Adopted Budget 2013 - Cork City Council

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Adopted Budget 2013 - Cork City Council

Comhairle Cathrach Chorcaí

Buiséad Bliantúil 2013

Cork City Council

Annual Budget 2013

Adopted


CORK CITY COUNCIL

COMHAIRLE CATHRACH

CHORCAÍ

BUDGET 2013

Page

City Manager’s Report 1

Summary Financial Information & Charts 13

Statutory Tables 21

Service Division Details 29

Capital Programme 2013-2015 95


BUDGET 2013

CITY MANAGER'S

REPORT

1


COMHAIRLE CATHRACH CHORCAÍ

CORK CITY COUNCIL

Budget 2013

A Ard-Mhéara agus Comhairleoirí,

I enclose for your consideration the 2013 draft Budget for Cork City Council.

The overall revenue expenditure proposed for 2013 is €162,164,600 by comparison with

€166,968,900 for 2012. This represents a reduction of €4.8m or 2.9% on the 2012 Budget.

Economic Climate

Preparing this years budget for consideration and adoption by Council has been an extremely

difficult task. The general economic climate and state of the national finances have severely

impacted on the City Council over the past four years and will continue to do so during 2013.

Many of our Income sources continue to be under severe pressure, while the current economic

situation also results in increased demand for services in many areas, further exacerbating the

pressure on the city’s finances. In bringing a balanced budget before Council for adoption,

significant decisions were required with regard to priorities for 2013 and the manner in which

we will continue to deliver services.

In light of these parameters within which we must frame the 2013 Budget, there is a clear

requirement to continue to reduce and restrict expenditure in all areas and across all elements

while endeavouring to minimise the impact on the level of service to our citizens and

ratepayers. If more funds were available then additional services could be provided, but we

must have regard to the ability of our citizens and our businesses to finance any increased levels

of expenditure.

The views and priorities of Council, as expressed through pre-budget meetings and by the

Corporate Policy Group, have also been factored into what follows. This represents a

considered and reasonable balance between the desirability of maintaining services and our

ability to fund it, given the current economic situation and the financial position of the Council.

Staffing

Throughout 2012 staffing levels continued to decline through retirement, early retirement

schemes, career breaks and the non replacement of scheduled retirees. As of the 1 st December

a total of 289 employees had left the organisation and were not replaced. Overtime has been

significantly reduced from 2008 levels and now represents 5.2% of the total payroll in the 2013

budget. In 2012 a total of 46 employees left the organisation while this budget for 2013 is based

on a further reduction in staff of 39, to an overall level of close to 1,250 from a high of 1,593

some years ago. Under the Local Government Efficiency Review process a National Manpower

Planning exercise is being undertaken across the Local Government Sector which will set

further targets for staff reductions and which the Council will need to take cognisance of. I will

elaborate further on this hereunder. The full costs of pension payments in 2013 in respect of

these additional retirements is accounted for in the budget as presented. The longer term

continuous lowering of the City Councils’ overall payroll costs will ensure a sustainable financial

position into the future.

The reduction in staff numbers has resulted in staff costs declining by over €14.6m since 2009.

It however inevitably impacts on the levels of service provided right across the organisation.

3


Local Government Fund

The General Purposes Grant Allocation from the Local Government Fund for 2013 will be

€16,612,500. This is an effective reduction of 3.78% on the 2012 level and a cumulative

reduction of 40.2% since 2009.

For 2013, the Local Government Fund will be made up of receipts from motor taxation and the

proposed new Local Property Tax (LPT). The total income from this new tax will replace the

Household Charge and the Exchequer contribution to the Fund. The LPT will also replace the

NPPR (second homes levy), income from which currently accrues directly to the relevant local

authority, from 1 st January 2014.

Local Government Efficiency

The Council will continue in 2013 to identify areas where further efficiencies can be made in

delivering services. In particular, the Council will continue to roll out business process reviews

across services, aimed at identifying and eliminating waste while increasing predictability in

service delivery. Further progress will be made in procurement and shared services initiatives

both locally and nationally. The local government sector has performed admirably in meeting

its targets under the Croke Park Agreement and will continue to be at the forefront in meeting

the challenges that lie ahead. Currently, a total of 31 shared services business plans are being

progressed by Local Authorities on a national sectoral basis while locally, further consideration

is being given to opportunities for additional shared service delivery at a county/city level.

Review of staffing complement in Cork City

The independent review of the staffing complement of the City Council under the aegis of the

Efficiency Review Group on Local Government is progressing. The completion of the National

Manpower Plan for the local government sector nationally has indicated target staffing levels set

for the four middle management and senior management grades for different categories of local

authorities across the state. On foot of this, the specific review of staff levels in the City Council

must take cognisance of same. The national targets set are challenging and would result in the

further reduction of staff at this level over the next few years, requiring continuous reorganisation

and prioritisation of service delivery and methods of delivery. The City Council

review will be completed in early 2013.

Commercial Rates

There is an understandable desire across the business sector for the Council to deliver a

significant reduction in the Annual Rate on Valuation. The income from this source represents

40% of total income of the City Council.

While the Council has made significant progress in reducing its expenditure levels through

efficiency measures and staff reductions, as evidenced by a reduction in its payroll budget of

€14.6m since 2009 and significant reductions in its non-pay expenditure, it has been unable to

transfer the benefits of these to ratepayers due to the level of reductions in its income base over

the same period. For example, the Local Government Fund grant from central government has

been cut by €11.2m or 40.2% since 2009. This equates to more than 17% of the rate income, a

reduction which could have been passed on to the business sector if grant levels were not

reduced so drastically.

Without the significant progress made by the Council in reducing its cost base and delivering

increased operational efficiencies, it would not be possible to retain the Annual Rate on

Valuation at the same level over the five years 2009-2013. It is also of interest to note that over

this period, utility charges to businesses from other sectors have increased substantially, thus

resulting in the commercial rate being a relatively low cost to business when compared to other

utility costs.

In the context of not providing for a reduction in Rates, it is important to note that the budget

provides for a full continuation of the City Councils vibrant Arts, Cultural and Festivals

4


programme. The budget also provides for a continuation and enhancement of our input into

leading the tourism development of Cork City, while our Economic Development Fund is also

continued, with a further contribution of €651,000 being 1% of rates. Continuation of these

initiatives would not be possible if a reduction in rates were provided for. Commercial rates are

a form of local government taxation and an essential source of funding for local services

The Council has managed to freeze commercial rates for four years in succession. This is only

possible because we achieved significant efficiencies which in turn, enabled us to absorb

significant austerity cuts imposed by government without passing them on to business.

The Council also works on a one-to-one basis with struggling businesses to tailor payment plans

to try to meet their needs.

Analysis confirms that commercial rates form a small proportion of the cost of doing business.

Rising utility charges, wages, rents and loan repayments pose a challenge to competitiveness,

whereas the overhead cost of commercial rates is decreasing in real terms.

It would be the clear wish of Council to provide further business supports whether in the form

of a reduction in the Annual Rate on Valuation or otherwise. It is clear that Commercial rates

are inextricably linked to the broader structures of local government finance, which are in

transition. Given the extent of reform taking place in the sector, stability is of over-riding

concern. It will take time for a Local Property Tax to bed in, during which time there will be a

need to review the existing funding model. Taking into account these factors, any proposed

supports can only be delivered in local government funding over the next 24 months in the

context of a property tax being introduced. A national funding mechanism would need to be in

place to deliver such supports, while any initiatives should not lead to a deterioration in the level

of funds coming into the sector.

Water Services

Central Governments “Polluter Pays” policy requires that the cost of non-domestic water must

be recovered from the non-domestic sector. This resulted in the price of water for Cork City

Council customers being set at €2.30 in 2005, a small increase to €2.35 in 2009 and this has

remained unchanged since then. To move towards full cost recovery it is necessary in 2013 to

increase the charge to €2.44. This represents a 3.8% increase and is the first increase since

2009.

Car Parking Charges and Parking Regulation

There will be no increase in car parking charges in 2013 which remain generally at €2.00 for

both on-street and off-street parking. The Council’s multi-storey car-parks at Paul Street and

Kyrls Quay/North Main Street are the cheapest in the city. A review of the charging regime at

Kyrls Quay/North Main Street Car Park is merited as it has unutilised capacity, and this will be

undertaken in early 2013 with a view to increasing its usage and contribution to both the City

Council and the city generally.

In the case of on-street car parking, the re-tendering of the Park-by-Phone service is ongoing.

There is significant opportunity to grow Park-by-Phone usage as the preferred method for the

majority of vehicle owners paying for on-street parking. It is an extremely convenient method

and a specific focus will be placed on marketing it as such, once a new contract is entered into

in 2013.

The cessation of clamping in the city has been favourably received while the current towaway

regime continues. The towaway regime is directed through the Councils Traffic Warden Service

and is focused on the removal of vehicles that are causing obstruction in the city. All vehicles

towed receive a fixed charge penalty notice at present. Despite this, the tow-away service as

currently operated costs the Council in the order of €120,000 per annum. The 2013 budget is

5


however prepared on the basis that all towed vehicles will, along with being issud with a FCPN,

will also be issued with an additional charge/fine to recover the cost of operating the system.

This will require the introduction of a charge by council in 2013 possibly through the approval

of a new bye-law governing same. Introduction of this measure will ensure that the operation of

the towaway system will be cost neutral in 2013.

Housing Rents and Local Authority Housing

Housing Rents are based on ability to pay and no increases are proposed under this scheme.

Budgeted income is set at a similar level to 2012 to reflect the expectation that social welfare

payments will not be reduced.

With regard to our housing maintenance programme generally, Members will be aware that

significant changes were made to our programme of works from mid 2011 and throughout

2012. It will be necessary to continue these into 2013.

The housing maintenance programme regime will continue to be based on limited planned

maintenance being undertaken with the emphasis being on responding to emergency and urgent

repairs in the first instance, and any improvement works thereafter. This is necessary due to

falling grant aid for maintenance and a significant drop in the level of funds that will be

available from internal capital receipts.

In order to ensure that the Council meets its statutory obligation to work within a balanced

budget in 2012, the planned servicing of boilers was deferred. In 2013, the Council will

introduce a boiler servicing programme. However it is provided for in the budget on a cost

neutral basis. As outlined to Council recently, the City Council has approximately 8,800

dwelling units, 600 of which are heated by district heating systems leaving approximately 8,200

with individual boilers. An annual service of these boilers is likely to cost €840,600 with a biannual

service costing €420,300 per annum. The funding for boiler servicing is not currently

available within the proposed annual budget for 2013. A cost neutral provision is made in the

draft budget with a proposal to introduce a cost recovery mechanism to be charged in addition

to the normal weekly rent. The cost to the tenant is likely to be €2 per week for annual

servicing or €1 per week for bi-annual servicing. An option can be included in the boiler

servicing scheme which provides for the tenant to undertake boiler servicing and to opt out of

any charges under the proposed scheme for the regular servicing of boilers however, a

certificate confirming that the boiler has been serviced will be required by the City Council.

The nature of such certification will be included in the scheme.

Disabled Persons Grants and Disability Works to Local Authority Houses

The budget as presented provides for a similar level of activity and expenditure of

approximately €1m in 2013, as in 2012, on disabled person grants to private homeowners. A

significant number of grant approvals have issued by the Council in recent years however, many

approvals have not materialised into actual works being undertaken by homeowners. This

results in a lower level of actual spend in any one year than the level of approvals issued. The

budget as presented more accurately reflects the actual payment level that is required in 2013

based on 2012 payments level. It is expected that the annual government grant will materialise

at this level and that the Councils contribution to the overall spend will be in the order of

€200,000.

Due to a significant drop in the level of Internal Capital Receipts that are available, the Council

is not in a position to allocate any of its own funds in 2013 towards undertaking significant

disability works/extensions to the City Councils own dwellings. In 2012, our Internal Capital

Receipts were capable of contributing €400,000 to such works, this also being supplemented by

a grant of circa €286,000 from central government. In 2013 therefore, our programme of works

will be limited to the level of grant aid that we receive from central government and this is not

likely to be notified until early 2013.

6


Roads and Transportation

The 2013 budget sees a further shift in emphasis in terms of both the manner in which the

Council will deliver its work programme and, the type of work it will undertake. There will be a

significant reduction in improvement type works being undertaken with the emphasis being

primarily on a care and maintenance programme.

In view of the reductions in funds available for this programme, there is a need to focus all

funds on maintaining our asset base on a prioritised basis, taking account of traffic volumes and

strategic importance of the route network. The level of funds available for works is also

dependent on the road grants the Council will receive. Also, there will be a need for significant

flexibility with regard to the manner in which block grant allocations are spent. The block grant

will need to support a major portion of our maintenance works as opposed to improvement

works as heretofore.

In view of the aforementioned, the Budget presented for adoption does not provide for specific

funds in 2013 for areas such as estate road resurfacing, traffic calming measures, laneway

closures and new public lights. While desirable, the funds available simply do not provide the

level of discretion to provide specifically for these types of works. Provision continues to be

made for a sum of €248,000 for Ward Funds.

Despite this, there will continue to be a significant focus on the further development of works

under the National Transport Authority funded sustainable transport programme. The City

Centre Movement Strategy currently at public consultation stage will provide the framework for

targeted investment in the city over the next 5 years with an envisaged spend of up to €7m per

annum. This will form part of our capital programme and members will be advised of grant

allocations as they emerge in 2013.

Support to Visitor Centres, Events, Community and Arts Grants

It has again been necessary for 2013 to introduce a further minor overall reduction in funds

provided for the City Councils contributions to other bodies in this area. This had been limited

to 3.78%, equivalent to the percentage reduction in the local government fund. While this is a

reduction in funding, the fact that the Council was in a position to reverse the planned cuts in

this area in 2012, as a result of the positive response by nearly 70% of city householders in

paying the household charge, is a positive outcome and should assist community groups in

receipt of funds in managing this minor reduction in 2013.

A sum in the order of €836,200 is provided for 2013, which includes the retention of €250,000

for Cork Opera House. Along with this, a provision of €259,800 is also included for grants

made by the Arts Committee of Council and a provision of €218,100 is made for Community

Grants. The budget as presented also provides for the full continuation of the Councils

Community Warden Service for 2013 and this is now fully funded by the Council as is the

Rapid Co-ordinator service.

In 2012, Council also introduced a new €750,000 Community Fund provision over a three year

period, focused on sports development in the city. The second tranche of €250,000 will be

available for distribution in 2013.

Economic Development and Tourism

The City Council, as one of the biggest employers in Cork City, and as a public service delivery

agency plays a significant role in facilitating initiatives aimed at increasing the attractiveness of

the city for economic activity. In this regard, the 2013 budget makes specific provision for the

continuation of an economic development fund equivalent to 1% of total rates income or

€651,000. A full report on proposals developed in the first two years of the fund has been

presented to Council on a number of occasions through the Strategic Planning and Economic

Development Directorate. Further proposals for the overall fund into 2013 will be brought to

this Strategic Policy Committee.

7


In 2013, there will be a particular focus on further developing the Councils tourism initiatives,

many of which will be funded from the economic development fund, while also being

supplemented by a further specific provision of €325,000, similar to that provided in 2012. The

adoption of the Councils three year Tourism Strategy in 2012 was a significant milestone and

provides an ambitious programme of work across both product development and marketing.

Councils continued support in this area is welcome at a time of significant pressures and

challenges in prioritisation of programme spend. This strategic and visionary approach must

however be continued as the Council does need to continue to perform its role in the area of

city economic development out of which the benefits to social and community development

emerge.

Strategic Development of Cork City

At a time of continued budgetary and resource pressures as evidenced in this report and budget,

it is critically important at the same time that the City Council performs its role in continuing to

lead the strategic development of the city. Despite the pressures, it is important to recognise

that there are significant advances being made by the Council in this regard. This budget and

indeed the three year capital programme continues to support initiatives such as the following:









Advancement of the regeneration programme for the north west of the city, at a likely level

of investment of c.€10m per annum

Advancement of the NTA funded sustainable transport programme at a likely level of

investment of c.€7m per annum for the next 5 years

The further planning and advancement of major parks and recreation projects such as the

redevelopment of the former Kinsale Road Landfill Site, Marina Park and Mardyke

Gardens

The completion of the Economic Proposition Report on Cork Docklands and the

presentation of same to Government, with proposals aimed at developing the mechanisms

for unlocking the potential of this area of the city

The undertaking of an assessment of the need for investment by the public sector in an

Events Centre in the city

The progression of a feasibility study on the development of a Food Enterprise,

Innovation and Tourism Centre in the city centre

The progression of a City Centre Viability Study aimed at guiding and charting the future

growth of the city centre economy

Furthering the tourism development projects including the bid to secure for the city the

governments plan to develop a National Diaspora Centre through the Councils concept for

a World Centre of Irish Heritage, the opening and development of Elizabeth Fort for

tourism, and the development of the city signage strategy.

These, along with other revenue and capital development projects, and with the support of the

Members of Council, continue to ensure that we are providing for the further development of

our city as the premier driver of economic growth in the southern region. While not

immediately evident, they are a necessary element of our work, particularly so at times of

economic contraction.

Conclusion

The preparation of this budget has again been a difficult one for Council. A significant effort

has been made by all members of the Councils Management Team and their staff to produce a

budget and associated work-programme which will ensure that the Council maximises its output

and impact for the citizens of Cork City. I would like to thank the Assistant City Manager, all

Directors of Service, Heads of Function and their staff for their work in this regard.

The proposed budget provides a reasonable balance across the competing objectives of

developing the social, cultural, economic and infrastructural needs of the City, in a socially

8


inclusive manner, that Council is charged with progressing. This is a challenge for Council and

I would like to thank the Lord Mayor, the Corporate Policy Group and all Members of Council

for their input and assistance in the Budget preparation.

I would also like in particular to convey my thanks to Tim Healy, Head of Finance, John

Hallahan, Management Accountant and the staff of the Finance Directorate for their assistance.

I recommend the adoption of the 2013 Budget, as prepared, to the City Council.

TIM LUCEY

CITY MANAGER

7 th December, 2012

9


AMENDMENT TO DRAFT ANNUAL BUDGET AS PRESENTED TO COUNCIL

BY THE CITY MANAGER

The draft Annual Budget was considered by Members at the Budget Meeting held on

Wednesday 19 th December, 2012. The budget was adopted as presented except for the

following motion:-

“That the Draft Cork City Council Budget as presented for the local financial year ending 31st

December 2013 be and is hereby amended as hereunder :-

EXP B0502 Public Lighting Improvement +€9,200

EXP H0902 Lord Mayor/Deputy Lord Mayor Allowances -€9,200

EXP B0502 Public Lighting Improvement +€5,000

EXP H0904 Expenses LA Members -€45,000

INC B0902 Operation of Street Parking -€40,000

These changes are reflected in the figures and analysis contained in the following sections.

10


BUDGET 2013

SUMMARY FINANCIAL

INFORMATION &

CHARTS

13


GROSS REVENUE EXPENDITURE

2009-2013


2009 199,162,300

2010 193,855,800

2011 196,631,600

2012 166,968,900

2013 162,124,600

€225,000,000

€200,000,000

€175,000,000

€150,000,000

2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

15


EXPENDITURE BY SERVICE DIVISION

2013 2012

€ €

A Housing & Building 40,166,000 41,034,700

B Road Transport & Safety 25,673,800 25,885,400

C Water Services 21,225,900 21,230,500

D Development Management 8,834,200 9,208,500

E Environmental Services 31,276,300 31,980,900

F Recreation & Amenity 20,329,100 20,832,000

G Agriculture, Education, Health & Welfare 3,743,500 5,926,800

H Miscellaneous Services 10,875,800 10,870,100

162,124,600 166,968,900

45.00

40.00

35.00

30.00

25.00

20.00

15.00

10.00

5.00

0.00

2013

2012

16


EXPENDITURE BY ELEMENTS

€ %

1 Payroll 63,214,700 39.0

2 Superannuation 16,106,600 9.9

2 Loan Charges 2,867,100 1.8

3 Mandatory Charges 5,185,300 3.2

4 Liability Insurances 3,536,700 2.2

5 Other 71,214,200 43.9

TOTAL 162,124,600 100.0

Other

43.9%

Payroll

39.0%

Liability Insurances

2.2%

Superannuation

9.9%

Mandatory Charges

3.2%

Loan Charges

1.8%

17


PAYROLL & SUPERANNUATION COSTS

2009-2013

Payroll

Superannuation

2009 77,819,200 13,684,700

2010 70,094,300 14,173,900

2011 67,320,600 14,117,300

2012 63,448,400 16,953,900

2013 63,214,700 16,106,600

Payroll

Superannuation

90,000,000

80,000,000

70,000,000

60,000,000

50,000,000

40,000,000

30,000,000

20,000,000

10,000,000

0

2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

18


INCOME BY ELEMENTS

STATE GRANTS AND SUBSIDIES

€ %

Local Government Fund 16,612,500 10.2

Dept of Environment, Heritage & Local Government 8,543,600 5.3

Road Fund Grants - NRA & DOT 6,334,900 3.9

Grants from Other Departments 3,826,500 2.4

35,317,500 21.8

OTHER

Rent from Houses (incl RAS) 26,420,200 16.3

Rate Collection 64,880,400 40.0

Pension Related Deduction 3,527,300 2.2

Service Income 31,979,200 19.7

126,807,100 78.2

TOTAL 162,124,600 100.0

Service Income

19.7%

State Grants

21.8%

Rent from Houses

16.3%

Pension Related

Deduction

2.2%

Rate Collection

40.0%

19


INCOME SUMMARY

2009-2013

Rates Grants Service Income

2009 61,280,200 61,420,100 76,462,000

2010 63,190,200 59,157,500 71,508,100

2011 63,842,400 65,184,800 67,604,400

2012 64,462,500 42,414,700 60,091,700

2013 64,880,400 38,844,800 58,399,400

80,000,000

Rates Grants Service Income

70,000,000

60,000,000

50,000,000

40,000,000

30,000,000

20,000,000

10,000,000

0

2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

20


BUDGET 2013

STATUTORY TABLES

Table A

Table B

Table C

Table D

Table E

Table F

Calculation of Annual Rate on Valuation

Expenditure & Income for 2013 and Estimated

Outturn for 2012

Calculation of Annual Rate on Valuation

Relevant to Authorities with Town Councils only

Analysis of Budget 2013 Income from Goods &

Services

Analysis of Budget 2013 Income from Grants &

Subsidies

Annual Budget – Expenditure & Income

Contained in Service Division Details Section

21


Summary by Service Division

CORK CITY COUNCIL - ANNUAL BUDGET

TABLE A - CALCULATION OF ANNUAL RATE ON VALUATION

Expenditure Income Estimated Net

Expenditure

2013

Estimated

Outturn 2012

Net

Expenditure

€ € € % € %

23

Gross Revenue Expenditure & Income

A Housing and Building 40,166,000 37,077,500 3,088,500 3.6% 3,582,600 4.2%

B Road Transport & Safety 25,673,800 15,484,000 10,189,800 12.0% 10,346,000 12.0%

C Water Services 21,225,900 9,607,500 11,618,400 13.7% 12,556,300 14.6%

D Development Management 8,834,200 963,600 7,870,600 9.3% 7,709,700 9.0%

E Environmental Services 31,276,300 4,997,300 26,279,000 30.9% 25,557,100 29.7%

F Recreation and Amenity 20,329,100 2,077,100 18,252,000 21.5% 18,438,800 21.4%

G Agriculture, Education, Health & Welfare 3,743,500 3,392,500 351,000 0.4% 352,500 0.4%

H Miscellaneous Services 10,875,800 3,504,900 7,370,900 8.7% 7,597,200 8.8%

Financed by Other Income/Credit Balances

Provision for Credit Balance

162,124,600 77,104,400 85,020,200 100% 86,140,200 100%

0 0

Local Government Fund /General Purpose Grant 0 16,612,500

Pension Levy Deduction

Sub - Total (B)

Amount of Rates to be Levied C=(A-B)

Net Effective Valuation D

General Annual Rate on Valuation C/D

0 3,527,300

20,139,800

64,880,400

876,170

74.05


Housing and Building

A01 Maintenance/Improvement of LA Housing Units 15,168,500 15,168,500 20,940,000 20,940,000 13,883,700 14,138,700 20,112,600 20,103,900

A02 Housing Assessment, Allocation and Transfer 827,400 827,400 0 0 839,400 838,600 0 0

A03 Housing Rent & Tenant Purchase Administration 856,700 856,700 10,900 10,900 808,400 804,800 12,000 11,500

A04 Housing Community Development Support 5,580,900 5,580,900 217,300 217,300 5,179,700 5,362,100 180,100 181,900

A05 Administration of Homeless Service 5,392,700 5,392,700 4,926,900 4,926,900 5,211,200 4,638,500 4,778,000 4,175,700

A06 Support to Housing Capital Prog. 1,286,500 1,286,500 804,700 804,700 1,835,500 1,896,400 875,800 939,800

A07 RAS Programme 7,631,400 7,631,400 7,460,800 7,460,800 7,754,800 7,508,900 7,560,700 7,230,600

A08 Housing Loans 1,715,400 1,715,400 1,527,300 1,527,300 1,914,900 1,879,200 1,784,600 1,607,400

A09 Housing Grants 1,330,100 1,330,100 1,100,000 1,100,000 3,122,200 1,458,100 2,560,000 1,000,000

A11 Agency & Recoupable Services 376,400 376,400 89,600 89,600 484,900 410,100 90,500 102,000

Service Division Total 40,166,000 40,166,000 37,077,500 37,077,500 41,034,700 38,935,400 37,954,300 35,352,800

Water Services

C01 Water Supply 8,956,900 8,956,900 9,461,100 9,461,100 9,296,800 9,123,200 9,686,500 9,246,100

C02 Waste Water Treatment 11,435,600 11,435,600 74,000 74,000 11,024,100 11,917,300 75,600 76,200

C03 Collection of Water and Waste Water Charges 746,000 746,000 6,300 6,300 773,500 796,600 6,400 6,500

C04 Public Conveniences 52,900 52,900 11,000 11,000 51,800 57,600 10,000 11,000

C07 Agency & Recoupable Services 34,500 34,500 55,100 55,100 84,300 54,200 73,500 52,800

Service Division Total 21,225,900 21,225,900 9,607,500 9,607,500 21,230,500 21,948,900 9,852,000 9,392,600

Division & Services

CORK CITY COUNCIL - ANNUAL BUDGET

TABLE B - EXPENDITURE & INCOME FOR 2013 AND ESTIMATED OUTTURN FOR 2012

2013 2012

Expenditure Income Expenditure Income

Adopted by by Estimated by Adopted by Estimated by Adopted by Estimated Adopted Estimated

Council Manager Council Manager Council Outturn Council Outturn

€ € € € € € € €

24

Road Transport & Safety

B01 NP Road - Maintenance and Improvement 2,557,900 2,557,900 2,272,700 2,272,700 2,541,700 2,497,300 2,269,300 2,284,600

B02 NS Road - Maintenance and Improvement 20,700 20,700 500 500 16,500 400 600 600

B03 Regional Road - Maintenance and Improvement 479,200 479,200 11,800 11,800 491,100 561,600 12,100 12,300

B04 Local Road - Maintenance and Improvement 8,097,000 8,097,000 3,653,900 3,653,900 8,453,800 8,397,600 3,562,400 3,574,100

B05 Public Lighting 2,764,300 2,750,100 115,600 115,600 2,600,000 2,555,800 107,500 118,100

B06 Traffic Management Improvement 4,822,900 4,822,900 255,900 255,900 4,829,400 4,459,000 244,200 257,900

B07 Road Safety Engineering Improvement 120,200 120,200 398,000 398,000 280,200 2,200 565,000 62,000

B08 Road Safety Promotion/Education 771,600 771,600 19,900 19,900 737,000 735,300 20,500 20,800

B09 Car Parking 4,706,500 4,706,500 8,589,900 8,629,900 4,590,500 4,726,300 9,003,900 8,450,900

B10 Support to Roads Capital Prog. 1,326,900 1,326,900 11,600 11,600 1,339,500 1,336,800 12,000 12,200

B11 Agency & Recoupable Services 6,600 6,600 154,200 154,200 5,700 8,700 163,500 141,500

Service Division Total 25,673,800 25,659,600 15,484,000 15,524,000 25,885,400 25,281,000 15,961,000 14,935,000


Development Management

D01 Forward Planning 1,234,400 1,234,400 23,600 23,600 1,322,300 1,292,300 24,300 24,300

D02 Development Management 2,110,500 2,110,500 294,500 294,500 2,067,100 2,059,100 358,300 295,800

D03 Enforcement 754,900 754,900 21,800 21,800 775,700 760,300 22,100 23,400

D05 Tourism Development and Promotion 754,300 754,300 0 0 707,100 707,200 0 0

D06 Community and Enterprise Function 1,405,800 1,405,800 291,300 291,300 1,711,700 1,391,700 384,000 395,500

D08 Building Control 362,400 362,400 8,800 8,800 412,200 369,900 8,900 9,100

D09 Economic Development and Promotion 1,439,100 1,439,100 11,700 11,700 1,475,300 1,474,300 11,900 12,100

D10 Property Management 2,000 2,000 0 0 1,900 1,100 0 0

D11 Heritage and Conservation Services 483,000 483,000 22,100 22,100 484,200 436,000 21,200 22,300

D12 Agency & Recoupable Services 287,800 287,800 289,800 289,800 251,000 251,000 250,500 250,700

Service Division Total 8,834,200 8,834,200 963,600 963,600 9,208,500 8,742,900 1,081,200 1,033,200

Recreation & Amenity

F01 Leisure Facilities Operations 1,212,800 1,212,800 600,900 600,900 1,200,900 1,201,700 635,500 603,500

F02 Operation of Library and Archival Service 7,288,900 7,288,900 909,900 909,900 7,134,600 7,177,600 952,600 890,000

F03 Outdoor Leisure Areas Operations 8,636,300 8,636,300 493,500 493,500 9,177,200 8,845,800 507,900 503,500

F04 Community Sport and Recreational Development 772,600 772,600 39,000 39,000 738,700 739,000 39,100 39,100

F05 Operation of Arts Programme 2,418,500 2,418,500 33,800 33,800 2,580,600 2,566,400 79,100 55,600

Service Division Total 20,329,100 20,329,100 2,077,100 2,077,100 20,832,000 20,530,500 2,214,200 2,091,700

Division & Services

CORK CITY COUNCIL - ANNUAL BUDGET

TABLE B - EXPENDITURE & INCOME FOR 2013 AND ESTIMATED OUTTURN FOR 2012

2013 2012

Expenditure Income Expenditure Income

Adopted by by Estimated by Adopted by Estimated by Adopted by Estimated Adopted Estimated

Council Manager Council Manager Council Outturn Council Outturn

€ € € € € € € €

25

Environmental Services

E01 Landfill Operation and Aftercare 1,859,300 1,859,300 1,500,700 1,500,700 1,862,700 1,820,300 1,930,600 1,422,600

E02 Recovery & Recycling Facilities Operations 1,373,200 1,373,200 58,100 58,100 1,922,200 1,335,700 104,100 105,300

E05 Litter Management 257,300 257,300 68,500 68,500 309,700 280,000 58,100 69,900

E06 Street Cleaning 7,193,600 7,193,600 212,300 212,300 7,853,700 7,311,100 250,500 319,000

E07 Waste Regulations, Monitoring and Enforcement 398,700 398,700 250,300 250,300 390,600 391,300 215,900 259,000

E08 Waste Management Planning 458,100 458,100 148,900 148,900 464,600 475,800 160,600 147,600

E09 Maintenance of Burial Grounds 1,328,600 1,328,600 560,000 560,000 1,348,300 1,251,700 549,100 507,500

E10 Safety of Structures and Places 665,800 665,800 117,000 117,000 664,700 651,100 116,400 97,800

E11 Operation of Fire Service 15,445,800 15,445,800 1,746,400 1,746,400 14,796,400 14,714,600 1,727,700 1,597,700

E12 Fire Prevention 1,666,000 1,666,000 247,700 247,700 1,772,800 1,560,100 245,200 254,600

E13 Water Quality, Air and Noise Pollution 629,900 629,900 87,400 87,400 595,200 633,400 31,200 87,000

Service Division Total 31,276,300 31,276,300 4,997,300 4,997,300 31,980,900 30,425,100 5,389,400 4,868,000


Agric,Education,Health & Welfare

G04 Veterinary Service 110,600 110,600 70,900 70,900 101,700 106,000 38,000 36,600

G05 Educational Support Services 3,632,900 3,632,900 3,321,600 3,321,600 5,825,100 3,604,700 5,548,000 3,321,600

Service Division Total 3,743,500 3,743,500 3,392,500 3,392,500 5,926,800 3,710,700 5,586,000 3,358,200

Division & Services

CORK CITY COUNCIL - ANNUAL BUDGET

TABLE B - EXPENDITURE & INCOME FOR 2013 AND ESTIMATED OUTTURN FOR 2012

2013 2012

Expenditure Income Expenditure Income

Adopted by by Estimated by Adopted by Estimated by Adopted by Estimated Adopted Estimated

Council Manager Council Manager Council Outturn Council Outturn

€ € € € € € € €

26

Miscellaneous Services

H03 Administration of Rates 8,041,400 8,041,400 69,700 69,700 8,024,000 8,541,500 69,900 93,200

H04 Franchise Costs 288,400 288,400 11,300 11,300 273,900 274,200 11,600 11,700

H05 Operation of Morgue and Coroner Expenses 872,300 872,300 2,800 2,800 846,100 848,400 2,900 2,900

H06 Weighbridges 67,400 67,400 26,800 26,800 66,000 66,300 41,900 24,900

H07 Operation of Markets and Casual Trading 159,800 159,800 323,200 323,200 160,400 152,200 323,200 292,200

H09 Local Representation/Civic Leadership 1,322,200 1,376,400 0 0 1,392,400 1,407,300 0 0

H11 Agency & Recoupable Services 124,300 124,300 3,071,100 3,071,100 107,300 86,100 3,118,400 3,353,900

Service Division Total 10,875,800 10,930,000 3,504,900 3,504,900 10,870,100 11,376,000 3,567,900 3,778,800

OVERALL TOTAL 162,124,600 162,164,600 77,104,400 77,144,400 166,968,900 160,950,500 81,606,000 74,810,300


CORK CITY COUNCIL - ANNUAL BUDGET

TABLE D

ANALYSIS OF BUDGET 2013 INCOME FROM GOODS AND SERVICES

Source of Income

2013 2012

€ €

Rents from Houses (incl RAS) 26,420,200 26,472,500

Housing Loans Interest & Charges 1,118,300 1,359,600

Parking Fines/Charges 8,506,200 8,907,700

Commercial Water 6,958,000 7,225,000

Planning Fees 190,000 260,000

Landfill Charges 1,430,000 1,855,000

Fire Charges 152,000 152,000

Recreation / Amenity/Culture 562,000 635,100

Library Fees/Fines 200,000 236,500

Agency Services & Repayable Works 149,600 132,100

Local Authority Contributions 3,846,600 3,875,400

Superannuation 2,329,600 2,367,200

NPPR 2,545,400 2,523,400

Other Income 3,991,500 4,090,200

TOTAL 58,399,400 60,091,700

27


CORK CITY COUNCIL - ANNUAL BUDGET

TABLE E

ANALYSIS OF BUDGET INCOME 2013 FROM GRANTS AND SUBSIDIES

Department of the Environment, Community and Local

Government

2013 2012

€ €

Housing and Building 7,821,600 8,317,900

Road Transport & Safety 0 0

Water Services 296,000 263,000

Development Management 245,300 337,200

Environmental Services 180,700 180,700

Recreation and Amenity 0 0

Agriculture, Education, Health & Welfare 0 0

Miscellaneous Services 0 0

8,543,600 9,098,800

Other Departments and Bodies

NRA & DoT 6,334,900 6,379,800

Arts,Sports & Tourism 0 0

DTO 0 0

Social & Family Affairs 270,000 280,800

Defence 82,400 82,400

Education and Science 3,314,100 5,538,500

Library Council 50,000 50,000

Arts Council 0 0

Transport and Marine 0 0

Justice Equality and Law Reform 0 0

Agriculture Fisheries and Food 0 0

Non-Dept HFA and BMW 0 0

Other Grants & Subsidies 110,000 84,000

10,161,400 12,415,500

Total Grants & Subsidies 18,705,000 21,514,300

28


BUDGET 2013

SERVICE DIVISION

DETAILS

29


SERVICE DIVISION A – HOUSING & BUILDING

Total Expenditure of €40.2m (€41m in 2012) is

provided for 2013.

This Service Division represents 25% of Total

Expenditure.

A total of €13.9m is provided for the maintenance

and repair of Cork City Council’s housing stock,

although this expenditure in 2013 is predicated on a

Social Housing Improvement Programme Grant of

€0.95m being received. The number of housing

units has increased significantly over the years and

currently stands at 8,823 dwellings. This

maintenance budget covers the repair of both

vacant units as well as ongoing works carried out in

response to repair requests from tenants.

Routine Maintenance

Maintenance demands under this heading continue

to increase with contributory factors including

stock increases, rising standards, new work items

(e.g. heating installation/maintenance) and tenant

expectations. A recoverable provision has been

made to cover the cost of boiler servicing. A

charge will be made under Section 2 of the Local

Government (Financial Provisions) (No 2) Act

1983 for the boiler maintenance service and is likely

to range between €1 - €2 per week to be collected

in addition to the normal weekly rent.

Vacant units and Energy Efficiency of current

stock

A total of 270 vacant units were re-tenanted in

2012. During 2012 the City Council availed of grant

assistance from the Department of the

Environment, Community and Local Government

towards the refurbishment and the retrofitting of

energy efficiency measures to 97 vacant units. The

works were carried out both by the City Council’s

own staff and by contract. It is hoped that

Department of the Environment, Community and

Local Government funding will be provided to

continue this initiative in 2013, as such grant aid

also assists with the normal repair works to vacant

units. However, any reduction in the level of

Department of the Environment, Community and

Local Government grant aid in 2013, below 2012

levels, will restrict City Council’s ability to maintain

the repair of vacant units at the same rate as in

2012.

In addition to such work to vacant units, the City

Council, again with the assistance of the

Department of the Environment, Community and

Local Government, carried out installation of

31

central heating and energy efficiency measures to

occupied properties, comprising 39 units of older

housing stock and 19 apartments in 2012.

Consideration will be given to a scheme using

available housing instruments to arrest the growing

void problems within the housing stock. Failure to

deal with this problem will have severe implications

for the maintenance budget.

House Construction

In 2012, Cork City Council received a reduced

Capital Allocation of €3.2m for Housing

Construction, from the Department of the

Environment, Community and Local Government.

This allocation has/is facilitating the completion of

over 34 no. new housing units together with

funding of final accounts on completed schemes. A

further allocation in July 2012 of €880,000 was

made for 5 no. house acquisitions in 2012. It is

anticipated that the 2013 allocation for house

construction will be reduced. The Department of

the Environment, Community and Local

Government has refocused attention on alternative

initiatives such as Social Leasing, RAS, CALF,

housing direct etc. to address the social housing

need.

While it is anticipated that this change in funding

streams will continue in the coming years it is

hoped that significant allocations will be

maintained in the separate area of regeneration.

Regeneration - City Northwest Quarter

The Northwest Regeneration process includes a

suite of Projects which provides high quality

housing and improved tenure mix, high quality

built environment, improved social infrastructure

and improvement in the economic circumstances

of the area and its residents. The first phase is

underway with the relevant site substantially

vacated. It is expected that 23 units will be

commenced in this phase in 2013.

A Sustainable Communities Programme is one of

the initiatives within the Northwest Regeneration

Programme. Projects to date under this heading

include interventions in Shanakiel, Northwest

Community Garden, the closure of Hollyhill Lane

and it is expected the refurbishment of McSwiney

Sports Hall will begin early 2013.

Sprigg’s Road refurbishment work is continuing

with an expected completion date of Autumn 2013.

The Glen Regeneration Project Phase 2 is expected

to be completed in mid 2013.


SERVICE DIVISION A – HOUSING & BUILDING

Long Term Leasing

In 2010, the Government introduced a new Social

Housing Leasing Initiative for Housing Authorities

and Approved Housing Bodies, in order to provide

accommodation to persons who are currently

unable to source suitable properties from their own

resources.

While some proposals have been received and

examined the numbers deemed suitable and

approved for inclusion in the scheme have been

relatively low.

The Council have finalised a number of individual

leases with property owners under availability

agreements and this initiative will be progressed

further in 2013. The Council will intensify its

engagement with Property Developers, Property

Owners and Approved Housing Bodies, in order to

advance suitable proposals under the initiative.

Voluntary & Co-Operative Housing

In 2012, Cork City Council received a Capital

Allocation of over €300,000 for the provision of

special needs accommodation by the Voluntary &

Co-Operative Housing Sector. This funding was to

facilitate the payment of final accounts. In July

2012, the department requested proposals for CAS

funded projects in 2012 and into 2013/2014. The

Council received €596,000 for various homeless

accommodation in 2012 and funding for the

provision of 10 no. units of sheltered

accommodation at Dublin Street in conjunction

with Respond!. This scheme will be progressed in

2013. The delivery of further units under the

Capital Assistance Scheme will be for small scale

projects with the bigger voluntary schemes being

advanced by way of borrowings from the

HFA/private sector with state support via the

CALF scheme and support payments.

RAS

In relation to the Rental Accommodation Scheme,

over 200 agreements will be substantially achieved

during 2012 excluding qualifying transfers. In total

around 900 RAS agreements have been put in place

between the Private Rented and Voluntary sectors

by the end of 2012. Provision has been made for

further expansion of the scheme in 2013.

The scheme will continue to effectively address

social housing need to include homeless persons

and will continue to work with the various housing

bodies to provide support to tenants where

necessary.

32

Homeless Section and Cork Foyer

The Cork Foyer which is a Supported Residential

Project owned and managed by Cork City Council

continues to meet the diverse and complex needs

of 18 - 25 years old who are homeless or at risk of

becoming homeless. The Foyer plays a focused

strategic role in reducing youth homelessness

through a holistic case management approach and

preventative/resettlement strategies. The project is

jointly funded by and the Department of

Environment, Community and Local Government,

HSE and the City of Cork VEC.

The City Council has been approved as the lead

agency for the Southwest Region to manage the

Devolved Funding Arrangements in this region.

In 2012, Cork City Council, on behalf of the South

West Region, received approval from the

Department of the Environment, Community and

Local Government for funding for a new project to

provide a service which focuses on the Housing

First approach to homelessness. Threshold Access

Housing Unit was set up in 2012 and employs two

tenancy sustainment workers and one advice and

accommodation worker.

The provision for homeless services in 2012 is

estimated at €4.5m, with 90% recoupable from the

Department of the Environment, Community and

Local Government.

Housing Allocations Section

The Housing Allocations Section is responsible for

the carrying out of social housing assessments

under Section 20 of the Housing (Miscellaneous

Provisions) Act 2009 and under the Social Housing

Assessment Regulations 2011 (S.I. 84/2011) and

the Social Housing Assessment (Amendment)

Regulations 2011 (S.I. No. 136/2011).

Each application is assessed in accordance with the

Allocations Scheme made under Section 22 of the

Housing (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 2009 and

Social Housing Allocation Regulations 2011 (S.I.

198/2011).

Social Housing Applicants are periodically reviewed

as required by the Department of Environment,

Community and Local Government.

The eligible Housing Application list for 2012

approximated 7,000 – 8,000 throughout the year.


Overview

SERVICE DIVISION A

HOUSING AND BUILDING

AIMS

To ensure that every household has a dwelling suitable to its needs, located in an acceptable environment

and at a price or rent it can afford.

Service Division A € 40,166,000 25%

Service Division B € 25,673,800 16%

Service Division C € 21,225,900 13%

Service Division D € 8,834,200 5%

Service Division E € 31,276,300 19%

Service Division F € 20,329,100 13%

Service Division G € 3,743,500 2%

Service Division H € 10,875,800 7%

€ 162,124,600 100%

Service Division

A

€ 40,166,000

How the Service Division is Spent

Housing Maintenance € 15,168,500 38%

Housing Development € 5,580,900 14%

Rental Allowance Scheme € 7,631,400 19%

House Loans € 1,715,400 4%

Disabled Persons Grants € 1,330,100 4%

Support to Capital Programme € 1,286,500 3%

Homelessness Legislation € 5,392,700 13%

Other Services € 2,060,500 5%

€ 40,166,000 100%

Housing

Maintenance

38%

Housing

Development

14%

Other Services

5%

Rental Allowance

Scheme

19% House Loans

4%

Homelessness

Legislation

13%

Disabled Persons

Grants

4%

Support to Capital

Programme

3%

How the Service Division is Funded

Government Grants € 7,913,600 20%

Rents from Houses € 19,234,400 47%

Rental Allowance Scheme € 7,185,800 18%

Housing Loans € 1,118,300 3%

Other Income € 1,625,400 4%

Rates & Local Gov Fund € 3,088,500 8%

€ 40,166,000 100%

Rates & Local Gov

Fund

8%

Government

Grants

20%

Other Income

4%

Housing Loans

3%

Rental Allowance

Scheme

18%

Rents from Houses

47%

33


A01

A02

A03

A04

MAINTENANCE/IMPROVEMENT LA HOUSING UNITS

Payroll € 7,472,800

Overheads € 1,439,200

Non Pay € 6,256,500

HOUSING ASSESS, ALLOC & TRANSFER

Payroll € 594,300

Overheads € 233,100

Non Pay € 0

HOUSING RENT & TENANT PURCHASE ADMIN

Payroll € 270,300

Overheads € 190,600

Non Pay € 395,800

HOUSING COMM DEVELOP SUPPORT

Payroll € 3,249,600

Overheads € 1,792,300

Non Pay € 539,000

A05 ADMIN OF HOMELESS SERVICE

Payroll € 675,000

Overheads € 99,400

Non Pay € 4,618,300

Homelessness Expenditure is recouped to extent of €4,143,400

A07

RAS PROGRAMME

Payroll € 266,700

Overheads € 229,100

Non Pay € 7,135,600

LOAN CHARGES

Loan Charges are the amounts of interest on loans that the City Council will have to

repay in 2013. Repayments of the Council’s debt are funded by borrowers’ own

repayments. The following is an analysis of City Council Borrowers.

S.D.A.

Shared Ownership

H.F.A.

Affordable Housing Scheme

Convertible

Income Related

Caravan Loans

Tenant Purchase

Home Choice

Oct-12

Oct-11

254 320

72 75

27 29

200 201

4 4

4 4

70 68

88 104

5 4

724 809

34


Expenditure by Service and Sub-Service

TABLE F - EXPENDITURE

CORK CITY COUNCIL - ANNUAL BUDGET

HOUSING & BUILDING

2013 2012

Adopted by

Council

Estimated by

Manager

Adopted by

Council

Estimated

Outturn

€ € € €

A0101 Maintenance of LA Housing Units 12,346,700 12,346,700 11,752,400 11,945,700

A0103 Traveller Accommodation Management 1,039,200 1,039,200 964,300 964,300

A0104 Estate Maintenance 61,500 61,500 24,000 24,000

A0199 Service Support Costs 1,721,100 1,721,100 1,143,000 1,204,700

Maintenance/Improvement of LA Housing Units 15,168,500 15,168,500 13,883,700 14,138,700

A0201 Assessment of Housing Needs, Allocs. & Transfers 594,300 594,300 602,200 602,200

A0299 Service Support Costs 233,100 233,100 237,200 236,400

Housing Assessment, Allocation and Transfer 827,400 827,400 839,400 838,600

A0301 Debt Management & Rent Assessment 664,100 664,100 615,600 612,600

A0399 Service Support Costs 192,600 192,600 192,800 192,200

Housing Rent & Tenant Purchase Administration 856,700 856,700 808,400 804,800

A0401 Housing Estate Management 2,160,100 2,160,100 2,196,700 2,123,400

A0402 Tenancy Management 39,600 39,600 44,100 44,100

A0499 Service Support Costs 3,381,200 3,381,200 2,938,900 3,194,600

Housing Community Development Support 5,580,900 5,580,900 5,179,700 5,362,100

A0502 Homeless Service 5,293,300 5,293,300 5,125,800 4,550,700

A0599 Service Support Costs 99,400 99,400 85,400 87,800

Administration of Homeless Service 5,392,700 5,392,700 5,211,200 4,638,500

A0601 Technical and Administrative Support 119,100 119,100 120,300 120,300

A0602 Loan Charges 806,000 806,000 875,900 939,600

A0699 Service Support Costs 361,400 361,400 839,300 836,500

Support to Housing Capital Programme 1,286,500 1,286,500 1,835,500 1,896,400

A0701 RAS Operations 7,402,300 7,402,300 7,523,300 7,278,700

A0799 RAS Service Support Costs 229,100 229,100 231,500 230,200

RAS Programme 7,631,400 7,631,400 7,754,800 7,508,900

A0801 Loan Interest and Other Charges 1,214,000 1,214,000 1,401,300 1,371,900

A0802 Debt Management Housing Loans 188,500 188,500 198,900 193,500

A0899 Service Support Costs 312,900 312,900 314,700 313,800

Housing Loans 1,715,400 1,715,400 1,914,900 1,879,200

A0901 Disabled Persons Grants 1,300,000 1,300,000 3,100,000 1,434,000

A0999 Service Support Costs 30,100 30,100 22,200 24,100

Housing Grants 1,330,100 1,330,100 3,122,200 1,458,100

A1101 Agency & Recoupable Service 233,000 233,000 337,500 264,000

A1199 Service Support Costs 143,400 143,400 147,400 146,100

Agency & Recoupable Services 376,400 376,400 484,900 410,100

Service Division Total 40,166,000 40,166,000 41,034,700 38,935,400

35


Income by Source

TABLE F - INCOME

CORK CITY COUNCIL - ANNUAL BUDGET

HOUSING & BUILDING

2013

Adopted by

Council

2012

Estimated by Adopted by

Manager Council

€ € € €

Estimated

Outturn

Government Grants & Subsidies

Environment, Community & Local Government 7,821,600 7,821,600 8,317,900 6,076,500

Other 92,000 92,000 67,000 67,000

Total Grants & Subsidies (a) 7,913,600 7,913,600 8,384,900 6,143,500

Goods and Services

Rents from Houses (incl RAS) 26,420,200 26,420,200 26,472,500 26,321,700

Housing Loans Interest & Charges 1,118,300 1,118,300 1,359,600 1,177,800

Superannuation 428,200 428,200 435,200 442,100

Agency Services & Repayable Works

Local Authority Contributions

Other Income 1,197,200 1,197,200 1,302,100 1,267,700

Total Goods and Services (b) 29,163,900 29,163,900 29,569,400 29,209,300

Total Income c=(a+b) 37,077,500 37,077,500 37,954,300 35,352,800

36


A0101 - MAINTENANCE OF LOCAL AUTHORITY HOUSING

Adopted Adopted Estimated

Budget 2013 Budget 2012 Outturn 2012

General and Planned Maintenance 5,224,400 6,051,200 5,636,600

Fire Services - Maintenance in Flats 30,000 40,900 27,900

Vacant Dwellings 4,526,900 2,912,600 3,721,400

Boiler Servicing 420,400 216,700 300

Security of Dwellings 152,000 188,400 154,200

Electrical 222,900 250,700 223,000

Central Heating 607,500 1,024,800 808,400

Plant and Machinery 526,300 475,700 650,400

Public Access Lights 85,200 102,800 85,200

Waste Disposal 201,000 138,500 288,200

Liability Insurance 350,100 350,100 350,100

TOTAL SERVICE A0101 12,346,700 11,752,400 11,945,700

37


SERVICE DIVISION B – ROAD TRANSPORT & SAFETY

Total Expenditure of €25.7m (€25.9 m in 2012) is

provided for 2013.

This Service Division represents 16% of Total

Expenditure.

Roads Infrastructure

Having commenced in July 2011 the N25 Bandon

Sarsfield Interchanges Contract continued during

the year. The Scheme has an expected completion

date of mid 2013.

A number of smaller projects were started or

completed in 2012 including Kyrl’s Quay,

Boreenmanna Road, Skehard Road, Cork Cycle

Network Phase 1a Douglas, Barrack Street,

Hollyhill Access Road and Blackrock Harbour

Remediation Scheme Phase II.

Reconstruction of the quay wall, Grenville Place

and remedial work on other quays, were carried out

in 2012.

A number of projects addressing infrastructure

deficits were the subject of design work in 2012.

Locations include Parnell Place, Tinkers Cross, City

Centre/Bus Station to Kent Station and the Cork

Cycle Network linking both UCC and Ballyvolane

to the city centre.

Transport System

The transport system planned for Metropolitan

Cork comprises of a northern rail service, priority

bus services, walking routes, cycle routes, traffic

routes, facilities and technologies to manage all

transport modes and various parking facilities.

Sustainable Transport Measures

Progress has been made in facilitating and

implementing sustainable transport measures by

undertaking a substantial review of the transport

routes for all modes in the city centre and

identifying changes to be implemented, by reducing

the speed limit in the city centre and adjacent to

some schools, providing additional cycle lanes and

bicycle parking facilities (in city & suburban

locations as well as schools), the provision of VMS

on important routes, installation of Real Time

Passenger Information signage and replacement of

bus shelters.

The highly successful Green Route bus network

will continue to provide improved speeds and

journey quality for public transport users on the

existing metropolitan Cork services.

39

The Blackash Park & Ride service still provides a

hassle free and efficient alternative to commuters

and shoppers alike.

Work continued on a series of colour coded

walking trails within the city to include:

Shandon Walk – the red walk

South Parish Walk – the blue walk

City Centre Island Walk – the orange walk

University Walk – the green walk

The City Council will continue to work with other

Irish partners to increase the use of electric vehicles

in corporate and public services fleets and to

promote the uptake of electric vehicles in line with

government policy.

The EU Sponsored Green E-Motion project will

include the use of power assisted cycling measures

as an alternative to motorised trips in urban areas.

UTC & Traffic Signals

The City Council has spent considerable monies to

date in maintaining and upgrading the operation,

maintenance and improvement of its traffic signal

and control systems. Keeping this system up to

date is critical if the city is to derive maximum

benefit from the system. It is anticipated that there

will be significant investment in traffic signals,

controls systems & ITS in the coming years.

Public Lighting

The maintenance of public lighting infrastructure

for the City Council is currently undertaken by

Airtricity Utility Solutions. Replacement of obsolete

columns in the city centre and brackets on ESB

Networks throughout Cork city is a priority. It has

not been possible to provide funding in the

Estimates 2013 for any improvement works in

public lighting.

Road Asset Management & Maintenance

An electronic road schedule for every road in the

city was completed 2010/2011 and will form the

basis of the Asset Management system being

developed. The customer relations management

system which serves the citizen interface, provides

outputs which are integrated into the operational

and maintenance programmes, contained in the

annual Road Works Programme.


SERVICE DIVISION B – ROAD TRANSPORT & SAFETY

The reduction in resources in the Roads budget has

increased the demand on the Council’s staff for the

execution of day to day repairs. Every effort will

again be made to protect the strategic elements of

the network.

The passive fire protection upgrade was

substantially completed in 2012 at the Jack Lynch

Tunnel. Further upgrades to the emergency

telephones and scada will take place in 2013 as well

as the installation of a new auto incident detection

system.

The Plant & Machinery Section is now a

Department within the Roads & Transportation

Directorate and is a support service to Cork City

Council. It provides a wide range of mechanical

and electrical services to the directorates and

others. These services are provided to the highest

technical standards in a cost efficient and effective

manner. The types of service provided are:

Fleet Provision: the sourcing, hiring and

maintenance of vehicles and plant including trucks,

compressors, cars, vans, road sweepers and refuse

trucks. The Plant fleet comprises over 250 items of

equipment sourced through various tendering

mechanisms.

Building Services: the supply, installation and

maintenance of plant in the Council’s public

buildings, swimming pools, offices and depots. The

plant maintained includes Electrical Supply

equipment, lighting, heating, intruder detection, fire

and smoke detection and CCTV equipment.

Works also include, the installation of Christmas

tree lighting, electrical power provision for events

held on Grand Parade plaza, Bishop Lucey Park

etc., Maintenance of plant at the Waterworks and at

Waste Water Sewerage Pumping Stations, along

with Energy provision to buildings and assistance

to the Energy agency in energy management. A

public Weighbridge is also operated by Plant &

Machinery, this is located on Kennedy Quay within

the Port of Cork.

40


SERVICE DIVISION B

ROAD TRANSPORT AND SAFETY

AIMS

To secure efficient, safe and modern transport infrastructure in order to facilitate increased

economic development with due regard to environmental values.

Overview

Service Division A € 40,166,000 25%

Service Division B € 25,673,800 16%

Service Division C € 21,225,900 13%

Service Division D € 8,834,200 5%

Service Division E € 31,276,300 19%

Service Division F € 20,329,100 13%

Service Division G € 3,743,500 2%

Service Division H € 10,875,800 7%

€ 162,124,600 100%

Service Division

B

€ 25,673,800

How the Service Division is Spent

National Roads Upkeep € 2,578,600 10%

Regional Roads Upkeep € 479,200 2%

Local Road Upkeep € 8,097,000 32%

Public Lighting € 2,764,300 11%

Traffic Manage & Improve € 4,943,100 19%

Road Safety € 771,600 3%

Car Parking € 4,706,500 18%

Other Services € 1,333,500 5%

€ 25,673,800 100%

Local Road Upkeep

32%

Regional Roads

Upkeep

2%

National Roads

Upkeep

10%

Public Lighting

11%

Other Services

5%

Traffic Manage &

Improve

19%

Car Parking

18%

Road Safety

3%

How the Service Division is Funded

NRA Grants € 2,526,900 10%

DoT Grants € 3,808,000 15%

Parking Income € 8,506,200 33%

Agency € 70,500 0%

Other Income € 572,500 2%

Rates & Local Gov Fund € 10,189,700 40%

€ 25,673,800 100%

Rates & Local Gov

Fund

40%

NRA Grants

10%

DoT Grants

15%

Other Income

2%

Agency

0%

Parking Income

33%

41


MAINTENANCE & IMPROVEMENT

B01 NP ROAD - MAINTENANCE & IMPROVEMENT

Payroll € 558,500

Overheads € 221,000

Non Pay € 1,778,400

32km of Road and Jack Lynch Tunnel to be maintained

B03 REGIONAL ROAD - MAINTENANCE & IMPROVEMENT

Payroll € 183,100

Overheads € 53,500

Non Pay € 242,600

41km of Road to be maintained

B04 LOCAL ROAD - MAINTENANCE & IMPROVEMENT

Payroll € 2,948,900

Overheads € 823,800

Non Pay € 4,324,300

350km of Road to be maintained

B05 PUBLIC LIGHTING

Overheads € 7,100

Non Pay € 2,757,200

There are 13,860 lanterns in Cork City

TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT

B06 TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT IMPROVEMENTS

Payroll € 2,544,500

Overheads € 1,100,500

Non Pay € 1,177,900

B08

ROAD SAFETY PROMOTION/EDUCATION

Payroll € 622,900

Overheads € 112,800

Non Pay € 35,900

B09

CAR PARKING

Payroll € 1,935,900

Overheads € 578,000

Non Pay € 2,192,600

MISCELLANEOUS

B10 SUPPORT TO ROADS CAPITAL PROG

Payroll € 1,067,700

Overheads € 234,200

Non Pay € 25,000

B11

AGENCY & RECOUPABLE SERVICES

Payroll € 600

Overheads € 5,700

Non Pay € 300

42


Expenditure by Service and Sub-Service

TABLE F - EXPENDITURE

CORK CITY COUNCIL - ANNUAL BUDGET

ROAD TRANSPORT & SAFETY

2013 2012

Estimated by

Manager

Adopted by

Council

€ € € €

Adopted by

Council

Estimated

Outturn

B0102 NP – Pavement Overlay/Reconstruction 40,000 40,000 40,000 51,000

B0103 NP – Winter Maintenance 16,600 16,600 17,500 3,200

B0104 NP – Bridge Maintenance (Eirspan) 26,900 26,900 28,000 200

B0105 NP - General Maintenance 2,253,200 2,253,200 2,261,900 2,249,300

B0106 NP – General Improvements Works 200 200 200 0

B0199 Service Support Costs 221,000 221,000 194,100 193,600

Nat Primary Rd–Maintenance & Improvement 2,557,900 2,557,900 2,541,700 2,497,300

B0205 NS – Bridge Maintenance (Eirspan) 1,200 1,200 1,200 0

B0206 NS - General Maintenance 19,100 19,100 14,800 0

B0299 Service Support Costs 400 400 500 400

Nat Secondary Rd–Maintenance & Improvement 20,700 20,700 16,500 400

B0302 Reg Rd Surface Rest/Road Reconstruction/Overlay 150,000 150,000 150,000 279,000

B0303 Regional Road Winter Maintenance 11,000 11,000 11,400 0

B0304 Regional Road Bridge Maintenance 1,300 1,300 1,300 500

B0305 Regional Road General Maintenance Works 195,300 195,300 199,100 177,600

B0306 Regional Road General Improvement Works 22,600 22,600 24,900 0

B0399 Service Support Costs 99,000 99,000 104,400 104,500

Regional Road – Improvement & Maintenance 479,200 479,200 491,100 561,600

B0402 Local Rd Surface Rest/Road Reconstruction/Overlay 500,000 500,000 650,000 521,000

B0403 Local Roads Winter Maintenance 256,400 256,400 375,700 47,900

B0404 Local Roads Bridge Maintenance 7,600 7,600 7,800 0

B0405 Local Roads General Maintenance Works 6,061,600 6,061,600 6,178,700 6,587,700

B0406 Local Roads General Improvement Works 29,900 29,900 31,100 12,500

B0499 Service Support Costs 1,241,500 1,241,500 1,210,500 1,228,500

Local Road - Maintenance & Improvement 8,097,000 8,097,000 8,453,800 8,397,600

B0501 Public Lighting Operating Costs 1,637,000 1,637,000 1,513,200 1,521,300

B0502 Public Lighting Improvement 1,093,400 1,079,200 1,052,000 999,200

B0599 Service Support Costs 33,900 33,900 34,800 35,300

Public Lighting 2,764,300 2,750,100 2,600,000 2,555,800

B0601 Traffic Management 1,948,700 1,948,700 2,025,200 1,657,600

B0602 Traffic Maintenance 872,200 872,200 864,900 864,900

B0603 Traffic Improvement Measures 20,400 20,400 15,000 18,400

B0699 Service Support Costs 1,981,600 1,981,600 1,924,300 1,918,100

Traffic Management Improvement 4,822,900 4,822,900 4,829,400 4,459,000

B0701 Low Cost Remedial Measures 120,000 120,000 280,000 2,000

B0799 Service Support Costs 200 200 200 200

Road Safety Engineering Improvements 120,200 120,200 280,200 2,200

B0801 School Wardens 632,600 632,600 639,500 639,500

B0802 Publicity and Promotion Road Safety 26,200 26,200 14,700 8,700

B0899 Service Support Costs 112,800 112,800 82,800 87,100

Road Safety Promotion/Education 771,600 771,600 737,000 735,300

B0901 Maintenance and Management of Car Parks 1,660,200 1,660,200 1,664,800 1,813,200

B0902 Operation of Street Parking 401,100 401,100 366,600 357,600

B0903 Parking Enforcement 876,400 876,400 903,500 894,500

B0999 Service Support Costs 1,768,800 1,768,800 1,655,600 1,661,000

Car Parking 4,706,500 4,706,500 4,590,500 4,726,300

B1001 Administration of Roads Capital Programme 1,092,700 1,092,700 1,105,400 1,105,400

B1099 Service Support Costs 234,200 234,200 234,100 231,400

Support to Roads Capital Programme 1,326,900 1,326,900 1,339,500 1,336,800

B1101 Agency & Recoupable Service 900 900 900 3,700

B1199 Service Support Costs 5,700 5,700 4,800 5,000

Agency & Recoupable Services 6,600 6,600 5,700 8,700

Service Division Total 25,673,800 25,659,600 25,885,400 25,281,000

43


Income by Source

TABLE F - INCOME

CORK CITY COUNCIL - ANNUAL BUDGET

ROAD TRANSPORT & SAFETY

2013 2012

Estimated by

Manager

Adopted by

Council

€ € € €

Adopted by

Council

Estimated

Outturn

Government Grants

Environment, Community & Local Government

NRA & DoT 6,334,900 6,334,900 6,379,800 6,012,300

Arts, Sports & Tourism

DTO

Other

Total Grants & Subsidies (a) 6,334,900 6,334,900 6,379,800 6,012,300

Goods and Services

Parking Fines & Charges 8,506,200 8,546,200 8,907,700 8,366,800

Superannuation 327,900 327,900 333,200 338,600

Agency Services & Repayable Works 70,500 70,500 73,600 93,900

Local Authority Contributions

Other income 244,500 244,500 266,700 123,400

Total Goods and Services (b) 9,149,100 9,189,100 9,581,200 8,922,700

Total Income c=(a+b) 15,484,000 15,524,000 15,961,000 14,935,000

44


ROADS RELATED FUNDING & EXPENDITURE

EXPENDITURE

Adopted Budget

2013

Adopted Budget

2012

B01 to B04 Roads Maintenance

11,154,800 11,503,100

of which Direct Maintenance 8,707,300 9,055,600

Liability Insurance 2,447,500 2,447,500

B05 Public Lighting

2,764,300 2,600,000

B06 Traffic Management & Improvement

4,822,900 4,829,400

B07 to B08 Road Safety

891,800 1,017,200

B09 Parking Facilities

4,706,500 4,590,500

B10 to B11 Administration & Miscellaneous

1,333,500 1,345,200

Sub-Total 25,673,800 25,885,400

ROADS EXPENDITURE IN DIVISION C

C01 Water Supply (Reinstatements)

265,400 278,400

TOTAL ROADS RELATED EXPENDITURE 25,939,200 26,163,800

FUNDED BY

Dept of Transport/National Roads Agency Grants 6,334,900 6,379,800

Pay Parking Income 8,506,200 8,907,700

Agency 70,500 73,600

Other Income 572,400 599,900

Rates/Local Government Fund 10,455,200 10,202,800

TOTAL FUNDING OF ROADS 25,939,200 26,163,800

45


ANALYSIS OF PARKING FACILITIES (B09)

Adopted Budget

2013

Adopted Budget

2012

High Rise Car Parks 3,420,100 3,672,100

Sale of Discs 2,951,000 3,021,600

Parking Fines 925,000 969,500

Pay by Phone 420,000 395,000

Park & Ride Facilities 610,000 690,000

Off-Street Parking 0 99,200

Miscellaneous 195,100 85,900

TOTAL INCOME 8,521,200 8,933,300

Towaway & Clamping 150,000 150,000

On-Street Parking 2,028,400 1,958,600

Off-Street Parking (incl Park & Ride) 851,000 850,600

Lavitts Quay (Paul St) Car Park 788,500 770,900

Kyrls Quay (North Main St) Car Park 310,600 333,200

Overheads 578,000 527,200

Sub-Total 4,706,500 4,590,500

Net Contribution to Roads Directorate 3,814,700 4,342,800

TOTAL EXPENDITURE 8,521,200 8,933,300

46


SERVICE DIVISION C – WATER SERVICES

Total Expenditure of €21.2m (€21.2m in 2012) is

provided for 2013.

This Service Division represents 13% of Total

Expenditure.

The primary aims of this programme are:

- to provide an adequate supply of wholesome

and clean piped water for domestic, industrial

and other uses and

- to ensure the safe disposal of sewerage and

other waterborne waste.

The Environment & Recreation Directorate

achieves these aims through the operations of the

Water and Waste Water Service Divisions.

Drainage

The Drainage Section has responsibility for the

operation and maintenance of over 550 km of main

sewers and culverts. This is made up of

approximately 40% combined sewers, 30% foul

and 30% storm sewers. Stormwater impact on the

foul network is controlled by means of 60 storm

overflow chambers. The main spine interceptor

sewers convey sewage to the Atlantic Pond

pumping station whence it is pumped to the

Ballinure header chamber. Here it is joined by

sewage from the Tramore Valley which serves part

of the south side of the City and the developed

county areas. Sewage flows by gravity across the

estuary to the Carrigrennan treatment plant located

at Little Island.

Carrigrennan Waste Water Treatment Plant treats

in the order of 100,000 cubic metres of effluent per

day, including effluent from Little Island and

Glanmire. It is treated in accordance with the

requirements of the Urban Waste Water Directive

and is licensed with the EPA. It produces almost

3,000 tonnes of sterilised, dried by-product which

is used in pellet form as a fertiliser on agricultural

land. The plant is currently removing in the order

of 92% of the pollution load delivered.

The Drainage Section also deals with public

conveniences and local flood management support.

The latter involves monitoring waterways in the

city for potential of flooding and includes

maintenance of culverts. In relation to tidal and

fluvial flooding risks from the river Lee weather

and gauge levels are monitored and when

appropriate alerts are issued through the media. In

2010 the OPW published the draft Lee CFRAMS

Report which deals with flood risk assessment and

management in the Lee catchment. The Drainage

Section has been cooperating and assisting with this

work.

A total of €11.4m has been provided to fund the

core operations of the Drainage Section in 2013.

Water Production

The Council operates a major water treatment plant

located on the Lee Road. Approximately 45,000

cubic meters (10 million gallons) of raw water are

extracted daily from the River Lee to supply the

plant.

Treated water is pumped to strategically located

reservoirs at Churchfield, Hollyhill and Shanakiel

from where it gravitates through the distribution

network to various users across the city and county

areas on the northern city boundary.

The council operates its plant and equipment to a

very high standard and an ongoing monitoring

programme is in place in order to ensure that water

supplied is compliant with the requirements of the

European Communities Drinking Water

Regulations. The water quality reports for recent

years indicate that, despite an ageing infrastructure,

the quality of water produced is generally good.

The Lee Road supply is augmented by a 23,000

cubic metres (5 million gallons) daily supply from

the Inniscarra Water Treatment Plant which is

operated and managed by Cork County Council on

behalf of both local authorities.

Water Distribution

The Water Section has responsibility for the

maintenance of over 650 km of watermain. It

operates a water metering programme for nondomestic

users and in accordance with the

requirements of the Government’s Water Pricing

Policy non-domestic charges are billed on the basis

of actual use. The Council continues to effect

improvements in its customer service and meter

reading systems, including increased use of

automated meter reading systems and frequent

billing for major consumers. The council also

continues to seek maximum efficiencies and value

for money in the operation of the water services

programme. Annual leak detection activities have

resulted in daily savings of 2000m 3 and further cost

savings have been secured from energy services

tendering.

47


SERVICE DIVISION C – WATER SERVICES

A total of €9.3m has been provided to fund the

core operations of the Water Services Division in

2013.

Capital Projects

The Water Service Investment Programme 2010-

2012 was published in early 2010. Ongoing

progress is being made on a range of projects

included in the programme including replacement

of the Lee Road Treatment Plant, water mains

replacement, Chetwynd Reservoir to Lee Road

Water Treatment Plant inter-connector, Docklands

water services and rising main improvements from

the existing Lee Road Treatment Plant to Shanakiel

reservoirs. Planning for the upgrading of the

Wastewater Treatment Plant is due to commence in

2013.

roll out of the proposed domestic metering

programme. For the next number of years it is

envisaged that all Local Authorities will operate as

agents of the company, with the Local Authority

retaining their operational responsibilities for

delivery of smaller scale investments.

Water/Wastewater Charges

The key factors influencing the expenditure levels

in Service Division C include service demand

levels, energy, marginal capital cost, loan

repayments and labour. The proposed charge for

2013 is €2.44 per 1000 litres of water supplied and

wastewater treated including the marginal capital

cost contribution.

Water Ireland Development

The delivery of high quality water and waste water

services, including the need to meet the everincreasing

demands for water and security of

supply and responsiveness to the needs of

commercial and domestic consumers, continues to

pose a significant challenge to the Council.

Following the publication late last year of the

Department of the Environment, Community and

Local Government’s proposals for the

establishment of Irish Water, the transfer of

responsibility for water services provision from all

Local Authorities to Water Ireland has

commenced. The most effective assignment of

functions and structural arrangements for

delivering high quality competitively priced water

services to customers, both domestic and nondomestic

and for infrastructure provision is now

being developed.

Water Ireland will be a self-funding water utility in

a regulated environment, responsible for operation,

maintenance and investment in all water services

infrastructure, customer billing, charging. The work

of the new public utility company will involve

strategic planning, delivery of projects of a

regional/national priority and more immediately

48


SERVICE DIVISION C

WATER SERVICES

AIMS

1. To provide an adequate supply of piped high quality water for domestic, industrial and other uses.

2. To provide a safe and adequate system for the disposal of sewerage and other water borne waste.

Overview

Service Division A € 40,166,000 25%

Service Division B € 25,673,800 16%

Service Division C € 21,225,900 13%

Service Division D € 8,834,200 5%

Service Division E € 31,276,300 19%

Service Division F € 20,329,100 13%

Service Division G € 3,743,500 2%

Service Division H € 10,875,800 7%

€ 162,124,600 100%

Service Division

C

€ 21,225,900

How the Service Division is Spent

Water Supply € 8,956,900 42%

Waste Water Treatment € 11,435,600 54%

Other Services € 833,400 4%

€ 21,225,900 100%

Waste Water

Treatment

54%

Water Supply

42%

Other Services

4%

How the Service Division is Funded

Government Grants € 296,000 1%

Water Services Charges € 6,958,000 33%

Other Local Authorities € 2,025,500 10%

Agency Services € 79,100 0%

Other Income € 248,900 1%

Rates & Local Gov Fund € 11,618,400 55%

€ 21,225,900 100%

Other Income

1%

Agency Services

0%

Other Local

Authorities

10%

Rates & Local Gov

Fund

55%

Water Services

Charges

33%

Government

Grants

1%

49


C01

WATER SUPPLY

Payroll € 4,294,300

Overheads € 972,700

Non Pay € 3,689,900

C02

C03

C04

C07

WASTE WATER TREATMENT

Payroll € 1,689,500

Overheads € 525,200

Non Pay € 9,220,900

COLL OF WATER & WASTEWATER CHARGES

Payroll € 216,200

Overheads € 138,300

Non Pay € 391,500

PUBLIC CONVENIENCES

Payroll € 0

Overheads € 10,100

Non Pay € 42,800

AGENCY & RECOUPABLE SERVICES

Payroll € 15,800

Overheads € 3,200

Non Pay € 15,500

50


Expenditure by Service and Sub-Service

TABLE F - EXPENDITURE

CORK CITY COUNCIL - ANNUAL BUDGET

WATER SERVICES

2013 2012

Adopted by

Council

Estimated by

Manager

Adopted by

Council

Estimated

Outturn

€ € € €

C0101 Water Plants & Networks 7,984,200 7,984,200 8,423,300 8,234,700

C0199 Service Support Costs 972,700 972,700 873,500 888,500

Water Supply 8,956,900 8,956,900 9,296,800 9,123,200

C0201 Waste Plants and Networks 10,910,400 10,910,400 10,544,600 11,431,400

C0299 Service Support Costs 525,200 525,200 479,500 485,900

Waste Water Treatment 11,435,600 11,435,600 11,024,100 11,917,300

C0301 Debt Management Water and Waste Water 607,700 607,700 635,600 659,600

C0399 Service Support Costs 138,300 138,300 137,900 137,000

Collection of Water & Waste Water Charges 746,000 746,000 773,500 796,600

C0401 Operation and Maintenance of Public Conveniences 42,800 42,800 44,300 49,500

C0499 Service Support Costs 10,100 10,100 7,500 8,100

Public Conveniences 52,900 52,900 51,800 57,600

C0701 Agency & Recoupable Service 31,300 31,300 81,600 51,400

C0799 Service Support Costs 3,200 3,200 2,700 2,800

Agency & Recoupable Services 34,500 34,500 84,300 54,200

Service Division Total 21,225,900 21,225,900 21,230,500 21,948,900

51


Income by Source

TABLE F - INCOME

CORK CITY COUNCIL - ANNUAL BUDGET

WATER SERVICES

2013 2012

Estimated by

Manager

Adopted by

Council

€ € € €

Adopted by

Council

Estimated

Outturn

Government Grants

Environment, Community & Local Government 296,000 296,000 263,000 296,000

Other

Total Grants & Subsidies (a) 296,000 296,000 263,000 296,000

Goods and Services

Commercial Water 6,958,000 6,958,000 7,225,000 6,740,000

Domestic Waste Water

Commercial Waste Water

Superannuation 216,100 216,100 219,600 223,100

Agency Services & Repayable Works 79,100 79,100 58,500 75,100

Local Authority Contributions 2,025,500 2,025,500 2,050,300 2,025,600

Other income 32,800 32,800 35,600 32,800

Total Goods and Services (b) 9,311,500 9,311,500 9,589,000 9,096,600

Total Income c=(a+b) 9,607,500 9,607,500 9,852,000 9,392,600

52


ANALYSIS OF WATER SUPPLY (C01)

Adopted

Budget 2013

Adopted

Budget 2012

Estimated

Outturn 2012

Water Plant Operation & Maintenance

Salaries & Wages 1,274,700 1,536,400 1,540,700

Maintenance of Joint Water Supply Scheme 830,000 830,000 830,000

Electricity Charges 900,000 887,000 830,000

Water Treatment Costs 604,000 612,500 598,300

Maintenance & Repairs 335,600 348,900 311,400

Sub-Total 3,944,300 4,214,800 4,110,400

Distribution Network

Salaries & Wages 2,116,000 2,102,100 2,048,100

Materials, Plant & Transport 548,000 513,900 624,100

Reinstatements 291,800 304,800 256,800

Extensions & Renewals 173,300 174,600 172,800

Charge Works 563,800 704,100 673,500

Waste to Landfill 86,800 148,800 88,800

Overheads 972,700 873,500 888,500

Liability Insurance 260,200 260,200 260,200

Sub-Total 5,012,600 5,082,000 5,012,800

CO1 TOTAL EXPENDITURE 8,956,900 9,296,800 9,123,200

ANALYSIS OF WASTE WATER TREATMENT (C02)

Adopted

Budget 2013

Adopted

Budget 2012

Estimated

Outturn 2012

Drainage Network

General Maintenance 1,554,700 1,696,400 1,808,300

Miscellaneous Costs 474,400 514,400 562,400

Sub-Total 2,029,100 2,210,800 2,370,700

Treatment Network

Treatment Plant Operation 5,763,600 5,615,300 5,951,600

Ballinure Header Chamber 1,303,900 1,225,000 1,321,100

Operation & Maintenance of Pumphouses 1,522,000 1,151,100 1,499,600

Miscellaneous Costs 817,000 821,900 774,300

Sub-Total 9,406,500 8,813,300 9,546,600

CO2 TOTAL EXPENDITURE 11,435,600 11,024,100 11,917,300

53


SERVICE DIVISION D – DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT

Total Expenditure of €8.8m (€9.2m in 2012) is

provided in this Division for 2013, which

represents 5% of Total Expenditure.

Strategic Planning & Economic Development

The Strategic Planning and Economic

Development Directorate became operational on

March 1st 2012 as a result of reorganisation of

Senior Management within Cork City Council. It is

an amalgamation of the Planning and Development

Directorate and the Docklands Directorate. It is

principally involved in the delivery of the following

elements of the Cork City Corporate Plan 2012-

2014:

High Level Goal 2: City Economy - Increase

employment and population in the City by

optimising the capacity and attractiveness of

the City to support economic growth

High Level Goal 3: City Identity - Enhance

and celebrate the unique identity of Cork

High Level Goal 4: Quality

Urban

Environment – Deliver a high quality

environment and cityscape giving a choice of

locations for socio-economic activities and

residents

The directorate is led by a Director of Services and

has four functions, each of which is led by a Senior

Planner or Senior Executive Officer:

‐ Development Management–Ronnie McDowell,

Senior Planner

‐ Economic Development–Tony Brauders,

Senior Executive Officer

‐ Enforcement and General Admin. –

‐ Neil Fitzpatrick, Senior Executive Officer

‐ Planning Policy – Ann Bogan, Senior Planner

The Directorate is dependent on the co-operation

of other directorates/departments within the City

Council and on organisations outside of the City

Council in order to achieve its objectives. A brief

description of the achievements of each section in

2012 and their programme for 2013 is set out

below.

Development Management

The Planning and Development Directorate

processed approximately 375 planning applications

together with some 50 applications to extend the

duration of planning permissions in 2012. Some of

the more significant planning applications

considered during the year included the following:

‐ a multi-purpose events and convention centre

at Navigation House and adjoining lands,

Albert Quay

‐ a shopping centre to the rear of the Fox and

Hounds, Ballyvolane

‐ a 13,300 square ms factory expansion by Apple

Computers at Hollyhill Industrial Estate

‐ a new factory for Boston Scientific at

Melbourne Business and Technology Park,

Model Farm Road

‐ a new Bishopstown Credit Union premises at

Curraheen Road

‐ the rehabilitation and reuse of the Unitarian

Church, Princes Street and pedestrian linkage

of same into the English Market

‐ a local centre at Melbourne Business Park,

Model Farm Road

‐ a new headquarters and centre of excellence for

the Cork County Boxing Board at

Knocknaheeny Avenue

‐ a Scout Hall at Gillabbey Park

Of significance in 2012 was that An Bord Pleanála

confirmed on appeal the decision of the City

Council to grant permission for the redevelopment

of the strategic Beamish and Crawford lands at

South Main Street which included the reuse of the

heritage buildings on-site.

Economic Development

The Economic Development Fund supported

projects in 2012 which delivered benefits to Cork

including:

Cork Docklands Economic Proposition Report

Cork Innovates

‐ Energy Cork

‐ viaFulcrum – construction industry hub

‐ Northside Economic Plan

‐ IGNITE Programme

‐ Monahan’s Road Improvements

‐ Promoting Cork in Asia

City Centre viability

Some of these projects will continue in 2013 with

the following additions:

‐ Food Innovation Hub

‐ Strategic Marketing of Cork

‐ ITLG Conference

Cork Meet

The Marina Park Master Plan was also prepared

during 2012.

55


SERVICE DIVISION D – DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT

The CASP Office is serviced by the Directorate as

in Cork’s growing engagement with China. The

City Council recently agreed to conclude a

Memorandum of Understanding with the Shenzhen

Municipal People’s Government in 2013.

Planning Enforcement & General

Administration

During 2012, a review commenced of the

administration of the Planning Enforcement

function within Cork City Council, with the

objective of developing a more integrated and

effective operation involving the Development

Management and Enforcement Sections.

In order to bring increased public awareness & to

facilitate improved consistency in the

administration of the planning enforcement

function by practitioners, the Department of the

Environment Community & Local Government

published A Guide to Planning Enforcement in

Ireland in November 2012.

Development contributions collected under the

current Development Contribution Schemes,

which were adopted in April 2009, are utilised for

public infrastructure and facilities benefiting

development within the Cork City Council area.

These monies are ring-fenced for capital works.

Due to the current changed Economic landscape,

the Department of the Environment Community &

Local Government published Development

Contributions Draft Guidelines for Planning

Authorities in 2012 for comment/feedback. It is

anticipated that the finalised Guidelines will be

issued in late 2012/early 2013.

Planning Policy

The preparation of a new City Development Plan

will formally commence in April 2013 with public

consultation to identify the issues that the next plan

should address. In preparation for this a Joint

Housing Strategy for Cork City and County and a

Joint Retail Strategy for Metropolitan Cork are

underway in conjunction with Cork County

Council. Preparation of a strategy for the

regeneration of the City Centre will also get

underway in early 2013. A Local Area Plan for

Mahon is virtually complete and will go to Council

early in the New Year.

2012 saw the implementation of a series of projects

to promote the heritage of the city, including a

programme of activities for Heritage Week, a very

well attended Heritage Open Day, the Schools

Heritage Project, an archaeological monograph of

56

the South Main Street and a grant scheme for

heritage organisations. A study in keeping

traditional buildings in use is also underway. In

2013 preparation of a new 5 year Plan for Heritage

will get underway. This will be preceded by an

evaluation of the current Plan. Measures to tackle

dereliction are focusing on preventing deterioration

of run-down buildings and finding new or

temporary uses for vacant buildings, with particular

emphasis on the historic building stock in the city.

Community and Enterprise

In 2012 the Community & Enterprise Directorate

was disbanded. Key City Development Board

functions transferred to Corporate Affairs such as

the Joint Policing Committee and the Social

Inclusion Unit.

Ongoing initiatives include Cork’s Healthy City

initiative, Cork City Learning Forum, Project

Refocus, LGBT Interagency steering group, the

Music Education Partnership, Cork City

Integration Strategy, Northside Economic

Development Plan and Comhairle na nÓg.

Interagency projects underway include Lifelong

Learning Festival and Discovery Science Festival.

Community Safety is promoted through the Joint

Policing Committee, the local Safety Fora and the

Safety units which tackle the practical issues on the

ground. As part of the reforms enclosed in “Putting

People First”, Action Programme for Effective Local

Government the City Development Board will be

replaced in 2013 by Socio-Economic Committees.

RAPID

The RAPID Programme continued to be

implemented in 2012 across the four RAPID areas:

- Knocknaheeny/Hollyhill/Churchfield

- Farranree/Fairhill/Gurranabraher

- Mayfield/the Glen/Blackpool

- Togher/Mahon

It operates across seven strategic themes of

community safety, employment and training,

health, family support, physical environment, youth

supports and education. Some of the highlights of

the year included further development of Project

Refocus for young unemployed people, continued

development of the community safety fora and

implementation of the Happy Talk early learning

and language project in Mayfield and the Glen.

Plans for 2013 include further close collaboration

with the Northwest Regeneration and the

development and implementation of a northside

economic plan.


Overview

SERVICE DIVISION D

DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT

AIMS

Within the framework of national policies, to take, contribute to and support measures at local and regional level to secure an

improvement in the quality of life, including attainment of economic growth, an acceptable standard of living and a satisfactory physical

environment for living and working.

Service Division A € 40,166,000 25%

Service Division B € 25,673,800 16%

Service Division C € 21,225,900 13%

Service Division D € 8,834,200 5%

Service Division E € 31,276,300 19%

Service Division F € 20,329,100 13%

Service Division G € 3,743,500 2%

Service Division H € 10,875,800 7%

€ 162,124,600 100%

Service Division

D

€ 8,834,200

How the Service Division is Spent

Forward Planning € 1,234,400 14%

Development Management € 2,110,500 23%

Enforcement € 754,900 9%

Community & Enterprise € 1,405,800 16%

Develop & Promote Tourism € 754,300 9%

Economic Development

Building Control

€ 1,439,100

€ 362,400

16%

4%

Other Services € 772,800 9%

€ 8,834,200 100%

Building Control

4%

Economic

Development

16%

Develop &

Promote Tourism

9%

Community &

Enterprise

16%

Other Services

9%

Forward Planning

14%

Development

Management

23%

Enforcement

9%

How the Service Division is Funded

Government Grants € 261,300 3%

Planning Fees € 190,000 2%

Agency Services € 282,600 3%

Other Income € 229,700 3%

Rates & Local Gov Fund € 7,870,600 89%

€ 8,834,200 100%

Rates & Local Gov

Fund

89%

Other Income

3%

Planning Fees

Agency Services 2%

3%

Government

Grants

3%

57


PLANNING

D01 FORWARD PLANNING

Payroll € 719,200

Overheads € 394,500

Non Pay € 120,700

D02

DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT

Payroll € 1,353,400

Overheads € 656,100

Non Pay € 101,000

D03

D08

ENFORCEMENT

BUILDING CONTROL

Payroll € 463,900

Overheads € 245,000

Non Pay € 46,000

Payroll € 238,800

Overheads € 109,600

Non Pay € 14,000

OTHER DEVELOPMENTS & PROMOTION

D05 TOURISM DEVELOPMENT&PROMOTION

Payroll € 248,800

Overheads € 1,300

Non Pay € 504,200

COMMUNITY & ENTERPRISE

D06 COMMUNITY & ENTERPRISE FUNCTION

Payroll € 849,900

Overheads € 387,800

Non Pay € 168,100

58


TABLE F - EXPENDITURE

CORK CITY COUNCIL - ANNUAL BUDGET

DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT

Expenditure by Service and Sub-Service

2013 2012

Adopted by

Council

Estimated by

Manager

Adopted by

Council

Estimated

Outturn

€ € € €

D0101 Statutory Plans and Policy 727,000 727,000 772,000 748,000

D0199 Service Support Costs 507,400 507,400 550,300 544,300

Forward Planning 1,234,400 1,234,400 1,322,300 1,292,300

D0201 Planning Control 1,341,600 1,341,600 1,258,000 1,258,000

D0299 Service Support Costs 768,900 768,900 809,100 801,100

Development Management 2,110,500 2,110,500 2,067,100 2,059,100

D0301 Enforcement Costs 396,100 396,100 365,900 365,900

D0399 Service Support Costs 358,800 358,800 409,800 394,400

Enforcement 754,900 754,900 775,700 760,300

D0501 Tourism Promotion 753,000 753,000 706,200 706,200

D0599 Service Support Costs 1,300 1,300 900 1,000

Tourism Development and Promotion 754,300 754,300 707,100 707,200

D0601 General Community & Enterprise Expenses 503,800 503,800 891,100 559,600

D0602 RAPID Costs 372,700 372,700 300,600 300,600

D0603 Social Inclusion 141,500 141,500 142,000 151,400

D0699 Service Support Costs 387,800 387,800 378,000 380,100

Community and Enterprise Function 1,405,800 1,405,800 1,711,700 1,391,700

D0802 Building Control Enforcement Costs 252,800 252,800 307,200 263,300

D0899 Service Support Costs 109,600 109,600 105,000 106,600

Building Control 362,400 362,400 412,200 369,900

D0902 EU Projects 7,500 7,500 8,000 8,000

D0903 Town Twinning 80,000 80,000 86,000 86,000

D0905 Economic Development & Promotion 1,124,800 1,124,800 1,149,000 1,149,000

D0999 Service Support Costs 226,800 226,800 232,300 231,300

Economic Development and Promotion 1,439,100 1,439,100 1,475,300 1,474,300

D1001 Property Management Costs 1,600 1,600 1,600 800

D1099 Service Support Costs 400 400 300 300

Property Management 2,000 2,000 1,900 1,100

D1101 Heritage Services 165,400 165,400 162,400 162,400

D1102 Conservation Services 233,100 233,100 241,400 191,600

D1199 Service Support Costs 84,500 84,500 80,400 82,000

Heritage and Conservation Services 483,000 483,000 484,200 436,000

D1201 Agency & Recoupable Service 279,800 279,800 243,200 243,200

D1299 Service Support Costs 8,000 8,000 7,800 7,800

Agency & Recoupable Services 287,800 287,800 251,000 251,000

Service Division Total 8,834,200 8,834,200 9,208,500 8,742,900

59


Income by Source

TABLE F - INCOME

CORK CITY COUNCIL - ANNUAL BUDGET

DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT

2013 2012

Estimated by

Manager

Adopted by

Council

€ € € €

Adopted by

Council

Estimated

Outturn

Government Grants

Environment, Community & Local Government 245,300 245,300 337,200 346,600

Arts, Sports & Tourism

Other 16,000 16,000 15,000 16,000

Total Grants & Subsidies (a) 261,300 261,300 352,200 362,600

Goods and Services

Planning Fees 190,000 190,000 260,000 191,000

Sale/Leasing of other property/Industrial Sites

Superannuation 162,900 162,900 165,400 168,200

Agency Services & Repayable Works

Local Authority Contributions

Other income 349,400 349,400 303,600 311,400

Total Goods and Services (b) 702,300 702,300 729,000 670,600

Total Income c=(a+b) 963,600 963,600 1,081,200 1,033,200

60


SERVICE DIVISION E – ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES

Total expenditure of €31.2m (€31.9m in 2012) is

provided in this Division for 2013, which

represents 19% of Total Expenditure.

Transfer of Refuse Collection Service

Following a detailed appraisal of Cork City

Council’s refuse and mixed dry recyclable collection

services, it was agreed to dispose of this service to

Country Clean Recycling Ltd from 15 th August

2011. The arrangement with the Council’s waivered

customers will be honoured by Country Clean

Recycling until April 2013.

Waste generated by Cork City Council

Cork City Council will generate approx 5,500

tonnes of waste from its own activities in 2013.

The key budgetary challenges arising for the

Council include the cost increases due to additional

requirements for waste treatment, transport and

disposal, as well as projected increases in the

landfill levy.

Landfill levies have risen from €20 per tonne in

2010 to €50 per tonne by the end of 2011. The

current rate is €65 per tonne increasing to €75 per

tonne in July 2013.

Cork City Council has procured two licensed

facilities to accept, treat, transfer and dispose of

these waste materials such as litter waste, housing

waste etc.

Former Kinsale Road Landfill Site

Land filling of waste ceased at the Kinsale Road

facility in mid 2009. In accordance with the EPA

licence, a decommissioning programme has

resulted in the provision of an engineered cap to 28

hectares of the site, with 7.5 hectares remaining to

be capped in 2013.

A provision is made in the budget to cover these

costs. The closed landfill is subject to a very

strict EPA licence which requires the Council

deal with the various emissions arising from the

3 million tonnes land filled over the past 50

years. This process will continue indefinitely into

the future. This includes the ongoing management,

environmental monitoring and maintenance of the

facility (leachate treatment, gas collection, landfill

monitoring etc) in accordance with additional

conditions of the recently granted EPA licence.

A sum of €1.37m has been allocated for

maintaining the former Landfill and compliance

with the E.P.A. Licence requirements.

The Central Laboratory located at Kinsale Road is

charged with statutory monitoring of drinking

water, surface water, air quality, noise etc.

throughout the city, as well as providing expertise

for ensuring Kinsale Road Landfill Site’s EPA

licence conditions are generally complied with.

Bring Banks & Kinsale Rd Civic Amenity Site

The Council continues to provide a range of

recycling services including bottle banks, paper,

plastic, cardboard, timber, composting etc at the

Kinsale Road Civic Amenity Site. In addition the

council operates a WEEE facility for the return of

electrical goods from domestic customers.

Domestic waste is also accepted at this facility.

The Council operates 42 bottle banks at various

locations throughout the City.

Waste Planning

Work has been continuing on the drafting of a

new Waste Management Plan during 2012. It is

expected that a new Waste Management Plan

for the Southern Region will be completed in

2013. This Plan will be informed by developments

in the waste sector and any changes to

Government Policy.

Waste Enforcement

Cork City Council receives substantial financial

assistance from the Department of the

Environment, Community and Local Government

for the provision of a multi disciplinary Waste

Enforcement team based in City Hall.

The aim of this section is to ensure that public and

private stakeholders are protected and that waste

licence holders comply with national and

international legislation.

Lifetime Lab

Lifetime Lab is located at the old Lee Road

Waterworks, its overall mission is to promote a

sustainable approach to living and environmental

responsibility. It is funded by Cork City Council,

private sector sponsors and revenue generated

from on site activities. In 2011 over 21,000 visitors

attended the centre. A budget of €265,000 is

provided for operational and promotional costs.

Cork City Energy Agency

The Council spends approximately €4.5 million per

annum on energy and it is imperative that this level

of expenditure is adequately administered and

appropriate energy reduction measures are put in

place. Cork City Energy Agency is charged with

this responsibility, as well as reducing Cork City

61


SERVICE DIVISION E – ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES

Council’s carbon footprint by 3% per annum until

2020.

Street Cleaning and Litter Management

A total of €7.2m has been provided for daily and

weekend street cleaning. Included in the foregoing

is provision for the late evening city centre street

cleaning operation and street washing in St

Patrick’s Street. In accordance with the Councils

Litter Management Plan increased emphasis is

being placed on the support of community action

for the prevention of litter and improved local

authority enforcement of offences. CCTV cameras

are used by the Council to gather evidence for

prosecutions.

Bulky Goods Collections

This service was introduced in 2006 and to date

collections have been offered to circa 25,000

households in areas in each of the six electoral

wards. Provision has been made for a limited

service in 2013.

Fire Department

Total expenditure of €17.1m is provided. Cork City

Fire Department comprises a professional team of

people who provide a variety of services for the

local community. Its functions include:

- Operational Fire Service

- Fire Prevention

- Major Emergency Management

- Civil Defence

The Fire Department continues to focus on the

challenges of being an efficient and effective

operational Fire Service and ensuring a sufficient

level of preparedness in the event of a Major

Emergency while also working to reduce the

number of fires, minimise life loss and injury

resulting from fire and protect the infrastructure of

Cork City.

As the role of the Fire Department continues to

evolve, the importance of having fully up to date

trained Fire Personnel and a well-equipped fleet

maintained in a continuous state of readiness is

further highlighted. Cork City Fire Brigade

continues to pursue an extensive training

programme. Fire Brigade Personnel have, in early

2012, completed phase 1 of a programme of

specialised Tunnel fire fighting training in

conjunction with other Principal Response Agency

staff and the National Roads Authority. The

remaining phase of this training will take place in

the Jack Lynch Tunnel in 2013.

The Major Emergency Plan is maintained, reviewed

and updated in accordance with the National

Framework for Emergency Management in

conjunction with other Principal Response

Agencies.

In the area of Fire Prevention, the examination of

Fire Safety Certificate Applications and Planning

Applications is ongoing.

Cork City Civil Defence continues to support

Community activities and provides assistance to the

community and principal response agencies in

emergency situations. This was particularly evident

following the severe weather events in June 2012.

Building Control

The Building Control Section’s major efforts

continue to focus on Dangerous Structures and

Building Regulations enforcement.

The introduction of the Disability Access

Certificate in January 2010 places building

accessibility at the top of the agenda for designers

and developers. The significant public relations

effort that was made in 2010 to communicate the

new statutory requirements to the industry with

public presentations contributed to the smooth

operation of the application and assessment

process.

A continuing feature of the construction and

property downturn has been the large proportion

of domestic house extensions relative to other

building works. Approximately 35% of all new

buildings notified to Building Control in 2011 were

inspected with an average of 4 inspections per

building during the various stages of construction.

Dangerous Structures are a critical part of the work

of the Building Control Section. Reports of

dangerous buildings received during office hours

are inspected as a first priority by the building

inspectors. Reports of dangerous buildings outside

of office hours are received by the Fire Brigade and

if assistance or expert advice is required a Building

Surveyor from the Department will attend the

scene. It is common for the Fire Brigade to request

the advice of a Building Surveyor at the scene of a

fire. The Building Control Section have effectively

used the relevant provision of the Local

Government (Sanitary Services) Act, 1964 to

compel building owners to make safe their property

and emergency works are carried out to remove any

danger where the owners are not willing or able to

carry out the work.

62


Overview

SERVICE DIVISION E

ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES

AIMS

To promote environmental conditions conducive to health and amenity and to protect persons and property from fire and other hazards

including dangerous buildings and places.

Service Division A € 40,166,000 25%

Service Division B € 25,673,800 16%

Service Division C € 21,225,900 13%

Service Division D € 8,834,200 5%

Service Division E € 31,276,300 19%

Service Division F € 20,329,100 13%

Service Division G € 3,743,500 2%

Service Division H € 10,875,800 7%

€ 162,124,600 100%

Service

Division E

€ 31,276,300

How the Service Division is Spent

Landfill € 1,859,300 6%

Recycling € 1,373,200 4%

Street Cleaning & Litter Control € 7,450,900 24%

Burial Grounds € 1,328,600 4%

Fire Protection & Prevention € 17,111,800 55%

Waste Manage & Pollution Control € 1,486,700 5%

Safety of Structures € 665,800 2%

€ 31,276,300 100%

Fire Protection &

Prevention

55%

Waste Manage &

Pollution Control

5%

Safety of

Structures

2%

Landfill

6%

Recycling

4%

Street Cleaning &

Litter Control

24%

Burial Grounds

4%

How the Service Division is Funded

Landfill Charges € 1,430,000 5%

Misc Waste Disposal Income € 118,500 0%

Burial Fees € 518,000 2%

Fire Protection Income € 152,000 0%

Other Local Authorities € 1,346,000 4%

Government Grants € 263,100 1%

Other Income € 1,169,600 4%

Rates & Local Gov Fund € 26,279,100 84%

€ 31,276,300 100%

Rates & Local

Gov Fund

84%

Government

Grants

1%

Other Income

4%

Other Local

Authorities

4%

Burial Fees

2%

Fire Protection

Income

0%

Landfill Charges

5%

Misc Waste

Disposal Income

0%

63


WASTE DISPOSAL

E01 LANDFILL OPERATION & AFTERCARE

Payroll € 424,200

Overheads € 341,100

Non Pay € 1,094,000

E02

RECOVERY & RECYCLING FACILITIES OPS

Payroll € 350,600

Overheads € 18,500

Non Pay € 1,004,100

E06

STREET CLEANING

Payroll € 4,773,800

Overheads € 897,500

Non Pay € 1,522,300

BURIAL GROUNDS

E09 MAINTENANCE OF BURIAL GROUNDS

Payroll € 1,083,300

Overheads € 137,700

Non Pay € 107,600

CIVIL DEFENCE & DANGEROUS BUILDINGS

E10 SAFETY OF STRUCTURES & PLACES

Payroll € 318,300

Overheads € 257,900

Non Pay € 89,600

FIRE PROTECTION & PREVENTION

E11 OPERATION OF FIRE SERVICE

Payroll € 12,931,500

Overheads € 1,059,100

Non Pay € 1,455,200

E12

FIRE PREVENTION

Payroll € 809,100

Overheads € 413,300

Non Pay € 443,600

POLLUTION CONTROL

E13 WATER QUALITY,AIR & NOISE POLLUTION

Payroll € 301,000

Overheads € 213,500

Non Pay € 115,400

64


TABLE F - EXPENDITURE

CORK CITY COUNCIL - ANNUAL BUDGET

ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES

Expenditure by Service and Sub-Service

2013 2012

Adopted by

Council

Estimated by

Manager

Adopted by

Council

Estimated

Outturn

€ € € €

E0101 Landfill Operations 1,307,100 1,307,100 1,367,300 1,358,300

E0103 Landfill Aftercare Costs 4,000 4,000 5,000 1,000

E0199 Service Support Costs 548,200 548,200 490,400 461,000

Landfill Operation & Aftercare 1,859,300 1,859,300 1,862,700 1,820,300

E0201 Recycling Facilities Operations 1,352,700 1,352,700 1,894,400 1,320,300

E0202 Bring Centres Operations 0 0 0 0

E0204 Other Recycling Services 2,000 2,000 12,500 0

E0299 Service Support Costs 18,500 18,500 15,300 15,400

Recovery & Recycling Facilities Operations 1,373,200 1,373,200 1,922,200 1,335,700

E0501 Litter Warden Service 200,900 200,900 214,700 204,000

E0502 Litter Control Initiatives 8,000 8,000 8,000 8,000

E0503 Environmental Awareness Services 20,000 20,000 67,500 47,500

E0599 Service Support Costs 28,400 28,400 19,500 20,500

Litter Management 257,300 257,300 309,700 280,000

E0601 Operation of Street Cleaning Service 5,903,100 5,903,100 6,442,900 5,910,900

E0699 Service Support Costs 1,290,500 1,290,500 1,410,800 1,400,200

Street Cleaning 7,193,600 7,193,600 7,853,700 7,311,100

E0702 Enforcement of Waste Regulations 276,400 276,400 282,300 282,300

E0799 Waste Service Regulations, Support CostsMonitoring and

122,300 122,300 108,300 109,000

Enforcement 398,700 398,700 390,600 391,300

E0801 Waste Management Plan 393,000 393,000 417,000 426,600

E0899 Service Support Costs 65,100 65,100 47,600 49,200

Waste Management Planning 458,100 458,100 464,600 475,800

E0901 Maintenance of Burial Grounds 1,190,900 1,190,900 1,252,800 1,151,800

E0999 Service Support Costs 137,700 137,700 95,500 99,900

Maintenance & Upkeep of Burial Grounds 1,328,600 1,328,600 1,348,300 1,251,700

E1001 Operation Costs Civil Defence 133,100 133,100 133,800 133,900

E1002 Dangerous Buildings 246,700 246,700 242,900 226,900

E1005 Water Safety Operation 28,100 28,100 76,100 76,100

E1099 Service Support Costs 257,900 257,900 211,900 214,200

Safety of Structures & Places 665,800 665,800 664,700 651,100

E1101 Operation of Fire Brigade Service 14,326,700 14,326,700 13,899,600 13,801,700

E1104 Operation of Ambulance Service 60,000 60,000 60,000 60,000

E1199 Service Support Costs 1,059,100 1,059,100 836,800 852,900

Operation of Fire Service 15,445,800 15,445,800 14,796,400 14,714,600

E1202 Fire Prevention and Education 1,252,700 1,252,700 1,424,600 1,209,400

E1299 Service Support Costs 413,300 413,300 348,200 350,700

Fire Prevention 1,666,000 1,666,000 1,772,800 1,560,100

E1301 Water Quality Management 288,300 288,300 361,000 381,500

E1302 Licensing and Monitoring of Air and Noise Quality 128,100 128,100 70,000 85,800

E1399 Service Support Costs 213,500 213,500 164,200 166,100

Water Quality, Air & Noise Pollution 629,900 629,900 595,200 633,400

Service Division Total 31,276,300 31,276,300 31,980,900 30,425,100

65


Income by Source

TABLE F - INCOME

CORK CITY COUNCIL - ANNUAL BUDGET

ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES

2013 2012

Estimated by

Manager

Adopted by

Council

€ € € €

Adopted by

Council

Estimated

Outturn

Government Grants

Environment, Community & Local Government 180,700 180,700 180,700 183,700

Social & Family Affairs

Defence 82,400 82,400 82,400 73,600

Other

Total Grants & Subsidies (a) 263,100 263,100 263,100 257,300

Goods and Services

Domestic Refuse Charges

Commercial Refuse Charges

Landfill Charges 1,430,000 1,430,000 1,855,000 1,352,700

Fire Charges 152,000 152,000 152,000 160,000

Superannuation 761,500 761,500 773,700 785,900

Agency Services & Repayable Works

Local Authority Contributions 1,346,000 1,346,000 1,346,000 1,210,000

Other income 1,044,700 1,044,700 999,600 1,040,100

Total Goods and Services (b) 4,734,200 4,734,200 5,126,300 4,548,700

Total Income c=(a+b) 4,997,300 4,997,300 5,389,400 4,806,000

66


ANALYSIS OF WASTE DISPOSAL (E1-E8)

E01 & E02 - LANDFILL

Adopted

Budget 2013

Adopted

Budget 2012

Estimated

Outturn 2012

Salaries & Wages 202,000 242,100 242,100

Plant 72,900 76,700 72,700

Cover Soil 1,800 2,000 2,000

Road Making Materials 3,100 3,500 3,500

Landscaping 22,000 25,000 25,000

Maintenance of Plant 200,000 200,000 200,000

Sampling & External Testing 54,000 60,000 60,000

EPA Licence & Monitoring 130,000 130,000 130,000

Recycling Initiatives 364,400 411,300 347,600

Loan Charges 500,000 500,000 500,000

Administration & Miscellaneous 1,682,300 2,134,300 1,573,100

Sub-Total 3,232,500 3,784,900 3,156,000

E05 - LITTER MANAGEMENT

Litter Warden 198,700 206,500 195,800

Administration & Miscellaneous 58,600 103,200 84,200

Sub-Total 257,300 309,700 280,000

E06 - STREET CLEANING

Salaries & Wages 4,763,400 5,201,000 4,789,800

Plant 1,012,900 935,000 922,400

Others 1,024,500 1,237,900 1,213,900

Landfill Charges 392,800 479,800 385,000

Sub-Total 7,193,600 7,853,700 7,311,100

E07 & E08 - WASTE REGULATION,

MONITORING & ENFORCEMENT

Waste Enforcement Unit 276,400 282,300 282,300

Administration & Miscellaneous 580,400 572,900 584,800

Sub-Total 856,800 855,200 867,100

TOTAL WASTE DISPOSAL 11,540,200 12,803,500 11,614,200

67


LANDFILL & RECYCLING EXPENDITURE & FUNDING

Adopted Budget Adopted Budget

2013

2012

E01 Landfill Operation 1,859,300 1,862,700

E02 Recovery & Recycling 1,373,200 1,922,200

TOTAL EXPENDITURE 3,232,500 3,784,900

FUNDED BY:

Landfill Charges 1,430,000 1,855,000

Timber Shredding/Green Waste/Other Landfill 54,200 100,900

Rates/Local Government Fund 1,748,300 1,829,000

TOTAL FUNDING 3,232,500 3,784,900

STREET CLEANING EXPENDITURE & FUNDING

Adopted Budget Adopted Budget

2013

2012

Direct Street Cleaning Costs 6,296,100 7,381,700

Service Support Costs 897,500 472,000

TOTAL EXPENDITURE 7,193,600 7,853,700

FUNDED BY:

Street Cleaning Income 4,000 4,000

Rates/Local Government Fund 7,189,600 7,849,700

TOTAL FUNDING 7,193,600 7,853,700

68


E11 & E12 - FIRE SERVICES

Adopted

Budget 2013

Adopted

Budget 2012

Estimated

Outturn 2012

EXPENDITURE

Salaries & Wages 13,588,800 13,290,300 13,030,000

Emoluments 143,200 143,200 143,200

Maintenance of Appliances & Equipment 310,000 300,800 310,000

Fuel & Motor Insurance 80,100 80,100 80,100

Power & Communications 216,200 216,200 216,200

Maintenance - Console & Station 222,500 226,800 226,500

Training Courses 278,400 278,400 278,400

Cleansing of Hydrants 82,500 85,700 84,000

Miscellaneous 337,700 337,700 312,700

CAMP/MRCC 380,000 400,000 390,000

Major Emergency Management 0 25,000 0

Overheads 1,472,400 1,185,000 1,203,600

TOTAL EXPENDITURE 17,111,800 16,569,200 16,274,700

FUNDED BY

Fire Cert Applications 150,000 150,000 158,000

Cork County Council Contribution 1,346,000 1,346,000 1,210,000

Miscellaneous 72,500 71,300 72,300

Rates/Local Government Fund 15,543,300 15,001,900 14,834,400

TOTAL FUNDING 17,111,800 16,569,200 16,274,700

69


SERVICE DIVISION F - RECREATION & AMENITY

Total Expenditure of €20.3m (€20.8m in 2012) is

provided in this Division for 2013, which

represents 13% of Total Expenditure.

This Division covers Arts activities, operation of

the Libraries and Parks, as well as various Sports

and Recreational facilities and programmes

throughout the city.

TEAM

Cork City Council’s TEAM Unit was launched in

May 2011. The Unit incorporates the Arts &

Culture section, which previously formed part of

the Recreation, Amenity & Culture Directorate, but

also has a number of important new functions.

Primarily, the Unit is charged with delivering an

integrated framework to enhance the City’s tourism

product and to coordinate the marketing and

promotion of the city as a premier tourist

destination on a regional, national and international

basis.

In November 2012 the Cork City Council Tourism

Strategy was launched. The decision by TEAM to

address the infrastructural deficits in Cork’s

tourism, it is hoped will deliver the following:

- A Diaspora Experience of National standing

- A National Food Centre

- Elizabeth Fort at the centre of a vibrant

Tourism Hub – the Cathedral Quarter

- A City renowned for its Irish Traditional

Music & Heritage

- A network of guided and self guided tours and

activities

- A state of the art way finding system for

visitors

- An enviable Festivals and Events calendar

- An integrated and relevant ICT strategy

- An effective and cost-efficient direct marketing

strategy

The Unit has also initiated a number of non capital

programmes including, ‘Pulses of Tradition’, ‘The

Lee Sessions’, a new website www.cork.ie dedicated

to tourism generation, the roll out of wifi in the

public areas of the city centre and the piloting of a

number of new festival proposals including a food

festival, a Rory Gallagher Festival.

Cork St. Patrick’s Festival attracted an audience

in excess of 90,000 over the three days of the

festival, with over 50,000 people at the Parade, and

the participation of over 1,200 people from the

sporting, community, voluntary, charitable and

71

educational sectors. A multi-media re-imagining of

the tale of St. Patrick by the composer Pierre

O’Reilly premiered during the festival.

‘A Cork Christmas Celebration’ is a unique free

Christmas event, presented by Cork City Council,

running from the 30 th November to the 23 rd

December. The event attracts in excess of 150,000

visitors to the city and includes a food and craft

market along the Grand Parade, as well as a festive

lighting installation inspired by The Nutcracker in

Bishop Lucey Park.

Arts Office

Grant Aid

The Arts Grant Scheme provided funding of

€270,000 in 2012 to 70 organisations. This funding

seeks to support the ongoing costs of a number of

organisations in the city, professional, community

and voluntary.

In addition a number of other individuals artists,

organisations and groups were supported through a

range of schemes, these included Project Scheme

Funding, Individual Artists Bursary, Arts in

Context Funding and Voyage Scheme Awards.

These schemes aim to provide initiation and/or

development funding to projects which are based

in the Cork city area and which provide audiences,

artists and participants with experiences,

opportunities and programmes to which they might

not otherwise have access.

Cork Screen Commission

The commission, a joint city and county initiative

continued its work promoting Cork as a centre for

the production of film and television.

Outreach and Education Programme

Access to and participation in the wealth of cultural

facilities in the city are a key target for the Arts

Office of Cork City Council. To this end there are

a number of projects directly programmed and

managed by the Arts Office with the collaboration

and support of our partners within the independent

cultural community in the city.

These include the following;

- Unfinished Book, a programme with five

schools in five branch libraries in a ten week

series of workshops resulting in the

publication of a volume of original creative

writing by participants.

- Beag, a programme of arts engagement with

pre-school took place in 20 child care facilities

in the city and county.


SERVICE DIVISION F - RECREATION & AMENITY

- Composer in the Classroom, a fifteen week

workshops programme with composers

working in two local secondary schools to

produce original music composed by students.

Arts & Disability Network Phase III funding for a

series of programmes including the commission of

a new piece of integrated dance which premiered at

the Irish Performing Arts Festival, by Croí Glan,

Pass Path Grove, a series of access audits for

venues, training for arts organisations in Disability

Equality and development of a new club for people

with intellectual disabilities.

The Music Generation a €1.2 million music

education programme over three years was

launched in September. This will take place in

range of primary, secondary and non education

space throughout the city.

Cork Culture Night

Cork Culture Night attracted in excess of 37,000

individual visits to venues on the 21 st September.

This was our most successful Culture Night ever,

with increased numbers, media coverage, and

interaction with our audience on social media

channels.

A exhibition of photography by John Minihan

‘Writers in Cork’ was launched in September 2012

and hung until the end of November. The 21 st

anniversary of the Cork Printmakers was celebrated

by an exhibition in the atrium of City Hall which

opened on the 7 th December 2012.

Libraries

Total expenditure of €5.44m is provided for

Libraries in 2013.

In recent years both membership of the library

service and usage generally have greatly increased.

The number of books and other items issued has

increased by more than 25% in the past two years,

and membership numbers have increased by a

similar amount. The emphasis will therefore be on

maintaining services to meet this need, in as far as

the current fiscal circumstances faced by the

Council will allow.

The digital revolution is greatly impacting on the

delivery of library services. The Council will, during

2013, enhance the opportunities for the public to

access information online – text, maps, photos –

and to carry out functions such as loan renewals,

requests, etc., online.

Following funding approval for a new purposebuilt

library in Hollyhill/Knocknaheeny, received in

2011, the Council has significantly progressed this

project. Part 8 planning approval was received

during 2012, and the project will be ready to go to

tender early in 2012.

Work is continuing on the design work on the

conversion of the ABODE building, Skehard

Road, to serve as the Blackrock-Mahon Library, to

bring it to Part 8 / tender stage.

During 2013 the Council will review the options

for the proposed new City Library on Grand

Parade.

Expenditure covers the following:

- Operation of Libraries

- Purchase of books & other materials

- Contribution to LGMA Libraries

Development

- Cork City & County Archives

Parks & Open Spaces

Management and maintenance of 1500 acres of

parks, open space areas including enclosed parks,

large open spaces, amenity areas, playgrounds,

walkways, pitches, municipal golf course and 4

cemeteries.

Achievements 2012

- Enhancement works carried out at Kennedy

Park, Bishop Lucey Park & Beaumont Park.

- 2 new Changing Pavilions constructed at

Pophams Park and the Fairfield.

- Phase 2 Energy & Improved Disability Works

carried out at the 3 City Council pools totalling

€468,000 complementing Phase 1 works

carried out in 2011.

- Bonfire Night Family Fun Night Project on

June 23 rd

- Tramore Valley Park Masterplan progressed

- CCTV installed at St Catherines Cemetery and

other Parks depots

Proposed Parks Capital Projects

- Mardyke Gardens

- Tramore Valley Park Development (Contract

9)

- Marina Park Masterplan progression

- Monahans Road & Boggy Field

- Marina Pontoon

- Footpaths Clashduv Park

There is significant progress in terms of the

development of new library facilities.

72


SERVICE DIVISION F

RECREATION & AMENITY

AIMS

To provide opportunities for participation in arts, cultural and other recreational activities

in order to promote a rewarding lifestyle.

Overview

Service Division A € 40,166,000 25%

Service Division B € 25,673,800 16%

Service Division C € 21,225,900 13%

Service Division D € 8,834,200 5%

Service Division E € 31,276,300 19%

Service Division F € 20,329,100 13%

Service Division G € 3,743,500 2%

Service Division H € 10,875,800 7%

€ 162,124,600 100%

Service Division

F

€ 20,329,100

How the Service Division is Spent

Leisure Facilities € 1,212,800 6%

Library & Archive Service € 7,288,900 36%

Parks & Open Spaces € 8,636,300 42%

Other Recreation & Amenity € 772,600 4%

Arts Programme € 2,418,500 12%

€ 20,329,100 100%

Arts Programme

12%

Other Recreation

& Amenity

4%

Leisure Facilities

6%

Library & Archive

Service

36%

Parks & Open

Spaces

42%

How the Service Division is Funded

Government Grants € 326,000 2%

Leisure Facilities € 562,000 3%

Libraries Income € 250,300 1%

Other Local Authorities € 475,100 2%

Other Income € 463,800 2%

Rates & Local Gov Fund € 18,251,900 90%

€ 20,329,100 100%

Other Income

2%

Other Local

Authorities

2%

Libraries Income

1%

Rates & Local Gov

Fund

90%

Government

Grants

2%

Leisure Facilities

3%

73


LEISURE FACILITIES

F01 LEISURE FACILITIES OPERATIONS

Payroll € 398,400

Overheads € 62,300

Non Pay € 752,100

LIBRARIES & ARCHIVE SERVICE

F02 OP OF LIBRARY & ARCHIVE SERVICE

Payroll € 4,158,900

Overheads € 1,786,700

Non Pay € 1,343,300

OUTDOOR LEISURE

F03 OUTDOOR LEISURE AREA OPERATION

Payroll € 5,579,900

Overheads € 1,175,000

Non Pay € 1,881,400

F04

COMM,SPORT & REC DEVELOPMENT

Payroll € 6,900

Overheads € 10,200

Non Pay € 755,500

ARTS PROGRAMME

F05 OPERATION OF ARTS PROGRAMME

Payroll € 485,300

Overheads € 199,700

Non Pay € 1,733,500

74


Expenditure by Service and Sub-Service

TABLE F - EXPENDITURE

CORK CITY COUNCIL - ANNUAL BUDGET

RECREATION & AMENITY

2013 2012

Adopted by Estimated by Adopted by Estimated

Council Manager Council Outturn

€ € € €

F0101 Leisure Facilities Operations 1,111,300 1,111,300 1,114,000 1,111,900

F0103 Contribution to External Bodies Leisure Facilities 39,200 39,200 39,200 39,200

F0199 Service Support Costs 62,300 62,300 47,700 50,600

Leisure Facilities Operations 1,212,800 1,212,800 1,200,900 1,201,700

F0201 Library Service Operations 4,659,400 4,659,400 4,564,300 4,647,300

F0202 Archive Service 331,500 331,500 336,000 335,500

F0204 Purchase of Books, CD’s etc. 281,700 281,700 281,700 231,700

F0205 Contributions to Library Organisations 229,600 229,600 278,300 262,800

F0299 Service Support Costs 1,786,700 1,786,700 1,674,300 1,700,300

Operation of Library & Archival Service 7,288,900 7,288,900 7,134,600 7,177,600

F0301 Parks, Pitches & Open Spaces 6,969,200 6,969,200 7,425,800 7,061,600

F0399 Service Support Costs 1,667,100 1,667,100 1,751,400 1,784,200

Outdoor Leisure Areas Operations 8,636,300 8,636,300 9,177,200 8,845,800

F0401 Community Grants 329,600 329,600 296,500 296,500

F0402 Operation of Sports Hall/Stadium 310,800 310,800 311,900 311,900

F0403 Community Facilities 122,000 122,000 122,000 122,000

F0404 Recreational Development 0 0 0 0

F0499 Service Support Costs 10,200 10,200 8,300 8,600

Community Sport & Recreational Devt 772,600 772,600 738,700 739,000

F0501 Administration of the Arts Programme 296,400 296,400 309,500 309,000

F0502 Contributions to other Bodies Arts Programme 1,391,000 1,391,000 1,424,200 1,424,200

F0503 Museums Operations 531,400 531,400 666,900 648,400

F0599 Service Support Costs 199,700 199,700 180,000 184,800

Operation of Arts Programme 2,418,500 2,418,500 2,580,600 2,566,400

Service Division Total 20,329,100 20,329,100 20,832,000 20,530,500

75


Income by Source

TABLE F - INCOME

CORK CITY COUNCIL - ANNUAL BUDGET

RECREATION & AMENITY

2013 2012

Estimated by

Manager

Adopted by

Council

€ € € €

Adopted by

Council

Estimated

Outturn

Government Grants

Environment, Community & Local Government

Education and Science 4,000 4,000 4,000 2,300

Arts, Sports and Tourism

Social & Family Affairs 270,000 270,000 280,800 272,800

Library Council 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000

Arts Council

Other 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000

Total Grants & Subsidies (a) 326,000 326,000 336,800 327,100

Goods and Services

Library Fees/Fines 200,000 200,000 236,500 190,800

Recreation/Amenity/Culture 562,000 562,000 635,100 585,400

Superannuation 392,300 392,300 398,700 404,900

Agency Services & Repayable Works

Local Authority Contributions 475,100 475,100 479,100 463,900

Other income 121,700 121,700 128,000 119,600

Total Goods and Services (b) 1,751,100 1,751,100 1,877,400 1,764,600

Total Income c=(a+b) 2,077,100 2,077,100 2,214,200 2,091,700

76


ANALYSIS OF LIBRARY & ARCHIVE SERVICE (F02)

Adopted Adopted Estimated

Budget 2013 Budget 2012 Outturn 2012

Central Library 1,835,200 1,813,200 1,860,600

E-Library/ICT 272,200 273,500 274,800

General Library Services 581,200 582,600 604,100

Local Libraries 2,188,400 2,142,800 2,152,100

Purchase of Books 281,700 281,700 231,700

Archives 331,500 336,000 335,500

Contribution to An Comhairle Leabharlanna 12,000 30,500 18,500

Overheads 1,786,700 1,674,300 1,700,300

TOTAL EXPENDITURE 7,288,900 7,134,600 7,177,600

FUNDED BY:

Library Fees & Charges 200,000 236,500 190,800

Government Grants & Subsidies 56,000 56,000 54,300

Receipts from Other Local Authorities 470,000 474,000 458,800

Other Income 51,100 51,100 49,000

Rates/Local Government Fund 6,511,800 6,317,000 6,424,700

TOTAL FUNDING 7,288,900 7,134,600 7,177,600

77


F04 - COMMUNITY, SPORT & RECREATIONAL DEVT

Adopted

Budget 2013

Adopted

Budget 2012

Estimated

Outturn 2012

City Sports 36,000 36,000 36,000

Sports Centres 166,300 167,400 167,400

Bonfire Night Entertainment 29,900 30,000 30,000

Loan Charges 230,000 230,000 230,000

Miscellaneous 310,400 275,300 275,600

TOTAL EXPENDITURE 772,600 738,700 739,000

F05 - ARTS PROGRAMME

Adopted Adopted Estimated

Budget 2013 Budget 2012 Outturn 2012

Museum 531,400 666,900 648,400

Arts Committee Grants 259,800 270,000 270,000

Contribution to Other Bodies 1,131,200 1,154,200 1,154,200

Overheads 199,700 180,000 184,800

Arts Development Plan 296,400 309,500 309,000

TOTAL EXPENDITURE 2,418,500 2,580,600 2,566,400

78


SERVICE DIVISION G – AGRICULTURE, EDUCATION, HEALTH &

WELFARE

Expenditure of €3.7m (€5.9m in 2012) is provided

in this Division for 2013.

This represents 2% of Total Expenditure.

79


SERVICE DIVISION G

AGRICULTURE, EDUCATION, HEALTH AND WELFARE

AIMS

To support provision of educational & welfare services in the context of the city's developement

Overview

Service Division A € 40,166,000 25%

Service Division B € 25,673,800 16%

Service Division C € 21,225,900 13%

Service Division D € 8,834,200 5%

Service Division E € 31,276,300 19%

Service Division F € 20,329,100 13%

Service Division G € 3,743,500 2%

Service Division H € 10,875,800 7%

€ 162,124,600 100%

Service Division

G

€ 3,743,500

How the Service Division is Spent

Higher Education Grants € 3,215,900 86%

Other Education Expenditure € 275,000 7%

Veterinary Service € 110,600 3%

Admin & Miscellaneous € 142,000 4%

€ 3,743,500 100%

Other Education

Expenditure

7%

Veterinary Service

3%

Admin &

Miscellaneous

4%

Higher Education

Grants

86%

How the Service Division is Funded

Higher Education Grants € 3,215,900 86%

Other Income € 176,600 5%

Rates & Local Gov Fund € 351,000 9%

€ 3,743,500 100%

Higher Education

Grants

86%

Rates & Local

Gov Fund

9%

Other Income

5%

81


VETERINARY

G04 VETERINARY SERVICE

Payroll € 0

Overheads € 40,100

Non Pay € 70,500

EDUCATION

G05 EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT SERVICES

Payroll € 0

Overheads € 142,000

Non Pay € 3,490,900

82


TABLE F - EXPENDITURE

CORK CITY COUNCIL - ANNUAL BUDGET

AGRICULTURE, EDUCATION, HEALTH & WELFARE

Expenditure by Service and Sub-Service

2013 2012

Adopted by

Council

Estimated by

Manager

Adopted by

Council

Estimated

Outturn

€ € € €

G0402 Inspection of Abattoirs etc 0 0 0 0

G0404 Operation of Dog Warden Service 70,500 70,500 64,400 68,000

G0405 Other Animal Welfare Services (incl Horse Control) 0 0 0 0

G0499 Service Support Costs 40,100 40,100 37,300 38,000

Veterinary Service 110,600 110,600 101,700 106,000

G0501 Payment of Higher Education Grants 3,215,900 3,215,900 5,440,300 3,215,900

G0503 Payment of VEC Pensions 0 0 0 0

G0505 Contribution to VEC 86,600 86,600 86,600 86,600

G0506 Other Educational Services 0 0 5,000 0

G0507 School Meals 188,400 188,400 188,400 188,400

G0599 Service Support Costs 142,000 142,000 104,800 113,800

Educational Support Services 3,632,900 3,632,900 5,825,100 3,604,700

Service Division Total 3,743,500 3,743,500 5,926,800 3,710,700

83


Income by Source

Government Grants

2013 2012

Estimated by

Manager

Adopted by

Council

€ € € €

Adopted by

Council

Estimated

Outturn

Environment, Community & Local Government

Arts, Sports & Tourism

Education and Science 3,310,100 3,310,100 5,534,500 3,310,100

Transport and Marine

Other

Total Grants & Subsidies (a) 3,310,100 3,310,100 5,534,500 3,310,100

Goods and Services

TABLE F - INCOME

CORK CITY COUNCIL - ANNUAL BUDGET

AGRICULTURE , EDUCATION, HEALTH & WELFARE

Superannuation 6,400 6,400 6,500 6,600

Agency Services & Repayable Works

Local Authority Contributions

Other income 76,000 76,000 45,000 41,500

Total Goods and Services (b) 82,400 82,400 51,500 48,100

Total Income c=(a+b) 3,392,500 3,392,500 5,586,000 3,358,200

84


SERVICE DIVISION H – MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES

Expenditure of €10.9m (€10.9m in 2012) is

provided in this Division for 2013.

This represents 7% of total expenditure.

The Division provides for a wide range of service

headings:-

• Financial Management

• Elections and Franchise

• Consumer Protection

• Lord Mayor’s Office

• Property Management, Markets and Casual

Trading

Council Meetings Administration and

Members’ Support

• Organisation of Civic Events

• Facilities Management

85


SERVICE DIVISION H

MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES

AIMS

1. To provide for quality service delivery whilst ensuring value for money.

2. To promote consumer protection, other trading and agency services.

Overview

Service Division A € 40,166,000 25%

Service Division B € 25,673,800 16%

Service Division C € 21,225,900 13%

Service Division D € 8,834,200 5%

Service Division E € 31,276,300 19%

Service Division F € 20,329,100 13%

Service Division G € 3,743,500 2%

Service Division H € 10,875,800 7%

€ 162,124,600 100%

Service Division

H

€ 10,875,800

How the Service Division is Spent

Administration of Rates € 8,041,400 73%

Franchise Costs € 288,400 3%

Local Representation

& Civic Leadership € 1,322,200 12%

Markets & Casual Trading € 159,800 1%

Coroner & Morgue Expenses € 872,300 8%

Admin & Miscellaneous € 191,700 2%

€ 10,875,800 100%

Admin &

Miscellaneous

2%

Coroner &

Morgue Expenses

8%

Markets & Casual

Trading

1%

Local Rep &

Civic Leadership

13%

Franchise Costs

3%

Administration of

Rates

73%

How the Service Division is Funded

Markets, Fairs & Abattoirs € 321,000 3%

Property Management € 231,000 2%

Recoupable Legal Costs € 200,000 2%

NPPR € 2,545,400 23%

Other Income € 207,600 2%

Rates & Local Gov Fund € 7,370,800 68%

€ 10,875,800 100%

Other Income

2%

NPPR

23%

Recoupable Legal

Costs

2%

Property

Management

2%

Rates & Local Gov

Fund

68%

Markets, Fairs &

Abattoirs

3%

87


RATES

H03 ADMINISTRATION OF RATES

Payroll € 651,300

Overheads € 472,000

Non Pay € 6,918,100

FRANCHISE

H04 FRANCHISE COSTS

Payroll € 165,300

Overheads € 96,300

Non Pay € 26,800

MORGUE & CORONER SERVICE

H05 OPERATION OF MORGUE & CORONER EXP

Payroll € 74,000

Overheads € 111,500

Non Pay € 686,800

MARKETS, FAIRS & ABBATOIRS

H07 OPERATION OF MARKETS & CASUAL TRADING

Payroll € 48,800

Overheads € 12,600

Non Pay € 98,400

LORD MAYOR & MEMBERS

H09 LOCAL REPRES/CIVIC LEADERSHIP

Payroll € 0

Overheads € 40,700

Non Pay € 1,281,500

MISCELLANEOUS

H11 AGENCY & RECOUPABLE SERVICES

Payroll € 110,200

Overheads € 600

Non Pay € 13,500

88


Expenditure by Service and Sub-Service

TABLE F - EXPENDITURE

CORK CITY COUNCIL - ANNUAL BUDGET

MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES

2013 2012

Adopted by

Council

Estimated by

Manager

Adopted by

Council

Estimated

Outturn

€ € € €

H0302 Debt Management Service Rates 691,200 691,200 706,000 698,200

H0303 Refunds & Irrecoverable Rates 6,808,200 6,808,200 6,780,000 7,368,000

H0399 Service Support Costs 542,000 542,000 538,000 475,300

Administration of Rates 8,041,400 8,041,400 8,024,000 8,541,500

H0401 Register of Elector Costs 192,100 192,100 183,200 183,200

H0499 Service Support Costs 96,300 96,300 90,700 91,000

Franchise Costs 288,400 288,400 273,900 274,200

H0501 Coroner Fees & Expenses 662,000 662,000 648,100 648,000

H0502 Operation of Morgue 98,800 98,800 98,800 98,800

H0599 Service Support Costs 111,500 111,500 99,200 101,600

Operation and Morgue and Coroner Expenses 872,300 872,300 846,100 848,400

H0601 Weighbridge Operations 59,600 59,600 60,100 60,100

H0699 Service Support Costs 7,800 7,800 5,900 6,200

Weighbridges 67,400 67,400 66,000 66,300

H0701 Operation of Markets 86,400 86,400 86,400 86,400

H0702 Casual Trading Areas 60,800 60,800 64,700 56,000

H0799 Service Support Costs 12,600 12,600 9,300 9,800

Operation of Markets and Casual Trading 159,800 159,800 160,400 152,200

H0901 Representational Payments 519,000 519,000 519,000 519,000

H0902 Lord Mayor/Deputy Lord Mayor Allowances 100,500 109,700 114,200 109,600

H0904 Expenses LA Members 100,700 145,700 145,700 115,700

H0905 Other Expenses 377,000 377,000 377,000 432,000

H0907 Retirement Gratuities 30,000 30,000 30,000 30,000

H0908 Contribution to Members Associations 154,300 154,300 176,500 168,400

H0999 Service Support Costs 40,700 40,700 30,000 32,600

Local Representation/Civic Leadership 1,322,200 1,376,400 1,392,400 1,407,300

H1101 Agency & Recoupable Service 0 0 0 11,000

H1102 NPPR 123,700 123,700 106,800 74,600

H1199 Service Support Costs 600 600 500 500

Agency & Recoupable Services 124,300 124,300 107,300 86,100

Service Division Total 10,875,800 10,930,000 10,870,100 11,376,000

89


Income by Source

TABLE F - INCOME

CORK CITY COUNCIL - ANNUAL BUDGET

MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES

2013 2012

Estimated by

Manager

Adopted by

Council

€ € € €

Adopted by

Council

Estimated

Outturn

Government Grants

Environment, Community & Local Government

Agriculture, Fisheries and Food

Social and Family Affairs

Justice, Equality and Law Reform

Non-Dept HFA and BMW

Other

Total Grants & Subsidies (a) 0 0 0 0

Goods and Services

Superannuation 34,300 34,300 34,900 35,400

Agency services

NPPR 2,545,400 2,545,400 2,523,400 2,900,000

Local Authority Contributions

Other income 925,200 925,200 1,009,600 843,400

Total Goods and Services (b) 3,504,900 3,504,900 3,567,900 3,778,800

Total Income c=(a+b) 3,504,900 3,504,900 3,567,900 3,778,800

90


SERVICE DIVISION J - CENTRAL MANAGEMENT CHARGE

Information Systems & Business Process Unit

In 2012 the Infrastructure and Budgeting team

completed a number of projects aimed at testing

and improving the resilience and security of the

ICT infrastructure. These included deploying a

mirrored mail architecture designed to ensure

continued mail communication in the event of a

loss of service in the main hosting site. Projects are

also underway for the implementation of a more

comprehensive off-site disaster recovery and

business continuity infrastructure as well as the

installation of a generator for the City Hall campus

to allow continuation of service in the event of a

loss of power. The enhanced DR facilities will

allow replication of all priority system to the offsite

facility as well as allowing access to these

solutions from a number of alternative Council

sites. An SMS and mail alert subscription solution

was introduced for severe weather warnings

extending the service previously offered for the

Jack Lynch Tunnel. The team continued the rollout

of Voice over IP telephony throughout the

organisation leading to additional savings and

introduced a Managed Print service significantly

reducing the number of printers throughout the

organisation.

A number of Open Source solutions are currently

being piloted including Alfresco for inter agency

collaboration. Collaboration continued with the

City Council tourism section which led to a number

of free wifi hot spots in public areas of the city

being introduced as well as the streaming of a

number of events such as the St. Patricks Day

parade.

The Applications team had another busy year in

2012 with the migration and upgrade of our

Financial Management System JD Edwards onto an

Oracle based platform providing a more cost

effective and resilient solution with extra reporting

products. Agresso, used for cash receipting and

other financial functions was also upgraded and a

process to manage Revenue Contract Tax was

implemented. Our GIS team were extensively

involved in a Noise Monitoring project and a pilot

assessment project for our Property Interest

Register. The Core project team implemented

fortnightly pay for all staff.

Our web development team implemented a major

website to promote Cork as a tourist attraction

www.cork.ie in conjunction with the TEAM

section and this went live in October 2012.

91

Another site www.energycork.ie to promote Cork

as an energy cluster of excellence went live in

December 2012 utilising Drupal, an open source

content management system. An accessibilty

redesign also took place on four of our website

suite.

A major project to implement a Customer

Relationship Management (CRM) in our water

department utilising the Open Source Sugar CRM

product is well advanced with a process mapping

and functional specification completed and

development phase commenced. Two of our most

experience team members departed to new

challenges in 2012 and two new staff members

have come onboard and commenced the upskilling

process.

BPI Unit

Following on from the projects completed in 2011

by the BPI Unit three new BPI process

improvement projects were commenced in 2012,

namely:

1) Housing Maintenance

2) Roads Licensing

3) Jet Vac Contractors

Project teams were setup for each of these projects

and the team members attended interactive

workshops on the DMAIC Framework approach

to BPI. Project charters were completed for each

project and process mapping of each stage of the

service was commenced.

Work also began on the introduction of the

FixYourStreet web portal into Cork City Council.

A number of cost saving reports were also

completed in 2012 including:

a) Secure Document Disposal & Recycling

services

b) Document Storage & Retention

c) Postage Service costs

Law Agent

The Law Agent’s office provides professional legal

services to the City Manager and to all Directorates

of Cork City Council and is managed by the Law

Agent.

The duty of the Law Agent is to advise the City

Manager in relation to the City Council’s statutory

powers and duties. The Law Agent must be aware


SERVICE DIVISION J - CENTRAL MANAGEMENT CHARGE

of all new legislation and advise the City Manager

as to the manner in which it affects the existing

powers and duties of the City Council.

The Law Agent’s office is responsible for all legal

work relating to the functions of Cork City Council

as a local authority, planning authority, road

authority, fire authority, building control authority,

sanitary authority, library authority and housing

authority and in relation to environmental issues.

The Law Agent’s office will endeavour to enhance

and maintain the successful working relationships

which have been built up over the years with its

client departments. The Law Agent’s office aim is

to satisfy its clients by meeting their requirements

on a day to day basis by:

1) Providing services to include:- property

law including Compulsory Purchase

acquisitions, code enforcement,

litigation including Judicial Reviews and

advisory service of a high quality and

efficiency;

2) Providing and/or managing such other

generalist or specialist legal services as

its client Directorates requires;

3) Supporting Cork City Council in

implementing its policies and strategies;

4) Continuing to identify areas in which

further efficiencies may be achieved.

5 continue to work with the other

Directorates in the organisation to

identify areas where further efficiencies

can be achieved.

92


APPENDIX 1

Summary of Central Management Charge

2013 2012

€ €

Corporate Affairs Overhead 4,458,000 3,999,200

Corporate Buildings Overhead 6,150,000 6,646,700

Finance Function Overhead 2,267,200 2,321,600

Human Resource Function 2,523,600 2,423,700

IT Services 2,169,800 2,389,500

Pension & Lump Sum Overhead 2,330,800 2,365,800

Total Expenditure Allocated to Services 19,899,400 20,146,500

93


BUDGET 2013

CAPITAL PROGRAMME

2013-2015

95


Cork City Council

Programme of Proposed Capital Spend 2013 - 2015 Inclusive*

Prog Project Description Gross Project Expenditure

Total

Group 2013 2014 2015 Expenditure

1 Housing & Building

Housing Programme 4,500,000 2,300,000 2,500,000 9,300,000

Refurbishment 7,500,000 1,500,000 1,500,000 10,500,000

Regeneration 13,000,000 13,000,000 13,000,000 39,000,000

Traveller Accomodation 3,300,000 1,700,000 1,000,000 6,000,000

28,300,000 18,500,000 18,000,000 64,800,000

2 Road Transportation & Safety

South Ring Road Interchange 10,000,000 500,000 0 10,500,000

NTA 100% Fully Funded Schemes 8,000,000 8,000,000 8,000,000 24,000,000

Laneway Closures 75,000 75,000 0 150,000

Blackrock Harbour Remediation 566,800 975,200 0 1,542,000

Barracks Street Public Realm Project 150,000 0 0 150,000

Jack Lynch Tunnel Upgrade 1,750,000 0 0 1,750,000

Kyrls Quay Realignment Project 100,000 0 0 100,000

Hollyhill Development Access Road 2,120,000 0 0 2,120,000

Estate Roads Resurfacing Programme 200,000 200,000 200,000 600,000

Maintenance of Local & Regional Bridges 500,000 1,310,000 500,000 2,310,000

Other 707,700 164,000 0 871,700

24,169,500 11,224,200 8,700,000 44,093,700

3 Water Supply & Sewage

Carrigrennan WWTW Upgrade 150,000 4,150,000 9,000,000 13,300,000

Lee Road Works Upgrade 1,000,000 12,000,000 11,000,000 24,000,000

Prelim Report RIS/Mains & Scada 1,000,000 1,500,000 0 2,500,000

Mains Rehab in the NLN & NLE DMA's 2,000,000 10,000,000 0 12,000,000

Water Supply to Docklands 500,000 500,000 900,000 1,900,000

Shanakiel Resevoir 300,000 100,000 0 400,000

Wilton Lee Road Upgrade 500,000 1,500,000 0 2,000,000

Other 2,167,300 2,137,300 2,137,300 6,441,900

7,617,300 31,887,300 23,037,300 62,541,900

4 Environmental Protection

Tramore Valley Park - Capping 2,780,000 50,000 50,000 2,880,000

2,780,000 50,000 50,000 2,880,000

5 Recreation & Amenity

Marina Park Development 200,000 1,500,000 1,700,000

Mardyke Garden 1,585,000 1,585,000

Fairhill Depot 42,000 42,000

Fairfield Park Pavillion 13,000 13,000

Lee Rowing Club Slipway 470,000 470,000

Beaumont Park - Car Park 20,000 20,000

Clashduv Park - Footpaths 95,000 95,000

Sports & Leisure Facilities 498,000 250,000 0 748,000

Cork City Marathon 300,000 310,000 310,000 920,000

Pophams Park Pavilion 15,000 15,000

Cemetries 42,000 0 0 42,000

Libraries 1,740,000 2,155,000 1,077,000 4,972,000

Other 245,300 15,000 15,000 275,300

5,265,300 4,230,000 1,402,000 10,897,300

6 Miscellaneous Services

NRA Tunnel Firefighting Project 107,600 107,600

Christchurch Triskel 0 50,000 50,000

City Hall Campus Generator 240,000 5,000 5,000 250,000

City Development, Heritage Plan & Projects 292,000 234,000 199,000 725,000

Other 2,189,000 234,000 237,000 2,660,000

2,828,600 523,000 441,000 3,792,600

Totals 70,960,700 66,414,500 51,630,300 189,005,500

* Dependent on levels of grant assistance from Central Government

97


Cork City Council

Finance Department

1st Floor, City Hall

Cork.

t: +353 21 492 4028

f: +353 21 492 4640

e: finance@corkcity.ie

w: www.corkcity.ie

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