Economic development strategy - London Borough of Hillingdon

hillingdon.gov.uk

Economic development strategy - London Borough of Hillingdon

A prosperous borough

Hillingdon’s strategy for a sustainable

economy 2005-2015

www.hillingdon.gov.uk


Published by:

Photographs by Graham Mullett, Simon Kreitem

Hillingdon Council,

Civic Centre,

High Street,

Uxbridge,

UB8 1UW

June 2005.

HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH


Contents

Foreword

Hillingdon’s economy, our aspirations and

objectives

Transport and Heathrow

Education, employment and the knowledge

economy

Equalities

Hillingdon for business and the Hillingdon brand

Housing, environment and quality of life

Appendices

Appendix 1 - Partners involved in developing the

strategy

Appendix 2 - Linkages with regional and subregional

strategies

Appendix 3 - Community Strategy targets for a

prosperous borough 2005-2015

HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH


FOREWORD

Foreword

We live in a dynamically

changing environment. The

region, and in particular the

sub-region, is evolving as a

high quality, highly skilled,

low-intensity, knowledge

economy.

The purpose of Hillingdon’s

Strategy for a Sustainable

Economy is to ensure that

the borough of Hillingdon

keeps abreast of economic

changes and that our landuse

strategies, workforce, businesses, public sector

infrastructure and educational establishments are aware

and prepared to meet the challenges ahead.

Hillingdon has a number of strategic advantages. These

include: the working age population which is broad, we

are strategically well located and we have a quality of

environment and diversity of housing to sustain a

diverse workforce. There are also a large number of

high-value companies in the borough which themselves

sustain smaller businesses in the supply chain.

There are, however, significant challenges before us. For

instance, the London Plan suggests that the Hayes/West

Drayton/Southall/Stockley area should deliver 35,000

new jobs and 5,800 new homes by 2016. The current

level of academic attainment in our schools and the

weak skill sets of the adult work force need intensive

investment to ensure that local people can benefit from

the growing opportunity and prosperity of the region.

We believe that thriving regions, cities, towns, villages

and neighbourhoods are fundamental to quality of life.

Also that strong economies with quality employment

opportunities, good access to services and attractive

and safe surroundings are vital for their sustainability.

Therefore for an economy to be sustainable we must

strive for a better quality of life for everyone, now and

for generations to come. Although the idea is simple,

the task is substantial. This strategy is the first step in

achieving a sustainable economy within our borough.

The aim is to identify the themes, co-ordinate policies

and bring together key partners to promote an

integrated approach to the development of our

economy, environment and society. Building sustainable

communities is about improvements to the places

where people live and work, and improving the

prosperity and overall environment for businesses,

communities and individuals. This encompasses:

• strengthening our local economy, including the

skills of our local workforce.

• promoting better health, housing and access to

services and recreation.

• improving local surroundings - revitalising town

centres, tackling degraded urban environments,

and ensuring that development respects the

character of our borough.

• reducing crime and the fear of crime and making it

easier for people to get involved in their

communities.

Achieving sustainable development in the London

Borough of Hillingdon therefore involves attaining the

correct balance between economic development, social

improvement and environmental protection. Our

approach to economic development will ensure that

there is a gradual movement towards sustainable

development and a continuous improvement in overall

quality of life for both our businesses and local

communities.

The Cabinet of Hillingdon Council and Hillingdon’s

Local Strategic Partnership have both formally adopted

Hillingdon’s Strategy for a Sustainable Economy.

Councillor Jonathan Bianco

Cabinet Member: Finance, Regeneration

& Corporate Services

1 HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH


Hillingdon’s

economy, our

aspirations and

objectives


HILLINGDON’S ECONOMY, OUR ASPIRATIONS AND OBJECTIVES

Hillingdon’s economy, our aspirations

and objectives

Hillingdon as an economic entity

Over the past 12 months key public documents have

emerged including the London Development

Agency’s (LDA’s) Economic Development Strategy,

and the West London Economic Development

Strategy (WLEDS). In addition, the Government has

launched its new initiative, the Local Authority

Business Growth Incentives (LABGI), giving local

authorities a financial incentive to maximise

economic growth in their boroughs. These

developments will influence the economic context

in which local economies operate, and have

therefore prompted a range of partner agencies to

come together to share a vision for the economy of

Hillingdon and to develop a strategy and action

plan to realise the vision.

No sector alone, whether public, private or

voluntary, has the power to drive, influence and

shape the economy in its broadest sense i.e.

incorporating the housing market, transportation,

employment, land use, etc. It is therefore felt that a

shared sense of ownership is vital not just for the

writing of the strategy but in driving through its

aims and objectives. To this end 17 partner agencies

(see Appendix 1 for details) attended a series of

seven meetings over a period of two months to

comment on the analysis of Hillingdon’s strengths,

weaknesses, opportunities and threats, and the

statistical analysis of the economy, to create the

vision and influence the shape of the Strategy for a

Sustainable Economy in Hillingdon.

This document draws together the work of the

partners and recommends a series of economic

actions to capitalise on opportunities, develop

strategic leadership, promote partnership working

and realise the strategy’s vision. The recommended

actions will be used to direct the annual Delivery

Action Plan.

Strategic links

The strategy has been developed in the knowledge

that the borough’s economic vision will continue to

be tempered and influenced by wider external

factors, for many of which there is limited local

power to influence or change but whose impact on

this borough would be huge e.g. Heathrow Third

Runway, Cross Rail, the Olympics etc. In developing a

united vision for the future of the borough, it is

hoped that local concerns can be more clearly

articulated and action taken to capitalise on

emerging opportunities.

In light of regional and sub-regional strategies with a

direct influence on economic activity, in particular the

Sub-Regional Development Framework and the West

London Economic Development Strategy, it has been

vital for the strategy to be developed in partnership

with sub-regional strategic organisations. To this end

the strategy complements other regional, subregional

and local strategies including the Hillingdon

Local Development Framework and Hillingdon's

Community Strategy. Key targets from these

strategies are attached as Appendix 2. In moving to

implement the strategic recommendations, it will be

advantageous to work in partnership with

neighbouring boroughs to tackle issues holistically

and maximise resources available.

Future partnership action

Hillingdon’s Local Strategic Partnership, known as

the Hillingdon Partners, aims to use its authority

and strategic influence to facilitate partnership

working. This approach will enable greater focus in

the use of resources and create an infrastructure

that will achieve a sustainable, inclusive and

economically prosperous borough.

The range of partners engaged in this process has

been extensive and given the opportunity presented

by their diversity and commitment, it is intended

3 HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH


HILLINGDON’S ECONOMY, OUR ASPIRATIONS AND OBJECTIVES

that they become constituted as the Economically

Prosperous Theme Group of Hillingdon Partners

with responsibility for driving the Delivery Action

Plan and realising the vision.

Time frame

This strategy sets the vision for a sustainable economy

for the next five to ten years. The accompanying

Delivery Action Plan will be the tool by which the

Hillingdon Partners Theme Group can plan and

measure performance. The Delivery Action Plan will

complement this strategy, turning aspirations into

meaningful projects and actions by detailing targets

for the following two to three years.

Aspirations for the local economy

The partnership identified the following aspirations,

which have underpinned the development of this

strategy and its objectives:

Economic development – The borough will strive for

economic growth and thriving businesses that trade

within and outside the borough, without which

current economic development activity is

unsustainable. Businesses earning income from

outside Hillingdon create employment opportunities

for local people thereby adding net value to the

local economy and as such these businesses should

be encouraged/supported by this strategy.

Inclusion – Hillingdon should capitalise on the

strength of the local economy and the predicted

future shortfall in both the quantity and quality of

employees, as the catalyst to removing barriers to

economic inclusion and to addressing the needs of

adults in low-skill/low paid employment, disaffected

young people and those far removed from the

labour market.

Sustainability – There is a need to encourage and

support participants in the Hillingdon economy to

think global and act local; improving the

environment, conserving natural resources including

air quality, and distributing the benefits of

development equitably.

Resources – Understand the importance of good

resources that enable businesses to operate

efficiently and competitively. Explore opportunities

and partnership ventures to optimise

natural/financial resources, generate economies of

scale and add-value to existing practices.

Resources include:

• skilled workforce.

• entrepreneurial flair.

• land.

• transport infrastructure.

• environmental quality (technical and amenity).

Strategic influence – Hillingdon Partners should

advocate a balance between land uses in the

borough, to create a borough where people want

to work, live and participate in recreation.

Recognise that the route to achieving this will

include active involvement in regional and subregional

partnerships.

Partnership – Hillingdon needs to work to integrate

local employers in realising the strategic vision

through quality communication and collaborative

working. Recognise the important role which

partners within the voluntary and community sector

play both in the local and sub-regional economy

and in improving the quality of people’s lives.

HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH

4


HILLINGDON’S ECONOMY, OUR ASPIRATIONS AND OBJECTIVES

Well-being – Bring greater co-ordination to

fragmented action to address economic and social

inclusion. Work to mitigate the negative impacts of

the economy on quality of life and the environment.

Support services – Recognise the importance of

efficient and competitive services to support

business activities and the local population. These

services may be public e.g. transportation, health

services, or private, e.g. local car repair garages,

hairdressers, printers, etc.

Objectives for a sustainable

Hillingdon economy

To deliver the economic vision, this strategy focuses

on seven objectives, which encapsulate the priority

concerns and aims. This strategy aims to complement

the work of both the London Development Agency

(LDA) and the West London Alliance (WLA) who have

set the vision and framework for economic

regeneration for London and the sub-region. The

degree to which we have attempted to follow their

strategic lead is detailed in Appendix 3. Although the

process of developing Hillingdon’s strategy began by

borrowing heavily from the structure of the West

London Economic Development Strategy (WLEDS),

partners found that at a local level, this artificially

compartmentalised issues and did not reflect the

complex nature of the challenges nor the holistic

approach needed to address them.

Tempering the local emphasis of this work is the

reality that integrated action is needed to balance

the demands of sub-regional development in terms of

the growth of the population, jobs and business

across public sector bodies. Hillingdon ought to

actively engage in inter-borough working to realise

common goals for social economic and environmental

cohesion and sustainability. Resources to realise

regeneration aspirations are likely to be distributed

at a sub-regional/regional level, it is therefore vital to

participate in inter-borough, regional and subregional

partnerships to deliver this strategy.

5 HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH


Key economic opportunity areas

© Crown Copyright. All rights reserved.

London Borough of Hillingdon 100019283 2005

Wards

Borough boundary

Heathrow Airport


HILLINGDON’S ECONOMY, OUR ASPIRATIONS AND OBJECTIVES

Key areas for cross-borough action:

• Creating movement and real choice in social

housing through extending choice-based lettings

in West London.

• Action to equip local people with the skills to

meet the needs and opportunities in business

growth sectors, particularly in the following

industries: creative, tourism, ICT and construction.

• Co-ordinate transport strategies and lobby

together for investment that brings real choice in

travel options to local people.

• Ensure co-ordination between the London Plan,

Sub Regional Development Framework and the

Local Development Framework to establish an

effective tool by which to manage future

development.

• Work with employers and representative bodies

such as West London Business to promote and

facilitate innovation and best practice in

workforce development.

• Develop the West London agenda for

environmental protection and social inclusion.

• Support business engagement in corporate social

responsibility, for the benefit of the wider

community.

The strategic objectives of Hillingdon’s strategy

for a sustainable economy

1. Pursue opportunities to promote balanced

and sustainable economic development in

Hillingdon.

2. Enhance and maintain Hillingdon’s

competitive position as a location to live,

work and to do business.

3. Develop initiatives to maximise the unique

advantages of Hillingdon’s strategic location

which encompasses Heathrow Airport, rail

and road connections, Brunel University,

Hillingdon Hospital, etc.

4. Enable Hillingdon people to realise their full

potential through education and training.

5. Maximise opportunities for local employment

and career progression for Hillingdon

residents.

6. Maximise opportunities that are offered by

the diversity of the borough’s population.

7. Engage employers in work to address

community needs including crime and antisocial

behaviour, academic underachievement,

social exclusion, etc.

8. Co-ordinate action to manage growth

opportunities and reflect current needs in the

Hayes/West Drayton corridor.

9. Support excellence in public services

particularly in areas such as schooling, health

facilities, open spaces and recreation

facilities.

7 HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH


Transport and

Heathrow


TRANSPORT AND HEATHROW

Transport issues

Hillingdon is a transport hub transected by three

motorways and the Great Western Railway; the

borough is also home to two busy airports and

three tube lines. Strategically Hillingdon is the

‘Gateway to the London/the West’.

Despite the abundance of public transport routes

through and to the borough, Hillingdon has the

highest proportion of car ownership per head of

population within London. All major public

transport routes are radial. The majority of

commuting from Hillingdon is undertaken by car

with 59.7% of work journeys by borough residents

made by car, the highest figure of any London

borough. Non-borough residents hold 66% of jobs

in Hillingdon, many of these commuters are likely to

travel into the borough by car on a daily basis.

Hillingdon is also perceived to be far enough out of

London to be a good stopping point for people

wanting to do business in central London without

the hassle of commuting in or entering the central

London congestion charging zone. Blockage on any

one of the borough’s arterial routes causes gridlock

on the other parallel arteries. Such circumstances

are not unusual and raise questions about the longterm

sustainability of the borough’s transportation

network.

The high level of commuting in and out of the

borough causes considerable congestion, road

safety concerns, air pollution and environmental

degradation. Businesses frequently cite congestion

and car parking restrictions as a major disadvantage

of doing business in Hillingdon. Deliveries to

businesses are particularly affected by congestion.

There is a high number of warehousing, storage

and logistics businesses in the borough, many of

which are linked to Heathrow Airport and represent

the largest business sector in the borough,

providing employment to 32.2% of Hillingdon

residents (Annual Business Inquiry 2002). The

amount of freight on Hillingdon roads is set to

grow largely as a result of trends in supermarket

business and EU directives on HGV driving hours.

Freight businesses need logistics parks, distribution

centres and free-flowing traffic to function

effectively. West London Freight Quality Partnership

is currently investigating the issues around freight

movement in West London.

To optimise the function and efficiency of public

transport and thereby encourage people out of

their own cars, transport interchanges need to be

effective and fully integrated. Hillingdon needs to

develop a vision for effective modal interchanges

and campaign to drive the vision through to

implementation. The borough also has an ambitious

programme to implement a green travel plan,

which aims to reduce congestion on the roads and

promote alternative means of travel. It is clear

however, that given projections on the rising levels

of car ownership and rising numbers of commuters

into central London, more creative thought is

needed to avoid spiralling pollution, environmental

degradation, stress and dissatisfaction. Tempering

ambitions for creative solutions to our transport

problems is the recognition, echoed by the Mayor’s

transport strategy, that for outer London boroughs

such as Hillingdon, the car will remain the main

mode of transport in the future and this must be

reflected in future transport strategies.

Easy access to affordable car parking is of vital

importance to businesses in the borough. Fifty four

percent of customers to Uxbridge town centre are

from outside the borough and the smaller,

neighbourhood shopping centres rely heavily on

passing trade. It is clear that any growth in

commercial floor space in Uxbridge town centre will

increase pressure on current car parking provision

and the road infrastructure. Other town centres

pursue transport policies that are deliberately

‘unfriendly’ to cars, but in most circumstance such

9 HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH


To Watford

Rickmansworth

Moor Park

Northwood

Northwood Hills

To Amersham

Pinner

Denham

Ruislip

West Ruislip

Ickenham

Hillingdon

Uxbridge

Eastcote

Ruislip Manor

Rayners Lane

Ruislip Gardens

South Ruislip

North Harrow

Northolt

West Harrow

South Harrow

Northolt Park

Greenford

To London

To Slough

West Drayton

Hayes & Harlington

Southall

To London

Heathrow 5

Hounslow West

Heathrow Tube 123

Hatton Cross

Heathrow Express 123

Heathrow Express 4 Heathrow Tube 4

© Crown Copyright. All rights reserved.

London Borough of Hillingdon 100019283 2005

Hillingdon Strategy for a Sustainable Economy

Motorways Transportation

A-Roads

B-Roads

Minor Roads

Transportation in Hillingdon

Proposed Tram Alignment

Proposed Crossrail Alignment

© Crown Copyright. All rights reserved.

London Borough of Hillingdon 100019283 2005

Main Line

Central

stations

Picadilly / Metropolitan

Picadilly

Metropolitan

Metropolitain / Main Line

Borough boundary


TRANSPORT AND HEATHROW

policies are complemented by services such as park

and ride or integrated transport networks with

effective coverage of residential areas with fast,

efficient and affordable bus services. Hillingdon

would have difficulties meeting the land

requirements of a park and ride scheme;

furthermore the development of new bus routes are

frequently met with opposition from residents,

who, although happy to see improved network

coverage, do not want to see new routes and bus

stops outside their homes.

Heathrow Airport uses its commercial capabilities to

develop its own bus network at the airport. BAA are

currently working to promote improvements to the

efficiency and effectiveness of the existing bus and

coach network through marketing, improvements

to interchanges, the provision of high quality and

high frequency links with identified key local and

regional transport interchanges and complementing

local and regional transport strategies. This work is

based around three principles:

1. Quality – A holistic journey approach, exceed

customers expectations, provide seamless,

integrated journeys.

2. Sustainability – minimise environmental impacts

(air quality, reduce private single occupancy car

use).

3. Commercial vitality – Profitable public transport

services meeting customers’ and airport’s

demands.

This network is extending out from the airport to

create routes to work, to childcare facilities and to

training facilities throughout the sub-region. There

may be opportunities for other companies to

participate in such schemes to overcome transport

problems that impact on their business, for example

utilising finance generated by a Business

Improvement District to sponsorship of a park and

ride facility.

Along with the rest of West London, Hillingdon

suffers from a lack of orbital road and public

transport routes. The economic and social exclusion

experienced by communities predominantly

clustered in the south of the borough is

compounded by their remoteness from public

transport facilities and thus poor access to amenities

and facilities. Furthermore, as the south of the

borough has the largest concentration of

employment opportunities, improving accessibility

and permeability of the borough is of major

importance in efforts to tackle exclusion. These

problems are particularly acute for those who are

less than fully mobile, particularly in terms of their

access to essential public services such as health

care.

Future major transport infrastructure projects

include the West London Tram and Cross Rail. The

tram should ideally service Hayes station and in

doing so doing link with the new Heathrow

stopping service. Such a development would create

an effective transport hub. There are concerns

however that the Cross Rail development will not

really improve the transport options for local

people, but will only serve to enable commuters

from outside London to reach central London more

quickly. There are other transport infrastructure

projects that would more effectively address the

transport needs of the borough. These are outlined

in the action points overleaf.

Better integration of transport strategies at both a

local and sub-regional level would ensure

customers’ needs are at the forefront of planning so

that services, charges, regulations etc can be

compatible or complementary.

11 HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH


TRANSPORT AND HEATHROW

Transport: Action

Arrange expert facilitators to lead a multiagency

group in appraising the future of

transport, congestion and car parking in

Hillingdon and the impact of transport on

business. Possible areas for action include:

• Individualised travel planning for new

residential developments.

• Auditable quantified travel plans for new

businesses.

• Infrastructure for cleaner vehicle technology

(e.g. electric car charging points etc).

• Rethink the location and availability of car

parking.

• Section 106 funding (see footnote) to support

major public transport improvements.

o activate existing freight tracks between

Reading and Hayes for passenger traffic.

Work also needs undertaking to create business

and public sector involvement in:

• Support for the implementation of the green

travel plan.

• Integrating cycling, walking etc into transport

hubs.

Footnote

Planning obligations or ‘Section 106 agreements’ are legal

agreements negotiated by the local planning authority with the

developer (or landowner) of a proposed development. They

identify the specific local facilities, services or improvements

necessary to make the development acceptable in planning

terms. Where it is not possible to provide such facilities on-site,

Section 106 agreements can specify that developers make

financial contributions, or ‘commuted sums’, to the local

authority to enable it to provide the required facilities/services

outside the site.

• Campaign for integration of north/south

public transport routes and to create modal

transport interchanges:

o the West London Tram to stop at Hayes

station.

o the Central Line to be extended from

South Ruislip to Uxbridge town centre,

which would improve commuting options

and better integrate this part of the

borough with the rest of West London.

o Uxbridge town centre transport

interchange – improvements are needed

to improve the train, bus and taxi

interchange in Uxbridge town centre,

making the process of transferring from

one to the other easier and a pleasant

experience for travellers.

HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH

12


TRANSPORT AND HEATHROW

Heathrow

There are approximately 350 companies based at

London Heathrow, the majority of these directly

support airport related business. Through the

procurement of goods and services Heathrow airport

has considerable strategic influence on the local

business community, affecting the location, type,

size and nature of local businesses and thereby local

employment opportunities. In employment terms,

Heathrow generates £5 billion per annum in wages,

sustaining 270,000 jobs in the UK alone.

Heathrow is a major economic influence on the

borough, the sub-region and the country as a whole.

The impact on the borough is both positive and

negative. Better collaboration with BAA will help

businesses and the public sector capitalise on its positive

impacts and work to mitigate some of the negative

effects. Areas for greater collaboration include:

• Work to mitigate the environmental impact of

the airport – e.g. a detailed specification for

excellence in architectural design and energy

efficient building, needs to be developed for all

development south of M4.

• In circumstances where there would be

advantages for the wider Hillingdon economy,

explore whether all airport dependent business is

best located on the airport site, or whether it

may be beneficial to move office-based

employment off the airport site to utilise empty

office accommodation within the borough and

provide local, accessible employment for

borough residents. From this, businesses such as

logistic parks and freight could be located more

closely to their supply sources. This may prompt

greater supply-chain opportunities to open-up to

local businesses, particularly small and medium

enterprises, creating local employment

opportunities and presenting opportunities for

the on-going regeneration of Hayes and the

West Drayton corridor. These opportunities

however, must be balanced by concerns

regarding the environmental impact of

Heathrow Airport.

Hillingdon could do better at embracing the

unique opportunity presented by Heathrow

Airport and exploit its international links, for

example foreign students, business tourists etc,

many of whom stay in the borough, but few will

be aware of the local and sub-regional attributes

and spend time and money in the borough itself.

In recognition of the huge significance that

Heathrow airport has on the London and UK

economy, airport related businesses are working

collaboratively with Brunel University to explore the

potential for creating a University of Aviation

Business (UAB), which would confirm Heathrow’s

status as a knowledge-rich and high-value business.

The UAB would create synergy between Heathrow

airport and the University with its proud

engineering history and in so doing complement

the objectives of West Focus by creating stronger

links between industry and education. The UAB,

although conceptual and virtual, could lead to more

cost effective and high quality mechanisms for

addressing specialised human resources and skills

development requirements, as well as knowledge

transfer between higher education institutes and

industry. The project could also have a range of

wider economic, social and environmental benefits.

13 HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH


TRANSPORT AND HEATHROW

Heathrow: Action

In the interest of harnessing the potential of the

airport for the benefit of the borough in terms

of education, training, environmental

protection, tourism, land use and business

supply chains, it is suggested that work is

undertaken in partnership with BAA and its

supply chains to plan action for the

development of each of the following areas:

• Meet the buyer – continue to build the

capacity of local businesses to compete for

and deliver Heathrow work contracts. Use

this model to demonstrate best practice and

cascade practices to other businesses in the

borough and the public sector (particularly

the council and Primary Care Trust).

• Complement work underway to map

Heathrow initiatives in recent years,

identifying what went well and what did not,

in an attempt to action plan for the future

and to add value where appropriate.

• University of Aviation Business - The UAB has

the potential to become a flagship initiative

for Hillingdon and further work needs to be

done to ensure the borough’s involvement

and support in order to maximise benefit for

local residents. Greater collaboration with a

range of agencies including Uxbridge College

and secondary schools would add value to

the project and create borough-wide

stakeholders in this project.

HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH

14


Education,

employment and

the knowledge

economy


EDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT AND THE KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY

Strategic priorities

Attainment and employment issues

14-19 Education

The availability of an educated and highly skilled

workforce is at the heart of the knowledge

economy. Equally skill deficiencies are at the root of

the deprivation suffered by many people. Therefore

addressing local skills deficiencies is the key to

preserving the future viability of the local economy

and the prosperity of local communities.

Table 1 illustrates that academic attainment in

Hillingdon schools is below the London average and

significantly below the outer London average. In

the academic year 2003/4 1,527 16-year-old pupils

left school without attaining level 2 (equivalent to 5

GCSE passes at grade C or above) and 25% of these

failed to attain level 1 (pre GCSE). The trend is

generally better in schools in the north of the

borough than those in the south, see table 2. In

addition to this, participation in post-16 education

and training in Hillingdon is generally low and

Hillingdon has the highest proportion of young

people in the NEET category (Not in Employment,

Education and Training) than any other West

London borough.

% Attained

100%

80%

60%

40%

20%

0%

Table 1: GCSE results in 2003

5+A*-C 5+A*-G 1+A*-G

Grades A* - G

Hillingdon

West London

London

Urgent action is required to address falling

education attainment and the high number of NEET

youths. A possible course of action is to broaden out

the learning experience in partnership with

businesses, to create more vocational education

Wards

Table 2: Population aged 16-24 with level 1 or no

qualifications

Botwell

Townfield

Pinkwell

West Drayton

Yeading

Yiewsley

Heathrow Villages

Barnhill

East Hillingdon

Charville

Brunel

Uxbridge North

Uxbridge South

South Ruislip

Cavendish

East Ruislip

Northwood Hills

Manor

West Ruislip

Northwood

Harefield

0 200 400 600 800

Population

opportunities. Such initiatives could include preemployment

schemes, where 16-19 year old

students work with employers, building their skills

and the employer’s confidence in ‘the product’.

Involving businesses in work-based training will

increase the range and flexibility of employment or

training provision. Whilst vocational studies

represent only a small proportion of demand for

education, it is viewed that this form of education is

beneficial for those who have been disadvantaged

from formal education. Therefore there is enormous

potential for schools to develop vocational studies

whilst continuing to provide academic courses.

Post-19 Education

Academic underachievement is not just an issue for

the current generation of school leavers, as low

skilled workers currently dominate Hillingdon’s

workforce. It is estimated that 43% of the

borough’s working aged people have no more than

level 1 education. Table 3 illustrates the difference

in the qualifications of those aged 25-39 years

throughout the borough, table 3 shows that those

with lowest qualifications are concentration in the

south of the borough.

HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH

16


EDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT AND THE KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY

Wards

Table 3 Population aged 25-39 with level 1

or no qualification

Yeading

Botwell

Pinkwell

Yiewsley

West Drayton

Townfield

Barnhill

Charville

East Hillingdon

South Ruislip

Heathrow

Brunel

Manor

Uxbridge South

Cavendish

Uxbridge North

West Ruislip

Northwood Hills

Harefield

East Ruislip

Northwood

Ickenham

0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600

Population

The LDA’s Framework for Regional Employment and

Skills Action (FRESA) predicts that by 2010, 46% of

jobs in the region are likely to demand skills at NVQ

level 4 or above. There is a real threat that

employment opportunities in the expanding

knowledge economy will pass by local workers if

their skill levels are not developed. In addition,

should there be a downturn in the economy, those

with the weakest skills set would find themselves

most disadvantaged in the labour market. Table 4

illustrates the difference in attainment between the

top-performing northern wards and southern wards

performing worst. The difference in attainment is

indicative of the life prospects of those in different

parts of the borough, as it may be argued that

future earnings potential, job opportunities,

geographic mobility and quality of life are to some

extent underpinned by academic attainment.

Table 4: Difference in numbers with level 1

or no qualifications in 5 worst and 5 best

performoing wards

Table 5 highlights that Hillingdon’s residents are

proportionally less employed as managers and senior

officers, and in professional, associate and technical

positions. Residents are better represented in

administrative, secretarial, skilled trades, especially

in metal and electrical trades, personal services, sales

and customer services, process plant and machine

operations and elementary occupations.

% of residents

employed

20

15

10

5

0

Managers

and Senior

Officers

Professional

Occupations

Occupation

Associate

Professional

and Technical

Admin and

Secretarial

Hillingdon

London

Table 6 illustrates that Hillingdon residents are more

skilled at lower attainment levels and less at higher

education compared to the rest of London. Industry

trends predict an expanding knowledge economy,

growth in the number and range of services

provided by call centres and further location of low

skilled jobs in remote locations. These factors may

be seen to narrow the employment prospects of the

preponderance of low skilled residents in

Hillingdon.

% of working

age residents

35

30

25

20

15

10

5

0

Table 5: Residents by occupation, 2001

Table 6: Highest qualifications of working age

population

No

qualifications

Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4/5 Qualifications/

level

unknown

Hillingdon

London

No. of population with

level 1 or no

qualifications (%)

20

15

10

5

0

16-24 25-39 40-49 50-64

Age Groups

Best

performing

wards

Worst

performing

wards

Qualifications

17 HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH


EDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT AND THE KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY

Specific skill deficiencies in the West London

economy identified by the LDA are:

• English for speakers of other languages (ESOL).

• Basic literacy/numeracy skills.

• Computing and technical skills.

It is thought that a likely contributing factor to poor

academic attainment is the large supply of relatively

well-paid entry-level employment opportunities for

school leavers in Hillingdon, particularly related to

Heathrow Airport. Realising the limited

opportunities of low-skilled employment, many

adults seek to return to studies aged over 19.

However funding for training for those aged 19 and

over is limited and these adults often have

complications that make retraining/studying difficult

e.g. existing jobs, childcare, mortgage, financial

commitments, limited free-time etc. Compounding

this problem are the training packages offered by

employers, these are generally not accredited and

trainees can therefore not take their achievements

to other employers and build on the skills attained.

High demand in West London for 14-19 education,

together with the targeting of funds towards some

priority groups and sectors, has resulted in limited

resources for education and training for those aged

19 and over. In Hillingdon, Uxbridge College has

recorded strong recruitment amongst adult learners

on both vocational and academic courses, however

education establishments generally face difficulties

in making the funding stack-up for adult learners.

Greater flexibility in funding streams is needed to

overcome this problem.

Employment

Hillingdon has a working age population of

approximately 175,600. With approximately 168,000

people employed in Hillingdon, there are close to as

many jobs as there are residents in the borough.

Proportion of working age population claiming

unemployment benefit

Hillingdon average 2.3%

West London average 2.73%

London average 3.5%

Source Aug. 2004 Nomis Socio-economic claimant

counts (Job Seekers Allowance)

The number of residents claiming unemployment

benefit reflects the relative buoyancy of the local

labour market, yet the low average percentage of

claimant masks wards in the borough where pockets

of unemployment are above the London average

i.e. Barnhill (3.6%), Botwell (3.4%), Pinkwell (3.8%),

Townfield (3.8%), West Drayton (3.8%) and Yeading

(3.8%). Within these wards certain communities -

particularly black and minority ethnic communities -

are represented in higher numbers. Table 7

highlights the imbalance in age and gender in

unemployment trends in five key wards in the south

of the borough, where young men under 24 years

of age experience disproportionate levels of

unemployment.

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18


EDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT AND THE KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY

12.00

10.00

Table 7: Percentage unemployed by age and gender

% unemployed

8.00

6.00

4.00

2.00

16-24

25-64

Source: Census 2001

0.00

Ward

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

Barnhill Botwell Townfield West

Drayton

Male

Female

Yeading

Statistics show that even where unemployment is

not high, many communities in the south of the

borough have income levels that are

disproportionately lower than those elsewhere in

Hillingdon, illustrating the preponderance of lowskilled

and low-paid employment.

Employers are inheriting significant skills

deficiencies in school leavers (particularly for entry

level jobs). There is predicted to be a significant

shortfall in both quantity and potential quality of

employees in the future. The challenge is to engage

those employers without active workforce

development and vocational training packages, to

ensure that they can access training of the right

type and quality. There is an opportunity to work

with employers to optimise provision of quality,

accredited in-house training programmes and to

maximise opportunities for adult learners to

participate in training provided for those under 19

years.

Training is generally not driven by the needs of

individuals and business and is consequently slow to

respond to changing business requirements. The

culture of competition between training providers

(driven by funding rules) is felt to be unhealthy and

unhelpful. There is a clear need to create real

collaboration and partnership between training

providers and to better utilise training resources.

Most training agencies are currently running at

capacity and therefore must gear-up to meet future

demand to increase the skills of the emerging

workforce.

Key growth industries are identified by the LDA as:

• Creative

• Information, Communication, Technology

• Tourism

• Construction

19 HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH


EDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT AND THE KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY

In conclusion Hillingdon is experiencing a structural

problem that threatens to upset economic and social

balance in the borough. Urgent action is required

to address the following inter-generational cycle:

narrowing

aspirations

low education

attainment

limited

employment

prospects

Attainment and employment: Action

Key priorities for targeted action over the next

two years are as follows:

• Address skills deficiencies of those aged 19

years and over.

• Raise the aspirations of school-aged pupils.

• Identify exactly what is failing in schools in

the south of the borough.

• Nurture active partnerships between local

businesses, local schools and parents and use

this to develop broader curriculum support

for 14 –19 year olds.

• Encourage employers to nurture and recruit

home grown talent. Key local employers such

as the council, Primary Care Trust, BAA and

Stockley Park should lead such an initiative.

• A better dialogue between local businesses

to nurture supply chains, and build on the

success for BAA’s ‘Meet the Buyer’ events by

integrating public sector contracting

opportunities and inviting other key local

businesses such as those located on Stockley

Park, BA, Xerox etc.

• Deliver more work-based training programmes

and work experience placements.

• Pilot a programme with hotel and

construction industries to identify future skills

needs and work in partnership to create a

direct link between the aspirations, training

and employment opportunities of local

people so that they can participate in the

growing prosperity of the sub-region.

• Schools, trainers, the college and LSC need to

work collaboratively in Hillingdon to deliver a

sizeable increase in the range and volume of

vocational skills training opportunities for

14–19 year olds.

• Work in partnership to deliver the actions

detailed in the 14–19 Strategy to address the

falling number of residents with Level 4/5

qualifications and above.

• Develop a dialogue with businesses with a

view to comprehensively engage employers

in work force development. Need to create

jobs with progression paths, attach ‘learning

entitlements’ to jobs, invest in customer

service skills (as the significant jobs growth

will be in customer-facing jobs) and develop

employee-grooming programmes in key

industries. This may also help improve the

image of jobs in fields such as catering and

retail.

HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH

20


EDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT AND THE KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY

Brunel University

Brunel University is a centre of excellence with

significant potential for drawing business to the

area, especially engineering and high tech

businesses, which will be attracted by the source of

quality graduates. The recent increase in the

number of undergraduates coming to Brunel from

West London highlights opportunity for high-tech

engineering businesses, as the sub-region will

increasingly offer a resident, quality graduate

market from which to recruit. Despite the

opportunity for business growth presented by

Brunel University, the borough’s growth in high tech

services and manufacturing has fallen behind the

rest of London. It is thought that Hillingdon’s

limited supply of high tech business start-up units

may be the cause of this under achievement. This

represents a lost opportunity to develop new

businesses and keep graduates in the sub region.

The role of Brunel University as a driver of

innovation, change, growth and an asset to

borough residents and businesses needs to be fully

recognised and promoted. Brunel has the power to

influence and not just respond to the labour

market. For example:

1. West Focus – This is a government backed, fiveyear

programme involving seven higher

education institutions in West London. The

initiative seeks to ensure that the economic and

social potential of this combined knowledge base

is realised through full engagement with local

businesses and the local community. West Focus

will aim to tackle fragmented enterprise support

and with Brunel as a leading force in its

development, represents a valuable opportunity

for local enterprise.

2. Key Workers - Brunel’s training of key workers

including physiotherapists, teachers, social

workers, youth workers, occupational therapists

etc is a significant and growing proportion of the

University’s undergraduate population. The

University reports that despite abundant local

employment opportunities, few graduates

currently live or work in Hillingdon. This

situation represents a wasted opportunity

particularly for the borough’s public services.

3. Science Park - A problem that hampers

homegrown entrepreneurs is the quality and cost

of business start-up accommodation. Brunel’s

own science park has successfully nurtured

graduate entrepreneurs and now has the

financial backing to extend provision of hightech

services and manufacturing business start-up

units within the sub-region. Brunel has

experience and a proven track record in growing

innovative businesses many of which have

become strong, successful companies employing

highly skilled, well-paid employees. With the

trend in undergraduates attending university in

the area where their parents live, an extended

science park is an opportunity to build a dynamic

sub-region where residents are nurtured, then

educated and supported to maximise their full

potential while remaining residents.

Brunel University: Action

Brunel should be seen as integral to the

development of the Hillingdon ‘brand’. The

borough should recognise the strong reputation

of the university for excellence in the fields of

bio-technology and bio-engineering, sports, multimedia

technology, etc. Brunel is a major draw for

students, businesses and academics, and presents

an opportunity to generate a dynamic knowledge

21 HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH


EDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT AND THE KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY

economy that extends beyond the university and

into the borough’s schools and colleges. Key

actions include:

• West Focus - Hillingdon should fully embrace

the opportunity presented by West Focus and

actively communicate its aims and integrate

its objectives into other programmes.

Hillingdon Business Forum may be a potential

vehicle for engaging the wider business

community in the initiative.

• In an attempt to reverse the current trend in

key worker graduates moving away for work

and housing, the following initiatives could

be explored:

o provide quality (paid) work placements for

undergraduates.

o build relationships between employers and

undergraduates.

o provide financial incentives to graduates,

particularly in hard to recruit to posts such

as maths and science teachers, for example

‘golden handcuffs’.

o work collaboratively with colleagues in

housing to develop a partnership

approach to key worker housing.

• Science Park – focusing on bio-engineering

and environmental engineering. Every

support needs to be given to Brunel to

identify and secure a site to expand the

existing science park. The location of this

science park could bring wider regeneration

benefits to areas within the borough

suffering economic and social exclusion. The

legacy of this commitment is likely to be felt

for many years to come as young people

become inspired and then engaged in highly

skilled, highly paid, local employment.

• The University for Aviation concept unites

Hillingdon’s strategic advantage of proximity

to the world’s busiest airport and the

university with its proud engineering

background. Further collaboration to engage

a range of agencies including Uxbridge

College, would support the creation of a

flagship initiative for the borough.

• There is scope to explore how successful and

experienced institutions such as Brunel

University and Uxbridge College can

contribute to addressing falling standards in

our schools. Opportunities such as mentoring,

student exchanges, role modelling, etc, will

be among the areas explored.

HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH

22


Equalities


EQUALITIES

Equalities issues

The proportion of black and minority ethnic (BME)

Hillingdon residents in 1991 was 12.3%; in 2001 this

figure was 21% (Census 1991 & 2001). The 2001

Census for the first time divided the White category

into White British, White Irish, White Other, whereas

the 1991 Census simply had White as an ethnic group.

If the total white Irish, white other and non-white

ethnic population continues to increase as it has over

the last decade it is projected that the total ethnic

population could increase to over 40% by 2011.

Statistics record very different levels of attainment

throughout school by students from BME

backgrounds. Students of Chinese and mixed race

Asian/white origin perform particularly well

throughout their school careers. However students

of other ethnic origins perform consistently poorly

from key stage 1 through to GCSE. This prompts

concerns about a distinctive, emerging underclass of

under-achieving, disaffected, disengaged young

people, who are predominantly male and live

mainly in the south of the borough. Exemplifying

this problem is the Botwell ward, where 25% of

young men, mostly of white British origin aged 19 –

25 are unemployed.

Within the BME population there are large

variations in employment rates. For example, across

London in 2001 20.5% of Bangladeshi people active

in the labour market were unemployed and 17.6%

of people in the Black Other group. In contrast,

Indian workers had unemployment levels of 5.9%,

which are fairly close to those for White groups. The

unemployment rate for young people from BME

groups averaged 21.6% - more than twice as high as

the rate for white groups (9.5%). Again

unemployment rates are very high for young Black

workers; within this group 29.8% of Black

Caribbean, Black African and Black Other residents

who were economically active were unemployed.

Unemployment rates are generally higher for men

(7.6%) than for women (5.8%) and this is generally

true across the BME population too.

In Hillingdon, there are 1,700 disabled individuals

between the ages of 18 and 65 who are in receipt

of Disability Living Allowance but not Severe

Disability Allowance (source: Nomis 20th April

2005). A number of these individuals may have the

potential to secure employment. Further work is

required to identify their specific needs and

aspirations, to realise their employment potential.

Equalities: Action

The actions detailed below should be seen as a

sub-set of work on Attainment and Employment.

• Co-ordinated action is required across a

range of agencies and community groups to

harness the potential and the energy of the

growing BME population, in the interest of

social justice and community cohesion.

• It is imperative that partner organisations

responsible for skills training and employment

within the borough pool statistical data to

ensure effective targeting of resources. To

further community cohesion statistical analysis

should encompass age, gender, disability and

faith as well as ethnic origin.

• Action to address inequalities needs to be

referenced to current and projected shortages

in the labour market and skill levels.

• Work is underway to target needs of those

far removed from the labour market under

the auspices of the Hayes, Heston, Southall

programme. The challenge is to develop

effective programmes that will continue to

secure financial support to ensure

sustainability in the medium term.

HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH

24


Hillingdon for

business and the

Hillingdon brand


HILLINGDON FOR BUSINESS AND THE HILLINGDON BRAND

Business activity

Industry trends

The transport, storage and communication

industries employed 32.2% of the borough’s

workforce in 2002, having increased 24.5% between

1991-2002. Of these almost 70% were employed in

air transport. However with over 70,000 people

employed on the airport site alone, this represents

only 11.5% of the airport’s employment needs,

emphasising the importance of Heathrow as an

employer to both the local and regional economy.

The number of people employed in the construction

industry in Hillingdon increased by 42.9% between

1991-2002, reflecting the borough’s proximity to

major construction projects including Terminal 5,

Paddington Basin, Wembley Stadium, M25

widening, etc. As the Mayor of London proposes

60,000 additional new homes in London, with many

of these in outer London, the outlook for the

construction industry looks promising in the

medium term.

Local businesses have cited their inability to recruit

skilled staff and managers as a significant

impediment to economic growth in Hillingdon.

Sectors that have particular recruitment problems

include: hotels and restaurants; public

administration, defence, and social security;

wholesale and retail trade, repair etc; real estate,

renting and business activities. The hospitality and

retail industries have a high demand for people

with entry-level skills. Local employers claim

Heathrow Airport and its associated hospitality and

retail infrastructure, impact on the local jobs market

and artificially inflate wages.

Small and medium sized enterprises

Although Hillingdon has a reasonable supply of

small business space for both offices and factories,

as Table 8 illustrates, there is a lower than average

start-up rate of small and medium sized enterprises

(SME) in the borough. Problems that hamper

homegrown entrepreneurs are the quality and cost

of the available accommodation. SME

accommodation is frequently expensive and the

lease terms are inflexible and require a large

financial commitment up-front such as six months

deposit. In addition, much of the accommodation is

unsuitable particularly for specialist high-tech

services and manufacturing. It is reputedly difficult

for businesses to start-up and to grow in Hillingdon.

Table 8: VAT registrations per 1000 VAT registered firms

40.0

20.0

0.0

-20.0

-40.0

-60.0

-80.0

-100.0

VAT registration

per 1000

Hillingdon

London

Agriculture/Fishing

Energy/Water

Manufacturing

Construction

Retail

Hospitality

Type of firm

Transport and

Communications

Finance

Real Estate

Public Sector

HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH

26


HILLINGDON FOR BUSINESS AND THE HILLINGDON BRAND

Office accommodation

Hillingdon, in common with West London, currently

has an over-supply of office accommodation and

there looks to be no sign of this changing in the

short term. Compounding the office vacancy

problem is the high number of outstanding office

planning permissions that are not being

implemented while the office market remains flat.

Reports suggest that once over-supply in the market

has been absorbed, Hillingdon’s office market is

likely to pick-up. However headquarters have

become smaller as companies out-source and

downsize, and companies can now afford to locate

their small, specialist workforce in prestige, mixeduse

developments. Therefore even if the market

does pick up, the Hillingdon office market may be ill

equipped to respond to the changing nature of

demand.

Stockley Park

The Stockley Park business park is a major source of

employment opportunities in the borough. Stockley

Park’s excellent communication links, car parking

provision and high quality environment have made

it a high-value, prestige business park for over 10

years. The Park accommodates the headquarters of

key businesses including BT, GlaxoSmithKlein, Apple

Computers UK, Centrica, Hasbro UK, Marks &

Spencer and Matsushita Electric Europe. The skilled

workforce it attracts are commonly mobile

professionals able to take advantage of the efficient

road infrastructure that services Stockley Park. It is

estimated that the majority of staff working at

Stockley Park commute into and out of the borough

on a daily basis.

There is a concern about the current vacancy rate at

Stockley (Source: The Golden Triangle Report –

Spring 2005 by Rogers Chapman Research for West

London Business). This reflects general malaise in

the West London office market and it may continue

to suffer in the future from the shift towards small,

prestige office development in mixed-use

environments. The availability of land at Stockley

Park for future phases of commercial development,

may provide the opportunity to re-think the

business park structure and explore mixed-use

development. In so doing, it may be possible to

optimise the creation of local employment.

Town centres

Uxbridge has evolved from a historic market town

located on a strategic trade route, adjoining the

boundary with South Buckinghamshire. Following a

period of decline in the 1980s, Uxbridge has now

successfully reinvented itself as a thriving

metropolitan centre. It has a vibrant commercial

and retail focus and first class local educational

opportunities at Brunel University and Uxbridge

College. The town centre is the focus of Hillingdon’s

local government and public services.

The town benefits from excellent transport links

with the M40 and M25 motorways in close

proximity. Public transport includes a comprehensive

bus network and Metropolitan and Piccadilly

services on the London Underground. Heathrow

Airport is 20 minutes away. Over 3,000 parking

spaces are available for car bound visitors.

More than 500 businesses occupy a compact core

business area of Uxbridge town centre area, in an

area roughly 1km by 0.5km. A significant number of

offices are UK and European headquarters. A retail

space of over 1 million square feet accommodates

national multiples in two covered shopping centres

as well as independents in the high street and

adjacent roads. Retail spending in 2004 was tenth

highest in Greater London, with 54% derived from

people living outside London. Town centre

management statistics show that, on average, 20-

25,000 people come into Uxbridge daily.

When one considers the substantial residential and

student population within one kilometre of

Uxbridge town centre, the entertainment, leisure

and cultural offer in the town is limited. It currently

27 HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH


HILLINGDON FOR BUSINESS AND THE HILLINGDON BRAND

comprises a ten-screen cinema, three gyms, one

nightclub and thirteen bars, many of which offer

food in the daytime. There are approximately 25

eateries, with about a dozen restaurants trading in

the evening. Like many towns, post 8pm when the

working population has dispersed, the Uxbridge

evening economy is dominated by younger people

and focused on alcohol. This acts as a powerful

disincentive for older persons and it is felt that

wider leisure and cultural opportunities would

benefit the town.

Hayes shopping centre is situated in the south of

the borough and is the closest shopping centre for

many of the bough’s most excluded communities.

The quality of the Hayes shopping environment is

poor and the range of shops is limited, possibly

reflecting the modest spending power of the

residential population. A number of major capital

investments are planned for Hayes and these

present an opportunity from which to plan for

renewed vitality for Hayes town centre. Investment

projects include:

• The Heathrow Connect rail service that will be

operating via Hayes Town Centre from 2005

could be the long awaited catalyst for the

regeneration of Hayes.

• Health facilities need to be integrated within the

overarching plan for sustainable improvement.

• Comprehensive leisure facilities at Botwell Green.

• The redevelopment of Hayes Goods Yard, which

could help build a residential profile and

catchment area with a spending profile that

would attract better quality retail outlets.

Land use

There is growing pressure for sites designated for

industrial and business use to be re-designated for

higher value uses including residential development.

With the shortage of affordable housing, the

Government is looking to utilise former industrial

sites for residential purposes. In the London Plan,

the Mayor of London has a target of 45,000 new

homes to be built in the ‘Western Wedge’ of

London by 2016. West London stands to lose 41

hectares of industrial and business land during the

period up to 2016, primarily for housing/mixed use

schemes. Hillingdon is challenged with ensuring

that opportunities for employment within the

borough are optimised in order to avoid becoming

a ‘dormitory’ for commuters. There are concerns

that becoming a suburban dormitory would lead to

greater environmental degradation (associated with

rising levels of commuting), pressure on local

amenities and facilities, fragmented communities, a

limited range of local employment opportunities

and consequently a narrowing of the image/identity

for the borough.

It is hoped that Hillingdon’s forthcoming Local

Development Framework (LDF) will incorporate the

aspiration to optimise opportunities for

employment within the borough. The LDF will,

through public consultation, establish the borough’s

spatial land use framework, replacing the Unitary

Development Plan. The LDF will incorporate a

review of all brown field sites in the borough and

their designated uses.

Mixed-use developments and live/work units are

seen as a way of creating a balance between

industrial and residential land uses. Quality design,

early consultation and quality local management

are seen as the essential ingredients to make such

schemes successful. Brunel University is experienced

in both developing and managing such schemes and

HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH

28


HILLINGDON FOR BUSINESS AND THE HILLINGDON BRAND

would be a key participant in any emerging local

policy guidelines.

High quality design and innovation in energy

efficiency as detailed in BREEM (Building Research

Establishment Environmental Assessment Method)

and CABE (Commission for Architecture and the

Built Environment) should be sought from all new

developments and formalised as a requirement in

the Local Development Framework. Where business

activity is known to have a distinctive, detrimental

impact on the environment, e.g. airport business,

road freight etc, excellence in terms of energy

efficiency, noise and air pollution should be sought.

Supporting business: Action

This strategy aims to develop action and influence

strategies that will nurture and promote business

activities that add value to the local and regional

economy, while ensuring that the local workforce

is equipped with the skills and has access to the

emerging employment opportunities.

• The Local Development Framework will be a

key vehicle for nurturing industrial

specialisms, which could be a catalyst for the

growth of new supply chains.

• In the procurement of goods and services,

work can be undertaken to explore

opportunities for public sector bodies and

companies to commit to local procurement,

thereby strengthening and supporting local

small and medium sized enterprises and the

not-for-profit sector.

• The LDA’s work on Supporting Enterprise

pioneered ring-fencing business rents to

support clusters of small emerging

enterprises, removing the disincentive of

inflexible lease terms and costly deposits.

This work should be explored with local

property owners to see if its principles could

be piloted in long-term vacant office

accommodation in the borough.

• To support the vitality of town centres and to

initiate the regeneration of some of the more

marginal centres (specifically Yiewsley and

Hayes), a review should be carried out on

brown field land in close proximity to town

centres. Diversifying land use in these areas

will introduce a different profile of shopping

centre consumer and in doing so underpin

the commercial viability of these areas.

Hillingdon needs to develop a strategic view

about the relationship between and future of

the boroughs town centres, neighbourhood

shopping centres and out of town retail parks,

in the context of what is located outside the

borough boundary. A strategy for the future

of our town centres will incorporate views

about community and environmental impact,

changes to our retail centres and plan action

to support an area through change.

• In collaboration with town centre partners, a

brief should be developed for a modal

transport interchange in Uxbridge town centre.

• A key aspiration of this strategy is the

development of a Hayes Town Centre Action

Plan, exploring the following issues and

opportunities:

o Training centre – linked to Heathrow

Training Centre. Hayes Town Centre could

be the catalyst for joining-up skills,

business needs and trainers. Opportunity

for major public sector relocation from decentralisation

of Government

departments.

29 HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH


HILLINGDON FOR BUSINESS AND THE HILLINGDON BRAND

o Image – a possible way to improve the

image of Hayes Town Centre would be to

improve the current range and quality of

retail outlets. This may involve attracting

multiples, developing niche markets

and/or using Compulsory Purchase Orders

(CPO) powers to assemble improved retail

sites. A retail study would support the

Hayes Town Centre Action Plan and

support the area’s broader regeneration.

o Capital investment taking place in and

around Hayes Town Centre presents an

opportunity to manage growth and create

a sustainable community and

environment.

o London Gate – large office population

could sustain a lunchtime and evening

economy.

o Options associated with CPO action could

be explored with LDA/English Partnerships.

• Conference centre – explore more and

improved hotel and conferencing facilities. It

is generally felt that a first-class

conference/exhibition facility would be a

great asset for the borough. However, there

are problems with the environmental impact

of high-trip generating developments –

hotels and conference centres - in the

Heathrow area. Furthermore, hotels and

conference centres would not be able to

compete with residential and commercial

land values. Such a facility would need to be

part of a mixed-use development and/or

include a hefty public sector subsidy. Further

exploration of the market for such a facility is

required.

The Hillingdon brand

Hillingdon has a very local flavour, with many

people having lived here all their lives. As such

promoting the borough’s image and commercial

offer’ has in the past not been a priority. In looking

forward and driving a vision for the economic future

of the borough in a climate of increased competition

and external pressures, there is a growing need to

develop and promote the Hillingdonoffer’. A

contemporary vision of the borough is required and

this should be marketed to residents, those working

in the borough and those living outside the

borough, and the business community.

Hotel accommodation, catering and conference

facilities clustered around Heathrow Airport comprise

the largest tourism sector in the region. More could

be done to encourage business tourists to spend time

and money in Hillingdon and the sub-region. Work

undertaken in partnership with neighbouring

boroughs, the LDA and hotels themselves will

promote regional attractions to business tourists.

Developing the tourism market may entail

investment in facilities that will attract visitors and

tourists to spend time and money in the borough.

The borough offers a diversity of opportunity that

few other boroughs in the region can boast, such as

excellent communications, a pioneering knowledge

economy, quality shopping facilities, an accessible

and highly regarded natural environment and

through this, a quality life/work balance.

Developing a stronger sense of the brand and using

it to promote the borough is an important

foundation for the creation of a sustainable

economic future.

HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH

30


HILLINGDON FOR BUSINESS AND THE HILLINGDON BRAND

Development of the brand would reflect the

interests of the different target audience:

• Residents – to develop and reinforce the image

of a borough where people can live, work and

play in safety and health.

• All employers seeking to attract and retain good

quality staff.

• Customers of the borough’s shopping centres,

particularly Uxbridge Town Centre where 54% of

customers come from out of the borough.

• Business tourists – to encourage them to bring

some of their spending power to Hillingdon

shops and businesses.

• University students and their visiting friends and

families.

• Businesses, who although initially attracted by

advantages of location, would become

participants in a dynamic vision for the future of

the borough.

The Hillingdon brand will closely link with the LDA’s

work on tourism development at a regional and

sub-regional level.

31 HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH


Housing,

environment and

quality of life


HOUSING, ENVIRONMENT AND QUALITY OF LIFE

Housing, environment and quality of life

A key objective of the strategy is to address

residents’ ’well being’ and to look at the economic

impact on quality of life and the environment.

Quality of life

Deprivation (as measured at a regional level) is limited

in Hillingdon, contained within the Townfield, Yeading

and West Drayton wards. However it is the relative

differences in health, wealth, opportunities and quality

of life between the best and worst electoral wards that

are the greatest threat to social cohesion in the

borough. For example there are gross inequalities in

health, with an eight-year difference in life expectancy

between the borough’s best and worst wards and a

nearly three-fold difference in the rates of low birth

weights. It is relative rather than absolute deprivation

and people’s perception of how well off they are in

comparison to others, which is a key influence on

health, quality of life and ultimately social cohesion. If

the widening gap between the better and worst off is

not challenged in Hillingdon, there is a danger of rising

racial tensions and a diminishing quality of life for all.

Homes

An adequate supply of housing is crucial to meet the

growth in household formation and to accommodate

the workforce for a growing economy. Within this, it

is important to promote mixed and balanced

communities to redress the trend towards social

polarisation, whereby many households are squeezed

out of inner London by the high cost of housing and

either travelling long distances to work or leaving

London altogether. Hillingdon house prices are on

average 86% of London prices and this differential is

larger for terraced houses (75.2%) and

flats/maisonettes (63.0%).

Almost 17% of Hillingdon’s housing stock is social

rented housing, provided by the council and

registered social landlords (census 2001). The need

for social housing is often only a household’s

presenting problem, as low skills, low aspirations,

unemployment, language barriers, etc are at the

core of their inability to secure a job and thereby

housing on the open market. Past developments of

large-scale social housing have created large

concentrations of worklessness. The Social Housing

Policy as detailed in the LDF together with a choicebased

lettings programme will help to prevent

further large-scale concentrations of economic

exclusion, however co-ordinated action is required

to address the economic exclusion of many of

Hillingdon’s social housing residents.

Environmental

Air quality standards based on nitrogen dioxide

(NO2) concentrations are extensively breached

especially in the following locations: Heathrow, M4,

M40, A316, and industrial areas in the south of the

borough. Poor air quality is linked to a range of

respiratory complaints including asthma and thus

compounds the economic deprivation of residents in

the south of the borough.

In contrast to this, Hillingdon’s environmental

attributes include a canal, lido, marina, ancient

woodland, sites of special scientific interest, country

park and numerous parks and woodland areas. The

natural environment contributes to biodiversity,

diversity in landscape and has a positive effect on

people’s health and perceptions of quality of life.

Hillingdon’s diverse environment presents an

opportunity to enhance the borough’s image, range

of leisure pursuits and promotional opportunities.

The image and environment of an area together with

access to good public services such as schools and

health care services are fundamental to sustaining a

thriving borough where people want to live and

work, and businesses want to locate and grow.

33 HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH


HOUSING, ENVIRONMENT AND QUALITY OF LIFE

Improving quality of life: Action

Area Profiles, being pioneered by the Audit

Commission, will attempt to assess the level of

well being within a community. It is anticipated

that this will be implemented in all local

authorities over the next few years. This

development in Audit Commission assessment

validates and gives emphasis to the integration

of quality of life issues within this strategy.

• The desire to erode the difference between

the best and worst-off wards - by improving

the worst wards - is central to this strategy

and will underpin most of the activity

generated through the Delivery Action Plan.

• It is hoped that this strategy will engage

employers in embracing wider values that

support economic sustainability for example,

healthy lifestyle, physical activity, leisure,

culture and community cohesion. Employers

could address these issues through conditions

and the atmosphere created in workplaces,

promoting and facilitating healthy life styles

and work/life balance. The strategic action

plan could be a vehicle for mainstreaming

diversity and tolerance.

• Planning for a high quality, accessible

infrastructure in Hillingdon to ensure

serviced, cohesive, ‘sustainable’ communities

needs to be embedded in the LDF process.

Infrastructure needs to include leisure

facilities, childcare, cultural pursuits,

transport and parking, green spaces, schools,

health facilities etc.

• Work in partnership to realise the borough’s

aspirations for ‘decent homes and decent

neighbourhoods’, and in so doing, address

the problem of worklessness in social

housing.

• There needs to be investment in the

environment, particularly in areas that attract

visitors.

• Where possible residential communities need

to offer a range of sizes and affordability

levels to ensure a mixed resident profile that

will support a range of commercial services

and amenities.

Work also needs undertaking to create business

and public sector involvement in:

• Grow-your-own initiative to support and

nurture local employment and local

entrepreneurs.

• Action to improve employees’ work/life

balance.

• Work in partnership to promote health

messages and support people to participate

in healthy activities as outlined in the London

Health Impact Assessment.

HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH

34


APPENDIX 1

Partners involved in developing this strategy

External representatives

Ian Frost – BAA

Joe Hardman – BAA

John Rider – BAA

Roz Rossington – Brixton Estates

Ian MacKay – Brixton Estates

Keith Robson – Brunel University

Lesley Mortimer – Brunel University

Brian Noble – Business Link London

Tony Dunn – The Chimes Shopping Centre

Peter Sale – Education Business Partnership

Sue Stock – Education Business Partnership

Isobel King – Groundwork

Neil Sherman – Harlington School

Mike Langham – Hillingdon Chamber of Commerce

Andy Janson – Jansons

Jashoda Pindoria – Job Centre Plus

David Boyer – Learning & Skills Council

Charles Shaw – Paradigm Housing

Mick Morris – Metropolitain Police

John Aldous – Primary Care Trust

Shirley Goodwin – Primary Care Trust

Maxine Johnson – Primary Care Trust

Andrew Knight – Primary Care Trust

Uma Purohit – Primary Care Trust

Melanie Smith – Primary Care Trust

Barbara Wood – Primary Care Trust

Michael Farley – Uxbridge College

Peter Alder – West London Business

Hillingdon Council representatives

Andy Codd – Transport

Nigel Cramb – Economic Development and

Community Partnerships

Zaid Dowlut – Social Services

Gerry Edwards – Corporate Property

Angela Flux – Healthy Hillingdon

Sally Hamblin – Economic Regeneration

Ann Lander – Housing

Brian Murrell – Corporate Policy

Chandra Raval – Transportation

Mark Silverman – Planning Policy

Andy Stubbs – Uxbridge Initiative

Ian Dunsford – Planning Policy

Helena Webster – Economic Development

Martin White – Corporate Property

Mary Worrall – Environment

35 HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH


APPENDIX 2

Table illustrating the link between regional,

sub-regional and local economic strategies

London Development Agency Economic

Development Strategy

Ensure that London’s growth respects the need

for social progress, environmental protection

and conservation of scarce resources.

Support London’s economy, both as a world

business centre and as a balanced regional

economy.

West London Economic Development Strategy

Secure a sustainable economy through the

appropriate utilisation, including mixed use

development, of West London’s land and property

by promoting, managing and enhancing the quality

of the existing stock of key strategic employment

locations, and promoting higher standards of design

and environmental good practice. Support the

rejuvenation of town centres in West London as

centres for employment, shopping and living.

Establish a competitive economy underpinned by

sustained and sustainable growth and value-added

output principally through ensuring high and effective

levels of appropriate support for both indigenous and

foreign-owned investors. There is also the need to

further develop knowledge-based economic activity

through increased linkages and interaction between

businesses and the academic community, as well as

businesses in sub-regional economies.

Hillingdon’s Strategy for a Sustainable Economy

1. Pursue opportunities to promote balanced and

sustainable economic development in Hillingdon.

2. Enhance and maintain Hillingdon’s competitive

position as a location to do business and to work.

3. Develop initiatives to maximise the unique

advantages of Hillingdon’s strategic location i.e.

Heathrow Airport, rail and road connections,

Brunel University, Hillingdon Hospital, etc.

Invest in public transport infrastructure, in

particular to support the suburban centres and

where the main employment and housing growth

will occur. Plan public transport to link residential

areas and town centres in West London.

Develop London as a city of knowledge and

learning in order to fulfil the potential of its

people and its businesses.

Support London’s continuing renewal as a

vibrant and inclusive city, acknowledging the

diversity of London’s people as an asset.

Increase the supply of affordable housing and

supported housing, improve the quality of older

housing stock and ensure the sustainability of

housing developments. Focus on developing an

appropriate mix of housing in terms of type, size

reception and move-on property and ensure higher

density build where appropriate, particularly where

there is good access to public transport.

Improve levels of employability and reduce the

polarisation of the skills economy primarily by

improving training access opportunities for

excluded groups, improving literacy and numeracy

skills and fostering a culture for lifelong learning

and workforce development.

Invest in sustainable business communities, and

encourage businesses to play a greater role in the

management, maintenance and improvement of their

environmental management systems. Ensure high

quality design of future housing and employment site

developments. Improving access to quality green spaces

and cultural resources. Quality of life issues must also

address crime and the underlying causes of crime.

4. Enable Hillingdon people to realise their full

potential through education and training.

5. Maximise opportunities for local employment

and career progression for Hillingdon residents.

6. Maximise opportunities offered by the diversity

of the borough’s population.

7. Engage employers in addressing community

needs including crime and anti-social behaviour,

academic underachievement, social exclusion, etc.

HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH

36


APPENDIX 3

Community strategy targets

Aspirations for Hillingdon

A place where enterprise is encouraged, businesses

supported and new jobs created for local people.

A thriving, self-sufficient centre for commerce.

As home of the world’s busiest airport and one of

London’s most successful centres for shopping,

Hillingdon is well poised to increase its relative

prosperity. The key for us is to ensure that this

prosperity benefits our entire community.

We want the next decade to bring unprecedented

economic growth and development to the entire

borough. We want firms up and down Hillingdon to

benefit from the success of business hubs such as

Heathrow Airport and Uxbridge town centre. We

will bring local business people together to

encourage trade within, as well as outside the

borough. We also value the importance of the right

vocational training for some of our young people,

matching the skills we teach them to the needs of

local firms; where Hillingdon’s businesses have a

skills gap, it should be filled with local workers.

By 2015, we will:

• encourage new business, through initiatives such

as the Hayes Business Incubation Unit and closer

working with Brunel University business school.

• encourage the Hillingdon Partners to buy services

from local small and medium sized businesses

where possible.

• have ensured that Uxbridge remains one of

London’s top 10 shopping centres.

• operate a skills centre in Hayes to train young

people, raise their aspirations and increase their

chances of finding rewarding employment.

A prosperous borough

Activity areas 1 year targets 3 year objectives 10 year sustainable

outcomes

Delivering a prosperous economy

1) Establish the business/economy

theme group of the LS P and the

‘Strategy for a Sustainable

Economy’ is adopted.

(Nigel Cramb, LB Hillingdon)

2) Establish a Hillingdon Business

Forum with wide business

representation.

3) Develop a Corporate Social

Responsibility programme which

business signs up to.

(Nigel Cramb, LB Hillingdon)

4) Complete Feasibility Study and

Business Plan to release London

Development Agency (LDA) capital

funding for the construction of the

Hayes Business Incubation Units.

(Nigel Cramb, LB Hillingdon)

Strong economic growth achieved

through the delivery of the

Economic Strategy for the Borough

within a sub-regional context.

Business Forum thriving and

providing focus for wider business

engagement in community

programmes as part of their

corporate social responsibility.

20 new businesses created as

occupants of the Hayes Businees

Incubation Units.

Within 10 years the Hillingdon

Partners will be contributing

positively to the economic

prosperity and vitality of the

borough and the sustainability of

the local economy; in particular

working with businesses to achieve

strong economic growth.

37 HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH


APPENDIX 3

A prosperous borough

Activity areas 1 year targets 3 year objectives 10 year sustainable

outcomes

Improving training and skills

5) Develop proposals to improve the

balance of local small and medium

enterprises (SME) and large-scale

contractors within LB Hillingdon’s

procurement arrangements.

(Nigel Cramb, LB Hillingdon)

6) In partnership with Brunel

University and the West Focus

Project, identify barriers and

weaknesses affecting the long-term

financial sustainability of

Hillingdon’s voluntary sector.

(Nigel Cramb, LB Hillingdon)

7) Hold 3 events during 2005/06 in

relation to Business Planning,

Sources of Finance and

Procurement/Commissioning.

(Nigel Cramb, LB Hillingdon)

8) As part of the business start up

initiative run a programme to

include the following:

150 Business Information Sessions

69 Business Advice Sessions

31 Business Consultancies

25 Business Start-ups

Evaluate success with Brunel

Business School.

(Nigel Cramb, LB Hillingdon)

9) Maintain Uxbridge’s position as

one of London’s top ten shopping

centres.

(Brian Murrell, LB Hillingdon)

10) Firm up plans and strategy for

improving Hayes Town Centre in

partnership with key stakeholders.

(Brian Murrell, LB Hillingdon)

11) Develop a firm proposal with

partners for creating a multifunctional

skills centre in Hayes.

(Nigel Cramb, LB Hillingdon)

Significantly increased numbers of

SME’s involved in procurement.

Council signed up to Small Business

[SME] Friendly Concordat.

Voluntary and community sector

organisations better able to access

mixed funding sources and less

dependant on grant funding.

Greater levels of new business

start-ups and survival rates within

Hillingdon in particular, minority

ethnic businesses.

Vibrant and sustainable town

centres supported by effective and

inclusive town centre partnerships.

Demonstrable improvement and

significant regeneration of Hayes

Town Centre.

Programmes in place to address

low aspirations, low attainment

and low skills/low pay in the 19+

age group and vocational training

opportunities extended for the

14-16 age group.

Vocational training and the skills

level of the workforce will have

increased significantly, thereby

improving the employability of

local people. High quality jobs and

training opportunities will be

available for which local people,

including ‘excluded’ groups will be

suitably qualified.

HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH

38


APPENDIX 3

A prosperous borough

Activity areas 1 year targets 3 year objectives 10 year sustainable

outcomes

Maximising the benefits of

Heathrow Airport

12) Deliver employment-training

schemes, youth enterprise

initiatives, as part of the Hayes,

Heston, Southall regeneration

scheme, that produce benefits for

local people.

(Nigel Cramb, LB Hillingdon)

13) Contribute to Hayes, Heston

Southall training programmes on

the needs of ‘excluded groups,’

specifically (16–24 years) providing

training for 100 young people not

currently engaged in education or

employment.

(Nigel Cramb, LB Hillingdon)

14) Extend programmes to a new

facility at Jupiter House, Hayes for

16–19 years not in education or

employment.

(Nigel Cramb, LB Hillingdon)

15) Devise with key partners a pilot

training programme for hotels and

the construction industries to

address their future employment

skills requirements.

(Peter Sale, LB Hillingdon)

16) Expand the ‘Meet the Buyer’

programme to ensure local

businesses are able to maximise

the opportunities the programme

offers. Evaluate the outcomes.

(Joe Hardman, British Airports

Authority; Nigel Cramb, LB

Hillingdon)

17) Work with BAA and other

regional partners to ensure that

BAA’s Local Labour Strategy

delivers employment opportunities

to local people.

(Nigel Cramb, LB Hillingdon)

Successful delivery of Hayes, Heston,

Southall programmes;

LDA commitment to continue

funding further work on

regeneration of the sub-region.

Work collaboratively at regional

and sub-regional level with a range

of partners and possible funders to

secure investment over the medium

term for improving skills and

employment opportunities.

Complete programme with hotels

and construction industries, identify

future skills needs and create a

direct link between the aspirations,

training and employment

opportunities of local people.

Greater involvement of local

business and the local workforce in

airport related business.

39 HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH


APPENDIX 3

A prosperous borough

Activity areas 1 year targets 3 year objectives 10 year sustainable

outcomes

18) Organise a seminar to examine

successful local initiatives to extend

procurement/supply chains and the

introduction to travel plans.

(Joe Hardman, British Airports

Authority; Nigel Cramb, LB

Hillingdon)

Improving Transport

19) Work with partners to secure a

firm plan for the redevelopment of

the Hayes Station site.

(Brian Murrell, LB Hillingdon)

Lobby Transport for London and

Mayor’s Office for investment in

transport infrastructure in the

borough. Major improvements

made to Hayes Station. Continue to

argue the case for extension of the

Central Line to Uxbridge and the

benefits of linking the West London

Tram to the Hayes Transport Hub.

The business partnership will have

developed strong links with local,

regional and national transport

bodies and providers and be able

to promote and lobby for

improvements to transport

infrastructure that support a

sustainable and growing economy

in the borough.

HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH

40


YOUR VIEWS AND COMMENTS

Your views and comments

We hope that you have found the information in

this strategy interesting. If you’d like to tell us

your views please contact:

Economic Partnership Unit

Hillingdon Civic Centre

High Street

Uxbridge UB8 1UW

Telephone 01895 277345

Fax 01895 250823

Email: hwebster@hillingdon.gov.uk

or visit www.hillingdon.gov.uk

41

HILLINGDON’S ECONOMIC STRATEGY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY 2005-2015 - A PROSPEROUS BOROUGH


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