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conference programme - University of Central Lancashire

conference programme - University of Central Lancashire

conference programme - University of Central

UCLan’s Undergraduate Research Conference 2013 1:00 – 2:00 Session A: Welcome, Poster Presentations and Lunch Harrington Foyer Coral Leather Homophobia and the American Jeremiad My work explores the Christian Right’s use of the American jeremiad to communicate their anti-gay messages. I began by providing examples of the jeremiad from the Puritan era and New England territories, moving through to the Long 1960s. This period was immensely troubling for the Christian Right, but one during which they rose to popularity. Finally, I examined contemporary examples of the Christian Right’s utilisation of the American jeremiad, and considered the efficiency of its use as an expression of their homophobia. Through this work, I was able to conclude that the Christian Right’s appeal lies in their ability to communicate a strict message to a certain demographic. Independent of this faction however, the Christian Right jeremiad can be described as troublesome – due to its insensitive use of stereotypes, homophobic slurs, and moments of national tragedy in the communication of their message. Emma Roden The Effect of Pet Ownership on Evacuation Behaviours Pet owners in the USA are more likely to fail to evacuate during emergencies. The current study explores whether pet ownership in England could also be likely to reduce compliance with an order of evacuation, as well as disaster type and demographic information. Participants (n=160) recruited from the North West of England completed a vignette study and filled in a questionnaire. The vignette was manipulated on two levels; disaster (fast moving chemical spill or slow moving flood) and whether or not the pet owners were able to take their pets with them. Participants then answered questions relating to their evacuation likelihood. In addition the questionnaire asked about demographic characteristics, pet attachment, general and pet preparedness. The results suggested that overall participants were more likely to evacuate from a fast moving disaster, but that pet ownership did not modulate the likelihood of evacuation regardless of the disaster type. Results also suggested that couples were less likely to evacuate than those who were single. In regression analysis, pet preparedness was found to be a better predictor of pets being less likely to prevent an individual evacuating than general preparedness, pet attachment and disaster type. Overall the results suggest the English pet owners are not as inclined to save their pet from emergencies as American pet owners. Tom Higgins, Keyleigh Johnson, Stuart Pugh & George White Low mood in everyday life as a mediator of subjective stress responses to an acute naturalistic stressor Depression as a mediator of subjective stress responses to an acute naturalistic stressor. Research has shown exposure to an acute naturalistic stressor can induce changes in subjective mood measures. Furthermore, subjective responses to stress have been shown to be mediated by levels of depression. However, the association between depression and mood changes in responses to acute stress is unclear. Therefore, this study details the extent to which exposure to an acute stressor induces changes in subjective mood responses (anger, anxiety, vigor, fatigue, confusion). Further, this study examines whether depression mediates these responses to stress. Methods: Twenty-four healthy male participants were exposed to an acute naturalistic stressor: helicopter underwater evacuation training (HUET) and mood measurements using the Profile of Moods questionnaire was measured at four time-points (T1:120 min pre- HUET; T2: immediately before HUET, T3: immediately after HUET, T4: 60 min following HUET). Trait depression was assessed using the Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Results: Participants were divided into high and low depression groups using a median split. The high depression group reported higher levels of anxiety, anger and confusion during the HUET exposure. Discussion: This paper highlights the effect of trait depression levels on subjective mood responses to acute naturalistic stressor. Philip Dwerryhouse The effects of playing Tetris on intrusive memories of emotional material Intrusive mental images are the defining symptom of PTSD, a psychiatric disorder prevalent across the globe. While interventions exist for the treatment of fully developed PTSD, there is a lack of interventions for use in the hours immediately after the trauma inducing event, when ‘flashbacks’ may be most emotionally salient. Previous research has suggested that visuospatial (VS) tasks may be effective in reducing the emotionality and frequency of such unwanted intrusions. The current study investigated the effect of VS tasks on memory for emotional material. Forty

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