Kirklees Employer Survey 2008 - Kirklees Metropolitan Council

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008 - Kirklees Metropolitan Council

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Research

Report

Kirklees Employer Survey

2008

Prepared for: Kirklees Council


Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

Prepared for: Kirklees Council

Prepared by: June Wiseman, Director and Emma Parry, Account Manager, BMG

Research

January 2009

Produced by BMG Research

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Table of Contents

1 Executive summary ......................................................................................................... 1

1.1.1 Workforce, skills and planning........................................................................... 1

1.1.2 Business plans, training and development........................................................ 3

1.1.3 Land and location .............................................................................................. 3

1.1.4 Business growth and competitiveness .............................................................. 4

1.1.5 Corporate social responsibility and engagement .............................................. 5

2 Background...................................................................................................................... 7

3 Workforce, Skills and Planning ...................................................................................... 12

3.1 Structure of workforce ............................................................................................ 12

3.1.1 Working status................................................................................................. 12

3.2 Gender profile of workforce .................................................................................... 13

3.3 Age profile of workforce.......................................................................................... 14

3.4 Profile of workforce by ethnic minority group.......................................................... 15

3.5 Representation of disabled workers in the workforce............................................. 16

3.6 Employment of migrant workers ............................................................................. 17

3.7 Trends in workforce growth .................................................................................... 17

3.8 Occupational profile of the workforce ..................................................................... 20

3.9 Local employment .................................................................................................. 21

3.10 Working arrangements for employees.................................................................... 21

3.11 Staff turnover .......................................................................................................... 24

3.12 Skills needs ............................................................................................................ 25

4 Business Plans, Training and Development .................................................................. 28

4.1 Business plans ....................................................................................................... 28

4.2 Equal Opportunities policy...................................................................................... 29

4.3 Training infrastructure............................................................................................. 29

4.3.1 Training plan.................................................................................................... 29

4.3.2 Formal assessments of skill needs ................................................................. 30

4.3.3 Off-the-job training or development................................................................. 31

4.3.4 On-the-job and informal training or development ............................................ 32

5 Land and Location ......................................................................................................... 35

5.1 Reasons for choosing to locate where they did...................................................... 35


Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

5.2 Benefits to being located where they are ............................................................... 36

5.3 Rating of the locality as a place to conduct business ............................................. 38

5.3.1 Reasons for rating the local area as poor ....................................................... 38

5.4 Concerns regarding current location ...................................................................... 39

5.5 Expansion............................................................................................................... 41

5.6 Adequacy of site ..................................................................................................... 41

5.7 Potential relocation ................................................................................................. 42

5.8 Surplus space......................................................................................................... 42

6 Business Growth and Competitiveness ......................................................................... 44

6.1 Access to online markets........................................................................................ 44

6.2 Exporting ................................................................................................................ 47

6.3 Turnover and growth .............................................................................................. 48

6.3.1 Approximate turnover ...................................................................................... 48

6.3.2 Growth in turnover........................................................................................... 48

6.3.3 Growth in profit ................................................................................................ 51

6.4 New products and services .................................................................................... 52

7 Corporate Social Responsibility and Engagement ........................................................ 56

7.1 Involvement in any community activities ................................................................ 56

7.2 Attracting new recruits and retaining employees.................................................... 57

8 Profile of Organisations within Kirklees ......................................................................... 60

8.1 Geographic distribution........................................................................................... 60

8.2 Industry sector profile ............................................................................................. 60

8.3 Number of staff employed ...................................................................................... 61

8.4 Number of sites ...................................................................................................... 62

8.5 Organisation type ................................................................................................... 63

8.6 Years established ................................................................................................... 63

8.7 Business ownership................................................................................................ 63

8.7.1 Women-led businesses ................................................................................... 63

8.7.2 MEG-led businesses ....................................................................................... 64

9 Locality Profiles and Key Indicators............................................................................... 65

9.1 Batley, Birstall and Birkenshaw .............................................................................. 67

9.1.1 Workforce ........................................................................................................ 67

9.1.2 Business Planning and Training...................................................................... 71

9.1.3 Land and location ............................................................................................ 72


9.1.4 Business growth and competitiveness ............................................................ 74

9.1.5 Corporate social responsibility and engagement ............................................ 75

9.1.6 Attracting new recruits and retaining employees............................................. 76

9.2 Denby Dale and Kirkburton .................................................................................... 76

9.2.1 Workforce ........................................................................................................ 76

9.2.2 Business Planning and Training...................................................................... 79

9.2.3 Land and location ............................................................................................ 80

9.2.4 Business growth and competitiveness ............................................................ 82

9.2.5 Corporate social responsibility and engagement ............................................ 83

9.2.6 Attracting new recruits and retaining employees............................................. 84

9.3 Dewsbury and Mirfield ............................................................................................ 84

9.3.1 Workforce ........................................................................................................ 84

9.3.2 Business Planning and Training...................................................................... 88

9.3.3 Land and location ............................................................................................ 88

9.3.4 Business growth and competitiveness ............................................................ 90

9.3.5 Corporate social responsibility and engagement ............................................ 91

9.3.6 Attracting new recruits and retaining employees............................................. 92

9.4 Huddersfield North.................................................................................................. 92

9.4.1 Workforce ........................................................................................................ 92

9.4.2 Business Planning and Training...................................................................... 95

9.4.3 Land and location ............................................................................................ 96

9.4.4 Business growth and competitiveness ............................................................ 98

9.4.5 Corporate social responsibility and engagement ............................................ 99

9.4.6 Attracting new recruits and retaining employees........................................... 100

9.5 Huddersfield South ............................................................................................... 100

9.5.1 Workforce ...................................................................................................... 100

9.5.2 Business Planning and Training.................................................................... 103

9.5.3 Land and location .......................................................................................... 104

9.5.4 Business growth and competitiveness .......................................................... 106

9.5.5 Corporate social responsibility and engagement .......................................... 107

9.5.6 Attracting new recruits and retaining employees........................................... 108

9.6 Spen ..................................................................................................................... 108

9.6.1 Workforce ...................................................................................................... 108

9.6.2 Business Planning and Training.................................................................... 111


Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

9.6.3 Land and location .......................................................................................... 112

9.6.4 Business growth and competitiveness .......................................................... 114

9.6.5 Corporate social responsibility and engagement .......................................... 115

9.6.6 Attracting new recruits and retaining employees........................................... 116

9.7 The Valleys........................................................................................................... 116

9.7.1 Workforce ...................................................................................................... 116

9.7.2 Business Planning and Training.................................................................... 119

9.7.3 Land and location .......................................................................................... 120

9.7.4 Business growth and competitiveness .......................................................... 122

9.7.5 Corporate social responsibility and engagement .......................................... 123

9.7.6 Attracting new recruits and retaining employees........................................... 123


Executive summary

1 Executive summary

The following are the key findings of a telephone survey of 1,415 employers across the

full range of industry sectors in Kirklees. The aim of the survey was to update and

expand Kirklees Council’s knowledge of the local business community.

The data was weighted in order to ensure that the findings reflect those of the locality’s

business population.

The most populated area is that of Huddersfield South (23% of all organisations in

Kirklees) followed closely by the Valleys (21%). Relatively few organisations are to be

found in Huddersfield North (9%) and Denby Dale and Kirkburton (7%).

Wholesale and retail (26%) and real estate, renting and business activities (23%)

businesses account for nearly half of all organisations in the local area.

Overall, 77% of all organisations operate within service sectors.

Despite accounting for 70% of businesses in the local area, firms with just between 2 to 4

employees only employ 22% of all employees. Organisations employing 200+ employees

account for just 1% of all organisations but provide jobs for 14% of the workforce.

More than three-quarters of all organisations (77%) are single site. This declines to just

over a third (37%) of 200+ employers.

The majority of organisations operate within the private sector (83%). Those in the public

sector account for one in seven (14%) with just 4% of all organisations in the local area

operating in the voluntary sector.

Around half the organisations in Kirklees have been established at their current site for

more than 10 years (49% have). Which leaves half that have been established or have

moved to their existing site in the last 10 years.

More than two-fifths of all organisations (45%) are women-led businesses. Some

industries have higher than average levels of women-led businesses and these include

hotels and restaurants, education, health and social work and ‘other’ sectors.

Only a minority of organisations (11%) are majority owned or managed by individuals

from an ethnic minority group (i.e. MEG-led). The proportion declines to just 3% of all

organisations with 25+ staff. More than a fifth of organisations in Dewsbury and Mirfield

and a third of those in the Dewsbury West regeneration area are MEG-led.

1.1.1 Workforce, skills and planning

1.1.1.1 Structure of the workforce

Full time working accounts for 70% of jobs in the local area. Part time working is

particularly significant within the sectors of wholesale and retail, hotels and restaurants

and within the largely public, service sectors of education and health and social work.

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

There is a slight male bias in the working population (54% of employees are male) but this

is more pronounced in primary, manufacturing and construction industries, as well as

“heavier” service based industries such as transport, storage and communication. In real

estate, renting and business services and public administration and defence the male bias

reflects particularly low levels of part time working.

Only around a fifth of employees are aged under 25 and less than half the Kirklees

employers employ anyone of this age.

Except in larger organisations, the ethnic profile of the workforce tends to reflect that of

the ownership/senior management.

Very few employees have a disability which limits the type of work that they undertake.

Just one in twenty employers employs someone from this minority group,

The proportion of local employers that employ migrant workers is even lower, although

the proportion increases considerably with organisation size.

1.1.1.2 Trends in workforce growth

One in six employers in Kirklees report that there has been an increase in the size of their

workforce in the past 12 months and one in eight has reported a decrease. The on-going

trend is expected to be more positive with around one in five anticipating workforce

growth. Few employers anticipate a decline in the workforce in the short term. This

undoubtedly reflects the fact that workforce reductions tend to happen as a result of staff

suddenly leaving and are less commonly planned.

Workforce growth is most likely to occur in Batley, Birstall and Birkenshaw and Dewsbury

and Mirfield where one in four employers is planning to increase the size of their

workforce.

1.1.1.3 Occupational profiles

Three-quarters of employers employ managerial staff, although these staff account for

just one in six employees. Occupational profiles vary considerably by industry.

Use of the local labour force is significant with more than three-fifths of all employers

saying they employ individuals living within a 2 to 3 mile radius of their workplace.

Managerial staff are more likely to be recruited from outside the area as these higher level

jobs make it more worthwhile for people to travel.

1.1.1.4 Working arrangements

More than half of Kirklees employers have working arrangements in place allowing

employees to work flexible hours, shift patterns or more easily combine work with family

life. This increases to 90% of public administration and defence. More than one in three

offer flexitime, whilst one in five allow shift patterns and/or the opportunity to work at or

from home.

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Executive summary

1.1.1.5 Level of staff turnover

When asked about the level of staff turnover (i.e. how often staff leave and need to be

replaced) most estimate that it is low within their organisation. It is interesting that most

employers see themselves as below average in this respect, reflecting, perhaps the fact

that they over-estimate staff turnover in their sector.

1.1.1.6 Skill needs

One in six employers anticipate changing skill needs and this is most likely to be in the

areas of management skills, IT user skills and technical, practical or job specific skills.

Emerging skill needs are likely to vary considerably by industry and the demand for skill

improvements is likely to be greater within larger organisations.

1.1.2 Business plans, training and development

1.1.2.1 Formal planning

The propensity for formal business and training planning increases with organisation size.

Overall, employers in Kirklees are more likely not to have a business plan, a training plan

and/or processes in place to formally assess whether individual employees have gaps in

their skills than they are to have them.

1.1.2.2 Training and development

Organisation size is the greatest determinant of the propensity to fund or arrange either

off or on the job training. This tends to be reflected in differences by industry sector and

in the fact that organisations operating at more than one site are more likely to train than

single site organisations.

1.1.3 Land and location

1.1.3.1 Benefits and disadvantages to current location

The top five reasons for locating in their chosen area, cited by respondents, are: the

availability of appropriate land/premises; personal/historic reasons; overall attractiveness

of the area; quality of local environment; and/or cost of land and/or premises.

When asked about the benefits of being located where they are access to transport links

becomes far more significant. This is also significant as a disadvantage amongst

employers interviewed in depth. It suggests that links to transport may not be taken into

sufficient consideration in location decisions or that they were not such a priority when

longer established businesses first chose their site.

Despite the fact that the world is shrinking in terms of access to national and international

markets, through the internet mainly, lack of potential consumers locally is the most

frequently cited reason for feeling that the local area is a poor place to do business.

In terms of employers’ concerns with regard to their current location, parking and traffic

congestion are most frequently cited.

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

1.1.3.2 Expansion and relocation

Nearly a fifth of all employers have expanded at their site since first establishing

themselves there. The majority (81%) feel that their current site is sufficient for their

current and foreseeable future requirements.

However, a significant minority of employers (16%) feel they will require further land in the

next 3 to 5 years and this proportion increases to nearly half of the largest employers.

Amongst some of those businesses interviewed in depth lack of space is a real issue and

there are a number of potential solutions offered. These include changing the layout of

the operational space, taking on additional units on an ad hoc basis and increasing the

hours of production are all being considered as alternatives to relocation.

Around 10% of all employers expect to relocate to obtain extra space in the next 3 to 5

years. Just one in eight of these expect to move out of Kirklees, although this increases

to around a third of potentially re-locating establishments in Dewsbury and Mirfield.

Just 8% of all employers, though not expecting to relocate in the next 3 to 5 years,

thought that it was likely that they would. The reasons for considering relocation were

diverse and included a better environment/area; high costs/rates/cost of premises; and

expansion.

Again, 8% of all employers currently have land that is surplus to requirements. Only a

small minority of these employers plan to do anything with their surplus land. The main

options are to rent/let/sub let it or extend their premises/use it as additional office space.

1.1.4 Business growth and competitiveness

1.1.4.1 IT usage

Overall, 80% of employers have access to any internet based technology. Some 74%

have access to the internet and most of these (69% of all employers) have a broadband

connection. Access to broadband increases with organisation size and all very large

employers have internet access.

There is also a relationship between industry sector and IT usage, with firms in

construction and financial intermediation particularly likely to have access to at least one

of the technologies. There is also a relationship between the proportion of employees

that are administrative/secretarial staff and the high level of access.

1.1.4.2 Exporting

One in seven (15%) of private sector organisations sell overseas. This figure is highest

within manufacturing (31%). It increases with organisation size.

Exporters most commonly sell to markets in the European Union but more than half sell to

other non-EU parts of Europe and/or to America.

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Executive summary

1.1.4.3 Turnover and growth

Based on all private sector organisations providing a response (three-fifths of those

asked) the average annual turnover is £3.3 million. A third of businesses have a turnover

of less than £100k per annum.

More than two-fifths of private sector organisations (44%) report growth in their turnover in

the last 3 years. Just 19% report declining turnover, but this increases to 28% amongst

private sector organisations based in Batley, Birstall and Birkenshaw.

Turnover growth tends to be accompanied by workforce growth, an increase in land

space and is also linked to whether organisations fund or arrange training.

Some 30% of private sector organisations feel they face barriers to growth.

increases to 36% of those based in Denby Dale and Kirkburton.

The four most frequently cited barriers to growth include over-regulation/red tape, energy

costs, transport costs and/or interest rates. It is clear that energy/fuel costs are very

much at the forefront of people’s minds, particularly within the construction, agriculture

and transport, storage and communication sectors.

The trend with regard to the growth in profitability is less positive but local private sector

organisations are still more likely to report an increase in profits rather than a decline

(35%, compared with 22%).

1.1.4.4 New products and services

Two-fifths of all employers (41%) report having introduced new products or services in the

last 3 years. This increases to 94% of very large organisations.

There is link between innovation and workforce and business growth. Furthermore, the

introduction of new products or services tends to go hand in hand with increasing land

space and exporting.

A similar proportion of employers (42%) plan to introduce new products or services in the

next 3 years. Those reporting a barrier to innovation are in the minority (13%). Cost/lack

of finance/cashflow is the most significant barrier to innovation.

Amongst businesses interviewed in depth competition is a significant driver in the ongoing

development of their products and services.

1.1.5 Corporate social responsibility and engagement

1.1.5.1 Involvement in any community activities

More than a quarter of all employers (29%) reported having been involved in any

community activities. The proportion is particularly high in education, health and social

work and other sectors.

Community activities are most likely to comprise fundraising/sponsorship and donations

and other charity work. One in six has been involved with local schools.

This

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

1.1.5.2 Attracting new recruits and retaining employees

In terms of what employers themselves feel are their organisations’ biggest selling points,

reputation is the most frequently cited. Good working environment/friendly/well looked

after and/or pay and benefits are next most likely to be considered benefits to working

within the organisation.

6


Background

2 Background

In March 2008, Kirklees Council commissioned BMG Research to undertake a two-stage

research exercise amongst local employers. It involved conducting a large number of

telephone interviews and a small number of more qualitative interviews with employers in

the area.

Kirklees Council is keen to work with local businesses to maximise the potential for

regeneration, business development and investment, but has identified a need to update

and expand their knowledge of the local business community in respect to its needs,

concerns and priorities. Following a tendering exercise, the Council, through Kirklees

Economic Development Service (EDS), selected BMG to undertake a survey of local

businesses and employers to bridge this knowledge gap.

There was a need for the following information which was incorporated in the survey

design.

Core data

• Sector and business activity

• Establishment type and ownership

• Business age

• Head office location (if not above) and no. of sites/branches

Workforce profile

• Total workforce size per site

• Numbers working full/part time

• Workforce Occupational breakdown

• Gender/ethnicity/age/disability profile

• Work patterns – shifts, flexible working arrangements etc (childcare arrangements?)

• Workforce dynamics: more or less? Why? More of what?

Employment land use

• Current land usage/constraints

• Capacity issues: size of site, surplus space.

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

• Under utilised land – inefficient use of available land use assessment

• Future location/site needs including suitability for current and future needs;

condition; any proposed development plans; space for growth/future land use

requirements.

• List of potential development opportunities – priority actions

Growth / Competitiveness

• Turnover, profit last 3 years.

• Growth expectations: next 5 years

• Barriers to growth (red tape, legislation, globalisation, competition, skilled workforce,

increasing costs - wage inflation, lack of capital for investment, lack of R&D)

• Local regional and international markets/supply chains

• Staff turnover/recruitment and retention issues

Connectivity & location

• Access issues: transport links, broadband, physical access/constraints

• Physical environment

• Rent/rates

• Public amenities

• Crime/security

• Access to skilled local workforce

Aspirations/Motivations

• Vision/strategy/forward planning

• Research & development/innovation

Views on:

• Equality and diversity

8


Background

• Corporate social responsibility - involvement in community activities/initiatives

• Consultation with Local Authority/public agencies (preferred methods)

In total, 1,415 telephone interviews were conducted with local employers. Each interview

took between 20 and 25 minutes depending on the answers given.

A quota for interviewing was set based on organisation size (number of employees at the

site) and industry sector. During data preparation the data was weighted to reflect the

actual size and sector profile of the employer population.

The following table summarises the population profile, the number of interviews

conducted and the sample bases following weighting of the data by size and sector.

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

Population (n) Population %

No. of

interviews

conducted

No. of cases

(weighted)

Organisation size

2-4 employees 9735 70 601 996

5-9 employees 1930 14 413 198

10-24 employees 1130 8 218 114

25-199

employees

990 7 173 100

200+ employees 83 1 10 7

Industry sector

A & B:

Agriculture,

hunting, forestry

and fishing

C: Mining and

quarrying

227 2% 25 23

7 *% 0 0

D: Manufacturing 1,542 11% 202 158

E: Electricity, gas

and water supply

9 0% 1 *

F: Construction 1,447 10% 94 148

G:

Wholesale/retail

trade; repair, etc

H: Hotels and

restaurants

I: Transport,

storage and

communication

J: Financial

intermediation

K: Real

estate,renting,

business

activities

L: Public

admin/defence;

social security

3,568 26% 366 367

920 7% 137 94

657 5% 80 67

210 2% 24 20

3,110 22% 190 320

88 1% 5 3

M: Education 401 3% 61 41

N: Health and

social work

674 5% 88 69

All other industry 1,008 7% 142 104

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Background

Total 13,868 100% 1415

This report summarises the main findings of the quantitative stage of the research

exercise and references the findings from the qualitative stage.

28 employers from across the region who had been consulted as part of the quantitative

survey were also invited to take part in a qualitative one-on-one depth interviews to

explore some of the issues in greater detail. 10 of the depth interviews were conducted

face-to-face and 18 over the telephone; all were carried out between May and June 2008.

In the vast majority of cases the discussions lasted between 30 minutes and an hour.

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

3 Workforce, Skills and Planning

3.1 Structure of workforce

Respondents were asked a series of questions about the structure of their workforce in

terms of their status (full or part time), gender, age profile and the extent to which their

organisation has employees from any minority group (i.e. ethnic group, disability, whether

they employ migrant workers).

3.1.1 Working status

The majority of employees (70%) across all the organisations participating in the survey

work on a full time basis. This varies little by organisation size but considerably by

industry sector. The figure below summarises the profile by industry, highlighting high

levels of part time employment within hotels and restaurants, education, health and social

work and wholesale and retail and particularly low levels of part time employment in

manufacturing, construction, real estate, renting etc and public administration and

defence.

Figure 1: Working status profile by industry (all employees)

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted employee numbers

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Workforce, Skills and Planning

Levels of part time working are highest in Huddersfield North (41% of employees in that

area work part time). The proportion of the workforce working part time falls to just 22%

of those in Spen.

Overall, 42% of all organisations do not employ anyone part time. This proportion

declines to just over one in five organisations with 11 or more staff. The proportion is

higher in manufacturing (56%), construction (61%) and real estate, renting etc (55%),

reflecting the fact that the workforce is predominantly full time in these sectors.

Despite having a lower proportion of the workforce than average employed part time

within public administration and defence, just 33% of all organisations in this sector do not

employ anyone on a part time basis. It implies that part time workers are thinly spread

across organisations in this sector.

3.2 Gender profile of workforce

Overall the workforce is fairly evenly split between male and female (54% are male; 46%

are female). As one would expect, given the occupational profiles and extent to which

part time working is represented, there are significant variations in the gender profile of

the workforce by industry sector.

There is below average representation of females in the workforce within manufacturing,

transport, storage and communication, real estate, renting etc and public administration

and defence, reflecting or contributing to lower levels of part time employment in these

sectors. Construction is particularly male-dominated.

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

Figure 2: Gender profile of workforce by industry (all employees)

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted employee numbers

The proportion of the workforce that is female is higher within women-led organisations

(63% of the workforce).

3.3 Age profile of workforce

Nearly half the workforce across all organisations within Kirklees are aged between 25

and 44 (47%). A third (32%) is aged between 45 and 64 and just under a fifth (19%) are

aged under 25.

Once again, the age profile of the workforce varies by sector: hotels and restaurants

employ relatively significant employers of young people (37% are aged between 16 and

24), whilst agriculture etc and transport, storage and communication organisations employ

higher than average proportions of older workers (45+ year olds). This is summarised in

the figure below.

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Workforce, Skills and Planning

Figure 3: Age profile of workforce by industry (all employees)

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted employee numbers

In terms of the employment of young people, more than half the organisations (57%) do

not employ anyone under the age of 25. This increases to 72% of financial intermediation

firms, 70% of those in the agriculture and primary industry sector and 67% of

organisations in real estate, renting etc.

Seven percent of organisations employ anyone aged 65 or over. The proportion is low

across all industry sectors, as one would expect.

3.4 Profile of workforce by ethnic minority group

There is evidence to suggest that many firms are wholly ‘white’ in terms of their ethnic

profile; that only a few are wholly ‘non-white’ and that not many more employ workers

from a cross section of ethnic groups.

Just 7% of all organisations do not employ ‘white’ employees. This rises to 55% of MEGled

organisations.

In contrast, 82% of organisations do not employ anyone from an Asian or Asian British

group, 94% do not employ anyone from a Black or Black British group, 98% do not

employ anyone from a mixed race group, 99% do not employ anyone of Chinese

extraction and 98% do not employ anyone from another ethnic group.

Overall, 80% of the workforce amongst organisations in Kirklees is white. Asian or Asian

British account for 9% of the workforce, whilst Black or Black British, mixed race, Chinese

or other ethnic groups each account for no more than 2% of the workforce.

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

Workforces become more diverse as they grow in size, with 200+ employers employing a

wider range of ethnic groups and reporting that a third of their workforce (35%) are from a

‘non-white’ ethnic group.

By area, workforce ethnic diversity is more common within Dewsbury and Mirfield, whilst

‘non-white’ workers are very much in the minority across organisations within Denby Dale

and Kirkburton and The Valleys – reflecting the local population profile. This is

summarised in the figure below.

Figure 4: Breakdown of the workforce with regard to ethnicity by area (all employees,

where provided a valid response)

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted employee numbers * denotes less than 0.5%

Within MEG-led organisations the profile of the workforce is very different. Just a third are

‘white’ (35%) and a higher proportion (45%) are Asian. Other ethnic minority groups

account for small proportion of the MEG-led workforce; 4% are Black, 9% of mixed race,

1% are Chinese and 3% represent another ethnic minority group.

3.5 Representation of disabled workers in the workforce

Respondents were asked if any employees within their organisation had a disability which

limits the type of work that they undertake. Just 6% of all respondents reported that their

organisation employs any ‘disabled’ employees. The larger the organisation, the more

likely they are to employ at least one disabled person (15% of 25-199 employers; 48% of

200+ employers).

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Workforce, Skills and Planning

‘Disabled’ employees make up just one in a hundred of the local workforce (i.e. 1%). The

proportion varies little by organisation size and sector, although it increases to 6% of the

workforce in the agriculture and primary sector.

3.6 Employment of migrant workers

Just 3% of all respondents report that their organisation employs any migrant workers.

However, this proportion increases sharply amongst organisations employing more than

25 staff (18% of those employing 25-199 staff and 57% of those employing 200+ staff).

Perhaps surprisingly, the propensity to employ any migrant workers varies little by

industry sector. Hotels and restaurants (6%), manufacturing firms (5%) and health and

social work organisations (5%) are most likely to employ any.

By area, one in twenty organisations based in Dewsbury and Mirfield and Huddersfield

North employ migrant workers (5%). The proportion increases, however, to 11% of

organisations in Dewsbury West regeneration area and 14% of those in Ashbrow.

A few of the businesses interviewed in depth use migrant staff. There is some feeling that

the work ethic of these staff is superior to that of local people.

“We find they [migrant workers] are hard working and will do overtime and

different shifts. They will do the jobs that some British people find harder to do.”

(manufacturer – carpets, large employer in Spen)

3.7 Trends in workforce growth

The majority of respondents report no change in the size of their workforce over the last

12 months (70%). One in six (17%) report an increase and fewer (12%) report a

decrease over time.

The likelihood of workforce growth increases with organisation size. This is likely to

reflect the fact that small increases in the number of people employed are more easily

accommodated by larger organisations in terms of budget and facilities. An increase of

one person within a small firm is likely to have a more significant impact than an additional

person in a company of 100+.

The trend is expected to be more positive in the future with more than one in five

respondents (21%) reporting a probable increase in workforce size and just 4% reporting

a probable decrease. To some extent, however, this pattern can be explained by the way

in which firms add to their number i.e. workforce expansion is usually planned and the

way in which workforce numbers decline i.e. staff suddenly give their notice and are not

always easily replaced. A reduction in the workforce is less commonly planned.

The following table summarises workforce growth, recent and in the near future, by key

variables.

17


Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

Table 1: Workforce growth (all respondents)

Unweighted

sample bases

Growth in the last 12

months

Decline in the last

12 months

Increase in the next

12 months

All respondents 1415 17 12 21

Organisation size

2-4 employees 601 12 11 18

5-10 employees 413 23 14 23

11-24 employees 218 29 12 33

25-199 employees 173 40 15 33

200+ employees 10 57 12 51

Industry sector

Agriculture etc 26 22 11 14

Manufacture 201 17 15 22

Construction 95 20 20 23

Wholesale and retail 372 14 12 16

Hotels and restaurants 140 14 15 24

Transport, storage and

communication

Financial

intermediation

82 16 9 18

26 8 21 12

Real estate etc 195 16 10 24

Public administration

and defence

5 22 0 45

Education 51 53 7 28

Health and social work 96 22 5 18

Other 126 16 10 23

Priority sector

Advanced

manufacturing

71 23 12 22

Construction 96 20 20 24

Hospitality and leisure 166 16 14 23

Finance and business

services

201 16 12 25

Creative and digital 48 18 4 18

Area

Batley, Birstall and

Birkenshaw

Denby Dale and

Kirkburton

172 21 14 27

95 15 7 14

Dewsbury and Mirfield 245 22 12 25

18


Workforce, Skills and Planning

Unweighted

sample bases

Growth in the last 12

months

Decline in the last

12 months

Increase in the next

12 months

Huddersfield North 119 10 18 14

Huddersfield South 310 16 8 22

Spen 179 19 12 18

The Valleys 271 15 15 19

Increased land space 310 25 10 26

Export 202 28 10 33

19


Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

3.8 Occupational profile of the workforce

Respondents were asked for detailed information on the occupations employed within

their organisation. Managers and senior officials are employed within three-quarters of

organisations (75%). A third employ administrative and secretarial staff (34%). However,

the actual profile of the workforce by occupation is very different, highlighting the extent to

which administrative/secretarial and particularly managerial staff, while widely employed,

account for a minority of employees.

Table 2: Occupations of staff employed (all respondents)

% of all respondents

employed staff in these

groups

% of workforce in these

groups

Managers and senior

officials

75 18

Professional occupations 21 12

Associate professional and

technical occupations

Administrative and

secretarial occupations

10 7

34 11

Skilled trades occupations 23 12

Personal service

occupations

Sales and customer service

occupations

Process, plant and machine

operatives

5 5

29 17

7 9

Elementary occupations 12 9

Unweighted sample bases 1415 18079 *

* Where provided a response

Managerial staff account for a higher proportion of staff within smaller firms (35% of staff

within firms employing between 2 and 4 employees, compared with just 9% of those

employed in 200+ employer organisations), but other differences in occupational profiles

are generally related to industry sector.

Public administration/defence and education sectors employ a higher than average

proportion of associate professional and technical staff (22% and 20% respectively). A

third of staff in financial intermediation firms (34%) and more than a quarter of staff in

public administration/defence (27%) work in administrative and secretarial occupations.

Skilled trades occupations account for more than a third of staff in construction (37%) and

around one in six workers in production industries overall.

20


Workforce, Skills and Planning

A third of staff in health and social work (33%) are employed in personal service

occupations and the proportion of professional staff in this sector is also higher than

average (19%).

Professional occupations are particularly significant within education (45% of the

workforce) and represent a higher than average proportion of staff in financial

intermediation (28%).

Sales and customer service occupations account for nearly half of all staff in the

wholesale and retail sector (47%), while 41% of all staff in hotels and restaurants are

employed in elementary occupations.

A quarter of all staff in transport, storage and communication (25%) and public

administration and defence (24%) are process, plant and machine operatives.

3.9 Local employment

Respondents were asked about the proportion of employees that live within a 2 to 3 mile

radius of their workplace.

Nearly two-fifths (38%) reported that all their workforce lives within this distance from

work. This proportion is highest amongst small firms (48% of those employing less than 5

staff).

One in eight respondents (13%) do not employ anyone living within a 2 to 3 mile radius of

their workplace. Again, this proportion is higher within the smallest firms (16% of those

employing less than 5 staff, compared with less than 1% of those employing 25+).

This highlights the extent to which larger firms must cast their net more widely in order to

meet all their recruitment needs.

The propensity to employ locally based staff is significantly higher amongst organisations

based in The Valleys (49% only employ local staff). The proportion increases still further

amongst organisations based in the Colne Valley (54%) and Dewsbury South (53%)

regeneration localities.

Some businesses that were interviewed in depth reported difficulties in recruiting

managers locally but that this was not a major issue as people working at this level are

more prepared to travel. The difficulties arise when businesses attempt to recruit lower

paid but still specialised staff which the local area cannot always provide.

“We do find it harder to get managers but for these positions we find people are

prepared to travel.”

“There is a general lack of weavers. There just aren’t enough around.”

3.10 Working arrangements for employees

Respondents were asked about the range of working arrangements that they have in

place for employees. They included: flexitime (defined as where an employee has no set

start or finish time but an arrangement to work a set number of hours per week or per

month); shift working, working at or from home during normal working hours; and

assistance with childcare.

21


Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

More than half (55%) offer at least one of the above, with flexitime the most commonly

provided option (36%). One in five respondents report that their organisation offers

employees the opportunity to work at or from home (20%); the same proportion offer shift

patterns.

The likelihood of offering any of these working arrangements increases with organisation

size. All organisations with 200+ employees offer at least one. That said, flexitime is just

as likely to be offered by smaller employers as it is by larger employers.

Figure 5: Working arrangements for employees at establishments – prompted, multiple

response (all respondents)

Figures in parentheses are unweighted sample bases

In public administration and defence these working arrangements are far more common

place than in others (90% offer them). Nearly all these organisations offer at least one to

their employees, most notably flexitime (again, 90%). Organisations within health and

social work are more likely than average to offer these working arrangements (72%), but

this is mainly because more than two-fifths have shift patterns in place for employees

(42%). The same is true of hotels and restaurants (67% offering these working

arrangements, 43% having shift patterns in place for employees).

Within construction and wholesale and retail, employers are less likely than average to

offer these working arrangements (45% and 49% do respectively, compared with an

average of 55%).

Although more than half the organisations operating in the private sector (53%) offer

these working arrangements, the proportion is higher within public sector organisations

(62%) and higher still within voluntary organisations (71%). More than half the voluntary

organisations (56%) offer flexitime, compared with a third of private (35%) and public

22


Workforce, Skills and Planning

(also 35%) organisations. More than a third of voluntary organisations allow home

working (36%), compared with 19% of private and 24% of public sector organisations.

23


Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

3.11 Staff turnover

Respondents were asked whether they consider staff turnover at their establishment site

to be high, average or low. Those that feel that staff turnover is high are very much in the

minority at just 5% of all respondents. The proportion is slightly higher than average in

the transport, storage and communication sector (9%) and particularly high in public

administration and defence (22%), although the sample base is small in this sector.

In terms of area, nearly one in ten respondents working within organisations based in

Dewsbury and Mirfield (9%) feel that staff turnover is high.

It is likely that respondents over-estimate average levels of staff turnover. Either that or

they under-estimate their own levels of staff turnover, as, rather than the majority

considering staff turnover to be in line with average levels, the majority (69%) feel that

staff turnover at their establishment to be below average. This leaves less than one in

four (24%) who consider that staff turnover at their establishment to be ‘average’. An

‘average’ by definition is likely to account for the majority of cases, or else be the mid

point between two points that are equally in evidence.

The following figure summarises these findings by industry sector. In assessing the

various levels of staff turnover, the conditions within individual industry sectors should be

taken into account. So, for example, in hotels and restaurants staff turnover tends to be

higher than in other sectors, so the average is already relatively high.

Figure 6: Perceived levels of staff turnover by sector (all respondents)

24


Workforce, Skills and Planning

Figures in parentheses are unweighted sample bases

The higher than average level of staff turnover in the hotels and restaurants sector is

confirmed by comments from a restaurant/bar employer interviewed in depth. They

highlight the transitory nature of some jobs in their business.

“We get a lot of people coming and going in the year. We mainly have students

working here and they will either move on to better jobs or leave to go to

university.” (restaurant/bar: large employer in Huddersfield North)

Although women-led organisations are no more likely than the average company to feel

that staff turnover is high at their establishment (5%, identical to the average), MEG-led

organisations report higher than average levels of high staff turnover (11%, compared

with 4% of non-MEG-led organisations).

Within some firms, particularly within manufacturing, there is still a ‘job for life’ culture in

evidence.

“..some people have only worked in one industry and they have no other

experience and they do the same for their entire career.” (manufacturer – cloth:

large employer in Huddersfield South)

Amongst textile manufacturing businesses interviewed in depth respondents report staff

staying within the industry that they have experience in and this is compounded by the

fact that with so many mills in the area closing there is much less competition for staff.

“In the past workers had a lot of choice when there may have been 6 or 7 mills in

the area and people would move to another company for getting 10p more but

now they have all closed down and you find people haven’t got that choice and

they stay much longer.” (manufacturer – pallets, large employer in the Valleys)

3.12 Skills needs

When asked if they feel that their skill needs will change at their establishment in the next

3 years, one in six respondents (16%) responded that they thought they would. This

proportion increases to around one in five organisations with 5 or more staff and more

than half of the largest organisations (52% with 200+ employees).

The figure is particularly high in education (29%) and the priority sector of creative and

digital (26%).

As one would expect, workforce growth is more likely to bring about changes in skill

needs (29% of those that have recently experienced an increase in employee numbers)

and this is also reflected in the need to increase expand the work site (23% of those

increasing land space anticipate changing skill needs).

Respondents identifying changing skill needs were asked to specify the skills that feel

need developing in the next 3 years.

25


Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

The skills most frequently selected from a predetermined list include management skills –

leadership/strategic (70%), IT user skills, both general and professional (69%) and

technical, practical or job specific skills (65%). Three in five respondents citing the need

to develop skills in their workforce identify training/coaching (63%), customer handling

(61%), management skills – supervisory/operational (60%) and team working (60%) skills.

The skills that respondents identify that need developing over the next 3 years are

summarised in the figure below.

Figure 7: Skills that will need developing over the next 3 years – prompted, multiple

response (where skill needs will change)

Unweighted sample base = 249

The need for skills in nearly every area investigated increases with organisation size

which is a reflection of the widening range of occupations and activities as the workforce

grows.

Skill needs vary by industry sector but providing a robust analysis in this respect is difficult

due to the small sample bases when focusing on just those who identify changing skill

needs. It is apparent that the need for IT user skills is great across the range of sectors,

26


Workforce, Skills and Planning

while some sectors, including financial services and transport, storage and

communication are more likely than average to identify a need for greater oral and written

communication. Customer handling, team working and management skills are particularly

significant within wholesale and retail, hotels and restaurants, health and social work and,

again, transport, storage and communication sectors.

Numeracy and literacy skills are most frequently cited in financial services organisations,

whilst technical, practical or job specific skills are cited by nearly all construction

companies.

Amongst businesses interviewed in depth the need for specialist skills was highlighted.

There is widespread recognition that the local labour market is not always going to

provide what businesses need in this respect. This is further exacerbated by businesses

struggling to obtain skilled staff in traditional skill areas and within engineering where

there is a national shortage of appropriated trained people. It is not so much a case of

skills needs changing but of businesses having skills needs that are difficult to address on

an on-going basis.

“It’s hard to get skilled engineers. We had to replace someone who retired last

year and we found it a real struggle.” (manufacturer – gear cutting tools, large

employer in the Valleys)

“Our work is very specialised so we will take people on who have the right

attitude and are quick learners and then we can train them on the machines (inhouse).”

(manufacturer – carpets, large employer in Spen)

27


Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

4 Business Plans, Training and Development

This section discusses the extent to which local employers have business plans and

equal opportunities policies and the extent to which they formally assess their employees’

skills levels and offer training and development.

4.1 Business plans

Respondents were asked if their organisation has a business plan that specifies the

objectives for the coming year. More than two-fifths (43%) do and this proportion

increases with organisation size (see figure below).

Figure 8: Proportion of respondents reporting that their organisation has a business

plan, by organisation size (all respondents)

Figures in parentheses are unweighted sample bases

Organisation size is the main determinant of whether or not companies have a business

plan. Industry sector variations tend to be due to average organisation size across the

different sectors. Sectors in which organisations are more likely than average to have

business plans include public administration and defence (100%), education (83%), real

estate, renting etc (53%), health and social work (53%) and financial intermediation

(50%).

28


Business Plans, Training and Development

By locality, more than half the respondents in Huddersfield North (54%) report that their

organisation has a business plan. Slightly fewer in Huddersfield South (48%) say that this

is the case, whilst across the other Localities around two in five have business plans.

4.2 Equal Opportunities policy

Equal Opportunities policies are more prevalent than business plans. More than threequarters

of respondents (78%) report that their organisation has an equal opportunities

policy. Again, this increases with organisation size (see figure below). The proportion is

higher than average in the public sector (88%) but higher still in the voluntary sector

(96%).

Figure 9: Proportion of respondents reporting that their organisation has an equal

opportunities policy, by organisation size (all respondents)

Figures in parentheses are unweighted sample bases

The proportion of MEG-led organisations that have an equal opportunities policy is higher

than average (87%) despite the fact that MEG-led organisations are more likely than non-

MEG-led organisations to be small firms.

4.3 Training infrastructure

4.3.1 Training plan

More than a third of all respondents (37%) report that their organisation has a training

plan that specifies in advance the level and type of training their employees will need in

29


Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

the coming year. As for other plans, this proportion increases with organisation size but in

this case, not all 200+ employers have such a training plan (see figure below).

Figure 10: Proportion of respondents reporting that their organisation has a training

plan, by organisation size (all respondents)

Figures in parentheses are unweighted sample bases

Once again, public sector organisations are more likely to have training plans (49%) and

this proportion is still higher within voluntary organisations (54%). They are particularly

prevalent in public administration and defence (all) and education (82%).

Relatively few agriculture etc organisations (18%) and manufacturing firms (27%) have

training plans and the figure is also particularly low within wholesale and retail firms (just

29%).

4.3.2 Formal assessments of skill needs

More than two-fifths of all respondents (42%) report that their organisation formally

assesses whether individual employees have gaps in their skills. The link with

organisation size and formal processes continues to be true in this case, but again, not to

the extent that all 200+ employers undertake formal assessments (see figure below).

30


Business Plans, Training and Development

Figure 11: Proportion of respondents that report that their organisation formally

assesses whether individual employees have gaps in their skills, by organisation size (all

respondents)

Figures in parentheses are unweighted sample bases

In terms of the organisations most likely to undertake formal assessment of skill needs,

the propensity to do so follows the pattern of other formal plans and policies. Thus,

voluntary organisations are most likely to formally assess employees’ skill needs (65%)

and public sector organisations are more likely to do so than private sector organisations

(59%, compared with 38%). The proportion of organisations that do so is highest in public

administration and defence (all) and much higher than average in education (83%) and

health and social work (67%), whilst particularly low in agriculture etc (11%), construction

(27%) and manufacturing (33%).

Training Needs Analysis or appraisals are undertaken by about half the businesses

interviewed in depth. Use of external training suppliers is relatively rare and use of local

training suppliers even less common, based on comments about the lack of suitable

training locally.

4.3.3 Off-the-job training or development

Respondents were asked if their organisation has funded or arranged any off-the-job

training or development for employees at their site in the past 12 months.

More than a third reported that their organisation has done so (37%) and this proportion

increases with organisation size.

31


Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

There are clear indications that formal training or development goes hand in hand with

business planning and the propensity to have other formal processes in place. Off-the-job

training or development is at higher levels in organisations that have more than one site

(53%), larger organisations, voluntary organisations (61%) and within the industry sectors

of public administration and defence (all), education (77%) and health and social work

(64%).

4.3.4 On-the-job and informal training or development

Levels of on-the-job and informal training or development are only slightly higher (44%).

It suggests that some respondents may not recognise some activities as informal training.

These activities may include initial coaching for new staff and helping existing employees

to expand their job role. These activities are likely to be particularly commonplace within

large organisations and those with a more hierarchical structure and it is difficult to believe

that one in five organisations with between 25 and 199 employees have not provided

some form of informal training and development in the last 12 months.

The following table summarises the incidence of training provision by organisation size

and sector, as well as other carefully selected organisational characteristics. It can be

seen that larger organisations and those with more than one site are more likely to

provide any training and that employees within smaller firms and within organisations

operating within certain industry sectors are likely to be at more of a disadvantage in

terms of access to employer provided training opportunities.

Amongst businesses interviewed in depth induction and basic training for new employees

is universally undertaken. However, training at a formal level, such as for NVQs and

other vocational organisations is less commonly offered. Just one in four of those

interviewed in depth reported that they provided this training.

32


Business Plans, Training and Development

Table 3: Training and development provision (all respondents)

Unweighted

sample bases

Off-the-job and formal

training and

development

On-the-job and

informal training

and development

Any training

All respondents 1415 37 44 54

Organisation size

2-4 employees 601 28 34 44

5-10 employees 413 49 54 68

11-24 employees 218 58 74 82

25-199 employees 173 77 79 89

200+ employees 10 88 100 100

Industry sector

Agriculture etc 26 32 25 39

Manufacture 201 36 42 54

Construction 95 41 33 52

Wholesale and retail 372 20 38 42

Hotels and restaurants 140 34 46 56

Transport, storage and

communication

Financial

intermediation

82 26 31 39

26 59 48 65

Real estate etc 195 45 48 61

Public administration

and defence

5 100 100 100

Education 51 77 70 85

Health and social work 96 64 71 81

Other 126 43 47 58

Priority sector

Advanced

manufacturing

71 35 54 -

Construction 96 41 33 -

Hospitality and leisure 166 36 45 -

Finance and business

services

201 48 52 -

Creative and digital 48 35 30 -

Other organisational characteristics

Single site 980 33 40 50

Multi site 431 53 58 70

Women-led 648 38 42 -

33


Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

Unweighted

sample bases

Off-the-job and formal

training and

development

On-the-job and

informal training

and development

Any training

MEG-led 142 24 38 -

34


Land and Location

5 Land and Location

5.1 Reasons for choosing to locate where they did

Respondents that have been at their current site for less than 3 years were asked why

their organisation chose to locate in the locality in which they are based.

From a prompted list availability of appropriate land and/or premises is most frequently

selected (52%), followed by a number of what could be considered subjective reasons,

such as personal/historic or the overall attractiveness of the locality, which took priority

over financial considerations.

Figure 12: Reasons for locating in chosen locality – prompted, multiple responses

(where established for less than 3 years)

Unweighted sample base: 145

Amongst longer established businesses interviewed in depth the reasons for originally

locating where they had were hard to recall. Amongst smaller, more recently established

businesses reducing the need to travel between home and work was a priority, with the

level of passing trade also a major consideration.

35


Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

“The site is close to my house. There was no other reason for setting up here.”

(retail – ladieswear, medium employer in Huddersfield South)

“It’s near to town and on a busy road. Also the rent is very competitive here.”

(retail - food, small employer in Huddersfield South)

5.2 Benefits to being located where they are

Respondents are most likely to consider the access to transport links as a main benefit to

their current location (59%), but the overall attractiveness of the locality and quality of the

local environment are cited by just slightly fewer respondents (both 57%). Access to

markets/bordering cities is cited as a key benefit by more than half the respondents

(54%). Once established at the location, availability of appropriate land and/or premises

is of less significance but is still cited as a benefit by nearly half the respondents.

Figure 13: Main benefits of being located in the locality – prompted, multiple response

(all respondents)

Unweighted sample base: 1415 * denotes less than 0.5%

36


Land and Location

Businesses interviewed in depth cited some highly individual benefits to being at the

location where they are. These benefits range from having an accommodating landlord

that lets them expand and contract depending on the level of activity, to flexibility and

having no fixed contract to being able to draw on the university or local colleges for

labour.

“We have a good landlord. They are very flexible and at busy times we can get

extra units from them and if it gets quiet they will let us scale it down.”

(manufacturer – gear cutting tools, large employer in the Valleys)

“The university runs an engineering course and we do pick up graduates from

there.”

Businesses interviewed in depth were also asked about the disadvantages of being

located at their site and these disadvantages included lack of space to expand, poor

public transport links and lack of support and financial pressure from utility companies in

the locality.

“Yorkshire Water has put a limit on us. We are running at our maximum

capacity…the attitude of the water company is ‘you can close down if you want.’

(manufacturer – textiles, large employer in the Valleys)

One business focused on what it considers to be the poor road system in the locality

which is causing additional driving time and associated costs.

“Road system appears to have no plan…There used to be three main routes into

Huddersfield with dual carriageways, now they are all single lanes which means

driving time goes up, cost goes up and it affects profit.” (manufacturer – sheet

metal, large employer in Huddersfield North).

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

5.3 Rating of the locality as a place to conduct business

Respondents were asked to rate their local area as a place to do business. More than

half (54%) consider it good/excellent (9% excellent) and only 8% say it is poor. However,

more than a third (36%) rated the locality as an adequate place to do business, which

suggests that, while suitable, their current location could be improved in some respects.

Establishments based in Dewsbury and Mirfield are most likely to feel their current

location is poor as a place to do business (15% - a statistically significant variance from

other localities).

Figure 14: Rating of local area as a place to conduct business by location (all

respondents)

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted sample base

5.3.1 Reasons for rating the local area as poor

Those rating their local area as a poor place to do business are most likely to cite no

customer base/low income locality/lack of business (33%) and/or lack of

regeneration/locality poor/run down (also 33%). Respondents in Dewsbury and Mirfield

are no more likely than average to cite these as reasons. However, they are more likely

than average to cite a lack of amenities/facilities/shops closing down (21%, compared

with 15% of all those rating their local area as poor).

38


Land and Location

Other reasons include: high crime levels/drugs and/or no council support/grants (both 9%)

and lack of industry facilities (2%).

5.4 Concerns regarding current location

Respondents were presented with a number of issues that might be of concern to them

from the point of view of their location.

Of most concern tends to be lack of parking (40% are concerned and 26% feel it is very

much a concern for them). In a similar vein, traffic congestion is almost as much of a

concern (38%; 24% citing this as very much a concern).

Respondents appear to be least likely to be concerned with IT infrastructure/access to

broadband (9% are concerned) and poor access to markets/suppliers (10%).

Figure 15: Proportion of respondents that are concerned about aspects regarding

current location – prompted (all respondents)

Unweighted sample base: 1415

At a locality level, traffic congestion is of particular concern in Spen, while parking is more

likely than average to be a concern in Huddersfield South and Denby Dale and

Kirkburton. As many as one in three respondents are concerned about theft and

vandalism in Batley, Birstall and Birkenshaw, Spen and Dewsbury and Mirfield. One in

five respondents is concerned about the lack of skilled staff in Dewsbury and Mirfield.

39


Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

Table 4: Proportion of respondents that feel that aspects of their location are a concern

(all respondents) – prompted (multiple response)

Total

Batley,

Birstall and

Birkenshaw

Denby Dale

and

Kirkburton

Dewsbury

and Mirfield

Huddersfield

North

Huddersfield

South

Spen

The Valleys

Traffic congestion 38 41 31 37 38 32 53 38

Lack of parking 40 28 44 40 35 45 39 39

Uniform business

rates

Issues of staff

safety and violence

Theft and

vandalism

Quality of local

environment

Poor access to

markets/suppliers

Poor transport

connections

Lack of social

facilities/amenities

Lack of available

skilled staff

Poor access to

public transport

IT

infrastructure/acce

ss to broadband

Unweighted sample

bases

27 34 24 32 31 23 23 27

17 22 15 16 14 16 22 13

30 36 24 32 23 25 35 29

23 24 16 23 19 22 25 28

10 14 7 6 4 9 12 13

14 18 18 11 10 10 14 17

13 12 17 17 6 10 14 17

15 17 8 20 17 16 13 13

12 19 13 11 7 9 15 13

9 10 4 6 6 7 9 14

1415 172 95 245 119 310 179 271

Businesses interviewed in depth expressed some concern about what they perceive to be

poor policing locally.

“We have had 2 arson attacks, 12 break-ins and twice we have been held up by

armed gangs. On one occasion we even corned a guy for 10 minutes and called

the police and they turned up an hour later but by then we had to let him go in

case it became dangerous for us. We have even given the police car

40


Land and Location

registrations and names of people who have broken in and the police have done

nothing for us.” (manufacturer – gear cutting tools, large employer in the Valleys)

5.5 Expansion

Nearly a fifth of all respondents (19%) report that their establishment has taken on more

space and increased the size of the site since occupying their current site. The key

determinant of this activity is that of establishment size (increases to 31% of

establishments with 11+ employees). As one would expect, expansion in spatial terms is

often (but not always) accompanied by expansion in terms of the workforce (increases to

28% of those reporting workforce growth) and the business (24% of those reporting

business growth).

5.6 Adequacy of site

The majority of respondents (81%) feel that their current site is sufficient for their current

and future requirements. However, 16% of all respondents feel that they will require

further land to satisfy their requirements in the next 3 to 5 years.

This proportion increases with establishment size, to 24% of establishments with 25 to

199 employees and 45% of those with 200+ employees.

By industry, construction and education establishments are most likely to feel they will

need further land in the next 3 to 5 years (23% and 24% respectively). At locality level,

the proportion is higher than average in Dewsbury and Mirfield (24%).

Establishments reporting recent workforce growth are significantly more likely to be

thinking of expansion (30%, compared with 11% that report a decline in the workforce).

Warehousing and storage is a key requirement where the need for expansion is

anticipated (53% of those requiring further land) with around two in five (41%) needing

general office space.

Lack of space to expand is cited as a disadvantage to the current site by some

businesses interviewed in depth and half the businesses interviewed in more detail

reported that lack of space is a real issue. Rearranging machinery is one way that one

business has addressed insufficient space; another has a flexible landlord that allows

them to take on additional units when needed. Relocation and expansion tends to be a

last resort both from the point of view of cost and staff travel considerations.

“We are having another move around. We will do it floor by floor starting with the

shop floor. By moving some of the machines around it will give us extra space to

bring in new machinery.” (manufacturer – textiles, large employer in the Valleys)

“the last thing I want to do is to move from the village because I don’t want the

hassle of driving to work.” (manufacturer – clocks, medium employer in Denby

Dale and Kirkburton)

“We can’t expand any more. Our play area backs onto the Church so we can’t

go in that direction. We can only go into the basement or build on the top floor

but all that would cost an awful lot of money.” (private nursery, small employer in

Huddersfield South)

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

Two businesses are reviewing their working hours in order to maximise production at their

current site in lieu of relocating and expanding.

“We are thinking of going 24/7 because we can’t build on this site. We will have

to watch the noise level at night and if residents complain then we will have no

choice but to move.” (manufacturer – pallets, large employer in the Valleys)

“We are going to increase our shifts where people can start earlier and finish

late.” (manufacturer – carpets, large employer in Spen)

5.7 Potential relocation

More than half of those considering that further land will be required in the next 3 to 5

years (54%) expect to relocate elsewhere to obtain the extra space. The proportion

declines as establishment size increases (to 29% of those with 25-199 employees and

35% of those with 200+ employees).

Around a third of establishments anticipating expansion (35%) expect to expand at their

current location. This proportion is higher than average within the education sector (53%)

and also amongst financial intermediation/insurance businesses (50%).

Just one in eight of those anticipating re-location (12%) expect that they will move out of

Kirklees. The majority (79%) expect to remain in the locality and the remaining 9% do not

know.

Around a third of re-locating establishments in Dewsbury and Mirfield (34%) plan to move

outside of Kirklees, whilst the same proportion in Batley, Birstall and Birkenshaw are not

at present sure whether or not they will move outside the locality.

Respondents whose establishments are not planning to expand at this stage (84% of all

respondents) were asked about the likelihood of relocating from their current site in the

next 3 to 5 years. Just one in ten feels that it is likely (5% that it is very likely).

The proportion who consider it very likely that they will relocate is higher amongst

financial intermediation/insurance businesses (13%). It varies little by other factors.

The most frequently cited reasons for considering relocation include: a better

environment/locality (20%); high costs/rates/cost of premises (16%); expansion (14%);

need more space/parking/bigger premises (13%); lack of custom/business (8%); to buy

own land/premises (7%); better facilities (6%); retirement (3%); building is run down/old

(2%).

5.8 Surplus space

One in ten respondents (10%) that do not require further land currently have land that is

surplus to requirements. This proportion is higher amongst the largest establishments

(22% of those with 200+ employees) and is particularly high amongst manufacturing

companies (17%). The proportion is similar across all Localities, although slightly higher

in Huddersfield North.

Surplus space is most likely to take the form of general office space (49%), although, only

slightly fewer (45%) have too much warehousing and storage space.

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Land and Location

Two-fifths of those with space surplus to requirements (40%) do not intend to do anything

in particular with the space. One in six (18%) plan to rent/let/sub let it and slightly fewer

intend to extend their premises/use it as office space (13%).

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

6 Business Growth and Competitiveness

This section summarises local businesses’ recent growth and any steps they are taking

towards growth and diversification in the future. It covers their use of the internet as a

marketing tool and whether or not they export.

6.1 Access to online markets

Respondents were asked if they have access to the internet and, specifically, broadband

and whether their organisation has a website, intranet, or extranet.

Around three-quarters of respondents (74%) have access to the internet and most of

these (69% of all respondents) have a broadband connection. More than half of all

respondents (58%) report that their company has a website and both this and internet

access increases to include all the establishments with 200+ employees.

The level of access to any of the IT technology specified increases with company size, but

this is less obvious with regard to broadband. The following figure summarises the

relationship between access to IT and company size.

Overall, 80% of establishments have access to at least one of the technologies. The

proportion that does not is very small amongst establishments with more than 10

employees.

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Business Growth and Competitiveness

Figure 16: Proportion of respondents that report their establishment having access to IT

technologies – prompted, multiple response (all respondents)

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted sample bases

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

Although company size is the main determinant of IT usage, differences by industry

sector are also significant. Usage is lowest within hotels and restaurants (58% use any,

with 54% having access to the internet) despite the fact that average business size is

similar to all businesses. Furthermore, access to IT is high within construction (88% have

access to at least one of the technologies) even though some 92% of businesses in this

sector have fewer than 10 employees. Similarly, financial intermediation businesses have

high levels of IT usage (all have access to at least one type).

It is also not just about the number of staff that an establishment has, but also the type of

staff it employs. Generally speaking, where the proportion of staff that are

administrative/secretarial is higher than average, usage of any of the IT technologies also

tends to be higher than average.

The following table compares IT usage across industry sectors. It highlights the

proportion of the workforce in those sectors that are employed in

administrative/secretarial jobs. It can be seen that low proportions of

administrative/secretarial staff tend to be accompanied by low levels of IT usage.

Table 5: IT usage by sector – prompted, multiple response (all respondents)

Other

Health and Social work

Education

Public admin. And

defence

Real estate, renting

and business activities

Financial

intermediation

Transport, storage and

communication

Hotels and restaurants

Wholesale and retail

Construction

Manufacturing

Agriculture etc

Total

The internet 74 62 84 84 61 54 74 96 89 100 84 77 61

Company

website

58 31 70 51 50 36 54 98 70 100 75 60 54

Intranet 36 38 38 32 28 28 37 67 45 78 59 50 26

Extranet 7 7 9 1 4 6 6 18 9 67 7 11 6

Broadband 69 39 77 82 53 50 64 84 87 78 83 66 55

Any 80 77 87 88 70 58 79 100 92 100 90 85 68

None 20 33 13 12 30 42 21 0 8 0 10 15 32

% that are

admin./

secretarial staff

Unweighted

sample bases

11 5 13 16 8 3 11 34 14 27 8 8 11

1415 26 201 95 372 140 82 26 195 5 51 86 126

Of the private sector organisations that do not have access to broadband (26% of all

respondents) around one in six (17%) feel they could do more business if they had

access to it. This proportion is highest amongst the smallest companies (19%) and

46


Business Growth and Competitiveness

declines to just one establishment with 25 or more staff. This suggests that where larger

businesses have identified a need for broadband, they have generally already got it.

6.2 Exporting

Private sector businesses (making up 83% of all respondents) were asked if they sell

outside the UK. One in seven (15%) do. This proportion increases with company size

(see figure below) and is highest within manufacturing (31%) and business services

(24%).

Figure 17: Proportion of businesses that sell outside the UK, by company size (private

sector businesses

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted sample bases

In terms of the priority industry sectors, selling outside the UK is more prevalent within

advanced manufacturing (30%) and creative and digital (34%) sectors.

By locality, one in five private sector businesses in Denby Dale and Kirkburton sell outside

the UK (20%). The proportion is slightly lower in the Valleys (18%). Fewer than one in

ten businesses in Huddersfield North sell outside the UK (9%) and the proportion is only

slightly higher in Spen (11%).

Those that sell outside the UK most commonly sell to markets in the European Union

(83% of exporters). More than half the respondents sell to other non-EU parts of the

Europe (58%) and/or to America (53%).

Responses are summarised in the figure below.

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

Figure 18: Overseas markets served by private sector businesses – prompted, multiple

response (where sell outside the UK)

Unweighted sample base = 202

6.3 Turnover and growth

6.3.1 Approximate turnover

Three-fifths of respondents representing private sector businesses provided an

approximation of their gross annual turnover. A minority of respondents (15% of those

providing a response) estimate their organisation’s turnover at more than £1 million a

year. However, the mean annual turnover across all the businesses providing a response

is estimated at £3.3 million, highlighting the fact that there are some very high earning

businesses in the sample.

Around one in three businesses (32% of those providing a response) have a turnover of

less than £100k.

6.3.2 Growth in turnover

The growth trend over the past 3 years has been very positive. More than two-fifths of

respondents working in private sector businesses (44%) report growth during this time.

Less than a fifth (19%) report declining turnover.

There are particularly high levels of turnover growth within the sectors of education (65%),

financial services (52%) and business services (also 52%). Sectors most likely to suffer a

decline in their turnover include hotels and restaurants (27%) and (again) financial

services (26%).

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Business Growth and Competitiveness

Across Localities, there is little variation in the level of growth in turnover in the last three

years. However, in Batley, Birstall and Birkenshaw more than one in four respondents

(28%) report declining turnover within the private sector organisation in which they work.

As one would expect, turnover growth is generally accompanied by workforce growth

(73% of those reporting recent workforce growth also report a growth in turnover), an

increase in land space (57% that have increased the size of their site since moving to

their current site), selling overseas (56%) and, interestingly, training (55% of those that

have delivered any type of training in the last 12 months, compared with 30% that have

not).

Private sector businesses that consider that their organisations face barriers to growth (or

further growth) in turnover are in the minority but it is a significant minority at 30%. The

proportion increases with company size to more than half the largest private sector

businesses (53%). Across industry sectors, the proportion is lowest amongst education

establishments (3%) and highest in agriculture, mining and power companies (51%).

Amongst others, the proportion varies between one in five and one in three.

By location, organisations based in Huddersfield North (22%) are least likely to consider

that they face barriers to turnover growth, whilst those based in Denby Dale and

Kirkburton are most likely to feel there are barriers (36%).

Respondents identifying the existence of barriers to growing turnover were prompted with

a list of possible obstacles. The top four, each cited by at least three-fifths of those

experiencing barriers, are over regulation/red tape (70%); energy costs (68%); transport

costs e.g. fuel etc (63%) and/or interest rates (62%). It is clear that energy/fuel costs are

very much at the forefront of people’s minds.

Of course, businesses in different sectors have differing concerns and transport costs are

of particular concern to organisations within construction (91%), the agriculture/primary

sector and those within the transport, storage and communication sector (each 79%).

Interest rates too are of particular concern to those in construction (98% cite them as a

barrier to growing turnover) and this is likely to be a reflection of the impact of increasing

mortgage interest rates and the ‘credit crunch’ on property sales.

The following table summarises barriers to turnover growth identified by respondents that

feel they exist at all and highlights differences by industry sector.

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

Table 6: Barriers to turnover growth by sector – prompted, multiple response (where

barriers to growing turnover)

percentages

Total

Agriculture etc

Manufacturing

Construction

Wholesale and retail

Hotels and restaurants

Transport, storage and

communication

Financial

intermediation

Real estate, renting

and business activities

Education

Health and Social work

Other

Over regulation/red tape 70 86 61 59 68 71 59 90 80 0 62 73

Energy costs 68 76 63 76 73 71 64 18 65 100 55 61

Transport costs e.g. fuel etc 63 79 69 91 68 47 79 46 51 100 40 41

Interest rates 62 25 57 98 69 63 59 47 50 100 62 65

Competition 53 14 54 68 62 58 49 63 39 0 31 73

Increasing labour costs 49 35 51 68 58 59 46 18 30 100 36 49

Strength of the pound 48 44 58 67 55 40 59 19 32 0 28 39

Lack of capital for

investment

46 45 44 71 46 48 30 0 42 0 43 50

Cash flow 44 14 44 70 48 48 21 0 42 0 35 46

Market size 42 24 47 44 43 51 21 55 39 0 21 53

Availability of land or

premises (too small/not

equipped/can’t fine)

27 25 24 43 25 19 38 0 25 0 30 32

Availability of skilled labour 20 25 23 7 16 20 4 36 26 100 31 43

Sickness or injury absence 19 31 12 7 22 15 18 28 23 0 18 20

Employee resistance to

change

Transport infrastructure

(road, rail and sea)

Availability of labour

generally

18 3 24 24 21 24 6 35 6 100 45 24

17 21 14 27 18 15 34 0 10 0 19 19

14 10 19 15 16 13 2 18 9 100 26 20

Management skills 12 11 9 24 8 21 7 10 7 100 35 38

Lack of training available

locally

IT infrastructure/lack of

broadband

11 3 6 10 13 23 4 0 5 0 35 23

9 10 5 14 13 4 7 0 7 0 23 0

Economic climate 5 0 7 11 2 0 7 10 7 0 0 16

Business rates 2 0 0 0 1 5 0 0 4 0 0 0

Time 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

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Business Growth and Competitiveness

percentages

Total

Agriculture etc

Manufacturing

Construction

Wholesale and retail

Hotels and restaurants

Transport, storage and

communication

Financial

intermediation

Real estate, renting

and business activities

Education

Health and Social work

Other

Smoking ban 1 0 0 0 0 17 0 0 0 0 0 0

Parking problems 1 0 3 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

The housing market 1 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0

Cost of raw materials 1 10 0 0 1 4 0 0 1 0 0 0

Other 14 14 13 24 19 13 12 37 3 0 21 16

Unweighted sample bases 349 12 58 24 102 41 20 7 56 1 12 16

Threats to businesses’ current activity levels as well as to future growth, as reported by

businesses interviewed in depth, include competition from cheap imports and from

businesses operating at the lower quality end of the market. This is particularly the case

with regard to retail.

“There is more competition with Mark One and Primark offering cheaper

products and we can’t compete with their prices.” (retail – ladies wear, medium

employers in Huddersfield South)

Some of the businesses are prospering and those that are tend to operate in niche

markets. The businesses’ recognition of their unique position has helped them in

developing new markets.

“We produce very high quality material for branded suits. Since 2002 the

turnover has been going up and we have got to a point where now we are not

looking for any more business but to maintain production at the existing level for

the coming year.” (manufacturer – textiles, large employer in the Valleys)

6.3.3 Growth in profit

The picture with regard to the growth in profitability is less positive but still one in three

respondents from private sector businesses (35%) report a growth in profits in the last 3

years.

The proportion that report a decline in profits is lower but still reflects a downturn for just

slightly more than one in five businesses (22%).

Increasing profit is most prevalent in education (47%) and business services (44%). A

decline is more commonly reported in financial services (39%) and hotels and restaurants

(34%).

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

The following table summarises growth in profitability and turnover by sector. As one

would expect growth in turnover tends to go hand in hand with growth in profitability (and

decline in turnover also tends to go hand in hand with decline in profitability). However, in

the financial intermediation sector the proportion of organisations reporting a decline in

profitability is significantly above the average, despite an above average propensity to

have experienced a growth in turnover. Within manufacturing lower levels of growth in

turnover are reported but growth in profitability is slightly above average. There is also

evidence of a similar trend within the agriculture and primary production industries.

Table 7: Growth in turnover/profitability reported in the last 3 years and anticipated in

the next 3 years, by sector (private sector businesses)

percentages

Total

Agriculture etc

Manufacturing

Construction

Wholesale and retail

Hotels and restaurants

Transport, storage and

communication

Financial

intermediation

Real estate, renting

and business activities

Education

Health and Social work

Other

Turnover

In the past 3 years

Growth in turnover 44 41 38 47 40 35 38 52 52 65 45 39

Decline in turnover 19 18 22 18 23 27 22 26 13 2 9 17

In the next 3 years

Growth in turnover 50 49 56 51 50 37 40 44 55 62 35 52

Decline in turnover 12 18 11 11 12 23 13 27 12 0 6 4

Any barriers to

(further) growth in

turnover?

30 51 33 24 32 35 35 28 29 3 20 22

Profit

In the past 3 years

Growth in profit 35 36 37 37 30 24 24 18 44 47 36 25

Decline in profit 22 20 23 17 28 34 31 39 15 2 9 22

Unweighted sample bases 1152 25 183 82 322 120 62 20 180 25 60 73

6.4 New products and services

All respondents, both public and private sector, were asked if they had introduced any

new products or services during the last 3 years, any plans they have to do so and any

impediments that they might be facing in developing new products or services.

Two in five respondents (41%) reported that their organisation has introduced new

products or services during the last 3 years. This proportion increases to 94% of

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Business Growth and Competitiveness

organisations with 200+ employees. It is higher than average within organisations with

more than 5 but fewer than 200 staff (49%).

The recent introduction of new products and services is more likely within the sectors of

manufacture (52%), financial intermediation (50%) and wholesale and retail (49%). The

propensity to have done so is particularly high within the priority sub-sector of creative

and digital (71%).

There is a link to workforce and business growth, with those organisations reporting either

more likely to report that their organisation has introduced new products or services

during the last 3 years. Innovation, it appears, also tends to go hand in hand with

increasing land space and exporting.

A similar proportion of respondents that report recent new product or service launches

plan to introduce new products or services within the next 3 years (42%). The propensity

to be planning new products or services follows a similar pattern to that of recent

launches, highlighting the extent to which certain types of organisation are more likely to

incorporate innovation into their regular business activity.

The following table summarises the propensity to innovate:

Table 8: Introduction of new products and services (all respondents)

Unweighted

sample bases

Have introduced during

the last 3 years

Have plans to introduce

in the next 3 years

All respondents 1415 41 42

Organisation size

2-4 employees 601 38 38

5-10 employees 413 51 50

11-24 employees 218 46 49

25-199 employees 173 48 55

200+ employees 10 94 88

Industry sector

Agriculture etc 26 22 16

Manufacture 201 52 48

Construction 95 25 32

Wholesale and retail 372 49 48

Hotels and restaurants 140 40 45

Transport, storage and

communication

82 30 27

Financial intermediation 26 50 50

Real estate etc 195 40 38

Public administration and

defence

5 45 45

Education 51 19 42

Health and social work 96 32 32

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

Unweighted

sample bases

Have introduced during

the last 3 years

Have plans to introduce

in the next 3 years

Other 126 50 61

Priority sector

Advanced manufacturing 71 40 38

Construction 96 25 32

Hospitality and leisure 166 43 49

Finance and business

services

201 35 33

Creative and digital 48 71 73

Workforce

Grown 292 57 58

Stayed the same 936 37 39

Declined 175 42 38

Business

Growing 524 49 49

Static 369 33 34

Declining 194 41 40

Increased land space 310 53 55

Export 202 68 65

One in eight respondents (13%) considers that their organisation faces barriers in

developing new products and services. This proportion increases slightly with

organisation size (to 28% of those with 200+ employees) and is higher than average in

the sectors of education (29%) and public administration and defence (22%). Considering

how likely those in the creative and digital sub-sector are to introduce new products and

services, just one in six (17%) of respondents representing these organisations feel that

they face such barriers.

Thus, it would appear that, whilst to some extent identifying barriers is an integral part of

introducing new products or services, the extent to which barriers to doing so are

perceived is not significant at all. It is unlikely that only a small minority of organisations

are actually prevented from introducing products and services by external factors. The

most frequently cited barrier to innovation is that of cost/lack of finance/cash flow (43% of

those identifying any barriers) which is an internal issue to be overcome (or not) in a

variety of ways. Next most frequently cited is that of space (15%). This too, could be

overcome through financing solutions.

One in eight of those identifying barriers to innovation (12%) highlight over regulation/red

tape (including planning permission). Presumably the opportunities for overcoming these

regulatory barriers are limited and less likely to be overcome by presenting a good

business case with regard to the new products or services proposed.

Perceived barriers to innovation are summarised in the figure below.

54


Business Growth and Competitiveness

Figure 19: Barriers to developing new products and service – unprompted, multiple

response (where identified barriers)

Unweighted sample base = 186

Amongst about three-quarters of the businesses interviewed in depth business planning is

ingrained. A quarter of the businesses are looking to go into new overseas markets whilst

other businesses are looking at expanding or enhancing what they offer to stay ahead of

the game or in response to competitor activity.

“Our sales team have just come back from the States and looked at the

possibility of us exporting and it’s looking good.” (manufacturer – carpets, large

employer in Spen)

“There’s been a new [sandwich] shop opened up about 3 months ago. It’s only

about 400 yards up the road so we have to try to stay ahead of the game and do

things better. I have already invested in a new counter and display cabinet

which cost £3,000 and I am looking to offer more of a healthier option with a

variety of salads and yogurts.” (retail – food, small employer in Spen)

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

7 Corporate Social Responsibility and Engagement

7.1 Involvement in any community activities

Respondents were asked if their organisation has been involved in any community

activities. More than a quarter (29%) said that their organisation has. This proportion

increases with the size of the organisation to 71% of those with 200+ employees.

The proportion is higher than average in education (65%), health and social work (49%)

and ‘other’ (48%) sectors.

Whilst just a quarter of all private sector organisations have been involved in any

community activities (25%), the proportion is higher amongst public sector organisations

(40%) and voluntary organisations are far more likely than average to have done so

(75%).

By location, organisations based in The Valleys are most likely to have been involved in

any community activities (35%) and those in Huddersfield North are least likely to have

been (19%).

In terms of the way in which respondents have been involved in community activities,

fundraising/sponsorship and donations (33% of those having been involved in community

activities), community activities/work (30%) and charity work (28%) are most frequently

mentioned. One in six (16%) cite involvement with local schools and this proportion

increases to one in three of those in education (33%).

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Corporate Social Responsibility and Engagement

Figure 20: Ways in which organisations have been involved in community activities –

unprompted, multiple response (where have been involved)

Unweighted sample base = 484 *denotes less than 0.5%

7.2 Attracting new recruits and retaining employees

Respondents were asked to identify what they consider to be their organisation’s biggest

selling point when it comes to recruiting and retaining employees. This helps to show the

extent to which their organisation recognises what they can offer employees over and

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

above a basic salary and how it competes with firms offering similar jobs for the best

candidates.

This was an ‘open’ question and respondents are most likely to spontaneously cite,

unprompted, their organisation’s reputation as their biggest selling point (17%). This is an

interesting response, which implies that some respondents believe that working for their

organisation offers employees “higher status” employment. Next most frequently cited

issues include a good working environment/friendly/well looked after staff and pay and

benefits (each mentioned by 11% of respondents). Job security is mentioned by slightly

fewer (9%).

Responses are summarised in the figure below:

Figure 21: Perceived biggest selling points for recruiting and retaining employees –

unprompted (all respondents)

Unweighted sample base = 1415 *denotes less than 0.5%

58


Corporate Social Responsibility and Engagement

Recent recruitment amongst businesses interviewed in depth has been to replace staff

who retire. Word of mouth is considered a more reliable tool for recruitment than

advertising and the use of jobcentres. Jobcentres, in particular, are considered a fairly

inefficient way of recruiting. Some businesses expressed the view that Jobcentres made

little effort to match the person to the job.

“There is always someone here who knows someone else who is looking for a

job and we find them more suitable because they come on recommendation,

they are reliable and harder working compared to advertising in papers or

jobcentres.” (manufacturer – gear cutting tools, large employer in the Valleys)

“When we get applications from jobcentres they [applicants] just lack the whole

approach and motivation to work.” (restaurant/bar, large employer in

Huddersfield North)

“With the jobcentre it’s a numbers game. They just want to tick their boxes and

they will send anyone.” (manufacturer – gear cutting tools, large employer in the

Valleys)

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

8 Profile of Organisations within Kirklees

The sample data of 1,415 respondents within the Kirklees district was weighted by

organisation size and industry sector to ensure that the data is representative of the

employer population within the District. Therefore, the sample profile which will be

reported on in this section will reflect the profile of organisations within the various

Localities.

8.1 Geographic distribution

The following figure summarises the distribution of organisations across the seven

Localities.

Figure 22: Geographic distribution of organisations (all respondents)

Unweighted sample base = 1415

8.2 Industry sector profile

The two industry sectors that account for the highest proportion of respondents are

wholesale and retail (26%) and real estate, renting and business activities (23%). The

profile of organisations by industry is summarised in the figure below.

60


Profile of Organisations within Kirklees

Figure 23: Industrial profile of organisations within Kirklees (all respondents)

Unweighted sample base = 1415

The following Priority industrial sectors, or sub-sectors, were also identified for analysis by

Kirklees Council:

Advanced manufacturing

Hospitality and leisure 8%;

Finance and business services 21%;

Creative and digital industries 5%.

8.3 Number of staff employed

4% of all organisations;

The survey only included organisations with at least one employee besides the owner

manager. Larger organisations tend to be over-sampled in order to achieve robust

sample sizes, but because the data is weighted, the survey reflects the actual employer

population profile by organisation size.

Organisations with no more than 10 employees account for the majority of respondents

(84%). Most of these employ fewer than 5 employees (70%).

Although organisations with 200+ employees account for less than 1% of all respondents,

they employ 14% of the total workforce reported by respondents. The smallest firms

account for only 22% of the total workforce despite the fact that they make up the majority

of employers.

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

Figure 24: Organisation size (all respondents)

Unweighted sample base = 1415

At sector level, smaller firms predominate to an even greater extent than the average

within agriculture (98% employ up to 10 staff), construction (92%) and real estate, renting

etc (92%). Some 90% of all public administration and defence organisations employ

more than 25 people, whilst the proportion is below that level but still considerably higher

than average in education (45%).

Amongst the priority sectors, 91% of finance and business services organisations employ

no more than 10 employees and creative and digital firms are also more likely than

average to be small employers (91%).

8.4 Number of sites

More than three-quarters of organisations (77%) do not have sites elsewhere. This

proportion declines as organisation size increases (from 85% of 2-4 employers to just

37% of 200+ employers).

Multi-site organisations therefore account for 22% of all respondents. All organisations in

public administration and defence are multi-site and the proportion that are multi-site is

higher in health and social work (51%), financial intermediation (42%) and just slightly

above average in the wholesale and retail sector (29%).

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Profile of Organisations within Kirklees

8.5 Organisation type

More than four-fifths of all respondents represent private sector organisations (83%).

Public sector organisations account for one in seven of all respondents’ organisations

(14%), whilst 4% operate in the voluntary sector.

There are few differences in organisation type by size of firm and as one would expect,

higher proportions of public sector organisations in public administration and defence (all),

education (58%) and health and social work (22%) sectors. Voluntary organisations are

concentrated in the ‘other’ or health and social work sectors.

Private sector organisations are most likely to be private limited companies (41% are) and

this proportion increases with organisation size (to two-thirds of organisations with

between 11 and 199 employees and all those with 200+).

Single proprietorships account for 30% of all private sector organisations. This figure

increases to 35% of those employing between 2 and 4 employees, falling slightly to 24%

of those employing between 5 and 10 staff. Less than one in ten organisations with more

than 10 employees are single proprietorships.

Approximately one in four organisations are partnerships (24%), increasing to 62% of

agricultural firms and 34% of hotels and restaurants.

The remainder are public limited companies (3%) and these organisations are largely in

real estate, renting etc or wholesale and retail.

8.6 Years established

Respondents were asked to specify the length of time their organisation has been

established at that site (under all ownerships and all legal status). Around half (49%)

have been established at their current site for more than 10 years. The majority of these

(28% of all respondents) have been at their current site for more than 20 years.

The proportion long established at their current site (i.e. for more than 20 years) increases

to more than half of 200+ employers.

8.7 Business ownership

8.7.1 Women-led businesses

More than two-fifths of all organisations (45%) are women-led businesses. That is to say,

more than 50% of the business’ owners/managers are women.

The proportion that are women-led varies little by organisation size, but declines to 34%

of all organisations with 200+ staff.

Industry sectors with higher than average levels of women-led businesses include hotels

and restaurants (65%), education (68%), health and social work (72%) and ‘other’ sectors

(67%). Of those organisations within the hospitality and leisure priority sector, 61% are

women-led.

There is no variation in the extent to which women-led businesses are represented across

the seven Localities that make up Kirklees.

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

8.7.2 MEG-led businesses

Around one in ten organisations (11%) are MEG-led businesses. That is to say, more

than 50% of the business’ owners/managers are from an ethnic minority group.

The proportion that is MEG-led declines to just 3% of all organisations with 25+ staff.

Industry sectors with higher than average levels of MEG-led businesses include transport,

storage and communications (19%) , wholesale and retail (17%) and the creative and

digital priority sub-sector (16%).

By locality, more than a fifth of businesses in Dewsbury and Mirfield (21%) are MEG-led

and this rises to 33% in the Dewsbury West regeneration area.

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Locality Profiles and Key Indicators

9 Locality Profiles and Key Indicators

This section summarises the profiles and key indicators by locality. Firstly, the profiles of

the seven localities are summarised in one table. Following on from that, each locality is

discussed separately with tables relating to key issues and a brief summary of the key

findings.

Table 9: Profile of organisations by locality

Total

Batley, Birstall

and

Birkenshaw

Denby Dale

and Kirkburton

Dewsbury and

Mirfield

Huddersfield

North

Huddersfield

South

Spen

The Valleys

Organisation size

2-4 employees 70 68 72 65 71 73 70 75

5-10 employees 14 15 17 17 15 11 16 13

11-24 employees 8 10 8 10 7 8 7 7

25-199 employees 7 7 3 8 6 8 7 5

200+ employees 1 0 0 1 * 1 1 *

Industry sector

Agriculture/huntin

g/ forestry

2 2 5 1 1 1 2 3

Manufacture 11 12 10 10 4 10 16 12

Electricity, water

and gas supply

* 0 0 0 0 0 0 *

Construction 11 8 17 7 4 6 10 20

Wholesale and

retail

Hotels and

restaurants

Transport, storage

and

communication

Financial

intermediation/

insurance

Real estate, renting

and business

activities

Public

administration and

26 28 22 33 26 28 20 24

7 6 3 7 5 8 9 6

5 8 3 5 6 5 5 3

1 2 2 2 1 1 1 1

23 18 26 15 31 29 22 21

* * 0 1 0 * * 0

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

Total

Batley, Birstall

and

Birkenshaw

Denby Dale

and Kirkburton

Dewsbury and

Mirfield

Huddersfield

North

Huddersfield

South

Spen

The Valleys

defence

Education 3 4 1 6 1 3 2 2

Health and social

work

5 5 2 5 9 3 5 5

Other 7 7 9 9 12 8 7 4

Organisation type

Private sector 83 79 95 78 76 83 82 89

Public sector 14 16 4 16 20 15 14 9

Voluntary sector 4 5 2 6 4 3 4 2

Single site 77 73 88 74 74 72 75 85

Multi site 22 27 12 24 26 27 25 14

Women-led 45 44 45 45 41 45 46 45

MEG-led 11 15 6 21 14 10 6 5

Unweighted sample

bases

1415 172 95 245 119 310 179 271

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Locality Profiles and Key Indicators

9.1 Batley, Birstall and Birkenshaw

Batley, Birstall and Birkenshaw conforms to the average with regard to the profile of its

business population by size. By sector, real estate, renting and business activities firms

are represented to a lesser extent than average (18%, compared with 23%). There are

also fewer construction firms in the locality than average (8%, compared with 11%). A

higher proportion than average of its businesses are within the transport, storage and

communication sector (8%, compared with 5%) and wholesale and retail firms account for

a slightly higher than average proportion of the business population (28%, compared with

26%).

Public sector organisations represent 16% of business units in the locality, compared with

a slightly lower average across Kirklees of 14%. There are a higher proportion of multisite

organisations than average in the locality (27%, compared with 22%). Similarly to the

Kirklees average, women-led businesses account for 44% of all businesses locally. The

proportion that are MEG-led is slightly higher than average (15%, compared with 11%).

9.1.1 Workforce

The following figure summarises the workforce profile in Batley, Birstall and Birkenshaw:

Figure 25 : Workforce profile in Batley, Birstall and Birkenshaw

Based on unweighted employee base of 1900

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

The workforce profile is more male-biased and has a slightly higher proportion of the

workforce in the prime working age group of 25-44 than average. Despite having a higher

proportion of MEG-led firms, the ethnic profile of the locality’s workforce is similar to the

average.

Just 7% of all respondents in the local area reported that their organisation employs any

‘disabled’ employees. This compares with 6% on average across Kirklees.

In terms of the proportion of the workforce that ‘disabled’ employees represent it is just

over one in a hundred (i.e. 1.5%).

Just 1% of all respondents in Batley, Birstall and Birkenshaw report that their organisation

employs any migrant workers. This is a slightly lower proportion than the Kirklees

average of 3%.

9.1.1.1 Trends in workforce growth

The majority of respondents locally report no change in the size of their workforce over

the last 12 months (64%). One in five (21%) report an increase and fewer (14%) report a

decrease over time. Thus the recent trend in workforce growth within the local area is

slightly more likely to be positive than is the case across Kirklees (where just 17% of

respondents have reported a recent increase in the size of their workforce).

The trend in the next 12 months is expected to be more positive with more than one in

four respondents (27%) in Batley, Birstall and Birkenshaw reporting a probable increase

in workforce size and just 6% reporting a probable decrease. This pattern is likely to, at

least in part, reflect the fact that workforce expansion is usually planned whilst workforce

decline tends to reflect unexpected events such as staff suddenly giving notice or a

downturn in activity. A reduction in the workforce is less commonly planned.

9.1.1.2 Occupational profile of the workforce

Respondents were asked for detailed information on the occupations employed within

their organisation. The profile is summarised in the table below and shows the range of

occupations employed in organisations and the proportion of the local area workforce

employed in each occupational group.

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Locality Profiles and Key Indicators

Table 10: Occupations of staff employed (all respondents)

Batley, Birstall and

Birkenshaw

Kirklees

Batley, Birstall and

Birkenshaw

Kirklees

% of all respondents employed staff

in these groups

% of workforce in these groups

Managers and

senior officials

Professional

occupations

Associate

professional and

technical

occupations

Administrative and

secretarial

occupations

Skilled trades

occupations

Personal service

occupations

Sales and customer

service occupations

Process, plant and

machine operatives

Elementary

occupations

Unweighted sample

bases

77 75 21 18

22 21 7 12

7 10 7 7

29 34 11 11

25 23 17 12

4 5 3 5

34 29 18 17

8 7 7 9

12 12 9 9

172 1415 1872* 18079 *

* Where provided a response

Within Batley, Birstall and Birkenshaw, skilled trades occupations make up a higher than

average proportion of the workforce. Fewer staff are employed in professional

occupations compared with the Kirklees average.

9.1.1.3 Local employment

Respondents were asked about the proportion of employees that live within a 2 to 3 mile

radius of their workplace.

Around a third (35%) reported that all their workforce lives within this distance from work.

This proportion is lower than the Kirklees average (38%).

One in seven respondents locally (15%) report that their organisation does not employ

anyone living within a 2 to 3 mile radius of their workplace. This compares with 13%

across Kirklees.

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

9.1.1.4 Working arrangements for employees

In terms of working arrangements that they have in place for employees, local

organisations are most likely to offer flexitime (29%). However, fewer than average

organisations locally have this in place (36% across Kirklees).

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Locality Profiles and Key Indicators

Less than half (47%) have at least one flexible option. This proportion is lower than the

Kirklees average (55%). Locally, nearly one in five respondents report shift patterns in

place at their site (19%) and a slightly lower proportion (16%) report that their organisation

offers employees the opportunity to work at or from home (16%).

9.1.1.5 Staff turnover

Respondents were asked whether they consider staff turnover at their establishment site

to be high, average or low. Those that feel that staff turnover is high are very much in the

minority at just 4% of all respondents locally (5% is the Kirklees average).

The majority of respondents in Batley, Birstall and Birkenshaw (63%) feel that staff

turnover at their establishment to be below average. Given the fact that an ‘average’ by

definition is likely to account for the majority of cases, or else be the mid point between

two points that are equally in evidence, it is likely that respondents over-estimate average

levels of staff turnover. Just a third of local respondents (32%) consider staff turnover at

their establishment to be ‘average’.

9.1.1.6 Skills needs

When asked if they feel that their skill needs will change at their establishment in the next

3 years, one in six respondents in Batley, Birstall and Birkenshaw (17%) responded that

they thought they would. This compares with a similar proportion across Kirklees (16%).

In terms of the skills most likely to need developing in the next 3 years, the three most

frequently cited are training and coaching skills (78%), management skills -

leadership/strategic (77%) and customer handling skills (70%).

Compared with organisations across Kirklees, IT user skills are less likely to be cited by

local respondents but they are still significant, mentioned as they are by 61%. Also of

significance are technical, practical and job specific skills (69%) and team working skills

(66%).

9.1.2 Business Planning and Training

The proportion of organisations in Batley, Birstall and Birkenshaw that have business

planning, HR and training infrastructure and activity in place is summarised in the figure

below.

The data suggests similar levels of formal business planning and training within

organisations in the local area as in Kirklees overall.

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

Figure 26 : Business planning and training in Batley, Birstall and Birkenshaw

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted sample bases

9.1.3 Land and location

The main benefits for businesses in locating in Batley, Birstall and Birkenshaw are felt to

be: access to markets/bordering cities (66%), access to transport links (64%) and/or

availability of appropriate land and/or premises (61%).

Around half the respondents in Batley, Birstall and Birkenshaw (51%) rate their local area

as good or excellent as a place in which to conduct business. This compares with the

average across Kirklees of 54%.

One in four (25%) of those rating the locality as poor as a place to conduct business felt it

was lacking regeneration/‘run down’.

The proportions of respondents in the locality that are concerned about various issues is

summarised in the figure below.

72


Locality Profiles and Key Indicators

Figure 27: Proportion of respondents concerned about specified issues

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted sample bases

Future plans for expansion or for off-loading land/premises in the locality are summarised

in the figure below.

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

Figure 28: Land issues

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted sample bases

9.1.4 Business growth and competitiveness

Organisations in Batley, Birstall and Birkenshaw have similar levels of access to IT, such

as the internet, a company website, an intranet, and extranet and broadband as

organisations across the District.

One in seven (15%) private sector organisations, the same proportion as the average

across Kirklees, sell outside the UK, although local businesses are more likely to rely on

trade with EU countries, than with non-EU, and those on other continents.

The mean turnover amongst private sector organisations locally is £492k, which is

considerably lower than the Kirklees mean of just under £3.4m.

The trend in turnover and profit past and future is summarised in the figure below. It

shows greater levels of pessimism locally, with higher proportions of private sector

organisations anticipating a decline in turnover in the next three years, following on from a

higher level of decline in turnover and profit in the last three years.

74


Locality Profiles and Key Indicators

Figure 29 : Turnover and profit: Trends

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted sample bases

Just over two-fifths of respondents in Batley, Birstall and Birkenshaw (42%) have

introduced new products or services in the last three years. This compares with 41%

across Kirklees. The proportion of local organisations with plans to introduce new

products or services is slightly higher (46%) and this compares with a lower average

across Kirklees (42%).

One in eight respondents in the local area (13%) consider there are barriers to developing

new products and services. This is the same proportion as the Kirklees average,

suggesting that organisations in Batley, Birstall and Birkenshaw are no more likely to feel

impeded in terms of innovation. As with organisations in other Localities, cost is most

frequently mentioned as a barrier to developing new products or services.

9.1.5 Corporate social responsibility and engagement

Around a quarter of respondents in Batley, Birstall and Birkenshaw (26%) report that their

business is involved in community activities. This proportion is slightly lower than the

Kirklees average (29%).

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

The community activities that local organisations are involved in are, most commonly,

fundraising/sponsorship/donations (40%), a range of unspecified activities (32%) and

charity work (22%).

9.1.6 Attracting new recruits and retaining employees

Respondents in Batley, Birstall and Birkenshaw are most likely to cite reputation as their

biggest selling point for recruiting and retaining their workforce (19%). Pay and benefits is

next most frequently cited (12%) and job security is cited by a similar proportion (11%).

9.2 Denby Dale and Kirkburton

The Denby Dale and Kirkburton locality business population has a similar size profile to

the Kirklees average. By sector, wholesale and retail firms are represented to a lesser

extent than average (22%, compared with 26%). There are also relatively fewer

organisations in education (1%, compared with 3%) and in health and social work (2%,

compared with 5%). A higher proportion than average of its’ businesses are within

construction (17%, compared with 11%) and real estate, renting and business activities

firms account for a slightly higher than average proportion of the business population

(26%, compared with 23%).

Public sector organisations represent just 4% of business units in the local area,

compared with the Kirklees average of 14%. There are a lower proportion of multi-site

organisations than average in the local area (12%, compared with 22%). Similarly to the

Kirklees average, women-led businesses account for 45% of all businesses locally. The

proportion that are MEG-led is lower than average (6%, compared with 11%).

9.2.1 Workforce

The following figure summarises the workforce profile in Denby Dale and Kirkburton:

76


Locality Profiles and Key Indicators

Figure 30 : Workforce profile in Denby Dale and Kirkburton

Based on unweighted employee base of 2898

The workforce profile is more male-biased and has a slightly higher proportion of the

workforce in older age groups than average. The lower proportion of MEG-led firms in the

local area is reflected in the ethnic profile of the locality’s workforce which has a much

lower proportion of non-white employees than average.

Just 7% of all respondents in the local area reported that their organisation employs any

‘disabled’ employees. This compares with 6% on average across Kirklees.

In terms of the proportion of the workforce that ‘disabled’ employees represent it is just

one in a hundred (i.e. 1%).

Less than 1% of all respondents in Denby Dale and Kirkburton report that their

organisation employs any migrant workers. This is a lower proportion than the Kirklees

average of 3%.

9.2.1.1 Trends in workforce growth

The majority of respondents locally report no change in the size of their workforce over

the last 12 months (77%). One in seven (15%) report an increase and fewer (7%) report

a decrease over time. Thus the recent trend in workforce growth within the local area is

slightly more likely to be positive than is the case across Kirklees (where 12% of

respondents have reported a recent decrease in the size of their workforce).

The trend in the next 12 months is expected to reflect the last 12 months with 14% of

respondents in Denby Dale and Kirkburton reporting a probable increase in workforce

size and just 7% reporting a probable decrease.

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

9.2.1.2 Occupational profile of the workforce

Respondents were asked for detailed information on the occupations employed within

their organisation. The profile is summarised in the table below and shows the range of

occupations employed in organisations and the proportion of the local area workforce

employed in each occupational group.

Table 11: Occupations of staff employed (all respondents)

Denby Dale and

Kirkburton

Kirklees

Denby Dale and

Kirkburton

Kirklees

% of all respondents employed staff

in these groups

% of workforce in these groups

Managers and

senior officials

Professional

occupations

Associate

professional and

technical

occupations

Administrative and

secretarial

occupations

Skilled trades

occupations

Personal service

occupations

Sales and customer

service occupations

Process, plant and

machine operatives

Elementary

occupations

Unweighted sample

bases

70 75 19 18

12 21 7 12

8 10 4 7

42 34 12 11

36 23 21 12

2 5 6 5

20 29 8 17

8 7 5 9

14 12 18 9

95 1415 999 18079 *

* Where provided a response

Within Denby Dale and Kirkburton, skilled trades and elementary occupations make up

higher than average proportions of the workforce. Fewer staff are employed in

administrative and secretarial occupations compared with the Kirklees average.

9.2.1.3 Local employment

Respondents were asked about the proportion of employees that live within a 2 to 3 mile

radius of their workplace.

Around two-fifths (41%) reported that all their workforce lives within this distance from

work. This proportion is slightly higher than the Kirklees average (38%).

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Locality Profiles and Key Indicators

One in seven respondents (15%) report that their organisation locally does not employ

anyone living within a 2 to 3 mile radius of their workplace. This compares with 13%

across Kirklees.

9.2.1.4 Working arrangements for employees

In terms of working arrangements that they have in place for employees, local

organisations are most likely to allow flexitime (41%) and slightly more organisations than

average locally have this in place (36% across Kirklees).

Three-fifths (60%) have at least one flexible arrangement and this proportion is higher

than the Kirklees average (55%). Locally, one in three respondents report that their

organisation offers employees the opportunity to work at or from home (32%). Just one in

six (16%) report shift patterns in place at their site.

9.2.1.5 Staff turnover

Respondents were asked whether they consider staff turnover at their establishment site

to be high, average or low. Those that feel that staff turnover is high are very much in the

minority at just 1% of all respondents locally (5% is the Kirklees average).

The majority of respondents in Denby Dale and Kirkburton (77%) feel that staff turnover at

their establishment to be below-average. Given the fact that an ‘average’ by definition is

likely to account for the majority of cases, or else be the mid point between two points that

are equally in evidence, it is likely that respondents over-estimate average levels of staff

turnover. Only a minority of local respondents (17%) consider staff turnover at their

establishment to be ‘average’.

9.2.1.6 Skills needs

When asked if they feel that their skill needs will change at their establishment in the next

3 years, fewer than one in ten respondents in Denby Dale and Kirkburton (9%) responded

that they thought they would. This compares with a higher proportion across Kirklees

(16%).

In terms of the skills most likely to need developing in the next 3 years, the three most

frequently cited are IT user skills (96%), management skills (leadership/strategic) and

supervisory/operational (both 77%).

Compared with organisations across all Kirklees, product development skills are more

likely to be cited by local respondents (66%). Also of some significance in Denby Dale

and Kirkburton are technical, practical and job specific skills (67%) and problem solving

skills (65%).

9.2.2 Business Planning and Training

The proportion of organisations in Denby Dale and Kirkburton that have business

planning, HR and training infrastructure and activity in place is summarised in the figure

below.

The data suggests similar levels of formal business planning and training within

organisations in the local area.

79


Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

Figure 31: Business planning and training in Denby Dale and Kirkburton

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted sample bases

9.2.3 Land and location

The main benefits for businesses in locating in Denby Dale and Kirkburton are reported

as the quality of the local environment and the overall attractiveness of the locality (both

74%). Access to markets/bordering cities and access to transport links are each cited by

47% of respondents.

Two-thirds of respondents in Denby Dale and Kirkburton (67%) rate their local area as

good or excellent as a place in which to conduct business. This is higher than the

average across Kirklees of 54%.

Three in five (60%) of those rating the locality as poor as a place to conduct business give

the reason as no customer base/low income locality/lack of business.

The proportions of respondents in the locality that are concerned about various issues is

summarised in the figure below.

80


Locality Profiles and Key Indicators

Figure 32: Proportion of respondents concerned about specified issues

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted sample bases

Future plans for expansion or for off-loading land/premises in the locality are summarised

in the figure below.

81


Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

Figure 33 : Land issues

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted sample bases

9.2.4 Business growth and competitiveness

Organisations in Denby Dale and Kirkburton have similar levels of access to IT, such as

the internet, a company website, an extranet and broadband as organisations across the

region. They are, however, less likely than average to have an intranet (26%, compared

with an average of 36% across Kirklees).

One in five (20%) private sector organisations, a higher proportion than the average

across Kirklees (15%), sell outside the UK and local businesses are more likely to rely on

trade with non-EU countries, than with those inside the EU.

The mean turnover amongst private sector organisations locally is £311k, which is

considerably lower than the Kirklees mean of just under £3.4m.

The trend in turnover and profit past and future is summarised in the figure below. It

shows greater levels of pessimism locally, with lower proportions of private sector

organisations anticipating an increase in turnover in the next three years, following on

from a lower level of increase in turnover and profit in the last three years.

82


Locality Profiles and Key Indicators

Figure 34 : Turnover and profit: Trends

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted sample bases

Just over two-fifths of respondents in Denby Dale and Kirkburton (42%) have introduced

new products or services in the last three years. This compares with 41% across

Kirklees. The proportion of local organisations with plans to introduce new products or

services is slightly lower (40%) and this compares with a slightly higher average across

Kirklees (42%).

Few respondents in the local area (7%) consider there are barriers to developing new

products and services. The proportion is lower than the Kirklees average (of 13%),

suggesting that organisations in Denby Dale and Kirkburton are less likely to feel impeded

in terms of innovation. Within the local area, competition is most frequently mentioned as

a barrier to developing new products or services.

9.2.5 Corporate social responsibility and engagement

Around a quarter of respondents in Denby Dale and Kirkburton (27%) report that their

business is involved in community activities. This proportion is slightly lower than the

Kirklees average (29%).

The community activities that local organisations are involved in are, most commonly, a

range of unspecified activities (39%), fundraising/sponsorship/donations (30%), and

involvement with local schools (23%).

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

9.2.6 Attracting new recruits and retaining employees

Respondents in Denby Dale and Kirkburton are most likely to cite reputation as their

organisation’s biggest selling point for recruiting and retaining their workforce (12%). A

good working environment/friendly/well looked after staff is next most frequently cited

(11%).

9.3 Dewsbury and Mirfield

Dewsbury and Mirfield’s business base has a slightly different size profile than Kirklees. It

has a higher proportion of larger organisations than average with 19% having 11 or more

employees, compared with 16% across Kirklees.

By sector, wholesale and retail firms are represented to a greater extent than average

(33%, compared with 26%). There are, however, fewer construction firms (7%, compared

with 11%) and fewer firms in real estate, renting and business activities (15%, compared

with 22%).

Public sector organisations represent 16% of business units in the local area, compared

with the Kirklees average of 14%. Multi-site organisations account for around one in four

organisations (24%), a proportion that is statistically similar to the Kirklees average (22%).

As in Kirkless overall, women-led businesses account for 45% of all businesses locally

but the proportion that are MEG-led is higher than average (21%, compared with 11%).

9.3.1 Workforce

The following figure summarises the workforce profile in Dewsbury and Mirfield:

84


Locality Profiles and Key Indicators

Figure 35 : Workforce profile in Dewsbury and Mirfield

Based on unweighted employee base of 3832

The workforce profile is more male-biased and, reflecting the higher proportion of MEGled

firms in the local area, has a higher proportion of non-white employees than average.

Just 4% of all respondents in the local area reported that their organisation employs any

‘disabled’ employees. This compares with 6% on average across Kirklees.

In terms of the proportion of the workforce that ‘disabled’ employees represent it is just

one in a hundred (i.e. 1%).

One in twenty respondents in Dewsbury and Mirfield (5%) report that their organisation

employs any migrant workers. This is a similar proportion to the Kirklees average of 3%.

9.3.1.1 Trends in workforce growth

The majority of respondents locally report no change in the size of their workforce over

the last 12 months (65%). More than one in five (22%) report an increase and fewer

(12%) report a decrease over time. Thus the recent trend in workforce growth within the

local area is slightly more likely to be positive than is the case across Kirklees (where

17% of respondents have reported a recent increase in the size of their workforce).

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

The trend in the next 12 months is expected to reflect the last 12 months with 25% of

respondents in Dewsbury and Mirfield reporting a probable increase in workforce size and

just 4% reporting a probable decrease. Increases tend to be easier to predict than

decreases as staff lay-offs are uncommon and sudden departures in staff and associated

difficulties in replacing them are by their very nature hard to predict.

9.3.1.2 Occupational profile of the workforce

Respondents were asked for detailed information on the occupations employed within

their organisation. The profile is summarised in the table below and shows the range of

occupations employed in organisations and the proportion of the local area workforce

employed in each occupational group.

Table 12: Occupations of staff employed (all respondents)

Dewsbury and

Mirfield

Kirklees

Dewsbury and

Mirfield

Kirklees

% of all respondents employed staff

in these groups

% of workforce in these groups

Managers and

senior officials

Professional

occupations

Associate

professional and

technical

occupations

Administrative and

secretarial

occupations

Skilled trades

occupations

Personal service

occupations

Sales and customer

service occupations

Process, plant and

machine operatives

Elementary

occupations

Unweighted sample

bases

77 75 16 18

24 21 14 12

12 10 7 7

30 34 7 11

19 23 13 12

8 5 3 5

34 29 18 17

9 7 14 9

12 12 8 9

245 1415 3660 18079 *

* Where provided a response

Within Dewsbury and Mirfield, process, plant and machine operatives make up a higher

than average proportion of the workforce. Slightly fewer staff are employed in managerial

occupations compared with the Kirklees average.

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Locality Profiles and Key Indicators

9.3.1.3 Local employment

Respondents were asked about the proportion of employees that live within a 2 to 3 mile

radius of their workplace.

More than a third (37%) reported that all their workforce lives within this distance from

work. This proportion is similar to the Kirklees average (38%).

One in eight respondents locally (13%) report that their organisation locally does not

employ anyone living within a 2 to 3 mile radius of their workplace. This too is similar to

the Kirklees average (also 13%).

9.3.1.4 Working arrangements for employees

In terms of working arrangements that they have in place for employees, local

organisations are most likely to allow flexitime (35% but below the Kirklees average of

36%).

Three-fifths (61%) have at least one flexible working arrangement in place and this

proportion is higher than the Kirklees average (55%). Locally, nearly one in four

respondents report that their organisation has shift patterns in place (23%) and one in six

(18%) report that their organisation offers employees the opportunity to work at or from

home.

9.3.1.5 Staff turnover

Respondents were asked whether they consider staff turnover at their establishment site

to be high, average or low. The proportion of respondents that feel their organisation’s

staff turnover is high is in the minority, but higher than average (9% of all respondents

locally, compared with 5% across Kirklees as a whole).

The majority of respondents in Dewsbury and Mirfield (62%) feel that staff turnover at

their establishment to be below average. Given the fact that an ‘average’ by definition is

likely to account for the majority of cases, or else be the mid point between two points that

are equally in evidence, it is likely that respondents over-estimate average levels of staff

turnover. Only a minority of local respondents (26%) consider staff turnover at their

establishment to be ‘average’.

9.3.1.6 Skills needs

When asked if they feel that their skill needs will change at their establishment in the next

3 years, one in six respondents in Dewsbury and Mirfield (18%) responded that they

thought they would. This compares with a similar proportion across Kirklees (16%).

In terms of the skills most likely to need developing in the next 3 years, the three most

frequently cited are customer handling skills (79%), management skills, both

leadership/strategic (75%) and supervisory/operational (72%).

Compared with organisations across all Kirklees, language skills are more likely to be

cited by local respondents (47%). Also of some significance in Dewsbury and Mirfield are

technical, practical and job specific skills (71%) and IT user skills (also 71%).

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

9.3.2 Business Planning and Training

The proportion of organisations in Dewsbury and Mirfield that have business planning, HR

and training infrastructure and activity in place is summarised in the figure below.

The data suggests similar levels of formal business planning and training within

organisations in the local area.

Figure 36: Business planning and training in Dewsbury and Mirfield

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted sample bases

9.3.3 Land and location

The main benefits for businesses in locating in Dewsbury and Mirfield are reported as

access to transport links (61%), access to markets/bordering cities (55%) and availability

of appropriate land and/or premises (54%).

Nearly half the respondents in Dewsbury and Mirfield (48%) rate their local area as good

or excellent as a place in which to conduct business. This is lower than the average

across Kirklees of 54%.

More than a quarter (29%) of those rating the locality as poor as a place to conduct

business give the reason as lack of regeneration/locality poor/run down. Around one in

five (21%) cite lack of amenities/facilities/shops closing down.

The proportions of respondents in the local area that are concerned about various issues

is summarised in the figure below.

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Locality Profiles and Key Indicators

Figure 37: Proportion of respondents concerned about specified issues

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted sample bases

Future plans for expansion or for off-loading land/premises in the local area are

summarised in the figure below.

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

Figure 38: Land issues

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted sample bases

9.3.4 Business growth and competitiveness

Organisations in Dewsbury and Mirfield have similar levels of access to IT, such as the

internet, a company website, an intranet and/or extranet and broadband as organisations

across the region.

One in seven (15%) private sector organisations, the same proportion as the average

across Kirklees, sell outside the UK, although local businesses are more likely to rely on

trade with EU countries and the Middle East and rest of Asia.

The mean turnover amongst private sector organisations locally is £3.2m, which is similar

to the Kirklees mean of just under £3.4m.

The trend in turnover and profit past and future is summarised in the figure below. It

shows that the outlook locally is similar to that across Kirklees. Local organisations are

slightly more likely to report an increase in profit in the last three years.

90


Locality Profiles and Key Indicators

Figure 39: Turnover and profit: Trends

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted sample bases

Around a third of respondents in Dewsbury and Mirfield (36%) have introduced new

products or services in the last three years. This compares with 41% across Kirklees.

The proportion of local organisations with plans to introduce new products or services is

slightly higher (39%) and compares with a slightly higher average across Kirklees (42%).

One in seven respondents in the local area (14%) consider there are barriers to

developing new products and services. The proportion is similar to the Kirklees average

(of 13%), suggesting that there are unlikely to be greater impediments to innovation in the

local area. Amongst respondents in Dewsbury and Mirfield, cost is the most frequently

mentioned barrier to developing new products or services (45%).

9.3.5 Corporate social responsibility and engagement

Around a quarter of respondents in Dewsbury and Mirfield (28%) report that their

business is involved in community activities. This proportion is similar to the Kirklees

average (29%).

The community activities that local organisations are involved in are, most commonly,

charity work (37%), community activities/work (24%) and fundraising/sponsorship/

donations (22%).

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

9.3.6 Attracting new recruits and retaining employees

Respondents in Dewsbury and Mirfield are most likely to cite reputation as their

organisation’s biggest selling point for recruiting and retaining their workforce (15%). A

good working environment/friendly/well looked after staff is next most frequently cited

(13%), followed by location (12%) and pay and benefits (11%).

9.4 Huddersfield North

Huddersfield North has a similar profile to that of Kirklees as a whole in terms of the size

of organisations in the local area.

By sector, real estate, renting and business activities firms are represented to a greater

extent than average (31%, compared with 23%). There are, however, fewer construction

firms (4%, compared with 11%) and manufacturers (4%, compared with 11%) firms in the

local area than average.

Public sector organisations represent 20% of business units in the local area, compared

with the Kirklees average of 14%. Multi-site organisations account for around one in four

organisations (26%), a proportion that is slightly higher than the Kirklees average (22%)..

Women-led businesses account for 41% of all businesses locally, which is slightly lower

than the Kirklees average of 45%. The proportion that is MEG-led is similar to the

average (10%, compared with 11%).

9.4.1 Workforce

The following figure summarises the workforce profile in Huddersfield North:

Figure 40: Workforce profile in Huddersfield North

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Locality Profiles and Key Indicators

Based on unweighted employee base of 1624

There is a higher proportion of part time workers and also, linked to this, females within

the workforce locally than average. There are fewer workers within the youngest and

older age groups, with more than half in their prime working years (25-44).

One in twenty respondents in the local area (5%) reported that their organisation employs

any ‘disabled’ employees. This compares with 6% on average across Kirklees.

In terms of the proportion of the workforce that ‘disabled’ employees represent it is just

one in a hundred (i.e. 1%).

One in twenty respondents in Huddersfield North (5%) report that their organisation

employs any migrant workers. This is a similar proportion to the Kirklees average of 3%.

9.4.1.1 Trends in workforce growth

The majority of respondents locally report no change in the size of their workforce over

the last 12 months (72%). One in ten (10%) report an increase and a higher proportion

(18%) report a decrease over time. Thus the recent trend in workforce growth within the

local area is less likely to be positive than is the case across Kirklees (where 17% of

respondents have reported a recent increase in the size of their workforce and 12% have

reported a recent decrease).

The trend in the next 12 months is expected to reflect the last 12 months with 14% of

respondents in Huddersfield North reporting a probable increase in workforce size and

just 8% reporting a probable decrease.

9.4.1.2 Occupational profile of the workforce

Respondents were asked for detailed information on the occupations employed within

their organisation. The profile is summarised in the table below and shows the range of

occupations employed in organisations and the proportion of the local area workforce

employed in each occupational group.

Table 13: Occupations of staff employed (all respondents)

Huddersfield North Kirklees Huddersfield North Kirklees

% of all respondents employed staff

in these groups

% of workforce in these groups

Managers and

senior officials

Professional

occupations

Associate

professional and

technical

occupations

Administrative and

secretarial

occupations

Skilled trades

occupations

75 75 18 18

32 21 10 12

11 10 6 7

34 34 11 11

22 23 8 12

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

Huddersfield North Kirklees Huddersfield North Kirklees

% of all respondents employed staff

in these groups

% of workforce in these groups

Personal service

occupations

Sales and customer

service occupations

Process, plant and

machine operatives

Elementary

occupations

Unweighted sample

bases

10 5 23 5

25 29 11 17

5 7 5 9

11 12 8 9

119 1415 1570* 18079 *

* Where provided a response

Within Huddersfield North, staff in personal service occupations make up a higher than

average proportion of the workforce. Slightly fewer staff are employed in skilled trades,

sales and customer service occupations and as process, plant and machine operatives

compared with the Kirklees average.

9.4.1.3 Local employment

Respondents were asked about the proportion of employees that live within a 2 to 3 mile

radius of their workplace.

Around a third (34%) reported that all their workforce lives within this distance from work.

This proportion is slightly lower than the Kirklees average (38%).

One in six respondents locally (16%) report that their organisation does not employ

anyone living within a 2 to 3 mile radius of their workplace (Kirklees average 13%).

9.4.1.4 Working arrangements for employees

In terms of working arrangements that they have in place for employees, local

organisations are most likely to offer flexitime (33%, 36% across Kirklees).

Nearly half (47%) have at least one flexible arrangement in place but this proportion is

lower than the Kirklees average (55%). Locally, around one in five respondents report

that their organisation has shift patterns in place (21%) and one in six (16%) report that

their organisation offers employees the opportunity to work at or from home.

9.4.1.5 Staff turnover

Respondents were asked whether they consider staff turnover at their establishment site

to be high, average or low. The proportion of local respondents that feel their

organisation’s staff turnover is high is in the minority (6% of all respondents locally,

compared with 5% across Kirklees as a whole).

The majority of respondents in Huddersfield North (65%) feel that staff turnover at their

establishment to be below average. Given the fact that an ‘average’ by definition is likely

to account for the majority of cases, or else be the mid point between two points that are

equally in evidence, it is likely that respondents over-estimate average levels of staff

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Locality Profiles and Key Indicators

turnover. Only a minority of local respondents (29%) consider staff turnover at their

establishment to be ‘average’.

9.4.1.6 Skills needs

When asked if they feel that their skill needs will change at their establishment in the next

3 years, one in ten respondents in Huddersfield North responded that they thought they

would. This compares with a higher proportion across Kirklees (16%).

In terms of the skills most likely to need developing in the next 3 years, the three most

frequently cited are team working skills (75%), IT user skills (71%) and training/coaching

skills (70%).

Compared with organisations across all Kirklees, local respondents are less likely to cite

most skills needs across most localities; the exceptions being those already mentioned

and problem solving skills.

9.4.2 Business Planning and Training

The proportion of organisations in Huddersfield North that have business planning, HR

and training infrastructure and activity in place is summarised in the figure below.

The data suggests similar levels of formal business planning and training within

organisations in the local area.

95


Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

Figure 41: Business planning and training in Huddersfield North

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted sample bases

9.4.3 Land and location

The main benefits for businesses in locating in Huddersfield North are reported as access

to transport links (56%), access to markets/bordering cities (55%), the overall

attractiveness of the locality (53%) and the quality of the local environment (53%).

More than half the respondents in Huddersfield North (54%) rate their local area as good

or excellent as a place in which to conduct business. This is the same as the average

across Kirklees.

More than three-quarters (77%) of those rating the locality as poor as a place to conduct

business give the reason as lack of regeneration/locality poor/run down.

The proportions of respondents in the local area that are concerned about various issues

is summarised in the figure below.

96


Locality Profiles and Key Indicators

Figure 42 : Proportion of respondents concerned about specified issues

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted sample bases

Future plans for expansion or for off-loading land/premises in the local area are

summarised in the figure below.

97


Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

Figure 43 : Land issues

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted sample bases

9.4.4 Business growth and competitiveness

Organisations in Huddersfield North have similar levels of access to IT, such as the

internet, a company website, an intranet and/or extranet and broadband as organisations

across the district.

Fewer than one in ten (9%) private sector organisations, a lower proportion than the

average across Kirklees (15%), sell outside the UK. Local businesses are more likely to

rely on trade with EU countries and the Middle East and rest of Asia.

The mean turnover amongst private sector organisations locally is £1.7m, which is lower

than the Kirklees mean of just under £3.4m.

The trend in turnover and profit past and future is summarised in the figure below. It

shows that the outlook locally is similar to that across Kirklees. Local organisations are,

however, slightly less likely to report an increase in profit in the last three years.

98


Locality Profiles and Key Indicators

Figure 44 : Turnover and profit: Trends

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted sample bases

Around two-fifths of respondents in Huddersfield North (39%) have introduced new

products or services in the last three years. This compares with 41% across Kirklees.

The proportion of local organisations with plans to introduce new products or services is

similar (38%) and compares with a slightly higher average across Kirklees (42%).

One in seven respondents in the local area (14%) consider there are barriers to

developing new products and services. The proportion is similar to the Kirklees average

(of 13%), suggesting that there are unlikely to be greater impediments to innovation in the

locality. Amongst respondents in Huddersfield North, cost is the most frequently

mentioned barrier to developing new products or services (50%).

9.4.5 Corporate social responsibility and engagement

Around a fifth of respondents in Huddersfield North (19%) report that their business is

involved in community activities. This proportion is lower than the Kirklees average

(29%).

The community activities that local organisations are involved in are, most commonly,

charity work (37%), fundraising/sponsorship/donations (32%) and community

activities/work (30%).

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

9.4.6 Attracting new recruits and retaining employees

Respondents in Huddersfield North are most likely to cite pay and benefits as their

organisation’s biggest selling point for recruiting and retaining their workforce (15%).

Reputation is next most frequently cited (11%), followed by a good working

environment/friendly/well looked after staff (11%).

9.5 Huddersfield South

Huddersfield South has a similar profile to that of Kirklees as a whole in terms of the size

of organisations in the local area.

By sector, real estate, renting and business activities firms are represented to a greater

extent than average (29%, compared with 23%). There are, however, fewer construction

firms in the locality than average (6%, compared with 11%).

Public sector organisations represent 15% of business units in the local area, compared

with the Kirklees average of 14%. Multi-site organisations account for more than one in

four organisations (27%), a proportion that is slightly higher than the Kirklees average

(22%). Women-led businesses account for 45% of all businesses locally, which is the

same as the Kirklees average. The proportion that are MEG-led is similar to the average

(10%, compared with 11%).

9.5.1 Workforce

The following figure summarises the workforce profile in Huddersfield South:

Figure 45: Workforce profile in Huddersfield South

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Locality Profiles and Key Indicators

Based on unweighted employee base of 4817

There is a higher representation of younger workers locally than average. The proportion

of workers that are non-white is slightly higher than across the whole of Kirklees.

Just under one in ten respondents in the local area (8%) reported that their organisation

employs any ‘disabled’ employees. This compares with 6% on average across Kirklees.

The proportion of the workforce that ‘disabled’ employees represent is just one in fifty (i.e.

1.6%).

Two percent of respondents in Huddersfield South report that their organisation employs

any migrant workers. This is below the Kirklees average of 3%.

9.5.1.1 Trends in workforce growth

The majority of respondents locally report no change in the size of their workforce over

the last 12 months (75%). One in six (16%) report an increase and fewer (8%) report a

decrease over time. Thus the recent trend in workforce growth in Huddersfield South

generally reflects that of Kirklees, although staff reductions have been less in evidence

locally (where 17% of respondents have reported a recent increase in the size of their

workforce and 12% have reported a recent decrease).

The trend in the next 12 months is expected to reflect the last 12 months with 22% of

respondents in Huddersfield South reporting a probable increase in workforce size and

just 5% reporting a probable decrease.

9.5.1.2 Occupational profile of the workforce

Respondents were asked for detailed information on the occupations employed within

their organisation. The profile is summarised in the table below: it shows the range of

occupations employed in organisations and the proportion of the local area workforce

employed in each occupational group.

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

Table 14: Occupations of staff employed (all respondents)

Huddersfield South

Kirklees

Huddersfield

South

Kirklees

% of all respondents employed staff

in these groups

% of workforce in these groups

Managers and

senior officials

Professional

occupations

Associate

professional and

technical

occupations

Administrative and

secretarial

occupations

Skilled trades

occupations

Personal service

occupations

Sales and customer

service occupations

Process, plant and

machine operatives

Elementary

occupations

Unweighted sample

bases

76 75 18 18

23 21 13 12

8 10 5 7

33 34 11 11

20 23 7 12

6 5 4 5

34 29 28 17

6 7 8 9

10 12 6 9

310 1415 4276* 18079 *

* Where provided a response

Within Huddersfield South, staff in sales and customer service occupations make up a

higher than average proportion of the workforce. Slightly fewer staff are employed in

skilled trades compared with the Kirklees average.

9.5.1.3 Local employment

Respondents were asked about the proportion of employees that live within a 2 to 3 mile

radius of their workplace.

Around a third (34%) reported that all their workforce lives within this distance from work.

This proportion is slightly lower than the Kirklees average (38%).

One in seven respondents locally (14%) report that their organisation locally does not

employ anyone living within a 2 to 3 mile radius of their workplace. This is similar to the

Kirklees average (13%).

9.5.1.4 Working arrangements for employees

In terms of working arrangements that they have in place for employees, local

organisations are most likely to offer flexitime (38%, 36% across Kirklees).

102


Locality Profiles and Key Indicators

More than half (59%) have at least one flexible working arrangement in place and this

proportion is slightly higher than the Kirklees average (55%). Locally, one in four

respondents report that their organisation has shift patterns in place (25%) and one in five

(20%) report that their organisation offers employees the opportunity to work at or from

home.

9.5.1.5 Staff turnover

Respondents were asked whether they consider staff turnover at their establishment site

to be high, average or low. The proportion of local respondents that feel their

organisation’s staff turnover is high is in the minority (4% of all respondents locally,

compared with 5% across Kirklees as a whole).

The majority of respondents in Huddersfield South (68%) feel that staff turnover at their

establishment to be below-average. Given the fact that an ‘average’ by definition is likely

to account for the majority of cases, or else be the mid point between two points that are

equally in evidence, it is likely that respondents over-estimate average levels of staff

turnover. Only a minority of local respondents (25%) consider staff turnover at their

establishment to be ‘average’.

9.5.1.6 Skills needs

When asked if they feel that their skill needs will change at their establishment in the next

3 years, one in six respondents in Huddersfield South (16%) responded that they thought

they would. This is the same as the Kirklees average.

In terms of the skills most likely to need developing in the next 3 years, the three most

frequently cited are management skills – leadership/strategic (81%), technical, practical or

job specific skills (77%) and IT user skills, both general and professional skills (also 77%).

Compared with organisations across all Kirklees, local respondents are more likely to

specify team working (75%, compared with 60%), language (49%, compared with 31%),

problem-solving (73%), management skills – supervisory/operational (73%, compared

with 60%) and numeracy skills (45%, compared with 32%)..

9.5.2 Business Planning and Training

The proportion of organisations in Huddersfield South that have business planning, HR

and training infrastructure and activity in place is summarised in the figure below.

The data suggests similar levels of formal business planning and training within

organisations in the local area.

103


Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

Figure 46 : Business planning and training in Huddersfield South

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted sample bases

9.5.3 Land and location

The main benefits for businesses in locating in Huddersfield South are reported as access

to transport links (64%), the overall attractiveness of the locality (59%) and the quality of

the local environment (57%). Access to markets/bordering cities is also cited as a benefit

by more than half the respondents (54%).

More than half the respondents in Huddersfield South (52%) rate their local area as good

or excellent as a place in which to conduct business. This is a similar proportion to the

average across Kirklees (52%).

More than a third (36%) of those rating the locality as poor as a place to conduct business

give the reason as lack of regeneration/locality poor/run down.

The proportions of respondents in the local area that are concerned about various issues

is summarised in the figure below.

104


Locality Profiles and Key Indicators

Figure 47: Proportion of respondents concerned about specified issues

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted sample bases

Future plans for expansion or for off-loading land/premises in the locality are summarised

in the figure below.

105


Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

Figure 48 : Land issues

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted sample bases

9.5.4 Business growth and competitiveness

Organisations in Huddersfield South have similar levels of access to IT, such as the

internet, a company website, an intranet and/or extranet and broadband as organisations

across Kirklees.

One in seven (15%) private sector organisations in Huddersfield South sell outside the

UK. This is the same proportion as the Kirklees average. Local businesses are less likely

to rely on trade with EU countries than average, but, as amongst their counterparts across

Kirklees, trade in a wide range of overseas markets.

The mean turnover amongst private sector organisations locally is just over £1m, which is

lower than the Kirklees mean of just under £3.4m.

The trend in turnover and profit past and future is summarised in the figure below. It

shows that the outlook locally is similar to that across Kirklees. Local organisations are,

however, slightly more likely to report an increase in turnover and profit in the last three

years.

106


Locality Profiles and Key Indicators

Figure 49: Turnover and profit: Trends

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted sample bases

More than two-fifths of respondents in Huddersfield South (44%) have introduced new

products or services in the last three years. This compares with 41% across Kirklees.

The proportion of local organisations with plans to introduce new products or services is

similar (44%) and compares with a slightly lower average across Kirklees (42%).

Around one in ten respondents in the local area (11%) consider there are barriers to

developing new products and services. The proportion is slightly lower than the Kirklees

average (of 13%). Amongst respondents in Huddersfield South, cost is the most

frequently mentioned barrier to developing new products or services (28%), followed by

space (20%), availability of labour/lack of skills/training (13%) and lack of custom (13%).

9.5.5 Corporate social responsibility and engagement

Around a third of respondents in Huddersfield South (31%) report that their business is

involved in community activities. This proportion is slightly higher than the Kirklees

average (29%).

The community activities that local organisations are involved in are, most commonly,

charity work (37%), fundraising/sponsorship/donations (34%) and community

activities/work (23%).

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

9.5.6 Attracting new recruits and retaining employees

Respondents in Huddersfield South are most likely to cite reputation as their

organisation’s biggest selling point for recruiting and retaining their workforce (17%). Pay

and benefits is next most frequently cited (13%), followed by a good working

environment/friendly/well looked after staff (9%).

9.6 Spen

Spen’s business base has a similar organisation size profile to that of Kirklees as a whole.

By sector, manufacturing is represented to a greater extent than average (16%, compared

with 11%). There are, however, fewer wholesale and retail firms in the locality than

average (20%, compared with 26%).

Public sector organisations account for 14% of business units in the local area, which is

the same as the Kirklees average. Multi-site organisations account for one in four

organisations (25%), a proportion that is slightly higher than the Kirklees average (22%).

Women-led businesses account for 46% of all businesses locally, which is similar to the

Kirklees average of 45%. The proportion that is MEG-led is lower than average (6%,

compared with 11%).

9.6.1 Workforce

The following figure summarises the workforce profile in Spen:

108


Locality Profiles and Key Indicators

Figure 50 : Workforce profile in Spen

Based on unweighted employee base of 2388

There is a higher representation of full time workers locally than average but the

workforce gender profile is similar to that of Kirklees as a whole. The proportion of

workers that are non-white is slightly higher than the Kirklees average.

Less than one in twenty respondents in the local area (4%) reported that their

organisation employs any ‘disabled’ employees. This compares with 6% on average

across Kirklees.

In terms of the proportion of the workforce that ‘disabled’ employees represent it is just

one in hundred (i.e. actually less than 1%).

One in fifty respondents in Spen (2%) reports that their organisation employs any migrant

workers. This is a similar proportion to the Kirklees average of 3%.

9.6.1.1 Trends in workforce growth

The majority of respondents locally report no change in the size of their workforce over

the last 12 months (70%). One in six (19%) report an increase and fewer (12%) report a

decrease over time. Thus the recent trend in workforce growth in Spen generally reflects

that of Kirklees, although staff reductions have been less in evidence locally (where 17%

of respondents have reported a recent increase in the size of their workforce and 12%

have reported a recent decrease).

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

The trend in the next 12 months is expected to reflect the last 12 months with 18% of

respondents in Spen reporting a probable increase in workforce size although just 3%

anticipate a decrease.

9.6.1.2 Occupational profile of the workforce

Respondents were asked for detailed information on the occupations employed within

their organisation. The profile is summarised in the table below: it shows the range of

occupations employed in organisations and the proportion of the local area workforce

employed in each occupational group.

Table 15: Occupations of staff employed (all respondents)

Spen Kirklees Spen Kirklees

% of all respondents employed staff

in these groups

% of workforce in these groups

Managers and

senior officials

Professional

occupations

Associate

professional and

technical

occupations

Administrative and

secretarial

occupations

Skilled trades

occupations

Personal service

occupations

Sales and customer

service occupations

Process, plant and

machine operatives

Elementary

occupations

Unweighted sample

bases

72 75 20 18

10 21 18 12

14 10 9 7

34 34 10 11

20 23 9 12

5 5 6 5

28 29 11 17

8 7 9 9

13 12 8 9

179 1415 2363 18079 *

* Where provided a response

Within Spen staff in professional occupations make up a higher than average proportion

of the workforce. Slightly fewer staff are employed in sales and customer service

occupations and skilled trades compared with the Kirklees averages.

9.6.1.3 Local employment

Respondents were asked about the proportion of employees that live within a 2 to 3 mile

radius of their workplace.

Around a third (36%) reported that all their workforce lives within this distance from work.

This proportion is slightly lower than the Kirklees average (38%).

110


Locality Profiles and Key Indicators

Around one in ten respondents (11%) report that their organisation locally does not

employ anyone living within a 2 to 3 mile radius of their workplace. This too is slightly

lower than the Kirklees average (13%).

9.6.1.4 Working arrangements for employees

In terms of working arrangements that they have in place for employees, local

organisations are most likely to offer flexitime (32%, 36% across Kirklees).

More than two-fifths (45%) have at least one flexible working arrangement in place, but

this proportion is lower than the Kirklees average (55%). Locally, one in six respondents

report that their organisation has shift patterns in place (18%) and one in seven (15%)

report that their organisation offers employees the opportunity to work at or from home.

9.6.1.5 Staff turnover

Respondents were asked whether they consider staff turnover at their establishment site

to be high, average or low. The proportion of local respondents that feel their

organisation’s staff turnover is high is in the minority (4% of all respondents locally,

compared with 5% across Kirklees as a whole).

The majority of respondents in Spen (70%) feel that staff turnover at their establishment

to be below average. Given the fact that an ‘average’ by definition is likely to account for

the majority of cases, or else be the mid point between two points that are equally in

evidence, it is likely that respondents over-estimate average levels of staff turnover. Only

a minority of local respondents (25%) consider staff turnover at their establishment to be

‘average’.

9.6.1.6 Skills needs

When asked if they feel that their skill needs will change at their establishment in the next

3 years, one in eight respondents in Spen (12%) responded that they thought they would.

This is lower than the Kirklees average of 16%.

In terms of the skills most likely to need developing in the next 3 years, the three most

frequently cited are management skills – leadership/strategic (72%), customer handling

skills (70%) and team working skills (69%).

Compared with organisations across all Kirklees, local respondents are more likely to

specify literacy (36%, compared with 30%) and health and safety skills (10%, compared

with 1%).

9.6.2 Business Planning and Training

The proportion of organisations in Spen that have business planning, HR and training

infrastructure and activity in place is summarised in the figure below.

The data suggests similar levels of formal business planning and training within

organisations in the locality.

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

Figure 51 : Business planning and training in Spen

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted sample bases

9.6.3 Land and location

The main benefits for businesses in locating in Spen are reported as access to transport

links (61%), access to markets/bordering cities (55%) and the availability of appropriate

land and/or premises (51%).

Around half the respondents in Spen (51%) rate their local area as good or excellent as a

place in which to conduct business. This is a similar proportion to the average across

Kirklees (52%).

More than two-fifths (44%) of those rating the locality as poor as a place to conduct

business give the reason as lack of regeneration/locality poor/run down.

The proportions of respondents in the local area that are concerned about various issues

is summarised in the figure below.

112


Locality Profiles and Key Indicators

Figure 52 : Proportion of respondents concerned about specified issues

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted sample bases

Future plans for expansion or for off-loading land/premises in the local area are

summarised in the figure below.

113


Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

Figure 53: Land issues

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted sample bases

9.6.4 Business growth and competitiveness

Organisations in Spen have similar levels of access to IT, such as the internet, a company

website, an intranet and/or extranet and broadband as organisations across Kirklees.

Around one in ten (11%) private sector organisations in Spen sell outside the UK. This is

a lower proportion than the Kirklees average. Local businesses are more likely to rely on

trade with EU countries than average and at least two-fifths of exporters (but more

commonly more than half) trade in the range of overseas markets, including America

(60%), the Middle East (55%) and Australia and New Zealand (54%).

The mean turnover amongst private sector organisations locally is just under £2.8m,

which is lower than the Kirklees mean of just under £3.4m.

The trend in turnover and profit past and future is summarised in the figure below. It

shows that the outlook locally is similar to that across Kirklees. Local organisations are,

however, slightly less likely to report an increase in profit in the last three years.

114


Locality Profiles and Key Indicators

Figure 54 : Turnover and profit: Trends

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted sample bases

More than a third of respondents in Spen (38%) have introduced new products or services

in the last three years. This compares with 41% across Kirklees. The proportion of local

organisations with plans to introduce new products or services is similar (36%) and

compares with a higher average across Kirklees (42%).

One in ten respondents in the local area (10%) consider there are barriers to developing

new products and services. The proportion is slightly lower than the Kirklees average (of

13%). Amongst respondents in Spen, cost is the most frequently mentioned barrier to

developing new products or services (30%), followed by space (22%) and competition

(22%).

9.6.5 Corporate social responsibility and engagement

Around a quarter of respondents in Spen (26%) report that their business is involved in

community activities. This proportion is slightly lower than the Kirklees average (29%).

The community activities that local organisations are involved in are, most commonly,

community activities/work (34%), fundraising/sponsorship/donations (32%) and charity

work (25%).

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

9.6.6 Attracting new recruits and retaining employees

Respondents in Spen are most likely to cite reputation as their organisation’s biggest

selling point for recruiting and retaining their workforce (17%). Location is next most

frequently cited (12%), followed by pay and benefits (11%).

9.7 The Valleys

The business community in the Valleys locality has a higher than average proportion of

small firms.

By sector, construction has an above average share of local businesses (20%, compared

with 11%) but, overall, the industrial profile of the Valleys is similar to that of Kirklees as a

whole.

Public sector organisations represent just 9% of business units in the local area, which is

lower than the Kirklees average of 14%. Multi-site organisations account for one in seven

organisations (14%), a proportion that is lower than the Kirklees average (22%). Womenled

businesses account for 45% of all businesses locally, which is the same proportion as

the Kirklees average. The proportion that is MEG-led is lower than average (5%,

compared with 11%).

9.7.1 Workforce

The following figure summarises the workforce profile in the Valleys:

Figure 55 : Workforce profile in the Valleys

Based on unweighted employee base of 2898

116


Locality Profiles and Key Indicators

There is a higher representation of male workers locally than average but the workforce

profile in terms of full time and part time status is similar to that of Kirklees as a whole.

The proportion of workers that are non-white is much lower than the Kirklees average,

reflecting the relatively low proportion of MEG-led organisations in the local area.

Less than one in ten respondents in the local area (7%) reported that their organisation

employs any ‘disabled’ employees. This compares with 6% on average across Kirklees.

In terms of the proportion of the workforce that ‘disabled’ employees represent it is just

one in hundred (i.e. 1.3%).

Just 3% of respondents in the Valleys report that their organisation employs any migrant

workers. This is the same as the Kirklees average.

9.7.1.1 Trends in workforce growth

The majority of respondents locally report no change in the size of their workforce over

the last 12 months (70%). One in seven (15%) report an increase and a similar

proportion (15%) report a decrease over time. Thus the recent trend in workforce growth

in the Valleys broadly reflects that of Kirklees, although job losses have been slightly

more in evidence locally (where 17% of respondents have reported a recent increase in

the size of their workforce and 12% have reported a recent decrease).

The trend in the next 12 months is expected to reflect the last 12 months with 19% of

respondents in the Valleys reporting a probable increase in workforce size although just

3% anticipate a decrease.

9.7.1.2 Occupational profile of the workforce

Respondents were asked for detailed information on the occupations employed within

their organisation. The profile is summarised in the table below: it shows the range of

occupations employed in organisations and the proportion of the local area workforce

employed in each occupational group.

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Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

Table 16: Occupations of staff employed (all respondents)

The Valleys Kirklees The Valleys Kirklees

% of all respondents employed staff

in these groups

% of workforce in these groups

Managers and

senior officials

Professional

occupations

Associate

professional and

technical

occupations

Administrative and

secretarial

occupations

Skilled trades

occupations

Personal service

occupations

Sales and customer

service occupations

Process, plant and

machine operatives

Elementary

occupations

Unweighted sample

bases

71 75 21 18

18 21 10 12

9 10 7 7

34 34 12 11

26 23 13 12

4 5 4 5

24 29 12 17

6 7 9 9

13 12 12 9

271 1415 2727 18079 *

* Where provided a response

Within the Valleys, staff in elementary occupations make up a higher than average

proportion of the workforce. Fewer staff are employed in sales and customer service and

professional occupations compared with the Kirklees average.

9.7.1.3 Local employment

Respondents were asked about the proportion of employees that live within a 2 to 3 mile

radius of their workplace.

Nearly half the respondents (49%) reported that all their workforce lives within this

distance from work. This proportion is higher than the Kirklees average (38%).

One in ten respondents locally (10%) report that their organisation locally does not

employ anyone living within a 2 to 3 mile radius of their workplace. This is slightly lower

than the Kirklees average (13%).

9.7.1.4 Working arrangements for employees

In terms of working arrangements that they have in place for employees, local

organisations are most likely to allow flexitime (39%, 36% across Kirklees).

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Locality Profiles and Key Indicators

More than half (58%) have at least one flexible working arrangement in place and this

proportion is similar to the Kirklees average (55%). Locally, more than one in four

respondents report that their organisation offers employees the opportunity to work at or

from home (28%) and one in six (16%) report that their organisation offers shift working.

9.7.1.5 Staff turnover

Respondents were asked whether they consider staff turnover at their establishment site

to be high, average or low. The proportion of local respondents that feel their

organisation’s staff turnover is high is in the minority (3% of all respondents locally,

compared with 5% across Kirklees as a whole).

The majority of respondents in the Valleys (79%) feel that staff turnover at their

establishment to be below average. Given the fact that an ‘average’ by definition is likely

to account for the majority of cases, or else be the mid point between two points that are

equally in evidence, it is likely that respondents over-estimate average levels of staff

turnover. Only a minority of local respondents (15%) consider staff turnover at their

establishment to be ‘average’.

9.7.1.6 Skills needs

When asked if they feel that their skill needs will change at their establishment in the next

3 years, one in five respondents in the Valleys (20%) responded that they thought they

would. This is slightly higher than the Kirklees average of 16%.

In terms of the skills most likely to need developing in the next 3 years, the three most

frequently cited are training/coaching skills (64%), IT user skills (60%) and management

skills – leadership/strategic (55%).

Compared with organisations across all Kirklees, local respondents are less likely to

specify any other skills.

9.7.2 Business Planning and Training

The proportion of organisations in the Valleys that have business planning, HR and

training infrastructure and activity in place is summarised in the figure below.

The data suggests similar levels of formal business planning and training within

organisations in the local area.

119


Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

Figure 56 : Business planning and training in the Valleys

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted sample bases

9.7.3 Land and location

The main benefits for businesses in locating in the Valleys are reported as the overall

attractiveness of the locality (66%), the quality of the local environment (64%) and the IT

infrastructure/access to broadband (52%).

Around three-fifths of respondents in the Valleys (62%) rate their local area as good or

excellent as a place in which to conduct business. This is a higher proportion than the

average across Kirklees (52%).

More than a quarter (28%) of those rating the locality as poor as a place to conduct

business give the reason as no customer base/low income locality/lack of business, while

slightly fewer (26%) cite lack of regeneration/locality poor/run down.

The proportions of respondents in the local area that are concerned about various issues

is summarised in the figure below.

120


Locality Profiles and Key Indicators

Figure 57: Proportion of respondents concerned about specified issues

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted sample bases

Future plans for expansion or for off-loading land/premises in the local area are

summarised in the figure below.

121


Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

Figure 58 : Land issues

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted sample bases

9.7.4 Business growth and competitiveness

Organisations in the Valleys have similar levels of access to IT, such as the internet, a

company website, an intranet and/or extranet and broadband as organisations across

Kirklees.

One in six (18%) private sector organisations in the Valleys sell outside the UK. This is a

slightly higher proportion than the Kirklees average of 15%. Local businesses are more

likely to rely on trade with non-EU countries within Europe than average as well as trade

with the Far East.

The mean turnover amongst private sector organisations locally is just under £9.5m,

which is higher than the Kirklees mean of just under £3.4m.

The trend in turnover and profit past and future is summarised in the figure below. It

shows that the outlook locally is more positive with regard to the next three years than it is

across Kirklees. Local organisations are, however, slightly less likely to report an

increase in profit in the last three years.

122


Locality Profiles and Key Indicators

Figure 59 : Turnover and profit: Trends

Figures in parentheses denote unweighted sample bases

More than two-fifths of respondents in the Valleys (44%) have introduced new products or

services in the last three years. This compares with 41% across Kirklees. The

proportion of local organisations with plans to introduce new products or services is

similar (45%) and compares with a lower average across Kirklees (42%).

One in six respondents in the local area (16%) consider there are barriers to developing

new products and services. The proportion is slightly higher than the Kirklees average (of

13%). Amongst respondents in the Valleys, cost is the most frequently mentioned barrier

to developing new products or services (46%), followed by over-regulation/red tape

(including planning permission) (21%).

9.7.5 Corporate social responsibility and engagement

Around a third of respondents in the Valleys (35%) report that their business is involved in

community activities. This proportion is higher than the Kirklees average (29%).

The community activities that local organisations are involved in are, most commonly,

fundraising/sponsorship/donations (40%), community activities/work (35%), and

involvement with local schools (25%).

9.7.6 Attracting new recruits and retaining employees

Respondents in the Valleys are most likely to cite reputation as their organisations biggest

selling point for recruiting and retaining their workforce (21%). Job security is next most

123


Kirklees Employer Survey 2008

frequently cited (11%), followed by good working environment/friendly/well looked after

staff (14%).

124


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