appropriate, easily understandable rewards programme in their individual

classroom. For continuous appropriate behaviour and work they are rewarded on the Super

Star and Shooting Stars programme.

- Stickers may also be used as rewards for good work, kind deeds, helpfulness, etc. If the

work/deed is exceptional then they may be sent to another class and/or Deputy Head of

Junior School / Head of Junior School to show/explain for recognition.

Sanctions

- The class has an appropriate, easily understandable sanctions programme in their

individual classroom. For continuous inappropriate behaviour sanctions are applied and they

may have their name placed on the Grumpy Cloud. In addition, other sanctions may be

applied:

- Removal from an activity

- Letters of apology to be written / apology to be given to the other pupil(s)

- Miss a session of playtimes – either stay indoors or stay with the teacher on

duty/supervisor during play.

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Classroom Code Of Practice

All classes during the first few days of term devise their own Classroom Code. This

will be broadly based on the following document, appropriate to the age and maturity

of the children, and posted in all classrooms.

What we expect from you in the classroom

• Arrive punctually and properly equipped for lessons.

• Enter the classroom in a sensible manner and sit where the teacher indicates.

• Place appropriate books/equipment on the table and settle down quickly, so that the

lesson can start in an orderly fashion.

• During the lesson stay in your seat unless the teacher gives you permission to leave

it.

• Show respect for other pupils and staff by listening carefully and courteously when

they are speaking, and raising your hand if you wish to ask, or answer, a question.

• When instructed to do so, work quietly, without disturbing other pupils.

• Do your best to make positive contributions and always complete work to the best of

your ability.

• Respect all school property and equipment.

• Show respect to any member of staff or visitors, by standing up when they enter your

classroom.

• Eating or chewing gum is not allowed during lessons. Pupils may carry a water

bottle, but no other drinks may be consumed in class.

• Permission from the teacher must always be sought before leaving the classroom

during lessons.

• At the end of the lesson, wait for the teacher’s instruction to pack up your books.

Leave the classroom neat and tidy, as you would expect to find it.

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Extra-curricular Information

Extra-Curricular Programme

The extra-curricular programme at Silcoates School widens the experiences available to

pupils, gives them the opportunity to try something new and promotes the idea that

education continues beyond the classroom. At Silcoates we try to offer a variety of activities

and we hope that you will support us by encouraging your child to participate in at least one

activity per term.

Activities take place at lunchtimes, after school, in the evenings and at weekends. The

Junior School Systems Co-ordinator is responsible for the programme. A termly schedule of

events is produced, the details of which are posted on the website at the start of each term,

and activities usually begin in the second week of term, although sporting practices start as

soon as possible.

Every child is encouraged to attend at least two clubs a week, but most children attend

many more. Including both lunchtime and after school there are well over 30 clubs on

offer to the children. Clubs cover a variety of different interests and include:

• Craft Based – sewing, lego, cardcraft

• Adventure – birdwatching, storytime, indoor board games, Dr Who

• Sport – football, rugby, netball, hockey, swimming, cricket, athletics, tri-golf,

running

• Music – offbeat, string group, samba band, brass group, recorder club, percussion,

music makers

• Other – Latin, play rehearsals, ICT

Children’s ideas will be listened to and, where possible, new clubs can be introduced.

Martial Arts for example has been introduced, although there is an additional charge for

children doing this club, due to the specialist teaching required. In addition, sporting

links have now been made with Wakefield Wildcats, and it is hoped dance and exercise

classes will be introduced.

Pupils are encouraged to develop their interests and abilities outside of the classroom, to

take full advantage of the many opportunities on offer. However, it is important for all

pupils to have a balance between their academic life and their extra-curricular activities.

House Competitions

There are four Houses, named after former Headmasters – Evans’, Moore’s, Spencer’s and

Yonge’s. Each pupil is allocated to a House when they join the school. Siblings are usually

placed in the same House and pupils transferring from the Junior School will retain their

House membership. Each House is overseen by a member of the teaching staff. House

Assemblies take place on a regular basis to celebrate pupil achievement, organise team lists

for competitions and discuss topical issues generally based on moral values. All pupils are

encouraged to take part in House competitions during the year as part of their commitment

to their House.

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Sport

Physical Education plays an important part in the extra-curricular programme. A major

emphasis of the programme is the pursuit of excellence and school representation in the

sports teams, which include rugby, girls’ hockey, netball, cricket, tennis, swimming,

athletics, cross-country running and football. Silcoates has a strong reputation for the

quality of its sports teams and all pupils are encouraged to join in. Team squad practices

take place at lunchtimes and after school, with mid-week matches usually taking place

during timetabled games afternoons. In addition, we try to offer a wide range of activities

for pupils to enjoy. Whether or not pupils are a beginner, an expert or keen to learn and

improve, they are welcome to try any or all of the activities.

All fixtures are listed in the school calendar. Pupils chosen to represent the school by

playing in a school team are expected to play during the week as required, as well as

attending the weekly training sessions.

Pupils selected to represent the school are notified and the specific arrangements given

to them as soon as possible and, in the case of away fixtures, at least two days before the

fixture. Parents should note that the arrangements for collecting pupils afterwards vary

from fixture to fixture but details of such arrangements are included on the team sheet

given to each player.

Parents are asked to support the great sporting tradition of Silcoates by ensuring that

their children are available to play for the school if they are chosen.

Music

The Music Department offers many opportunities for pupils to participate in musical

activities. It has ten practice rooms, two large teaching rooms and a computer laboratory

housing twenty-one computers with Sibelius 3 and Cubasis 5, controlled with a state-of-theart

virtual reality programme. Each practice room has a new Kawai piano, and there is a

large rehearsal room with a new Kawai baby grand.

All pupils receive class music lessons from the ages of 5 to 14 years, after which time the

subject may be studied at examination levels. In the first years the emphasis is on practical

experience, broadening out later.

Instrument Lessons

Any pupil may request individual lessons, which take place on a rota basis throughout the

day until Year 10 is reached, and thereafter during free time. At present lessons are

available for the following:

Piano, organ, strings, woodwind, brass, guitar and electric guitar, drum kit and orchestral

percussion, keyboard and singing.

Lessons are charged at approximately £250 per term: the cost per term is subject to

annual review. Thirty-one lessons lasting approximately thirty-five minutes are given in a

school year. One term’s notice of cancellation is required. Arrangements can be made

for the hiring of most instruments.

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Activities

Singers are encouraged to join Junior Choir. Instrumentalists can join Junior Orchestra,

Junior Brass Group, Junior Recorder Group, Junior Percussion Group, Junior Guitar Groups,

and Samba Band. Associated Board, Guildhall/Trinity and Rock School practical and theory

music examinations are held in school every term. Free theory and aural classes are held

for all pupils to help with these examinations.

Our young musicians work hard at Silcoates, at Chapel Services and assemblies, in termly

concerts, and House Music Competitions.

The Director of Music, Mrs Helen Crompton, will be pleased to consult with parents at any

time on their son’s or daughter’s musical education. A pro forma regarding instrument

lessons will be given to you with this booklet, and it would help organisation if this was

returned promptly for pupils who wish to begin lessons at the beginning of the school year.

Drama

For those who have an interest in drama, there is always a lot going on. Plays and

performances are put on in the School Hall. The productions might be small-scale, part of a

class assembly, or large-scale productions, either for year groups or for pupils across the

age ranges. Rehearsals take place at lunchtimes and after school during the week and at

weekends in the run up to the performance.

A recent example was last year’s Year 5 & 6 production of Joseph.

Outdoor Pursuits

There is a long tradition of training pupils and promoting an interest in Outdoor Pursuits in

school. The aim of the programme is to provide pupils with new, exciting and challenging

activities, and to encourage the development of self-reliance, self-discipline and a sense of

responsibility for others.

In the Junior School there is an opportunity for pupils to attend a residential outdoor

activities weekend. These normally take place in the summer term and separate trips are

organised for Years 4, 5 and 6. Each trip provides a good basic introduction for the pupils

to Outdoor Pursuits. Activities on each trip are either new or give an opportunity to develop

skills acquired on previous occasions.

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Sports Club

The Silcoates School Sports Club gives opportunities for recreational and social contact to

staff, parents and former pupils of Foundation schools.

Membership is principally for present parents and their children as family members, and

to Old Silcoatians, although a strictly-limited number of local residents are allowed to

join. Membership is non-transferable, and only those people whose names appear on

the application form are eligible to use the Club facilities. Members receive a ‘swipe’

card, which they need to gain access to the sports area.

For details of how to obtain membership please contact the Bursar’s P.A., Mrs Fiona Reed,

on 01924 885252.

The facilities open to members are:-

The indoor heated swimming pool

Badminton - 4 courts

The squash court

Tennis - 4 hard courts (April – October)

The Club is open to members at the following times during term time:-

Sports Hall

Swimming Pool

Monday 6.00pm to 9.30pm 6.00pm to 9.30pm

Tuesday 6.00pm to 9.30pm 6.00pm to 9.30pm

Wednesday None 8.00pm to 9.30pm

Thursday 6.00pm to 9.30pm 6.00pm to 9.30pm

Friday 6.00pm to 9.30pm 8.30pm to 9.30pm

Saturday 2.00pm to 7.30pm 4.30pm to 7.30pm

Sunday 9.00am to 6.30pm 9.00am to 6.30pm

The times of availability are subject to minor changes from term to term, and facilities are

occasionally unavailable for Sports Club use because of school events and external

bookings.

During holidays, the facilities are available all day and evening every day, except for brief

maintenance periods and occasional reservations. Outdoor facilities are available at any

time, subject to restrictions necessitated by maintenance or weather conditions. Details

of holiday availability are sent to all members at the end of each term.

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Silcoates School

Wrenthorpe Wakefield WF2 0PD

Tel: (01924) 291614 Fax: (01924) 368693 e-mail: head@silcoates.org.uk

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