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Jackson County

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JACKSON COUNTY PROFILE

2013

Fulton

Benton Carroll

Clay

Boone Marion

Randolph

Baxter

Sharp

Greene

Izard Lawrence

Washington

Madison

Newton Searcy Stone

Craighead

Independence

Mississippi

Jackson

Crawford Johnson Van Buren

Cleburne

Poinsett

Franklin

Pope

Conway White

Cross

Sebastian Logan

Woodruff

Faulkner

Crittenden

Yell

St. Francis

Perry

Scott

Pulaski LonokePrairie

Lee

Saline

Monroe

Montgomery

Garland

Polk

Phillips

Hot Spring

Grant Jefferson Arkansas

Pike

Howard Clark

Sevier

Dallas

Lincoln

Cleveland

Desha

Little River Hempstead

Nevada

Ouachita

Drew

Calhoun

Bradley

Miller

Lafayette

Chicot

Columbia

Union Ashley

Wayne Miller, Professor

Thai Nguyen, Intern


Foreword & Acknowledgments

The University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture Cooperative Extension Service

is pleased to release these updated county profiles in hopes that these publications may

serve as a useful tool for local officials, community leaders and economic development

professionals.

This publication provides a comparison and overview of the demographic, economic and

social trends in Arkansas counties. The information is presented in graphs and maps to

allow the reader to quickly grasp current trends and conditions and gain insight into local

and regional contexts. We encourage leaders and decision makers to use this publication in

conjunction with their knowledge of the local geography, culture and political environment

to make wise decisions for Arkansas’ future.

The state agencies providing data and assistance for this publication include the State Data

Center at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, the Arkansas Department of Workforce

Services, the Arkansas Department of Education, and the Arkansas Department of Health

and Human Services. We thank the many individuals at these departments and

organizations for their quick response to our requests for information.

Several departments and individuals of the University of Arkansas worked in collaboration

to publish these county profiles. Wayne Miller, Community and Economic Development,

coordinated the project. Thai Nguyen compiled the data and developed graphs and charts.

Vuko Karov developed the maps and checked the data for accuracy. Chris Meux designed

the cover, and Donna Rinke published the profiles on the Cooperative Extension website.

Their many hours of effort are greatly appreciated.

We hope you find this publication useful as you plan for the future of your communities.

Tony E. Windham, Ph.D.

Associate Vice President for Agriculture-Extension

and Director, Cooperative Extension Service

II


Table of Contents

Forward & Acknowledgments……..

……………………………………………………… II

Table of Contents……………………… ……………………………………………………… III

List of Figures…………………………… ……………………………………………………… IV

Internet Sources of Information………………………………………………………………… VI

Population………………………….…… …………………………...…………………………… 1

Education……………………………… ……………………………………………………… 6

Employment…………………………..

……………………………………………………… 8

Income…………………………………. ……………………………………………………… 12

Retail………………………………….

……………………………………………………… 17

Poverty…………………………………… ……………………………………………………… 18

Health…………………………………

Household……………………………..

……………………………………………………… 21

……………………………………………………… 22

Agriculture……………………………… ……………………………………………………… 23

Forestry……………………………...…… ………………………….…………………………… 26

Property Assessment…………………… ……………………………………………………… 28

County Roads………………………….. ……………………………………………………… 28

Glossary……………………………….. ………………………………………………………… 29

(For Local Staff Chair See Inside Backcover)

III


Figures

Figure

Description

Page

Population

Figure 1 Population……………………………………..…………………...……… 1

Figure 2 Population Change……………………………………….……………… 1

Figure 3 Population by Age Pyramid…………………………………………..…… 2

Figure 4 Population by Age …………………………...…………………………… 2

Figure 5 Population 65 and Older………………….……………………………… 3

Figure 6 Population Change of People 65 and Older……………..………………. 3

Figure 7 Migration of People………………………….…………………………… 4

Figure 8 Population by Household Type……………….…………………………. 4

Figure 9 Population by Race……………………………………...………………. 5

Figure 10 Population of Hispanic Origin…………………..……………………..… 5

Education

Figure 11 Public School Enrollment………………………...……………………… 6

Figure 12 Educational Attainment………………...………………………………… 6

Figure 13 Expenditure Per Child……………………………………………..…….. 7

Figure 14 Revenue by Source…………………………………..…………………… 7

Employment

Figure 15 Labor Force………………………………………….…………………… 8

Figure 16 Change in Employment…………………………..……………….……… 8

Figure 17 Unemployment Rates………………………………..…………….……… 9

Figure 18 Unemployment Rates, State………………………………………….…… 9

Figure 19 Jobs by Sector……..……………………………….……………………… 10

Figure 20 Workforce by Occupation…………………………….…………………… 10

Figure 21 Changes in Jobs by Sector……………………...…………………..……. 11

Figure 22 Jobs in Top Ten Manufacturing Sectors………………………………… 11

Income

Figure 23 Total Personal Income……………………………………...……..……… 12

Figure 24 Income by Source…………………………………………….…………… 12

Figure 25 Personal Income by Source………………………………….…………… 13

Figure 26 Median Household Income……………………………………………… 13

Figure 27 Per Capita Income, County……………………………………………… 14

Figure 28 Per Capita Income, State……………………………………..…………… 14

Figure 29 Earnings by Sector………….………………………...…………………… 15

Figure 30 Per Capita Unemployment Insurance Benefits………………………….. 15

Figure 31 Value Added of Manufacturing Sectors……………...………………….. 16

Figure 32 Earnings of Manufacturing Sector, State……………………...………... 16

IV


Figure

Description

Figures

Page

Retail

Figure 33 Total Retail Sales, County………………………………………………… 17

Figure 34 Retail Sales Per Capita, State……………………………………………… 17

Poverty

Figure 35 Persons Below Poverty Level, County…………………………………… 18

Figure 36 Persons Below Poverty Level, State……………………………………… 18

Figure 37 Age Groups & Poverty…………………………………………………… 19

Figure 38 Proportion of Students Receiving Free or Reduced Lunch……………… 19

Figure 39

Proportion of Population Participating in the Supplemented Nutrition

Assistance

20

Figure 40 Proportion of Population Medicaid Eligible………………………...…… 20

Health

Figure 41 Infant Mortality Rate…………………………………………………….… 21

Figure 42 Teen Fertility Rate……………………………………………….……… 21

Households

Figure 43 Female Headed Families…………………………………………….…… 22

Figure 44 Single Head of Family………………………………………………… 22

Agriculture

Figure 45 Market Value of Agricultural Products Sold, County………...………… 23

Figure 46 Market Value of Agricultural Products Sold, State……….…..………… 23

Figure 47 Farms & Percent of Sales by Size………………………………...……… 24

Figure 48 Number of Farms, County……………………………………...………… 24

Figure 49 Source of Farm Income, County………………………………...………… 25

Figure 50 Source of Farm Income, County & State…………………...…………… 25

Figure 51 Farm Income, County………………………………………….………… 26

Forestry

Figure 52 Timber Output…………………………………………………………… 26

Figure 53 Area of Timberland by Ownership Class…………………..……………. 27

Figure 54 Percent of Land in Forest by County……………….…………………… 27

Property Assessments

Figure 55 Assessments Per Person…………………………………………………. 28

Transportation

Figure 56 Miles of County Roads Per Person………………………………… 28

V


Internet Sources of Information

Population





Bureau of Census – 2010 Census .......................................http://2010.census.gov/2010census/data/

Bureau of Census ................................................................www.census.gov

Bureau of Economic Analysis .............................................www.bea.gov/bea/regional/data.htm

U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey ...........http://factfinder2.census.gov/

Education




Arkansas Department of Education, ADE Data Center ......http://adedata.arkansas.gov/

Arkansas Public School Computer Network .......................http://www.apscn.org/reports/reports.htm

U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey ...........http://factfinder2.census.gov/

Employment






Arkansas Department of Workforce Services .....................www.arkansas.gov/esd/

Discover Arkansas, Labor Market Information ..................www.discoverarkansas.net/cgi/dataanalysis/

Bureau of Economic Analysis .............................................www.bea.doc.gov/bea/regional/data.htm

U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey ...........http://factfinder2.census.gov/

Minnesota IMPLAN Group, Inc ......................................... www.implan.com

Income





Bureau of Economic Analysis .............................................www.bea.gov/bea/regional/data.htm

U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey ...........http://factfinder2.census.gov/

Discover Arkansas, Labor Market Information ..................www.discoverarkansas.net/cgi/dataanalysis/

Minnesota IMPLAN Group, Inc. ........................................ www.implan.com

Retail Sales

Woods & Poole, 2011 ........................................................ www.woodsandpoole.com

Poverty




Arkansas Department of Education, ADE Data Center ......http://adedata.arkansas.gov/

U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey ...........http://factfinder2.census.gov/

Arkansas Department of Human Services ..........................http://humanservices.arkansas.gov/

Health



Arkansas Department of Health ..........................................www.healthyarkansas.com/data/data.html

Arkansas Advocates for Children & Families .....................http://datacenter.kidscount.org/data/

Households

U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey ...........http://factfinder2.census.gov/

Agriculture



National Agricultural Statistical Service (NASS)...............www.agcensus.usda.gov/Publications/2007/

Bureau of Economic Analysis .............................................www.bea.gov/bea/regional/data.htm

Forestry

U.S. Forest Service .....................................................................http://srsfia2.fs.fed.us/php/tpo_2009/tpo_rpa_int1.php

U.S. Forest Service, Southern Forest Inventory & Analysis ......http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/

Property Assessments

Arkansas Assessment Coordination Department ................www.arkansas.gov/acd/

Transportation

Arkansas Highway & Transportation Department ..............www.arkansashighways.com

VI


Population

Population, 1960-2010

Jackson County

Figure 1

Number of People

25,000

20,000

22,843

20,452

21,646

18,944 18,418 17,997

15,000

10,000

5,000

0

1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010

Source: 1960, 1970, 1980, 1990, 2000 and 2010 Census of Population, U.S. Bureau of Census

The population of Jackson County declined from a high of 22,843 in 1960 to 17,997 in 2010.

Population Change, 2000 to 2010

The Natural State

Figure 2

Source: July 2000 & July 2010 Population Estimates, U.S. Bureau of Census

Population grew most rapidly in Northwest & Central Arkansas counties and declined in some East and South Arkansas

counties between 2000 and 2010.

1


Population

Figure 3

Percent of Total County Population by Age and Gender, 2010

Jackson County

Age 85 +

Age 80 ‐ 84

Age 75 ‐ 79

Age 70 ‐ 74

Age 65 ‐ 69

Age 60 ‐ 64

Age 55 ‐ 59

Age 50 ‐ 54

Age 45 ‐ 49

Age 40 ‐ 44

Age 35 ‐ 39

Age 30 ‐ 34

Age 25 ‐ 29

Age 20 ‐ 24

Age 15 ‐ 19

Age 10 ‐ 14

Age 5 ‐ 9

Age 0 ‐ 5

Males

Females

6%

4%

2%

0%

2%

4%

6%

Source: U.S. Bureau of Census, 2010 Census Summary File 1

There were more people living in Jackson County in the age groups between the ages of 45 and 54 than any other age

groups.

Population by Age, 2000 & 2010

Jackson County

Figure 4

2000 2010

6,000

5,000

4,000

3,000

2,000

1,000

0

5,172

4,927

4,716 4,831

3,672

3,131

3,095 3,213

1,052 1,015

841 750

Under 5 (5‐19) (20‐39) (40‐59) (60‐79) (80+)

Age Groups

Source: 2000 & 2010 Census of Population, U.S. Bureau of Census

The population in Jackson County between the ages of 40 and 79 increased, while the population of other age groups

decreased from 2000 to 2010.

2


Population

Population 65 and Older, 2010

The Natural State

Figure 5

Source: July 2010 Census of Population, U.S. Bureau of Census

Counties in Northcentral Arkansas had the highest proportion of people aged 65 and older in 2010.

Population Change of People 65 & Older, 2000 to 2010

The Natural State

Figure 6

Source: 2000 & 2010 Census of Population, U.S. Bureau of Census

The elderly population as a proportion of the total population grew most rapidly in Central and Northwest Arkansas from

2000 to 2010.

3


Population

Figure 7

Net Domestic Migration of People, 2005-2009*

The Natural State

Source: U.S. Bureau of Census, American Community Survey

Central & Northwest Arkansas had the highest domestic in-migration of people between 2005 and 2009, while Arkansas,

Bradley, Clay, Desha, Mississippi, Pulaski, Sebastian, Sevier and Woodruff counties had the largest domestic out-migration

of people during this period.

Figure 8

Population by Household Type, 2005-2009*

Jackson County & State

100%

80%

60%

74%

82%

County

State

40%

20%

0%

15% 15%

11%

3%

Family Households Non‐Family Households Group Quarters

Source: U.S. Bureau of Census, American Community Survey

Most of the people (74%) in Jackson County lived in family households. The proportion of people living in family households

in Jackson County was lower than the state average.

*Note: The data were from the five‐year sample (2005‐2009) collected by the American Community Survey. Since this is sample data, the margin of error for counties

with small populations may be large.

4


Population

Population by Race, 2010

Jackson County

Figure 9

Other races

1%

White

80%

African American

17%

Native Indian

1%

Asian

0%

Hawaiian or Pac. Islander

0%

Two or more races

1%

0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%

Source: 2010 Census of Population, U.S. Bureau of Census

Eightty percent of the people living in Jackson County were Caucasian. Seventeen percent were African American. Other

minorities represented about three percent of the population.

Population of Hispanic Origin, State and County for 2000 & 2010

Jackson County & State

County

State

Figure 10

7%

6%

5%

4%

3%

2%

1%

0%

1%

3%

2%

2000 2010

6%

Source: 2000 & 2010 Census of Population, U.S. Bureau of Census

The proportion of Hispanic people living in Jackson County increased from one percent in 2000 to two percent in 2010 and

remained lower than the state average. The Hispanic population may be of any race: white, black or any other combination

of races.

5


Education

Figure 11

Public School Enrollment, 1983-1984 to 2011-2012

Jackson County

Number of Students

4,500

4,000

3,500

3,000

2,500

2,000

1,500

1,000

500

0

3,933

2,179

'83‐'84 '86‐'87 '89‐'90 '92‐'93 '96‐'97 '01‐'02 '04‐'05 '08‐'09 '11‐'12

Source: Arkansas Department of Education (http://adedata.arkansas.gov/statewide/Counties/Enrollment.aspx)

Public school enrollment in Jackson County declined substantially since 1983-1984. Enrollment decreased from 3,933 in

1983-1984 to 2,179 in 2011-2012.

Figure 12

Educational Attainment, 2005-2009*

Jackson County & State

Graduate or professional degree

Bachelor's degree

6%

2%

5%

13%

State

County

Associate's degree

6%

4%

Some college, no degree

17%

22%

High school graduate (includes

equivalency)

35%

44%

Non‐HS Graduate

18%

28%

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50%

Source: U.S. Bureau of Census, American Community Survey

Jackson County had a smaller percentage of people who had bachelor's and professional degree as compared to the State

average in the five-year period 2005-2009.

*Note: The data were from the five‐year sample (2005‐2009) collected by the American Community Survey. Since this is sample data, the margin of error for counties

with small populations may be large.

6


Education Expenditure Per Child, County & State 2011-2012

Jackson County

Figure 13

County State

Education

$9,700

$9,600

$9,500

$9,400

$9,300

$9,200

$9,100

$9,000

$8,900

$8,800

$9,633

$9,112

Source: Arkansas Public School Computer Network (www.apscn.org/reports/hld/asr/asr.htm), Arkansas Department of Education

Schools in Jackson County spent $9,633 per child in the 2011-2012 school year as compared to an average expenditure of

$9,112 statewide.

Federal

Aid

18%

Education Revenue By Source, County & State 2009-2010

Jackson County & State

Figure 14

Other

Sources of

Funds

0%

Federal

Aid

15%

Other

Sources of

Funds

5%

Local

Revenue

24%

Local

Revenue

32%

State Aid

58%

County

State Aid

48%

State Average

Source: Arkansas Public School Computer Network (www.apscn.org/reports/hld/asr/asr.htm), Arkansas Department of Education

Jackson County schools raised more of their revenue from state and federal aid than did the average of all Arkansas public

schools in the 2009-2010 school year.

7


Employment

Figure 15

8,000

7,000

6,000

5,000

Labor Force, 2000 to 2010

Jackson County & State

7,125 7,325

6,525

4,000

3,000

Employment

Unemployment

2,000

1,000


575 600

800

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Source: Labor Market Information, Arkansas Employment Security Department

Jackson County employment decreased and unemployment increased since 2008.

Figure 16

Change in Employment, 2000 to 2010

The Natural State

Source: Regional Economic Information System (REIS), Bureau of Economic Analysis

Employment growth was highest in Central & Northwest Arkansas between 2000 and 2010.

8


Employment

12%

10%

8%

6%

4%

2%

Unemployment Rates, 1995 to 2010

Jackson County, State & United States

County State U.S.

Figure 17

10.9%

9.6%

7.9%

0%

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Source: Labor Market Information, Arkansas Employment Security Department

The unemployment rate in Jackson County increased significantly since 2008, and was above both the state and national

averages between 1995 and 2010.

Unemployment Rates, 2010

The Natural State

Figure 18

Source: Labor Market Information, Arkansas Employment Security Department

In general, Northwest, Central, and Western Arkansas counties had the lowest unemployment rates while Delta and Coastal

Plain counties had the highest rates in 2010.

9


Employment

Figure 19

Jobs by Sector, 2010

Jackson County

Missing

Trade

Farm & Farm Services

Government and …

Other Services

Professional Services

Finance, insurance, real …

Transportation and …

Manufacturing

Construction

Mining

0%

3%

4%

5%

Source: Regional Economic Information System, Bureau of Economic Analysis (REIS)

7%

8%

11%

11%

15%

15%

State

County

21%

0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25%

A larger proportion of jobs in Jackson County were in government & governmental enterprises (21%), trade (15%),

manufacturing (11%) and farm & farm services (8%) in 2010 as compared to the state average. There were missing data

due to non-disclosure of confidential information.

Figure 20

Workforce by Occupation, 2010

The Natural State & the Nation

25%

20%

AR State

United States

15%

10%

5%

0%

Management,

business, and

financial

Professional and

related

Service

Sales and related

Office and

administrative

support

Farming, fishing

and forestry

Construction and

extraction

Installation,

maintenance and

repair

Production

Transportation

and material

moving

Source: Minnesota IMPLAN Group, Inc.

More people were employed in service occupations in Arkansas and in the United States than in any

other occupation in 2010.

10


1,000

500

0

‐500

0

Changes in Jobs by Sector, 2001 to 2010

Jackson County

‐139 ‐116 ‐190

‐9

‐122

237

‐86 ‐155

Employment

Figure 21

780

‐1,000

‐1,500

‐1,051

Mining

Construction

Manufacturing

Transportation and

public utilities

Finance, insurance,

real estate and …

Professional Services

Other Services

Government and

government …

Farm & Farm Services

Trade

Missing Data

Source: Regional Economic Information System, Bureau of Economic Analysis (REIS)

The professional services sector lost more jobs, while the government & governmental enterprises sector gained more jobs

between 2001 and 2010 than any other sectors in Jackson County. There were considerable missing data due to nondisclosure

of confidential information.

Jobs in Top 10 Manufacturing Sectors, 2010

Arkansas State

Figure 22

Miscellaneous

Primary Metal Products

Electrical Equipment & Appliances

Wood Products

Plastics & Rubber Products

Paper Products

Machinery

Transportation Equipment

Fabricated Metal Products

Food Products

3%

5%

5%

6%

6%

6%

7%

7%

9%

29%

0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35%

Source: Minnesota IMPLAN Group, Inc.

Nearly 30 percent of the jobs in the manufacturing sector in 2010 in Arkansas were in the food processing industries.

11


Income

Figure 23

Total Personal Income, 1994 to 2010

Jackson County

Current $ Constant $ 2010

Millions of Dollars

$700

$600

$500

$400

$300

$200

$423

$287

$581

$100

$0

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Source: Regional Economic Information System, U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis

Total personal income in Jackson County, in constant dollars, increased from $423 million in 1994 to $581 million in 2010.

Figure 24

Income by Source, 1999 & 2010

Jackson County

$350

$329

1999 2010

Constant $ 2010 (Million)

$300

$250

$200

$150

$100

$50

$273

$72

$73

$128

$179

$0

Net Earnings by Residence Dividends, Interest & Rent

Transfer Payments

Source: Regional Economic Information System, U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis

Income from all three categories (net earnings and dividends; interest & rent; and transfer payments) increased in Jackson

County between 1999 and 2010.

12


Income

Income by Source, County and State 2010

Jackson County & State

Figure 25

County

State

70%

60%

50%

40%

30%

20%

10%

0%

57% 58%

31%

24%

17%

13%

Net Earnings by Residence Dividends, Interest & Rent Transfer Payments

Source: Regional Economic Information System, U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis

Jackson County residents received a smaller share of income from dividends, interest & rent and a larger share from

transfer payments than the average for all Arkansas residents in 2010. Income from net earnings was about the same as it

was for the state.

Median Household Income, 2005-2009*

Jackson County & State

Figure 26

County

State

$45,000

$40,000

$35,000

$30,000

$25,000

$20,000

$15,000

$10,000

$5,000

$0

$39,267 $38,984 $39,550

$32,055

$27,615

$23,175

Estimate Lower Estimate Upper Estimate

Source: U.S. Bureau of Census, American Community Survey

Median household income in 2005-2009 was lower in Jackson County than the state average.

*Note: The data were from the five‐year sample (2005‐2009) collected by the American Community Survey. Since this is sample data, the margin of error for counties

with small populations may be large.

13


Income

Figure 27

Per Capita Income, 1990 to 2010

Jackson County, State & United States

Constant $ 2010

$45,000

$40,000

$35,000

$30,000

$25,000

$20,000

$15,000

$10,000

$5,000

$0

County State U.S.

1990 1995 2000 2005 2010

Source: Regional Economic Information System, U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis

Jackson County per capita income was below both the state and national averages from 1990 to 2009 and was about the

same as the state average in 2010.

Figure 28

Per Capita Income, 2010

The Natural State

Source: Regional Economic Information System, U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis; 2010 Census of Population, U.S. Bureau of Census

Per capita incomes were highest in Central & Northwest Arkansas and lowest in some West & Northcentral counties in

2010.

14


Income

Earnings by Sector, 2010

Jackson County

Figure 29

Trade State County

Farm and Farm Services

Government & Government …

Other Services

Professional Services

Finance, Insurance, Information …

Transportation & Public Utilities

Manufacturing

Construction

Mining

0% 10% 20% 30% 40%

Source: Regional Economic Profiles, Bureau of Economic Analysis

The manufacturing sector accounted for one-third of total earnings in Jackson County in 2010, and comprised a much

larger share of total earnings as compared to the state as a whole.

Constant $ 2010

$500

$450

$400

$350

$300

$250

$200

$150

$100

$50

$0

Per Capita Unemployment Insurance Benefits, 2000 to 2010

Jackson County & State

Figure 30

2000

2001

2002

County

2003

2004

2005

State

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Source: Regional Economic Profiles, Bureau of Economic Analysis

Jackson County residents received per capita unemployment insurance benefits that were significantly higher than the state

average from 2000 to 2010.

15


Income

Figure 31

Value Added of Manufacturing Sectors, 2010

Arkansas State

Textile Products

Leather & Allied

Textile Mills

Computer & Other Electronics

Beverage & Tobacco

Printing & Related

Furniture & related Products

Nonmetal Mineral Products

Petroleum & Coal Products

Miscellaneous

Wood Products

Chemical Products

Primary Metal Products

Transportation Equipment

Plastics & Rubber Products

Machinery Products

Electircal Equipment & Appliances

Fabricated Metal Products

Paper Products

Food Products

0%

0%

1%

1%

1%

2%

2%

2%

3%

3%

4%

5%

6%

6%

6%

7%

7%

11%

12%

Source: Minnesota IMPLAN Group, Inc.

Most of the value added in the manufacturing sector in Arkansas came from food, paper and fabricated metal products in

2010.

21%

0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25%

Figure 32

Average Weekly Earnings, 2010

Arkansas State

Paper Products

Primary Metal Products

Chemical Products

Textile Mill Products

Electrical Equipment and …

Plastics & Rubber Products

Fabricated Metal Products

Transportation Equipment

Machinery

Printing

Wood Products

Furniture and Related …

Food Products

Leather and Allied Products

Apparel Products

$462 $591$655

$423

$858

$857

$841

$741 $807

$823

$713

$668

$1,089

$1,082

$1,073

$0 $200 $400 $600 $800 $1,000 $1,200

Source: Labor Market Information, Arkansas Employment Security Department

Average weekly earnings in the manufacturing sector ranged from a high of $1,089 in the paper products industry to a low

of $423 in the apparel industry in 2010.

16


Retail

Total Retail Sales, 1990 to 2010

Jackson County

Figure 33

Constant $ 2010 (Million)

$250

$200

$150

$100

$50

$0

$222

$174

$152

1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Source: Woods & Poole, 2011.

Jackson County retail increased from $174 million in 1990 to a high of $222 million in 1998, followed by a decline to $152

million in 2010.

Retail Sales Per Capita, 2010

The Natural State

Figure 34

Source: Woods & Poole, 2011; 2010 Census of Population, U.S. Bureau of Census

Retail sales per capita were highest in counties that are regional trade centers in 2010.

17


Poverty

Figure 35

30%

28%

25%

23%

20%

18%

15%

13%

10%

8%

5%

3%

0%

Persons Below Poverty Level, 1989, 1999 & 2005-2009*

Jackson County & State

27%

18%

17%

County

16%

State

26%

1989 1999 2005‐2009

18%

Source: U.S. Bureau of Census, American Community Survey

The estimated poverty level in Jackson County was higher than the state average in 1989, 1999 and 2005-2009.

Figure 36

Estimated People Below Poverty Level, 2005-2009*

The Natural State

Source: U.S. Bureau of Census, American Community Survey

The estimated poverty level was highest in the Delta with many counties having a poverty level over twenty-one percent in

the five-year period from 2005 to 2009..

*Note: The data were from the five‐year sample (2005‐2009) collected by the American Community Survey. Since this is sample data, the margin of error for counties

with small populations may be large.

18


Poverty

Age Groups & Estimated Poverty, 2005-2009*

Jackson County & State

County

State

Figure 37

45%

40%

35%

30%

25%

20%

15%

10%

5%

0%

41%

26%

26%

19%

18%

12%

(0‐17) (65 and Over) Total

Source: U.S. Bureau of Census, American Community Survey

A larger proportion of children lived in poverty than for the population as a whole in the five-year period, 2005-2009. There

was a larger proportion of young and elderly people living in poverty Jackson County than the state average.

Proportion of Students Receiving Free or Reduced Price Lunch, 2009-2010

The Natural State

Figure 38

Source: Arkansas Department of Education

There was a wide range in the proportion of students who received free and reduced price school lunches across the

seventy-five counties in the 2009-2010 school year. Participation rates ranged from thirty-five percent to one-hundred

percent with a higher percentage of youth in the Delta Region counties receiving free and reduced price lunches.

*Note: The data were from the five‐year sample (2005‐2009) collected by the American Community Survey. Since this is sample data, the margin of error for counties

with small populations may be large.

19


Poverty

Proportion of Population Participating in the Supplemented Nutrition Assistance Program,

2010

The Natural State

Figure 39

Source: 2010 Statistical Report, Arkansas Department of Human Services

A larger proportion of people living in the Delta counties and Columbia, Jefferson and Lafayette counties participated in the

Supplemented Nutrition Assistance Program when compared to people in other parts of the state in 2010.

Figure 40

Proportion of Population Medicaid Eligible, 2010

The Natural State

Source: 2010 Statistical Report, Arkansas Department of Human Services

A substantial percentage of the population (between 30% and 51%) was eligible for Medicaid in thirty-six counties in 2010,

primarily located in the Eastern and Southern parts of the state.

20


Health

Infant Mortality Rate, 2006-2010

The Natural State

Figure 41

Source: Arkansas Advocates for Children & Families

The infant mortality rate was highest in the Bradley, Crittenden, Dallas, Newton, Ouachita, Perry, Prairie, and Stone

counties in the five-year period from 2006 to 2010.

Teen Fertility Rate, 2006-2010

The Natural State

Figure 42

Source: Arkansas Advocates for Children & Families

The teen fertility rate varied from County to County and was highest in some Delta and Coastal Plain counties in the fiveyear

period from 2006 to 2010. Counties with the highest teen fertility rates included Bradley, Crittenden, Desha,

Hempstead, Mississippi, Monroe, Ouachita, Phillips, Poinsett, St. Francis, Scott, Sevier, and Yell counties.

21


Households

Female Headed Families, 1970, 1980, 1990, 2000 & 2005-2009*

Jackson County & State

Figure 43

County

State

25%

20%

15%

10%

10%

10%

13%

12%

17%

15%

13%

13%

22%

19%

5%

0%

1970 1980 1990 2000 2005‐2009

Source: 1970, 1980, 1990, 2000 Census of Population & 2010 American Community Survey, U.S. Bureau of Census

Female headed families as a proportion of total families in Izard County increased from ten percent in 1970 to twenty-two

percent in 2005-2009, which was higher than the state average of nineteen percent.

Figure 44

Single Head of Family, 2005-2009*

The Natural State

Source: American Community Survey, U.S Bureau of Census

The Delta counties and the Coastal Plains counties had the highest proportion of families with only a single parent present

in 2010.

*Note: The data were from the five‐year sample (2005‐2009) collected by the American Community Survey. Since this is sample data, the margin of error for counties

with small populations may be large.

22


Million Dollars

$160

$140

$120

$100

$80

$60

$40

$20

$0

Market Value of Agriculture Products Sold, 1978 to 2007

Jackson County

$150

$47

$122

$57 $52

Current $ Constant $ 2007

$95 $97 $104

$65

$80

$70

$60

Agriculture

Figure 45

1978 1982 1987 1992 1997 2002 2007

$107

Source: 2007 Census of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistical Service

The market value (in constant dollars) of agricultural products sold in Jackson County declined from $150 million in 1978 to

$107 million in 2007.

Market Value of Agriculture Products Sold, 2007

The Natural State

Figure 46

Source: 2007 Census of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistical Service

The two counties with the highest market value of agricultural production were in Northwest Arkansas. However, many

Delta and Highlands counties also ranked high in terms of the market value of agricultural production in 2007.

23


Agriculture

Figure 47

Farms & Farm Sales by Size, 2007

Jackson County

80%

70%

60%

50%

40%

30%

20%

10%

0%

45%

15%

4%

0% 1% 1%

< $10,000 $10,000 to

$49,999

Farms

Market Value Ag. Products

$50,000 to

$99,999

10%

8%

$100,000 to

$249,999

19%

13% 13%

$250,000 to

$499,999

69%

0%

$500,000+ Unknown*

Source: 2007 Census of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistical Service

Sixty percent of the farms in Jackson County had sales of less than $50,000 in 2007. These farms accounted for about one

percent of total farm sales. Thirteen percent of the farms had sales of $500,000 or more and these farms accounted for

sixty-nine percent of total sales.

Figure 48

1,000

900

800

700

600

500

400

300

200

100

0

Number of Farms, 1964 to 2007

Jackson County

Farms

888

679

550

475 469 450

461

445

398

1964 1974 1978 1982 1987 1992 1997 2002 2007

Source: 2007 Census of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistical Service

The number of farms in Jackson County declined from 888 in 1964 to 445 in 2007.

*Note: Due to the lack of available data, the unknown column was added for the missing data

24


Agriculture

Source of Farm Income, County 1999, 2003 & 2010

Jackson County

1999 2003 2010

Figure 49

Constant $ 2010 (Million)

$120

$100

$80

$60

$40

$20

$0

$4

$4

$6

$84

$88

$107

$46

$59

Livestock & Products Crops Government

Payments

$20

$23

$21

$10

Imputed & Misc.

Income Received

Source: Regional Economic Information System, U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis

Crop sales were the major source of farm income for Jackson County farmers, increasing between 1999 and 2010.

Source of Farm Income, County & State 2010

Jackson County & State

Figure 50

County

State

80%

70%

60%

50%

40%

30%

20%

10%

0%

4%

53%

75%

36%

14%

Livestock & Products Crops Government

Payments

4% 7% 6%

Imputed & Misc.

Income Received

Source: Regional Economic Information System, U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis

Jackson County farmers received a larger proportion of farm income from crops when compared to all Arkansas farmers in

2010.

25


Agriculture & Forestry

Figure 51

Farm Income, 1994 to 2010

Jackson County

Constant $ 2010 (Million)

$180

$160

$140

$120

$100

$80

$60

$40

$20

$0

Livestock Crops Government Payment Imputed Income

$163

$107

$91

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Source: Regional Economic Information System, U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis

Farm income from crop sales in Jackson County fluctuated from $91 million in 1994 to a high of $163 million in 2005,

followed by a decline to $107 million in 2010.

Figure 52

1,400

1,200

Timber Output, 1999 & 2009

Jackson County

1,233 1,233

Softwood Hardwood Total

1,000 Cubic Feet

1,000

800

600

400

200

0

‐ ‐

172

1999 2009

172

Source: U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis National Program

Total Timber output of Jackson County declined significantly between 1999 and 2009.

26


Forestry

Area of Timberland by Ownership Class, 2010

Jackson County

Figure 53

Thousand Acres

Private

Other Local Govt

County and Municipal

State

Other federal

Dept of Defense

Fish and Wildlife Service

National Park Service

National Forest System









72

0

25

50

75

100

Source: Southern Forest Inventory & Analysis, Southern Research Station, U.S. Forest Service, USDA.

The total timber acreage in Jackson County was 72,000 acres in 2010. Farmers/ranchers and private individuals owned

100% of the timberland in Jackson County.

Percent of Land in Forest By County, 2010

Jackson County

Figure 54

Source: Southern Forest Inventory & Analysis, Southern Research Station, U.S. Forest Service, USDA.

Over seventy-five percent of the land area in many Coastal Plain and Ouachita Highland counties qualified as timber

acreage in 2010.

27


Property Assessment & Roads

Figure 55

Property Assessments Per Person, 2010

The Natural State

Source: Arkansas Assessment Coordination Department, Little Rock, Arkansas; 2010 Census of Population, U.S. Bureau of Census

The average property assessments per person in 2010 varied greatly among Arkansas counties, from $7,427 to $27,781.

Figure 56

Miles of County Roads Per Person, 2010

The Natural State

Source: Road and Street Report, Arkansas State Highway Commission

In general, sparsely populated counties had more miles of County roads to maintain per person than more densely

populated counties in 2010.

28


Glossary

AGRICULTURAL SERVICES Includes establishments primarily engaged in performing soil preparation services, crop

services, veterinary and other animal services, farm labor and management services, and landscape and horticultural services,

for others on a contract or fee basis.

CIVILIAN LABOR FORCE The sum of all employed and unemployed persons 16 years of age or older. Members of the

Armed Forces are excluded.

"CONSTANT $" Figures adjusted for inflation using the Consumer Price Index, 1982-1984 = 100.

“CURRENT $” Figures not adjusted for inflation.

CONSTRUCTION Includes general building contractors (residential, operative, and nonresidential); heavy construction

contractors (highway, street, etc.); and special trade contractors (plumbing, heating, air conditioning, painting, paper hanging,

electrical, masonry, stonework, roofing, sheet metal, concrete, and miscellaneous special trade contractors).

DELIVERED VALUE OF HARVESTED TIMBER The value of harvested timber delivered to the first processing point.

The value includes the value of the timber (stumpage value), the cost of harvesting, and the cost of transporting the timber to the

first processing point.

EARNINGS Earnings include wages and salaries, other labor income, and proprietors' income by place of work.

EMPLOYMENT An estimate of the number of persons, on a place-of-residence basis, who worked anytime for pay or profit

or worked 15 hours or more as an unpaid family worker during the week of reference (the week including the 12th of the

month). Also included are those who, although not working, had some job attachment and were not looking for work, and

persons involved in labor-management disputes.

FAMILY HOUSEHOLDS Includes a householder and one or more other persons living in the same household who are

related to the householder by birth, marriage, or adoption. The number of family households always equals the number of

families; however, a family household may also include non-relatives living with the family. Families are classified by type as

either a married-couple family or other family which is further classified into "male householder" (a family with a male

householder and no wife present) or "female householder" (a family with a female householder and no husband present).

FARMING Includes businesses whose primary source of revenue is from crop and livestock production.

FEMALE HEADED FAMILIES A family with a female householder and no husband present.

FINANCIAL SERVICES Financial, insurance, and real estate services.

GOVERNMENT Employees of city, county, state and federal governments.

IMPUTED & MISC. INCOME RECEIVED Consists of imputed income, such as gross rental value of dwellings and value

of home consumption, and other farm related income components, such as machine hire and custom work income, rental

income, and income from forest products.

INCOME Total income is the algebraic sum of the amount reported separately for wage or salary income; non-farm net selfemployment

income; farm net self-employment income; interest, dividend, net royalty or rental income; social security or

railroad retirement income; public assistance or welfare income and all other income.

INFANT MORTALITY RATE The number of infant deaths (under one year of age) per 1,000 live births.

JOBS The number of full-time and part-time jobs in a geographic area.

MANUFACTURING Includes manufacturing industries dealing with food and kindred products; textile mill products;

apparel products; lumber and wood products; furniture and fixtures; paper and allied products; printing and publishing;

chemicals; petroleum and coal; rubber and miscellaneous plastics; leather; stone, clay and glass; primary metal industries;

fabricated metal products; machinery; electrical and electronic equipment; transportation equipment; instruments; and

miscellaneous industries.

29


Glossary

MARKET VALUE OF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS SOLD The gross market value before taxes and production expenses

of all agricultural products sold or removed from place regardless of who received payment. It includes sales by the operator as well

as the value of any shares received by partners, landlords, contractors, or others associated with the operation. It does not include

payment received for participation in federal farm programs nor does it include income from farm-related sources such as

agricultural services, or income from non-farm sources.

MINING Includes extraction of oil and gas, non-metallic minerals, sand and gravel.

NET DOMESTIC MIGRATION The difference between domestic in-migration to an area and domestic out-migration from the

area during the period.

PER CAPITA INCOME The per capita income is the total personal income divided by the total population of the area studied.

The per capita income measure should be used with care. In the short run, it may temporarily vary from the result of unusual

conditions (bumper crops, a major construction project or a catastrophe). In the long run, it may misrepresent the economic wellbeing

of the general population because of the presence of a large institutional population (college, prison). While per capita income

reflects average income per person, it does not accurately reflect family unit spendable income.

PERSONAL INCOME The total income received by residents of an area, including earnings, transfer payments, and interest,

dividends and rent.

POVERTY LEVEL An individual or household is considered to be living below the poverty level when their income is below an

income threshold established by the Bureau of Census. The income cutoffs used by the Bureau of Census to determine the poverty

status of families and unrelated individuals consist of a set of 48 thresholds arranged in a two-dimensional matrix consisting of

family size cross-classified by presence and number of family members under 18 years old.

RETAIL SALES Includes sales from general merchandise stores; department stores; variety stores; food, bakery and dairy stores;

automotive dealers; gasoline stations; eating and drinking establishments; and other retail trade establishments.

SINGLE HEAD OF FAMILY Single head of a family with no spouse present.

SERVICES Includes a variety of items ranging from hotels to attorneys. Included in this category are hotels and other lodging

places; personal services (laundry, photographic studios, beauty shops, shoe repair, funeral services); business services (advertising,

mailing, news syndicates, personnel supply services, computer services); auto repair services and garages (retail, parking, repair);

miscellaneous repair services (electrical, etc.); amusement and recreation services (orchestra, dance halls, etc.); health services

(physicians, dentists, nursing care facilities, hospitals, medical labs, outpatient care); legal services; educational services; social

services (job training, individual and family services, day care); membership organizations (business, professional, labor, civic,

social, etc.); engineering and architectural services; and other similar services.

STUMPAGE VALUE OF HARVESTED TIMBER The value of timber harvested going to the landowner.

TEEN FERTILITY RATE is the birth rate for women 15 to 19 years of age. It is the number of live births per 1000 women 15-

19 years of age.

TRADE Includes wholesale and retail trade.

TRANSPORTATION Includes railroads; trucking service and warehousing; other transportation services (bus, air, and U.S. postal

service); communication systems (radio, T.V., etc.); and utilities and sanitary services.

UNEMPLOYMENT An estimate of the number of persons who, for the entire week of reference (the week including the 12th of

the month), did not work at all, were able to work, and available for work, and (1) were looking for work, or (2) would have looked

for work except that (a) they were waiting to return to a job from which they had been laid off, or (b) they were waiting to report to a

new job.

UNEMPLOYMENT RATE The number of unemployed workers as a percentage of the civilian labor force.

30


Local Cooperative Extension Office

Jackson County Staff Chair

Name: Randy Chlapecka

Address: 649 Jackson 917,

Newport, AR 72112

Phone: 870-523-7450 (office)

Fax: 870-523-7452

or

Email: rchlapecka@uaex.edu

District

Delta District

Ozark District

Fulton

Benton Carroll Boone

Clay

Marion

Randolph

Baxter

Sharp

Izard Lawrence

Greene

Washington Madison

Newton Searcy Stone

Craighead

Independence

Mississippi

Jackson

Crawford Johnson Van Buren

Franklin

Cleburne

Poinsett

Pope

Conway

Cross

Logan

White

Sebastian

Woodruff

Faulkner

Crittenden

Yell

St. Francis

Perry

Scott

Pulaski Lonoke Prairie Lee

Saline

Monroe

Montgomery Garland

Polk

Phillips

Hot Spring

Grant Jefferson Arkansas

Pike

Howard Clark

Sevier

Dallas Lincoln

Cleveland

Desha

Little River Hempstead Nevada

Delta District

Ouachita

Drew

Calhoun

Bradley

Miller

Lafayette

Chicot

Columbia Union Ashley

Ouachita District

***For additional copies of the County Profile or information on your county,

please contact your County Staff Chair listed above.***


A r k a n s a s I s O u r C a m p u s

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The Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service offers its programs to all eligible persons regardless of race, color, national

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