Towards a Climate Change Strategy and Action ... - Knowsley Council

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Towards a Climate Change Strategy and Action ... - Knowsley Council

Towards a Climate Change

Strategy and Action Plan for

the Knowsley Partnership

A Consultation Document

December 2009

Prepared by:

Environmental Sustainability Service

Directorate of Neighbourhood Services

Knowsley Council Stretton Way

Huyton Knowsley L36 6JF


Page

1 About this Consultation 2

2 Vision and Objectives 3

3 The Causes of Climate Change 6

4 The Effects of Climate Change - Risks and Opportunities 7

5 Policy Context 9

6 Building Strategic Capacity 11

7 Knowsley’s CO 2 Emissions and Targets 13

8 Actions on Climate Change: 16

• Domestic Properties

• Business and Economic Development

• Transport

• Embedding Action on Climate Change

Across the Knowsley Partnership

• Natural Environment

• Adapting to Climate Change

• Land Use Planning

9 Next Steps 26

Appendix 1 - Consultation Response Form 27

1


The global challenge of tackling climate change presents both major

opportunities and risks for Knowsley. On one hand economies that move now

towards a low-carbon model will be well placed to benefit from new investment

in so-called ‘green collar’ jobs and markets, such as the new fuel efficient ‘baby

Range Rover’ by Jaguar in Halewood. On the other hand a future of uncontrolled

climate change will mean flooding, heat waves, and unpredictable weather will

create upheaval in the UK, but especially for the vulnerable and poor.

The purpose of developing a Strategy and Action

Plan for the Knowsley Partnership is to agree a

practical approach to tackle climate change in a way

between now and 2023 that supports Knowsley

Council objectives to boost the local economy,

protect us from severe weather, secure our energy

supply, and improve the quality of life for our citizens.

Knowsley is already carrying out a number of

powerful initiatives to deal with climate change that

we can rightly be proud of. Knowsley’s per capita

carbon emissions have reduced between 2005 and

2007 and remain below the national average.

Knowsley’s Sustainability Community Strategy

2008-2023 also underlines the Knowsley

Partnership’s commitment to act on climate change,

stating that by 2023 we want to have a Borough with

low carbon emissions, and that we will mitigate and

adapt to climate change, monitor and manage flood

risks and address the environmental and health

impacts of increased heat waves. Further to this, in

October 2008, Knowsley Council’s Climate Change

Strategy was approved. The Strategy includes action

on community CO 2 emissions in relation to the

Council’s role as a service provider and community

leader. The Council’s Strategy will therefore also

support and feed into the wider Local Strategic

Partnership (LSP) Strategy and Action Plan

proposed here.

This consultation document provides a summary of

the work undertaken to date and proposed future

actions in order to provide an opportunity for a wide

range of partners and stakeholders in Knowsley to

input their views to shape the final Strategy and

Action Plan.

These represent a mix of current and newly

suggested schemes to enable the Council to move

forward with our partners with confidence from day

one. Specific questions are posed throughout the

document but any other comments are also

welcome. The intention is to publish the final

document following feedback and iteration

in spring 2010. The deadline for feedback is

1st March 2010.

The consultation document has been prepared

following preliminary outreach to establish the

evidence-base for current and best practice.

This includes our understanding of the wider policy fit

with the Liverpool City Region and other agencies.

Over the last year, focus workshops have been

held with the Environment, Housing and Transport

Sub-groups of the Strategic Housing and

Environment Partnership (SHEP) to address key

issues such as energy use in domestic properties,

waste, communicating climate change, embedding

climate change across the LSP, adapting to climate

change and transport. Work has also been

on-going with the Knowsley Business Environment

Club (a sub-group of the Economic Partnership) to

address reducing energy use in industrial/

commercial properties. A general workshop on

climate change was held for LSP partners in

May 2009.

Recognising the complex nature of the issue, this

document will be used to produce bespoke

communications for the general public, businesses

and other key partners to ensure they are clear what

the Council and Knowsley Partnership are proposing

and are asking of them.

2


Our proposed Vision is:

Knowsley - the borough of choice for low carbon inward investment,

working, visiting and living’

If we successfully achieve this vision, by 2023 Knowsley will be a borough with low carbon emissions from both

its businesses and homes, will have prepared for the effects of climate change and will have a strong and

thriving low carbon economy.

QUESTION 1:

Is this the right vision for Knowsley’s Climate Change Strategy?

Does it capture the key elements of what we need to achieve?

Our 10 Catalytic Objectives are:

New/

Current Objective Key projects Measure Target

Current (1) To reduce CO 2 • Retrofit of poor housing stock via % reduction in CO 2 Use overall NI 186

emissions from Warmfront, Warmstreets and emissions from target (10.1%

efficiency in Community Energy Saving Programme energy use in reduction from 2005

energy use, waste to include regeneration of domestic properties baseline by 2011

and water in Stockbridge Village and 21.1% reduction

domestic • Re-launch of Strategic Housing and Kg of residual waste from 2005 baseline

properties in Environment Partnership per household by 2021) or develop

Knowsley • Participation in Energy Saving Trust separate target for

one-on-one programme

energy use in

• Recycling and other household

domestic properties.

behaviour change campaigns NI 191 targets -

e.g. ’Give and Take’ days with KHT

2009/10 667kg

and Green Fayre

residual waste.

• Application to DECC, ERDF and EST for

low carbon communities challenge

Targets for

subsequent years

are to be

determined

Current (2) To reduce CO 2 • Knowsley Business Environment Club % reduction in CO 2 Use overall NI 186

emissions from emissions from target (10.1%

efficiency in energy use in reduction from 2005

energy use, waste industrial/ baseline by 2011

and water in commercial and 21.1% reduction

industrial/ premises from 2005 baseline

commercial

by 2021) or develop

premises in

Knowsley

separate target for

energy use in

industrial/

commercial

premises

3


New/

Current Objective Key projects Measure Target

New (3) To increase the • Facilitate business proposals with Amount of Incorporate into

amount of Jaguar, QVC, Sonae and Energos. renewable energy draft LDF minimum

renewable energy To be developed as part of Knowsley generated in 12MW renewable

generated in Renewable Energy Study Knowsley energy by 2026

Knowsley

Current (4) To reduce CO 2 • All partners within the Knowsley % reduction in CO 2 Use overall NI 186

emissions from Partnership develop their own plans emissions from target (10.1%

transport in on Sustainable Travel transport reduction from 2005

Knowsley • Investigate/promote further use of baseline by 2011

alternative fuels

and 21.1% reduction

• Feed into the development of the next

from 2005 baseline

Local Transport Plan (LTP3) which will

by 2021) or develop

run from March 2011 - March 2016

separate target for

(led by Merseytravel)

transport

Current (5) To reduce CO 2 • Participation in Energy Saving Trust Accreditation to Third party

emissions from one-on-one programme Carbon Trust assessment against

the council’s • Application to Carbon Trust carbon standard Carbon Trust

estates and management programme standard by 2011

services in • ISO14001 environmental management

Knowsley

system pilot

New (6) To stimulate • A ‘People’s climate fund’ distributing Number of grant 10 projects per

grassroots grants to support locally championed funded projects partnership area

community projects. (This is a refresh and extension across each per annum

leadership in of the existing Environmental partnership area

Knowsley

Challenge Award)

New (7) To nurture • Knowsley Business Environment Club Achievement of April 2012

local low carbon • Sustainable procurement via flexible Level 5 of the

supply chains in framework with Environlink Northwest government’s

Knowsley • Application to SME environmental flexible framework

service with Groundwork

(Knowsley Council)

New (8) To establish • Participation in Liverpool City Region Representation to Formal appointment

Knowsley as a Low Carbon Economy strand of MAA Department for by Department for

Low Carbon economy programme Business, Innovation Business Innovation

Economic Trade • Application to Ofgem Low Carbon & Skills and Skills by 2010

Zone

Networks Fund

New (9) To embed • Establish cross-thematic Climate % of Partners with To be developed

action on climate Change Group as part of LSP Carbon following survey of

change across the • Participation in Local Government Management Plans current position

Knowsley

Information Unit carbon trading

Partnership scheme pilot

through carbon

budgets

Current (10) To prepare for • Rollout of new Green Space Strategy Achievement of April 2012

the future effects • Climate change-ready planning & Level 4 as defined

of climate change architecture to include Local by NI 188

in Knowsley Development Framework

4


These objectives are a mix of current and new

projects. Consequently we build on an existing

platform of productive work in the Borough.

Just as importantly the objectives bring together

activities in new technology and supporting

infrastructure with positive behaviour change

to ensure success.

QUESTION 2:

Will these set of objectives achieve our vision? If not, what else needs

to be included?

QUESTION 3:

With no data on the amount of trade waste collected in the Borough, how can

we measure progress against this objective?

QUESTION 4:

Should we set individual targets for reducing CO 2 emissions from energy use in

housing and industrial/commercial properties and transport?

5


A report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in 2007

concluded that it was at least 90% certain that human emissions of greenhouse

gases are warming the earth’s surface rather than natural variations.

The process of climate change is as follows: as the

sun warms the earth, some of the energy reflected

back towards space becomes trapped by gases in

the atmosphere, keeping the heat in. This is a

natural process known as the greenhouse effect.

When we use gas and electricity, travel in cars, send

waste to landfill, greenhouse gases such as carbon

dioxide (CO 2 ) and methane are emitted. There is

strong scientific consensus that this human activity is

making the greenhouse effect stronger, causing

global warming and the earth’s climate to

change unnaturally.

It is therefore clear that to lessen the future effects of

climate change, we need to reduce our greenhouse

gas emissions. This means reducing our energy

use, transport use and production of waste.

QUESTION 5:

Do you agree with the causes of climate change outlined here and agree that

everyone needs to take action now?

QUESTION 6:

As a householder/business/organisation, do you understand what action you

need to take to reduce your carbon emissions? What further support would

help you to take further action? What do you think the barriers are to taking

action and how can we address this?

6


Risks of Climate Change

In 2002, the UK Climate Impacts Programme

(UKCIP) published a range of climate change

scenarios, derived from a series of climate modelling

experiments (commonly known as the ‘UKCIP

Scenarios’). These have now been updated and in

July 2009, the UK Climate Projections 2009 were

released. The projections contain probabilistic

information on the likely effects of climate change

and the likely changes in weather patterns.

Key findings for 2020 (given a scenario of ‘medium’

carbon emissions) for the Northwest include:

• Warmer winters with increased precipitation;

• Hotter summers with decreased precipitation;

and

• Increased severe weather events and

storminess.

By 2080 the same trends continue but with

higher temperatures, and steeper changes in

precipitation patterns.

The projections are very detailed and training has

just been received in order that the specific data for

Knowsley can be analysed and fed into our on-going

work on adapting to climate change.

These predicted changes will have an impact.

In 2005, the Northwest Climate Group published a

report ‘Climate Change in the Northwest and its

Impacts’. Potential impacts for the region include:

• Increased risk of flooding;

• Transport disruption due to flooding, extreme

weather events, infrastructure damage;

• Building damage due to flooding and extreme

weather events;

• Building design will need to adapt to higher

summer temperatures; and

• Opportunities for increased visitor numbers,

which will need to be managed to protect the

environment.

The Health Protection Agency and Department of

Health have also highlighted potential impacts on

health such as increased risk of heat-related deaths,

skin cancer and food poisoning.

Research undertaken to date by Knowsley Council

has highlighted some of the recent impacts of severe

weather on the Borough which may increase in the

future, for example:

• Flooding incidents causing damage to

property and green spaces;

• Disruption to outdoor events; and

• Uncomfortable working conditions during heat

waves.

In addition, a trawl of local media articles undertaken

to compile a Local Climate Impact Profile (LCLIP),

highlight some of the impacts on everyday life in

Merseyside. Below are just a few examples:

• “City sizzles as mercury rises”

(Liverpool Daily Post, 30/06/2009);

• “Driver dies after flooding crash”

(BBC Merseyside News, 12/05/2008); and

• “Storms cause chaos across region”

(Liverpool Daily Post, 18/01/2007).

Therefore to fulfil the vision of Knowsley’s

Sustainable Community Strategy for Knowsley to be

the ‘Borough of Choice’, it is essential that we ensure

Knowsley is well adapted to cope with the future

effects of climate change.

7


QUESTION 7:

Do you understand how future climate change will affect Knowsley and you as

an individual and your business/organisation? If not, what further information/

support is needed?

Opportunities of Climate Change

There are clear opportunities from taking action on

climate change that should not be overlooked, and

indeed embraced. The Treasury’s ‘Stern Review’

made headline news in 2006 as it was the first

comprehensive assessment of global economics

and climate change. Two main messages came out

of the review:

• The economic benefits of strong, early action

on climate change outweigh the costs.

Therefore the costs incurred in reducing

emissions must be viewed as an investment to

avoid the risks of the future.

• The stabilisation of carbon emissions and

averting climate change is feasible and

consistent with continued economic growth.

In July 2009, a mini-Stern review for the Liverpool City

Region was published. The review concluded that by

2020 the costs to businesses and public sector

bodies of not adjusting and adapting to climate

change could amount to 1% of the area’s GVA

(a measure of economic value). The area has

some significant potential assets to exploit the

opportunities from the low carbon economy, and

could see 6,000 to 7,000 new jobs in the energy and

environmental technology and service sector emerge

in the next five to seven years.

This is picked up in the Economy Platform of the

Liverpool City Region’s Multi Area Agreement, which

was signed in September 2009. One of the four

‘Transformational Actions’ within this platform relates

to the Low Carbon Economy and states:

‘We (the Liverpool City Region) will become

energy self-sufficient and a net energy

exporter by the year 2030, through a

combination of greater energy efficiency

and renewable supply.’

‘We will become the biggest low carbon

goods and services city-region economy in

the UK’.

Other opportunities presented by taking action on

climate change include:

• Increased renewable energy supply resulting

in a reduced reliance on limited natural

resources such as oil and gas;

• Lower energy bills due to increased energy

efficiency measures;

• Reduction in the amount of waste sent to

landfill; and

• Improvements in public transport resulting in

improved accessibility.

QUESTION 8:

Do you agree that the Climate Change Strategy should also address how

Knowsley can take advantage of the opportunities of a transition to a low

carbon economy?

QUESTION 9:

Are there any other key opportunities that need to be considered?

8


International and National

The Kyoto Protocol is an international agreement to

reduce greenhouse emission such as carbon

dioxide. It came into force in February 2005 and it is

legally binding to those countries that have ratified it

like the UK. The UK’s target is to reduce emissions

by 12.5% below 1990 levels between 2008-2012.

In March 2008 the Government reported that the UK

is on track to meet its target. It is to be renegotiated

in December 2009 with the expectation that the

target will be increased.

The UK Climate Change Act 2008 sets legally

binding carbon budgets with the long term goal to

reduce CO 2 emissions by a very challenging 80% by

2050. The UK Government has placed an emphasis

on local authorities setting a leading example on

climate change. Action by local authorities will be

critical to the achievement of the Government’s

climate change objectives. As part of the Act, the

Carbon Reduction Commitment will establish a

new mandatory carbon emissions ‘cap and trade’

scheme designed to help public and private

organisations improve energy efficiency, save

money and reduce the amount of carbon dioxide

emitted in the UK. The Council is obliged to

participate in the scheme from April 2010 onwards

and register with the Environment Agency for it.

Each year Knowsley needs to purchase emission

allowances corresponding to our total CO 2

emissions. Finally, the UK Climate Change Act 2008

also establishes scrutiny arrangements on

adaptation. This gives the Government power to

require public authorities and others to report on

how they have assessed the risks of climate change

to their work and what they are doing to address

these risks.

In July 2009 DEFRA and DECC produced the Draft

Flood and Water Management Bill and Low

Carbon Transition White Paper respectively.

The former proposes new powers and responsibilities

for local authorities in relation to flood management

versus those of the Environment Agency. The latter

sets out the path towards achieving the long term

goal to reduce CO 2 emissions by a very challenging

80% by 2050 including new funding schemes from

central government and the big six energy suppliers

for local authorities such as “green innovation towns”

and “green transport” competitions and a “pay as

you save for greener households” pilot. The issue of

building strategic capacity in Knowsley is explored in

more detail in Section 6.

Local planning authorities like Knowsley Council are

required to promote greater use of decentralised and

renewable or low carbon energy in developments.

Building Regulations Part L 2006 sets minimum

requirements for emissions and energy use from new

or substantially refurbished buildings. This now

includes a zero carbon requirement for new homes

by 2016.

The Government’s Performance Framework has also

created several National Indicators specific to

climate change with regards to Knowsley Council

estates and operations (NI185), per capita emissions

(NI186), NI187 (fuel poverty), and adaptation (NI188).

The Council is required to report on an annual

basis to the Government (DEFRA/DECC) on

these indicators regardless of whether we have

adopted them in our Local Area Agreement or not.

Wider inspection is required in the form of the

Comprehensive Area Assessment (CAA), which is a

new approach that provides the first independent

assessment of the prospects for local areas and the

quality of life for people living there. It assesses and

reports how well public money is spent and ensures

that local public bodies are accountable for their

quality and impact. ‘Use of Resources’ is a key part

of the organisational assessment that relates to

Knowsley Council. Its definition includes natural

resources, which is directly relevant to climate

change. The Key Line of Enquiry (KLOE) focus

involves an organisation understanding and

quantifying its use of natural resources, managing its

performance to reduce its impact on the

environment, and managing the environmental risks

it faces, working effectively with partners. In further

support of this, the Department of Communities and

Local Government’s (DCLG) Strengthening Local

Democracy consultation paper in July 2009

proposed new powers for local authorities to set

so-called ‘carbon budgets’ for their areas.

9


Regional and Sub-regional

In the 'Rising to the Challenge - A Climate

Change Action Plan for England's Northwest

2007-09', the North West Development Agency

(NWDA) has identified how the Northwest can tap

into the £30 billion opportunity that climate change

represents for British business over the next ten

years. In partnership with the Northwest

Improvement and Efficiency Partnership, the

NWDA’s Climate Change Unit is leading the

delivery of support to local strategic partnerships

and local authorities through Climate Change

Local Areas Support Programme (CLASP) for the

National Indicators on climate change.

As part of the review and development of the

wider Regional Economic Strategy, the Climate

Change Action Plan will be refreshed and

re-launched in 2010.

At the sub-regional level, as noted in Section 4

above, the new Economy Platform of the Liverpool

City Region’s Multi Area Agreement places the

transition to a Low Carbon Economy as a key pillar of

regeneration. This includes a number of specific

measures to support the goal of a low carbon super

port such as the development of major tidal energy

and next generation distribution networks or the

so-called ‘smart grid’.

Local

Knowsley’s Sustainable Community Strategy 2008 -

2023 includes action on climate change under the

key driver ‘Improving the offer and quality of place’

and is also directly relevant to ‘a well connected

Knowsley’, ‘safer more cohesive communities’ and ‘a

diverse and prosperous economy’. The strategy

states that by 2023 we want to have a Borough with

low carbon emissions, and we will mitigate and

adapt to climate change through the Borough’s

Climate Change Strategy, monitor and manage flood

risks and address the environmental and health

impacts of increased heat waves.’

This commitment was reinforced in Knowsley’s

Local Area Agreement 2008-2010, where

National Indicator 186 ‘Per capita reduction in CO 2

emissions in the local authority area’ was selected

for inclusion as one of the 35 priority indicators.

Improvement targets against this indicator have

been agreed with Government Office North West

(See Section 7).

10


Governance

The Knowsley Partnership Executive delegated the

development of the Partnership’s response to climate

change to the Strategic Housing and Environment

Partnership (SHEP). The work carried out to date on

the development of the Climate Change Strategy has

been undertaken by SHEP in conjunction with its

sub-groups:

• Housing Partnership;

• Environment Sub-Group; and

• Transport Sub-Group.

In addition, work has been undertaken with the

Knowsley Business Environment Club Steering

Group, a sub-group of the Economic Partnership.

The Environmental Sustainability Service in the

Directorate of Neighbourhood Services (DNS) at

Knowsley Council has taken a lead co-ordinating role

in developing the strategy. DNS has been working in

a collaborative manner with a number of directorates,

such as the Directorate for Regeneration, Economy,

and Skills which has been advancing renewable

energy options for the Borough. Going forward the

Council will review and develop its cross-directorate

mode of working to ensure it remains efficient,

effective and accountable.

However, climate change also impacts significantly

on the agenda of other thematic partnerships:

• Health and Well-Being Partnership

(reducing carbon emissions from NHS

buildings, health impacts of future climate

change, fuel poverty);

• Economic Forum (reducing carbon emissions

from businesses, adapting to future climate

change, economic opportunities of a low

carbon economy);

• Children and Young Peoples’ Board

(environmental education, adapting to future

climate change, reducing carbon emissions

from educational buildings); and

• Safer Knowsley Partnership (future effects of

climate change on crime and anti-social

behaviour).

In other local areas, cross-thematic climate change

partnerships have been established to ensure that

climate change is effectively addressed across the

partnership and is not just seen as the remit of the

‘environmental’ thematic.

The Strategic Housing and Environment Partnership

is currently under review. A new project board is

proposed with a dedicated Climate Change Group.

The Climate Change Group would be accountable to

the SHEP Board, but would be a cross-cutting group

with representation from partners across the other

thematic partnerships.

QUESTION 10:

Do you believe that a cross-thematic climate change group as part of the Local

Strategic Partnership structure, would be the most effective governance

arrangement, to oversee the development of the Climate Change Strategy and

subsequent implementation and monitoring?

11


Funding

It is critical that Knowsley sets aside appropriate

financial resources to deliver the proposed catalytic

actions. The precise budget pressures will depend

on scope and scale and on what external funds are

available for capital and revenue works. Just as

important is that we use the proposed strategy to

target appropriate funds as opposed to tailor our

strategy to meet the criteria for available funds.

At the same time it is expected that it will be more

difficult to secure external funds for certain types of

new and additional activities proposed here, notably

the ‘People’s Climate Fund’ and the ‘SME

environmental business service’ under objectives #7

and #8 respectively of our 10 Catalytic Objectives.

Taken together these have a combined revenue cost

of c£0.150m per annum.

All things being equal, building on the existing levels

of service delivery, it is anticipated that strategic

fundraising in the form of grant and loan for

remaining objectives should prove successful.

Likely funders include amongst others the

Carbon Trust, Co-operative Bank, Department for

Energy & Climate Change, Energy Savings Trust,

European Investment Bank, and the North West

Development Agency.

Finally, Knowsley can also explore opportunities to

‘invest as we save’ noting there may be potential

substantive cost-benefits from energy efficiency in

particular. For example, North East Lincolnshire

Council is expected to save £4.800m over five years

in energy bills on the back of an interest free loan of

£0.500m from the Carbon Trust as part of a carbon

management programme to reduce CO 2 emissions

by 25% by 2013.

12


Knowsley’s CO 2 Emissions

CO 2 emission data for 2007 was published by the

Government’s Department of Energy and Climate

Change (DECC) in September 2009 and this is the

latest data available. At the same time revised data

was published for 2005 and 2006.

Emission sources included in the DECC figures

are energy use in domestic, industrial and

commercial properties, road transport, changes in

land use and forestry. However it has been

recognised that there are certain elements that local

authorities and their partners have little or no control

over. For the purposes of National Indicator 186,

only CO 2 emissions from the following sources

need to be considered:

• Energy use from domestic and

industrial/commercial properties, but

excluding industrial installations that are

covered by the European Union Emissions

Trading Scheme; and

• Road transport excluding motorways.

In 2007, Knowsley’s emissions in relation to

NI 186 were 7.4 tonnes per head of the population.

As Figure 1 below displays, this is the second

reduction in CO 2 emissions since 2005, a 3.9%

reduction on 2006 levels and a 7.5% reduction on

2005 baseline levels.

In 2007, the greatest proportion of NI 186 emissions

was from energy use in the industrial/commercial

sector (48%), followed by energy use in domestic

properties (29%) and then transport (23%).

Between 2006 and 2007 the greatest reduction in

CO 2 emissions was from energy use in the

industrial/commercial sector which showed an 8.9%

decrease. Domestic emissions were also reduced

compared to 2006 levels by 3.3%. Transport saw a

slight increase of around 1% but an overall reduction

of 1.2% on 2005 baseline emissions.

When compared to other authorities in the Liverpool

City Region Knowsley has relatively high emissions

(Table 1). However, analysis of year on year

reductions shows that Knowsley has made one of

the largest reductions on the 2005 baseline figures.

Geographical

Per Capita Emissions (tonnes)

Neighbours 2005 2006 2007

Sefton 5.1 5.0 5.0

Liverpool 6.5 6.6 6.5

St Helens 7.8 7.6 7.3

Knowsley 8.0 7.7 7.4

Halton 9.9 9.1 8.9

Table 1

Per capita CO 2 emissions in the Liverpool City Region

9

Tonnes (CO2) Per Capita

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

0

8

7.7

2005 2006

Year

7.4

Figure 1

Knowsley’s per capita CO 2 emissions

2007

Using Chartered Institute of Public Finance and

Accountancy (CIPFA) data, it is possible to

compare Knowsley to boroughs across the UK

with similar characteristics. Table 2 below shows

that Knowsley has relatively high emissions

compared to other local authorities with similar

population, tax base population, % unemployment,

housing benefit caseload and property related

statistics. (The cause and effect here will be

investigated further). However, out of the 16

authorities below, Knowsley has the third largest

decrease of emissions since 2005 (7.5%).

Knowsley is also below the National Average of

8.5 tonnes CO 2 per capita.

13


CIPFA Nearest

Per Capita Emissions (tonnes)

Neighbours 2005 2006 2007

South Tyneside 5.2 5.2 4.9

Oldham 5.4 5.3 5.2

Tameside 5.8 5.7 5.5

Wigan 5.7 5.7 5.6

Rochdale 5.7 5.8 5.6

Bolton 6.2 6.1 6.0

Walsall 6.3 6.4 6.2

Rotherham 8.2 6.9 6.6

Barnsley 7.2 7.3 6.7

Sunderland 7.0 6.9 6.7

North Tyneside 7.3 7.0 6.7

Wakefield 7.1 7.1 6.9

Sandwell 7.0 7.3 7.1

St Helens 7.8 7.6 7.3

Knowsley 8.0 7.7 7.4

Gateshead 8.3 8.5 8.3

Table 2

Per capita CO 2 emissions CIPFA nearest neighbours

Waste is not included within National Indicator 186.

However, when waste degrades in landfill sites it

releases carbon dioxide and methane, both

greenhouse gases. Waste is subject to its own

specific targeted reductions in the National

Performance Framework (NI 191 - residual

household waste per head). We explore this issue

further in Section 8.

Targets

National Indicator 186 has been included in

Knowsley’s Local Area Agreement (LAA)

2008 - 2010. The reduction targets in Table 3 below

were agreed by Government Office NW in April 2008.

The targets were based on the results of work

commissioned by the Government to establish

achievable targets for each local authority area over

the period 2006 to 2010. A 1.92% reduction on the

recommended target was agreed which related to

CO 2 reduction measures taken locally in 2006 and

2007 as this was outside the timeframe of the LAA.

However Government Office requested that the CO 2

reductions from ‘National’ measures in 2006 and

2007 were reflected in the 2008 target. This is

demonstrated in the Table 3 below.

Overall CO 2 CO 2 reductions CO 2 reductions

reduction from from ‘National’ from ‘Local’

Year 2005 baseline measures measures

2006 - - (0.96%)

2007 - - (0.96%)

2008 4.72% 4.32% 0.40%

2009 2.68% 1.44% 1.24%

2010 2.68% 1.44% 1.24%

Total 10.08% 7.20% 2.88%

Table 3

Summary of annual targets to meet Knowsley’s 10% NI 186

target from 2005 to 2010

14


Future Targets

The Climate Change Act 2008 commits the UK to

reduce CO 2 emissions by 34% by 2020 and 80% by

2050 against a 1990 baseline.

The UK Low Carbon Transition Plan published in

July 2009 outlined proposals for emission cuts of

18% on 2008 levels by 2020.

Baseline levels for local authority areas for 1990 are

not available, so it is not straightforward to set local

targets that align with the national targets in the

Climate Change Act. Similarly, 2008 data for local

areas will not be available until Autumn 2010, so

again it is not straightforward to set local targets that

align with the national targets set in the UK Low

Carbon Transition Plan.

The Government research in relation to

appropriate targets for local authority areas used

to set the LAA target to 2011, also covered the

period 2010 - 2020. This suggests that a CO 2

reduction of 21.1% from the 2005 baseline should

be achieved by the end of 2020.

It is therefore recommended that this target is

adopted as Knowsley’s minimum contribution to the

national targets, and is reviewed when further data

becomes available. Critical going forward will be our

understanding of how this interim target fits with the

wider UK trajectory of an 80% reduction by 2050.

For instance, the Committee on Climate Change

recommends a reduction of 34% before 2023, by

which time our current LAA will be concluded.

QUESTION 11:

Do you agree that Knowsley’s CO 2 reduction target should reflect the

Government’s research on achievable reductions for this area?

Do you feel that the target is too challenging or not challenging enough?

15


Domestic Properties

Carbon Emissions from

Domestic Properties in Knowsley

Energy Use

There are currently 64,629 dwellings in Knowsley.

Of these 46,352 are in the private sector and 18,277

managed by Registered Social Landlords (RSLs).

74% of the RSL dwelling stock is managed by

Knowsley Housing Trust (KHT) and 10% by Villages

Housing. The remaining 16% is divided between

19 different RSLs.

According to DECC figures, in 2007 326,000 Tonnes

of CO 2 was emitted from gas and electricity use in

Knowsley’s domestic properties, equating to 2.2

Tonnes per head of population. 29% of Knowsley’s

emissions are from this source.

The data shows that there has been a decrease in

emissions from this source over the last two years as

outlined in Figure 2 below.

Under the Home Energy Conservation Act 1995

(HECA), all councils are required to reduce CO 2

emissions from domestic properties by 30% from a

1996 baseline by March 2010.

Waste

Domestic waste can have a huge effect on the

environment. Waste that goes to landfill sites

generates greenhouse gases when it decomposes

which contributes to climate change and to air

pollution. In Knowsley, the Council is responsible for

collecting waste from domestic properties, which is

then passed to the Merseyside Waste Disposal

Authority for disposal. NI 186 does not include

carbon emissions generated from domestic waste.

However there is a separate National Indicator

‘Residual household waste per head’ (NI 191).

Figure 3 below shows that the amount of waste per

household has decreased over the last three years.

This correlates with an increase in household

recycling in the Borough.

1000

Total CO2 Emissions (’000 tonnes)

350

300

250

200

150

100

50

342 337

326

Kg residual waste per household

800

600

400

200

0

887 878

2005 2006

821

Year

725

2007 2008

0

2005 2006

Year

2007

Figure 3

kg residual waste per household

of Knowsley, 2005 - 2008

Figure 2

Total CO 2 emissions from domestic

properties in Knowsley

In 2007, according to DECC figures, Knowsley had the

lowest per capita emissions from energy use in

domestic properties on Merseyside.

The target figure for kg of residual waste per

household in Knowsley for 2009/10 is 667kg, a

reduction of 58kg per household.

16


Current Activity

Warmstreets and Warmfront

Since 2003, Knowsley Council have been working in

partnership with the Government and utility

companies to improve the energy efficiency of

residential properties, through schemes such as

‘Warmstreets’ and ‘Warmfront’. In 2008/09, over

4,200 properties in Knowsley received energy

efficiency measures such as loft and cavity wall

insulation, saving on average one Tonne of CO 2 per

household, per year. In addition Registered Social

Landlords operating within Knowsley are undertaking

their own programmes of improvements including

installation of double glazing, upgrading central

heating and insulation.

Recycling

To reduce the amount of domestic waste sent to

landfill Knowsley Council now provide a

comprehensive recycling service to its residents.

This includes fortnightly kerbside collections of

‘co-mingled’ waste (paper, glass, cans, card and

plastic bottles) and green waste. A new weekly food

waste collection service has just been launched,

available across the borough. The Merseyside

Waste Disposal Authority also promote the use of

real nappies, home composting, support the

community recycling sector on Merseyside and

operate the two Household Waste Recycling Centres

in Knowsley.

Awareness-raising and Events

Knowsley Council work with the Merseyside and

Cheshire Energy Saving Trust Advice Centre to

raise awareness on domestic energy efficiency,

waste and water reduction and reducing carbon

emissions from transport.

Activities include promotions at major events such as

the Green Fayre, the Knowsley Flower Show,

roadshows, talks to community groups and schools,

mailshots, promotion in local media and resident

engagement via door-knocking. The Energy Saving

Trust operate a telephone advice service which

includes promotion of grants available to

householders to improve the energy efficiency of

their homes. The Merseyside Waste Disposal

Authority also support on waste minimisation

education, awareness and communications

programmes across the region.

Proposed Actions

• Proposals and applications for funding to

extend current home insulation schemes,

including hard to treat properties

(e.g. Community Energy Saving Programme -

CESP).

• Proposals and applications to the Department

of Energy and Climate Change (DECC),

European Regional Development Fund

(ERDF) and Energy Saving Trust (EST) as

appropriate for developing low carbon

communities.

• Development of targeted awareness-raising

programmes to change behaviours.

• Transition of Environmental Challenge Award

to be re-launched as a new and larger

People’s Climate Fund to reward grassroots

community leadership.

• Development of ‘Give and Take’ days for

unwanted household items - Knowsley Council

in partnership with Knowsley Housing Trust

QUESTION 12:

Do you agree with these proposed actions for reducing carbon emissions from

domestic properties?

Are there any additional actions that should be considered?

17


Business and

Economic Development

Carbon Emissions from

Businesses in Knowsley

Energy Use

Knowsley has over 3,000 businesses, of

which around 2,300 are small and medium

enterprises (SMEs).

NI 186 data published by DECC indicates that

535,000 tonnes of CO 2 was emitted in Knowsley from

energy use in the industrial/commercial sector in

2007 (excluding installations covered by the EU

Emissions Trading Scheme). This equates to

48% of Knowsley’s emissions for NI 186.

The data shows that there has been a decrease in

emissions from this source over the last two years as

outlined in Figure 4 below.

Total CO2 Emissions (’000 tonnes)

800

700

600

500

400

300

200

100

0

615

587

2005 2006

Year

535

Waste

Trade waste that goes to landfill sites generates

greenhouse gases when it decomposes which

contributes to climate change and to air pollution.

Waste from industrial and commercial premises

makes up around a quarter of all the waste

produced in the North West.

2007

Figure 4

Knowsley CO 2 emissions from gas and electricity

use in the industrial/commercial sector

NI 186 does not include carbon emissions generated

from trade waste. Moreover, there are no dedicated

national indicators relating to the reduction of trade

waste in the Borough.

It is not considered feasible to collect data on the

amount of trade waste generated in Knowsley.

This is due to the many private companies that are

involved with collecting and disposing of trade waste

from Knowsley businesses.

Current Activity

Knowsley Business Environment Club

There is a range of support available to assist

Knowsley businesses in reducing carbon emissions

and this is promoted via the Knowsley Business

Environment Club. The Club was formed in 2002,

was the first of its kind on Merseyside, and one of the

first in the UK. Knowsley Council has supported this

innovative club since its inception and has championed

the close partnership approach taken, believing that

it is only with the real collaboration of all the agencies

and the local business community that a change in

culture could be achieved. The Club was set up to

help SMEs particularly to take the leap into more

environmentally friendly practices, often against a

range of objections.

The Club recently commissioned Groundwork

Merseyside to conduct a trade waste survey in

Knowsley. The aim of the survey was to identify

current levels of trade waste recycling, to understand

the perceived barriers to recycling, to investigate

incentives to increase trade waste recycling rates

and to identify waste materials to target for increased

recycling and methods for private sector partnerships

to be developed in the Borough.

100 businesses completed questionnaires which

were conducted through door to door knocking,

appointments and email.

The survey provided an array of information on how

current trade waste is being disposed of in Knowsley.

In addition, the study identified an increase in trade

waste recycling in Knowsley. These findings will help

shape and design future initiatives in order to

increase recycling amongst commercial and

industrial premises.

18


Environmental Audits for Businesses

Free support to Knowsley businesses to help reduce

their use of resources is available via the ENWORKS

programme, delivered by Groundwork Merseyside.

From 2005 to March 2009 it is estimated that this

programme has achieved a reduction in carbon

emissions from Knowsley businesses of nearly 1,200

Tonnes per annum. If businesses were to implement

all other recommendations made as a result of this

programme, an additional 4,000 Tonnes of carbon

per annum could potentially be saved.

Organisations with an annual energy spend of

£0.05m or more can access a free carbon survey

from the Carbon Trust, which will identify energy

saving opportunities. The Carbon Trust are also

currently offering interest free loans of between

£0.003m and £0.4m for equipment upgrades over a

period of up to 4 years. The scheme is designed for

energy savings to cover repayments so that the loan

effectively pays for itself.

The Carbon Reduction Commitment (CRC)

Energy Efficiency Scheme

The CRC Energy Efficiency Scheme is a mandatory

trading emissions scheme which will operate from

April 2010. It will target large businesses that

annually have energy bills in excess of £0.5m.

Businesses that are already part of the EU ETS

(European Union Emissions Trading Scheme) or the

Climate Change agreements will not be included in

the scheme. The scheme will encourage businesses

to reduce their CO 2 emissions by purchasing

allowances. The amount of energy that they use

will determine their position in a league table.

Knowsley Council will be included in the scheme and

is currently participating in the Local Government

Information Unit’s Carbon Trading Scheme to gain

experience of carbon trading in a virtual environment.

It is not currently known how many Knowsley

businesses will be affected by this legislation.

Knowsley’s Renewable Energy Study

In June 2009, Knowsley Council commissioned

consultants Arup to undertake a Renewable Energy

Study for the Borough. The aim of the study was to

identify how to increase production of renewable

energy in Knowsley and make it a realistic option for

local businesses. The study has identified that

Knowsley already has a growing and thriving

Renewable Energy Sector.

This is still in its infancy but there is considerable

scope to ensure that Knowsley is one of the key

areas in the region for employment in this sector.

The findings of the study will be used to develop a

Renewable Energy Action Plan for Knowsley, which

will link to and support the objectives of the LSP

Climate Change Strategy. Linked to this is a need to

develop ‘smart grids’ to support local metering and

renewable energy supplies. Application details for a

£500.000m Ofgem fund are expected in December

2009 to pilot low carbon networks over a five year

period. The fund requires a joint bid with network

operators like Scottish Power.

Liverpool City Region’s Multi Area Agreement -

Economy Platform

In September 2009, Knowsley along with the other

Merseyside authorities signed the Economy Platform

of the Liverpool City Region’s Multi Area Agreement.

One of the four ‘Transformational Actions’ within this

platform relates to the Low Carbon Economy.

A Low Carbon Economy Strategy for the sub-region

is scheduled for April 2010.

Proposed Actions

Given the high proportion of carbon emissions

from this source in Knowsley it is essential that we

develop further ways of supporting businesses to

take action. Current proposals being developed/

considered include:

• Developing the activity of the Knowsley

Business Environment Club to engage with a

higher proportion of businesses across the

borough and further uptake of the support

services available

• Assess the findings of the Knowsley Trade

Waste Study to develop further actions to

reduce the production of trade waste in

Knowsley

• Development of a Renewable Energy Action

Plan for Knowsley

• Participation in the Carbon Reduction

Commitment Energy Efficiency Scheme for

qualifying businesses and organisations

19


• Work with business support

officers/enforcement officers to ensure that

they are able to give advice/signpost support

on reducing carbon emissions when visiting

businesses.

• Consider developing proposals to apply for

funding for a ‘smart grid’ pilot with network

operators.

QUESTION 13

Do you agree with these proposed actions for reducing carbon emissions from

industrial/commercial premises?

Are there any additional actions that should be considered?

Transport

Carbon Emissions from

Transport in Knowsley

NI 186 data from DECC for each local authority area

indicates that in 2007, 251,000 Tonnes of CO 2 was

emitted from local road transport in Knowsley

(excluding motorways) (Figure 5). This equates to

1.6 tonnes per resident of Knowsley and represents a

reduction on baseline 2005 emissions of just over

1%. However, of concern is that emissions from this

source increased from 2006 to 2007, and Knowsley

has the second highest per capita emissions from

transport on Merseyside.

Total CO2 Emissions (’000 tonnes)

300

250

200

150

100

50

0

254 247 251

2005 2006

Year

2007

Examples of Current Activity

Merseyside Local Transport Plan 2006-11

The Council work in partnership with Merseytravel

and the other Merseyside authorities to produce an

integrated transport plan, the Merseyside Local

Transport Plan (LTP). The current Plan (LTP2) covers

the period 2006 - 2011. The LTP incorporates a

£200m investment programme of new transport

infrastructure (roads, buses, trains, cycle and walking

paths) and improved services to provide Merseyside

with a safer, greener, transport network.

School Travel Plans

Around 97% of Knowsley’s schools have Travel Plans

in place, which is very good progress towards the

national target of all schools to have a travel plan by

2010. Monitoring shows a 4.5% reduction in car use

for schools in Knowsley with travel plans.

Joint Staff Travel Plan for Knowsley Council

and NHS Knowsley

A Travel Plan Co-ordinator for Knowsley Council and

NHS Knowsley was appointed in 2008 and a draft

Staff Travel Plan has been produced to reduce car

use across both organisations.

Figure 5

Knowsley’s total CO 2 emissions from transport

20


Proposed Actions

• All partners within the Knowsley Partnership

develop their own plans on Sustainable Travel

• Investigate/promote further use of alternative

fuels

• Feed into the development of the next Local

Transport Plan (LTP3) which will run from

March 2011- March 2016 (developed by

Merseytravel)

QUESTION 14

Do you agree with these proposed actions for reducing carbon emissions from

transport? Are there any additional actions that should be considered?

Embedding Action on

Climate Change Across

the Knowsley Partnership

To ensure that real progress is made in addressing

climate change we need to ensure that organisations

across the Knowsley Partnership lead by example in

taking action to reduce their own carbon emissions

and to adapt to climate change. We also need to

ensure that when decisions are taken by the

Partnership, the impacts of those decisions on

climate change are also addressed, and the priorities

and targets in this strategy are translated into the

operational plans of the Council and partners.

Knowsley Council produced its own Climate Change

Strategy in October 2008, which included reducing

emissions from its own estate (including schools)

and support to reduce carbon emissions in the

community. The Council has also joined the

Energy Saving Trust’s Local Authority One to One

Support Programme, which involves a review of

current action to reduce carbon emissions both

within the Council and in the local community and

makes recommendations for further action.

In addition, support has also been secured from

Envirolink’s Buy Recycled Code Sustainable

Procurement Support Package to progress the

sustainable procurement agenda in accordance with

the Government’s ‘Flexible Framework’ on

sustainable procurement. A pilot Environmental

Management System is being developed and an

application to the Carbon Trust’s Carbon

Management Programme is under consideration.

A number of partners have indicated that they are

also already taking action, developing their own

environmental management systems and carbon

management plans.

21


Proposed actions:

• All partners within the Knowsley Partnership

develop their own Carbon Management Plans,

including a baseline review of emissions,

setting of carbon reduction targets or so called

‘carbon budgets’, action plans and monitoring

arrangements

• All partners within the Knowsley Partnership

develop their own plans on Sustainable

Procurement

• All partners within the Knowsley Partnership

develop their own plans on adapting to

climate change

• Consideration is given to how climate change

can be systematically addressed in decisions

taken by the Knowsley Partnership

• Establish Knowsley as a Low Carbon

Economic Trade Zone.

QUESTION 15:

Do you agree with these proposed actions for embedding action on climate

change across the Knowsley Partnership? Are there any additional actions that

should be considered?

Natural Environment

The Borough’s green spaces play a vital role in

both mitigating CO 2 emissions and adapting to

climate change.

When trees are growing, they utilise CO 2 from the

atmosphere, a process known as carbon

sequestration. Green spaces can also reduce

CO 2 emissions indirectly, for example, food grown

on local allotments can reduce ‘food miles’ and

hence CO 2 emissions from transport.

There is evidence that in addition to mitigating

carbon emissions, green spaces can help areas to

adapt to climate change through cooling, provision

of shade and water management. The provision of

parks and play areas will also be important as the

demand for outdoor recreational facilities increases

during the predicted hotter, drier summers.

However, green spaces are also susceptible to the

impacts of climate change such as earlier flowering

and longer growing seasons, increased competition

from weeds and increased water stress on plants,

lawns and grass swards. Some effects have already

been observed in Knowsley - the extended growing

season has given rise to increased mowing

frequency with increasing costs for this activity.

Considerable storm damage has increased the costs

of arboricultural services and tree replacement, and

aggressive weed growth has been encountered,

especially exotic species.

Further to this, a new Green Space Strategy for the

Council is presently being developed.

22


Examples of Current Activity

Mersey Forest Green Streets Project

This programme improves the appearance and

community cohesion of urban areas through the

planting of street trees with local residents. Last year

120 new street trees were planted in Halewood,

North Huyton and North Kirkby.

Review of Woodland Sites

A review of woodland sites in Knowsley has been

undertaken and new management systems have

been established.

Proposed Actions:

• Development of a draft Green Infrastructure

Framework for the Liverpool City Region by

March 2010, with adapting and mitigating to

climate change one of five areas to be

developed.

• Approval of the Green Space Strategy for

Knowsley

• Production of enhanced management and

development programmes for woodlands

• Potential woodland creation project in

Northwood

• Tree planting activity associated with National

Tree Week (end of November each year)

• Engagement with schools to develop school

woodland sites

• Enhanced management of semi-natural

spaces and local wildlife sites.

QUESTION 16:

Do you agree with these proposed actions to address how the natural

environment can assist with mitigating carbon emissions?

Are there any additional actions that should be considered?

23


Adapting to

Climate Change

As outlined in Section 4, even if we take action to

reduce our carbon emissions, it is predicted that we

will still experience some effects of climate change

such as hotter/drier summers, warmer/wetter winters

and more extreme weather events and this could

create risks and opportunities for Knowsley.

The Government have included an indicator on

adapting to climate change in the new performance

framework:

• NI 188 - Planning to adapt to climate change

The indicator will measure our progress on assessing

and managing climate risks and opportunities, and

incorporating appropriate action into partners’

strategic planning.

A process has been set out by the Government

which local authorities must follow, and performance

will be measured against 5 levels of progress:

Level 0:

Level 1:

Level 2:

Level 3:

Level 4:

Current Activity

Getting Started

Public commitment and impacts

assessment

Comprehensive risk-based

assessment and prioritised

action in some areas

Comprehensive action plan and

prioritised action in all priority

areas

Implementation, monitoring and

continuous review.

National Indicator 188 -

Planning to Adapt to Climate Change

In May 2009, the Council was required to report

to the Government on the level achieved as of

31st March 2009. At this stage Knowsley had

achieved Level 0, although a substantial amount

of work has been undertaken in accordance with

Level 1.

A workshop was held with key Council services to

raise awareness of adapting to climate change and

to identify relevant existing plans and strategies.

This was supplemented with interviews with relevant

Council officers to further identify the effects of

extreme weather events on the Council’s estate

and services, and assess current vulnerabilities

and opportunities.

Work has also been undertaken to look at the

current impacts of severe weather on the

community via a trawl of local media sources to

produce a Local Climate Impacts Profile. The latest

information on future climate scenarios for this area

has also been assessed.

Plans are now being developed to achieve Level 2

of NI 188, which will involve working with partners

across the Knowsley Partnership.

Safer, Stronger Communities Scrutiny

Committee Scrutiny Review Report 2009 -

Building Community Resilience with Knowsley

The Safer, Stronger Communities Working group

considered a wide range of evidence in relation to

emergency and flood management within the

Borough. This involved analysing data in relation to

flooding incidents in Knowsley, flood maps and

evidence from operational teams and partner

organisations. A total of 17 recommendations were

made to ensure that the borough is prepared and

resilient to flood risk.

Knowsley Strategic Flood Risk Assessment

A Strategic Flood Risk Assessment for Knowsley was

commissioned during 2008/09 and the final report

has been agreed.

Proposed Actions:

• To develop an Action Plan for adapting to

climate change in Knowsley by working

through the five levels of NI 188. It is

proposed to achieve Level 2 by the end of

March 2010, and as a minimum, aim to

progress at least one level each subsequent

year (this is classified as ‘good performance’

by the Government)

24


QUESTION 17:

Do you agree that working through the levels of NI 188 is the most appropriate

methodology for ensuring that Knowsley is well-adapted to the future effects of

climate change?

Land Use Planning

Physical development and regeneration in Knowsley

are governed by policies and strategies in the Unitary

Development Plan (UDP), which was adopted in

2006. The UDP contains a number of policies on

energy, transport and waste that will support the

reduction of carbon emissions from development.

The planning system has now changed and

Knowsley’s UDP will be replaced by a Local

Development Framework (LDF) in early 2012.

Development work is in progress and an ‘Issues and

Options’ paper has been produced. The Framework

will be subject to a Strategic Environmental

Assessment and Sustainability Appraisal.

SPD on Householder Development

A Supplementary Planning Document (SPD) on

Householder Development was produced in

November 2007 which promotes energy efficiency,

renewable energy, re-use of building materials and

facilities for recycling. A Supplementary Planning

Document on the Design of New Development is

in preparation which will promote sustainable forms

of development.

Sustainability Statement

Since April 2008, a Sustainability Statement is

required to be submitted with planning applications

for large developments.

Current Activities

10% Renewable Energy in New Developments

Policy MW7 of the current UDP requires that 10% of

the energy requirements to be generated on-site by

renewable energy for all new residential

developments of over 10 homes and for

industrial/commercial developments over 1000m 2 .

Proposed Actions

Climate change will be taken into

consideration as the LDF is progressed to

ensure that carbon emissions from

development in Knowsley are minimised.

• New Supplementary Planning Documents on

Transport and Design to address climate

change.

• Piloting of ‘smart grid’ technology as part of

MAA next generation distribution network.

QUESTION 18:

Do you agree that reducing carbon emissions from development should be

addressed via the Local Development Framework, which will be subject to

extensive consultation over the coming months?

25


This document will be used as a basis for a wide-ranging consultation exercise,

to allow stakeholders within Knowsley to contribute to the development of a

Climate Change Strategy for the Borough.

This will include:

• LSP Partners via the Thematic Partnerships

Knowsley Council elected members, area

boards and staff

• Community groups

• Residents

• Local businesses

• Other relevant organisations.

Following this consultation exercise, a Climate

Change Strategy and Action Plan for Knowsley will

be prepared in Spring 2010. This will include a series

of SMART actions to achieve our agreed vision and

objectives to address climate change in Knowsley.

26


For an electronic version of this form please visit www.knowsley.gov.uk

Name:

Organisation:

Contact Details:

QUESTION 1 (page 3):

Is this the right vision for Knowsley’s Climate Change Strategy?

Does it capture the key elements of what we need to achieve?

QUESTION 2 (page 5):

Will these set of objectives achieve our vision? If not, what else needs to be included?

QUESTION 3 (page 5):

With no data on the amount of trade waste collected in the Borough, how can we

measure progress against this objective?

QUESTION 4 (page 5):

Should we set individual targets for reducing CO 2 emissions from energy use in

housing and industrial/commercial properties and transport?

QUESTION 5 (page 6):

Do you agree with the causes of climate change outlined here and agree that

everyone needs to take action now?

27


QUESTION 6 (page 6):

As a householder/business/organisation, do you understand what action you

need to take to reduce your carbon emissions? What further support would

help you to take further action? What do you think the barriers are to taking

action and how can we address this?

QUESTION 7 (page 8):

Do you understand how future climate change will affect Knowsley and you as an

individual and your business/organisation? If not, what further information/support is needed?

QUESTION 8 (page 8):

Do you agree that the Climate Change Strategy should also address how Knowsley

can take advantage of the opportunities of a transition to a low carbon economy?

QUESTION 9 (page 8):

Are there any other key opportunities that need to be considered?

QUESTION 10 (page 11):

Do you believe that a cross-thematic Climate Change Partnership as part of the

Local Strategic Partnership structure would be the most effective governance

arrangement, to oversee the development of the Climate Change Strategy and

subsequent implementation and monitoring?

28


QUESTION 11 (page 15):

Do you agree that Knowsley’s CO 2 reduction target should reflect the Government’s

research on achievable reductions for this area? Do you feel that the target is too

challenging or not challenging enough?

QUESTION 12 (page 17):

Do you agree with these proposed actions for reducing carbon emissions from domestic

properties? Are there any additional actions that should be considered?

QUESTION 13 (page 20):

Do you agree with these proposed actions for reducing carbon emissions from

industrial/commercial premises? Are there any additional actions that should

be considered?

QUESTION 14 (page 21):

Do you agree with these proposed actions for reducing carbon emissions from transport?

Are there any additional actions that should be considered?

QUESTION 15 (page 22):

Do you agree with these proposed actions for embedding action on climate change

across the Knowsley Partnership? Are there any additional actions that should be considered?

29


QUESTION 16 (page 23):

Do you agree with these proposed actions to address how the natural environment

can assist with mitigating carbon emissions? Are there any additional actions that

should be considered?

QUESTION 17 (page 25):

Do you agree that working through the levels of NI 188 is the most appropriate

methodology for ensuring that Knowsley is well-adapted to the future effects of

climate change?

QUESTION 18 (page 25):

Do you agree that reducing carbon emissions from development should be addressed

via the Local Development Framework, which will be subject to extensive consultation

over the coming months?

ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:

Please return to:

Environmental Sustainability Service, Directorate of Neighbourhood Services

Knowsley Council

Stretton Way Huyton Knowsley Merseyside L36 6JF

E-mail: dns.sustainability@knowsley.gov.uk

Telephone: 0151 443 3682

The deadline for completed responses is Monday 1st March 2010

30


You can also get this information in other formats.

Please phone Customer Services on 0151 443 4031,

or email customerservices@knowsley.gov.uk

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