here - The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

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here - The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

CONTENTS

Page No.

1. General Programme Information 1 – 2

2. Aims and Characteristics 2 – 3

3. Programme Structure 3 – 6

4. Year One Study Pattern 6 – 9

5. Management and Operation 9 – 10

6. Other Academic Regulations 10 – 19

APPENDICES

General University Requirement Appendix A 20 – 25

Suggested Study Pattern Appendix B 26 – 34

Programme Executive Group and Academic Advisors Appendix C 35

Computer Codes for Subject Assessment Appendix D 36

Grade Point to Grade Conversion Methodology Appendix E 37

Different Types of GPA and their Calculation Methods Appendix F 38 – 39

Subject Description Forms Appendix G 40 – 111

Note:

The Programme Booklet is applicable for the 2013/14 intakes cohort. It is subject to review

and changes which the Programme host Faculty may make from time to time. Students will be

informed of the changes as and when appropriate.

Students should refer to the Definitive Programme Document of the respective programmes as

soon as they have indicated their programme choice.


1 General Programme Information

1.1 Title of Broad Discipline

Broad Discipline of Applied Sciences

應 用 科 學 廣 泛 學 科

1.2 Host Department

Faculty of Applied Science & Textiles

1.3 Final Awards

Students admitted to the Broad Discipline will complete a common Year 1 curriculum.

They will declare no later than the end of Year 1 their individual awards to pursue from

the second year (and start to study the corresponding contents). The Broad Discipline

leads to one of the following awards:

• BSc(Hons) in Applied Biology with Biotechnology

• BSc(Hons) in Chemical Technology

• BSc(Hons) in Engineering Physics

• BSc(Hons) in Food Safety and Technology

• BSc(Hons) in Investment Science

1.4 Mode of Attendance : Full-time

1.5 Intake Number : 28

1.6 Medium of Instruction : English

1.7 Date of Commencement : 2 September 2013

1


1.8 Entrance Requirements

For admission to undergraduate degree programmes, the University requires applicants

to have completed the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination

(HKDSE) or obtained a relevant local qualification, or a local/non-local qualification

deemed to be acceptable equivalents for admission purpose. Details of these are

specified below:

• Level 3 in English Language and Chinese Language; AND

• Level 2 in Mathematics, Liberal Studies and one other Elective subject

Preferred Subjects

There is no compulsory subject requirement. Preferred elective subjects for the

programme include:

• Extended modules of Mathematics

• All single science and Combined Science subjects

Satisfactory performance in preferred subjects will have a positive influence on

admission selection. However, applicants who have not taken the preferred subjects will

still be considered for admission but they may need to take relevant underpinning

subjects after admission to PolyU to gain the necessary foundation knowledge.

Applied Learning Subjects

The following relevant Applied Learning Subjects with an attainment at distinction

level are accepted as meeting the elective subject requirement of the programme:

• Child Development and Care

• Events Planning and Operation

• Exercise Science and Health Fitness

• Fundamental Health Care

• Health and Beauty Keeping in TCM

• Health Care Practice

• Medical Laboratory Science

• Sports Coaching and Management

2 Aims and Characteristics

2.1 Programme Aims

The Broad Discipline of Applied Sciences aims to facilitate students’ active exploration

of the disciplines under applied sciences (biology, chemistry, mathematics and physics)

in the first year of study. Students who are interested in the following programmes and

wish to explore the different disciplines before selection of the one to pursue can apply

for admission to this Broad Discipline of Applied Sciences. This allows students

flexibility to finalise their programme choice before or at the end of Year One.

Programme

Hosting Department

Applied Biology with Biotechnology

(12451 / JS3923) Department of Applied Biology and

Chemical Technology (12447 / JS3997) Chemical Technology (ABCT)

Food Safety and Technology (12454 / JS3349)

Engineering Physics (11439 / JS3985) Department of Applied Physics (AP)

Investment Science (63423 / JS3363)

Department of Applied Mathematics (AMA)

After completion of the 4-year programme, students are awarded the degree of the

selected programme.

2


2.2 Programme Characteristics

This programme is an undeclared track. It offers students the first year to cogitate and

decide on the specific applied sciences and mathematics programme to pursue from the

second year of study.

3 Programme Structure

3.1 Programme Selection

The Broad Discipline leads to one of the following BSc(Hons) awards:

• Applied Biology with Biotechnology

• Chemical Technology

• Engineering Physics

• Food Safety and Technology

• Investment Science

Students will choose their individual awards no later than the end of Year 1 and follow

the corresponding progression pattern as from the second year of study. Each student is

required to complete from 120 to 129 credits for graduation depending on the students’

HKDSE attainment/academic background and Discipline-Specific Requirement of the

programme selected.

The number of credits required for graduation for different awards are given in Table

3.1.1.

Table 3.1.1: Credits required for different awards

Award

Credits Required*

BSc(Hons) Applied Biology with Biotechnology 120

BSc(Hons) Chemical Technology 120

BSc(Hons) Engineering Physics 125

BSc(Hons) Food Safety and Technology 122

BSc(Hons) Investment Science 129

*Some students would be required to take more credits depending on their background

For passing a subject which is designed to fulfil the credit requirement of different types

of subject, students will be regarded as having fulfilled the credit requirements of the

particular types of subject concerned. Nevertheless, the subject itself will only be

counted once in the student's total credit requirements, and the students will be required

to make up the total credit requirement by taking another subject.

3.2 Curriculum

Students admitted to the Broad Discipline will complete a common first semester of

study. They will choose some Discipline Specific Requirement subjects in Semester

Two to prepare for their progression towards one of the five applied sciences and

mathematics programmes. The pool of subjects offered to students in these five

programmes will also be available for their selection. The common curriculum covers

fundamental subjects in areas of physics, chemistry, biology and mathematics. After the

second semester, students must select the programme they want to pursue and to follow

its curriculum until graduation.

3


Among the credits required for graduation, 30 of them are General University

Requirements (GUR). Students are allowed to take more elective subjects beyond the

General University and Discipline-Specific Requirements up to 150 credits without

incurring a higher tuition rate.

3.2.1. General University Requirement (GUR) Subjects:

Areas

Credits

Language & Communication Requirements (LCR) 9

• English (6)

• Chinese (3)

Cluster-Area Requirements (CAR) plus Reading (R) and Writing (W)

requirements in English and Chinese

12

• 3 credits from each of the following 4 cluster areas

- Human Nature, Relations and Development (3)

- Community, Organisation and Globalisation (3)

- History, Cultures and World Views (3)

- Science, Technology and Environment (3)

• At least 3 credits of the above CAR subjects be designated as

“China-related”

(A list of CAR subjects under each of the four Cluster Areas is available

at: https://www2.polyu.edu.hk/as/Polyu/GUR/index.htm)

Other Requirements

• Freshman Seminar 3

• Leadership and Intra-personal Development 3

• Service-Learning

(A list of Service Learning subjects is available at:

https://www2.polyu.edu.hk/as/Polyu/GUR/index.htm)

• Healthy Lifestyle (non-credit bearing)

(More details can be found at: http://www.polyu.edu.hk/sao/hlr)

3

0

Total GUR credits 30

Please refer to Appendix A for details of General University Requirements.

3.2.2. Common subjects for applied sciences and mathematics programmes

Students will be assigned common subjects in Semester One and/or Semester Two

according to their HKDSE attainments or academic background. Students are allowed

to choose some Discipline Specific Requirement subjects or GUR subjects in Semester

Two. They are advised to refer to the curricula of the five applied sciences and

mathematics programmes and consult their Academic Advisor for selection of suitable

subjects to be taken in Semester Two.

4


A. Common Subjects for Applied Sciences and Mathematics Programmes

Broad Discipline common subjects

Credit

Category (A) (B)

Introduction to Physics [AP10001] or University Physics I [AP10008] 3

Introduction to Chemistry [ABCT1700] or General Chemistry I [ABCT1741] 3

Introductory Life Science [ABCT1101] or General Biology [ABCT1102] 3

Basic Statistics [AMA1006] 2

Calculus & Linear Algebra [AMA1007] 3

Underpinning subject

Credit

Basic Mathematics [AMA1100] 2

1. All applied science & mathematics students are required to complete one broad

discipline common subject each in Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Calculus & Linear

Algebra and Basic Statistics.

2. The science subjects under Category A are designed for students who have not

attained Level 3 or above in Physics, Chemistry and/or Biology as a single Science

subject or a component of the Combined Science (sub-score) in HKDSE.

3. Students who have attained Level 3 or above in Physics, Chemistry and/or Biology,

as a single Science subject or a component of the Combined Science (sub-score) are

required to take the relevant subjects under Category B.

4. Students must retake a compulsory subject which they have failed. Those who fail

Category B subjects and pursue for programmes which accept Category A subjects

could take the relevant Category A subject as replacement. Academic Advisors will

provide academic counseling to students on the appropriate subject to take/retake.

5. Students who have not achieved Level 2 or above in Extended Modules of

Mathematics (M1 or M2) in HKDSE are required to complete AMA1100 before

progressing to take AMA1006 and AMA1007.

6. ABCT, AMA and AP will provide academic counseling to students upon their

admission and before subject registration.

7. Broad Discipline students who take subject(s) under Category A may need to take

relevant subject(s) under Category B according to the requirements of individual

degrees in applied science and in mathematics.

5


B. Discipline Specific Requirement (DSR) Subjects

Other than the common subjects, students may choose from the following DSR subjects

to prepare for their progression towards one of the five applied sciences and

mathematics programmes in Semester Two. Students are strongly advised to refer to

the curricula of these programmes and consult their Academic Advisor when choosing

the DSR subjects.

Subject Code Subject Title Credits

ABCT1102 General Biology 3

ABCT1103 General Laboratory Techniques and Safety 3

ABCT1741 General Chemistry I 3

AP10007 Applied Physics Laboratory 3

AP10008 University Physics I 3

AP10009 University Physics II 3

4 Year One Study Pattern

(Information as at July 2013. Please refer to the Definite Programme Document of

individual programme for the updated Study Pattern.)

4.1 Broad Discipline of Applied Sciences

DSR/

Subject Code Subject Title Credits C / E

GUR

Semester 1

FAST1000 Freshman Seminar 3 C GUR

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 1^ 3 C GUR

AP10001/ Introduction to Physics # /

AP10008 University Physics I # 3 C DSR

ABCT1700/ Introduction to Chemistry # /

ABCT1741 General Chemistry I # 3 C DSR

ABCT1101/ Introductory Life Science # /

ABCT1102

AMA1100/

AMA1007

General Biology # 3 C DSR

Basic Mathematics # /

2/

Calculus & Linear Algebra # C DSR

3

Total 17/18

Semester 2

APSS1L01 Tomorrow’s Leader 3 C GUR

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 2^

3 C GUR

CBSXXXX Chinese LCR subject^

3 C GUR

AMA1006 Basic Statistics 2 C DSR

AMA1007 Calculus & Linear Algebra # 3 C DSR

AP10008 University Physics I # E DSR

AP10009 University Physics II E DSR

ABCT1741 General Chemistry I # No more than E DSR

ABCT1102 General Biology # 7/10 credits E DSR

ABCT1103 General Laboratory Techniques and Safety in total E DSR

AP10007 Applied Physics Laboratory E DSR

XXXX CAR subjects + E GUR

Total Max. 21 credits

Study pattern for Year One students of the Broad Discipline with different combinations of

HKDSE attainments are listed in Appendix B.

6


4.2 BSc (Hons) Applied Biology with Biotechnology

Subject code Subject Credits C / E * DSR /

GUR

Semester 1

FAST1000 Freshman Seminar 3 C GUR

ELCXXXX

CBSXXXX

English LCR subject 1^

Chinese LCR subject^

3 C GUR

3 C GUR

XXXX Leadership and Intra-personal Development 3 C GUR

AMA1100 Basic Mathematics # 2 C DSR

XXXX CAR subject + 3 E GUR

Semester 2

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 2 3 C GUR

ABCT1741 General Chemistry I # 3 C DSR

ABCT1102 General Biology # 3 C DSR

AMA1007 Calculus & Linear Algebra # 3 C DSR

ABCT1103 General Laboratory Techniques and Safety 3 C DSR

XXXX CAR subject + 3 E GUR

4.3 BSc(Hons) Chemical Technology

Subject code Subject Credits C / E * DSR /

GUR

Semester 1

FAST1000 Freshman Seminar 3 C GUR

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 1^

3 C GUR

XXXX Leadership and Intra-personal Development 3 C GUR

ABCT1700/

ABCT1101/

XXXX

Introduction to Chemistry # /

Introductory Life Science # /

CAR subject + 3

C/

C/

E

DSR/

DSR/

GUR

AMA1006 Basic Statistics # 2 C DSR

Semester 2

ABCT1741 General Chemistry I # 3 C DSR

ABCT1102 General Biology # 3 C DSR

ABCT1103 General Laboratory Techniques and Safety 3 C DSR

AMA1007 Calculus and Linear Algebra # 3 C DSR

AP10001/

ELCXXXX

Introduction to Physics # /

English LCR subject 2^ 3 C

DSR/

GUR

7


4.4 BSc(Hons) Food Safety and Technology

Subject code Subject Credits C / E * DSR /

GUR

Semester 1

FAST1000 Freshman Seminar 3 C GUR

ELCXXXX

CBSXXXX

English LCR subject 1^

Chinese LCR subject^

3 C GUR

3 C GUR

AMA1006 Basic Statistics # 2 C DSR

XXXX CAR subject + 3 C GUR

Semester 2

ELCXXXX

English LCR subject 2^

3 C GUR

ABCT1741 General Chemistry I # 3 C DSR

ABCT1102 General Biology # 3 C DSR

ABCT1103 General Laboratory Techniques & Safety 3 C DSR

AMA1007 Calculus and Linear Algebra # 3 C DSR

XXXX Leadership and Intra-personal Development 3 C GUR

4.5 BSc(Hons) Engineering Physics

Subject code Subject Credits C / E * DSR /

GUR

Semester 1

FAST1000 Freshmen Seminar 3 C GUR

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 1^

3 C GUR

XXXX Leadership and Intra-personal Development 3 C GUR

AP10008 University Physics I # 3 C DSR

ABCT1700 Introduction to Chemistry # 3 C DSR

ABCT1101 Introductory Life Science # 3 C DSR

AMA1007 Calculus and Linear Algebra # 3 C DSR

Semester 2

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 2^

3 C GUR

CBSXXXX Chinese LCR subject^

3 C GUR

AP10009 University Physics II 3 C DSR

ABCT1741 General Chemistry I # 3 C DSR

ABCT1102 General Biology # 3 C DSR

AMA1006 Basic Statistics # 2 C DSR

AP10007 Applied Physics Laboratory 3 C DSR

8


4.6 BSc(Hons) Investment Science

Subject code Subject Credit C / E * DSR /

GUR

Semester 1

FAST1000 Freshman Seminars 3 C GUR

APSS1L01 Tomorrow’s Leader 3 C GUR

ELCXXXX

English LCR subject 1^

3 C GUR

AP10001 Introduction to Physics # 3 C DSR

AMA1100 / Basic Mathematics # /

AMA1006 Basic Statistics # 2 C DSR

ABCT1101 Introductory Life Science # 3 C DSR

ABCT1700 Introduction to Chemistry # 3 C DSR

Semester 2

ELCXXXX

CBSXXXX

English LCR subject 2^

Chinese LCR subject^

3 C GUR

3 C GUR

AP10008 University Physics I # 3 C DSR

ABCT1741 General Chemistry I # 3 C DSR

ABCT1102 General Biology # 3 C DSR

AMA1007 Calculus and Linear Algebra # 3 C DSR

XXXX CAR subject + 3 C GUR

Remarks:

*

^Please

C = Compulsory; E = Elective

refer to Appendix A on details of LCR subjects.

# Common subjects to be assigned according to students’ HKDSE attainments or academic background.

Please refer to section 3.2.2.

+ CAR subjects could be taken any time during the 4-year study according to students’ progress.

5 Management and Operation

5.1 General Administration

The Faculty of Applied Science and Textiles is the administrative host of the Broad

Discipline. General administration of admission, preparation for Board-of-Examiners

meetings and documentations is thus carried out by the Faculty. Registration and

student records of students are also handled by the Faculty while individual

Departments will look after the administration for students once they have finalized

their programme choices by the end of year one.

5.2 Programme Executive Group

A Programme Executive Group, composing of a Chairman, appointed by the Dean of

the Faculty of Applied Science and Textiles, and representatives from the three applied

sciences departments, i.e. Applied Biology and Chemical Technology, Applied

Mathematics and Applied Physics, undertakes the overall academic and operational

responsibility for the Broad Discipline and its development within the defined policies,

procedures and regulations of the PolyU.

The Programme Executive Group is responsible for the academic operation, admission,

quality assurance and management of Year One of the Broad Discipline. It reports to

the Faculty Board of Applied Science and Textiles. As soon as students enrolling on

this Broad Discipline have opted for one of the designated degree by the end of Year

One, they will leave this Broad Discipline and join the specific programme.

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The membership of the Programme Executive Group is in Appendix C.

The Programme Leader is appointed by the Dean of Faculty of Applied Science and

Textiles and responsible to him for the day-to-day administration of the programme. He

and the members will meet students regularly to collect their views on the programme

and to provide them with academic counseling.

5.3 Academic Counselling

For each students admitted to the Broad Discipline, an academic adviser will be initially

assigned to him/her by the Faculty for the first year. A “permanent” academic advisor

will be assigned by the department concerned once the student declares his/her major by

the end of Year One.

In view of the nature of broad discipline, it is important for students to have academic

guidance on selection of the major they will pursue starting from the second year of

study. Programme Leader of the BD and Programme Leaders of the five applied

sciences and mathematics programmes offered by constituent departments of the

Faculty will therefore act as academic advisors. The Undergraduate Secretary from the

Faculty Office will advise Broad Discipline students on academic requirements and

regulations related to the five applied sciences programmes and the GUR requirements.

Academic advisors will meet their students in small group and/or individually during

the semester to discuss with them major issues related to academic matters, e.g. subject

and programme selection, GUR subjects to be taken, study progress, etc.

Information about Academic Advising System of the Faculty is available at

http://www.polyu.edu.hk/fast/bd2.php. The list of academic advisors and their contact

information is in Appendix C.

6 Admission

Students admitted to the Broad Discipline of Applied Sciences would be guaranteed for

admission to one of the five BSc degrees listed in Table 3.1.1. without any additional

requirements.

7 Re-admission

Students who have been required to withdraw on grounds of academic failure or have

been de-registered, and those who have discontinued their studies without completing

the proper procedures for official withdrawal, shall not be considered for re-admission

to the same programme/stream in the following academic year. However, for students

de-registered/withdrawn from a 3-year full-time Bachelor’s degree programme, they

will be allowed to apply to the 4-year degree programme leading to the same award.

Those de-registered/withdrawn from a Broad Discipline will also be allowed to apply to

the constituent single discipline programmes, and vice versa, in the following academic

year.

10


8 Maximum Duration for Completion of a Programme

The maximum period of registration on, and for completion of, a programme is

normally twice the duration of the programme, and must not exceed 8 years. This 8 year

maximum period shall apply to programmes whose specified duration is more than 4

years. This period shall exclude deferment granted for justifiable reasons such as illness

or posting to work outside Hong Kong, but any semester in which the students are

allowed to take zero subject will be counted towards the maximum period of

registration.

9 Subject Registration and Withdrawal

9.1 In addition to programme registration, students need to register for the subjects at

specified periods prior to the commencement of the semester. An add/drop period will

also be scheduled for each semester/term. Students may apply for withdrawal of their

registration on a subject after the add/drop period, if they have a genuine need to do so.

The application should be made to the relevant programme offering Department/Faculty

and will require the approval of both the subject lecturer and Programme

Leader/Coordinator of the host Department/Faculty concerned (or an alternate academic

staff authorised by the programme offering Department). Applications submitted after

the commencement of the examination period will not be considered. For approved

applications of subject withdrawal, the tuition fee paid for the subject will be forfeited

and the withdrawal status of the subject will be shown in the examination result

notification and transcript of studies, but will not be counted in the calculation of the

GPA.

9.2 The pre-requisite requirements of a subject must have been fulfilled before a student

registers for that subject. However, the subject offering Department has the discretion

to waive the pre-requisite requirements of a subject, if deemed appropriate. If the prerequisite

subject concerned forms part of the requirements for award, the subject has to

be passed in order to satisfy the graduation requirements for the programme concerned,

despite the waiving of the pre-requisite.

9.3 Students will be allowed to take additional subjects for broadening purpose, after they

fulfil the graduation requirements and for the following semester. However, they will

still be subject to the maximum study load of 21 credits per semester and the availability

of places in the subjects concerned, and their enrolment will be as subject-based

students only.

11


10 Study Load

10.1 For students following the progression pattern specified for their programme, they have

to take the number of credits, as specified in the Definitive Programme Document, for

each semester. Student cannot drop those subjects assigned by the department unless

prior approval has been given by the department.

10.2 The normal study load is 15 credits in a semester. The maximum study load to be taken

by a student in a semester is 21 credits, unless exceptional approval is given by the Head

of the programme offering Department/Faculty. For such cases, students should be

reminded that the study load approved should not be taken as grounds for academic

appeal.

10.3 Students are not allowed to take zero subject in any semester, including the mandatory

summer term as required by some programmes, unless they have obtained prior

approval from the programme offering Department; otherwise they will be classified as

having unofficially withdrawn from their programme. Students who have been

approved for zero subject enrolment (i.e. taking zero subject in a semester) are allowed

to retain their student status and continue using campus facilities and library facilities.

Any semester in which the students are allowed to take zero subject will nevertheless be

counted towards the maximum period of registration

10.4 Students who have obtained approval to pace their studies and students on programmes

without any specified progression pattern who wish to take more than the normal load

of 15 credits in a semester should seek advice from the Department/Faculty concerned

before the selection of subjects.

11 Deferment of study

11.1 Students may apply for deferment of study if they have a genuine need to do so such as

illness or posting to work outside Hong Kong. Approval from the Department/Faculty

offering the programme is required. The deferment period will not be counted towards

the maximum period of registration.

11.2 Application for deferment of study will be entertained only in exceptional circumstances

from students who have not yet completed the first year of a full-time or sandwich

programme.

11.3 Where the period of deferment of study begins during a stage for which fees have been

paid, no refund of such fees will be made.

11.4 Students who have been approved for deferment are not entitled to enjoy any campus

facilities during the deferment period.

12


12 Principles of assessment

12.1 Assessment of learning and assessment for learning are both important for assuring the

quality of student learning. Assessment of learning is to evaluate whether students have

achieved the intended learning outcomes of the subjects that they have taken and have

attained the overall learning outcomes of the academic programme at the end of their

study at a standard appropriate to the award. Appropriate methods of assessment that

align with the intended learning outcomes should be designed for this purpose. The

assessment methods will also enable the teacher to differentiate students’ different

levels of performance within the subject. Assessment for learning is to engage students

in productive learning activities through purposefully designed assessment tasks.

12.2 Assessment will also serve as feedback to students. The assessment criteria and

standards should be made explicit to students before the start of the assessment to

facilitate student learning, and feedback provided should link to the criteria and

standards. Timely feedback should be provided to students so that they are aware of

their progress and attainment for the purpose of improvement.

12.3 The ultimate authority in the University for the confirmation of academic decisions is

the Senate, but for practical reasons, the Senate has delegated to the Faculty/School

Boards the authority to confirm the decisions of Boards of Examiners provided these are

made within the framework of the General Assessment Regulations. Recommendations

from Board of Examiners which fall outside these Regulations shall be ratified by the

Academic Regulations Committee (ARC) and reported to the Senate.

13 Assessment methods

13.1 Students' performance in a subject can be assessed by continuous assessment and/or

examinations, at the discretion of the individual subject offering Department. Where

both continuous assessment and examinations are used, the weighting of each in the

overall subject grade shall be clearly stated in the definitive programme document. The

subject offering Department can decide whether students are required to pass both the

continuous assessment and examination components, or either component only, in order

to obtain a subject pass, but this requirement (to pass both, or either, components) shall

be specified in the Definite Programme Document. Learning outcome should be

assessed by continuous assessment and/or examination appropriately, in line with the

outcome-based approach.

13.2 Continuous assessment may include tests, assignments, projects, laboratory work, field

exercises, presentations and other forms of classroom participation. Continuous

Assessment assignments which involve group work should nevertheless include some

individual components therein. The contribution made by each student in continuous

assessment involving a group effort shall be determined and assessed separately, and

this can result in different grades being awarded to students in the same group.

13.3 Assessment methods and parameters of subjects shall be determined by the subject

offering Department.

13.4 At the beginning of each semester, the subject teacher should inform students of the

details of the methods of assessments to be used, within the assessment framework as

specified in the definitive programme document.

13


14 Progression/Academic Probation/Deregistration

14.1 The Board of Examiners shall, at the end of each semester (except for Summer Term

unless there are students who are eligible to graduate after completion of Summer Term

subjects), determine whether each student is

(i)

(ii)

(iii)

eligible for progression towards an award; or

eligible for an award; or

required to be deregistered from the programme.

14.2 When a student has a Grade Point Average (GPA) (see Section 17.2 below) lower than

2.0, he will be put on academic probation in the following semester. If a student is able

to pull his GPA up to 2.0 or above at the end of the semester, the status of "academic

probation" will be lifted. The status of "academic probation" will be reflected in the

examination result notification but not in the transcript of studies.

14.3 A student will have 'progressing' status unless he falls within any one of the following

categories which may be regarded as grounds for deregistration from the programme:

(i)

(ii)

(iii)

the student has exceeded the maximum period of registration for that

programme, as specified in the Definitive Programme Document; or

the student's GPA is lower than 2.0 for two consecutive semesters and his

Semester GPA in the second semester is also lower than 2.0; or

the student's GPA is lower than 2.0 for three consecutive semesters.

14.4 The progression of students to the following academic year will not be affected by the

GPA obtained in the Summer Term, unless Summer Term study is mandatory for all

students of the programme and constitutes a requirement for graduation, and is so

specified in the Definitive Programme Document.

14.5 A student may be de-registered from the programme enrolled before the time frame

specified in Sections 14.3(ii) or 14.3(iii) above if his academic performance is poor to

the extent that the Board of Examiners deems that his chance of attaining a GPA of 2.0

at the end of the programme is slim or impossible.

14.6 Where there are good reasons, the Board of Examiners has the discretion to recommend

allowing students who fall into categories as stated in Sections 14.3(ii) or 14.3(iii)

above to stay on the programme, and these recommendations should be presented to the

relevant Faculty/School Board for final decision.

14.7 Under the current procedures, a student can appeal against the decisions of the Boards

of Examiners to de-register him. If such an appeal was upheld by the

Department/School concerned, the recommendation (to reverse the previous decision to

de-register the student) should also be presented to the relevant Faculty/School Board

for final decision.

14


15 Retaking of subjects

15.1 Students may retake any subject for the purpose of improving their grade without

having to seek approval, but they must retake a compulsory subject which they have

failed, i.e. obtained an F grade. Retaking of subjects is with the condition that the

maximum study load of 21 credits per semester is not exceeded. Students wishing to

retake passed subjects will be accorded a lower priority than those who are required to

retake (due to failure in a compulsory subject) and can only do so if places are available.

15.2 The number of retakes of a subject is not restricted. Only the grade obtained in the final

attempt of retaking (even if the retake grade is lower than the original grade for

originally passed subject) will be included in the calculation of the Grade Point Average

(GPA). If students have passed a subject but failed after retake, credits accumulated for

passing the subject in a previous attempt will remain valid for satisfying the credit

requirement for award. (The grades obtained in previous attempts will only be reflected

in transcript of studies.)

15.3 In cases where a student takes another subject to replace a failed elective subject, the

fail grade will be taken into account in the calculation of the GPA, despite the passing

of the replacement subject.

16 Absence from an assessment component

16.1 If a student is unable to complete all the assessment components of a subject, due to

illness or other circumstances which are beyond his control and considered by the

subject offering Department as legitimate, the Department will determine whether the

student will have to complete a late assessment and, if so, by what means. This late

assessment shall take place at the earliest opportunity, and before the commencement of

the following academic year (except that for Summer Term, which may take place

within 3 weeks after the finalisation of Summer Term results).

16.2 The student concerned is required to submit his/her application for late assessment in

writing to the Head of Department offering the subject, within five working days from

the date of the examination, together with any supporting documents. Approval of

applications for late assessment and the means for such late assessments shall be given

by the Head of Department offering the subject or the Subject Lecturer concerned, in

consultation with the Programme Coordinator.

15


17 Grading

17.1 Assessment grades shall be awarded on a criterion-referenced basis. A student's overall

performance in a subject (including GUR subjects) shall be graded, and a numeral grade

point is assigned to each subject grade, as follows:

Subject

grade

Short

description

A+ Exceptionally

Outstanding

Elaboration on subject grading description

The student's work is exceptionally outstanding. It

exceeds the intended subject learning outcomes in all

regards.

A Outstanding The student's work is outstanding. It exceeds the

intended subject learning outcomes in nearly all regards.

B+ Very Good The student's work is very good. It exceeds the intended

subject learning outcomes in most regards.

B Good The student's work is good. It exceeds the intended

subject learning outcomes in some regards.

C+ Wholly

Satisfactory

The student's work is wholly satisfactory. It fully meets

the intended subject learning outcomes.

C Satisfactory The student's work is satisfactory. It largely meets the

intended subject learning outcomes.

D+ Barely

Satisfactory

D

Barely

Adequate

The student's work is barely satisfactory. It marginally

meets the intended subject learning outcomes.

The student's work is barely adequate. It meets the

intended subject learning outcomes only in some

regards.

F Inadequate The student's work is inadequate. It fails to meet many

of the intended subject learning outcomes.

Grade

Point

4.5

4

3.5

3

2.5

2

1.5

1

0

‘F’ is a subject failure grade and all others (‘D’ to ‘A+’) are subject pass grades. No

credit will be earned if a subject is failed.

17.2 At the end of each semester/term, a Grade Point Average (GPA) will be computed as

follows, and based on the grade point of all the subjects:

∑ Subject Grade Point × Subject Credit

n

GPA =

Subject Credit Value


n

Value

where n = number of all subjects (inclusive of failed subjects) taken by the student up to and

including the latest semester/term. For subjects which have been retaken, only the

grade point obtained in the final attempt will be included in the GPA calculation

16


In addition, the following subjects will be excluded from the GPA calculation:

(i) Exempted subjects

(ii) Ungraded subjects

(iii) Incomplete subjects

(iv) Subjects for which credit transfer has been approved, but without any grade

assigned

(v) Subjects from which a student has been allowed to withdraw (i.e. those with the

code ‘W’)

Subject which has been given an “S” subject code, i.e. absent from examination, will be

included in the GPA calculation and will be counted as “zero” grade point. GPA is thus

the unweighted cumulative average calculated for a student, for all relevant subjects

taken from the start of the programme to a particular point of time. GPA is an indicator

of overall performance and is capped at 4.0.

17.3 The grades and codes for the subject and final assessments are shown in Appendix D.

17.4 In the event that grade is awarded to subject components, a grade point with the decimal

value may be generated for the overall result of the subject. This grade point with

decimal value will be converted to grade according to the conversion methodology as

shown in Appendix E for deriving the subject overall grades. The corresponding grade

point for the subject overall grade, instead of the actual grade points obtained by

students, will be used for GPA calculation. This methodology for deriving subject

overall grades only serves as an aid to subject assessors. As assessment should be a

matter of judgement, not merely a result of computation, the subject lecturer will have

the discretion to assign a grade which is considered to reflect more appropriately the

overall performance of the student in a subject to override the grade derived by the

computer.

18 Different types of GPA's

18.1 GPA's will be calculated for each Semester including the Summer Term. This Semester

GPA will be used to determine students' eligibility to progress to the next Semester

alongside with the 'cumulative GPA'. However, the Semester GPA calculated for the

Summer Term will not be used for this purpose, unless the Summer Term study is

mandatory for all students of the programme concerned and constitutes part of the

graduation requirements.

18.2 The GPA calculated after the second Semester of the students' study is therefore a

'cumulative' GPA of all the subjects taken so far by students, and without applying any

level weighting.

18.3 Along with the 'cumulative' GPA, a weighted GPA will also be calculated, to give an

indication to the Board of Examiners on the award classification which a student will

likely get if he makes steady progress on his academic studies. GUR subjects will be

included in the calculation of weighted GPA for all programmes.

18.4 When a student has satisfied the requirements for award, an award GPA will be

calculated to determine his award classification. GUR subjects will be included in the

calculation of award GPA for all programmes.

17


18.5 For students taking the Major/Minor study route, a separate GPA will be calculated for

their Major and Minor programmes. The Major GPA will be used to determine his

award classification, which will be so reflected on the award parchment. The Minor

GPA can be used as a reference for Board of Examiners to moderate the award

classification for the Major.

18.6 The relationship between the different types of GPA's, and the methods for calculating

each, is further explained in Appendix F.

19 Examination result announcements, transcripts, testimonials and references

19.1 At the end of each semester, where appropriate, examination results are announced

online for individual students' checking. It provides information on subjects taken and

grades attained, the Grade Point Average (GPA) for all subjects, and the overall result

for that semester. The announcement serves as an official notification of the student's

academic performance.

19.2 A formal transcript of studies will be issued by the University, upon request, to any

student registered on a programme offered by the University, and it will include the

following information:

(i)

(ii)

name and student number;

title of the programme(s) on which enrolled, or from which graduated;

(iii) medium of instruction for the programme (applicable only to programmes which

are delivered in Chinese and for which both Chinese and English versions are

offered);

(iv) a full academic record, giving subjects taken and grades attained, and the Grade

Point Average (GPA) for all subjects;

(v)

credit requirement of the student if different from the normal credit requirement of

the programme;

(vi) where relevant, the final award(s) granted, with classification and year of award;

and

(vii) a statement indicating that the student has completed the Work-integrated

Education (WIE) activities, and the Healthy Lifestyle subject which is non-credit

bearing.

19.3 Students may request for a testimonial which is a certification of their studies at the

University, but without details on subjects and subject results.

19.4 Students may also request for references direct from academic staff/members

concerned.

18


20 Medium of instruction

20.1 English is the medium of instruction (the only exceptions are for a small number of

programmes/subjects which have got special approval to be taught and examined in

Chinese, due to the nature and objectives of the programmes/subjects concerned).

Chinese could only be used in small group discussions/tutorials/practical sessions if and

when necessary.

20.2 In the presence of non-Cantonese-speaking students, English should be used all the

time.

21 Plagiarism and misconducts in assessments/examinations

21.1 Rules governing the conduct of examination, procedures for leave of absence, deferment

of study, withdrawal of study, student appeals against the decisions of the Board of

Examiners, and applications of transcripts of studies and testimonials, etc., are

documented in the Students’ Handbook.

21.2 All rules concerning the assessment and examination matters are governed by the

General Assessment Regulations of the University.

21.3 To help you understand the importance of academic honesty and learn ways to ensure

that your work and behaviour at PolyU are acceptable in this regard, the Online Tutorial

on Academic Integrity is provided for you in the subject “Freshman Seminar”. The

Online Tutorial is part of the subject completion requirement. Students who fail to

complete the Online Tutorial will fail this subject.

21.4 The Online Tutorial can be accessed on LEARN@PolyU ( 理 學 網 ). It takes

approximately two hours to complete. For more information on the Online Tutorial,

please refer to Online Tutorial on Academic Integrity: A Student Guide

(http://edc.polyu.edu.hk/PSP/Student_Guide_Online_Tutorial.pdf).

22 University Regulations

The regulations in this booklet are only those which apply specifically to the UGCfunded

Broad Discipline of Applied Sciences. Student should refer to the Definitive

Programme Documents of the five applied sciences and mathematics programmes for

regulations applicable to the specific programmes and the current issue of Student

Handbook for the General Regulations of the University.

23 Amendment to the Booklet

The curriculum, subject contents, assessment schemes and criteria of progression stated

in this document may be amended from time to time if the Faculty considers such

amendment justifiable and students will be notified accordingly.

19


Appendix A

General University Requirement

As part of the university graduation requirements, students have to complete 30 credits of general

university requirement (GUR) as follows:

Areas

Credits

Language & Communication Requirements (LCR) 9

• English (6)

• Chinese (3)

Cluster-Area Requirements (CAR) plus Reading (R) and Writing (W) requirements

in English and Chinese

12

• 3 credits from each of the following 4 cluster areas

- Human Nature, Relations and Development (3)

- Community, Organisation and Globalisation (3)

- History, Cultures and World Views (3)

- Science, Technology and Environment (3)

• at least 3 credits of the above CAR subjects be designated as “China-related”

A list of CAR subjects under each of the four Cluster Areas is available at:

https://www2.polyu.edu.hk/as/Polyu/GUR/index.htm

Other Requirements

• Freshman Seminar 3

• Leadership and Intra-personal Development 3

• Service-Learning

(A list of Service Learning subjects is available at:

https://www2.polyu.edu.hk/as/Polyu/GUR/index.htm)

3

• Healthy Lifestyle (non-credit bearing)

(More details can be found at: http://www.polyu.edu.hk/sao/hlr)

Nil

Total GUR credits 30

1. Language and Communication Requirements (LCR)

1.1. English

All undergraduate students must successfully complete two 3-credit English language subjects as

stipulated by the University (Table 1.1.1). These subjects are designed to suit students’ different

levels of English language proficiency at entry, as determined by their HKDSE score or the

English Language Centre (ELC) entry assessment (when no HKDSE score is available).

Students who can demonstrate that they have achieved a level beyond that of the LCR proficient

level subjects as listed in Table 1.1.2 (based on an assessment by ELC) may apply for subject

exemption or credit transfer of the LCR subject or subjects concerned.

20


Table 1.1.1: Framework of English LCR subjects

HKDSE Subject 1 Subject 2

Level 5 or

equivalent

Level 4 or

equivalent

Advanced English for University

Studies (ELC1014)

[3 credits]

English for University Studies

(ELC1012/1013)

[3 credits]

Any LCR Proficient level subject in

English (see Table 1.1.2)

[3 credits ]

Advanced English for University

Studies (ELC1014)

[3 credits]

Level 3 or

equivalent

Practical English for University

Studies (ELC1011)

[3 credits]

English for University Studies

(ELC1012/1013)

[3 credits]

Table 1.1.2: LCR Proficient level subjects in English

For students entering

with HKDSE Level 5, or

at an equivalent level or

above

Advanced English Reading and Writing Skills

(ELC2011)

Persuasive Communication (ELC2012)

English in Literature and Film (ELC2013)

3 credits

each

1.2. Chinese

All undergraduate students are required to successfully complete one 3-credit Chinese language

subject as stipulated by the University (Table 1.2.1). These Chinese subjects are designed to suit

students' different levels of Chinese language proficiency at entry, as determined by their HKDSE

score or the Chinese Language Centre (CLC) entry assessment (when no HKDSE score is

available). Students can also opt to take additional Chinese LCR subjects (Table 1.2.3) in their

free electives.

Students who are non-Chinese speakers (NCS), or whose Chinese standards are at junior

secondary level or below, will also be required to take one LCR subject specially designed to suit

their language background and entry standard as shown in Table 1.2.2.

Students who can demonstrate that they have achieved a level beyond that of the course

"Advanced Communication Skill in Chinese" as listed in Table 1.2.1 (based on an assessment by

CLC) may apply for subject exemption or credit transfer of the LCR subject concerned.

21


Table 1.2.1: Framework of Chinese LCR subjects

HKDSE

HKDSE Level 4 and 5 or equivalent

Required subject

Advanced Communication Skills in Chinese

(ACSC) (CBS1101P)

[3 credits]

HKDSE Level 3 or equivalent

Fundamentals of Chinese Communication

(FCC) (CBS1102P)

[3 credits]

For non-Chinese speakers or students

whose Chinese standards are at junior

secondary level or below

One subject from table 1.2.2 below

Table 1.2.2: Chinese LCR Subjects for non-Chinese speakers or students whose Chinese

standards are at junior secondary level or below

Subject

Chinese I (for non-Chinese

speaking students) (CBS1151)

Pre-requisite/exclusion

• For non-Chinese speaking students at

beginners’ level

Chinese II (for non-Chinese

speaking students) (CBS1152)

• For non-Chinese speaking students; and

• Students who have completed Chinese I or

equivalent

Chinese III (for non-Chinese

speaking students) (CBS2151)

• For non-Chinese speaking students at higher

competence levels; and

• Students who have completed Chinese II or

equivalent

3 credits

each

Chinese Literature –

Linguistics and Cultural

Perspectives (for non-Chinese

speaking students) (CBS2152)

• For non-Chinese speaking students at higher

competence levels

22


Table 1.2.3: Other LCR Electives in Chinese

Subject

Chinese and the Multimedia

(CBS2109P)

Creative writing in Chinese

(CBS2102P)

Elementary Cantonese

(CBS1153/CBS1153P)

Putonghua in the Workplace

(CBS2101P)

Pre-requisite/exclusion

• For students entering with HKDSE level 4 or

above ; or

• Students with advanced competence level as

determined by the entry assessment; or

• Students who have completed “Fundamentals

of Chinese Communication”

• For students entering with HKDSE level 4 or

above ; or

• Students with advanced competence level as

determined by the entry assessment; or

• Students who have completed “Fundamentals

of Chinese Communication”

• For students whose native language is not

Cantonese

• Students who have completed “Fundamentals

of Chinese Communication” or could

demonstrate with proof basic proficiency in

Putonghua

• For students whose native language is not

Putonghua

3 credits

each

1.3. Discipline-specific language requirement

There must be a mandatory requirement in DSR for students to complete 2 subjects (each of 2

credits) which contain the necessary embedded language requirements in English and in Chinese.

Students who are non-Chinese speakers or those whose Chinese standards are at junior secondary

level or below will be, by default, exempted from the Discipline-specific Chinese Language

Requirements.

23


2. Cluster-Area Requirement (CAR)

To expand students’ intellectual capacity beyond their disciplinary domain and to enable them to

tackle professional and global issues from a multidisciplinary perspective, students have to choose

and successfully complete a total of 12 credits from CAR subjects according to their own

interests, with 3 credits to be selected from each of the following 4 cluster areas:

• Human Nature, Relations and Development

• Community, Organisation and Globalisation

• History, Culture and World Views

• Science, Technology and Environment

BD students are advised not to take those CAR subjects which are offered by ABCT, AMA and

AP before their selection of programme.

Reading and Writing Requirements

To enhance students’ literacy skills in reading and writing, students must, among the CAR

subjects they take, pass one subject that includes the requirement for a substantive piece of

writing in English (EW Requirement) and one subject with the requirement of a substantive piece

of writing in Chinese (CW Requirement). Subjects approved for meeting the Writing

Requirement will be given a “W’ designation.

They must also, among the CAR subjects they take, pass one subject that includes the requirement

for the reading of an extensive text in English (ER Requirement) and one subject with the

requirement for the reading of an extensive text in Chinese (CR Requirement). Subjects approved

for meeting the Reading Requirement will be given an “R” designation.

Students who are non-Chinese speakers or those whose Chinese standards are at junior secondary

level or below will be, by default, exempted from the Reading and Writing Requirements in

Chinese.

China-Study Requirement

To enable students to develop a deeper understanding of China (i.e., its history, culture and

society, as well as emerging issues or challenges), students are further required to complete at

least 3 credits of CAR subjects which are designated as “China-related” from any of the four

Cluster Areas.

3. Freshman Seminar

All students must successfully complete, normally in their first year of study, one 3-credit

Freshman Seminar offered by their chosen Broad Discipline. The purpose is to (1) introduce

students to their chosen discipline and enthuse them about their major study, (2) cultivate

students’ creativity, problem-solving ability and global outlook, (3) give students an exposure to

the concepts of, and an understanding of, entrepreneurship, and (4) engage students, in their first

year of study, in desirable forms of university learning that emphasises self-regulation,

autonomous learning and deep understanding.

A list of Freshman Seminars offered by the Broad Disciplines can be found at:

https://www2.polyu.edu.hk/as/Polyu/GUR/index.htm

24


4. Leadership and Intra-Personal Development

All students must successfully complete one 3-credit subject in the area of Leadership and Intra-

Personal Development, which is designed to enable students to (1) understand and integrate

theories, research and concepts on the qualities (particularly intra-personal and interpersonal

qualities) of effective leaders in the Chinese context, (2) develop greater self-awareness and a

better understanding of oneself, (3) acquire interpersonal skills essential for functioning as an

effective leader, (4) develop self-reflection skills in their learning, and (5) recognise the

importance of the active pursuit of knowledge on an intra-personal and interpersonal level and its

relationship to leadership qualities.

A list of designated subjects for meeting the leadership and intra-personal development

requirement is available at: https://www2.polyu.edu.hk/as/Polyu/GUR/index.htm

5. Service-Learning

All students must successfully complete one 3-credit subject designated to meet the servicelearning

requirement, in which they are required to (1) participate in substantial community

service or civic engagement activities that will benefit the service users or the community at large

in a meaningful way, (2) apply the knowledge and skills acquired from their Major or other

learning experiences at the University to the community service activities, and (3) reflect on their

service learning experience in order to link theory with practice for the development of a stronger

sense of ethical, social and national responsibility.

These subjects may take the form of:

• An open-to-all GUR service-learning subject

• A GUR service-learning subject targeted for a particular student group (e.g. a Broad

Discipline), or

• A customised DSR subject (core or elective) within the Major/Minor with all the required

features and components to meet the Service-Learning Requirement.

Students who have satisfied the Service-Learning Requirement via a customised DSR subject will

be required to take another 3-credit subject to make up for the total credit requirement.

A list of designated subjects for meeting the service-learning requirement is available at:

https://www2.polyu.edu.hk/as/Polyu/GUR/index.htm

6. Healthy Lifestyle

Healthy lifestyle is the platform for all-round development. All students are required to

successfully complete a non-credit-bearing programme in healthy lifestyle offered by the Student

Affairs Office. The programme will cover: (1) fitness evaluation, (2) concepts on health and

fitness, (3) sports skills acquisition, and (4) exercise practicum. More details can be found at:

http://www.polyu.edu.hk/sao/hlr

25


Appendix B

Suggested Study Patterns

Common Subjects for Applied Sciences and Mathematics Programmes

Broad Discipline common subjects

Category (A) (B)

Introduction to Physics [AP10001] or University Physics I [AP10008] 3

Introduction to Chemistry [ABCT1700] or General Chemistry I [ABCT1741] 3

Introductory Life Science [ABCT1101] or General Biology [ABCT1102] 3

Credit

Basic Statistics [AMA1006] 2

Calculus & Linear Algebra [AMA1007] 3

Underpinning subject

Credit

Basic Mathematics [AMA1100] 2

1. All applied science & mathematics students are required to complete one broad discipline common subject

each in Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Calculus & Linear Algebra and Basic Statistics.

2. The science subjects under Category A are designed for students who have not attained Level 3 or above in

Physics, Chemistry and/or Biology as a single Science subject or a component of the Combined Science

(sub-score) in HKDSE.

3. Students who have attained Level 3 or above in Physics, Chemistry and/or Biology, as a single Science

subject or a component of the Combined Science (sub-score) are required to take the relevant subjects under

Category B.

4. Students must retake a compulsory subject which they have failed. Those who fail Category B subjects and

pursue for programmes which accept Category A subjects could take the relevant Category A subject as

replacement. Academic Advisors will provide academic counseling to students on the appropriate subject to

take/retake.

5. Students who have not achieved Level 2 or above in Extended Modules of Mathematics (M1 or M2) in

HKDSE are required to complete AMA1100 before progressing to take AMA1006 and AMA1007.

6. ABCT, AMA and AP will provide academic counseling to students upon their admission and before subject

registration.

7. Broad Discipline students who take subject(s) under Category A may need to take relevant subject(s) under

Category B according to the requirements of individual degrees in applied science and in mathematics.

Guide to Suggested Study Patterns

HKDSE Level 3 or above in the

single Science subject or a

component of the Combined

Science (sub-score)

Without Physics, Chemistry &

Biology

26

Suggested Study Pattern

Without HKDSE Level 2 or above

in Extended Modules of Mathematics

(M1 or M2)

A

With HKDSE Level 2 or above

in Extended Modules of

Mathematics (M1 or M2)

Physics only C D

Chemistry only E F

Biology only G H

Physics & Chemistry I J

Physics & Biology K L

Chemistry & Biology M N

With Physics, Chemistry & Biology O P

Remarks:

- Students will be assigned all subjects in Semester 1, and some in Semester 2, 2012/13 according to their

HKDSE attainments. In Semester 2, 2012/13, students are required to take Discipline Specific

Requirements subjects (DSR) to prepare for furthering their study in one of the applied sciences

programmes from the second year of study. Therefore students are strongly recommended seeking

advice from their Academic Advisors before subject registration.

- The minimum and maximum number of credits students are allowed to take in one semester is 9 and 21

respectively.

B


A. Students without HKDSE Level 2 or above in M1 or M2 and Level 3 or above in Physics,

Chemistry & Biology:

Subject code Subject Credits

Semester 1

FAST1000 Freshman Seminar – Science to Improve Quality of Life 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 1 3

AP10001 Introduction to Physics 3

ABCT1700 Introduction to Chemistry 3

ABCT1101 Introductory Life Science 3

AMA1100 Basic Mathematics 2

Total 17

Semester 2

APSS1L01 Tomorrow’s Leader 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 2 3

CBSXXXX Chinese LCR subject 3

AMA1006 Basic Statistics 2

AMA1007 Calculus & Linear Algebra 3

AP10008

AP10009

ABCT1741

ABCT1102

ABCT1103

AP10007

DSR subjects available for selection:

University Physics I

University Physics II

General Chemistry I

General Biology

General Laboratory Techniques and Safety

Applied Physics Laboratory

No more than

7 credits in

total

XXXX

CAR subjects

Total Max. 21

B. Students with HKDSE Level 2 or above in M1 or M2 but without Level 3 or above in

Physics, Chemistry & Biology:

Subject code Subject Credits

Semester 1

FAST1000 Freshman Seminar – Science to Improve Quality of Life 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 1 3

AP10001 Introduction to Physics 3

ABCT1700 Introduction to Chemistry 3

ABCT1101 Introductory Life Science 3

AMA1007 Calculus & Linear Algebra 3

Total 18

Semester 2

APSS1L01 Tomorrow’s Leader 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 2 3

CBSXXXX Chinese LCR subject 3

AMA1006 Basic Statistics 2

AP10008

AP10009

ABCT1741

ABCT1102

ABCT1103

AP10007

DSR subjects available for selection:

University Physics I

University Physics II

General Chemistry I

General Biology

General Laboratory Techniques and Safety

Applied Physics Laboratory

No more than

10 credits in

total

XXXX

CAR subjects

Total Max. 21

27


C. Students with HKDSE Level 3 or above in Physics, but not in Chemistry & Biology, and

without Level 2 or above in M1 or M2:

Subject code Subject Credits

Semester 1

FAST1000 Freshman Seminar – Science to Improve Quality of Life 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 1 3

AP10008 University Physics I 3

ABCT1700 Introduction to Chemistry 3

ABCT1101 Introductory Life Science 3

AMA1100 Basic Mathematics 2

Total 17

Semester 2

APSS1L01 Tomorrow’s Leader 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 2 3

CBSXXXX Chinese LCR subject 3

AMA1006 Basic Statistics 2

AMA1007 Calculus & Linear Algebra 3

AP10009

ABCT1741

ABCT1102

ABCT1103

AP10007

DSR subjects available for selection:

University Physics II

General Chemistry I

General Biology

General Laboratory Techniques and Safety

Applied Physics Laboratory

No more than

7 credits in

total

XXXX

CAR subjects

Total Max. 21

D. Students with HKDSE Level 2 or above in M1 or M2, and Level 3 or above in Physics, but

not in Chemistry & Biology:

Subject code Subject Credits

Semester 1

FAST1000 Freshman Seminar – Science to Improve Quality of Life 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 1 3

AP10008 University Physics I 3

ABCT1700 Introduction to Chemistry 3

ABCT1101 Introductory Life Science 3

AMA1007 Calculus & Linear Algebra 3

Total 18

Semester 2

APSS1L01 Tomorrow’s Leader 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 2 3

CBSXXXX Chinese LCR subject 3

AMA1006 Basic Statistics 2

AP10009

ABCT1741

ABCT1102

ABCT1103

AP10007

DSR subjects available for selection:

University Physics II

General Chemistry I

General Biology

General Laboratory Techniques and Safety

Applied Physics Laboratory

No more than

10 credits in

total

XXXX

CAR subjects

Total Max. 21

28


E. Students with HKDSE Level 3 or above in Chemistry, but not in Physics & Biology, and

without Level 2 or above in M1 or M2:

Subject code Subject Credits

Semester 1

FAST1000 Freshman Seminar – Science to Improve Quality of Life 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 1 3

AP10001 Introduction to Physics 3

ABCT1741 General Chemistry I 3

ABCT1101 Introductory Life Science 3

AMA1100 Basic Mathematics 2

Total 17

Semester 2

APSS1L01 Tomorrow’s Leader 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 2 3

CBSXXXX Chinese LCR subject 3

AMA1006 Basic Statistics 2

AMA1007 Calculus & Linear Algebra 3

AP10008

AP10009

ABCT1102

ABCT1103

AP10007

DSR subjects available for selection:

University Physics I

University Physics II

General Biology

General Laboratory Techniques and Safety

Applied Physics Laboratory

No more than

7 credits in

total

XXXX

CAR subjects

Total Max. 21

F. Students with HKDSE Level 2 or above in M1 or M2 and Level 3 or above in Chemistry,

but not in Physics & Biology:

Subject code Subject Credits

Semester 1

FAST1000 Freshman Seminar – Science to Improve Quality of Life 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 1 3

AP10001 Introduction to Physics 3

ABCT1741 General Chemistry I 3

ABCT1101 Introductory Life Science 3

AMA1007 Calculus & Linear Algebra 3

Total 18

Semester 2

APSS1L01 Tomorrow’s Leader 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 2 3

CBSXXXX Chinese LCR subject 3

AMA1006 Basic Statistics 2

AP10008

AP10009

ABCT1102

ABCT1103

AP10007

DSR subjects available for selection:

University Physics I

University Physics II

General Biology

General Laboratory Techniques and Safety

Applied Physics Laboratory

No more than

10 credits in

total

XXXX

CAR subjects

Total Max. 21

29


G. Students with HKDSE Level 3 or above in Biology but not in Physics & Chemistry, and

without Level 2 or above in M1 or M2:

Subject code Subject Credits

Semester 1

FAST1000 Freshman Seminar – Science to Improve Quality of Life 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 1 3

AP10001 Introduction to Physics 3

ABCT1700 Introduction to Chemistry 3

ABCT1102 General Biology 3

AMA1100 Basic Mathematics 2

Total 17

Semester 2

APSS1L01 Tomorrow’s Leader 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 2 3

CBSXXXX Chinese LCR subject 3

AMA1006 Basic Statistics 2

AMA1007 Calculus & Linear Algebra 3

AP10008

AP10009

ABCT1741

ABCT1103

AP10007

DSR subjects available for selection:

University Physics I

University Physics II

General Chemistry I

General Laboratory Techniques and Safety

Applied Physics Laboratory

No more than

7 credits in

total

XXXX

CAR subjects

Total Max. 21

H. Students with HKDSE Level 2 or above in M1 or M2 and Level 3 or above in Biology, but

not in Physics & Chemistry:

Subject code Subject Credits

Semester 1

FAST1000 Freshman Seminar – Science to Improve Quality of Life 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 1 3

AP10001 Introduction to Physics 3

ABCT1700 Introduction to Chemistry 3

ABCT1102 General Biology 3

AMA1007 Calculus & Linear Algebra 3

Total 18

Semester 2

APSS1L01 Tomorrow’s Leader 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 2 3

CBSXXXX Chinese LCR subject 3

AMA1006 Basic Statistics 2

AP10008

AP10009

ABCT1741

ABCT1103

AP10007

DSR subjects available for selection:

University Physics I

University Physics II

General Chemistry I

General Laboratory Techniques and Safety

Applied Physics Laboratory

No more than

10 credits in

total

XXXX

CAR subjects

Total Max. 21

30


I. Students with HKDSE Level 3 or above in Physics & Chemistry but not in Biology, and

without Level 2 or above in M1 or M2:

Subject code Subject Credits

Semester 1

FAST1000 Freshman Seminar – Science to Improve Quality of Life 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 1 3

AP10008 University Physics I 3

ABCT1741 General Chemistry I 3

ABCT1101 Introductory Life Science 3

AMA1100 Basic Mathematics 2

Total 17

Semester 2

APSS1L01 Tomorrow’s Leader 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 2 3

CBSXXXX Chinese LCR subject 3

AMA1006 Basic Statistics 2

AMA1007 Calculus & Linear Algebra 3

AP10009

ABCT1102

ABCT1103

AP10007

DSR subjects available for selection:

University Physics II

General Biology

General Laboratory Techniques and Safety

Applied Physics Laboratory

No more than

7 credits in

total

XXXX

CAR subjects

Total Max. 21

J. Students with HKDSE Level 2 or above in M1 or M2 and Level 3 or above in Physics &

Chemistry, but not in Biology:

Subject code Subject Credits

Semester 1

FAST1000 Freshman Seminar – Science to Improve Quality of Life 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 1 3

AP10008 University Physics I 3

ABCT1741 General Chemistry I 3

ABCT1101 Introductory Life Science 3

AMA1007 Calculus & Linear Algebra 3

Total 18

Semester 2

APSS1L01 Tomorrow’s Leader 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 2 3

CBSXXXX Chinese LCR subject 3

AMA1006 Basic Statistics 2

AP10009

ABCT1102

ABCT1103

AP10007

DSR subjects available for selection:

University Physics II

General Biology

General Laboratory Techniques and Safety

Applied Physics Laboratory

No more than

10 credits in

total

XXXX

CAR subjects

Total Max. 21

31


K. Students with HKDSE Level 3 or above in Physics & Biology but not in Chemistry, and

without Level 2 or above in M1 or M2:

Subject code Subject Credits

Semester 1

FAST1000 Freshman Seminar – Science to Improve Quality of Life 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 1 3

AP10008 University Physics I 3

ABCT1700 Introduction to Chemistry 3

ABCT1102 General Biology 3

AMA1100 Basic Mathematics 2

Total 17

Semester 2

APSS1L01 Tomorrow’s Leader 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 2 3

CBSXXXX Chinese LCR subject 3

AMA1006 Basic Statistics 2

AMA1007 Calculus & Linear Algebra 3

AP10009

ABCT1741

ABCT1103

AP10007

DSR subjects available for selection:

University Physics II

General Chemistry I

General Laboratory Techniques and Safety

Applied Physics Laboratory

No more than

7 credits in

total

XXXX

CAR subjects

Total Max. 21

L. Students with HKDSE Level 2 or above in M1 or M2 and Level 3 or above in Physics &

Biology, but not in Chemistry:

Subject code Subject Credits

Semester 1

FAST1000 Freshman Seminar – Science to Improve Quality of Life 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 1 3

AP10008 University Physics I 3

ABCT1700 Introduction to Chemistry 3

ABCT1102 General Biology 3

AMA1007 Calculus & Linear Algebra 3

Total 18

Semester 2

APSS1L01 Tomorrow’s Leader 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 2 3

CBSXXXX Chinese LCR subject 3

AMA1006 Basic Statistics 2

AP10009

ABCT1741

ABCT1103

AP10007

DSR subjects available for selection:

University Physics II

General Chemistry I

General Laboratory Techniques and Safety

Applied Physics Laboratory

No more than

10 credits in

total

XXXX

CAR subjects

Total Max. 21

32


M. Students with HKDSE Level 3 or above in Chemistry & Biology but not in Physics, and

without Level 2 or above in M1 or M2:

Subject code Subject Credits

Semester 1

FAST1000 Freshman Seminar – Science to Improve Quality of Life 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 1 3

AP10001 Introduction to Physics 3

ABCT1741 General Chemistry I 3

ABCT1102 General Biology 3

AMA1100 Basic Mathematics 2

Total 17

Semester 2

APSS1L01 Tomorrow’s Leader 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 2 3

CBSXXXX Chinese LCR subject 3

AMA1006 Basic Statistics 2

AMA1007 Calculus & Linear Algebra 3

AP10008

AP10009

ABCT1103

AP10007

DSR subjects available for selection:

University Physics I

University Physics II

General Laboratory Techniques and Safety

Applied Physics Laboratory

No more than

7 credits in

total

XXXX

CAR subjects

Total Max. 21

N. Students with HKDSE Level 2 or above in M1 or M2 and Level 3 or above in Chemistry &

Biology, but not in Physics:

Subject code Subject Credits

Semester 1

FAST1000 Freshman Seminar – Science to Improve Quality of Life 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 1 3

AP10001 Introduction to Physics 3

ABCT1741 General Chemistry I 3

ABCT1102 General Biology 3

AMA1007 Calculus & Linear Algebra 3

Total 18

Semester 2

APSS1L01 Tomorrow’s Leader 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 2 3

CBSXXXX Chinese LCR subject 3

AMA1006 Basic Statistics 2

AP10008

AP10009

ABCT1103

AP10007

DSR subjects available for selection:

University Physics I

University Physics II

General Laboratory Techniques and Safety

Applied Physics Laboratory

No more than

10 credits in

total

XXXX

CAR subjects

Total Max. 21

33


O. Students with HKDSE Level 3 or above in Physics, Chemistry & Biology, but without Level

2 or above in M1 or M2:

Subject code Subject Credits

Semester 1

FAST1000 Freshman Seminar – Science to Improve Quality of Life 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 1 3

AP10008 University Physics I 3

ABCT1741 General Chemistry I 3

ABCT1102 General Biology 3

AMA1100 Basic Mathematics 2

Total 17

Semester 2

APSS1L01 Tomorrow’s Leader 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 2 3

CBSXXXX Chinese LCR subject 3

AMA1006 Basic Statistics 2

AMA1007 Calculus & Linear Algebra 3

AP10009

ABCT1103

AP10007

XXXX

DSR subjects available for selection:

University Physics II

General Laboratory Techniques and Safety

Applied Physics Laboratory

CAR subjects

No more than

7 credits in

total

Total Max. 21

P. Students with HKDSE Level 2 or above in M1 or M2 and Level 3 or above in Physics,

Chemistry & Biology:

Subject code Subject Credits

Semester 1

FAST1000 Freshman Seminar – Science to Improve Quality of Life 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 1 3

AP10008 University Physics I 3

ABCT1741 General Chemistry I 3

ABCT1102 General Biology 3

AMA1007 Calculus & Linear Algebra 3

Total 18

Semester 2

APSS1L01 Tomorrow’s Leader 3

ELCXXXX English LCR subject 2 3

CBSXXXX Chinese LCR subject 3

AMA1006 Basic Statistics 2

AP10009

ABCT1103

AP10007

XXXX

DSR subjects available for selection:

University Physics II

General Laboratory Techniques and Safety

Applied Physics Laboratory

CAR subjects

No more than

10 credits in

total

Total Max. 21

34


Appendix C

Programme Executive Group and Academic Advisors

Name Department Direct line E-mail address

Dr Kam-Len Daniel Lee

Programme Leader,

Broad Discipline of

Applied Sciences /

BSc(Hons) Applied

Biology with

Biotechnology

Applied Biology

and Chemical

Technology

Room: Y853

3400 8729 kam-len.daniel.lee@polyu.edu.hk

Dr Michael Wing-Yiu Yu

Programme Leader,

BSc(Hons) Chemical

Technology

Dr C.L. Mak

Programme Leader,

BSc(Hons) Engineering

Physics

Dr Han-hua Liang

Programme Leader,

BSc(Hons) Food Safety

and Technology

Dr Joseph Lee

Programme Leader,

BSc(Hons) Investment

Science

Applied Biology

and Chemical

Technology

Room: Y849

Applied Physics

Room: CD624

Applied Biology

and Chemical

Technology

Room: Y804

Applied

Mathematics

Room: HJ632

3400 8725 wing-yiu.yu@polyu.edu.hk

2766 5669 c.l.mak@polyu.edu.hk

3400 8663 han-hua.liang@polyu.edu.hk

2766 6951 joseph.lee@polyu.edu.hk

35


Appendix D

Grades to Denote Overall Subject Assessments (and subject components*, if deemed appropriate)

Subject grades

Interpretation

A+ Exceptionally Outstanding

A

Outstanding

B+ Very Good

B

Good

C+ Wholly Satisfactory

C

Satisfactory

D+ Barely Satisfactory

D

Barely Adequate

F

Inadequate

Codes Interpretation Remarks

I #

Assessment to be

completed

An incomplete grade must be converted to a regular grade normally in

the following academic year at the latest.

N Assessment is not required ⎯

P

U

Pass on an ungraded

subject

Fail on an ungraded

subject

This code applies to an ungraded subject, such as industrial training.

This code applies to an ungraded subject, such as industrial training.

M Pass with Merit This code applies to all General Education subjects. The adoption or

otherwise of this code to other subjects adopting a "Pass/Fail" grading

system would be subject to the decision of individual Departments.

The grade "Pass with Merit" can be awarded when the student's work

exceeds the subject learning outcomes in the majority of regards.

L

Subject to be continued in

the following semester

This code applies to subjects like "Project" which may consist of

more than 1 part (denoted by the same subject code) and for which

continuous assessment is deemed appropriate.

S Absent from assessment ⎯

W Withdrawn from subject Dropping of subjects after the add/drop period is normally not

allowed. Requests for withdrawal from subjects after the add/drop

period and prior to examination will only be considered under

exceptional circumstances. This code is given when a student has

obtained exceptional approval from Department to withdraw from a

subject after the "add/drop" period and prior to examination;

otherwise, a failure grade (grade F) should be awarded.

Z Exempted ⎯

T Transfer of credit ⎯

* Entry of grades/codes for subject components is optional.

# For cases where students fail marginally in one of the components within a subject, the BoE can defer making a

final decision until the students concerned have completed the necessary remedial work to the satisfaction of

the subject examiner(s). The students can be assigned an ' I ' code in this circumstance.

Note: Subjects with the assigned codes I, N, P, U, M, L, W, Z and T (if the subject is without grade transferred)

will be omitted in the calculation of the GPA. A subject assigned code S will be taken as zero in the calculation

36


Appendix E

Grade Point to Grade Conversion Methodology

for Deriving Subject Overall Grade

Grade point range

Subject overall grade

derived by the computer

Corresponding grade point

used for GPA calculation

4.15 – 4.5 A+ 4.5

3.75 – 4.14 A 4

3.25 – 3.74 B+ 3.5

2.75 – 3.24 B 3

2.25 – 2.74 C+ 2.5

1.75 – 2.24 C 2

1.25 – 1.74 D+ 1.5

0.6 – 1.24 D 1

0 – 0.59 F 0

37


Appendix F

Different types of GPA, and their calculation methods

Types of GPA Purpose Rules for GPA calculation

GPA

Determine

Progression/

Graduation

(1) All academic subjects taken by the student

throughout his study, both inside and outside

the programme curriculum, are included in

the GPA calculation.

(2) For training subjects, including WIE and

Clinical/Field subjects, departments can

decide whether to include them in the GPA

calculation.

(3) For retake subjects, only the last attempt will

be taken in the GPA calculation.

(4) Level weighting, if any, will be ignored.

Semester GPA

Weighted GPA

Determine

Progression

To give an

interim

indication on

the likely Award

GPA

Similar to the rules for GPA as described above,

except that only subjects taken in that Semester,

including retaken subjects, will be included in the

calculation.

(1) Similar to the rules for GPA, except that only

subjects inside the programme curriculum

concerned will be included in the calculation.

Subjects outside the programme curriculum

will be excluded.

(2) Departments can decide whether the training

subjects are to be counted towards the

Weighted GPA.

(3) For retake subjects, only the last attempt will

be taken in the Weighted GPA calculation.

(4) A weighting of 2 for Level 1 and 2 subjects,

and a weighting of 3 for Level 3 and 4

subjects, will be included in the calculation

to determine the Honours classifications.

(5) The weighted GPA will be the same as the

Award GPA unless a student has taken more

subjects than required.

38


Types of GPA Purpose Rules for GPA calculation

Major/Minor

Major/Minor GPA

GPA

For reference

and

determination of

award

classification

(1) Only subjects inside the curriculum of the

Major/Minor Programmes will be taken in

the Major/ Minor GPA calculation.

(2) Departments can decide whether the training

subjects, are to be counted towards the

Major/Minor GPA.

(3) For retake subjects, only the last attempt will

be taken in the Major/Minor GPA

calculation.

(4) Up to 6 credits from the Major/GUR

[including Language Communication

Requirements (LCR) subjects at proficiency

level] can be counted towards the chosen

Minor.

Major GPA

Level weighting will be included in the calculation

of Major GPA.

Minor GPA

Level weighting will not be included in the

calculation of Minor GPA.

Award GPA

For

determination of

award

classification

If the student has not taken more subjects than

required, the Award GPA will be as follows:

(1) For single Major:

Award GPA = Weighted GPA

(2) For Major/Minor programmes:

Award GPA = Major GPA

39


Appendix G

Subject Description Forms

Table of Contents

Page

1. ABCT1101 Introductory Life Science 41 – 43

2. ABCT1102 General Biology 44 – 46

3. ABCT1103 General Laboratory Techniques and Safety 47 – 49

4. ABCT1700 Introduction to Chemistry 50 – 51

5. ABCT1741 General Chemistry 1 52 – 53

6. AMA1006 Basic Statistics 54 – 55

7. AMA1007 Calculus and Linear Algebra 56 – 57

8. AMA1100 Basic Mathematics - an introduction to Algebra 58 – 59

and Differential Calculus

9. AP10001 Introduction to Physics 60 – 61

10. AP10007 Applied Physics Laboratory 62 – 63

11. AP10008 University Physics I 64 – 65

12. AP10009 University Physics II 66 – 67

13. APSS1L01 Tomorrow’s Leaders 68 – 74

14. CBS1101P Fundamentals of Chinese Communication 75 – 77

15. CBS1102P Advanced Communication Skills in Chinese 78 – 80

16. CBS1151 Chinese I (for non-Chinese speaking students) 81 – 82

17. CBS1152 Chinese II (for non-Chinese speaking students) 83 – 84

18. CBS2151 Chinese III (for non-Chinese speaking students) 85 – 86

19. CBS2152 Chinese Literature – Linguistics and Cultural 87 – 89

Perspectives (for non-Chinese speaking students)

20. ELC1011 Practical English for University Studies 90 – 92

21. ELC1012 /

English for University Studies 93 – 95

ELC1013

22. ELC1014 Advanced English for University Studies 96 – 98

23. ELC2011 Advanced English Reading and Writing Skills 99 – 101

24. ELC2012 Persuasive Communication 102 – 103

25. ELC2013 English in Literature and Film 104 – 106

26. FAST1000 Freshman Seminar – Science to Improve Quality

of Life

107 – 111

40


Subject Description Form

Subject Code

Subject Title

ABCT1D04/ABCT1101

Introductory Life Science

Credit Value 3

Level 1

Pre-requisite /

Co-requisite/

Exclusion

Objectives

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Subject Synopsis/

Indicative Syllabus

No pre-requisite

In this subject, students will be introduced to the very basic background knowledge

and concepts in biology, together with some recent advances in biotechnology. The

main aim of this subject is to arouse students’ interest in biological developments so

that they can appreciate the impact of biotechnology.

Upon completion of the subject, students will be able to:

(a) have a basic understanding of the biological world

(b) appreciate the importance of the biological world to human

(c) appreciate the recent biotechnological advancement and their impacts

The different forms of biological organisms:

Contact Hours

(1) Viruses, Bacteria, Protozoa, Algae, Fungi, Plants, Animals 1 Hr

(2) The involvement of these different organisms in our daily life 1 Hr

(3) The importance of ecology and biodiversity to human 1 Hr

The cell:

(1) The building blocks of biological organisms 1 Hr

(2) Structure and functions 2 Hrs

(3) Different types of cells 1 Hr

(4) Cell division and proliferation 2 Hrs

The heredity:

(1) The genetic material 1 Hr

(2) The genetic information in the form of genes 2 Hrs

(3) The expression of the genetic information 2 Hrs

(4) The passing of genetic information to offspring 2 Hrs

41


The organization and functions of complex biological organisms:

(1) The structure and functions of plants 1 Hr

(2) The importance of plants to human 1 Hr

(3) The structure and functions of animals – human as an example 1 Hr

(4) Organization of tissues, organs and functional systems in human 5 Hrs

Modern biotechnology:

(1) Major developments:

(a) In vitro fertilization 1 Hr

(b) Gene cloning 2 Hrs

(c) GM foods 2 Hrs

(d) GM organisms 2 Hrs

(e) Gene therapy 1 Hr

(f) Stem cell therapy 1 Hr

(g) Human genome project 2 Hrs

(h) Human cloning 1 Hr

(2) Their impacts on our life, present and future, and the environment 2 Hrs

(3) Ethical, social and legal issues 4 Hrs

Teaching/Learning

Methodology

In the lectures, the basic concepts and knowledge will be delivered to the students.

These knowledge and concepts will be further enhanced through tutorial exercises,

discussions and debates during tutorials, and through assessments.

Assessment Methods

in Alignment with

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Specific assessment

methods/tasks

%

weighting

Intended subject learning outcomes to

be assessed (Please tick as

appropriate)

a b c

1.Written assessment I 15%

2.Written assessment II 20%

3.Written assignment 15%

4. End of subject exam 50%

Total 100 %

Each student will be required to read broadly and to complete a written assignment

in which an understanding of some of the major concepts and knowledge has to be

demonstrated. In this written assignment, a student will also need to express his/her

critical evaluation of the impacts of a new development in biotechnology. This

assignment will be in the form of a critical review essay.

A student will also need to take two tests (Written assessments I & II) which will

gauge their learning outcomes at two separate stages of the subject. These

42


assessments will also allow students to get feedbacks on their performance and how

well they are achieving the learning outcomes.

Student Study Effort

Expected

There will also be an end of subject assessment which will assess all of the four

learning outcomes. This will most likely be in the form of an examination.

Class contact:

• Lectures 28Hrs.

• Tutorials 14Hrs.

Other student study effort:

• Self Study 66Hrs.

Total student study effort

108Hrs.

Reading List and

References

43


Subject Description Form

Subject Code

Subject Title

ABCT1102

General Biology

Credit Value 3

Level 1

Pre-requisite /

Co-requisite/

Exclusion

Objectives

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Pre-requisite: ABCT 1101, or completed HKDSE level biology as a full subject or

as a component in a Combined Science subject.

In this subject, students will learn the basic knowledge and concepts in various areas

of biology at the university entry level. It underpins all the other subjects in

biological or health fields.

Upon completion of the subject, students will be able to:

(a) have a basic understanding of the structure and functions of the cell

(b) have a basic understanding of genetics and inheritance

(c) have a basic understanding of the structure and function of animals

(d) have a basic understanding of the structure and function of plants

(e) appreciate the importance of evolution and biological diversity

Subject Synopsis/

Indicative Syllabus

THE CELL:

Molecules and structure of the cell

Activities inside the cell

Harvesting chemical energy in the cell

Photosynthesis: Harvesting light energy and producing food

Contact Hours

2 Hr

2 Hr

2 Hrs

2 Hrs

CELLULAR REPRODUCTION AND GENETICS

Reproduction and inheritance at the cellular level

Patterns of inheritance

Molecular biology of the gene

Gene control

DNA technology and genomics

2 Hrs

2 Hrs

2 Hrs

2 Hrs

2 Hrs

EVOLUTION AND BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY

The origin and evolution of microbial life: Prokaryotes and protests

Plants, fungi, and the colonization of Land

Invertebrate diversity

Vertebrate diversity

2 Hr

1 Hr

1 Hr

1 Hr

44


ANIMALS: FORM AND FUNCTION

Unifying concepts of animal structure and function

Nutrition and digestion

Gas exchange and circulation

Control of body temperature and water balance

Hormones and the endocrine system

Reproduction

2 Hr

2 Hr

2 Hr

2 Hrs

2 Hr

2 Hr

Control systems in plants

2 Hr

ECOLOGY

The biosphere

Behavioral adaptations to the environment

Population ecology

Communities and ecosystems

Conservation biology

1 Hr

1 Hr

1 Hr

1 Hr

1 Hr

Teaching/Learning

Methodology

Lectures

Tutorials with exercises and discussions

mini-projectSelf Study

Assessment Methods

in Alignment with

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Specific assessment

methods/tasks

%

weighting

Intended subject learning outcomes to

be assessed (Please tick as appropriate)

a b c d e

1.Written assessment I 15%

2.Written assessment II 15%

3.Written assignment 10%

4. Presentation 5%

5. Tutorial attendance 5%

6. End of subject exam 50%

Total 100 %

Student Study Effort

Expected

Class contact:

• Lectures 28Hrs.

• Tutorials 14Hrs.

Other student study effort:

45


• Self Study 66Hrs.

• Hrs.

Total student study effort

108Hrs.

Reading List and

References

Text book:

Campbell Biology: Concepts and Connections, 7/E

Jane B. Reece, Martha R. Taylor, Eric J. Simon, Jean L. Dickey

Pearson 2012

Reference:

Essentials of Biology, 3/E

Sylvia S. Mader

McGraw-Hill 2012

46


Subject Description Form

Subject Code

Subject Title

ABCT1103

General Laboratory Techniques and Safety

Credit Value 3

Level 1

Pre-requisite/

Co-requisite/

Exclusion

Objectives

NIL

To introduce the basic techniques commonly used in biological and chemical

experimental studies, as well as safety practices in biological and chemical

laboratories.

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Subject Synopsis/

Indicative Syllabus

Upon completion of the subject, students will be able to:

(a) understand the basic and common techniques used in biological and chemical

laboratories;

(b) prepare laboratory records and make accurate observations in the form of a

laboratory notebook;

(c) analyze and interpret properly data obtained from laboratory work; and

(d) report the laboratory work in a properly written form;

(e) understand the general laboratory safety, the biological safety and the chemical

safety practices.

Laboratory Safety

The PolyU Health and Safety Policy;

General laboratory safety practices;

Hazards and risk assessment;

General principles of biosafety;

Basic laboratories – Biosafety Levels 1 and 2;

Equipment designed to reduce biological hazards;

Safe laboratory techniques; disinfection and sterilization;

Hazards associated with chemicals and chemical waste;

General knowledge on the handling, storage and disposal of chemicals and chemical

wastes;

Personal protection and protective clothing for handling of potentially hazardous

chemicals, chemical wastes and spillages;

Laws pertaining to the handling and storage of chemicals: dangerous goods,

controlled chemicals, dangerous substances used in industry, disposal of chemical

waste and others.

Basic Laboratory Measurements

Measurement of weight, volume, temperature, pH; uncertainty in measurements and

statistics; basic mathematical techniques, proportional relationships, relationships and

graphs

Basic Solution Techniques

Use of analytical balances, graduated glassware; water for laboratory use;

concentrations and calculation;, preparation of laboratory solutions, reagents and

standard solutions; dilutions and serial dilutions; biological / physiological solutions,

sterilization of solutions

47


General Laboratory Techniques

Microscopy: principles of light microscopy and electron microscopy; proper use and

care of light microscopes. Staining of chromosomes; staining of bacteria; preparation

of slides for microscopy.

Centrifugation: principle of centrifugation, different modes of centrifugation, use of

centrifugation in separation of cells or subcellular particles.

Measurements involving light: transmission, reflection, scattering, absorption,

principle of spectrophotometry, use of spectrophotometer; standard curves and

calibration.

Bacterial culture medium and culture plates, culture transfer and cultivation, plate

streaking/spreading; growth curve; identification of bacteria.

Qualitative techniques for inorganic analysis, solvent extraction, gravimetric analysis,

acid-base titration, complexometric titration, redox titration, precipitation titration

Proper record keeping and documentation;

Teaching/Learning

Methodology

Assessment Methods

in Alignment with

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Proper data analysis and report writing

The basic principles and concepts of the basic laboratory techniques and laboratory

safety will be delivered in the form of lectures. To practice, students will work

individually or in teams in the laboratory sessions, and each session will be

supplemented with in-lab briefing and demonstration. Each student will be required

to keep up-to-the-minute record of the laboratory works in the form of a laboratory

notebook.

Specific assessment

methods/tasks

%

weighting

Intended subject learning outcomes

to be assessed (Please tick as

appropriate)

a b c d e

1. Laboratory reports 30

2. Laboratory Notebook 20

3. Laboratory

performances

30


4. Quizzes 20

Total 100 %

Learning outcomes will be gauged through quizzes, laboratory notebooks, and

laboratory reports. Student will also be assessed on their laboratory practices in

selected laboratory sessions.

Through the quizzes, students will be assessed on their understanding of the basic

concepts and principles of the common laboratory techniques and safety.

Through the laboratory notebooks, students will be assessed on their record keeping

and accuracy in observation.

48


In the laboratory reports, students are expected to perform analysis on the data

obtained as well as to interpret their findings. Their abilities in these aspects may thus

be assessed.

The performance of students during the laboratory sessions will be monitored and

assessed to gauge their mastering of the basic techniques and their practice of

laboratory safety.

Student Study Effort

Expected

Class contact:

• Lectures 14 Hrs.

• Laboratory session (4 hr per session X 10 weeks) 40 Hrs.

Other student study effort:

• Self-study 50 Hrs.

• Laboratory reports 30 Hrs.

Reading List and

References

Total student study effort

134 Hrs.

Fleming & Hunt (Editors) Biological Safety Principles and Practices 4 th Edition

ASM Press 2006

Laboratory Biosafety Manual, Second Edition (Revised); World Health

Organization, Geneva 2003

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for

Disease Control and Prevention and National Institutes of Health; Biosafety in

Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories, Fourth Edition; U.S. Department of

Health and Human Services Washington 1999

Hall, Stephen K.; Chemical Safety in the Laboratory; Boca Raton, Fla.: Lewis

Pubishers, 1994

United Nations Environment Programme, The International Labour Organisation, and

the World Health Organization; Assessing human health risks of chemicals:

derivation of guidance values for health-based exposure limits; World Health

Organization, Geneva 1994

HKSAR Justice Department; HKSAR Bilingual Laws Information

System; http://www.justice.gov.hk/Home.htm HKSAR Justice Department Webpage

Seidman & Moore Basic Laboratory Methods for Biotechnology: Textbook and

Laboratory Reference Prentice-Hall 2000

Norrell & Messley Microbiology Laboratory Manual Second Edition Pearson 2003

Vogel, A. I.; Barnes, J. D.; Denney, R. C.; Mendham, J.; Thomas, M. J. K. Vogel’s

Quantitative Chemical Analysis, 6 th edition, Harlow: Prentice Hall, 2000

Svehla, G. Vogel's Qualitative Inorganic Analysis, 7 th edition, Harlow: Longman,

1996

49


Subject Description Form

Subject Code

Subject Title

ABCT1700

Introduction to Chemistry

Credit Value 3

Level 1

Pre-requisite /

Co-requisite/

Exclusion

Objectives

No pre-requisite. This subject is intended for students who DO NOT have

background in NSS Chemistry

This is a one-semester introductory course of Chemistry. This course surveys the

fundamental concepts in chemistry for understanding structure and properties of the

material universe. Principles will be illustrated with application to daily life.

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Subject Synopsis/

Indicative Syllabus

Upon completion of the subject, students will be able to:

a. understand the core concepts of chemistry;

b. describe chemical structures and events using standard representations;

c. apply and incorporate the chemical principles and knowledge learned to solve

chemical problems and to appreciate modern applications in real life.

Foundation: atoms, molecules and ionic compounds, masses of atoms,

stoichiometry, naming of chemical compounds, physical properties of compounds,

Periodic table

Chemical Reactions: Chemical equations, major reaction types, enthalpy of chemical

processes

Atoms: Light, electrons, quantum numbers and atomic orbitals, electronic

configurations; general periodic trends in properties among elements.

Chemical Bonding: Nature of chemical bonding, ionic bond, covalent bond, valence

bond theory and hybridization; resonance; molecular shape by VSEPR method, bond

polarity, intermolecular forces.

Chemistry of Carbon: Naming of compounds containing carbon chains and

rings. Isomerism, regioisomers and optical isomers. Major functional groups:

alkanes, alkenes, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and esters.

Major reactions and properties of functional groups.

Teaching/Learning

Methodology

Lecture: the fundamental principles of chemistry will be explained. Examples will be

used to illustrate the concepts and ideas in the lecture. Take-home problem sets will

be given, and the students are encouraged to solve the problems before seeking

assistance.

Tutorials: students present their solutions on a set of problems in the tutorials.

Students should try the problems before seeking assistance. These problem sets

provide them opportunities to apply the knowledge gained from the lecture. They also

help the students consolidate and familiarize with what they have learned.

Furthermore, students can develop a deeper understanding of the subject through

group discussion and self-study.

50


Assessment Methods

in Alignment with

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Specific assessment

methods/tasks

%

weighting

Intended subject learning outcomes to

be assessed (Please tick as

appropriate)

a b c

1.written examination 50 × × ×

2. continuous

assessment

50 × × ×

Total 100 %

Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the

intended learning outcomes:

Assignments, quizzes and examinations are used to assess student’s learning in key

physical concepts in atomic structure, chemical bonding, and chemical reactions.

Homework assignments (e.g. end-of-chapter exercises and online assignments) would

reinforce student’s knowledge in these key topics and practice for their numerical

skills and problem-solving skill through analysis of experimental data.

Student Study Effort

Expected

Class contact:

• Lecture 36 Hrs.

• Tutorial 6 Hrs.

Other student study effort:

• Self study 50 Hrs.

• Problem assignments / homework 16 Hrs.

Total student study effort

108 Hrs.

Reading List and

References

Essential (tentative)

Tro, Nivaldo Introductory Chemistry Pearson 2012

51


Subject Description Form

Subject Code

Subject Title

ABCT1741

General Chemistry I

Credit Value 3

Level 1

Pre-requisite

HKDSE Chemistry or Combined Science with Chemistry component Level 3 or

Introduction to Chemistry or Chemistry and Modern Living

Objectives (1) To introduce a molecular perspective for understanding the natural world

(2) To identify the fundamental principles underlying any physical and chemical

changes of matters

(3) To visualize the physical and chemical changes through the understanding of

molecular behavior

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Subject Synopsis/

Indicative Syllabus

Upon completion of the subject, students will be able to:

(a) understand the macroscopic properties of the states of matters;

(b) understand the basic principles of chemical energetics and equilibria;

(c) apply and incorporate the chemical principles and knowledge learned to

solve chemical problems and to appreciate modern applications in real

life;

(d) demonstrate the abilities in communication as well as skills in problemsolving

and analytical thinking.

Measurement in Chemistry: Significant figures; SI units; substances and

mixtures; solution and concentration; mole and Avogadro’s number; chemical

reactions and balanced equations; temperature scales

Thermochemistry: Heat and Work, The First Law of Thermodynamics, Heat

of Reactions (ΔU and ΔH), Hess’s law

Chemical Kinetics: Reaction rates and measurements; the rate law and rate

constant; molecularity and mechanism of a reaction; collision theory;

activated complexes; transition state theory and; chain reaction; catalysis;

enzymatic reactions

Physical Properties of Solutions: Solution concentration, intermolecular

forces and the solution process, solubilities of gases, vapor pressues of

solutions, osmotic pressure, freezing point depression and boiling point

elevation, solutions of electrolytes, colloidal properties

Principle of Chemical Equilibria: law of chemical equilibrium and

equilibrium constant; Le Chatelier principle

Acid-Base Equilibria in Aqueous Solutions: Ionization of water; pH, pOH

52


and pKw; acids and bases; polyprotic acids; buffers; solubility equilibria

Solubility and Complex-Ion Equilibria: Solubility constants and solubility,

common ion effects, precipitation, equilibria involving complex ions

Structures and Reactions of Organic Compounds: Isomerisms, functional

groups of organic compounds, nucleophilic substation reactions, elimination

reactions, addition reactions of alkenes, electrophilic aromatic substitution,

reactions of alkanes, polymers and polymerization reactions

Teaching/Learning

Methodology

Lectures supplemented with guided reading will be used to introduce the key

concepts of the topics. Home works or assignments would be given for students to

enhance their learning. Tutorials will be arranged and students would be assigned in

small groups for discussion.

Assessment Methods

in Alignment with

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Specific assessment

methods/tasks

%

weighting

Intended subject learning outcomes to

be assessed (Please tick as appropriate)

a b c d

1.written examination 50 √ √ √ √

2. continuous

assessment

50 √ √ √ √

Total 100 %

Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the

intended learning outcomes:

Student Study Effort

Expected

Class contact:

• Lectures 28 Hrs.

• Tutorials 14 Hrs.

Other student study effort:

• Self-study 56 Hrs.

• Home work and assignments 20 Hrs.

Total student study effort

118 Hrs.

Reading List and

References

Essential reading

Petrucci, Herring, Madura and Biossonnette, General Chemistry: Principle and

Modern Applications, 10 th edition, 2011, Pearson

53


Subject Description Form

Subject Code

Subject Title

AMA1006

Basic Statistics

Credit Value 2

Level 1

Pre-requisite

and/or Exclusion(s)

Objectives

Pre-requisite: HKDSE extended module in Calculus and Statistics (M1) or HKDSE

extended module in Calculus and Algebra (M2) or Basic Mathematics (AMA1100)

This subject is to introduce to students the fundamental concepts of probability

distributions, sampling, and estimation of parameters in statistics.

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Subject Synopsis/

Indicative Syllabus

Upon completion of the subject, students will be able to:

(a) apply statistical reasoning to describe and analyze essential features of data sets

and different problems

(b) extend their knowledge of statistical techniques and adapt inferential procedures to

different situations

(c) develop and extrapolate statistical concepts in synthesizing and solving problems

(d) search for useful information and use statistical tables in solving statistical

problems

(e) undertake the formulation of statistical problems through continuous self-learning

(f) demonstrate the abilities of logical and analytical thinking

Introduction to Probability

Experiment, events and probability. Probability rules. Bayes’ Theorem.

Discrete Random Variables

Introduction to discrete random variables such as uniform, binomial, Poisson, etc. and

their probability distributions. Mathematical expectation.

Continuous random variables

Concept of continuous random variables such as uniform, exponential, normal, etc.

and their probability density functions. Mathematical expectation. Normal

approximation to the binomial distribution.

Sampling Distributions

Population and random samples. Sampling distributions related to sample mean,

sample proportions, and sample variances.

Estimation of Parameters

Concepts of a point estimator and a confidence interval. Point and interval estimates of

a mean and the difference between two means.

54


Teaching/Learning

Methodology

The subject will be delivered mainly through lectures and tutorials. The lectures will

be conducted to introduce the basic statistics concepts of the topics in the syllabus

which are then reinforced by learning activities involving demonstration and tutorial

exercise.

Assessment

Methods in

Alignment with

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Specific assessment

methods/tasks

%

weighting

Intended subject learning outcomes to be

assessed (Please tick as appropriate)

(a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f)

1. Assignments/Test 40 √ √ √ √ √ √

2. Examination 60 √ √ √ √ √ √

Total 100%

To pass this subject, students are required to obtain Grade D or above in

both the Continuous Assessment and Examination components.

Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the

intended learning outcomes:

The subject focuses on knowledge, skill and understanding of Basic Statistics II, thus,

Exam-based assessment is the most appropriate assessment method, including a test

(no more than 40%) and an examination (60%). Moreover, assignments are included

as a component of the continuous assessment so as to keep the students’ learning in

progress.

Student Study

Effort Expected

Class contact:

• lecture 20 Hrs.

• tutorial 8 Hrs.

Other student study effort:

• self-study 44 Hrs.

• Hrs.

Total student study effort

72 Hrs.

Reading List and

Reference

Walpole, R.E., Myers, R.H., Myers, S.L. & Ye, K.Y. (2002). Probability and Statistics

for Engineers and Scientists. 7 th ed. Prentice Hall

Mendenhall, W., Beaver, R.J. & Beaver, B.M. (2006). Introduction to Probability and

Statistics. 12 th ed. Thomson

55


Subject Description Form

Subject Code

Subject Title

AMA1007

Calculus and Linear Algebra

Credit Value 3

Level 1

Pre-requisite /

Co-requisite/

Exclusion

Objectives

Pre-requisite: HKDSE extended module in Calculus and Statistics (M1) or HKDSE

extended module in Calculus and Algebra (M2) or Basic Mathematics (AMA1100)

This subject is to provide students with the basic skills of Calculus, and to introduce

the ideas and techniques of basic linear algebra and its applications.

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Subject Synopsis/

Indicative Syllabus

Upon completion of the subject, students will be able to:

a. apply mathematical reasoning to solve problems in their discipline

b. make use of the knowledge of mathematical techniques and adapt known

solutions to various situations

c. apply mathematical modeling in problem solving in applied sciences

d. develop and extrapolate mathematical concepts in solving new problems

e. undertake continuous learning

Review of basic algebra and trigonometry; Limit and continuity; Derivatives; Mean

Value Theorem; Logarithmic and exponential functions; Maxima and Minima;

Curve sketching; Definite and indefinite integrals; Methods of integration;

Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; Taylor’s Theorem with remainder; Improper

Integrals; Applications.

Matrices, Determinant and systems of linear equations.

Teaching/Learning

Methodology

By lectures, tutorials and exercises

56


Assessment Methods

in Alignment with

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Specific assessment

methods/tasks

%

weighting

Intended subject learning outcomes to

be assessed (Please tick as appropriate)

a b c d e

1. Tests/assignments 40 √ √ √ √ √

2. Examination 60 √ √ √ √ √

Total 100 %

To pass this subject, students are required to obtain Grade D or above in both the

Continuous Assessment and Examination components.

Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the

intended learning outcomes:

By learning how to solve a collection of theoretical and practical mathematical

problems designed and distributed in assignments, tests and examination, the

students will master the basic techniques in calculus and linear algebra, and will be

able to apply the techniques to model and solve simple practical problems in their

discipline.

Student Study Effort

Expected

Class contact:

• lecture 28 Hrs.

• tutorial 14 Hrs.

Other student study effort:

• self-study 66 Hrs.

• Hrs.

Total student study effort

108 Hrs.

Reading List and

References

K.F. Hung, Wilson C.K. Kwan and Glory T.Y. Pong (2011) Foundation

Mathematics & Statistics. McGraw Hill

Chan, C.K., Chan, C.W. & Hung, K.F. (2011) Basic Engineering Mathematics. 3rd

ed. McGraw Hill

Thomas, G.B., Finney, R.L., Weir, M.D. & Giordano, F.R. (2009) Thomas’

Calculus. 12th ed. Addison Wesley

57


Subject Description Form

Subject Code

Subject Title

AMA1100

Basic Mathematics - an introduction to Algebra and Differential Calculus

Credit Value 2

Level 1

Pre-requisite /

Co-requisite/

Exclusion

Objectives

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Exclusion: HKDSE extended module M1 or M2.

This subject aims to introduce students to the basic concepts and principles of

algebra, limit and differentiation. It is designed for those students with only the

compulsory mathematics component in the NSS curriculum. Emphasis will be on

the understanding of fundamental concepts as well as applications of mathematical

techniques in solving practical problems in science and engineering.

Upon completion of the subject, students will be able to:

a. apply mathematical reasoning to solve problems in science and engineering;

b. make use of the knowledge of mathematical techniques and adapt known

solutions to various situations;

c. apply mathematical modeling in problem solving;

d. demonstrate abilities of logical and analytical thinking.

Subject Synopsis/

Indicative Syllabus

Mathematical Induction; Binomial Theorem; Functions and inverse functions;

Trigonometric functions. Limit concepts, derivatives and their physical & geometric

meanings, rules of differentiation.

Teaching/Learning

Methodology

Basic concepts and techniques of topics in algebra and in elementary differential

calculus will be discussed in lectures. These will be further enhanced in tutorials

through practical problem solving.

Assessment Methods

in Alignment with

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Specific assessment

methods/tasks

%

weighting

Intended subject learning outcomes to be

assessed (Please tick as appropriate)

a b c d e

1.Homework, quizzes

and mid-term test

40% √ √ √ √

2. Examination 60% √ √ √ √

Total 100 %

Continuous Assessment comprises of assignments, in-class quizzes, online quizzes

58


and a mid-term test. An examination is held at the end of the semester.

Questions used in assignments, quizzes, tests and examinations are used to assess

students’ level of understanding of the basic concepts and their ability to use

mathematical techniques in solving problems in science and engineering.

To pass this subject, students are required to obtain grade D or above in both the

continuous assessment and the examination components.

Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the

intended learning outcomes:

The subject focuses on understanding of basic concepts and application of

techniques in algebra, limit and differentiation. As such, an assessment method

based mainly on examinations/tests/quizzes is considered appropriate.

Furthermore, students are required to submit homework assignments regularly in

order to allow subject lecturers to keep track of students’ progress in the course.

Student Study Effort

Expected

Class contact:

• Lecture 20 Hours

• Tutorial 8 Hours

Other student study effort:

• Self study 42 Hours

Total student study effort

70 Hours

Reading List and

References

Hung, K.F., Kwan W.C.K and Pong, G.T.Y. Foundation Mathematics & Statistics,

McGraw Hill 2011

Chung, K.C. A short course in calculus and matrices (2 nd edition), McGraw Hill

2010

Lang, S. Short Calculus, Springer 2002

59


Subject Description Form

Subject Code

Subject Title

AP10001

Introduction to Physics

Credit Value 3

Level 1

Pre-requisite/

Co-requisite/

Exclusion

Objectives

Nil

This is a subject designed for students with no background in physics studies.

Fundamental concepts in major topics of physics (mechanics, heat, wave and

electromagnetism) will be discussed. The aim of this subject is to equip students with

some basic physics knowledge, and to appreciate its applications in various branches of

science and technology.

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Upon completion of the subject, students will be able to:

a) solve simple problems in kinematics and Newton’s law;

b) solve problems in heat capacity and latent heat;

c) explain phenomena related to the wave character of light;

d) apply the superposition of waves;

e) define electrostatic field and potential;

f) solve problems on interaction between current and magnetic field; and

g) apply Faraday’s law to various phenomena.

Subject Synopsis/

Indicative Syllabus

Mechanics: scalars and vectors; kinematics and dynamics; Newton’s laws;

momentum, impulse, work and energy; conservation of momentum and

conservation of energy.

Thermal physics: heat and internal energy; heat capacity; conduction,

convection and radiation; latent heat.

Waves: nature of waves; wave motion; reflection and refraction; image

formation by mirrors and lenses; superposition of waves; standing waves;

diffraction and interference; electromagnetic spectrum; sound waves.

Electromagnetism: charges; Coulomb’s law; electric field and potential;

current and resistance; Ohm’s law; magnetic field; magnetic force on moving

charges and current-carrying conductors; Faraday’s law and Lenz’s law.

Teaching/Learning

Methodology

Lecture: Fundamentals in mechanics, waves and electromagnetism will be explained.

Examples will be used to illustrate the concepts and ideas in the lecture. Students are

free to request help. Homework problem sets will be given.

Student-centered Tutorial: Students will work on a set of problems in tutorials.

Students are encouraged to solve problems and to use their own knowledge to verify

their solutions before seeking assistance. These problem sets provide them

60


opportunities to apply their knowledge gained from the lecture. They also help the

students to consolidate what they have learned. Furthermore, students can develop a

deeper understanding of the subject in relation to daily life phenomena or experience.

e-learning: In order to enhance the effectiveness of teaching and learning processes,

electronic means and multimedia technologies would be adopted for presentations of

lectures; communication between students and lecturer; delivery of handouts,

homework and notices etc.

Assessment

Methods in

Alignment with

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Specific assessment

methods/tasks

%

weighting

Intended subject learning outcomes

to be assessed

(Please tick as appropriate)

a b c d e f g

(1) Continuous assessment 40 ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓

(2) Examination 60 ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓

Total 100

Continuous assessment:

The continuous assessment includes assignments, quizzes and test(s) which aim at

checking the progress of students study throughout the course, assisting them in

fulfilling the learning outcomes.

Assignments in general include end-of-chapter problems, which are used to reinforce

and assess the concepts and skills acquired by the students; and to let them know the

level of understanding that they are expected to reach.

At least one test would be administered during the course of the subject as a means of

timely checking of learning progress by referring to the intended outcomes, and as

means of checking how effective the students digest and consolidate the materials

taught in the class.

Examination: This is a major assessment component of the subject. It would be a

closed-book examination. Complicated formulas would be given to avoid rote

memory, such that the emphasis of assessment would be put on testing the

understanding, analysis and problem solving ability of the students.

Student Study

Effort Expected

Class contact:

• Lecture

• Tutorial

Other student study effort:

• Self-study

Total student study effort

36 h

6 h

78 h

120 h

Reading List and

References

John D. Cutnell & Kenneth W. Johnson, Introduction to Physics, 9th edition, 2013,

John Wiley & Sons.

Hewitt, Conceptual Physics, 11th edition, 2010, Benjamin Cummings.

61


Subject Description Form

Subject Code

Subject Title

AP10007

Applied Physics Laboratory

Credit Value 3

Level 2

Pre-requisite/

Co-requisite/

Exclusion

Objectives

Nil

Through lectures and experiments, this subject will provide the fundamental concepts

of measurement of both engineering and physical parameters. Data treatment and

analyzing skills and basic electronic practice such as circuit assembly are also

included.

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Upon completion of the subject, students will be able to:

(a) analyze experimental data by least-squares fit method with first and higher order

polynomials, and perform error analysis;

(b) describe results by a written report containing tabulation of data and graphical

illustrations;

(c) use a CRO to measure electrical signals, and an AC bridge to determine

capacitance and inductance;

(d) apply thermocouples, thermistors and IR thermometers to measure temperature;

(e) use simple lab equipment to measure basic physical constants such as the speed of

light, the Planck’s constant and the Stefan-Boltzmann constant; and

(f) get familiar with LabVIEW based software interfaces for equipment control and

data acquisition.

Subject Synopsis/

Indicative Syllabus

Measurement techniques: standards of fundamental units and derived units; Length:

micrometer; caliper.

Temperature: thermocouple; resistance temperature detector (RTD); thermistor; IR

radiometer.

Time and frequency: counter and timer; determination of polarization orientation.

Basic instrumentation: electronic circuit assembly; use of CRO; function generator;

pulse generator; digital multimeter and AC bridge for LCR measurement.

Data treatments: precision; accuracy and resolution. Gaussian distributions;

systematic and random errors; error estimations; propagation of errors; significant

figures; least-squares fit to a straight line and second order polynomial.

Teaching/Learning

Methodology

The data processing methods and the principles of the laboratory experiments are

introduced in lectures in parallel with the laboratory sessions. This would help

students to develop better understandings of the physical principles and to build up

their capability to write high-quality experimental reports. The working principles of

the equipment are presented in the laboratory manuals and the key points and

62


precautions are highlighted at the beginning of the laboratory class. During the

laboratory session, technician and teaching assistant will assist students to solve

unexpected problems and lead them through the difficult parts. In addition, a

presentation session will be arranged for students to form groups to present on any

topics related to the experiments. This encourages students to go for in-depth self

study, broadens their knowledge and improves their communication skills in technical

discussions.

Assessment Methods

in Alignment with

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Specific assessment

methods/tasks

% weighting Intended subject learning

outcomes to be assessed

(Please tick as appropriate)

a b c d e f

(1) Continuous assessment 40

(2) Practical examination 20

(3) Written test 40

Total 100

Students are expected to excel in physical understanding and practical operation. The

continuous assessment includes the laboratory reports and log books. Written test and

practical examination can evaluate the capabilities of the students in problem solving

and practical operation.

Student Study Effort

Expected

Class contact:

• Lecture 14 h

• Laboratory 42 h

Other student study effort:

• Laboratory report preparation 36 h

• Laboratory manual reading, assignment preparation

and lecture notes review

Total student study effort

28 h

120 h

Reading List and

References

Bevington, P. R., et al., Data Reduction and Error Analysis for the Physical Sciences,

3rd Ed, McGraw-Hill, 2003.

Dunn P. F., Measurement and Data Analysis for Engineering and Science, High

Education, 2005.

Kraftmakher Y., Experiments and Demonstrations in Physics, World Scientific, 2007.

63


Subject Description Form

Subject Code

Subject Title

AP10008

University Physics I

Credit Value 3

Level 1

Pre-requisite/

Co-requisite/

Exclusion

Objectives

Nil

This course provides a broad foundation in mechanics and thermal physics to those

students who are going to study science, engineering, or related programmes.

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Upon completion of the subject, students will be able to:

a) solve simple problems in single-particle mechanics using calculus and vectors;

b) solve problems in mechanics of many-particle systems using calculus and vectors;

c) define simple harmonic motion and solve simple problems;

d) explain the formation of acoustical standing waves and beats;

e) use Doppler’s effect to explain changes in frequency received.

f) explain ideal gas laws in terms of kinetic theory;

g) apply the first law of thermodynamics to simple processes; and

h) solve simple problems related to the Carnot cycle.

Subject Synopsis/

Indicative Syllabus

Mechanics: calculus-based kinematics, dynamics and Newton’s laws; calculus-based

Newtonian mechanics, involving the application of impulse, momentum, work and

energy, etc.; conservation law; gravitation field; systems of particles; collisions; rigid

body rotation; angular momentum; oscillations and simple harmonic motion;

pendulum; statics; longitudinal and transverse waves; travelling wave; Doppler effect;

acoustics.

Thermal physics: conduction, convection and radiation; black body radiation and

energy quantization; ideal gas and kinetic theory; work, heat and internal energy; first

law of thermodynamics; entropy and the second law of thermodynamics; Carnot cycle;

heat engine and refrigerators.

Teaching/Learning

Methodology

Lecture: Fundamentals in mechanics, waves and electromagnetism will be explained.

Examples will be used to illustrate the concepts and ideas in the lecture. Students are

free to request help. Homework problem sets will be given.

Student-centered Tutorial: Students will work on a set of problems in tutorials.

Students are encouraged to solve problems and to use their own knowledge to verify

their solutions before seeking assistance. These problem sets provide them

opportunities to apply their knowledge gained from the lecture. They also help the

students to consolidate what they have learned. Furthermore, students can develop a

deeper understanding of the subject in relation to daily life phenomena or experience.

e-learning: In order to enhance the effectiveness of teaching and learning processes,

electronic means and multimedia technologies would be adopted for presentations of

lectures; communication between students and lecturer; delivery of handouts,

homework and notices etc.

64


Assessment

Methods in

Alignment with

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Specific assessment

methods/tasks

%

weighting

Intended subject learning outcomes to be

assessed

(Please tick as appropriate)

a b c d e f g h

(1) Continuous

40 ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓

assessment

(2) Examination 60 ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓

Total 100

Continuous assessment:

The continuous assessment includes assignments, quizzes and test(s) which aim at

checking the progress of students study throughout the course, assisting them in

fulfilling the learning outcomes.

Assignments in general include end-of-chapter problems, which are used to reinforce

and assess the concepts and skills acquired by the students; and to let them know the

level of understanding that they are expected to reach.

At least one test would be administered during the course of the subject as a means of

timely checking of learning progress by referring to the intended outcomes, and as

means of checking how effective the students digest and consolidate the materials

taught in the class.

Examination: This is a major assessment component of the subject. It would be a

closed-book examination. Complicated formulas would be given to avoid rote

memory, such that the emphasis of assessment would be put on testing the

understanding, analysis and problem solving ability of the students.

Student Study

Effort Expected

Class contact:

• Lecture

• Tutorial

Other student study effort:

• Self-study

Total student study effort:

36 h

6 h

78 h

120 h

Reading List and

References

Young and Freedman, (2007), University Physics, 12th edition, Pearson.

Bauer and Westfall, (2011), University Physics with Modern Physics, 1st edition,

McGraw-Hill.

65


Subject Description Form

Subject Code

Subject Title

AP10009

University Physics II

Credit Value 3

Level 1

Pre-requisite/

Co-requisite/

Exclusion

Objectives

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Nil

To provide students with fundamental knowledge in physics focusing on the topics of

waves and electromagnetism. This course prepares students to study science,

engineering or related programmes.

Upon completion of the subject, students will be able to:

(a) apply simple laws in optics to explain image formation;

(b) explain phenomena related to the wave character of light;

(c) define electrostatic field and potential;

(d) use Gauss’ law in solving problems in electrostatics;

(e) solve problems on interaction between current and magnetic field;

(f) apply electromagnetic induction to various phenomena; and

(g) solve simple problems in AC circuits.

Subject Synopsis/

Indicative Syllabus

Waves and optics: nature of light, reflection and refraction; image formation by

mirrors and lenses; compound lens; microscope and telescope; superposition of waves;

Huygen’s principle; interference and diffraction; interferometers and diffraction

grating; polarization.

Electromagnetism: charge and Field; Coulomb’s law and Gauss’ law; electrostatic

field and potential difference; capacitors and dielectric; current and resistance; Ohm’s

law; electromotive force, potential difference and RC circuits; magnetic force on

moving charges and current; Hall effect; Biot-Savart law and Ampere’s law; Faraday’s

law and Lenz’s law; self-inductance and mutual inductance; transformers; AC circuits

and applications.

Teaching/Learning

Methodology

Lecture: The fundamentals in optics and electromagnetism will be explained.

Examples will be used to illustrate the concepts and ideas in the lecture. Students are

free to request help. Homework problem sets will be given.

Student-centered Tutorial: Students will work on a set of problems in tutorials.

Students are encouraged to solve problems and to use their own knowledge to verify

their solutions before seeking assistance. These problem sets provide them

opportunities to apply their knowledge gained from the lecture. They also help the

students to consolidate what they have learned. Furthermore, students can develop a

deeper understanding of the subject in relation to daily life phenomena or experience.

e-learning: In order to enhance the effectiveness of teaching and learning processes,

electronic means and multimedia technologies would be adopted for presentations of

lectures; communication between students and lecturer; delivery of handouts,

66


homework and notices etc.

Assessment

Methods in

Alignment with

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Specific assessment

methods/tasks

%

weighting

Intended subject learning outcomes

to be assessed

(Please tick as appropriate)

a b c d e f g

(1) Continuous assessment 40 ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓

(2) Examination 60 ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓

Total 100

Continuous assessment:

The continuous assessment includes assignments, quizzes and test(s) which aim at

checking the progress of students study throughout the course, assisting them in

fulfilling the learning outcomes.

Assignments in general include end-of-chapter problems, which are used to reinforce

and assess the concepts and skills acquired by the students; and to let them know the

level of understanding that they are expected to reach.

At least one test would be administered during the course of the subject as a means of

timely checking of learning progress by referring to the intended outcomes, and as

means of checking how effective the students digest and consolidate the materials

taught in the class.

Examination: This is a major assessment component of the subject. It would be a

closed-book examination. Complicated formulas would be given to avoid rote

memory, such that the emphasis of assessment would be put on testing the

understanding, analysis and problem solving ability of the students.

Student Study

Effort Expected

Class contact:

• Lecture 36 h

• Tutorial 6 h

Other student study effort:

• Self-study 78 h

Total student study effort

120 h

Reading List and

References

John W. Jewett and Raymond A. Serway, “Physics for Scientists and Engineers”,

2010, 8th edition, Brooks/Cole Cengage Learning.

W. Bauer and G.D. Westfall, “University Physics with Modern Physics”, 2011,

McGraw-Hill.

67


Subject Description Form

Subject Code

Subject Title

APSS1L01

Tomorrow’s Leaders

Credit Value 3

Level 1

GUR Requirements

Intended to Fulfill

This subject intends to fulfill the following requirement(s) :

Healthy Lifestyle

Freshman Seminar

Languages and Communication Requirement (LCR)

Leadership and Intra-Personal Development

Service-Learning

Cluster-Area Requirement (CAR)

Human Nature, Relations and Development

Community, Organization and Globalization

History, Cultures and World Views

Science, Technology and Environment

China-Study Requirement

Yes or No

Writing and Reading Requirements

English or Chinese

Pre-requisite /

Co-requisite/

Exclusion

Nil

Assessment Methods

100% Continuous Assessment Individual Assessment Group Assessment

1. Class Participation /

Preparation

20%

2. Peer Assessment 5%

3. Group Project 30%

4. Individual Assignment 45%

Objectives

Specific objectives of the subject:

The course is designed to enable students to learn and integrate theories, research and

concepts of the basic personal qualities (particularly intrapersonal and interpersonal

qualities) of effective leaders. This course also intends to help students develop and

reflect on their intrapersonal qualities, interpersonal qualities and connection of

learning to oneself. Finally, the course cultivates students’ appreciation of the

importance of intrapersonal and interpersonal qualities in effective leadership.

68


Intended Learning

Outcomes

Subject Synopsis/

Indicative Syllabus

Teaching/Learning

Methodology

Upon completion of the subject, students will be able to:

a. Understand and integrate theories, research and concepts on the basic qualities

(particularly intrapersonal and interpersonal qualities) of effective leaders;

b. Cultivate self-awareness and self-understanding;

c. Develop interpersonal skills;

d. Cultivate self-reflection skills;

e. Understand the importance of intrapersonal and interpersonal qualities in

effective leadership, particularly the connection of learning in the subject to

one’s personal development.

1. An overview of the personal attributes of effective leaders: roles of selfunderstanding

and interpersonal relationship qualities in effective leadership.

2. Self-understanding and personality: theories and concepts; personality traits that

are conducive to successful leadership.

3. Cognitive competence: different types of thinking styles; higher-order thinking;

experiential learning; role of cognitive competence, critical thinking and

problem solving in effective leadership; effective leaders as teachers.

4. Emotional competence: awareness and understanding of emotions; emotional

quotient (EQ); role of emotional management in effective leadership; mental

health and stress management.

5. Resilience: stresses faced by adolescents; life adversities; coping with life

stresses; adversity quotient (AQ); role of resilience in effective leadership.

6. Morality and integrity: moral issues and moral competence; role of morality in

effective leadership; ethical leadership; integrity and effective leadership.

7. Spirituality: meaning of life and adolescent development; spirituality and mental

health; role of spirituality in effective leadership; servant leadership.

8. Positive and healthy identity: self-identity, self-esteem and self-concept; selfdiscrepancies;

role of self-concept in effective leadership.

9. Relationship building, team building and conflict management: relationship

quality and effective leadership; conflict management and effective leadership.

10. Social competence and egocentrism: basic social competence skills; roles of

social competence, care and compassion in effective leadership; egocentrism in

university students.

11. Interpersonal communication: theories, concepts, skills and blocks of

interpersonal communication; role of communication skills in effective

leadership.

12. Self-leadership and sense of responsibility in effective leaders; life-long learning

and leadership.

Students taking this course are expected to be sensitive to their own behavior in

intrapersonal and interpersonal contexts. Intellectual thinking, reflective learning,

experiential learning and collaborative learning are emphasized in the course. Case

studies on successful and fallen leaders will also be covered in the course. The

teaching/learning methodology includes:

1. Lectures;

2. Experiential classroom activities;

3. Group project presentation;

4. Written assignment.

69


Assessment Methods

in Alignment with

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Specific assessment

methods/tasks

%

weighting

Intended subject learning outcomes to be

assessed (Please tick as appropriate)

a b c d e

1. Class Participation /

Preparation

20%


2. Peer Assessment 5%

3. Group Project 30%

4. Individual

Assignment

45%


Total 100 %

Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the

intended learning outcomes:

1. Assessment of Class Participation/Preparation: It is expected that classroom

activities and preparation for lectures can help students understand the subject

matter and oneself, develop social skills, connect learning to oneself and promote

an appreciation of the importance of intrapersonal and interpersonal leadership

qualities. Hence, marks for class participation and preparation for lectures will be

given. Students will be assessed by: a) preparation for class (e.g., prepare

questions and dig up materials before class), b) participation in class (e.g.,

completion of worksheets and sharing) and c) volunteering to answer questions

and join discussions in class.

2. Peer Assessment: Students will be invited to rate the performance and learning of

other group members in an honest and authentic manner. The marks will reflect

the mastery of knowledge, self-reflection and quality of interpersonal skills (such

as collaboration with other members and contribution to the group) of the group

members. Peer assessment will contribute to marks in class participation.

3. Assessment of Group Project: Group project presentation can give an indication

of the students’ understanding and integration of theories and concepts on

personal qualities in effective leadership, personal and group reflections,

interpersonal skills and degree of recognition of the importance of active pursuit

of knowledge covered in the course.

4. Assessment of Individual Assignment: Individual paper can give an indication of

the students’ understanding and integration of theories and concepts on the

personal qualities in effective leadership, self-assessment, self reflection,

connection of the subject matter to oneself and degree of recognition of the

importance of active pursuit of knowledge covered in the course.

Based on the pilot implementation of this subject (a 2-credit version) in the second

term of 2010/11 academic year, evaluation findings consistently showed that this

subject was able to achieve the intended learning outcomes in the students. The

positive evaluation findings are documented as follows:

Shek, D. T. L., Sun, R. C. F., & Merrick, J. (2012). Editorial: How to promote

70


holistic development in university students? International Journal on Disability and

Human Development, 11(3), 171-172.

Shek, D. T. L. (2012). Development of a positive youth development subject in a

university context in Hong Kong. International Journal on Disability and Human

Development, 11(3), 173-179.

Shek, D. T. L., & Sun, R. C. F. (2012). Promoting psychosocial competencies in

university students: Evaluation based on a one group pretest-posttest design.

International Journal on Disability and Human Development, 11(3), 229-234.

Shek, D. T. L., & Sun, R. C. F. (2012). Promoting leadership and intrapersonal

competence in university students: What can we learn from Hong Kong?

International Journal on Disability and Human Development, 11(3), 221-228.

Shek, D. T. L., & Sun, R. C. F. (2012). Process evaluation of a positive youth

development course in a university setting in Hong Kong. International

Journal on Disability and Human Development, 11(3), 235-241.

Shek, D. T. L., & Sun, R. C. F. (2012). Qualitative evaluation of a positive youth

development course in a university setting in Hong Kong. International

Journal on Disability and Human Development, 11(3), 243-248.

Shek, D. T. L., & Sun, R. C. F. (2012). Focus group evaluation of a positive youth

development course in a university in Hong Kong. International

Journal on Disability and Human Development, 11(3), 249-254.

Shek, D. T. L., Sun, R. C. F., Chui, Y. H., Lit, S. W., Yuen, W. W., Chung, Y., &

Ngai, S. W. (2012). Development and evaluation of a positive youth development

course for university students in Hong Kong. The Scientific World Journal, 2012, 8

pages. doi: 10.1100/2012/263731

Shek, D. T. L. (2012). Post-lecture evaluation of a positive youth development

subject for university students in Hong Kong. The Scientific World Journal, 2012, 8

pages. doi: 10.1100/2012/934679

Shek, D. T. L. (2012). Reflective journals of students taking a positive youth

development course in a university context in Hong Kong. The Scientific World

Journal, 2012, 8 pages. doi: 10.1100/2012/131560

Shek, D. T. L., Sun, R. C. F., Yuen, W. W. H., Chui, Y. H., Dorcas, A., Ma, C. M.

S., Yu, L., Chak, Y. L. Y., Law, M. Y. M., Chung, Y..Y. H., & Tsui, P. F. (2013).

Second piloting of a leadership and intrapersonal development subject at The Hong

Kong Polytechnic University. International Journal on Disability and Human

Development, 12(2), 107-114.

Shek, D. T. L., & Sun, R. C. F. (2013). Post-lecture evaluation of a university course

on leadership and intrapersonal development. International Journal on Disability and

Human Development, 12(2), 185-191.

Shek, D. T. L., & Sun, R. C. F. (2013). Post-course subjective outcome evaluation of

a course promoting leadership and intrapersonal development in university students in

Hong Kong. International Journal on Disability and Human Development, 12(2),

193-201.

Shek, D. T. L., & Sun, R. C. F. (2013). Process evaluation of a leadership and

71


intrapersonal development subject for university students. International

Journal on Disability and Human Development, 12(2), 203-211.

Shek, D. T. L. (2013). Reflections of Chinese students on a university subject on

leadership and intrapersonal development. International Journal on Disability and

Human Development, 12(2), 213-219.

Shek, D. T. L., Sun, R. C. F., Tsien-Wong, T. B. K., Cheng, C. T., & Yim, H. Y.

(2013). Objective outcome evaluation of a leadership and intrapersonal development

subject for university students. International Journal on Disability and Human

Development, 12(2), 221-227.

Shek, D. T. L. (2013). Promotion of holistic development in university students: A

credit-bearing subject on leadership and intrapersonal development. Best Practices in

Mental Health, 9(1), 47-61.

Student Study

Effort Expected

Class contact:

• Lectures and experiential learning activities 42 Hrs.

Other student study effort:

• Group project preparation 20 Hrs.

• Reading and writing term paper 73 Hrs.

Total student study effort

135 Hrs.

Medium of

Instruction

Medium of

Assessment

Reading List and

References

English

English

Basic References:

Barki, H., & Hartwick, J. (2004). Conceptualizing the construct of interpersonal

conflict. The International Journal of Conflict Management, 15(3), 216-244.

Dalton, J., & Crosby, P. (2007). Being and having: Shouldn’t excellence in higher

education (and people) be a measure of what one does rather than what one has?

Journal of College and Character, 9(1), 1-5.

Dolbier, C. L., Soderstrom, M., & Steinhardt, M. A. (2001). The relationships

between self-leaders and enhanced psychological, health and work outcomes. Journal

of Psychology, 135, 469-485.

Gilley, A., Gilley, J. W., McConnell, C. W., & Veliquette. A. (2010). The

competencies used by effective managers to build teams: An empirical study.

Advances in Developing Human Resources, 12(1), 29-45.

Hui, E. K. P., & Tsang, S. K. M. (2012). Self-determination as a psychological and

positive youth development construct. The Scientific World Journal, 2012, 7 pages.

doi: 10.1100/2012/759358

Lam, C. M. (2012). Prosocial involvement as a positive youth development construct:

A conceptual review. The Scientific World Journal, 2012, 8 pages. doi:

10.1100/2012/769158

Lau, P. S. Y., & Wu, F. K. Y. (2012). Emotional competence as a positive youth

development construct: A conceptual review. The Scientific World Journal, 2012, 8

pages. doi: 10.1100/2012/975189

72


Law, B. M. F., Siu, A. M. H., & Shek, D. T. L. (2012). Recognition for positive

behavior as a critical youth development construct: Conceptual bases and

implications on youth service development. The Scientific World Journal, 2012, 7

pages. doi: 10.1100/2012/809578

Lee, T. Y., Cheung, C. K., & Kwong, W. M. (2012). Resilience as a positive youth

development construct: A conceptual review. The Scientific World Journal, 2012, 9

pages. doi:10.1100/2012/390450

Lee, T. Y., & Lok, D. P. P. (2012). Bonding as a positive youth development

construct: A conceptual review. The Scientific World Journal, 2012, 11 pages. doi:

10.1100/2012/481471

Lee, T. Y., Cheung, C. K., & Kwong, W. M. (2012). Resilience as a positive youth

development construct: A conceptual review. The Scientific World Journal, 2012, 9

pages. doi: 10.1100/2012/390450

Ma, H. K. (2012). Moral competence as a positive youth development construct: A

conceptual review. The Scientific World Journal, 2012, 8 pages. doi:

10.1100/2012/590163

Ma, H. K. (2012). Social competence as a positive youth development construct: A

conceptual review. The Scientific World Journal, 2012, 7 pages. doi:

10.1100/2012/287472

Ma, H. K. (2012). Behavioral competence as a positive youth development construct:

A conceptual review. The Scientific World Journal, 2012, 7 pages. doi:

10.1100/2012/568272

Ma, H. K. (2012). Moral competence as a positive youth development construct: A

conceptual review. The Scientific World Journal, 2012, 8 pages. doi:

10.1100/2012/590163

Moseley, D., Elliott, J., Gregson, M., & Higgins, S. (2005). Thinking skills

frameworks for use in education and training. British Educational Research Journal,

31(3), 367-390.

Rycek, R. F., Stuhr, S. L., McDermott, J., Benker, J., & Swartz, M. D. (1998).

Adolescent egocentrism and cognitive functioning during late adolescence.

Adolescence, 33, 745-749.

Shek, D. T. L. (2010). Nurturing holistic development of university students in Hong

Kong: Where are we and where should we go? The Scientific World Journal, 10, 563-

575.

Shek, D. T. L. (2012). Spirituality as a positive youth development construct: A

conceptual review. The Scientific World Journal, 2012, 8 pages. doi:

10.1100/2012/458953

Shek, D. T. L., Sun, R. C. F., & Merrick, J. (2012). Editorial: Positive youth

development constructs - conceptual review and application. The Scientific World

Journal, 2012, 3 pages. doi: 10.1100/2012/152923

Siu, A. M. H., Shek, D. T. L., & Law, B. (2012). Prosocial norms as a positive youth

development construct: A conceptual review. The Scientific World Journal, 2012, 7

pages. doi: 10.1100/2012/832026

Sun, R. C. F., & Hui, E. K. P. (2012). Cognitive competence as a positive youth

development construct: A conceptual review. The Scientific World Journal, 2012, 7

pages. doi: 10.1100/2012/210953

Sun, R. C. F., & Shek, D. T. L. (2012). Beliefs in the future as a positive youth

development construct: A conceptual review. The Scientific World Journal, 2012, 8

pages. doi: 10.1100/2012/527038

Tsang, S. K. M., Hui, E. K. P., & Law, B. C. M. (2012). Positive identity as a

positive youth development construct: A conceptual review. The Scientific World

Journal, 2012, 8 pages. doi: 10.1100/2012/529691

Tsang, S. K. M., Hui, E. K. P., & Law, B. C. M. (2012). Self-efficacy as a positive

youth development construct: A conceptual review. The Scientific World Journal,

2012, 7 pages. doi: 10.1100/2012/452327

73


Supplementary References:

Barki, H., & Hartwick, J. (2004). Conceptualizing the construct of interpersonal

conflict. The International Journal of Conflict Management, 15(3), 216-244.

Catalano, R. F., Berglund, M. L., Ryan, J. A. M., Lonczak, H. S., & Hawkins, J. D.

(2004). Positive youth development in the United States: Research findings on

evaluations of positive youth development programs. The Annals of the American

Academy of Political and Social Science, 591, 98-124.

Dalton, J., & Crosby, P. (2007). Being and having: Shouldn’t excellence in higher

education (and people) be a measure of what one does rather than what one has?

Journal of College and Character, 9(1), 1-5.

de Vries, R. E., Bakker-Pieper, A., Siberg, R. A., van Gameren, K., & Vlug, M.

(2009). The content and dimensionality of communication styles. Communication

Research, 36, 178-206.

Goleman, D. (1995). Emotional Intelligence: Why it can matter more than IQ. New

York: Bantam Books.

Houghton, J. D., & Yoho, S. K. (2005). Toward a contingency model of leadership

and psychological empowerment: When should self-leadership be encouraged?

Journal of Leadership and Organizational Studies, 11(4), 65-84.

Masten, A. S., & Obradović, J. (2006). Competence and resilience in development.

Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1094, 13-27.

McCrae, R. R., & Costa, P. T. Jr. (2008). Empirical and theoretical status of the Five-

Factor Model of personality traits. In G. J. Boyle, G. Matthews, & D. H. Saklofske

(Eds.), Sage handbook of personality theory and assessment, Vol. 1 (pp. 273-294).

Los Angeles, Sage.

Seligman, M. E. P., & Csikszentmihalyi, M. (2000). Positive psychology: An

introduction. American Psychologist, 55, 5-14.

Smalley, G. & Trent, J. (2005). The two sides of love. New Dundee, ON: Living

Books.

Stets, J. E., & Burke, P. J. (2003). A sociological approach to self and identity. In M.

R. Leary, & J. P. Tangney (Eds.), Handbook of self and identity (pp. 128-152). New

York: The Guilford Press.

石 丹 理 、 劉 兆 瑛 主 編 (2007)。《 共 創 成 長 路 .. 賽 馬 會 青 少 年 培 育 計 劃 。 概 念 架

構 及 課 程 設 計 手 冊 ( 一 ): 背 景 、 概 念 和 設 計 》。 香 港 : 商 務 印 書 館 。

石 丹 理 、 李 德 仁 主 編 (2007)。《 共 創 成 長 路 .. 賽 馬 會 青 少 年 培 育 計 劃 。 概 念 架

構 及 課 程 設 計 手 冊 ( 二 ): 青 少 年 正 面 發 展 構 念 》。 香 港 : 商 務 印 書 館 。

74


Subject Description Form

Subject Code

CBS1101P

Subject Title Fundamentals of Chinese Communication( 大 學 中 文 傳 意 )

Credit Value 3

Level 1

Pre-requisite /

Co-requisite/

Exclusion

Remarks:

For students entering with HKDSE Chinese subject result at Level 3 or equivalent

Objectives

This subject aims to foster students’ communicative competence in using both written

and spoken Chinese to communicate for effectiveness, appropriateness, flexibility and

politeness in real situated social settings.

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Subject Synopsis/

Indicative Syllabus

Teaching/Learning

Methodology

Upon completion of the subject, students will be able to:

(a) develop effective communication skills in written Chinese required for basic

usage in the work-place;

(b) master properly and flexibly, the written format, organization, language and style

of expression of various genres of Chinese practical writing such as official

correspondences, publicity materials, reports and proposals;

(c) give formal presentation in Putonghua effectively and appropriately;

(d) engage with formal discussion in Putonghua effectively and politely.

1. Written Chinese for practical purposes

• Format, organization, language of each genre;

• Coherence in Chinese writing

• Style of expression of different genres such as official correspondences,

publicity materials;

• Context dependent stylistic variation

• Appropriateness in communication

2. Formal Presentation in Putonghua

• Choice of words in Putonghua

The flow of speaking

• Manner of speaking and gesture

3. Formal Discussion in Putonghua

• Identification of main idea and key messages

• Evaluation of relevancy of information in a message

• Skills of summarizing

• Agreeing/disagreeing/answering to questions politely

The subject will be conducted in Putonghua, in highly interactive seminars. The

subject will motivate the students’ active participation by assigning group

presentation /discussion in class. In a forum-like format, students are guided to : (1)

present to the class, their understanding of each genre designed for the syllabus for

discussions and improvement; (2) modify passages in a given genre/style into other

genres/styles for addressing different audiences and purposes; (3) give a power-point

75


presentation in Putonghua in front of the whole class, then receive on spot feedback

for discussion and improvement; then (4) prepare a written report/proposal on the

same topic; and (5) engage in formal discussion in Putonghua on topics related to

current issues and/or business operation; then (6) produce a written document on the

same topic using a chosen genre.

Assessment Methods

in Alignment with

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Specific assessment

methods/tasks

%

weighting

Intended subject learning outcomes

to be assessed (Please tick as

appropriate)

a b c d

1. Written Assignment 30% √ √

2. Oral Presentation 30% √ √

3. Final Examination 40% √ √ √ √

Total 100 %

Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the

intended learning outcomes:

Both written assignments and oral presentation will focus on the functions of

communication and the appropriateness of language used in authentic social settings.

The examination emphasizes the correctness of expression and students’ general

competence in Chinese Language.

Students obtaining a subject pass must pass both components, i.e. the continuous

assessment and examination component of the subject. Students will get failure of

the subject if he/she fails in either one of the two components.

Student Study

Effort Expected

Class contact:

• Seminar 42 Hrs.

• Hrs.

Other student study effort:

• Outside Class Practice 42 Hrs.

• Self-study 42 Hrs.

Reading List and

References

Total student study effort

126 Hrs.

1. 路 德 慶 主 編 (1982) 《 寫 作 教 程 》, 華 東 師 範 大 學 出 版 社

2. 邵 守 義 (1991)《 演 講 全 書 》, 吉 林 人 民 出 版 社

3. 陳 建 民 (1994)《 說 話 的 藝 術 》, 語 文 出 版 社

4. 李 軍 華 (1996)《 口 才 學 》, 華 中 理 工 大 學 出 版 社

5. 陳 瑞 端 著 (2000)《 生 活 錯 別 字 》, 中 華 書 局

6. 邢 福 義 、 汪 國 勝 主 編 (2003)《 現 代 漢 語 》, 華 中 師 範 大 學 出 版 社

7. 于 成 鯤 主 編 (2003)《 現 代 應 用 文 》, 復 旦 大 學 出 版 社

8. 李 白 堅 、 丁 迪 蒙 (2004)《 大 學 體 型 寫 作 訓 練 規 程 》, 上 海 大 學 出 版 社

76


9. 鍾 文 佳 (2004)《 漢 語 口 才 學 》, 西 南 師 範 大 學 出 版 社

10. 于 成 鯤 、 陳 瑞 端 、 秦 扶 一 、 金 振 邦 主 編 (2011)《 當 代 應 用 文 寫 作 規 範 叢

書 》, 復 旦 大 學 出 版 社

77


Subject Description Form

Subject Code

CBS1102P

Subject Title Advanced Communication Skills in Chinese( 高 階 中 文 傳 意 )

Credit Value 3

Level 1

Pre-requisite /

Co-requisite/

Exclusion

Objectives

Remarks: For students entering with HKDSE Chinese subject result at Level 4 and 5

or equivalent

This subject aims to develop effective communication skills of students in both

spoken and written Chinese which are required for the business and professional

setting.

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Subject Synopsis/

Indicative Syllabus

Upon completion of the subject, students will be able to:

(a) develop effective communication skills in both spoken and written Chinese

required for in the business and professional setting;

(b) master the format, organization, language and style of expression of the

following genres of Chinese practical writing: argumentative and persuasive

writing, public speech;

(c) give public speech;

(d) produce creative writing.

1. Written Chinese for Practical Purposes

• Uses of words and sentences, choice of diction;

• Coherence and thread of thinking in Chinese writing

• Context dependent stylistic variation

• Format, organization, language and style of expression of speeches,

argumentative & persuasive writing;

2. Public Speech

• Contextual elements: the audiences, the purpose and the topic

• Identification of key points and collection of supporting information

• Articulation and flow of speaking

• Choice of words, manner and gesture

• Using of visual aids

• Handling of question and answer session

3. Creative Writing

• Understanding of the features of creative writing

• Being able to appreciate the arts of writing

Teaching/Learning

Methodology

The subject will be conducted in highly interactive seminars. The subject will

motivate the students’ active participation by assigning group presentation /discussion

in class. In a forum-like format, students are guided to : (1) present to the class, their

78


understanding of each genre designed for the syllabus for discussions and

improvement; (2) modify passages in a given genre/style into other genres/styles for

addressing different audiences and purposes; (3) prepare a script for public speaking;

(4) give a public speech in front of the whole class, then receive on spot feedback for

discussion and improvement; and (5) engage in formal discussion on topics related to

current issues and/or business operation that require persuasive and argumentative

skills; then (6) produce an argumentative article on the same topic.

Assessment Methods

in Alignment with

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Specific assessment

methods/tasks

%

weighting

Intended subject learning outcomes to

be assessed (Please tick as appropriate)

a b c d

1. Prose Writing 20% √ √

2. Written Draft for

Formal Speech

10% √ √ √

3. Formal Speech 10% √ √ √

4. Feature Article 20% √ √ √

5. Class Participation 10% √ √ √ √

6. Final Examination 30% √ √ √ √

Total 100 %

Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the

intended learning outcomes:

Both written assignments and oral presentation will focus on the functions of

communication and the adequacy of language used in authentic social settings. The

examination emphasizes the correctness of expression and students’ general

competence in Chinese Language.

Students obtaining a subject pass must pass both components, i.e. the continuous

assessment and examination component of the subject. Students will get failure of the

subject if he/she fails in either one of the two components.

Student Study

Effort Expected

Class contact:

• Seminar 42 Hrs.

• Hrs.

Other student study effort:

• Outside Class Practice 42 Hrs.

• Self-study 42 Hrs.

Total student study effort

126 Hrs.

79


Reading List and

References

1. 路 德 慶 主 編 (1982) 《 寫 作 教 程 》, 華 東 師 範 大 學 出 版 社

2. 邵 守 義 (1991)《 演 講 全 書 》, 吉 林 人 民 出 版 社

3. 陳 建 民 (1994)《 說 話 的 藝 術 》, 語 文 出 版 社

4. 李 軍 華 (1996)《 口 才 學 》, 華 中 理 工 大 學 出 版 社

5. 陳 瑞 端 著 (2000)《 生 活 錯 別 字 》, 中 華 書 局

6. 于 成 鯤 主 編 (2003)《 現 代 應 用 文 》, 復 旦 大 學 出 版 社

7. 邢 福 義 、 汪 國 勝 主 編 (2003)《 現 代 漢 語 》, 華 中 師 範 大 學 出 版 社

8. 李 白 堅 、 丁 迪 蒙 (2004)《 大 學 體 型 寫 作 訓 練 規 程 》, 上 海 大 學 出 版 社

9. 鍾 文 佳 (2004)《 漢 語 口 才 學 》, 西 南 師 範 大 學 出 版 社

10. 于 成 鯤 、 陳 瑞 端 、 秦 扶 一 、 金 振 邦 主 編 (2011)《 當 代 應 用 文 寫 作

規 範 叢 書 》, 復 旦 大 學 出 版 社

80


Subject Description Form

Subject Code

Subject Title

CBS1151

Chinese I (for non-Chinese speaking students)

Credit Value 3

Level 1

漢 語 I( 非 華 語 學 生 課 程 )

Pre-requisite /

Co-requisite/

Exclusion

Objectives

Remarks: For non-Chinese speaking students at beginners’ level

This subject aims to introduce to non-Chinese speaking students with basic

phonological structure of modern standard Chinese and enable them to master the

Chinese phonology and conduct simple conversation in Chinese.

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Subject Synopsis/

Indicative Syllabus

Teaching/Learning

Methodology

Upon completion of the subject, students will be able to:

(a) master basic pronunciations of Chinese;

(b) make use of the Hanyu Pinyin system as a learning tool and for self-study;

(c) acquire some basic common vocabulary and basic sentence patterns;

(d) comprehend simple messages conveyed in Putonghua;

(e) engage in simple daily communication in Putonghua;

1. The Hanyu Pinyin System;

2. The Pronunciation of Phonetic Symbols;

3. The Syllabic Structure of Putonghua;

4. Tone Variation, Neutral Tone and Final Retroflexion ;

5. 100 Characters and 200 Common Words;

6. Common Expressions and Sentence Structure;

7. Simple Daily Conversation

Teaching and learning activities will be in the form of interactive seminars where

students will be given a lot of chances to practice. After class consultation forms

another major element to maximize communications between students and teachers.

81


Assessment Methods

in Alignment with

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Specific assessment

methods/tasks

%

weighting

Intended subject learning outcomes to be

assessed (Please tick as appropriate)

a b c d e

1. Listening Practice 30% √ √ √

2. Vocabulary and

Grammar Practice

20% √ √ √ √

3. Oral Presentation 20% √ √ √ √

4. Conversation Practice 30% √ √ √ √

Total (Continuous

Assessment)

100 %

Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the

intended learning outcomes:

The assessment methods aim (1) to distinguish the initials, finals and tones of

monosyllables and disyllables and words, (2) to understand the meaning of simple

statement and short conversation in actual communicative situations, (3) to present a

self-introduction in Chinese, (4) to master the vocabulary and sentence patterns

learned, (5) to give the proper answers to the questions asked by teachers, and (6) to

know the meaning of basic characters.

All assignments are in continuous assessment. Each assignment will be evaluated in

terms of criterion reference assessment.

Student Study

Effort Expected

Class contact:

• Seminar 42 Hrs.

• Hrs.

Other student study effort:

• Outside Class Practice 42 Hrs.

• Self-study 39 Hrs.

Reading List and

References

Total student study effort

123 Hrs.

Textbook:

刘 珣 主 编 (2007) 《 新 实 用 汉 语 课 本 》 第 一 册 (New Practical Chinese Reader)

(Vol.1), 北 京 语 言 大 学 出 版 社 。

82


Subject Description Form

Subject Code

Subject Title

CBS1152

Chinese II (for non-Chinese speaking students)

Credit Value 3

Level 1

漢 語 II ( 非 華 語 學 生 課 程 )

Pre-requisite /

Co-requisite/

Exclusion

Objectives

Remarks:

‣ For non-Chinese speaking students; and

‣ Students who have completed Chinese I or equivalent

This subject aims to enhance non-Chinese-speaking students’ oral communication

skill and their ability in conducting simple daily conversation in Chinese.

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Upon completion of the subject, students will be able to:

(a) improve their pronunciation in Chinese;

(b) be able to carry out simple conversation;

(c) understand basic sentence patterns in Chinese;

(d) recognize 100 new Chinese characters;

(e) understand and be able to use 200 new words ; and

(f) input Chinese by means of Pinyin.

Subject Synopsis/

Indicative Syllabus

1. Pronunciation

2. Vocabularies and Grammar

3. Speaking Skills

4. Pragmatics Rules and Implication

5. Cultural Background of China Reflected in Daily Conversation

6. Structure of Chinese Character and Character Writing

Teaching/Learning

Methodology

Teaching and learning activities will be in the form of interactive seminars where

students will be given a lot of chances to practice. After class consultation forms

another major element to maximize communications between students and teachers.

83


Assessment Methods

in Alignment with

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Specific assessment

methods/tasks

%

weighting

Intended subject learning outcomes to be

assessed (Please tick as appropriate)

a b c d e f

1. Listening Practice 20% √ √ √

2. Vocabulary and

Grammar Practice

20% √ √ √ √

3. Oral Presentation 20% √ √ √ √

4. Conversation Practice 20% √ √ √ √

5. Writing Practice 20% √ √

Total (Continuous

Assessment)

100 %

Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the

intended learning outcomes:

The assessment methods aim (1) to distinguish the tones of monosyllables, the neutral

tone of disyllables and words, (2) to understand the meaning of conversation in actual

communicative settings, (3) to conduct a dialogue in designed situations in Chinese,

(4) to master the vocabulary and sentence patterns learned, (5) to assess the fluency

and accuracy of students’ Chinese by asking them to recite a text, and (6) to write

Chinese sentences.

All assignments are in continuous assessment. Each assignment will be evaluated in

terms of criterion reference assessment.

Student Study

Effort Expected

Class contact:

• Seminar 42 Hrs.

• Hrs.

Other student study effort:

• Outside Class Practice 42 Hrs.

• Self-study 26 Hrs.

Reading List and

References

Total student study effort

110 Hrs.

Textbook:

刘 珣 主 编 (2007) 《 新 实 用 汉 语 课 本 》 第 一 册 (New Practical Chinese Reader)

(Vol.1), 北 京 语 言 大 学 出 版 社

84


Subject Description Form

Subject Code

Subject Title

CBS2151

Chinese III (for non-Chinese speaking students)

Credit Value 3

Level 2

漢 語 III( 非 華 語 學 生 課 程 )

Pre-requisite /

Co-requisite/

Exclusion

Objectives

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Remarks:

‣ For non-Chinese speaking students at higher competence levels; and

‣ Students who have completed Chinese II or equivalent

This subject aims to further improve non-Chinese-speaking students’ Chinese ability

and oral communication skill in Chinese by expanding the vocabulary and mastering

more sentence structures.

Upon completion of the subject, students will be able to:

(a) further cultivate their Putonghua communicative ability and handle basic daily

conversation;

(b) recognize 100 new characters;

(c) understand and use 250 new words;

(d) use basic Chinese sentence structures to create short narratives;

(e) handle Chinese character input.

Subject Synopsis/

Indicative Syllabus

1. Pronunciation and Intonation

2. Vocabularies, Expressions and Grammar

3. Speaking Skills

4. Colloquial Expressions vs. Formal Expressions

5. Conversation under Different Situations

6. Sentence Writing

7. Further Practice of Character Input

Teaching/Learning

Methodology

Teaching and learning activities will be in the form of interactive seminars where

students will be given a lot of chances to practice. After class consultation forms

another major element to maximize communications between students and teachers.

85


Assessment Methods

in Alignment with

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Specific assessment

methods/tasks

%

weighting

Intended subject learning outcomes to be

assessed (Please tick as appropriate)

a b c d e

1. Listening Practice 20% √ √ √

2. Vocabulary and

Grammar Practice

20% √ √ √

3. Oral Presentation 20% √ √ √ √

4. Conversation Practice 20% √ √ √ √

5. Writing Practice 20% √ √ √ √ √

Total (Continuous

Assessment)

100 %

Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the

intended learning outcomes:

The assessment methods aim (1) to understand the meaning of conversation in actual

communicative settings and paragraph, (2) to conduct a presentation on given topics

and give the proper answers to the questions raised by teacher, (3) to conduct a

dialogue in designed situations in Chinese, (4) to master the vocabulary and sentence

patterns learned, and (5) to read and write Chinese passage.

All assignments are in continuous assessment. Each assignment will be evaluated in

terms of criterion reference assessment.

Student Study

Effort Expected

Class contact:

• Seminar 42 Hrs.

• Hrs.

Other student study effort:

• Outside Class Practice 42 Hrs.

• Self-study 39 Hrs.

Reading List and

References

Total student study effort

Textbook:

123 Hrs.

刘 珣 主 编 (2007) 《 新 实 用 汉 语 课 本 》 第 二 册 (New Practical Chinese Reader)

(Vol.2), 北 京 语 言 大 学 出 版 社

86


Subject Description Form

Subject Code

Subject Title

CBS2152

Chinese Literature – Linguistics and Cultural Perspectives (for non-Chinese speaking

students)

Credit Value 3

Level 2

中 國 文 學 、 語 言 與 文 化 面 面 觀 ( 非 華 語 學 生 課 程 )

Pre-requisite /

Co-requisite/

Exclusion

Objectives

Remarks: For non-Chinese speaking students at higher competence levels

This subject aims to provide non-Chinese speaking students with Chinese training in

twofold: (1) linguistic knowledge in Chinese language, Chinese literature and some

inherent cultural subjects; (2) more advanced level vocabularies and expression

structures for listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Modern

Standard Chinese.

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Upon completion of the subject, students will be able to:

(a) acquire a basic understanding of the basic features and varieties of the

Chinese language;

(b) understand how Chinese culture affects the Chinese language;

(c) attain some basic knowledge of the major genres of the Chinese

literature;

(d) understand the underlying aesthetic and cultural values through Chinese

operas, Chinese calligraphy and Chinese painting;

(e) acquire the spirits of Confucianism and Daoism as manifested in some great

works of the Chinese literature.

Subject Synopsis/

Indicative Syllabus

Teaching/Learning

Methodology

• Chinese language and Chinese dialects

• Chinese cuisine-cultural perspective

• Major genres of Chinese literature

• Chinese myths and Chinese folklores

• Varieties of Chinese opera

• Main streams of Chinese philosophy and religion

The subject will be delivered in mass lectures, group discussion and presentation. The

course will be using different forms of teaching materials such as movie clip, real life

conversations, art performances etc. for illustrations. Students will be required to

conduct some simple and basic research in a given topic related to the subject matter.

They will be asked to present their findings during tutorials as well as in a term paper.

87


Assessment Methods

in Alignment with

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Specific assessment

methods/tasks

%

weighting

Intended subject learning outcomes

to be assessed (Please tick as

appropriate)

a b c d e

1. Presentation (Group) 30% √ √ √

2. Participation in

Tutorial Discussion

3. Final Essay

(Individual)

5% √ √ √ √ √

35% √ √ √ √ √

4. Final Test 30% √ √ √ √ √

Total (Continuous

Assessment)

100 %

Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the

intended learning outcomes:

The assessment takes a criterion-referenced approach for all the required tasks. The

areas of evaluation cover non-Chinese students’ language abilities, their

understanding of Chinese language, literature and the inherent cultural phenomenon

as manifested in their viewpoints and ways of expression.

Student Study

Effort Expected

Class contact:

• Lecture 28 Hrs.

• Tutorial 14 Hrs.

• Assignment / Quiz 10 Hrs.

• Self-study 60 Hrs.

Total student study effort

112 Hrs.

Reading List and

References

Textbook:

刘 珣 主 编 (2007) 《 新 实 用 汉 语 课 本 》 第 三 册 (New Practical Chinese Reader)

(Vol.3), 北 京 语 言 大 学 出 版 社

Reference

1. Toynbee, Arnold: Mankind and Mother Earth, A Narrative History of the World,

Oxford U. Press, New York and London, 1976

2. Barraclough, Geoffrey, et al: The Times Atlas of World History, Times Books

Limited, London, 1979

3. Atlas of the People’s Republic of China, Map Publishing, Beijing, 1979

4. Huang, Renyu: China: a Macro History, Lian Jing Publisher, Taibei, 1993

5. Stephen Owen (1996), An Anthology of Chinese Literature. New York: Norton

6. Jacques Gernet (1996) A History of Chinese Civilization (2nd ed.) Cambridge:

Cambridge University Press

7. Bai, Shouyi: An Outline History of China (revised edition), Foreign Languages

Press, Beijing, 1998

8. Shaughnessy, Edward L.: editor, China, Empire and Civilization Oxford U. Press,

88


2000

9. Gascoigne, Bamber: A Brief History of the Dynasties of China, Constable &

Robinson Ltd, London, 2003

10. Zhang, Qizhi: editor, Traditional Chinese Culture, Foreign Languages Press,

Beijing, 2004

11. Armstrong, Karen: The Great Transformation – The World in the Time of

Buddha, Socrates, Confucius and Jeremiah, Atlantic Books. London, paperback

edition, 2007

12. City University of Hong Kong (2007), China Five Thousand Years of History &

Civilization. Hong Kong: City University of Hong Kong Press

89


Subject Description Form

Subject Code

Subject Title

ELC1011

Practical English for University Studies

Credit Value 3

Level 1

Pre-requisite /

Co-requisite/

Exclusion

Objectives

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Nil

This subject aims to develop and enhance students’ general proficiency and

communication skills in English. A strong focus will be given to enhancing

competence and confidence in grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and fluency.

Upon successful completion of the subject, students will be able to:

a. use a variety of strategies to comprehend meaning and messages of a range of

written and spoken texts

b. organise and write accurate and coherent short texts

c. use appropriate verbal and non-verbal skills in spoken communication

To achieve the above outcomes, students are expected to use language and text

structure appropriate to the context, select information critically, and present their

views logically and coherently.

Subject Synopsis/

Indicative Syllabus

1. Written communication

Enhancing the use of accurate and appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary

for various communicative purposes; improving the ability to organise written texts

logically; and improving cohesion and coherence in writing.

2. Spoken communication

Developing verbal and non-verbal interaction strategies appropriate to the context and

level of formality.

3. Reading and listening

Understanding the content and structure of information delivered in written and

spoken texts; developing effective reading and listening strategies; and using study

tools such as dictionaries to obtain lexical and phonological information.

4. Language development

Improving and extending relevant features of grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation

and fluency.

Teaching/Learning

Methodology

The study method is primarily seminar-based. Following a blended delivery

approach, activities include teacher input as well as in- and out-of-class individual

and group work involving drafting of texts, information search, mini-presentations

and discussions. Students will make use of elearning resources and web-based work

to improve their grammar and vocabulary, and other language skills.

90


Learning materials developed by the English Language Centre are used throughout

the course. Students will be referred to learning resources on the Internet and in the

ELC’s Centre for Independent Language Learning. Additional reference materials

will be recommended as required.

Assessment Methods

in Alignment with

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Specific assessment

methods/tasks

1. In-class grammar and

vocabulary tests

% weighting Intended subject learning

outcomes to be assessed

(Please tick as appropriate)

a b c

25%

2. Oral assessment 40%

3. Writing assessment 35%

Total 100 %

Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the

intended learning outcomes:

The in-class tests, which assess students’ grammar and vocabulary and their ability,

necessitate achievement of LOs (a) and (b). The oral assessment assesses students’

ability to speak accurately, appropriately and confidently. Students will need to

research a topic, organise information from a variety of sources, and present the

information as a digital story (ref. LOs (a) and (c)). The writing assessment evaluates

students' ability write a longer text in accurate and appropriate grammatical structures

(ref. Los (a) and (b)).

In addition to these assessments, students are required to complete further language

training through web-based language work. The additional language training offered

in online tasks is aligned with all the three LOs and corresponds to their learning in

class.

Student Study

Effort Expected

Class contact:

• Seminar 42 Hrs.

Other student study effort:

• Self-study/preparation 84 Hrs.

Total student study effort

126 Hrs.

91


Reading List and

References

Course material

Learning materials developed by the English Language Centre

Recommended references

Boyle, J. & Boyle, L. (1998). Common Spoken English Errors in Hong Kong. Hong

Kong: Longman.

Brannan, B. (2003). A writer’s workshop: Crafting paragraphs, building essays.

Boston: McGraw-Hill.

Hancock, M. (2003). English pronunciation in use. Cambridge: Cambridge

University Press.

Nettle, M. and Hopkins, D. (2003). Developing grammar in context: Intermediate.

Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Redman, S. (2003). English vocabulary in use: Pre-intermediate and intermediate.

Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

92


Subject Description Form

Subject Code

Subject Title

ELC1012/ELC1013

English for University Studies

Credit Value 3

Level 1

(This subject will be offered in two versions for students who will primarily be using

(1) APA/Harvard referencing styles or (2) IEEE/Vancouver referencing styles in their

university studies.)

Pre-requisite /

Co-requisite/

Exclusion

Objectives

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Students entering the University with Level 5 from the HKDSE will be exempted

from this subject. They can proceed to Advanced English for University Studies

(ELC1014).

This subject aims to help students study effectively in the University’s English

medium learning environment, and to improve and develop their English language

proficiency within a framework of university study contexts.

Upon successful completion of the subject, students will be able to:

a. refer to sources in written texts and oral presentations

b. paraphrase and summarise materials from written and spoken sources

c. plan, write and revise expository essays with references to sources

d. deliver effective oral presentations

To achieve the above outcomes, students are expected to use language and text

structure appropriate to the context, select information critically, and present

information logically and coherently.

Subject Synopsis/

Indicative Syllabus

1. Written communication

Analysing and practising common writing functions; improving the ability of writing

topic sentences and strategies for paragraph development; understanding common

patterns of organisation in expository writing; taking notes from written and spoken

sources; practising summarising and paraphrasing skills; improving coherence and

cohesion in writing; developing revision and proofreading skills.

2. Spoken communication

Recognising the purposes of and differences between spoken and written

communication in English in university study contexts; identifying and practising the

verbal and non-verbal interaction strategies in oral presentations; developing and

applying critical thinking skills to discussions of issues.

3. Language development

Improving and extending relevant features of grammar, vocabulary and

pronunciation.

Teaching/Learning

Methodology

The study method is primarily seminar-based. Following a blended delivery

approach, activities include teacher input as well as in- and out-of-class individual

and group work involving drafting and evaluating texts, mini-presentations,

93


discussions and simulations. The process approach to writing is adopted, and

students make use of elearning resources to engage in academic discussions and to

reflect on their learning.

Learning materials developed by the English Language Centre are used throughout

the course. Students will be referred to learning resources on the Internet and in the

ELC’s Centre for Independent Language Learning. Additional reference materials

will be recommended as required.

Assessment Methods

in Alignment with

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Specific assessment

methods/tasks

% weighting Intended subject learning

outcomes to be assessed

(Please tick as appropriate)

a b c d

1. Academic essay 1 30%

2. Academic essay 2 30%

3. Oral presentation 40%

Total 100 %

Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the

intended learning outcomes:

Assessments 1 and 2 necessitate achievement of LOs (a), (b) and (c) in order to write

an effective academic essay via the process of extending and improving the essay for

assessment 1. In order for students to present an effective academic oral presentation,

as demanded in assessment 3, they will need to read, note and synthesise from a

variety of sources, and refer to those sources in their presentation (ref. LOs (a), (b)

and (d)).

In addition to these assessments, students are required to complete further language

training, through web-based language work, reading tasks and online reflections. The

additional language training offered in online tasks is aligned with all the four LOs.

In some of the tasks, students need to critically read and summarise information

contained in a variety of sources, as required in LOs (a) and (b).

Student Study

Effort Expected

Class contact:

• Seminars 42 Hrs.

Other student study effort:

• Self study/preparation 84 Hrs.

Total student study effort

126 Hrs.

Reading List and

References

Course material

Learning materials developed by the English Language Centre

Recommended references

Comfort, J. (2001). Effective presentations. Oxford: Cornelsen & Oxford University

Press.

94


Hung, T. T. N. (2005). Understanding English grammar: A course book for Chinese

learners of English. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press.

McWhorter, K. T. (2012). The successful writer's handbook. (2nd ed.). Boston:

Longman.

Zwier, L. J. (2002). Building academic vocabulary. Ann Arbor, MI: University of

Michigan Press.

95


Subject Description Form

Subject Code

Subject Title

ELC1014

Advanced English for University Studies

Credit Value 3

Level 1

Pre-requisite /

Co-requisite/

Exclusion

Objectives

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Pre-requisite: English for University Studies (ELC1012/ELC1013) (unless exempted)

This subject aims to help students study effectively in the University’s English

medium learning environment, and to improve and develop their English language

proficiency within a framework of university study contexts.

Upon successful completion of the subject, students will be able to:

a. use academic sources appropriately and effectively

b. plan, write and revise position argument essays (i.e. one-sided discursive essays)

with appropriate referencing; and

c. present views effectively and critically in spoken communication

To achieve the above outcomes, students are expected to use language and text

structure appropriate to the context, select information critically, and present and

support stance and opinion logically and persuasively.

Subject Synopsis/

Indicative Syllabus

1. Written communication

Developing logical and persuasive arguments; applying a variety of organisation

patterns in discursive writing, including the writing of explanatory and evaluative

texts; selecting information critically; supporting stance; maintaining cohesion and

coherence in discursive writing; achieving appropriate style and tone.

2. Spoken communication

Enhancing and practising the specific oral and aural skills required to participate

effectively in academic discussions and to present views in a formal academic

context.

3. Reading and listening

Understanding the content and structure of information in oral and written texts;

comprehending, inferring and evaluating messages and attitude.

4. Language development

Improving and extending relevant features of grammar, vocabulary and

pronunciation.

Teaching/Learning

Methodology

The study method is primarily seminar-based. Following a blended delivery

approach, activities include teacher input as well as in- and out-of-class individual

and group work involving drafting and evaluating texts, mini-presentations,

96


discussions and simulations. The process approach to writing is adopted, and

students make use of elearning resources to engage in academic discussions and to

reflect on their learning.

Learning materials developed by the English Language Centre are used throughout

the course. Students will be referred to learning resources on the Internet and in the

ELC’s Centre for Independent Language Learning. Additional reference materials

will be recommended as required.

Assessment Methods

in Alignment with

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Specific assessment

methods/tasks

%

weighting

Intended subject learning

outcomes to be assessed

(Please tick as appropriate)

a b c

1. Position Argument Essay

(draft)

2. Position Argument Essay

(final)

3. Academic presentation &

discussion

20%

45%

35%

Total 100 %

Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the

intended learning outcomes:

Assessments 1 and 2 assess the students’ abilities in producing a coherent academic

text which requires effective use and referencing of sources (ref. LOs (a) and (b)).

Assessment 3 assesses their abilities to plan and present their ideas, in two different

academic contexts (ref. LOs (a) and (c)).

In addition to these assessments, students are required to complete further language

training through working on their ePortfolio throughout the course. This will involve

students in reading texts and subsequent online writing and discussion that will

parallel the process writing approach involved in assessments 1 and 2, and align with

all three LOs.

Student Study

Effort Expected

Class contact:

• Seminars 42 Hrs.

Other student study effort:

• Self study/preparation 84 Hrs.

Total student study effort

126 Hrs.

97


Reading List and

References

Course material

Learning materials developed by the English Language Centre

Recommended references

Faigley, L. (2008). Backpack writing: Reflecting, arguing, informing, analyzing,

evaluating. New York, NY: Pearson/Longman.

Madden, C. and Rohlck, T. N. (1997). Discussion and interaction in the academic

community. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.

Oshima, A. & Hogue, A. (2006). Writing academic English (4th ed.). White Plains,

NY: Pearson/Longman.

Reinhart, S. M. (2002). Giving academic presentations. Ann Arbor, MI: University

of Michigan Press.

Wood, N. V. (2009). Perspectives on argument (6th ed). Upper Saddle River, NJ:

Pearson/Prentice Hall.

98


Subject Description Form

Subject Code

Subject Title

ELC2011

Advanced English Reading and Writing Skills

Credit Value 3

Level 2

Pre-requisite /

Co-requisite/

Exclusion

Objectives

Pre-requisite: Advanced English for University Studies (ELC1014)

This subject aims to help students become more effective readers. It focuses on

developing students’ facility to read a variety of texts in a critical manner, and to be

able to discuss the stance of the writer as well as their own reflective response to a

text.

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the subject, students will be able to examine a variety

of texts, including literary texts, and:

a. identify salient ideas and implications, and distinguish unsupported claims from

supported ones, and fallacies from valid arguments

b. produce critical or interpretative texts which discuss and evaluate texts and writer

positions

c. write and discuss critical responses to various texts

To achieve the above outcomes, students are expected to use language and text

structure appropriate to the context, select information critically, and present and

support stance and opinion.

Subject Synopsis/

Indicative Syllabus

1. Reading strategies

Reading intensively to investigate a particular topic and develop an in-depth

understanding of issues and stances; reading critically to extract implications,

distinguish fact from opinion and fallacies from valid arguments, and to identify

writers’ assumptions and purposes; analysing issues raised in texts written from

different perspectives, including literary texts; reading extensively to appreciate the

use of language, acquire information, promote understanding and develop empathy.

2. Writing strategies

Presenting views and arguments to educated readers; describing and analysing the

structure, meaning and characteristics of a variety of texts; discussing writer

intentions.

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Teaching/Learning

Methodology

The study method is primarily seminar-based. Following a blended learning

approach, activities include teacher input as well as in- and out-of-class individual

and group work involving drafting and evaluating texts, mini-presentations and

discussions. The process approach to writing is adopted, and students make use of

elearning resources to engage in academic discussions and to reflect on their

learning.

Learning materials developed by the English Language Centre are used throughout

the course. Students will be referred to learning resources on the Internet and in the

ELC’s Centre for Independent Language Learning. Additional reference materials

will be recommended as required.

Assessment Methods

in Alignment with

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Specific assessment

methods/tasks

% weighting Intended subject learning

outcomes to be assessed

(Please tick as appropriate)

a b c

1. Reflective writing 20%

2. Analysing texts written in

different styles and from

various perspectives

40%

3. Writing a feature article 40%

Total 100%

Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the

intended learning outcomes:

Assessment 1 requires students to write reflective responses to texts and/or books

they have read, and is aligned with LO (c). Assessments 2 and 3 assess LO (a) and

involve students employing effective critical reading and thinking skills.

Assessment 3 requires students to conduct library/online search and produce a

critical text, thus integrating the receptive critical reading skills with the production

of a written text which critically assesses the texts they have read. All three

assessments assess students’ abilities with regard to LO (c) but in different ways,

and require students to present and support their interpretation of their reading.

Student Study

Effort Expected

Class contact:

• Seminars 42 Hrs.

Other student study effort:

• Self study/preparation 84 Hrs.

Total student study effort

126 Hrs.

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Reading List and

References

Course material

Learning materials developed by the English Language Centre

Recommended references

Best, J. (2001). Damned lies and statistics: Untangling numbers from the media,

politicians, and activists. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.

Cooper, S. & Patton, R. (2010). Writing logically, thinking critically. New York,

NY: Longman.

Damer, T. E. (2009). Attacking faulty reasoning: A practical guide to fallacy-free

arguments. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Cengage Learning.

Kennedy, X. J. & Gioia, D. (2010). Literature: An introduction to fiction, poetry,

drama, and writing (11 th ed.). New York, NY: Longman.

Mefcalfe, M. (2006). Reading critically at university. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

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Subject Description Form

Subject Code

Subject Title

ELC2012

Persuasive Communication

Credit Value 3

Level 2

Pre-requisite /

Co-requisite/

Exclusion

Objectives

Pre-requisite: Advanced English for University Studies (ELC1014)

This subject aims to help students become more persuasive communicators in a

variety of contexts that they may encounter at university and in the workplace.

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the subject, students will be able to

a. write persuasive texts intended for a variety of audiences

b. communicate persuasively in oral presentations

c. make persuasive arguments in formal discussions

To achieve the above outcomes, students are expected to use language and text

structure appropriate to the context, select information critically, and present and

support stance and opinion.

Subject Synopsis/

Indicative Syllabus

1. Preparing for effective persuasion

Assessing the situation; selecting relevant content; organising ideas and

information; selecting an appropriate tone, distance and level of formality; using

appropriate visual imagery to support the communication of messages.

2. Persuasion through writing

Developing and practising appropriate language, tone, style and structure; achieving

cohesion and coherence.

3. Persuasion through speaking

Developing and practising appropriate verbal and non-verbal skills for persuasive

oral communication; improving and extending relevant pronunciation features,

including articulation, pausing, intonation, word stress and sentence stress.

Teaching/Learning

Methodology

The study method is primarily seminar-based. Following a blended delivery

approach, activities include teacher input as well as individual and group work

involving reading and appreciating texts, discussions and presentations of ideas.

Learning materials developed by the English Language Centre are used throughout

the course. Students will be referred to learning resources on the Internet and in the

ELC’s Centre for Independent Language Learning. Additional reference materials

will be recommended as required.

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Assessment Methods

in Alignment with

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Specific assessment

methods/tasks

% weighting Intended subject learning

outcomes to be assessed

(Please tick as appropriate)

a b c

1. Persuasive written text 34%

2. Group presentation 33%

3. Debate 33%

Total 100 %

Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the

intended learning outcomes:

Assessment 1 concentrates on persuasive techniques in writing and assesses

students’ achievement of LO (a). Assessment 2 is a presentation that covers both

persuasive speaking and the use of visual aids to complement and reinforce the

message; and is aligned with intended LO (b). Assessment 3 assesses students’

performance in a different aspect of persuasion, the formal debate, in which students

need to explain their perspective, defend arguments and persuade the audience. It

aligns with intended LOs (a) and (b).

Student Study

Effort Expected

Class contact:

• Seminars 42 Hrs.

Other student study effort:

• Self study/preparation 84 Hrs.

Total student study effort

126 Hrs.

Reading List and

References

Course material

Learning materials developed by the English Language Centre

Recommended references

Breaden, B. L. (1996). Speaking to persuade. Fort Worth, TX: Harcourt Brace

College.

Leanne, S. (2008). Say it like Obama: The power of speaking with purpose and

vision. New York, NY: McGraw Hill.

Rogers, W. (2007). Persuasion: Messages, receivers, and contexts. Lanham, MD:

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.

Stiff, J. B. (2003). Persuasive communication (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Guilford

Press.

103


Subject Description Form

Subject Code

Subject Title

ELC2013

English in Literature and Film

Credit Value 3

Level 2

Pre-requisite /

Co-requisite/

Exclusion

Objectives

Pre-requisite: Advanced English for University Studies (ELC1014)

This subject aims to introduce students to a range of literary genres in English as

well as to enable them to consider differences in media representations of genres,

and to appreciate and negotiate the meanings of a variety of literary texts.

It is also intended that the subject will help students further develop literacy, as

well as higher order thinking and life-long learning skills.

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the subject, students will be able to:

a. examine and analyse literary texts on various themes from different

perspectives

b. discuss literary techniques employed by writers

c. appreciate and articulate differences in textual and visual media

representations

To achieve the above outcomes, students are expected to use language and text

structure appropriate to the context, select information critically, and present and

support stance and opinion.

Subject Synopsis/

Indicative Syllabus

1. Written communication

Describing and interpreting content and language in literary texts; employing

appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary.

2. Spoken communication

Presenting critical evaluation of literary works effectively and convincingly.

3. Reading

Developing understanding of and competence in using literary devices such as

metaphor, simile and symbolism, via reading literary texts and viewing film

versions.

4. Language development

Improving fluency and pronunciation, and extending grammatical and lexical

competence.

104


Teaching/Learning

Methodology

The study method is primarily seminar-based. Following a blended delivery

approach, activities include teacher input as well as in- and out-of-class individual

and group work involving listening to and viewing a variety of audio-visual

sources, reading and drafting texts, conducting internet research, making minipresentations,

participating in discussions, and comparing various representations

of literature. Students will make use of elearning resources and web-based work

to further improve their English literacy skills.

Learning materials developed by the English Language Centre are used

throughout the course. Students will be referred to learning resources on the

Internet and in the ELC’s Centre for Independent Language Learning. Additional

reference materials will be recommended as required.

Assessment Methods

in Alignment with

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Specific assessment

methods/tasks

% weighting Intended subject learning

outcomes to be assessed

(Please tick as appropriate)

a b c

1. Individual paper 30%

2. Written test 40%

3. Group project 30%

Total 100 %

Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the

intended learning outcomes:

In assessment 1, students are required to write an individual paper in which they

critically reflect on their reading of prose, and by so doing, demonstrate their

achievement of LO (a). Assessments 2 and 3 are aligned with all three LOs.

Assessment 2 assesses students’ understanding of a literary drama and requires

comparison of the merits of its textual and theatrical versions. Assessment 3 is a

group project that requires reading and interpretation of more creative literature

and presentation of audio-visual sources.

Student Study Effort

Expected

Class contact:

• Seminars 42 Hrs.

Other student study effort:

• Self study/preparation 84 Hrs.

Total student study effort

126 Hrs.

Reading List and

References

Required reading

The PolyU library retains either hardcopies or electronic copies of the following

titles. The titles can also be found online.

Honey, M., & Cole, J. L. (eds.). (2002). Madame Butterfly / John Luther Long;

and A Japanese nightingale / Onoto Watanna (Winnifred Eaton): Two orientalist

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texts. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press.

Available at Reserve Coll Reserve Coll PS3523.O4685 M33 2002

http://opera.stanford.edu/Puccini/Butterfly/source/JLLong.html

Stam, R., and Raengo, A. (eds.). (2004). A companion to literature and film.

[electronic source] Blackwell reference online. Malden: Blackwell.

Call number PN1995.3.C65 2004eb

http://www.blackwellreference.com/subscriber/uid=262/book?id=g978063123053

3_9780631230533&authstatuscode=202

Wilson, J. D. (ed.). (2009). William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

[electronic resource] Cambridge books online. Cambridge: Cambridge University

Press.

Call number PR2827.A1 2009eb

http://shakespeare.mit.edu/midsummer/full.html

Other readings will be specified by the ELC teacher, and may contain short

fiction, novelettes, plays and poetry.

106


Subject Description Form

Subject Code

Subject Title

FAST1000

Freshman Seminar – Science to Improve Quality of Life

Credit Value 3

Level 1

Pre-requisite /

Co-requisite/

Exclusion

Objectives

Nil

(a) To introduce students to applied science disciplines, and enthuse them

about their science major study

(b)

To expose students to the basic skills of teamwork, leadership and

entrepreneurship

(c) To cultivate students’ creativity and problem-solving ability, and global

outlook

(d) To engage students, in their first year of study, in desirable forms of

learning at university that emphasizes self-regulation, autonomous

learning, deep understanding and lifelong learning

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Upon completion of the subject, students will be able to:

(a) have a general understanding of history of science and topics of modern

science and technologies such as nanotechnology, sustainable energy,

gene technology, food safety and investment science

(b) generate innovative ideas and use different perspectives and creative

solutions to tackle scientific problems

(c) command the basic communication and interpersonal skills in teamwork

(d) appreciate the basic concepts of entrepreneurship

(e) develop a global outlook and passion for lifelong learning

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Subject Synopsis/

Indicative Syllabus

• History of science: from Newton to Einstein, establishment of

quantum physics, big bang theory, etc.

• Great scientific breakthroughs which shape our modern world: for

examples, algebra and calculus, classical mechanics, probability and

statistics, natural selection and evolution, germ theory of disease,

electromagnetism, atomic theory and the periodic table, double-helical

structure of DNA

• From basic science to applications and technologies. For examples:

− applications of mathematics in finance;

− nanotechnologies;

− clean energy and sustainability;

− quantum computing;

− drug and medicine;

− food safety;

− stem cells;

− cloning.

Teaching/Learning

Methodology

• Inspirational lectures and seminars by chair professors and renowned

experts from various areas to excite students about their major study

and to motivate students’ career inspirations

• Renowned experts from various areas are invited to deliver Expert

Seminars to students. Some of them are scholars as well as

entrepreneurs. Some have been working in the industrial/commercial

sector for years. They share with the students their success stories in

which students could know more about the basic concept of

entrepreneurship.

• Professors from different departments are invited as interviewees to

participate in “Interview a Professor” activity. They respond to the

questions of interest from students and share the history and story of

their respective department. This builds students’ recognition to the

department and establishes a close relationship among professors and

the students.

• Popular science programmes will be shown to the students in order to

introduce them to the interesting areas of applied science and the

access and awareness of the current/ important issues. The source of

these programmes includes the TED talks, Nobel lectures, Discovery

channel, BBC and National Geographic. Students will be required to

choose two science programmes they watched to submit two term

papers in the relevant topics.

• Small group projects to develop students’ problem solving ability and

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their understanding/application of theories in different disciplines

• Students will be informed to form groups in the first class. They have

to come up with a grouping and a project title in the 4th week. They

will need to search for materials and information and report to the

supervisor progress of the project regularly. Supervisors will

continuously monitor students’ work. In week 12 to 14, each group

will present their project and come up with a written report to

demonstrate their team work and individual performance.

The Online Tutorial on Academic Integrity is provided to help

students understand the importance of academic honesty and learn

ways to ensure that their work and behaviour at PolyU are acceptable

in this regard. Students are required to complete the Tutorial not later

than the end of Week 5.

Assessment

Methods in

Alignment with

Intended Learning

Outcomes

Students’ performance will be assessed by a letter-grading system.

The following assessment methods will be adopted:

Specific assessment

methods

%

weighting

Intended subject learning outcomes to

be assessed (Please tick as

appropriate)

a b c d e

1. Project write-up 30%

2. Project presentation 20%

3. Seminar attendance 10%

4. Assignments on

expert seminar

15%

5. Interview Report 5%

6. Term paper 20%

Total 100 %

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Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the

intended learning outcomes:

1. Project write-up – A project write-up forms the most important part of

the assessment for this subject. Students are required to design a

science-based multidisciplinary project to critically examine and to

suggest possible solutions to a daily life problem. The project will be

assessed based on its creativity, demonstration of critical thinking and

the viability of the proposed solutions. The required number of words

for the project is 4,000 – 7,000 per group.

2. Project presentation – Students are required to present their project.

Assessment will be based on similar criteria as above.

3. Seminar attendance – Students are required to attend various seminars.

Students will fail the subject, regardless the grade attained in other

components, if their attendance rate is lower than 70%.

4. Assignments on expert seminar – Students will be asked to write 1

page summary essay or answer MCQ based on the seminars given by

the invited speakers. Students will be assessed on their understanding

of the content of the seminars. Students are also required to add their

own opinions in the essays in order to show their problem-solving

skills and critical thinking ability.

5. Interview Report – Each student will be asked to write a summary

essay based on the group interview with the professor. Students will

be assessed on their preparation of questions listed and report of the

interview. Students are welcome to demonstrate their creativity in the

design of the interview report. The required number of words for the

paper is 400 – 600.

6. Term Papers – Students are required to choose two topics from the

science programmes they watched and write term papers in focusing

deeply on the science issues / problems related to the programmes.

The first topic can be related to the student’s own discipline while the

second one should be from other disciplines. Students are also

required to add their own ideas to show their innovation and problem

solving skills. The required number of words for the paper is 800 –

1,000.

7. The Online Tutorial on Academic Integrity can be accessed on

LEARN@PolyU ( 理 學 網 ). It takes approximately two hours to complete. To

successfully complete the Tutorial, students will attempt the Pre-test, read the

four modules, pass the Post-test (score of at least 75%, i.e. 15 out of 20;

multiple attempts allowed), and to sign the Honour Declaration.

The Online Tutorial is part of the subject completion requirement.

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Students who fail to complete the Online Tutorial will fail this subject.

Student Study

Effort Expected

Class contact:

• Lecture/Seminar 26 Hrs.

• Tutorial/Discussion 14 Hrs.

• Presentation 10 Hrs.

Other student study effort:

• Self-learning Package 12 Hrs.

• Reading/writing/preparation of

presentation

• Online Tutorial on Academic

Integrity

48 Hrs.

2 Hrs.

Total student study effort 112 Hrs.

Reading List and

References

References

1. The history of science and religion in the western tradition : an encyclopedia /

Gary B. Ferngren, Edward J. Larson, Darrel W. Amundsen and Anne-Marie

E. Nakhla. New York : Garland Pub., 2000.

2. Science and its History [electronic resource]: a Reassessment of the

Historiography of Science by Joseph Agassi, Dordrecht: Springer

Science+Business Media B.V., 2008.

3. The Discoveries: Great Breakthroughs in 20 th - Century Science by Alan

Lightman, Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, 2010.

4. Investment Science by D G Luenberger, Oxford University Press,

International edition, 2009.

5. Fundamentals of Futures and Options Markets by John C. Hull,

7 th edition, Pearson International Edition, 2011.

The Subject Description Form is subject to Faculty Board’s endorsement.

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