May 2, 2013 - Central Catholic High School

blmcchs.org

May 2, 2013 - Central Catholic High School

C E N T R A L C A T H O L I C

H I G H S C H O O L

V O L U M E 1 I S S U E 1 8

T H E S P E C T R U M

M A Y 2 , 2 0 1 3

B O S T O N M A R A T H O N

B Y : S I D N E Y W E T H

I N S I D E T H I S I S S U E :

N E W Y O R K M U-

S I C T R I P

2

B A S S F I S H I N G 2

S E N I O R

R E T R E A T

R A I N , R A I N A N D

M O R E R A I N

3

3

B I R T H D A Y S 3

R A I N C O N T . 4

S P E C I A L O L Y M-

P I C S E V E N T

4

L U N C H M E N U

M O N D A Y

P I Z Z A B U R G E R

T U E S D A Y

M A C A N D C H E E S E

W E D N E S D A Y

O R A N G E C H I C K E N

T H U R S D A Y

R A V I O L I

F R I D A Y

M I N I C O R N D O G S

Devastation appeared upon the faces of many on April 15th at the Boston Marathon

bombing. Runners had come from around the country and the world to Boston’s cherished

annual event. Many participants train for years, and the passion for running becomes part

of their daily lives. The day came when the runners envisioned victory and their happiness

would be fulfilled. This feeling would not last long because the lives of many were about

to be threatened by a cowardly act of terror.

Even through the darkest times, though, a glimmer of hope can appear. Hope came

from the kind hearts of survivors who, still facing danger, ran to the ones who were hurt.

Throughout the horrific hours that followed, heroes would run to give blood, push people

in wheelchairs to the nearest ambulance, and calm the frightened.

Carlos Arredondo was such a hero to a young man who lost both legs in this tragedy.

Carlos jumped over a fence to where the injured were engulfed in the smoke. Carlos

was at the marathon to remember the heroic acts of soldiers-- not realizing that he would

become a cherished hero to someone.

The dark cloud of tragedy hung over the city of Boston and the United States.

Though this act was cowardly, the power of positive thinking prevailed among the runners

who gave blood after the bombings. These heroic people- after just having run 26 miles-ran

even further to the Mass General Hospital to give blood to the many who were injured.

This type of act gives hope to all who feel as though this world is falling apart.

Throughout the gut- wrenching aftermath, the smallest acts of kindness made a portion

of fear subside. For example, one man gave orange juice to those who were dehydrated.

Another woman opened the doors of her home to give food and drinks to those who

had run the marathon.

Hope would seem unattainable if it weren’t for the people

who disregarded their own safety and the home owners who opened

up their homes. For peace to prevail, people need to follow in the

footsteps of these caring and kind souls. Even the smallest act of

kindness can change the world for someone.


T H E S P E C T R U M

Page 2

One of the perks of being a member of the Central Catholic Music Department is having the opportunity to go on

the biennial music department trip. This year marks one of those trips: the highly anticipated holiday to New York

City. The Big Apple, the City that Never Sleeps-- is the greatest metropolis to visit for anyone interested in anything,

especially the arts.

Around ninety of our music Saints will be taking a six day trip to NY from May 28 to June 2. The trip includes

visiting the usual tourist locations: Times Square, Central Park, Chinatown, Little Italy, Grand Central Station,

Greenwich Village. Unfortunately, a trip to Ellis Island will not occur. The visit, along with a performance by

the choir, was to happen; however, due to the effects of Hurricane Sandy, the island is closed, though, a ferry ride

by the island will ensue. In addition, the musicians will also be taking a tour of the National September 11th Memorial

and NBC Studios.

One other tourist attraction that the students will be visiting is the Great White Way: Broadway. Not only is it a

tourist attraction but also something close to many of the students. Broadway is a very musical and artistic place for

singers, actors, dancers, musicians alike. This is exactly what many of the students attending the trip are interested

in. The students will be seeing two shows: 1) the Tony nominated new musical about a newsboy strike, Newsies,

and 2) the revival of timeless classic about the orphan in New York, Annie.

Students will also have many opportunities that common tourists would not. The choir, band and jazz

band will all have the opportunity to attend a workshop with a professor from the Aaron Copland School of Music.

Here the professor will listen to the students’ performances and then give them suggestions on how to improve. Another

opportunity they will have is a chance to perform. The choir will perform at

the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, the largest cathedral in the world. The band

will then perform at the Madison Avenue Atrium and Sculpture Garden, one of the

most often visited corporate buildings in the city. Additionally, students will attend

a mass at St. Patrick’s Cathedral.

N E W Y O R K C I T Y M U S I C T R I P

B Y : M C K E N N A C A L H O O N

Each year, the trip is run by the music department teachers Mrs. Myers,

Mrs. Huberman and Mr. Huberman. About ten more teachers and parents also accompany

the students in order to make the trip occur. The New York trip will be

filled with music, food, friends, city happenings and memories. It is one that many have been looking forward to.

C C H S B A S S F I S H I N G

B Y : Z A C C O N N O R

The CCHS Bass fishing team had their sectional tournament on Evergreen Lake at Comlara Park near Kappa on

Monday. They were unsuccessful along with many other schools in the tournament. Only four of the twenty four

boats caught fish. Senior Davis Zangerle reeled in a Crappie but in Bass fishing that is not very helpful. They were

coached by Steve Hoselton this year. Weather is most likely to be the problem for the poor fishing conditions. With

all the rain and cold weather, the water is way too murky and cold to catch much of anything.


V O L U M E 1 I S S U E 1 8

Page 3

S E N I O R R E T R E A T

B Y : I R E N A D U M L E R

This year’s senior retreat was held on Wednesday, April 24. The day

began at 9am and went until 8pm. Seniors were to be at school by

8:40 and then we packed up the buses with the food that everyone

brought. Our destination was near the Germantown area at St. Mary

of Lourdes church.

We started off with Fr. Pilon leading us in prayer. Throughout

the whole day we had some of our fellow seniors give us talks;

then after each pair of talks we would break into our assigned groups

and review questions about the topics the talks covered. We played

games which included putting whipped cream on faces and throwing

candy to see how many pieces we could get to stick on the faces. Another

game was where everyone tied a balloon to his or her ankle and

then had to go around and try to pop everyone else’s balloon.

Lunch consisted of gondolas, chips, and cookies, with some drinks.

It was raining at first, but then when we arrived to the church; it was

sunny and was becoming warmer. We said

the rosary outside by the Grotto. Mass and

confessions took place in the church. We

had quite a bit of free time so some seniors

played football, rolled down the hill, or

even just sat and talked. The day ended

with a potluck of all the food we brought.

The day was filled with fun, food,

friends, and of course, faith. This was the class of 2013’s last retreat

at Central and everybody helped to make it a great one!

R A I N , R A I N A N D M O R E R A I N

Over the past weeks, rain has struck the Midwest greatly, especially

here in Illinois. This rainfall led to abundant flooding throughout the

state. The seniors saw a glimpse of this flooding on the way to their

retreat last Wednesday. Fishing docks were covered to the roof and

many buildings were nearly underwater. Among the cities hit the

hardest was Peoria. Over six inches of rain fell within just over two

days. In Peoria, and throughout the flooded region, people are without

homes, businesses, schools, (continued on page 4).

B I R T H D A Y S !

4-28 Jamie Stone 6-21 Carly Haynes

4-30 Matt Novak 6-22 Alexander Howe

5-01 Treon Bell

Reed Cavi

5-02 McKenna Calhoon 6-24 Jack Costigan

5-04 Dan Sheldon 6-25 Emma Hartness

5-08 Logan Gustafson 6-27 Carli Allison

Kellen Kiley 7-02 Claudia Zitkus

5-10 Hayley Shields 7-03 Clare O’Connor

5-12 Alex Volker

Jack Hester

Daniel Dionesotes Kyle Kwasny

5-13 Elese Hall

7-05 Caroline Friedmann

Andy Wilder

Mitch Arnold

Gillian Torres 7-08 Emily Rees

Claire Boe 7-09 Kaitlin Milligan

5-15 Samuel Gordon 7-10 Kevin O’Donnell

5-17 Kassie Mikesell 7-11 Sam Ford

5-21 Tony Rettick 7-12 Bailey McPherson

Charles Marshall 7-14 Marion Brady

5-24 Evan Calvert 7-15 Michael Rupert

Keira Kelly 7-16 Michael Billington

5-26 Katie Blaser 7-17 Emily Newmister

Bobby Schopp

Grant Glowacki

5-27 Sarah Gibbens 7-19 Jonathon Baldwin

Ariel Casper 7-20 Alison Migas

Lauren Feeney 7-22 Adam Kuebler

5-30 Cassidy Griffin 7-23 Min Jeong Chae

6-01 DJ Olker

Alexander Rappe’

6-02 Mackenzie Hume 7-25 Matthew Horton

Patrick Baranek 7-27 Isaiah Lee

6-04 Logan Friedrich 7-28 Eric Gilpin

6-05 Katie Harris 7-29 Leah Mason

6-06 Brian Eakle

Grant Holley

Bridget Dewey

Alexis Limon

Joe Bevilacqua 7-31 Daniel Dumler

6-10 Danielle Brady

6-13 Madison Cassidy

6-15 Michael Becker

6-18 Emily Schramm

6-19 Katherine Brady

6-20 Kyle Spencer


T H E S P E C T R U M

Page 4

R A I N C O N T I N U E D

churches and transportation.

Though not as severe, we have seen the effects of this rainfall in our

own city. Roads were closed limiting travel ability. Some schools near us

closed. Crop planting was delayed. Plants were unable to grow. However, the

people who suffered most from the weather were the athletes. Game and after

game was cancelled for Central’s baseball, softball, track, tennis and soccer

teams. Teams instead turned to practice often only indoors. If a game or meet

did ensue, students were forced to face the elements. This is not always the

most pleasant occurrence.

April definitely succeeded in bringing its showers. Many people suffered

consequences due to this. However, hopefully May will live up to its

standard and bring abundant flowers.

S P E C I A L O L Y M P I C S E V E N T

B Y : A N D R E W H A M M

All year long, the collections at mass, the two dollars on jeans days, and the senior boys’ no-shave

November profits have been going toward the senior class charity, Special Olympics. We have raised a

wonderful amount so far and all the donations are greatly appreciated, but we wanted to offer the organization

volunteer service as well. Central Catholic has gladly accepted Special Olympics’ request to hold an

event on Friday, May 10 here at school.

The event we are hosting is one Special Olympics has been doing for a few years, but has never

had in a centralized location, where all can participate. The event is for young persons (generally three

and four year olds) who, because of their young age, cannot participate in Special Olympics yet. We will be

hosting the end-of-the-year event and ceremony for all participants so they can experience the event as a

group, whereas the event has previously been brought to each participating school individually.

The senior class will be the volunteer base for staffing of the event. The seniors will run and supervise

the event all day long. We are very excited that we will be able to donate such a large amount to

them and look forward to providing a memorable experience for the children next Friday!

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