Final Programme Beyond the River - World Water Week

worldwaterweek.org

Final Programme Beyond the River - World Water Week

Building Capacity

Promoting Partnership

Reviewing Implementation

Beyond the River

– Sharing Benefits and

Responsibilities





Final Programme

• Workshops, Seminars and Side Events

• Tours and Social Activities

• Prizes and Award Ceremonies

• General Information

www.worldwaterweek.org


Welcome to the 2006 World

Water Week in Stockholm

Welcome to Stockholm! In 2006, the World Water Week

in Stockholm continues its important annual role at the

nexus of the water, environment, development and poverty

reduction fields.

This year, a multitude of workshops, seminars and side

events will explore three water-related complexes under the

overarching World Water Week theme of “Beyond the River

Sharing Benefits and Responsibilities”. The response from

the international water community, and its interest in being

active in the programme, has been overwhelming. Nearly 100

different organisations are on board as convenors or co-convenors

of different activities.

Plenary sessions, panel debates, technical tours, social

events and prize ceremonies round out the programme for the

Water Week. In Stockholm you will be joined by over 1500

participants who are expected from more than 100 countries.

They will represent businesses, governments, the water management

and science sectors, inter-governmental organisations,

non-governmental organisations, research and training institutions,

United Nations agencies and more.

Through capacity-building, partnership-building and

follow-up on the implementation of international processes

and programmes in water and development, the World Water

Week in Stockholm has gained a reputation as an event

not to be missed in the water and development field. The

Stockholm International Water Institute is pleased to host

the event, and I am happy that you joined us.

Welcome to Stockholm!

Anders Berntell

Executive Director, SIWI

Table of Contents

Welcome ............................................................................................... 2

Overall World Water Week Strategy ..................................................... 3

Map of the Venue ................................................................................. 4

Convenors and Co-Convenors ............................................................. 5

World Water Week Day-by-Day Overview .......................................6–7

Purpose and Scope of the World Water Week ................................. 8–11

Sunday Seminars ............................................................................ 12–19

Sunday Side Events ........................................................................ 20–21

Monday Opening and General Plenary Sessions ................................. 22

Monday High-Level Transboundary Waters Panel Debate ..................23

Monday Side Events .......................................................................24–25

Monday “Meet and Greet” Mayor’s Reception .....................................25

Tuesday Workshops ....................................................................... 26–29

Tuesday Seminars .......................................................................... 30–34

Tuesday Side Events ........................................................................ 35–36

Tuesday Award Ceremony: Stockholm Junior Water Prize ................. 37

Wednesday Workshops ...................................................................38–41

Wednesday Seminars ..................................................................... 42–49

Wednesday Side Events ..................................................................50–52

Wednesday Award Ceremony: Stockholm Industry Water Award ......52

Wednesday World Water Week Dinner ................................................52

Thursday Workshops ..................................................................... 53–54

Thursday Seminars ......................................................................... 55–59

Thursday Side Events ..........................................................................60

Thursday Award Ceremony: Stockholm Water Prize ..........................61

Thursday Aquatic Adventure Dinner ..................................................61

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Strategy of the World Water Week

The aim of the World Water Week in Stockholm is to

serve, on an annual basis, as the main arena for an exchange

of views and experiences between members of the

scientific, business, policy and civil society communities

in order to advance efforts related to water, the environment,

livelihoods and poverty reduction.

The World Water Week in Stockholm:

• Builds capacity for different professions to act and to

affect positive change by facilitating for them an increased

knowledge and a deeper understanding of the

links between water-society-environment-economy

• Promotes partnerships and alliances between individuals

and organisations from different fields of expertise

in an inspiring atmosphere which offers ample

opportunity for making new contacts and strengthening

existing relationships

• Reviews the implementation of actions, commitments

and decisions in international processes and by

different stakeholders in response to the challenges

By serving as a link between practice, science, policy

and decision making, the World Water Week moves beyond

simply talking about what is and what should be

by combining different types of knowledge and experiences

to achieve development objectives in a worthwhile

manner.

As a backdrop, the World Water Week’s basic perspective

is global, but it also acknowledges that there are

similarities and differences between regions of the world,

phases of development, political systems and climatic

conditions.

The World Water Week also serves as a venue for the

awarding of distinguished prizes and honours. In doing

so, the Week focuses attention on outstanding efforts and

raises awareness of different water and development issues.

A World Water Week in Stockholm niche is selected

and followed for a range of years. The present niche

(2003–2007) is ”Drainage Basin Security: Prospects for

Trade offs and Benefit Sharing in a Globalised World.”

The sub-theme for 2006 is “Beyond the River – Sharing

Benefits and Responsibilities” and offers participants the

opportunity to learn more about – and to contribute to

– solutions to one of the most significant development

and environmental challenges that the world has to come

to grips with. Workshops and special Poster Sessions will

be organised where selected abstracts will be presented.

Seminars and side events will feature invited speakers and

participants will present their views and experiences. Special

attention will be devoted to highlight concrete work

that matters for the poor, for the environment and for our

common future.

World Water Week Sunday

20 August

Monday

21 August

Tuesday

22 August

Wednesday

23 August

Thursday

24 August

Friday

25 August

Photo: SIWI

Saturday

26 August

Friday General and Closing Plenary Sessions ..................................... 62

Friday Seminars ............................................................................ 63–64

Friday Award Ceremony: Swedish Baltic Sea Water Award ................. 65

Friday Award Ceremony: World Water Week Best Poster .................. 65

Saturday Seminar ................................................................................66

Saturday Technical Tours ................................................................... 67

Special Session: Global Water Partnership .......................................... 68

Special Session: Comprehensive Assessment/Challenge Program 69–73

Special Session: EU Water Initiative Partners Meeting .................74–75

Poster Sessions ...............................................................................76–80

General Information ....................................................................... 81–83

Note on timing: In general, morning sessions begin at 09:00 and end at

12:00. Afternoon sessions begin at 13:30 and end at 17:00. Side events take

place between 12:15 and 13:15, and 17:15 and 18:45. Some events, particularly

on Thursday, may end earlier. Consult the specifi c programme page.

This Final Programme is published by the Stockholm International

Water Institute. Cover photos: Children in Tanzania, courtesy European

Commission-ECHO/Yves Horent; groundwater pumping in Australia,

courtesy CSIRO Land and Water; tsunami affected area of Aceh, Indonesia,

courtesy European Commission-ECHO/Martinus Jansen; partnership

building, courtesy SIWI. Back cover photo: Stockholm, courtesy

Stockholm Visitors Board.

3

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


City Conference Centre

Folkets Hus (FH)

City Conference Centre

Norra Latin (NL)

4


World Water Week Sunday

20 August

Photo: SIWI

2006 World Water Week

Convenors and Co-convenors

Andhra Pradesh Farmer Managed Groundwater Systems Project

• Baltic 21 • Bonn International Center for Conversion (BICC)

• Building Partnerships for Development in Water and Sanitation

(BPDWS) • Cap-Net • Centre for Ecology and Hydrology

(CEH) • Centre for Transdisciplinary Environmental Research

(CTM, Stockholm University) • CGIAR Challenge Program

on Water and Food (CPWF) • Comision Nacional del Agua

(CONAGUA, Mexico) • Comprehensive Assessment of Water

Management (CA) in Agriculture • Delft Hydraulics • Department

for International Development, United Kingdom • DHI

Water and Environment • East African Community (EAC) •

Euphrates-Tigris Initiative for Cooperation/Kent State University

(ETIC) • European Commission (EC) • European Union

Water Initiative (EUWI) • Every River has its People Project

(ERP) • Expert Group on Development Issues (EGDI), Ministry

for Foreign Affairs, Sweden • Federal Institute for Geosciences

and Natural Resources (BGR) Germany • Food and

Agricultural Organization (FAO) – New Delhi • French Water

Academy • Gender and Water Alliance (GWA) • Global Water

Partnership (GWP) • Global Water Partnership (GWP) – Eastern

Africa • Global Water Partnership (GWP) – Mediterranean

• Global Water Partnership (GWP) – Western Africa • International

Association for Hydrogeologists (IAH) • International

Association of Hydraulic Engineering and Research (IAHR) •

International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) •

International Federation of Environmental Journalists (IFEJ) •

International Hydropower Association (IHA) • International

Lake Environment Committee (ILEC) • International Livestock

Research Institute (ILRI) • International Secretariat for Water

• International Water Association (IWA) • International Water

Management Institute (IWMI) • International Water Resources

Association (IWRA) • IRC International Water and Sanitation

Centre • Japan Water Forum (JWF) • King’s College London •

Linköping University • London Water Research Group • Ministry

of Foreign Affairs, Danida, Denmark • Munich Re Foundation

• Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs • Northern

Water Network (NoWNET) [Australia Water Partnership, Danish

Water Forum, French Coordination for Water, Global Water

Partnership, Japan Water Forum, Korea Water Forum, Netherlands

Water Partnership, Swedish Water House and World Water

Council] • Okavango Delta Management Plan (ODMP) • Okavango

River Basin Water Commission (OKACOM) • Overseas

Development Institute (ODI), UK • Pakistan Water Partnership

(PWP) • Pan African Vision for the Environment (PAVE) •

Prince Sultan Bin Abdulaziz International Prize for Water, Prince

Sultan Research Center for Environment, Water and Desert,

King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia • Ramboll Natura

• Ramsar Convention on Wetlands • Stakeholder Forum for a

Sustainable Future • Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI)

• Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) – Asia • Stockholm

International Water Institute (SIWI) • Stockholm Water Company

• Stockholm Water Foundation • Streams of Knowledge

• Swedish Association for Environmental Journalists (MÖF) •

Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida)

• Swedish Society for Nature Conservation (SSNC) • Swedish

Water House (SWH) • Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science

and Technology (EAWAG) • Federal Ministry for Economic

Cooperation and Development, Germany • The International

Joint Commission (IJC) • The Nature Conservancy (TNC)

• The University of Tokyo • The World Bank • The World

Conservation Union (IUCN) • The World Life Sciences Forum

(BioVision) • Third World Centre for Water Management •

UN-Habitat • UN Task Force for Gender and Water – Division

for the Advancement of Women • UNDP Human Development

Report Office • UNEP Collaborating Centre on Water and Environment

• UNEP Division of the Global Environment Facility

(UNEP DGEF) • UNEP Global Programme of Action for the

Protection of the Marine Environment from Land-based Activities

(GPA) • UNESCO International Hydrological Programme

(UNESCO-IHP) • United Nations – Department of Economic

and Social Affairs (UNDESA) • United Nations Children’s

Fund (UNICEF) • United Nations Development Programme

(UNDP) • U.S. Department of State • UN-Water • VARIM

• WASTE Advisers on Urban Environment and Development •

Water and Sanitation Programme (WSP) • Water and Sanitation

Programme – South Asia (WSP-SA) • Water Environment Federation

(WEF) • Water Integrity Network (WIN) [International

Water and Sanitation Centre, Stockholm International Water

Institute, Swedish Water House, Transparency International and

Water and Sanitation Programme] • Water Supply and Sanitation

Collaborative Council (WSSCC) • WaterAid • Watershed

Media Project • Wetlands International • World Agroforestry

Centre (ICRAF) • World Business Council for Sustainable Development

(WBCSD) • World Health Organization (WHO) •

World Water Council (WWC) • World Water Institute • World

Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) Sweden

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Monday

21 August

Tuesday

22 August

Wednesday

23 August

Thursday

24 August

Friday

25 August

Saturday

26 August

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


World Water Week Overview

Sunday 20 August Monday 21 August Tuesday 22 August

Registration Hours

08:00–18:00 Registration*

08:00–18:00 Registration 08:00–18:00 Registration

Morning

Session

Closing the Sanitation Loop (12)**

Social and Environmental Change in

a Transboundary River Basin (13)

Young Water Professionals:

Co-management of Water for

Livelihoods and Ecosystems (14)

Transboundary Aquifers

– The Hidden Asset for Riparian

Cooperation in Africa (15)

Environmental Conflicts and the

Role of Media (16)

Opening Session

with the Official Address, Special

Guest Speakers, the Keynote

Address and the 2006 Stockholm

Water Prize Laureate Lecture (22)

WS 1: Tools for Benefit Sharing in

Transboundary Settings (26)

WS 2: Water and Trade: Matching

International Water Availability and

Local Needs (27)

WS 4: Benefits and Responsibilities

of Decentralised and Centralised

Approaches for Management of

Water and Wastewater (28)

Climate and Water-related

Risks (30)

Capturing the Big Picture of

Gender in Water (31)

Partnerships in Action (32)

Multi-scale Water

Governance (70)

EUWI: Infrastructure and Water

and Sanitation Services for the

Poor (74)

Lunch

Side Events (20–21)

Side Events (24–25) Side Events (35–36)

Afternoon

Session

Closing the Sanitation Loop

continues (12)

Young Water Professionals

continues (14)

Transboundary Aquifers

continues (15)

Saudi Water Day (17)

Environmental Flows:

Creating Benefits for Ecosystems

and People? (18)

What’s Water Worth? The Economic

Case for Water in Poverty Reduction

and National Development (19)

Plenary Session

with introductory presentations by

speakers from different sectors on

the theme of the week, “Beyond

the River: Sharing Benefits and

Responsibilities”. (22)

High-Level Panel on Benefit

Sharing on Transboundary

Waters (23)

WS 1 and 4 as above continue

WS 6: Changing Diets and Their

Implications for Water, Land and

Livelihoods (29)

Sanitation Partnerships:

Harnessing Their Potential for

Urban On-site Sanitation (32)

Fighting Corruption to Reduce

Poverty (33)

Financing Integrated Water

Resources Management in

the North – Strategies and

Experiences (34)

Practical Implementation of

Integrated Water Resource

Management (IWRM) in Africa (71)

Side Events (20–21)

Side Events (24–25)

Side Events (35–36)

Evening

GWP 10th Anniversary Celebration

(68)

SJWP Poster Session (79)

“Meet and Greet” Mayor’s Reception

at the Stockholm City Hall (25)

Poster Session (76)

Stockholm Junior Water Prize

Award Ceremony at the Stockholm

City Conference Centre (37)

6

* Please note that registration is possible also on Saturday, August 19, 15:00–17:00

** Page numbers are in parentheses


World Water Week Overview

World Water Week

Wednesday 23 August Thursday 24 August Friday 25 August Saturday 26 August

08:00–18:00 Registration 08:00–18:00 Registration 08:00–15:00 Registration 08:00–13:00 Registration

Sunday

20 August

WS 5: Decision Support Systems

and IWRM (38)

WS 7: Sharing the Benefits of

Ecosystem Services and the Costs of

Ecosystem Degradation (39)

WS 8: Large Lakes as Drivers for

Regional Development (40)

WS 9: Safe Water Storage and

Regulation During Floods and

Droughts (41)

The Middle East Seminar:

Cooperation Prospects in

Euphrates-Tigris Region (42)

UN-Water Seminar:

Coping with Scarcity (43)

Water and Resilience (44)

Future Wastewater Treatment (45)

WS 3: Economic Instruments (53)

WS 10: Extreme Events and

Sustainable Water and Sanitation

Services (54)

Hydro-Hegemony (55)

National IWRM Planning Processes

- Examples from the Ground (56)

Laureates Seminar:

Challenges and Opportunities

within the Water Sector (57)

Managing Freshwater Ecosystems

to Reach the MDGs (58)

Plenary Session

with High Level Representation

from the Goverments, Science

and Business to provide perspectives

related to the theme of the

week(62)

Best Poster Award (65)

Swedish Baltic Sea Water

Award Presentation (65)

End 13:00

SIWI Seminar:

Hard or Soft Landing in

Closing Basins? (66)

Technical

Tours (67):

Hammarby Sjöstad

– The Eco-cycle City Area

Water and

Regional Spatial

Planning in the City

of Stockholm

Monday

21 August

Tuesday

22 August

Wednesday

23 August

Side Events (50–52)

SIWA Ceremony and Founders

Luncheon (52)

Turning Assessment Findings

to Action (72)

EUWI Multistakeholder Forum (75)

Side Events (60)

Separation, Reuse

and Recycling

in Sätra Gård

Thursday

24 August

WS 5, 7, 8 and 9 as above continue

The Middle East Seminar:

continues (42)

Water and Wastewater in the

Sustainable City (46)

Flowing Upstream and

Downstream: Collaboration for

Better Management (47)

Partnership for Capacity

Development on WASH (48)

WS 3 and 10 as above continue

Hydro-Hegemony continues (55)

Promoting IWRM Beyond Borders:

Transboundary Waters and Human

Development (59)

Turning Assessment Findings

to Action continues (72)

Challenges in Governance

of Water (63)

The IWRM 2005 Target – Indicators

of Implementation (64)

Drought, Risk and Management

for Agricultural Water Use (73)

SIWI Seminar:

Hard or Soft Landing

in Closing Basins?

continues (66)

Friday

25 August

Saturday

26 August

Founders Seminar (49)

Moving the EUWI Forward

– Monitoring, Alignment and

Harmonisation (75)

Side Events (50–52)

Poster Session (76)

World Water Week Dinner (52)

Stockholm Water Prize

Award Ceremony and Royal Banquet

at the Stockholm City Hall (61)

Aquaria Water Museum Excursion

and Dinner (61)

Seminars Workshops WS Social Events Plenary Sessions

Side Events

7

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


Purpose and Scope of

the 2006 World Water Week in Stockholm

Beyond the river – sharing benefits and responsibilities

Human activities, policies and natural systems form a

complex web. What happens in society and through policy

has implications far beyond the river, the people and

the sector with which political decisions and activities are

associated. Similarly, links between land, water, ecosystems

and other natural resources provide opportunities

and challenges for appraising collaboration, technological

improvement, development and management.

Workshops, seminars and side events in 2006 will explore

three water-related complexes under the overarching

World Water Week theme of “Beyond the River – Sharing

Benefits and Responsibilities”:

• Livelihoods around the world are related increasingly

to transboundary and transbasin water contexts and

a global society with an urban majority. Given this,

what benefits are, or could be, generated, distributed

and shared in society? Equally important, how is it

possible to share the responsibilities and costs which

come with the changing management challenges?

• The landscape is not only home to human activities;

it is also the source and sink for our needs and wants.

It mirrors human ingenuity as well as ignorance.

Natural resources use and waste disposal are linked

intimately to human existence. A profound resource

challenge is to feed the world, in an increasingly competitive

context, without compromising vital ecological

functions.

• Natural disasters expose society’s vulnerability to the

forces of Nature. For different reasons, the impact

of these forces is increasingly severe. By defi nition,

it is impossible to plan for extreme events, but planning

to cope with emergencies and disaster situations

is not impossible. Prevailing development strategies

Photo: SIWI

8


will be evaluated in terms of, for instance, physical

planning and infrastructure design, including water

and sanitation services and pollution abatement.

Benefits are not easily achieved. They are even harder to

achieve when pledges remain on paper and when costly,

contentious and unanticipated social and environmental

issues arise and have no clear institutional home. It is essential

to explore the links between benefits, costs and

responsibilities with reference to water.

Beyond the river: water in a complex and dynamic context

What happens in the water sector is to a large extent the consequence

of decisions, activities and progress in other sectors.

Trade and economic integration, for instance, stimulates water

and other resource use in a manner that considers resource

availability and where the benefits are deemed to be most

worthwhile. No doubt, collaboration and exchanges across

political borders and between sectors can generate multiple

benefits. For instance, in transboundary water settings, with

significant variations in water availability and development

options, strategies are not only framed in a national water

perspective. They also pay attention to the potential benefits

that can accrue from collaboration in a basin-wide development

strategy. Similarly, rapid urban expansion has made it

possible, and necessary, to integrate water management with

reference to actual and potential rural-urban linkages.

Advances in other fields also drive water and environmental

management. Powerful information and communication

technologies have made it possible to monitor water

and other resource parameters and relate these to socioeconomic

trends in a sophisticated manner. Until recently,

this capability was confined to specialised and centralised

agencies. Management of water supply, hydropower production,

industrial processes and even farm operations can

now be done in real time, even at the local level.

Another example is the use of biotechnologies in wastewater

treatment and food production. It is important to

assess to what extent technological advances provides

opportunities for improved water management and risk

management, and how benefits can reach also the poor,

but also to discuss ethical issues related to technological

development and application.

Benefits and costs

Globalisation will increase cross-sector and cross-scale influences

on water. Parallel with a more intensive exchange

across sectors and political constituencies, a separation between

production and consumption and also between benefits

and social and environmental costs is noticeable.

Photo: EC/ECHO/François Goemans

It has become more difficult to evaluate how benefits and

costs are related and thus how responsibilities should be

shared. Increasing transports, for instance, imply environmental

consequences. Trade and trade restrictions are

both a hindrance and a stimulus to regional development

and resource utilisation. They are also a challenge to local

cultures and producers. The pros and cons of these

processes for the poor, for the environment and for the

stability of societies must be continuously debated and

scrutinised.

Track I and Track II approaches

Societal initiatives to formulate and influence water policy

and management run parallel with the formal political

influences on policy and management. Civil society

plays an important role since, for instance, NGOs are

a respected force, participate often in formal meetings,

and are actively involved in concrete water management.

Similarly, the scientific community is respected for its integrity

and professional insights.

The 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development

in Johannesburg recognised that there are two tracks towards

sustainable development. Track I refers to formal

contacts, including negotiations, between political units.

Track II refers to initiatives by informal, non-political

groups for fostering contacts between countries or other

political units. It is generally believed that the two tracks

are complementary and that their potential synergy is great.

Academic intellectuals, NGOs and other similar groups

could be a precursor to formal contacts at a political level,

for instance, between riparians in a transboundary basin.

As “whistle-blowers,” “watch dogs” or pressure groups,

they could help to increase transparency.

9

World Water Week Sunday

20 August

Monday

21 August

Tuesday

22 August

Wednesday

23 August

Thursday

24 August

Friday

25 August

Saturday

26 August

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


Photo: Michael Moore, SIWI

The resource dimension

The water flow and quality, and the health of the water

and aquatic ecosystems, is intimately related to what happens

in the landscape surrounding the river. Humans

have changed the face of the earth, for better and for

worse, and what is left of the river – or in it – reflects human

imprints on the entire landscape.

Naturally, water management and policy have focused

on water per se and generally on quantitative aspects of

rivers and other “blue” water bodies, i.e. lakes and ground

water resources. In planning and in the mind of the public,

however, links between surface and groundwater

bodies have not been subject to much scrutiny. Similarly

overlooked are the connections between land use, wetlands

and other ecosystems and water in catchments. Finally,

the river’s dual function – as a source and sink – is

seldom properly considered.

Water, food and urban expansion

In terms of total pressure on the world’s water resources,

the opportunities to enhance water productivity in the

agricultural sector are of special importance. With some

850 million people already undernourished, and with the

need to feed an annual increase of 70 to 80 million people,

substantial additional effort is needed.

A significant challenge, but also opportunity, for the

agricultural sector refers to the rapidly expanding urban

sector, along with new forms for trade and processing of

agricultural outputs and rapidly changing consumer tastes

and preferences. Pressure on water and other resources

is growing as per capita purchasing power improves and

diets change. With an increasing number of people having

better access to the food that is produced, production

of food itself must increase while urban demand for water

is increasing rapidly. Enhanced water productivity is the

most sensible strategy to meet the multiple challenges;

better use of the various fractions of the water resource,

“from the rain to the drain,” will help.

From linear flow to water re-use

The increasing demand for water has generally been met

by regulating and exploiting the easily available water resources

according to a linear logic. Water is brought from

an identified source and supplied to the sites and activities

where it is demanded. Over time, water has been brought

from sources farther and farther away, and from deeper and

deeper aquifers. The same logic has guided sewage disposal

by transporting it away from human settlements.

Unfortunately, the capacity to implement linear flow

is constrained by many factors; its validity as the sole solution

is now questioned. A new management strategy is

needed which facilitates a circular flow of water and other

resources, especially phosphorous, nitrogen and other

nutrients. Re-use should not only be considered within

industrial premises but in a landscape context.

Unexpected natural events

Recent dramatic events have underscored how water management

and policy cannot be based solely on “normal”

conditions and gradual change. Reality can quite rapidly

and sometimes unexpectedly jar us from a tranquil “Ol’

Man River” situation to one where forces of Nature ravage

and destroy lives, property and infrastructure on a

massive scale.

The devastation in the wake of the tsunami in South East

Asia and the hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico unveiled

the vulnerability of both developed and developing societies

to forces of Nature. Increasing numbers of people,

concentration of property in disaster-prone areas (notably

in coastal areas), and extreme weather conditions combine

to exact terrible tolls in human and economic terms,

and for long periods.

Conventional wisdom about management as a means

to facilitate development and promote human well-being

in a piecemeal manner under “normal” conditions falls

short of tackling these kinds of sudden events. Prolonged

droughts and their consequences are other examples of

large-scale disasters. Quite simply, strategies must consider

the vulnerability of social and infrastructure systems.

Sharing benefits or sharing responsibilities?

With a broader perspective on water policy and management,

a focus on the benefits that can be derived from

water use in a wide perspective, seems to make sense. The

10


discussion on how water can be allocated and shared can

be replaced by a more useful discussion on how these

benefits can be shared in society. Hence, the notion of

“sharing benefits” rather than “sharing water” has been

promoted.

Discussed originally in the context of transboundary

water courses, the notion is valid also at national and lower

levels of society. Natural resources use which takes into

account geography, water availability, soils, economic opportunities,

etc., generates more benefits per unit of water

than a strategy where water is shared between political

constituencies and used sector-wise.

Regional specialisation and collaboration could optimise

resource use, strengthen bonds across political and

other divides and contribute to stability and security.

A basic assumption, however, is that there is something

to share. In many river basins and countries, there is development

potential, but a lack of investments, exchange

mechanisms, and tangible goods and services which can

be shared. In poor areas, water may be one of the most

obvious assets that can be shared. Initially, then, it is

therefore not so much the benefits that may be shared,

but rather the innovations, investments and risks.

It is also prudent to recognise that environmental and

social costs are linked to benefits. Whatever is to be shared

– water flow, jobs, food, timber, income, risks, environmental

costs, investments, etc. – it is crucial to foster mutual

trust and transparency. We need to identify the mechanisms

for the processes which will lead to mutual trust and

confidence across political and cultural entities.

Scientific Programme Committee

(SPC)

• Professor Jan Lundqvist,

Linköping University, Sweden and SIWI (Chair)

• Ms. Katarina Andrzejewska,

SIWI, Sweden (Secretary)

• Mr. Anders Berntell, SIWI, Sweden

• Professor Asit K. Biswas, Third World Centre for

Water Management, Mexico

• Dr. Gunilla Brattberg, Stockholm Water

Company, Sweden

• Professor Klas Cederwall, The Royal Institute

of Technology, Sweden

• Professor Boniface Egboka, Nnamdi Azikiwe

University, Nigeria

• Professor Malin Falkenmark, SIWI, Sweden

• Ms. Ulla-Britta Fallenius, The Swedish

Environmental Protection Agency, Sweden

• Mr. Claus Hagebro, Weconsult, Denmark

• Mr. Robert Martin, World Business Council for

Sustainable Development (Co-opted Member)

• Professor Saburo Matsui, Kyoto University, Japan

• Dr. David Molden, International Water

Management Institute (Co-opted Member)

• Ms. Lynn Orphan, Water Environment Federation

• Professor Ausaf Rahman, USA

• Mr. Michael Rouse, UK

World Water Week Sunday

20 August

Monday

21 August

Tuesday

22 August

Wednesday

23 August

Thursday

24 August

Friday

25 August

Saturday

26 August

Photo: Mats Lannerstad

11

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


Sunday 20 August

Seminars

Closing the Sanitation Loop:

Innovative Approaches and Operational Strategies for

a Systems Approach to Sustainable Sanitation

Convenors: Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI), Stockholm International Water

Institute (SIWI), Linköping University and Stockholm Water Company

Photo: Mats Lannerstad

The seminar will address management, policy and institutional

dimensions of the water, sanitation and food

nexus. The seminar aim is to:

• Promote the vital role of sustainable sanitation to

deliver nutrients to secure food production and conserve

water, and

• Diagnose ecological potentials to plan sustainable

habitations for the next generations.

The seminar will set the scene for the coming 50 years and

the anticipated need to rethink links between sanitation,

water and food security. The green revolution has provided

enough food for the growing world population since the

1950s. This achievement has required massive inputs of fertilisers

and water. The looming shortage of water, fertilisers

and suitable land combined with increasing pollution

of water sources open up the need for new strategies. It is

increasingly difficult to maintain the present idea of linear

flows of resources for a variety of technical, economic

and other reasons. Influences from what is being done in

other sectors such as energy and manufacturing may assist

in guiding the way forward. A leading idea is to trap

valuable ingredients in discharges directly after use, and

treat and return them to the production/manufacturing

processes. Sustainable sanitation strategies aim at reducing

the mixing of flows of materials in order to contain, treat

and reuse the water and nutrients. Such a holistic approach

is just starting to be applied to water and nutrient flows to

enhance sustainable practices.

The seminar will bank on these experiences, not the

least for urban sanitation to be part of the global nutrient

and water cycles. The World Health Organization (WHO)

is active in rethinking sanitation and has recently issued

guidelines for reuse of greywater, urine and faecal matter.

These map out ways that nutrients and water can be recovered,

treated and reused. Effective technologies are being

developed which take into account local contexts (economic,

physical, social etc.). Other management measures

relate to selection criteria and processes for sanitation arrangements.

The keynote and ensuing speakers will elaborate

on this intriguing puzzle to make pieces fit reasonably

well to sustainable sanitation requirements.

Recommendations from this seminar will be forwarded

to the World Water Week Scientific Programme Committee

for consideration in the week’s overarching conclusions.

Programme Sunday 20 August, 09:00–17:00 Folkets Hus, Congress Hall B

09:00 Registration

09:30 Welcome to the Seminar. Dr. Johan Rockström, Executive

Director, SEI

09:45 Reuse: Making an Asset Out of Wastewater.

Prof. Frank Rijsberman, Director General, International Water

Management Institute

10:30 Safe and Sustainable Sanitation in Tamil Nadu:

A Case Study. Mrs. Shantha Sheila Nair, Former Principal

Secretary Rural Development, Tamil Nadu, India

11:00 The Sanitation Challenge in Policy Making. Hon. Derek Hanekom,

Deputy Minister for Science and Technology, South Africa

11:30 Water Shortage and the Need for Sustainable Sanitation in

Northern China. Mr. Hao Yidong, Vice Chairman, People’s

Government of Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China

11:40 Panel Discussion with the Speakers

12:30 Lunch

13:45 The New Sanitation: A Basis for the Safe Use of Excreta and

Greywater in Agriculture. Prof. Thor-Axel Stenström, Swedish

Institute for Infectious Disease Control and WHO Consultant

14:15 Securing Sustainable Recirculation for Food Security and

Improved Health. Ms. Margaret A. Mukulo, Rural Outreach

Program (ROP), Nairobi, Kenya

14:40 Institutional and Management Dimensions of Urban

Ecological Sanitation. Dr. Ana Cordova, Director General of

Research on Ecological Landscape Planning and Ecosystem

Conservation, National Institute of Ecology, Mexico

15:00 Coffee/Tea

15:30 Food Security – More Crop Per Drop and Dropping.

Dr. Jan-Olof Drangert, Linköping University, Sweden

15:40 Plenary Discussion and Recommendations to the World Water Week

16:30 Closing Remarks. Dr. Johan Rockström, SEI

12


Social and Environmental Change

in a Transboundary River Basin:

Linking Regional Drivers and Livelihood Vulnerabilities

in the Greater Mekong Region

Convenor: Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) – Asia

Sunday

20 August

The Mekong Region – comprised of the five countries

of Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam,

and the Yunnan Province of China through which the

Mekong River runs – is a region in transition. The seminar

will present ongoing research to identify and analyse

high risk areas in the Mekong with the aims to improve

scientific and policy ability to identify the most vulnerable

populations, provide early warning and intervention

strategies for vulnerable situations, support priority set-

ting, and increase the effectiveness of vulnerability reduction

and poverty alleviation strategies.

This work is part of the SEI Poverty and Vulnerability

Programme, which undertakes applied research and

policy support to address the challenge of reducing human

vulnerability to environmental and socio-economic

change and to support the overall goals of poverty reduction

and sustainable development. For more information

please go to www.sei.se or www.vulnerabilitynet.org

Monday

21 August

Tuesday

22 August

Programme Sunday 20 August, 09:00–12:00 Folkets Hus, Room 203

09:00 Regional Drivers of Change and High Risk Areas in the

Mekong. Mr. Vikrom Mathur, SEI – Asia

09:25 Presentation of the Four Case Studies

Confl ict Over Common Property and Indigenous Resources

in Yunnan, People’s Republic of China. Mr. Li Bo, Centre for

Biodiversity and Indigenous Knowledge, China

09:55 Socially Differentiated Vulnerability in the Mekong Delta

as it Relates to the Regional Context. Dr Fiona Miller, SEI

10:15 Coffee Break

10:30 Tonle Sap Lake, Inland Fisheries in the Mekong, Resource

Rich But Vulnerable Livelihoods. Mr. Mak Sithirith, Fisheries

Action Coalition Team (FACT), Cambodia

10:55 Land Use Change in Upland Laos.

Dr. Linkham Doungsavanh, National Agriculture and Forestry

Research Institute (NAFRI), Laos

11:20 Science Policy Interface: Making Vulnerability Research

Policy Relevant. Dr. Frank Thomalla, SEI

11:45 Moderated Discussion with Panel and Audience

Wednesday

23 August

Thursday

24 August

Photo: Michael Moore, SIWI

Friday

25 August

Saturday

26 August

13

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


Sunday 20 August

SIWI Seminar for Young Water Professionals:

Co-management of Water for Livelihoods and Ecosystems

Convenor: Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI)

Is it possible to reduce poverty and hunger without further

degrading ecosystems? The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment

warned that progress towards the goals of poverty

reduction, improved health and environmental protection

is unlikely to be sustained if ecosystems continue to be degraded.

The use and management of water across all sectors,

from agriculture to fisheries to industry, often in efforts to

reduce poverty, have however often resulted in degradation

of ecosystems and the goods and services they provide.

The SIWI Seminar for Young Water Professionals,

which supports young professionals in their efforts related

to water, will explore the links between water management,

livelihoods and ecosystem goods and services

from a multidisciplinary perspective. It will address ways

in which water can be co-managed to reduce poverty and

improve livelihoods, while sustaining ecosystem services

and restoring degraded ecosystems.

Photos: Aquapol, SIWI and Mats Lannerstad

Programme Sunday 20 August, 09:00–16:30 Folkets Hus, Room 300

Chair: Dr. Line Gordon, Stockholm University, Sweden

Co-chair: Ms. Rebecca Löfgren, SIWI

Rapporteur: (tbc)

09:00 Introduction by Chairs

09:10 Small Scale Water Innovations for Ecosystem Restoration in

Semi-arid Agro-ecosystems. Dr. Deborah Bossio, IWMI

(Invited Speaker)

09:35 Building Resilience in Semi-arid Agro-ecosystems:

The Importance of Managing Water and Soils for Food

Production and Ecosystem Insurance Capacity.

Ms. Elin Enfors, Stockholm University, Sweden

09:55 Negotiated River Basin Management for Co-managing

Ecosystems and Livelihoods. Ms. Parineeta Dandekar, Gomukh

Environmental Trust for Sustainable Development, India

10:15 Is Co-management of the Okavango Delta Resources Possible

and Can it Guarantee both Sustainable Livelihoods and

Ecosystem Protection? Ms. Phemo Kgomotso, University of

Western Cape, South Africa

10:35 Coffee Break

11:00 Rehabilitation of Tanks in Tamil Nadu for Livelihood Security

and Ecosystem Development. Mr. Karthikeyan Matheswaran,

Anna University, India

11:20 Industry, Community and Research Collaboration for

Sustainable Water Management – Some Australian Experience.

Ms. Anwen Lovett, Land & Water Australia

12:00 Lunch

13:30 Group Discussions

14:30 Coffee Break

15:00 Group Discussions

15:40 Final Discussion and Conclusions

14


Photo: Mats Lannerstad

Under Cover? Transboundary Aquifers

– The Hidden Asset for Riparian Cooperation in Africa

Convenors: Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR), Germany, International Association for

Hydrogeologists (IAH), Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI), UNEP Division of the Global Environment

Facility (UNEP DGEF) and UNESCO International Hydrological Programme (UNESCO-IHP)

Groundwater is of vital importance for Africa as about 60

to 90% of all communities are served by this resource.

The conditions for using groundwater differ substantially

and require specialised know-how. This is even more obvious

in cases of transboundary aquifers because usage of

groundwater on one side of a border can considerably influence

the situation on the other side.

In the framework of its International Shared Aquifer

Resources Management (ISARM) project, UNESCO-

IHP organised the international workshop on “Managing

Shared Squifer Resources in Africa” in Tripoli, June 2002.

As a result, more than 38 transboundary aquifers were identified

and mapped. Despite the relevance of these basins for

the well-being of people in many countries, there are very

few attempts until now to cooperate on their management.

While cooperation on surface watercourses is gaining more

and more attention in Africa, fostering the creation and

sharing of benefits from transboundary aquifers remains a

main duty for today’s and future water managers.

The aim of this seminar is to bring out the relevance of

riparian cooperation on groundwater and to clarify what

benefits such cooperation can generate and in which way

they can be best created. Benefits in this context should

not be limited to economic gains but also include increased

social and ecological welfare. The seminar provides a forum

for the exchange of experiences from African transboundary

aquifers. On the basis of these experiences it is

envisaged to stimulate the dialogue between policy makers

and experts from North and South to elaborate new

ideas for transboundary cooperation on groundwater. A

key element of this seminar is the multi-dimensional approach

to benefit sharing. Groundwater is of vital importance

for Sub-Saharan Africa regarding different aspects

of society like human well-being (drinking water supply),

economic development (industry, agriculture) as well as

preserving the environment for future generations. These

manifold functions of groundwater require transboundary

cooperation beyond economic benefit sharing.

Sunday

20 August

Monday

21 August

Tuesday

22 August

Wednesday

23 August

Thursday

24 August

Programme Sunday 20 August, 09:00–17:00 Folkets Hus, Room 307

09:00 Welcome Address. Prof. Jan Lundqvist, SIWI

• Opening Statement on the Behalf of Convenors.

Mr. Martin Kipping, Federal Ministry of Economic

Cooperation and Development – BMZ, Germany

• Opening Statement by Dr. Jaiafar Abubakar Sedeeq, African

Ministers’ Council on Water, Nigeria, tbc

09:15 Keynotes on Technical, Legal, Institutional Issues for Shared

Groundwater Cooperation with Special Focus on Generation

of Regional Benefits in Sub-Saharan Africa

Chair: Dr. Ralf Klingbeil, BGR

• Introductory Note on the Transboundary Aquifers Main

Issues, Recommendations of the UNESCO ISARM Project,

Focus on SSA. Mr. Shammy Puri, UNEP Division of Global

Environment Facility (DGEF)

• Role of Law and Institutions in the Management of

Transboundary Aquifers, Focus on Benefits for SSA. tbc

• The Status of Transboundary Aquifers in the Draft Articles

at the UN ILC and in Regional Conventions in Africa.

Ms. Raya Stephan, UNESCO

• Inventory of Transboundary African Aquifer Systems.

Dr. Bo Appelgren, International Shared Aquifer Resource

Management – ISARM Africa

Discussion

10:15 Coffee Break

10:45 African Cases, Processes, Obstacles and Ways Forward, Concentration

on Benefits for the People in the Region, Beyond

the Actual, Technical Joint Resource Management Issues

Chair: Prof. Jan Lundqvist, SIWI

• Iullemeden Aquifer System. Dr. Abdel Kader Dodo,

Observatory of the Sahara and the Sahel, Tunisia

• Lake Chad Basin. Mr. Segun Adelana, IAH, Vice-President

Sub-Sahara Africa, South Africa

• Cases from SADC Region. Mr. Piet Heyns, Ministry of

Agriculture, Water and Rural Development, Namibia

Discussion

12:00 Lunch Break

13:30 Panel Discussion: Why do We Need Transboundary

Groundwater Cooperation? Potentials and Benefits

Moderator: Mr. Peter Croll, Bonn International Centre

for Conversion (BICC), Germany

Panel Participants: Dr. Henry Ntale, African Ministers’

Council on Water, Uganda, (tbc); Dr. Alice Aureli, UNESCO-

IHP; Dr. Wilhelm Struckmeier, BGR, Germany; IAH (tbc);

Mr. Shammy Puri, UNEP DGEF; NGO Representatives (tbc)

14:30 Coffee Break

15:00 Panel Discussion (cont.): What Kind of International Processes/Support

are Needed to Enhance Cooperation Processes?

16:30 Wrap-up and Conclusions. Mr. Peter Croll, BICC

17:00 Closure. BGR, UNESCO

15

Friday

25 August

Saturday

26 August

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


Sunday 20 August

Environmental Conflicts

and the Role of Media

Convenors: International Federation of Environmental

Journalists (IFEJ) and Swedish Association for

Environmental Journalists (MÖF) with support from

the Swedish Water House (SWH)

This seminar concerns environmental conflicts from the

perspective of media coverage. What roles do media actually

have in environmental confl icts? How is media

perceived by other actors in a confl ict situation? What

are the expectations on media in these situations? Invited

international delegates from the International Federation

of Environmental Journalists, IFEJ, will present their

own experiences of topical environmental conflicts to inspire

the following discussions between all the workshop

participants. This is a unique occasion where journalists,

policy makers, practitioners and representatives from

non-governmental organisations have a chance to meet

and discuss the topic “Environmental Conflicts and the

Role of Media”. The results from the discussions will be

summarised and presented in the exhibition space during

the World Water Week to enable further dialogue.

Photos: SIWI

Programme Sunday 20 August, 09:00–12:00 Folkets Hus, Lilla Teatern

Moderator: Mr. Johan Kuylenstierna, Project Director, Stockholm

International Water Institute (SIWI), and Manager, SWH, Sweden

09:00 Introduction

09:05 Welcome Addresses

• Mr. Lars Ringberg, MÖF, Sweden

• Mr. Anders Berntell, Executive Director, SIWI

09:20 Fighting Pollution in Nigeria: The Amukoko Local Government

Area Case. Ms. Jennifer Igwe, The Nigerian Television

Authority (NTA Channel 5), Nigeria

09:35 The Role of Media in Advocating Environmental Protection in

the Philippines. Ms. Tess Raposas, Freelance Journalist, Philippines

09:50 Environmental Confl icts and the Role of Media. Mr. Darryl

D’Monte, Former Chief Editor, The Times of India, and President,

IFEJ, India

10:05 Challenges of Environmental Reporting in Ghana.

Mr. Mike Anane, Freelance Journalist and President of the

League of Environmental Journalists, Ghana

10:20 Moderator Introduction to Coffee Discussions

10:30 Coffee and Informal Discussions

11:00 Panel and Discussion

Panellists:

• Mr. Robert A. Thomas, Interim Director, School of Mass

Communications, Loyola University, USA

• Prof. Kevin Noone, Executive Director, International

Geosphere-Biosphere Programme, Sweden

• Ms. Sunita Narain, Executive Director, Centre for Science

and Environment, India

• Mr. Henrik Stridsman, Director of Communications,

ITT Flygt AB, Sweden

11:45 Moderator Summary

12:00 Close

16


Sunday

20 August

Photo: SIWI

Saudi Water Day

Convenors: Prince Sultan Bin Abdulaziz International Prize for Water, Prince Sultan Research Center

for Environment, Water and Desert, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Monday

21 August

The Prince Sultan Bin Abdulaziz International Prize for

Water was announced in 2002. The Prize is intended to

reward the efforts undertaken by innovative scholars and

scientists as well as applied organisations in the realm of

water resources worldwide. The Prize aims to advance the

research dedicated to solving the problems associated with

the provision as well as the preservation of adequate and

sustainable water resources, particularly in arid regions.

The international award is bestowed in five branches,

each receiving a monetary award of 500,000 Saudi Riyals

(about usd 133,000). The Prize is accompanied by a gold

medallion, armour and a certificate. The Prize embraces

the following branches: surface water, groundwater, alternative

(non-traditional) water resources, water resources

management, and protection of water resources.

Goals of the seminar are:

1. To show the real and noble objectives of the Prince

Sultan Bin Abdulaziz International Prize for Wa-

ter to the audience at a well known platform that

includes water specialists and professionals from

different countries of the world.

2. To introduce examples of the experiences, latest scientific

solutions and advancements in water resources

management and development under the extremely

arid conditions of Saudi Arabia which have been developed

by the Saudi research centers and universities.

3. To introduce the newly developed National Saudi

Water Strategy using integrated approaches for

meeting the long-term water challenges under scarce

water conditions.

4. To brief the audience about the Saudi contribution

for solving the water problems worldwide, especially

in Asia and Africa.

5. To address scientific advancements for large-scale

production by sea water desalination technologies.

Tuesday

22 August

Wednesday

23 August

Thursday

24 August

Friday

25 August

Programme Sunday 20 August, 13:30–17:00 Folkets Hus, Room 203

Chair: Dr. AbdulMalek A. Al-Alshaikh, General Secretariat of the

Prince Sultan Bin Abdulaziz International Prize for Water

(PSIPW), Prince Sultan Research Center for Environment,

Water and Desert, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia

Rapporteur and Coordinator: Prof. Walid Abderrahman, President,

Saudi Water Association, Manager, Water Section, King Fahd

University of Petroleum & Minerals, Saudi Arabia

13:30 The Role of Prince Sultan Bin Abdulaziz International Prize

for Water in Advancement of Water Science and Technologies

Worldwide. Dr. AbdulMalek A. Al-Alshaikh, General Secretariat

of the Prince Sultan Bin Abdulaziz International Prize for

Water (PSIPW), Prince Sultan Research Center for Environment,

Water and Desert, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia

13:55 Seawater Desalination as Strategic Option for Water Shortage.

H.E. Mr. Fuheed Al Sharief, Governor, Sea Water Desalination

Corporation, Saudi Arabia

14:20 Decision Support System for Groundwater Resources Management

in Saudi Arabia and Arid Regions. Prof. Walid Abderrahman,

President, Saudi Water Association, Manager, Water Section, King

Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals, Saudi Arabia

14:40 The Efforts of the Ministry of Water and Electricity in

Developing and Structuring the Water and Wastewater Sector in

the Kingdom. Mr. Loay Musallam, Deputy Minister for Planning

and Development, Ministry of Water and Electricity, Saudi Arabia

15:00 Coffee Break Including Saudi Dates and Refreshments

15:20 Advanced Methods in Rainwater Harvesting in Saudi Arabia

and Arid Regions. Prof. Abdulaziz Al-Turbak, King Saud University,

Saudi Arabia

15:40 Groundwater Rise Control in Saudi Cities. Prof. Omar

Aburizaiza, King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia

16:00 Assessment of Polymers Effects on Irrigation Water Consumption

and Soil Properties in Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia.

Dr. Yousef Y. Al-Dakheel, Director, Water Studies Center, King

Faisal University, Saudi Arabia

16:20 The Role of the Saudi Fund for Development in Supporting

Water Projects in Developing Countries. Mr. Fawzi O. Alsuad,

Consultant, Saudi Funds for Developments, Saudi Arabia

16:40 Open Discussion and Concluding Remarks

17:00 Close

17

Saturday

26 August

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


Sunday 20 August

Environmental Flows:

Creating Benefits for Ecosystems and People?

An Open Discussion to Explore the Development of a Global Environmental

Flows Network of Local and National Practitioners and Experts

Convenors: Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI), The World Conservation Union (IUCN),

International Water Management Institute (IWMI), Delft Hydraulics, DHI Water and Environment,

The Nature Conservancy (TNC), Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH) and the Swedish Water House (SWH)

Photo: Mats Lannerstad

The concept of environmental flows, commonly understood

as the flow regime required to sustain freshwater

dependent ecosystems, provokes diverging views. Are

environmental flows only for nature, or also for people?

Is water for ecosystems a threat to water for food? Can

environmental flows be implemented in developed and

developing countries alike? What is the role of information

sharing in advancing the concept? How can relevant,

state-of-the-art knowledge and experience on environmental

flows be shared?

This seminar will address these questions as a way to

explore how a global network of local and national prac-

titioners and experts on environmental flows can be developed.

Revolving and active roundtable discussions will

focus on how such a network could be structured and

function most effectively. A wide interdisciplinary range

of stakeholders, including experts, practitioners, policy

makers, local community representatives, end users and

participants from all appropriate sectors, are encouraged

to participate. The aim will be to identify the added value

of such a network by stimulating debate around how

stakeholders can contribute, access and share relevant information

and experiences on environmental flows from

around the world.

Programme Sunday 20 August, 13:30–17:00 Norra Latin, Music Room 456

Chair: Dr. Ger Bergkamp, Head, Water Programme, The World

Conservation Union (IUCN)

13:30 Welcome and Introduction. Dr. Ger Bergkamp, IUCN

13:45 Keynote Speech: Demand of Environmental Flows from a

User Perspective. Mr. Sylvand Kamugisha, IUCN Pangani

River Basin Management, Tanzania

14:00 Latest Developments in Environmental Flows: A Network

Approach to Delivering Progress. Dr. Mike Acreman, CEH, UK

14:15 Roundtable Discussions

Participants discuss the implications for how the network

will help face the challenges of implementing Environmental

Flows, focusing on:

1. Environmental Flows Generate Benefits for People

and Ecosystems

2. Environmental Flows are Essential for Delivering

the MDGs and for Reducing Poverty

3. Environmental Flows are an Essential Part of IWRM, River

Basin Management and Environmental Impact Assessment.

4. Environmental Flows Needs Technical, Social, Political and

Economic Support for Implementation

16:30 Synthesis of Discussions by Facilitators of Roundtables

17:00 Conclusions Including Statements of the Outputs from the

Seminar and the Way Forward

18


What’s Water Worth?

The Economic Case for Water in Poverty Reduction and National Development

Convenors: Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI), Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI),

United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and World Health Organization (WHO)

Sunday

20 August

Addressing water-related challenges in a sustainable manner

requires that water resources management and provision

of water services are seen as sound public and private

investments and key to a strategy that boosts economies,

enables poor people to explore new income opportunities

and provides them with a fair chance to prosper. Too

often investments in water have been seen as producing

inadequate direct returns to economic growth and development;

as a result, the limited resources available are prioritised

for other sectors perceived to be more productive.

The evidence available, however, suggests the contrary:

that investments in different aspects of water management

do offer good holistic rates of return and are indeed

worth considering. The session will focus on how to further

develop the economic growth and poverty reduction

argument for increasing levels of water investment.

The session brings together the experiences of a number

of international organisations to examine the economics

of water in developing countries. Topics will include: the

role of water in the livelihoods of the rural and urban

poor; the economic impact of improved water resources

management and infrastructure development; the costs

and benefits of achieving the water and sanitation

MDGs; and household-level analyses of water projects.

Programme Sunday 20 August, 13:30-16:30

Folkets Hus, Congress Hall A

13:30 Opening Address. Dr. Håkan Tropp, SIWI

13:40 Keynote Speech:

The Argument for Investing in Water for Economic Growth

and Poverty Reduction. Prof. John Soussan, SEI-UK

14:00 The Poverty-Environment Partnership and the Economic

Valuation Initiative. Dr. Joakim Harlin, UNDP

14:20 The Value of Water for Health. Dr. Jamie Bartram, WHO

14:50 Field Methodologies for Cost-Benefit Analyses. Ms. Laura

Hucks, WaterAid

15:20 Panel Discussion:

Why are water investments not seen as providing competitive

returns? What evidence will counter that perception? What is

needed to influence the decision making process?

Panel Members:

• Dr. Vahid Alavian, The World Bank

• Dr. Aaron Salzberg, U.S. Department of State

• Mr. Jan Møller Hansen, Danida

• Ministerial-Level Representation from the South

16:20 Closing Remarks. Dr. Håkan Tropp, SIWI

Monday

21 August

Tuesday

22 August

Wednesday

23 August

Thursday

24 August

Friday

25 August

Saturday

26 August

Photos: Mats Lannerstad

19

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


Sunday 20 August

Side Events

Side Events on 20 August

Photo: SIWI

12:15–13:15 Folkets Hus, Room 307

17:15–18:45 Folkets Hus, Room 203

Local Action: Integrated Water

Resources Management for Poverty

Alleviation

Convenor: Pakistan Water Partnership (PWP)

The Pakistan Water Partnership (PWP), a network of professionals,

experts and stakeholders in the water sector in

Pakistan and a country partner of GWP, promotes better

water resources management and achievement of the

Millennium Development Goals. PWP has conducted activities

for promotion of Integrated Water Resources Management

(IWRM) and related causes from its inception in

February 1999. PWP concluded that success in IWRM requires

grassroots action. Thus it helped create a number of

local level organisations called ”Area Water Partnerships”

(AWPs). AWPs are visualised as a network of existing

government departments, line agencies, non-government

organisations, community based organisations, local institutions,

stakeholders, water experts and common users at

the grassroots level, with the prime focus to disseminate,

practice and propagate the principles of IWRM to eradicate

poverty and improve livelihoods. Eight AWPs have

been established throughout the country.

The side event will enable participation of representatives

of GWP-South Asia and the Country Water Partnerships

from Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan

and Sri Lanka, apart from others. PWP will present two

AWPs who have solidly contributed to mitigate problems

with local actions by adopting IWRM principles.

Promoting Civil Society Partnership

in the Water Sector

Convenor: Pan African Vision for the Environment (PAVE)

The current record of civil society engagement by the

Lagos Private Sector Participation (PSP) process with

respect to transparency and accountability is seen by

both civil society and funders/donors to need considerable

strengthening. Thus the PAVE project on the Lagos

water sector reform monitoring has facilitated civil society

participation in the PSP process. The goal of Project

WET (Water Education for Teachers) is to facilitate and

promote awareness, appreciation, knowledge and stewardship

of water resources in Nigeria through the development

and dissemination of classroom material, including

ready-teaching aids such as a curriculum and activity

guide. This project is ongoing in schools.

17:15–18:45 Folkets Hus, Room 300

From Poster to PowerPoint to Pod Cast:

Reaching the Public with Meaningful Visual Information

about Water, Drainage Basins and the Hydrologic Cycle

Convenor: Watershed Media Project

Rivers and lakes, as with most surface water, are easily

seen. Groundwater, deep oceans, the water sequestered

in plants and flows of atmospheric water are not as easily

20


perceived. With the most recent developments in sensing

and visualisation, many more people can understand and

interpret these important parts of the hydrologic cycle.

The side event will show and discuss a number of short

(1–5 minute) fi lms about water, intended to be disseminated

primarily over the internet to an international audience.

The many uses of these fi lms will be discussed,

including how the fi lms can be made useful for the water

community in the dissemination of essential knowledge

about water to stakeholders and the general public.

Sunday

20 August

Monday

21 August

17:15–18:45 Folkets Hus, Room 307

New Aid Modalities in

the Water Sector

Tuesday

22 August

Convenors: Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark,

Danida, in Cooperation with the Overseas Development

Institute (ODI), UK

Wednesday

23 August

Since the early 2000s there have been marked changes

in international development cooperation, especially in

terms of new aid implementation approaches and delivery

mechanisms. Harmonisation and alignment – and mainstreaming

– have all received considerable prominence in

new aid approaches, and increasingly so in the water sector.

This side event explores early lessons learnt in working

towards new modalities in the water sector – drawing

from lessons learnt by national partners, Danida and

DGIS – and seeks to synthesise lessons emerging for both

policy and practice. At the same time the side event will

draw on a broader range of experiences and seek to develop

new action-oriented approaches to improve sharing

of experiences in the water sector between and within development

partners, governments and civil society.

The side event will be chaired by Mr. Jan Møller

Hansen, Senior Advisor at the MoFA, Danida, and will

feature presentations from Ms. Kathi Welle from ODI,

UK, Mr. Frank van Steenbergen from MetaMeta, Netherlands,

and speakers from national authorities and partners

from Uganda and Vietnam.

Photo: SIWI

21

Thursday

24 August

Friday

25 August

Saturday

26 August

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


Monday 21 August

World Water Week Opening Plenary Day

Congress Hall

World Water Week Opening Session

Chair: Mr. Johan Kuylenstierna, Project Director, Stockholm

International Water Institute (SIWI)

10:00 Cultural Event

10:15 Welcome

Mr. Anders Berntell, Executive Director, Stockholm

International Water Institute (SIWI)

10:25 Official Opening Address of the 2006 World Water Week

Ms. Carin Jämtin, Minister for International Development

Cooperation, Deputy Minister for Foreign Affairs, Sweden

10:40 Keynote Speaker

H.R.H. The Prince of Orange

11:05 Keynote Speaker

Ms. Doris Ombara, Project Officer, World Wide Fund for

Nature, East Africa

11:30 2006 Stockholm Water Prize Laureate Lecture

Challenging Prevailing Wisdoms. Prof. Asit K. Biswas,

President, Third World Centre for Water Management,

Mexico

12:00 Lunch

Plenary Session

Chair: Prof. Jan Lundqvist, Chair, Scientific Programme Committee,

Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI)

13:30 Introduction

13:35 Benefit Sharing of Transboundary Waters between Canada

and the United States. Rt. Honourable Herb Gray, Chair,

Canadian Section, International Joint Commission of Canada

and the United States

13:55 At the Crossroads: Balancing Competing Interests and Responsibilities

in River Basin Ecosystem Management.

Ms. Tabeth Chiuta, IUCN ROSA Regional Programme

Coordinator, Zimbabwe

14:15 Feeding the World. Prof. Frank Rijsberman, Director General,

International Water Management Institute (IWMI)

14:35 Natural Disasters and Extreme Climate Events: Impacts and

Implications for Water Resources Management.

Dr. Chennat Gopalakrishnan, Professor, University of

Hawaii at Manoa, USA

15:00 Coffee Break

15:30 High-Level Panel Discussion:

“Benefit Sharing in Transboundary Waters” (see next page)

This session, which will be moderated by Mr. Nik Gowing,

BBC World, will include representatives from government,

business, the international institutions and non-governmental

organisations.

17:00 End of Plenary Session

Photos: SIWI

22


High-Level Panel

on Benefit Sharing in

Transboundary Waters

The world’s 263 international river basins cover almost

half of the surface of the earth. Some 145 countries are

classified as riparians to these transboundary basins, and

about 45% of the world’s population live in internationally

shared river basins. Over 50% of the available surface

water is located in transboundary basins. Thus, the arrangements

to deal with transboundary basins are a key

development imperative.

In Stockholm, a high-level panel of distinguished experts

will discuss “Benefit Sharing on Transboundary

Waters”. The concept of “benefit sharing” has been discussed

in the international water debate for some years.

Proponents say that the concept, by approaching an

international water course through a benefit sharing approach,

as opposed to an approach in which one focuses

on water allocation and water rights, yields more peaceful

and sustainable solutions. An underlying hypothesis

of the benefit sharing approach is that the existing cooperation

over transboundary waters in certain river basins

can be used to promote cooperation in other spheres,

thereby potentially functioning as a confl ict prevention

mechanism.

Other examples of benefits to be materialised could be

hydropower, improved environmental stewardship, regional

integration and increased trade as well as increased

development, stability and peace. Benefits could thus both

be in terms of increased production, jobs, income, etc., but

also in terms of savings, e.g. reduced spending on security

measures, lower expenditure for each national unit of

joint services covering the basin. One shall also take into

account the “intangible” benefits which would stem from

increased trust between the riparians in the basin.

Increased understanding of the relationship between

the technical level (where most of the actual water coordination

and cooperation takes place), the political

level and the development agenda is therefore important.

Some questions to consider: is it reasonable to argue that

there are, or can be, cooperative spillover effects as a result

of the existing water cooperation on other political

questions and issue areas in the region? Can existing cooperation

over transboundary water in international river

basins be used to promote cooperation in other spheres

between the parties? Is it feasible to think that water may

Photo: SIWI

be a catalyst for increased security, development and

eventually regional stability and peace?

The high-level panel will be asked to address the issue of

benefit sharing within the context of the World Water Week

theme, “Beyond the River – Sharing Benefits and Responsibilities”.

The discussions within the panel will contribute

significantly to the overall theme of the World Water Week,

and therefore also provide input to the workshops, seminars

and side events that will follow the plenary session.

Programme

Monday 21 August, 15:30–17:00

Congress Hall

Moderator: Mr. Nik Gowing, BBC World

Panellists:

• Dr. Marwa Daoudy, Graduate Institute for International

Studies, Université de Genève, Switzerland

• H.E. Ato Asfaw Dingamo, Minister of Water Resources,

Ministry of Water Resources, Ethiopia

• Mr. David Grey, Senior Water Advisor, The World Bank

• H.E. LB Hendricks, Minister of Water Affairs and Forestry,

Department of Water Affairs and Forestry, South Africa

• Ms. Sunita Narain, Director, Centre for Science and

Environment, India

• Mr. Kevin Watkins, Director, Human Development Report

Office, United Nations Development Programme

• Mr. Syed Mohammad Zobaer, Secretary, Ministry of Water

Resources, Bangladesh

23

Monday

August 21

Tuesday

22 August

Wednesday

23 August

Thursday

24 August

Friday

25 August

Saturday

26 August

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


Monday 21 August

Side Events

Side Events on 21 August

Photo: SIWI

12:15–13:15 Folkets Hus, Room 307

17:15–18:45 Folkets Hus, Room 300

Special Session on the Follow-up to

the 4th World Water Forum

Convenors: Comision Nacional del Agua (CONAGUA,

Mexico), World Water Council (WWC) and Japan

Water Forum (JWF)

Through the presentation and discussion of the synthesis

report and the final report of the 4th World Water

Forum, this special session will invite a cross-section

of water experts from different disciplines and scopes to

share their analysis on the outcomes of the Forum, held

in Mexico from March 16–22, 2006. The Forum comprised

a number of components, including topic-sessions,

a Ministerial Conference, a Forum of Local Authorities, a

Parliamentarians Forum, and all of this came together to

form an event rich in concrete participation. What were

the main achievements of the Forum? Where does this Forum

now leave the international water movement? What

follow-up should be organised in the coming years?

One of the examples of concrete outputs of the Forum

was the creation of the Asia-Pacific Water Forum

(APWF). In this side event, the APWF will make an announcement

on the scope of its coming activities, including

a first Asia-Pacific Water Summit in Japan in 2007.

The discussion will also address the expectations and recommendations

of the water community for the 5th World

Water Forum, which should take place in Istanbul, Turkey in

March 2009. A light lunch will be offered to all participants,

as well as a copy of both the final report and the synthesis

report of the Forum. Participants will also be invited to freely

share their own experiences of and views on the Forum.

Official Development Assistance (ODA)

vs. Market-Based Mechanisms (MBM):

A Debate on Financing Water Supply and

Sanitation Services in Small Towns

Convenors: UN-Habitat and IRC International

Water and Sanitation Centre

Between 2002 and 2004, Official Development Assistance

(ODA) commitments to the water sector (globally)

nearly doubled. Over the past few years, private charities

and multi-national corporations have announced

millions of dollars in funds to support basic needs of the

poor, including water supply and sanitation, particularly

where linked with health outcomes. In an era where

attention to financing for the water sector is growing,

discussions on adequacy of overall water sector finance,

the ability to leverage local sources (i.e. users, domestic

banks), absorptive capacity at decentralised levels of water

governance, and donor harmonisation/coordination

are frequent.

On the other hand, abundant liquidity in local financial

markets in developing countries, plus increased interest

by financiers for transactions, has led to discussions

on new approaches to financing the sector. Terms like

guarantees, equity, microfinance and output-based aid

have entered the jargon alongside traditional grants and

concessionary loans.

UN-Habitat and the IRC will convene a debate to explore

the ins and outs and ups and downs of grant and

soft-loans, market-based approaches and everything in between,

as relates to financing a sustainable water sector.

24


Side Events

17:15–18:45 Folkets Hus, Room 307

17:15–18:45 Folkets Hus, Lilla Teatern

Donor Country Approaches to Water-

Related Development Cooperation

Water Scenarios to 2025:

Business in the World of Water

Focus Area: Public-Private Partnerships

in Water Supply and Sanitation

Convenor: Stockholm International Water Institute

(SIWI) in cooperation with the Netherlands Ministry

of Foreign Affairs, Department for International

Development, United Kingdom, Ministry of Foreign

Affairs of Denmark, State Department, USA and The

Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and

Development, Germany

Moderator: Mr. Anders Wijkman,

Member of the European Parliament

In this side event, a number of donor countries will present

and discuss their approaches on public-private partnerships

(PPPs) in the water sector, based on practical experiences

to such partnerships. PPPs are one option among others

for private participation in the sector. What are the fundamental

issues to be dealt with in order to forge successful

partnerships and what is the critical role of donors in relation

to such partnerships and in relation to other actors.

What are the future challenges and possibilities of such

partnerships to be an important tool for achieving the Millennium

Development Goal targets on water supply and

sanitation? Initial short presentations will be followed by

comments from representatives of recipient countries, also

providing their perspectives on current and future challenges

and opportunities for public-private partnerships.

Most of the time will be devoted to moderated, interactive

discussions.

“Meet and Greet”

Mayor’s Reception

Monday 21 August, 19:30–21:30

The Lord Mayor of Stockholm, on behalf of the City of

Stockholm, is pleased to give an opening reception at the

Stockholm City Hall for all World Water Week participants.

Join your colleagues in Stockholm’s beautiful City

Hall, with its imposing facades and National Romantic

style inspired by the palaces of the Renaissance.

Price: By invitation from the City of Stockholm.

Convenor: World Business Council for

Sustainable Development (WBCSD)

Discover the WBCSD Water Scenarios to 2025, and then

brainstorm about their relevance in stimulating group

discussions. The scenarios offer three stories about the

role of business in relation to the growing issue of water

in the world. They cover major global challenges of technology,

security and interconnectivity, as well as the associated

business challenges of innovation, social security

to operate and water governance. Rather than offering

answers, they create a common language and a shared

context so that we can begin conversation on the future

of water: our process has involved over 200 people, of

which nearly half were from business.

Photo: Q

Photo: Mats Lannerstad

25

Monday

August 21

Tuesday

22 August

Wednesday

23 August

Thursday

24 August

Friday

25 August

Saturday

26 August

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


Tuesday 20 August

Workshop 1

Tools for Benefit Sharing in Transboundary Settings

Convenor: Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI)

Co-convenors: Bonn International Center for Conversion (BICC) and The World Bank

Workshop Discussion Entry Points

The best way to facilitate transboundary development

seems to be sharing the benefits between parties. This

is not just about the physical allocation of the water resource

but also the environmental and socio-economical

benefits, which are based upon regional economic development

and integration. Political transboundary agreements

aim to promote development initiatives, collaboration

and investments and thereby lead to increased trade

and stability.

Bureaucracy and/or positive interdependence?

A high political focus and establishment of commissions and

agreements must involve the political system and bureaucracy.

Will the hegemony in the region use the system for its

own purposes or will a positive interdependency be created

between parties? Which types of instruments are needed by

the institutions, for example, for conflict resolution?

How to best combine formal and informal institutions?

In some regions both formal and customary, informal institutions

and laws for water governance exist in parallel.

How can such systems be combined or used for the benefit

of the region?

What and how about stakeholder involvement?

Currently, there is wide agreement about the importance

of stakeholder involvement. What does it entail and how

can a proper involvement of stakeholders be ensured?

Which political and other tools are needed for an organised

management process for the basin as a whole involving

public and private stakeholders?

Changing mindsets, but how?

Information, communication, negotiations and other

means of forming opinion and understanding is important

in transboundary contexts. How can we change the

mindsets of policy makers and the various stakeholders in

order to establish a proper basis for sustainable integrated

water resource management in transboundary catchments

for the benefit of everybody?

Programme Tuesday 22 August, 09:00–17:00 Norra Latin, Room 361

Chairs: Mr. Jakob Granit, The World Bank and Mr. Peter J. Croll, BICC

Rapporteur: Mr. Claus Hagebro, Weconsult, Denmark

Co-Rapporteur: Mr. Lars Wirkus, BICC

09:00 Introduction by Chairs

09:10 Mainstreaming Politics: The Bottom Line on

Transboundary Benefit Sharing. Mr. Larry Swatuk, HOORC,

Botswana (Invited Speaker)

09:35 International Cooperation as a Platform for Benefit Sharing

within Transboundary River Basins: Ukrainian Experience.

Dr. Viacheslav Manukalo, State Hydrometeorological Service,

Ukraine

09:55 Counter-hegemony in the Nile River Basin. Ms. Ana Cascao,

King’s College of London, UK

10:15 African Models of Transboundary Governance Project.

Dr. Jacqueline Ann Goldin, African Water Issues Research Unit,

University of Pretoria, South Africa

10:35 Coffee Break

11:00 The Development of Institutional Mechanisms to Facilitate

Multilateral Cooperation in the Mobilization of Shared Resources

in Internationally Shared Watercourse Systems: The Okavango

River. Mr. Pieter Heyns, Ministry of Agriculture, Namibia

11:20 Discussion

12:00 Lunch

13:30 Prospects of Cooperation in the Euphrates-Tigris Basin.

Prof. Olcay Unver, Kent State University, USA

13: 50 Customary Water Governance – A Neglected Approach to

Benefit Sharing in Transboundary River Basins.

Dr. Volker Boege, BICC

14:10 Benefit Sharing and Interdependency in Developing

International River Basins: A Comparative Study.

Dr. Naho Mirumachi, University of Tokyo, Japan

14:30 Coffee Break

15:00 Which Conflict Management Factors can be Identified in

order to Promote Cooperation on Shared River Basins?

Current Hungarian and German Approaches.

Ms. Nike Sommerwerk, Consultant, Germany

15:20 Frame Agreement for Territorial Development, River Contract

of Olona-Bozzente-Lura Basin. Mr. Angelo Elefanti, Lombardi

Region Public Utilities General Department, Italy

15:40 Integrative Management of Water Sector in Israel and its

Neighbors. Mr. David Yaroslavitz, Water Commission, Israel

16:00 Final Discussion and Conclusions

26


Workshop 2

Water and Trade: Matching International Water Availability and Local Needs

Convenor: Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI)

Co-convenors: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology (EAWAG),

The University of Tokyo and World Water Council (WWC)

Workshop Discussion Entry Points

Diverse and strong economies are water secure even if

they are poorly endowed with water. Economies that are

well endowed with water can, however, face water poverty.

Water poverty occurs if an economy does not have the

institutions and adaptive capacity to manage their water

resources effectively. The most effective and strategic

remedies to water scarcity lie in the promotion of socioeconomic

development. Contributing to the diversification

of an economy is much more important than the

effective allocation and management of local watershed

water in the achievement of water security.

Socio-economic diversification, but how?

A key challenge is how to achieve socio-economic development

and diversification of a national economy thus enhancing

the chances for water security. What are the social,

political and other opportunities and barriers for increased

diversification of an economy facing water stress?

Trade regulations

In today’s interdependent world water issues cannot be

treated as separate from other fields. Indeed, water is interconnected

to the international trading system. How are the

negotiations and regulations, for instance, within the World

Trade Organisation (WTO) affecting water management?

To what extent are trade regulations in the international context

affecting the prospects of different sectors, for instance,

the rules and regulations concerning agricultural products?

Institutional and human resource capacities

Institutional capacity at national and other decision

making levels is a key issue in opportunities for good

water (and other issues) management. What kinds of institutions

are required to build an adaptive capacity to

promote socio-economic development in water scarce

regions? What are the requirements in terms of human

resources, e.g. training and skills, to ensure efficient functioning

of the institutions?

Tuesday

August 22

Wednesday

23 August

Thursday

24 August

Programme Tuesday 22 August, 09:00–12:00 Folkets Hus, Congress Hall B

Chair: Prof. John Anthony Allan, King’s College London and School

of Oriental and African Studies, UK

Co-Chairs: Dr. Mikiyasu Nakayama, The University of Tokyo, and

Dr. Hong Yang, EAWAG

Rapporteur: Dr. Magdy Hefny, The Regional Center for Research and

Studies of Water Ethics (under UNESCO), Egypt

Co-Rapporteur: Dr. Naho Mirumachi, The University of Tokyo

09:00 Introduction by Chairs

09:10 How International Trade Discounts Water Management:

The Case from India. Ms. Sunita Narain, Director, Centre for

Science and Environment, India (Invited Speaker)

09:30 Dr. Mohammed Ait Kadi, President, Council for Agricultural

Development, Ministry of Agriculture, Morocco. (Invited

Speaker)

09:50 Various Ways of Estimating the Virtual Water Trade for

Various Purposes. Prof. Taikan Oki, University of Tokyo, Japan

(Invited Speaker)

10:10 Time for Questions

10:20 Limits of Virtual Water Trade, and Alternatives. Ms. Shiney

Varghese, Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy, USA

10:30 Coffee Break

11:00 Managing Dynamic Resource Externalities with Trade

Implications: The Case of Virtual Water. Dr. Siwa Msangi,

International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

11:10 The Concept of Virtual Water Trade – an Environmental

Research Perspective. Ms. Lena Partzsch, Free University of

Berlin, Germany

11:20 International Trade and Water Flows in Colombian

Agriculture: Analysis for the Period 1961–2004.

Prof. Mario Alejandro Perez-Rincon, Universidad del Valle

– Instituto CINARA, Colombia

11:30 Discussion and Conclusions

12:00 Lunch

27

Friday

25 August

Saturday

26 August

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


Tuesday 20 August

Workshop 4

Benefits and Responsibilities of Decentralised and Centralised

Approaches for Management of Water and Wastewater

Convenor: Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI)

Co-convenors: International Water Association (IWA) and Water and Sanitation Programme (WSP)

Workshop Discussion Entry Points

An integrated concept for water, sanitation and wastewater

system solutions is of great importance for sustainable

development and to reach the MDGs. The workshop aims

at encouraging decision makers to consider the policy steps

necessary to achieve improved integration in planning and

service delivery of water, sanitation and wastewater. The

outcome should be used in attempts to sensitise users to the

benefits and responsibilities of an integrated system, whilst

retaining their active participation at local levels.

Policy steps and institutional arrangements needed

Almost by definition, government departments have a

top-down approach in policy making. At the same time,

they are or could be the custodians for an involvement of

communities. What arrangements need to be made in order

to have a functional and effective balance between a

top-down and bottom-up approach?

A cascading use of water and nutrients

The conventional linear principle in water management

and wastewater handling implies missed opportunities,

for instance, to re-use nutrients in wastewater. What

technological options exist for a cascading use of water

and re-use of nutrients and what policy measures are required

to stimulate a water strategy in this direction?

Education, awareness building and knowledge transfer

Opportunities for structured and continuous learning are

required at all levels from the local to the national and

international level. What are the channels to increase the

knowledge and understanding among different groups

of people that clean water is everybody’s business? What

is the role of training courses, school programmes, etc?

Programme Tuesday 22 August, 09:00–15:30 Norra Latin, Room 359

Chair: Prof. Ausaf Rahman, USA

Co-Chair: Mr. Michael Rouse, UK

Rapporteur: Dr. Gunilla Brattberg, Stockholm Water Company, Sweden

Commentator: Mr. Piers Cross, WSP-Africa

09:00 Introduction by Chairs

09:10 The Role of Mapping in the Development of a Decentralized

Wastewater and Sewage System: The Cas of Karachi. Dr. Arif

Hasan, Urban Resource Centre, Pakistan (Invited Speaker)

09:45 Livable Pra-sae River; Five Strategic Actions to

Enhance Benefits in Water and Wastewater Management.

Mrs. Tharee Kamuang, Thailand Environmental Institute

10:00 When Communication Counts – Sharing Tasks and Changing

Roles in Dondo. Mr. Alberto Cumbana, PAARSS, Mozambique

10:15 A Discussion on Water Planning and Policy Related to Rural Water

Supply in China. Dr. Cailing Hu, Oxford Brookes University, UK

10:30 Coffee Break

11:00 Management of Wastewater and Stormwater Drainage

Systems in Kolkata – Problems and Recent Measures Taken.

Mr. Shivashish Bose, Jadavpur University, India

11:15 Implementation of Decentralised Water and Wastewater

Management in South Africa: Progress and Problems.

Prof. Christiaan Schutte, University of Pretoria, South Africa

11:30 Responsibility in Processes. Stakeholders Mobilize for IWRM

in Northern Uplands, Vietnam. Ms. Ngoc Pham Thi Bich,

Vietnam Institute for Water Resources Research

11:45 Discussion

12:00 Lunch

13:30 Central and Local Governments Engaging NGOs for Testing

and Demonstrating New Approaches to Service Delivery

in Water and Sanitation in Uganda. Ms. Caroline Batanda

Kisamba, Uganda Water and Sanitation NGO Network

13:45 The River Basin Plan as a Mechanism to Consolidate an

Integrated Approach. Ms. Valéria Nagy de Oliveira Campos,

Universidade de São Paulo – USP, Brazil

14:00 Strategy for Widespread Implementation of Numerous, Independent,

Small Scale Household Water Treatment Programs.

Ms. Camille Dow Baker, Centre for Affordable Water and

Sanitation Technology, Canada

14:15 Local Millennium Development Goals – Initiative (LMDG-I).

Ms. Ifeoma Charles-Monwuba, WaterAid, Nigeria

14:30 Coffee Break

15:00 Final Discussion and Conclusions

28


Workshop 6

Changing Diets and their Implications

for Water, Land and Livelihoods

Convenor: Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI)

Co-convenors: International Water Management Institute

(IWMI), International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI)

and Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI)

Workshop Discussion Entry Points

The workshop addresses the role of freshwater in producing

balanced and nutritious diets. Meat and dairy production

requires large amounts of water. While this has lead to

demands for reduced meat production, millions of poorly

nourished people need more dietary protein. Moreover,

livestock and fish production provide opportunities for

poor farmers and herders to increase income. In balancing

water between humans and ecosystems, there is a

conceptual difficulty in the sense that water consumed

for meat production on grazing land supports also a variety

of other ecosystem services. Well managed grazing

might also be an efficient and productive use of rainfall

on land unsuitable for crops. Inland fisheries and aquaculture

have special water requirements, often competing

with water for agriculture.

Variation in water requirements between

food production systems

What are the differences in water requirements between pastoral

(relying on grazing grasslands), mixed crop and livestock

systems (where animals can eat crop residues), and industrial

livestock systems (where grain is grown for feed)? How do we

calculate water requirements in each case, and what are the

ecological and livelihood trade-offs and impacts?

Role of aquaculture and capture fisheries?

Fish play a significant role as a source of food, in livelihoods

and in an ecological perspective. But there are significant

Photo: Michael Moore, SIWI

differences between capture fisheries and aquaculture in

terms of water requirements. Aquaculture, for instance,

needs water of high quality and the water regime plays a

major role in many fisheries. How should water requirements

in fisheries be calculated, and what are different ecological

and livelihood impacts of water use in each case?

Livelihood improvements and acceptable water use?

What are ways to reduce water requirements, and to increase

nutrition, income and other livelihood benefits, for

both the rural poor and the growing number of urban

poor? What are the realistic opportunities to improve

the diet of the poor and undernourished while reducing

water use? Are livelihood improvements among the poor

and the achievements of overall water use at “an acceptable

level” compatible objectives?

Tuesday

August 22

Wednesday

23 August

Thursday

24 August

Friday

25 August

Saturday

26 August

Programme Tuesday 22 August, 13:30–17:00 Folkets Hus, Room 203

Chairs: Dr. David Molden, IWMI and Dr. Johan Rockström, SEI

Rapporteur: Mr. Mats Lannerstad, Linköping University, Sweden

13:30 Introduction

Sub-session 1: Water Requirements

13:40 Improving Livestock Water Productivity to Help Satisfy

Future Human Dietary Requirements. Dr. Don Peden, ILRI,

Ethiopia (Invited Speaker)

14:00 Invisible Linkages of Intensive Livestock Production: Consequences

for Freshwater and Marine Resources and Ecosystem

Functioning. Dr. Lisa Deutsch, Centre for Transdisciplinary

Environmental Research (CTM, Stockholm University),

Sweden (Invited Speaker)

14:20 Discussion

14:30 Coffee Break

Sub-session 2: Diets

15:00 Poster Summary

15:15 Urbanization in West Africa: Impact on Diets, Informal

Irrigation and Health Risks. Dr. Pay Drechsel, IWMI, Ghana

15:30 Malnutrition, Obesity and Projected Water Demands.

Dr. Stephen Brichieri-Colombi, King’s College London

University, Italy

15:45 Final Discussion

16:00 General Discussion and Conclusions

29

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


Tuesday 22 August

Seminars

Climate and Water-related Risks

2005 – The Year When Climate Change Became Reality. Are the Strategies

for Coping with Climate and Water-related Risks Good Enough?

Convenor: Munich Re Foundation

Photo: SIWI

Man-made climate change will have a tremendous impact

on the water cycle and on water-related natural disasters.

The year 2005 saw record-breaking losses due to hurricanes

in the Caribbean, but also due to floods in other

regions of the world such as the Alps, in Romania and

in India. The seminar will summarise the implications

of climate- and water-related risks for humans, the envi-

ronment and the economy and provide an overview of

the strategies for coping with these risks, especially with

regard to developing countries. It will focus on questions

such as: What will be the frequency and intensity of natural

disasters in the future? What impact will they have

on the people concerned as well as on overall economic

and insured losses?

Programme Tuesday 22 August, 09:00–12:00 Folkets Hus, Congress Hall A

09:00 Opening Address: Outline of the Goal of the Seminar and

Presentation of the Speakers. Mr. Dirk Reinhard, Munich

Re Foundation, Germany

09:15 Record Storm and Flood Losses. Mere Chance or a Symptom

of Climate Change? Dr. Wolfgang Kron, Munich Re, Geo

Risks Research/Environmental Management, Germany

09:45 Risk Management at the Local Level, Targeting the Root

Causes. Examples of National and International Strategies for

Enhancing Capacities at the Local Level in Central America.

Dr. Juan Carlos Villagrán de León, United Nations University,

Institute for Environment and Human Security, Germany

10:15 Integrating Climate Change into Future Strategies. How to

Mainstream Climate Adaptation into Integrated Water

Resources Management and Development Cooperation.

Mr. Holger Hoff, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact

Research, Germany

10:45 Coffee Break

11:00 Investing in Ecosystem Services to Prepare for Climate

Impacts on Water, Nature and People? In What Areas and

When can Investments in Ecosystem Services Contribute to

Adaptation to Climate Change and Increased Variability.

Dr. Ger Bergkamp, The World Conservation Union (IUCN)

11:15 Panel Discussion

12:00 End of Seminar

30


Capturing the Big Picture of Gender in Water

Power Relations in Policy and Practise: How to Utilise Existing Knowledge?

Convenors: Gender and Water Alliance (GWA), Stockholm International Water

Institute (SIWI) and Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida)

Co-convenors: United Nations – Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA)

and the UN Task Force for Gender and Water – Division for the Advancement of Women

The knowledge on gender in the different water sectors

has expanded considerably over the past decades. There is

ample evidence of positive impact of gender mainstreaming

leading to greater efficiency, effectiveness, sustainability

and equity. This is recognised in international

agreements, nevertheless the practise in the water world

is often one of lip service or gender neutrality. Why are

methodologies and examples not used and replicated?

How do gender power relations function at higher levels?

The seminar is intended to look at the causes and

into drivers for change on different levels and in different

contexts.

Tuesday

August 22

Wednesday

23 August

Thursday

24 August

Friday

25 August

Photo: WSSCC

Programme Tuesday 22 August, 09:00–12:00 Folkets Hus, Room 300

Saturday

26 August

Chair: Ms. Ethne Davey, GWA Chair, Department of Water Affairs

and Forestry, South Africa

Co-chair: Dr. Håkan Tropp, Project Director, SIWI

Rapporteur: Ms. Esther de Jong, Programme Officer, GWA

09:00 Opening and Introduction of the Session. Ms. Ethne Davey,

GWA Chair

09:10 Ms. Thresiamma Mathew, Director, J. Jeevapoorna Trust, India

09:30 Prof. Dr. Demitrius Christofi dis, GWA Steering Committee,

Universidade de Brasília, Brazil

09:50 Ms. Meena Bilgi, Advisor, Gender, Agriculture and Water, India

10:10 Ms. Marcia Brewster, Task Manager, United Nation Task

Force for Gender and Water

10:30 Coffee Break

10:45 Panel

Facilitator: Dr. Sara Ahmed, GWA Steering Committee,

Advisor, Gender and Water Development, India

Introduction of Panel and Subject. Dr. Sara Ahmed,

GWA Steering Committee

Panel Members

• Mrs. Carolyn Hannan, Director, Division for the Advancement

of Women, UNDESA

• Ms. Ethne Davey, Chair, GWA

• Dr. Håkan Tropp, Project Director, SIWI

• Mrs. Lakech Haile, Head, Women’s Affairs Department,

Ministry of Water Resources, Ethiopia

• Ms. Mariam Yunusa, Senior Project Manager, Water

Sanitation and Infrastructure Branch, UN-Habitat, Kenya

11:30 Discussion

11:50 Summarising Key Messages to be Conveyed to the World

Water Week

12:00 End of Seminar

31

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


Tuesday 22 Tuesday August22 August

Partnerships in Action

Convenor: Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) and Water and Sanitation Programme (WSP)

Photo: WSSCC

Worldwide, over 2.6 billion people, or 40% of the world’s

population, lack basic sanitation facilities and more than

1.1 billion people have no access to safe water supply. The

consequence of this neglect is staggering: 1.6 million

deaths per year, including some 4,500 children dying everyday

from preventable diarrhoea and water, sanitation

and hygiene related diseases.

In order to work more effectively towards sustainable

sanitation and hygiene solutions, we need to extend alliances

and gain momentum through partnerships with a variety of

stakeholders and actors. The aim of the seminar is to present

and have an interactive discussion on different types of partnerships

that have managed to enhance progress, and identify

the success factors for replication.

Programme Tuesday 22 August, 09:00–12:00

Folkets Hus, Room 307

Moderator: Ms. Vanessa Tobin, Chief, Water, Environment and

Sanitation, UNICEF

09:00 Welcome and Introduction. Ms. Vanessa Tobin, UNICEF

09:15 The Diorano WASH Coalition, Madagascar – A Multi-stakeholder

Partnership in Action. Ms. Dorcas Pratt, WaterAid, Madagascar

09:35 Public Private Partnership for Handwashing – The Global Partnership

and the Peruvian Experience. Ms. Rocio Florez, WSP, Peru

10:00 Coffee Break

10:15 The Next Generation – Partnering Up with Youth. Ms. Diana

Iskreva, Earth Forever, Bulgaria (tbc)

10:35 National Multi-Stakeholder Campaigning – The WASH

Movement in Ethiopia. Mr. Takele Hunde, Hygiene and

Sanitation Coordinator, WaterAid, Ethiopia

10:55 Discussion

11:50 Summary and Conclusions

12:00 End of Session

Sanitation Partnerships:

Harnessing their Potential for Urban On-site Sanitation

Convenor: Building Partnerships for Development in Water and Sanitation (BPDWS)

Photo: Dr. Olli Varis

This seminar will address the market for on-site sanitation

services in poor urban communities, concentrating

on the relationships between various stakeholders. Discussions

will focus on how partnerships can play one of

three roles: improving the existing transactions that take

place, harnessing these towards public health goals, and

overcoming the institutional fragmentation that bedevils

sanitation delivery. Two case studies, from South Africa

and Madagascar, will be used to illustrate the issues and

promote lively debate amongst participants.

Programme Tuesday 22 August, 13:30-17:00 Folkets Hus, Room 307

Chair: Dr. Darren Saywell, International Water Association (IWA)

13:30 Where Partnerships Fit in the Overall Sanitation Challenge.

Dr. Darren Saywell, IWA

13:40 Sketching Sanitation Partnerships. Mr. Ken Caplan, BPDWS

14:10 Key Considerations for Sanitation Partnerships.

Mr. David Schaub-Jones, BPDWS

15:00 Coffee Break

15:15 Three Possible Roles for Partnership

15:35 Partnership Role A: Better Transactions and Improved Customer

Relationships. Ms. Dorcas Pratt, WaterAid, Madagascar

16:00 Partnership Role B: Translating Dignity and Comfort into

Health and Environmental Protection. Mr. Neil Macleod,

eThekweni Metro Water Services, South Africa

16:25 Partnership Role C: Overcoming Fragmentation.

Dr. Darren Saywell, IWA

17:00 End of Seminar

32


Fighting Corruption to Reduce Poverty:

Linking Global and Local Strategies

Convenors: Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida) and the Water Integrity Network (WIN)

[IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre, Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI), Swedish Water

House (SWH), Transparency International (TI) and Water and Sanitation Programme (WSP)]

Policy makers and analysts increasingly agree that corruption

is one of the major challenges facing the water

sector. The World Bank estimates that corruption undermines

efficiency in the water sector by 20–40% and

that it functions as an important driver to pollution and

over-pumping of ground and surface water. In short, corruption

affects the governance of water by deciding who

gets what water of what quality when, where and how.

It also determines how costs are distributed between individuals,

society and the environment. Corruption thus

worsens the world water crisis and evidence suggests that

the costs are disproportionably borne by the poor and

the environment. In addition, corruption can jeopardise

democratic principles of equal access in public decision

making. Social injustice is another consequence of corruption

because it undermines the rule of law and an effective

justice system while breeding discretionary and

unpredictable law enforcement.

Whereas solid knowledge on how to tackle corruption

is in high demand, the supply is low. Notwithstanding

some scattered islands of knowledge, the diagnostics on

corruption and a systematically developed understanding

of anti-corruption measures are only beginning to develop

in the water sector. The seminar aims at: increasing

awareness of the need for anti-corruption measures in the

water sector; expanding knowledge including scope and

different kinds of corruption in the sector with a particular

focus on how poor people are affected; and exploring

anti-corruption mechanisms and how they can be used in

the quest to alleviate poverty.

The seminar, which focuses on the link between corruption

and the creation and alleviation of poverty, will

also be a platform for launching WIN – Water Integrity

Network.

Programme Tuesday 22 August, 13:30–17:15 Folkets Hus, Room 300

Tuesday

August 22

Wednesday

23 August

Thursday

24 August

Chair: Mr. Paul Hassing, Deputy Director, Environment and Water,

Directorate General of International Cooperation, Ministry of

Foreign Affairs, Netherlands

Co-Chair: Representative of Sida

Moderator: Dr. David Nussbaum, Chief Executive Officer,

Transparency International - Secretariat, Germany

13:30 Block 1: Seminar Opening and Launch of WIN

• Words of Welcome on Behalf of Convenors.

Dr. Patrik Stålgren, SWH

• Opening Remarks by Convenor and WIN Sponsor. TBA,

Representative of Sida

• Opening Remarks by WIN Sponsor. Mr. Paul Hassing,

Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Netherlands

• Launch of the Water Integrity Network (WIN).

Dr. Håkan Tropp, WIN Interim Chair, SIWI

• TBA, High Level Participant

14:10 Block 2: Keynote Presentations

• Keynote 1: Political Commitment and Programs to Fight

Corruption in the Water Sector. Dr. Antonio Tujan Jr.,

Research Director, IBON Foundation Inc., Philippines

• Keynote 2: Private Sector Commitments and Programmes to

Fight Corruption in the Water Sector. Mr. Syed Adil Gilani,

Chief Executive Officer, TI-Pakistan, and Brig. Iftekhar

Haider, MD, Karachi Sewerage Board, Pakistan

14:40 Block 3: Setting the Scene for Learning about Anti-corruption

in the Water Sector

• A Framework for Fighting Corruption in the Water Sector

Worldwide. Mr. Piers Cross, WSP-Africa, Kenya

• Pro-poor Approaches and Policy Interventions to Anti-Corruption

in the Water Sector. Mrs. Janelle Plummer, World Bank

Consultant, UK, and Dr. Patrik Stålgren, SWH

15:00 Block 4: Learning About Curtailing

Corruption in the Water Sector

• Transparency in Water Management. Mr. Narasimah

Rao Chilukuri, National Level Monitor under the Ministry

of Rural Development of the Government of India

• Securing Community Water through Combating Corruption.

Dr. Ignatius Adeh, Research Fellow, European Institute of

Environmental Law Research, University of Bremen, Germany

• Tools to Ensure Transparency in Kerala Sanitation Programme.

Mrs. Kochurani Mathew, Socio-Economic Units Foundation, India

• Improvement of the Governance of Water Utilities.

Dr. Kazushi Hashimoto, Director General, Japan Bank for

International Cooperation

• Facing Up: How Shell Tackles Corruption. Mr. Albert Wong,

Head of Policy and External Relations, Shell International,

The Netherlands

• Perceptions and Levels of Corruption Survey in Southern

Africa. Mr. Anton Earle, Director, African Centre for Water

Research, South Africa

16:30 Block 5: Concluding Discussion and Way Forward

17:00 End of Seminar

17:15 Open WIN, Water Integrity Network, Meeting to Inform about

WIN and raise WIN Membership. Venue: Room 361 Norra Latin

33

Friday

25 August

Saturday

26 August

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


Tuesday 22 August

Photo: SIWI

Financing Integrated Water Resources Management in the North

– Strategies and Experiences

Convenors: Northern Water Network (NoWNET) [Australia Water Partnership, Danish Water Forum,

French Coordination for Water, Global Water Partnership, Japan Water Forum, Korea Water Forum,

Netherlands Water Partnership, Swedish Water House and World Water Council]

The Northern Water Network (NoWNET), launched at

the 3rd World Water Forum in Kyoto in 2003, mobilises

networks based in Northern countries to promote and

facilitate good water development and management practices.

Recognising that Northern countries face serious

water management challenges, the objective of NoWNET

is to promote the exchange of experiences and knowledge

between countries in the North (North-North), while

at the same time providing an improved platform and

mechanism for the sharing between Northern countries

and countries of the South (North-South).

The seminar will be divided in two different sessions.

Session 1 will discuss partnership and network building,

and the experiences and lessons learnt from the existing

members of the NoWNET on how to build effective cooperation

on a national level. Session 2 will focus on water

resources management financing strategies in Northern

countries and will present a number of national cases.

What financing strategies are currently being used? What

are the lessons learnt from past and current practices?

The seminar will be based on presentations and interactive

discussions among presenters and with the audience.

Programme Tuesday 22 August, 13:30–17:00 Norra Latin, Room 253

Chair: Prof. Torkil Jønch-Clausen, Danish Water Forum

Rapporteur: Ms. Noriko Yamaguchi, Japan Water Forum

13:00 Opening the Seminar. Prof. Torkil Jønch-Clausen, Danish

Water Forum

13:05 Session 1: Partnership and Network Building National

Presentations and Experience Sharing (5 minutes each)

French Coordination for Water. Mrs. Myriam Constantin,

Deputy Mayor Responsible for Water and Sanitation, Paris

Danish Water Forum. Dr. Torkil Jønch-Clausen

Japan Water Forum. Ms. Noriko Yamaguchi

Netherlands Water Partnership. Mr. Jeroen van der Sommen

Swedish Water House. Mr. Johan Kuylenstierna

13:35 Panel Discussion: (National representatives, GWP and

WWC): Challenges and Opportunities of Partnership and

Network Building in the North. What Role can NoWNET

Play in International Water Cooperation

14:00 Session 2. Financing Integrated Water Resources Management

in the North – Strategies and Experiences

Introductory Speaker: Mr. James Winpenny, Wychwood

Economic Consulting Ltd., UK

14:20 Economic Consequences of the EU Water Framework

Directive – the Danish Perspective. Dr. Jesper Sölver Schou,

National Environment Research Institute, Denmark

14:40 Polluter-Pays Principle and Cost-efficiency When Implementing

the EU Water Directive in Sweden. Dr. Henrik Scharin, Environmental

Economist, Swedish Environmental Protection Agency

15:00 Coffee Break

15:30 Investment in Water and its Contribution to Economic and

Social Development in Modern Japan. Dr. Koutaro Takemura,

Secretary General, Japan Water Forum

15:50 Financing IWRM in the Netherlands – Principles and Facts.

Mr. Henk Tiesinga, Chairman of the Water Board Zuiderzeeland

and Member of the Executive Assembly of the Association

of Water Boards, The Netherlands

16:10 Short Break

16:20 Panel Discussion. Lessons Learned on Financing IWRM in

the North – Implications for the South?

Moderator: Mr. James Winpenny, Wychwood Economic

Consulting Ltd., UK

16:55 Closing the Seminar. Prof. Torkil Jønch-Clausen, Danish Water

Forum

34


Side Events

Side Events on 22 August

12:15–13:15 Folkets Hus, Room 307

International Training Programmes on

Integrated Water Resources Management

and Transboundary Water Management

Convenors: Ramboll Natura and Stockholm

International Water Institute (SIWI)

Ramboll Natura of Sweden together with the Stockholm

International Water Institute implements Sida’s international

training programmes on Integrated Water Resources

Management (IWRM) and on Integrated Transboundary

Water Resources Management (ITWRM).

The focus in each course is on the participants’ own job

situation. Each participant develops an individual project

that highlights opportunities and challenges encountered

in their work. At present, training programmes on

IWRM include one course where participants are recruited

globally and one French speaking course, mainly targeted

for West Africa. Three transboundary programmes

are available on an annual basis – one global, one for the

Middle East/North Africa (MENA) region, and one for

Lake Victoria. The side event will present these international

training programmes and provide an opportunity

to meet course participants.

12:15–13:15 Folkets Hus, Room 300

The Difference a Tree Can Make:

Water, Tree and Soil Interactions

in Tropical Watersheds

Convenors: World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF)

Public perception of the effect of trees on watershed function

vacillates between strongly positive or negative,

influenced by media reports on floods and droughts and

scientific responses to publicised perceptions. However, research

led by ICRAF and partners shows that trees play a

nuanced role in important watershed functions. In waterscarce

conditions, the use of deciduous trees can greatly

reduce water use and competition with crops. In areas of

high erosion and sedimentation, maintenance of indigenous

trees in riparian areas may be the best option. Three brief

presentations at the side event will provide insight into

the ways trees can be best managed to advance watershed

management objectives and the implications for watershed

management policy and programme design.

The fi ndings presented at the side event are drawn

from more than 20 years of ICRAF research. For the first

time, these critical fi ndings are being brought together

in a series of information briefs, which will be launched

during the side event. With prominent media coverage

of floods and landslides, the rise of large scale afforestation

projects, and the rooting of carbon sequestration

projects, these findings have never been more relevant in

guiding decision making processes. Join us and learn the

secrets to using trees to achieve your watershed management

goals.

12:15–13:15 Folkets Hus, Room 203

Small Multi-Purpose

Reservoir Planning

Convenor: Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI)

The Challenge Program on Water and Food’s Small Reservoirs

Project is working with stakeholders to develop a

set of purpose-built tools and procedures for the appropriate

design, operation and maintenance of small multipurpose

reservoirs. These tools will assist people working

at two scales, the basin scale and the community scale.

Well-designed small reservoirs have the potential to improve

the lives of people who grow irrigated crops and

fi sh, water livestock and use water in their households.

With better information, people in small communities

will enjoy sustainable production systems that improve

their livelihoods without compromising the quality of the

environment.

35

Tuesday

August 22

Wednesday

23 August

Thursday

24 August

Friday

25 August

Saturday

26 August

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


Tuesday 22 August

17:15–18:45 Folkets Hus, Room 300

Developing Solutions to Protect the Marine

Environment from Land-Based Activities:

Stakeholder Dialogue for

the European Region

Convenors: Stakeholder Forum for a Sustainable

Future and UNEP Global Programme of Action for

the Protection of the Marine Environment from

Land-based Activities (GPA)

The major threats to the health, productivity and biodiversity

of the marine environment result from human activities

on land – in coastal areas and further inland. Some 80% of

the pollution load in the oceans originates from land-based

activities, such as aquaculture, sewage, tourism and mining.

The Global Programme of Action for the Protection of the

Marine Environment from Land-based Activities (GPA) is

one important response to these concerns. The GPA is the

only global mechanism that explicitly addresses the linkages

between freshwater, coastal and marine environments. This

side event will bring together stakeholders from around the

world to discuss issues threatening the marine environment

and the livelihoods of coastal communities. Stakeholders will

have the opportunity to comment on the draft Beijing Declaration,

identify priorities and discuss the roles of stakeholders

and national governments in developing solutions to these

problems. The outcomes will provide input into the upcoming

Second Intergovernmental Review (IGR-2) of the GPA,

which will be held in Beijing, China in October 2006.

17:15–18:45 Folkets Hus, Room 203

The Contribution of Life Sciences to

the Millennium Development Goals

Convenor: The World Life Sciences Forum (BioVision)

Water is one of the compelling issues of our time. From

all corners of the world, the foremost water experts and

opinion leaders converge in Stockholm during World Water

Week, where the focus will be on building capacity for

action. The purpose of the BioVision side event is to take

a proactive approach to open the doors to cooperation in

order to further action-oriented goals and agendas.

The World Life Sciences Forum BioVision is a biennial,

high-level global forum for dialogue, debate and

unique opportunity to efficiently carry the action message

directly to new constituencies from agriculture,

health and environment. In 2005, over 4000 participants

from 50 countries attended, representing science, society

(in the form of non-governmental organisations, international

organisations, leading institutes) and industry.

The theme of the next Forum will be “The Contribution

of Life Sciences to the Millennium Development Goals”,

and water will be an integral part of the Forum. BioVision

will take place in March 11–14, 2007, in Lyon, France

and will be an opportunity to build on the momentum

of Stockholm. Join the side event to find out more about

BioVision and help shape the debate in 2007.

www.biovision.org

17:15–18:45 Folkets Hus, Room 307

Donor Country Approaches to Water-

Related Development Cooperation

Focus Area: Water Resources Infrastructure

Convenor: Stockholm International Water Institute

(SIWI) in cooperation with the Netherlands Ministry

of Foreign Affairs, Department for International

Development, United Kingdom, Ministry of Foreign

Affairs of Denmark, U.S. Department of State and The

Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and

Development, Germany

Moderator: Mr. Nik Gowing, BBC World

In this side event, a number of donor countries will present

and discuss their approaches to water resources infrastructure,

both small-scale and large-scale, and the role of such

infrastructure to solve escalating water challenges. What

are the fundamental issues to be dealt with in order to

identify the most appropriate infrastructure and to generate

the necessary resources? Are there innovative funding

mechanisms that can be further supported? How can longterm

sustainability be secured, from economic, social and

environmental perspectives? Initial short presentations will

be followed by comments from representatives of recipient

countries, also providing their perspectives on current

and future challenges and opportunities for small and large

scale water resource infrastructure. Most of the time will

be devoted to moderated, interactive discussions.

36


Social Activity

Stockholm Junior Water Prize

Award Ceremony

The international Stockholm Junior Water Prize contest

aims to encourage young people’s interest in issues concerning

water and the environment. The award is given

annually for an outstanding water project by a young person

or a small group of young people.

The finalists at the international competition in Stockholm

this week are the winners of national SJWP contests.

The national and international competitions are open to

pre-university young people between the age of 15 and 20

who have conducted water-related projects focusing on

local, regional, national or global topics of environmental,

scientific, social or technological importance.

The international Stockholm Junior Water Prize winner

receives a usd 5,000 award and a blue crystal sculpture

in the shape of a water droplet. The national competitions

have helped young people around the world to

become active in water issues.

Tuesday

August 22

Wednesday

23 August

H.R.H. Crown Princess Victoria of Sweden is the Patron

of the Stockholm Junior Water Prize.

For these young water enthusiasts, the World Water Week

provides an opportunity to meet top world water experts

convening in Stockholm at the same time, participate in

seminars, visit research and technical facilities and attend

cultural and social events. This year, around 30 countries

are participating in the competition in Stockholm. The

competing projects deal with a wide variety of topics,

from the development of advanced technical devices to

aspects of relevance for the implementation of the Millennium

Development Goals, from simple local solutions

for dry countries to innovative pollution abatement ideas,

dissemination of key results and public awareness campaigns

to the local population.

The winner will be announced during the Award Ceremony

on the evening of Tuesday, August 22 in the Congress

Hall. A meeting for representatives of the National

Organisers in the participating countries will also be arranged,

and the students’ posters shall be on display on

Tuesday and Wednesday during the week.

Programme Tuesday 22 August, 18:45–20:30

Stockholm Junior Water Prize Award Ceremony in the presence of

H.R.H. Crown Princess Victoria

Speakers

Mr. Stig Larsson, Chairman, Stockholm Water Foundation

Dr. Magnus Enell, Chairman, SJWP Nominating Committee

Prof. Asit K. Biswas, 2006 Stockholm Water Prize Laureate

Mr. Thomas R. Martin, Senior Vice President and

Director of Corporate Relations, ITT Corporation

Prize Ceremony

H.R.H. Crown Princess Victoria presents the prize and the diplomas

Ms. Frida Lanshammar, Manager, Stockholm Junior Water Prize,

introduces the finalists

Music

Christopher Lehman, flute

Henrik Mawe, piano

Daniel Andersson Quartet

Rennie Mirro, musical performer

Dance

Kühler Dance Company

Choreography by KDC and Therese Carlsson

Master of Cermonies

Ms. Victoria Dyring

Folkets Hus, Congress Hall

37

Photo: SIWI

Thursday

24 August

Friday

25 August

Saturday

26 August

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


Wednesday 23 August

Workshop 5

Decision Support Systems and IWRM

Convenor: Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI)

Co-convenors: Global Water Partnership (GWP) and Stakeholder Forum for a Sustainable Future

Workshop Discussion Entry Points

There are many examples of decision support systems

(DSS) around the world, but there seems to be few which

cover all relevant issues in the development and implementation

of IWRM in practice. For DSS to be effective,

the main obstacles as well as the successful factors must

be identified and properly taken into account in its development

and implementation.

Governance and the role of policy, regulations,

and of local institutions

DSS tend to be designed from the requirements of planning

and similar formal institutions. With reference to

the support for IWRM, what are the requirements in

terms of inter-sector linkages to enhance an integrated

approach in water governance? Similarly, what kind of

support is required to integrate local level issues with a

composite regional, basin or national perspective?

Stakeholders and societal negotiation processes

It is more and more recognised within the development

community as well as within the community of water pro-

fessionals that increased dialogue between

business, government and the

civil society is needed. How can true

participatory dialogue and outcomes

of negotiation processes among relevant

parts of society be involved

when elaborating a DSS?

Decision support system that

works in practice

DSS must be designed so that the

users can apply them in their daily

duties or in strategic planning.

What is the role of models, data

retrieval systems and other similar

tools? DSS should also facilitate

dialogue between different interests

groups and people from various

backgrounds and with various

technical and other kinds of knowledge.

How can DSS be designed to

contribute to such a dialogue?

Programme Wednesday 23 August, 09:00–17:00 Folkets Hus, Congress Hall A

Chair: Prof. Torkil Jønch-Clausen, DHI Water & Environment, Denmark

Co-Chair: Mr. Felix Dodds, Stakeholder Forum for a Sustainable

Future, UK

Rapporteur: Mrs. Ulla-Britta Fallenius, The Swedish Environmental

Protection Agency

Co-Rapporteur: Mr. Alan Hall, GWP

09:00 Introduction by Chair

09:10 Climate Proofing of IWRM Decision Support Systems.

Prof. Pavel Kabat, ALTERRA Green World Research,

Wageningen University and Research Centre, Netherlands

(Invited Speaker)

09:45 Information – Analytical System of the River Basins

in Kazakhstan as the Technological Basis for IWRM.

Mr. Igor Shenberger, Kazgiprovodkhoz Project Institute,

Kazakhstan (Invited Speaker)

10:20 Coffee Break

10:45 Promote IWRM to Resolve a Complex Agriculture & Fishery

Issue through Dialogue – A Case from Sri Lanka. Ms. Mangala

Wickramanayake, Coast Conservation Department, Sri Lanka

11:00 Practical Experience towards Implementing IWRM for

Sustainable Management of Water Resources in Ethiopia: the

Case of Two Pilot Watersheds. Mr. Kidanemariam Jembere,

Ethiopia Country Water Partnership

11:15 Participative Management Decision Making

Guidelines for Quebec Watershed Agencies.

Prof. Catherine Choquette, University of Sherbrooke, Canada

11:30 Discussion on Presentations

12:00 Lunch

13:30 Introduction by Co-chair

13:40 Issues Related to the Regulatory and Legal Base Development

for Water Quality in Central Asia. Dr. Bulat Yessekin, The

Regional Environmental Centre for Central Asia, Kazakstan

13:55 The Rationale for Development of a Participatory Decision

Support System for Water Resources Management in Uganda.

Assoc. Prof. Gaddi Ngirane-Katashaya, Makerere University,

Uganda

14:10 Partnership Approaches to Decision Making: 20 years of

Progress in the Mersey Basin. Mr. Mark Turner, Mersey Basin

Campaign, UK

14:25 A Decision Support System for an Integrated Water Resources

Management in Vietnam. Prof. Harro Stolpe, Institute of

Environmental Engineering and Ecology, Germany

14:40 Discussion on Presentations

15:00 Coffee Break

15:30 Final Discussion and Conclusions

38


Workshop 7

Sharing the Benefits of Ecosystem Services and the Costs of Ecosystem Degradation

Convenor: Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI)

Co-convenors: CGIAR Challenge Program on Water and Food (CPWF) and Ramsar Convention on Wetlands

Workshop Discussion Entry Points

Benefits that people receive from ecosystems, terrestrial ones

as well as aquatic ones, take many forms and could be identified

with reference to different temporal and spatial scales. It

is also increasingly evident that the poorest segments of society

often bear the highest costs of ecosystem degradation.

Improved understanding and valuation of ecosystem services

is a necessary first step in developing and strengthening ways

and means for negotiating and sharing benefits of ecosystem

services. Improved knowledge of the value of such services

also helps to allocate responsibility for an effective maintenance

of functions and resilience of ecosystems.

What benefits at what position in a catchment?

Ecosystems form dynamic fluxes, often related to different

sites, which should also be seen in a wider context.

What benefits and services can be generated from different

types and scales of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems,

respectively, at different positions in a catchment?

Tools for identification and valuation

What tools and mechanisms are available and necessary

for identifying and valuing such benefits and services?

Principles for sharing of benefits and costs

Since many ecosystem services are generated without direct

human intervention, principles for the negotiation and sharing

of benefits from ecosystems, and for ecosystem degradation

cost allocation, need to be developed. What principles

must be adhered to in this connection? What conclusions

can be drawn regarding the responsibilities of various actors

for maintaining vital functions of ecosystems?

Wednesday

August 23

Programme Wednesday 23 August, 09:00–17:00 Folkets Hus, Room 307

Chair: Dr. Jonathan Woolley, CPWF

Co-Chair: Dr. Peter Bridgewater, Ramsar Convention on Wetlands

Rapporteur: Mr. Michael Moore, SIWI

Co-Rapporteur: Ms. Elin Enfors, Stockholm University, Sweden

09:00 Introduction

Sub-session 1: Valuation

09:10 Sharing the Costs of Ecosystem Degradation in the Murray

Darling Basin, Australia – The Results of the First Century of

Negotiations! Mr. John Scanlon, Murray Darling Basin Commission,

Australia (Invited Speaker)

09:30 An Economic or Pro-poor Pathway? The Dilemma of Water Allocating

Institutions in the Great Ruaha Catchment in Tanzania.

Mr. Reuben Kadigi, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Tanzania

09:40 Access: A Precondition for Payment for Environmental Service

– Understanding the Case of Tiquipaya Watershed, Bolivia. Mr.

Olaf Westerman, Danish Institute for International Studies

09:50 Financing of the Decision of Water Problems of Russia:

Between Command Approach, Market-Based Approach and

Ethical Traditions. Mrs. Olga Podosenova, Ural Ecological

Union, Russian Federation

10:15 Discussion

10:30 Coffee Break

Panel 1: Valuation: Uplands

11:00 Compensation for Environmental Services in the Andes,

Lessons for a Wider Application. Dr. Hector Cisneros,

Coordinador, Consortium for the Sustainable Development of

the Andean Ecoregion (CONDESAN), Peru

11:20 Carbon Sequestration Services of Reforestation Initiatives in

the Catchments Area of Lake Singkarak in Indonesia: Local

Action for Global Benefit. Dr. Bustanul Arifin, Syiah Kulala

University, Indonesia

11:30 Operationalizing Benefit-Sharing: The South African Experience.

Dr. Marius Claassen, African Water Issues Research Unit

11:40 Discussion

12:00 Lunch

Panel 2: Benefit Sharing: Upstream Ecosystems

13:30 Determining Costs and Benefits of Environmental Externalities

as an Instrument to Promote Alliances for Development. Fuquene

Watershed (Colombia). Ms. Marcela Quintero, CIAT, Colombia

13:40 Sharing Riverine Ecosystems Services, Benefits and Costs from

Water Transfer Projects: The Case of the Lesotho Highlands Water

Project. Dr. Mampiti Matete, National University of Lesotho

13:50 The Hydro-logic of Agroforestry: Fostering a New Appreciation of

the Hydrologic Functions of Agroforestry for Improved Policy and

Programme Design. Dr. Brent Swallow, World Agroforestry Centre

14:00 Relationship Water-Forest Management as a Sharing Benefit of

Natural Resources by Communities in the Sierra Juarez of Oaxaca,

Mexico. Ms. Claudia G. Méndez Jaime, Consultant, Mexico

14:10 Discussion

14:30 Coffee Break

Panel 3: Benefit Sharing: Downstream Ecosystems

15:00 Linking Flow, Services and Value – A Checklist and Some

Examples. Ms. Louise Korsgaard, DHI, Denmark

15:10 Monitoring Estuarine and Marine Water Quality and Ecosystem

Health: An Overview of an Established Programme

and its Relevance in Developing Nations. Ms. Kate Moore,

University of Queensland, Australia

15:20 Potential Benefits Associated with Payments for Ecosystem

Services in the Columbia River Basin of North America.

Prof. Robert Mahler, University of Idaho, USA

15:30 Environmental Aspects of Integrated Flood Management.

Mr. Avinash C. Tyagi, World Meteorological Organization,

Switzerland

15:40 Discussion

16:00 General Discussion and Conclusions

39

Thursday

24 August

Friday

25 August

Saturday

26 August

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


Wednesday 23 August

Workshop 8

Large Lakes as Drivers for Regional Development

Convenor: Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI)

Co-Convenors: East African Community (EAC), International Lake

Environment Committee (ILEC) and The International Joint Commission (IJC)

Workshop Discussion Entry Points

Large lakes, as illustrated by the very geography of economic

activities typical for lake regions, are strategic to regional

development. They are key to a variety of dynamic processes

where water resource and water-related risk factors interact

with other components in societal development. The

lake may, for instance, constrain the expansion of physical

infrastructure while serving urban planning with valuable

coastal zones. Globally, pressure on lake resources and surrounding

lands can be seen. This affects the water quality

of the lakes and thereby also the socio-economic conditions

and environmental status of the region. Visionary planning

is needed to integrate experience and knowledge into collaborative

and sustainable lake management.

Sustainable resource and risk management of lake basins

What kind of planning is required to realise and sustain the

considerable resource values of large lakes in expansive regions?

What risks in terms of pollution and degradation of the resources

in and around large lakes should be considered? What

regulations of human activities need to be considered?

Integrated, multi-objective water regulation systems

How can large lakes be most effectively managed through

water regulation systems, considering also water quality

aspects that provide strategic information and knowledge,

for regional development planning? How can broad – but

functional – participatory involvement be assured?

Transboundary lakes

How can the environmental and socio-economic benefits

from regional integration of transboundary lake basin

management be gained most effectively? How can the

principles for sustainable development and multi-objective

requirements for balancing resource and risk factors

be achieved in a transboundary setting?

Programme Wednesday 23 August, 09:00–17:00 Folkets Hus, Congress Hall B

Chair: Dr. Tom Okurut, EAC

Co-Chair: Prof. Boniface Egboka, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nigeria

Rapporteur: Prof. Saburo Matsui, Kyoto University, Japan

Co-Rapporteur: Prof. Klas Cederwall, The Royal Institute of Technology,

Sweden

Commentator: Prof. Sven Erik Jørgensen, Danish University of Pharmaceutical

Sciences

09:00 Introduction

First Block – Management

09:10 Managing Lakes and their Basins for Sustainable Use: the Basin

Governance Challenge. Dr. Masahisa Nakamura, Shiga University

Center for Sustainability and Environment, Japan (Invited Speaker)

09:30 A Survey of Institutional Features of International Lakes. Ms.

Catherine Ashcraft, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA

09:45 Allocation of Reservoir Water as Group Decision-making Problem

with Complete and Incomplete Information: Djerdap Dam

at the Serbia-Romania Frontier. Dr. Bojan Srdjevic, University

of Novi Sad, Serbia and Montenegro

10:00 Regional Participation on the Development of Transboundary Water

Resources: Civil Societies Engagement as Tool for Development in Nile

Basin. Dr. Amos E. Majule, University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

10:15 Discussion

10:30 Coffee Break

Second Block – Sustainable Development and Research Aspects

11:00 Looking in the Mirror: How Societies Learn from their Dependence

on Large Lakes. Prof. Dr. Richard A. Meganck, UNESCO-IHE

Institute for Water Education, The Netherlands (Invited Speaker)

11:20 Lombardy Lakes – The Present and the Future. Mr. Daniele

Magni, Research Institute for the Economy and Ecology Applied

to Alpine Areas, Italy

11:30 The World’s 10th Largest Lake under Threat: Lake Winnipeg,

the Economic Mainstay of Manitoba, Canada. Mr. Alex Salki,

Freshwater Institute Fisheries and Oceans, Canada

11:40 The Influence of Drainage Area on the Anthropogenic Transformation

of Vozhe Lake. Prof. Natalya Bolotova, Vologda

Pedagogical University, Russia

11:50 Tonle Sap Lake, Cambodia: Nature’s Affluence Meets Human Poverty.

Mr. Marko Keskinen, Helsinki University of Technology, Finland

12:00 Discussion

12:15 Lunch

Third Block – Overaching Issues

13:30 Dr. Nick V. Aladin, Russian Academy of Sciences Zoological

Institute (Invited Speaker)

Panel Discussion with Short Presentations:

13:50 Lakes as Repositories for Women’s Sustained Livelihood at Kodaikanal

Hills. Dr. D. Janaki, Mother Teresa Women’s University, India

13:55 Africa’s Lakes: An Analysis of Environmental Change.

Dr. Ashbindu Singh, UNEP/GRID – EROS Data Center, USA

14:05 Rejuvenation of Lake – Economic Engine: A Case Study of Kolleru

Lake in India. Dr. Trinadha Raju Rudraraju, GeoRIST, India

14:10 Networking between Networks: Baltic Cities Co-operate with

Lake Victoria Local Authorities. Dr. Sulev Nömmann, Union of

the Baltic Cities, Finland

14:15 Panel Discussion

14:30 Coffee Break

Fourth Block – Final Discussion

15:00 Discussion

Introduction by Dr. Erik Odada, University of Nairobi, Kenya

(Invited Speaker)

15:30 Final Discussion and Conclusions

40


Workshop 9

Safe Water Storage and Regulation during Floods and Droughts

Convenor: Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI)

Co-Convenors: International Association of Hydraulic Engineering and Research (IAHR), International Association

of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS), International Hydropower Association (IHA), International Water Resources

Association (IWRA) and Third World Centre for Water Management

Workshop Discussion Entry Points

Mitigation of both flood and drought problems is dependent,

among other things, on the capacity to store and regulate

runoff within river basins. Water retention capacity is partly

provided naturally in the landscape and also technically by

means of dams and reservoirs. Additionally, and equally important

in a mitigation strategy are non-technical measures,

for instance, education and information for building human

and institutional capacity to cope with floods and droughts.

Experiences from different climatic regions should be shared

and taken into account to include the necessary flexibility in

the efforts for achieving safe handling of water resources.

Floods and droughts are affected by climate change and

particularly by increased climate variability interacting with

human activities as amplifying or moderating factors. Water

resources management must therefore balance resource

and risk aspects to find measures and operation strategies

where seemingly conflicting interests can all benefit.

Multipurpose water regulation strategies

How and to what extent should water resources management

strategies include predictions of climate change in

order to decrease the vulnerability in society related to

floods and droughts?

Impact and vulnerability assessments

How are impact and vulnerability assessments related

to flood and drought situations most effectively used for

developing mitigation strategies? Do we put adequate

emphasis on the specific vulnerability related to different

threats for water quality degradation during both flood

and drought events?

Sustainable engineering?

Sustainable engineering is an important concept applicable

to water resources development where human activities

have to adapt to patterns that are robust in a long-term

perspective. What are the criteria defining sustainability

in situations where society has to cope with increasing

threats from climate change and climate variability? Do

we need new and more comprehensive risk management

strategies as part of sustainable engineering?

Wednesday

August 23

Thursday

24 August

Programme Wednesday 23 August, 09:00–17:00 Folkets Hus, Congress Hall C

Chair: Dr. Cecilia Tortajada, Third World Centre for Water

Management, Mexico

Rapporteur: Prof. Klas Cederwall, The Royal Institute of

Technology, Sweden

Co-Rapporteur: Ms. Alexandra Pres, InWent Capacity Building

International, Germany

Commentator: Prof. Benedito Braga, Agência Nacional de Águas (ANA),

Brazil

09:00 Introduction

First Block

09:10 The Role of Water Storage for Flood and Drought Mitigation:

Case Study of Turkey. Prof. Dogan Altinbilek, IHA, Turkey

(Invited Speaker)

09:45 Focusing on the Ethiopian Water Towers. Dr. Admasu

Gebeyehu, Consultant, Ethiopia

10:00 The Egyptian Experience on Setting Measures for Mitigation

Strategies to Reduce the Consequences of Floods and

Droughts, Associated with Climate Change uncertainty. Dr

Mohamed Abdul Aty Sayed, Egypt Ministry of Water Resources

and Irrigation

10:15 Improved Water Security by Protecting Natural Water Bodies

and Waterways in the Indus Basin. Dr. Zaigham Habib, International

Water Management Institute (IWMI), Pakistan

10:30 Coffee Break

Second Block

11:00 Squeezed Dry: Implications of Drought and Water

Regulation in the Krishna Basin, India. Dr. Anju Gaur, IWMI,

India (Invited Speaker)

11:30 Water Between Climatic Changes and Agricultural Requirements

– Romanian Case. Dr. Cristian Kleps, Romanian Academy

of Agricultural and Forestry Sciences

11:45 Operation of Three Dams to Protect Khartoum City from

Flood. Prof. Hussein Adam, University of Gezira, Sudan

12:00 Lunch

Third Block – Overaching Issues

13:30 Evaluation of Reservoirs as a Flood Mitigation Measure in

River Nyando Basin, Western Kenya. Mr. Joseph Sang, Regional

Land Management Unit (RELMA) in ICRAF, Kenya

13:45 Sustainable Drainage Systems (SUDS) – Seizing Opportunity

in a Crisis. Mr. Tapiwa Gavaza, UK

14:00 A Community’s Combined Efforts to Sustainable Water Resource

Management. Ms. Marlene Stolt, ACTEW Corporation, Australia

14:30 Coffee Break

Fourth Block – Final Discussion

15:00 Discussion Introductory by Prof. Benedito Braga, ANA, Brazil

15:30 Final Discussion and Conclusions

41

Friday

25 August

Saturday

26 August

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


Wednesday 23 August

Seminars

The Middle East Seminar: Cooperation

Prospects in the Euphrates-Tigris Region

Convenors: Euphrates-Tigris Initiative for Cooperation/Kent State University (ETIC), Global Water Partnership

Mediterranean (GWP-MED), Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida),

Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) and UNESCO

Photo: Katarina Andrzejewska, SIWI

Much has been said and written about the Middle East

and North Africa (MENA) region, including scenarios

predicting water wars, violent conflicts and actual/perceived

water shortages and deficits.

The founders of the Euphrates-Tigris Initiative for Cooperation,

or ETIC, believe this potential creates prospects

for cooperation rather than conflict. The social/economic/political

setting can support combinations where

all can benefit as opposed to “zero-sum” water-sharing

arithmetic.

This seminar will help enhance dialogue and mutual

understanding, discuss common issues and possible cooperative

solutions, and identify programs and activities

of common interest.

Programme Wednesday 23 August, 09:00–17:30 Norra Latin, Room 253

Chair: Prof. Jan Lundqvist, SIWI

Co-chair: Ambassador Bo Kjellén, Sweden

09:00 Welcoming Statements by ETIC, Sida and SIWI

09:15 Presentation on ETIC

• Ms. Patsy Broadway, International Programs Center, University

of Oklahoma, USA

• Dr. Olcay Unver, ETIC/Kent State University, USA

09:35 Presentation of Workshop Findings by Workshop Participants

09:50 Panel on Water Resources Presentation by ETIC Co-founders

Review of Riparian Relations:

• Ms. Lina Sergie Atassi, Aleppo University, Syria

• Dr. Aysegul Kibaroglu, Middle East Technical University, Turkey

A Status Report on Lower Mesopotamian Marshlands:

• Prof. Dr. Mohammed al-Najim, Ministry of Higher Education, Iraq

• Prof. Dr. Mukdad Ali, Baghdad University, Iraq

10:10 Challenges in Water Resources Management by Riparian

Participants

11:10 Roundtable Discussion

Participants:

• Dr. Marwa Daoudy, Graduate Institute for International Studies,

Université de Genève, Switzerland

• Mr. Housein Makhlouf, President, Water Resources Executive Board,

Ministry of Irrigation, Syria tbc

• Mr. Baseel Refaat, Director General of Engineering Design,

Ministry of Water Resources, Iraq

• Mr. Mithat Rende, Deputy Director General for Water, Energy

and Environment, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Turkey

• Prof. Dr. Karim Khalaf El-Jumaily, Baghdad University of

Technology, Iraq

• Prof. Dr. Wael Mualla, President, Damascus University, Syria

• Dr. Aysegul Kibaroglu, Middle East Technical University, Turkey

• Prof. Dr. Mukdad Ali, University of Baghdad, Iraq

12:30 Lunch Break

13:30 Transboundary Issues and Cooperation in a Broader Framework.

Dr. Olcay Unver, ETIC/Kent State University, USA

13:50 Invited Presentations from Each Country

14:50 Panel on Cross-Cutting Issues: Environment, Agriculture,

Energy, Social and Gender Aspects, Role of Education, Role of

Civil Society

Roundtable Discussion Participants:

• Prof. Dr. Fouad Shoukri Kourdi, Vice President, Kalamoun

University, Syria

• Ms. Lina Sergie Atassi, Aleppo University, Syria

• Prof. Dr. Nabil Ades, Vice President, Aleppo University, Syria

• Prof. Dr. Mohammed al-Najim, Ministry of Higher Education, Iraq

• Mr. Sabah M. Marruki, Ministry of Environment, Iraq

• Ms. Songul Omer Chapok, Head, Iraqi Women’s Coalition

• Ms. Filiz Demirayak, World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF),

Turkey

• Prof. Dr. Hasan Zuhuri Sarikaya, Undersecretary, Ministry of

Environment and Forestry, Turkey

• Prof. Dr. Zuhal Karahan Kara, Director, Institute of Social Sciences,

Harran University

16:30 General Discussion and Wrap-up

17:30 End

42


Coping with Water Scarcity

Convenor: UN-Water

UN-Water is made up of the UN agencies, programmes

and funds that have a significant role in tackling global

water concerns. It also includes major non-UN partners

who cooperate with them in advancing progress towards

water-related Millennium Development Goals. Annually,

UN-Water hosts a seminar in Stockholm focusing

on specific strategic issues it has identified as priority for

joint action during the decade Water for Life.

This year’s event addresses water scarcity. The seminar

will introduce the Water Scarcity Thematic Initiative of

UN-Water and will illustrate the type of actions UN-Water

agencies carry out with their partners. It will be an

opportunity to discuss the strategic role of UN-Water in

assisting countries in their efforts towards the achieving

the Millennium Development Goals, investigate the possibilities

for enhancing its effectiveness and impact and

explore possibilities for effective partnership.

Photos: Michael

Moore, SIWI, SIWI, and

Michael Moore, SIWI

Wednesday

23 August

Thursday

24 August

Programme Wednesday 23 August, 09:00–12:00 Folkets Hus, Room 300

Moderator: Mr. Johan Kuylenstierna, Project Director, Stockholm

International Water Institute (SIWI), Sweden

Rapporteur: Mr. Manuel Dengo, UN-Water Secretary,

UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs

09:00 Opening Address. Ms. Annika Söder, State-Secretary for

International Development Cooperation, Ministry for Foreign

Affairs, Sweden

09:10 Introduction to UN-Water and its Programmes. Dr. Jamie

Bartram, Coordinator, Water, Sanitation and Health, World

Health Organization (WHO), and Chair of UN-Water

09:25 Keynote Presentation: Coping with Water Scarcity in China.

Li Huanhua, Deputy Director General, Department of Irrigation,

Drainage and Rural Water Supply, Ministry of Water

Resources, China

09:55 The UN-Water Thematic Initiative “Coping with Water

Scarcity”. Mr. Alexander Müller, Assistant Director General,

Sustainable Development Department, Food and Agricultural

Organisation (FAO) tbc

10:15 Policies and Institutions for Coping with Environmental Aspects

of Water Scarcity in Western Asia. Mr. Hosny Khordagui,

Leader, Water and Environment Teams, UN-Economic and

Social Commission for Western Asia

10:30 Providing Information and Knowledge for Decision Making in

Water-scarce Regions through Water Assessments.

Mr. Ashbindu Singh, Regional Coordinator, UNEP Division

of Early Warning & Assessment

10:45 Decision Support Tools for Confl ict Resolution. Dr. Andras

Szollosi-Nagy, Director, Division of Water Sciences, UNESCO

11:00 Panel Discussion: How to Enhance the Impact and Effectiveness

of the Water Scarcity Thematic Initiative at Local Level;

at Country Level; at the Level of International River Basins?

Panellists:

• Mr. Hector Garduno, Water Resources Planning and

Management Expert, Mexico

• Mr. Peter Lee, President, International Commission on

Irrigation and Drainage

• Dr. Adeel Zafar, Director Designate, UNU-International

Network on Water, Environment and Health

• Mr. Peregrine Swann, Senior Water Advisor, Department

for International Development, UK

• Prof. Torkil Jønch Clausen, DHI Water & Environment and

Senior Advisor, UNEP, Denmark

• Dr. Mohamed Ait Kadi, Secretary General, Ministry of

Agriculture, Morocco tbc

• A Representative from the Italian Directorate General for

Development Cooperation

11:35 Open Discussion: Questions and Comments from Participants

11:55 Summary Report from Discussion. Mr. Stefano Burchi, Senior

Water Law Officer FAO

12:00 Closure: Mr. Johan Kuylenstierna, SIWI

43

Friday

25 August

Saturday

26 August

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


Wednesday 23 August

Water and Resilience

Water Management and Policy

in an Age of Complexity

Convenors: Centre for Transdisciplinary Environmental

Research (CTM, Stockholm University), Stockholm Environment

Institute (SEI) and Swedish Water House (SWH)

Agricultural systems, water policy makers and water

dependent livelihoods across the world are facing fundamental

challenges. If climatic variability and extreme

events increase as a consequence of climate change, already

vulnerable livelihoods will be increasingly under

threat. In addition, stressed social-ecological freshwater

systems could suddenly shift from seemingly steady states

generating high social welfare, to less productive states

that are difficult or even impossible to reverse. What characterises

vulnerable social-ecological freshwater systems?

Which policy initiatives are likely to reduce resilience in

freshwater systems? And how do we harness complexity

and uncertainty, and build resilience to the challenges of

the future?

This seminar brings together researchers who are working

at the interface of vulnerability and resilience science

and policy, to discuss emerging challenges in the field of

water management.

Programme Wednesday 23 August , 09:00–12:00

Norra Latin, Room 351

Photo: SIWI

Chair: Dr. Johan Rockström, Executive Director, SEI

Presentations by:

• Climate Variability Impacts on the Already Stretched Murray-Darling

Basin Water System – Assessment and Policy

Implications. Dr. Albert van Dijk, CSIRO Land and Water,

Australia

Water, Agriculture and Resilience – Mapping Vulnerabilities

to Regime Shifts at the Global Scale. Dr. Line Gordon, CTM,

Stockholm University/SEI

Water Stress and Food Security – Adaptive Strategies in

Freshwater Management. Dr. Gina Ziervogel, SEI Oxford

Office/Climate Systems Analysis Group, UK

Water, Livelihoods and Vulnerability – What Strategies Build

Resilience? Dr. Fiona Miller, SEI

• Policy Comments. Dr. Henrik Österblom, The Swedish

Environmental Advisory Council

44


Future Wastewater Treatment

In Focus: Regions Around the Baltic Sea and Other Closed Seas

Convenors: Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) and VARIM

The seminar aims to predict all aspects of the future of modern

wastewater treatment. A highlight of the seminar will be the

latest information on the MARE-model on the Baltic Sea, a

concept that could be very useful for other closed seas like the

Black Sea, the Mediterranean Sea and others. The chairmen

and the speakers are well-known in the international arena.

The seminar is part of the technical seminar series

which was established during the 2005 World Water

Week and which examines technical water and wastewater

treatment solutions from the Baltic Region that may

be of broader interest internationally.

Wednesday

23 August

Thursday

24 August

Friday

25 August

Photos: SIWI, Stephanie Blenckner, SIWI and SIWI

Programme Wednesday 23 August, 09:00–12:00 Norra Latin, Room 353

Saturday

26 August

Chair: Dr. Petr Grau, AquaNova International, Czech Republic

Co-Chair: Prof. Bengt Hultman, Swedish Royal Institute of Technology

09:00 Introduction followed by Presentations

• The MARE-model and the Baltic Sea. Prof. Fredrik Wulff,

Stockholm University, Sweden

• Wastewater Treatment in the Future. Requirements and

Possibilities – Large-scale and Small-scale Solutions.

Prof. Mogens Henze, Technical University of Denmark

Technical and Economical Optimisation of Wastewater

Treatment Plants – Development Perspectives.

• Control and Automation. Prof. Gustaf Olsson and

Dr. Christian Rosén, Lund Technical University

• Economical Optimisation. Mr. Jens Prisum, Managing

Director, Wastewater Centre Avedöre, Inc., Denmark

Coffee Break

How Does the Swedish Water Industry Face Future

Challenges?

• The Consultant: Dr. Per Johansson, Managing Director,

SWECO, Sweden

• The Industry: Mr. Kjell Axelsson, Vice President, Läckeby

Purac Group, Sweden

• The Wastewater Treatment Plant: Dr. Lars Gunnarsson,

Managing Director, SYVAB, Sweden

How to Finance Future Investments?

• Mr. Harro Pitkänen, Vice President, Nordic Investment

Bank, Finland

Discussion about the Future

• Chairman, Speakers and Public

12:00 Close

45

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


Wednesday 23 August

Water and Wastewater in the Sustainable City

How Could the Swedish Concept Contribute to Sustainable Solutions

in Urban and Peri-urban Areas?

Convenors: Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) and VARIM

The Swedish concept of “the Sustainable City” is based on

holistic and integrated solutions which include all different

service systems and multidisciplinary functions in a

city. The concept was first introduced at the World Urban

Forum in Johannesburg in 2002 and has since successfully

been introduced around the world. The Stockholm

seminar will place particular focus on the role of water and

wastewater in the sustainable city.

The seminar is part of the technical seminar series which

was established during the 2005 World Water Week and

which examines technical water and wastewater treatment

solutions which may be of broader interest internationally.

Programme Wednesday 23 August, 13:30–17:00 Norra Latin, Room 353

Moderator: Prof. Hans Lundberg, Swedish Environmental Research

Institute, IVL

13:30 Introduction followed by Presentations

• The Sustainable City Concept. Prof. Hans Lundberg, IVL

• Conditions and Demands for Innovative and Sustainable

Measures in Cities in Developing Countries. Dr. Graham

Alabaster and Mr. Pireh Otieno, Lake Victoria Region Water

and Sanitation Initiative, UN-Habitat.

• Speaker from India to be confi rmed.

• Strategic Planning of Future Sustainable Wastewater Systems

in a Global Perspective – Interactions with Other Infrastructure

Systems. Prof. Per-Arne Malmqvist, Chalmers University

of Technology, Sweden, and Ms. Agneta Sander, City of

Göteborg, Department of Sustainable Water and Waste

Management, Sweden

Coffee Break

Water and Wastewater Management in Urban and Peri-urban Areas:

Experiences from Swedish Water Utilities and Swedish Industry.

• Introduction. Mr. Rutger Engsäll, Swedish Trade Council

• Sjöstadsverket in Stockholm. Dr. Berndt Björlenius,

Stockholm Water Company, Sweden

• The Eco San System, Experiences and Possibilities. Dr. Johan

Rockström, Stockholm Environment Institute, Sweden

• Design of Sustainable Treatment Plants in Developing

Countries. Examples from Bangladesh and Honduras.

Speakers from Sweco and Purac, members of VARIM

• Financing of Urban and Peri-urban Activities. Speakers

from Sida and The World Bank

Public and Panel Discussion on the Way Forward. How Can Swedish

Professionals Contribute in Urban and Peri-urban Areas in Developing

Countries and in Countries under Transition?

• Moderator, Speakers and Public

17:00 Close

The Swedish Water and Wastewater Association (VARIM) invites

participants to mingle and meet with representatives of Swedish

companies. Refreshments will be served.

Photo: SIWI

46


Flowing Upstream and Downstream:

Collaboration for Better Management

Convenors: Okavango River Basin Water Commission (OKACOM), The World Conservation Union

(IUCN), Okavango Delta Management Plan (ODMP) and Every River has its People Project (ERP)

The sharing of ideas, skills, information and experiences

leads not just to improved management of shared water

resources but can also be an effective mechanism for sharing

benefits. Each country has a comparative advantage

in resources, capacity, knowledge, information, etc. Likewise

governments have their own priorities and political

realities. Collaboration through and beyond River Basin

Organisations can help partner states grasp issues faced

by the other and develop mechanisms for sharing knowledge,

skills and information that can flow upstream or

downstream to meet demand and supply.

Such collaboration can take the form of joint projects,

learning exercises, communication strategies, information

and knowledge sharing to name a few. Could the

expertise of a downstream country flow upstream or vice

versa? Currently Okavango River Basin Water Commission

(OKACOM) is directing a project on information

sharing to capitalise on the comparative advantages of

the three countries: hydrological monitoring in Angola,

training in Botswana and data management in Namibia.

What other such initiatives could further understanding,

transfer benefi ts and promote better management?

The seminar will explore ideas and opportunities for

collaboration and help to develop a plan for the future.

Programme Wednesday 23 August, 13:30–17:00 Folkets Hus, Room 300

Chair: Mr. Armindo M. Gomes da Silva, OKACOM Commissioner

Rapporteur: Mr. Anton Earle, Director for the African Centre for

Water Research, South Africa

13:30 Session 1: Introduction to the Okavango River Basin Water

Commission and the Basin

• Welcome and Introduction of Seminar Participants.

Mr. Armindo M. Gomes da Silva, OKACOM Commissioner

• Opening Remarks. Hon. Jose Maria Botelho de Vasconcelos,

Hon. Minister of Energy and Water, Angola

• Opening Remarks. Hon. Charles Tibone, Hon. Minister of

Minerals, Energy and Water Resources, Botswana

• Opening Remarks. Hon. Dr. Nickey Iyambo, Hon. Minister of

Agriculture, Water and Forestry, Namibia

• Introduction to Seminar and Vote of Thanks. Mr. Gabaake

Gabaake, Commissioner, OKACOM, Botswana

14:00 Session 2: Presentations and Discussions on Collaborative

Initiatives on the Management of the Okavango River Basin

Facilitator: Ms. Tabeth Matiza-Chiuta, IUCN

14:00 Creating an Enabling Environment for the Management of the

Okavango River Basin. Mr. Piet Heyns, Commissioner, OKACOM

14:15 Developing an Environment Conducive to Basin-wide Collaboration

in the Okavango River Basin: A basin-wide Strategic

Action Plan. Mr. Isidro Pinheiro, Commissioner, OKACOM

14:30 Background on Political Will to Facilitate Collective Action

and Ownership: Collaboration at the Policy-making Level.

Presentation on the Okavango Delta Management Plan. Ms.

Portia Segomelo, ODMP Project Coordinator

14:45 Sharing Information, Data and Know-how to Promote Better Management:

Collaboration at Technical Levels. Presentation on the

OKACOM Initiative on Data Gathering, Management, Training

and Sharing. Mr. Gabaake Gabaake, Commissioner, OKACOM

15:00 Sharing the Experience, Collective Action: Community Level

Collaboration Presentation by the Every River has its People

Project and the Basin Wide Forum. Mr. Montshiwa Montshiwa,

ERP Project Manager

15:15 Questions and clarifications

15:40 Session 3: Discussions, Synthesis and Way Forward

Flowing Upstream and Downstream: a Strategy for Improved

Management through Collaboration, Exchange of Information,

Training, Resources, Capacity and Knowledge

Facilitator: Ms. Tabeth Matiza-Chiuta, IUCN

Panel members:

• Mr. Isidro Pinheiro, Commissioner, OKACOM, Angola

• Mr. Gabaake Gabaake, Commissioner, OKACOM, Botswana

• Amb. Ndeutapo Amagulu, Commissioner, OKACOM, Namibia

• Mr. Piet Heyns, Commissioner, OKACOM, Namibia

• Ms. Portia Segomelo, ODMP Project Coordinator

• Mr. John Scanlon, Commissioner, Murray-Darling River Basin

Commission, Australia

• Mr. Luis De Almeida, Secretariat-Southern African Development

Community

• Mr. Abou Bamba, Senior Advisor for Africa – Ramsar Convention)

– tbc

• Ms. Masego Madzwamuse, IUCN

Expected Outcomes

a. Tangible collaborative projects to support OKACOM in their

decision-making process

b. Lessons for future regional collaboration

c. The role of communication and coordination in promoting

basin-wide cooperation.

17:00 Close of Seminar and Vote of Thanks: Amb. Ndeutapo

Amagulu, OKACOM Commissioner

47

Wednesday

23 August

Thursday

24 August

Friday

25 August

Saturday

26 August

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


Wednesday 23 August

Partnership for Capacity

Development on Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH):

Building Commitment

for Action

Convenors: Cap-Net, Streams of Knowledge

and IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre

Photo: David Dahmen

One of the most important challenges of the Millennium

Development Goals (MDGs) is to ensure that the water

and sanitation service targets will be reached and result in

sustainable access, especially for the poor. It is widely acknowledged

that capacity development, especially at the

intermediate and local levels, will be key in this. However

it is also clear that more needs to be done to scale up and

maximise the impact of capacity building activities.

Questions we will address include:

• What capacities are needed to achieve the MDGs in

water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH)?

• Are we reaching the right people?

• Are we managing the knowledge base?

• How can we build cooperation for capacity building

action?

The objectives of the seminar are to build commitment

and cooperation to address capacity building needs for

the MDGs on water supply, sanitation and hygiene, and

to increase understanding of constraints, opportunities

and priorities for moving forward into action.

Programme Wednesday 23 August, 13:30–17:00

Norra Latin, Room 351

13:30 Introduction – Facilitated by Cap-Net

Presentations and Discussion:

• What Capacities are Needed to Achieve the MDGs in WASH?

Ms. Rory Villaluna, Streams of Knowledge, Philippines

• Reaching the Right People Through Innovative Approaches.

Ms. Erma Uijterwaal, IRC, The Netherlands

• Working in Partnership for Capacity Building Action.

Dr. Paul Taylor, Cap-Net, The Netherlands

• Decentralised Water and Sanitation Systems: Knowledge

Gaps and Capacity Building Needs to Meet the MDGs.

Dr. Bekithemba Gumbo, WaterNet, Zimbabwe

• Networking and Knowledge Management, Improving WASH

Capacity Building. Dr. Cheick Tandia, CREPA, Burkina Faso

14:45 Open Space Discussions

Discussion of Topics Around Capacity Development, Using

‘Open Space’* Methodology – Facilitated by IRC

• The topics introduced above will be used to gather experience

from participants and build commitment to cooperative

action. The session will be creative and allow participants to

contribute ideas, and raise additional areas for consideration

by the group.

16:30 Synthesis of Outputs and Plans for Follow Up.

• We will use a simplified Open Space methodology in which

participants that want to bring in a topic will be asked to do

a ‘poster session’, which the other participants can join on a

voluntary basis to contribute to the ideas.

17:00 End of Seminar

48


The Founders Seminar: Business on the Ground

When Solving Local Community Water Issues Becomes Part of Doing Business

Convenors: Stockholm Water Foundation and World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD),

presented in honour of the Stockholm Water Prize Laureate and the Stockholm Industry Water Award Winner

Industry knows about water: without it, businesses fail;

where it is, investment occurs. And when industry invests

– as many multinational corporations are doing increasingly

in developing countries – it looks to secure water for

its operations. Sometimes, securing a safe water supply

for facilities also means securing it for those living around

them. And sometimes securing a healthy operating environment

means securing the health of the surrounding

community through adequate sanitation. But industry

can also be a powerful competitor for available water resources

and a major source of pollution.

Confl icts and competition can thus arise: with agriculture,

the traditionally dominant water user in most

developing countries; with fast-growing cities thirsty for

water; and with activists who paint a broad picture that

industry is always to blame – fairly or not – for water-related

problems.

How can industry work with other stakeholders to

minimise potential social risks? What have different

companies done in practical terms to share or supply water

and to protect water resources? What are the limits

of corporate responsibility? What is the business case for

looking beyond the factory fence-line? Examples will be

presented at the Founders Seminar.

Programme Wednesday 23 August, 14:00–17:00

Norra Latin, Pelarsalen

14:00 Part 1 – Interviews

World of Water in the Future: Why Existing Predictions

Will All Be Hopelessly Wrong. Prof. Asit K. Biswas, 2006

Stockholm Water Prize Laureate

• Every Drop Counts Business Program. Mrs. Gabrielle Kibble,

AO, Chairman, Sydney Water Corporation, 2006 Stockholm

Industry Water Award Laureate Company

Mr. Nik Gowing, BBC World, will conduct a short interview

following each presentation

15:00 Coffee Break

15:30 Part 2 – Presentations and Panel Discussion:

High-level Representatives from the Business Sector

and International Organisations

Moderator: Mr. Nik Gowing, BBC World

Panellists

• Ms. Camille Dow Baker, Chief Executive Officer, Centre

for Affordable Water and Sanitation Technology, Canada

• Dr. Wolfgang Bloch, VP Corporate Environmental Affairs

and Technical Safety, Siemens AG

• Mr. Björn Brovik, Legal Interface, Site Env. Manager, Saab

Automobile AB, Sweden

• Mr. Henry J. Driesse, Senior Vice President ITT Corporation

and President, ITT Fluid Technology

• Mr. Jürg Gerber, Chief Operating Officer, World Business

Council for Sustainable Development

• Mr. Sipho Mosai, Director of Water Services, City of Cape

Town, South Africa

• Dr. Dan Vermeer, Director, Environment and Water

Resources Dept., The Coca-Cola Company, USA

• Dr. Peter R. White, Associate Director for Corporate

Sustainable Development, Procter & Gamble, USA

17:00 Close

Wednesday

23 August

Thursday

24 August

Friday

25 August

Saturday

26 August

Photos: SIWI

49

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


Wednesday 23 August

Side Events

Side Events on 23 August

Photo: SIWI

12:15–13:15 Folkets Hus, Room 307

Green-Blue Initiative:

Integrated Green-Blue Land and Water

Resource Management for Poverty

Alleviation and Ecosystem Sustainability

Convenors: Stockholm International Water Institute

(SIWI) and Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI)

The Green-Blue Initiative (GBI) is a joint programme of

a group of international core partners, sharing the interest

of developing the new green-blue paradigm: SIWI, SEI,

International Water Management Institute, International

Food Policy Research Institute, The World Conservation

Union and the Association for Strengthening Agricultural

Research in Eastern and Central Africa.

The goal is green water policy development and proper

linkages to land use management policies, by integrating

green and blue water governance in Integrated Water Resource

Management. Water is seen as a leverage in driving

livelihood improvements. This ambitious initiative

will find out what local level mechanisms will be needed

to benefit more from the green water potential to alleviate

poverty.

The programme involves efforts on all scales, from

the local to the global. Until now, water resource planners

have been operating within a partial reality, a reality

based on a rather narrow set of blue water data. Such a

reality is inadequate to address emerging investment options

available, livelihood and poverty alleviation, and

environmental sustainability.

The core focus of the GBI programme will be at the

local scale, assessing the role of green and blue water

flows in poverty reduction. A green and blue water paradigm

opens new opportunities for investments in water

management for livelihood improvements. Field activities

will be carried out in pilot river basins where strong

partnerships will be established with both river basin and

community based organisations. Studies will focus on

governance approaches integrating green and blue water

management.

12:15–13:15 Folkets Hus, Room 300

Transboundary Water Cooperation as

a Tool for Conflict Prevention and

Broader Benefit Sharing – Book Launch

Convenor: Expert Group on Development Issues (EGDI),

Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Sweden

The study commissioned by the secretariat of the Expert

Group on Development Issues and written by Dr. David

Phillips, Consultant, UK; Dr. Marwa Daoudy, Graduate

Institute for International Studies, Université de Genève,

Switzerland; Dr. Anthony Turton, University of Pretoria,

South Africa; Dr. Joakim Öjendal, Gothenburg University,

Sweden; and Prof. Stephen McCaffrey, University of

the Pacific in California, USA, will be launched at this

event. The study considers three case study basins and

outlines a number of policy lessons. One lesson, for example,

is that there is an urgent need for more and better coordinated

support of transboundary water management.

Also, co-operative “spill-over effects” from transboundary

water can be attained, particularly in circumstances

that are not highly “securitised”. And, finally, that donor

and international financing institutions should take note

of the need to support weaker states in transboundary

settings.

12:15–13:15 Folkets Hus, Congress Hall B

Water and Film”: From Mexico City

to Istanbul via Stockholm

Convenors: French Water Academy, International

Secretariat for Water and Comision Nacional del Agua

(CONAGUA, Mexico)

The French Water Academy, the International Secretariat

for Water, CONAGUA and their partners invite you

to know more about the results of the 1st International

Water and Film” Event which took place in Mexico City

during the 4th World Water Forum in March 2006.

50


Photo: WSSCC

We will present the film catalogue, as well as some

trailers of the spots and films awarded, and give an account

of the roundtable on “Water, Film and Cultural

Diversity” which was held in the Citizen’s House.

This side event, which will be chaired by a key figure

in Swedish Cinema, will also be an occasion to discuss

about the preparation of the 2nd International “Water

and Film” Event that will take place during the 5th World

Water Forum scheduled in March 2009 in Istanbul.

17:15–18:45 Folkets Hus, Room 307

The Second Edition of

“Sir Richard Jolly Lecture Series”

Convenor: Water Supply and Sanitation

Collaborative Council (WSSCC)

The WSSCC established the Sir Richard Jolly Lecture Series

in 2004, in honour of its former chair who is still fighting for

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene for ALL” as the Honorary

Lifetime Patron and Ambassador of the Council. The inaugural

lecture was held in April 2004 during the csd-12 by the

Honorable Minister Ronnie Kasrils of South Africa.

This year’s speaker is Ms. Hilde Frafjord Johnson, coconvener

of the WSSCC initiative “Women Leaders for

WASH”. Her commitment to highlight the challenges

and issues related to water supply, sanitation and hygiene

(WASH) facing millions of women and girls in developing

countries, is inspiring and her enthusiasm and leadership

compelling.

Ms. Johnson is presently the Special Adviser to the

President of African Development Bank and the former

Minister of International Development of Norway, a post

she held twice from 1997 to 2000 and from 2001 to 2005.

Ms. Johnson is Co-chair of the Global Coalition for

Africa and has been a key

facilitator in the Sudan peace

negotiations. Ms. Johnson

has also served on advisory

groups in the World

Bank, and in 2003, she was

awarded the “Commitment

to Development Award” by

the Center for Global Development

and Foreign Policy

in Washington, D.C.

17:15–18:45 Folkets Hus, Room 203

Bridging the Gap: Citizens Action for

Accountability in Water and Sanitation

Convenor: WaterAid

The Millennium Development Goal (MDG) targets

on water and sanitation look like they will be missed by

some distance. New momentum is needed so that commitments

are met and entitlements attained. Something

is missing: accountability to the people; poor people have

a right to ask not only where are these basic services but

also who is responsible. This is the Citizens’ Action initiative:

local people being supported to negotiate with service

providers and governments; to hold them to account.

The session will allow organisations with an interest in

meeting the MDGs in general, and in governance and accountability

mechanisms in particular, to join and learn

about this exciting groundbreaking initiative. The aim is to

form a loose but expanding network of organisations working

to bridge the accountability gap. The keynote speaker

at the event will be Mr. Abdul Nashiru Mohammed, Head

of Policy and Partnerships, WaterAid, Ghana.

17:15–18:45 Folkets Hus, Room 300

IWRM at the Grassroots:

Andhra Pradesh Farmer Managed

Groundwater Systems Project, India

Convenors: Andhra Pradesh Farmer Managed

Groundwater Systems Project, FAO New Delhi

and World Water Institute

The session will include a presentation of the Andhra

Pradesh Farmer Managed Groundwater Systems (AP-

FAMGS) project and release of “Global Perspective on

IWRM: A Resource Kit”. The APFAMGS project promotes

water management strategies based on demand

management through the involvement of community

based Groundwater User Groups in Participatory Hydrological

Monitoring. The project promotes artificial

groundwater recharge, crop management and efficient

agricultural practices. Additional groundwater recharge

potential has been created in seven overexploited aquifer

zones and more than 1500 farmers have adapted to appropriate

agriculture practices.

51

Wednesday

23 August

Thursday

24 August

Friday

25 August

Saturday

26 August

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


Wednesday 23 August

Side Events

17:15–18:15 Norra Latin, Room 351

Teaming Up to Build Capacity

Through Knowledge Exchange

Convenor: Global Water Partnership and Cap-Net

To support the change process towards a more sustainable,

equitable and effective management of water resources,

the Global Water Partnership and Cap-Net have joined

forces to produce a CD that contains a wealth of information,

tools and training materials on water resources

management accessible through a user-friendly menu. The

CD includes all the contents from the IWRM ToolBox

(www.gwptoolbox.org) and from the training materials

and E-Library from CapNet (www.cap-net.org).

Award Ceremony

Stockholm Industry Water Award

Award Ceremony

Wednesday 23 August, 12:30 (by invitation only)

The Stockholm Industry Water Award was established by

the Stockholm Water Foundation in cooperation with the

Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences and the

World Business Council for Sustainable Development to

stimulate business sector contributions to sustainable development.

The award recognises innovative corporate development

of water and wastewater process technologies, contributions

to environmental enhancement through improved

performance in production processes, new products and

other significant contributions by businesses and industries

to better the world water situation.

The Award Ceremony for the Stockholm Industry

Water Award will be followed by the Founders Luncheon

and the Founder Seminar (see also page 49). Previous

winners of the award have shown that business and the

environment can go hand in hand, and the Award Ceremony

will provide yet another opportunity to highlight

positive contributions by business and industry in building

sustainable water resources.

The Sydney Water Corporation of Sydney, Australia has

been awarded the 2006 Stockholm Industry Water Award

for its “Every Drop Counts (EDC) Business Program”. The

programme demonstrates how the utility is working in partnership

with business, industry and government to help ensure

the long-term sustainability of Sydney’s water supply.

Social Activity

World Water Week Dinner

Wednesday 23 August, 19:30–24:00

The Butterfly Pavilion in Haga Park

Photo: Stephanie Blenckner, SIWI

During an intense week of plenary sessions, seminars, side

events and workshops, nothing could be better than joining

your colleagues and friends from around the world for

a night in the park – Stockholm’s beautiful Haga Park, that

is – where the official World Water Week buffet dinner

takes place next to the Butterfly Pavilion. But don’t just expect

fabulous food, drinks and conversation. After dinner,

be prepared to dance the night away and have some fun.

Price: 600 sek

Roundtrip transportation provided from the Stockholm

City Conference Centre.

52


Thursday 24 August

Workshop 3

Economic Instruments

Convenor: Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI)

Co-convenors: Third World Centre for Water Management, International Water Resources Association (IWRA) and

the Water and Sanitation Programme-South Asia (WSP-SA)

Workshop Discussion Entry Points

Decisions about water supply and other water services have

to a large extent been guided by administrative principles

and procedures. The actual performance of these principles

and procedures has generally not been scrutinised.

Similarly, the way that water is used and wastewater is

treated, reused or disposed has similarly not been subject

to systematic enquiry. With mounting competition for

water between sectors and various development objectives

and with serious risks of water and environmental degradation,

the interest in the use of incentives and sanctions to

promote best practice and performance has increased. In

addition, the heavy financial investments that are required

in connection with the building and maintaining of water

structures make economic instruments important.

Combining administrative and economic instruments

Obviously, it is necessary to have legal and administrative

procedures in water management. But how can these

formal management procedures best be combined with

formal and market based economic instruments?

Economic instruments, social justice

and environmental sustainability

There has been a lingering fear that introduction of economic

instruments will put the poor at a disadvantaged

position. Similarly, the assumption that environmental

values are hard to quantify and tend to be overlooked in

water management has been a barrier to the introduction

and use of economic instruments. To what extent

can these kinds of assumptions be validated? If so, what

policy measures can be used to rectify any undesirable

bias in the outcome economic instruments?

Costs and effectiveness in a time perspective

Are economic instruments cost effective? That is, are expenses

and efforts for their introduction and continuous

functioning commensurable with the outcome? What is

the time perspective for an effective use of economic instruments?

Wednesday

August 23

Thursday

24 August

Friday

25 August

Programme Thursday 24 August, 09:00–15:00 Folkets Hus, Room 300

Chair: Mr. Aly Shady, IWRA

Co-Chair: Dr. Anna Jonsson, Linköping University, Sweden

Rapporteur: Dr. Olli Varis, Helsinki University of Technology

Commentator: Ms. Cathrine Revels, WSP

09:00 Introduction by Chair

09:10 The Potential Role of Economic Instruments for Enhanced

River Basin Management. Dr. Claudia Ringler, Research

Fellow, Environment and Production Technology Division,

International Food Policy Research Institute (Invited Speaker)

09:35 Assessing Benefits and Costs for Sustainable Water Management:

The Case of Spain, Dr. José Albiac, Researcher, Agricultural

Economics Department, Government of Aragon, Spain

(Invited Speaker)

10:00 Follow-up Questions

10:15 Rational Pricing of Water as an Instrument of Improving

Water Use Efficiency in the Agricultural Sector: A Case Study

in Gujarat, India. Dr. Katar Singh, India Natural Resource

Economics & Management Foundation

10:30 Coffee Break

11:00 Discussion

11:15 Meeting Human and Environmental Water Needs:

Groundwater Mitigation Banking in the Deschutes Basin,

Oregon, United States. Mr. Brett Golden, Deschutes River

Conservancy, USA

11:30 Strategies for Improving Performance of Water Resources

Schemes – An Experience of Maharashtra State – India.

Mr. Suresh Sodal, Mumbai Water Resources Department, India

11:45 Follow-up Questions

12:00 Lunch

13:30 Decoupling the Subsidy for Water Pumping: The Mexican

Case. Ms. Sara Avila, National Institute of Ecology, Mexico

13:45 Follow-up Questions

14:10 Commentator’s Response

14:25 Dialogue and Conclusions

53

Saturday

26 August

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


Thursday 24 August

Workshop 10

Extreme Events and Sustainable

Water and Sanitation Services

Convenor: Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI)

Co-convenors: International Water Association

(IWA), United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and Water

Environment Federation (WEF)

Workshop Discussion Entry Points

A number of spectacular extreme natural events during

recent years have illuminated the vulnerability of virtually

any society to the forces of nature. It is difficult and

expensive to develop disaster plans and the risk awareness

among large segments of the population may not be

at a level for a smooth and effective implementation of

post-disaster operations. Apart from medical assistance

and rescue operations, an early resumption of water and

sanitation services is, however, vital for the community.

Role of community organisations and individuals

To rehabilitate water and sanitation services, a number of activities

have to be organised and executed. What are the roles

and responsibilities of different stakeholders? For instance,

what activities can be taken care of by community organisations

and individuals in the rehabilitation of water supply

and sanitation services in areas hit by extreme events?

Photo: EC/ECHO South Asia Office

Relation between temporary and permanent facilities

A typology of actions and time frame are necessary. What

are the most important short-term measures that are required

and how are these short-term or temporary measures

related to more permanent facilities?

Links between disaster plans and “normal” plans?

What are the main features of a disaster plan? Who has

the responsibility to formulate such a plan? Should it be

part of the normal physical planning or what is the legal

and formal status of such a plan?

Programme Thursday 24 August, 09:00–15:00 Folkets Hus, Congress Hall B

Chair: Prof. Mohamed F. Dahab, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA

Co-Chair: Ms. Vanessa Tobin, UNICEF

Rapporteur: Ms. Lynn Orphan, Kennedy/Jenks Consultants, USA

Co-Rapporteur: Dr. Darren Saywell, IWA

Commentator: Mr. Paul Reiter, IWA

09:00 Introduction by Chair

09:10 Prof. Hans-Peter Nachtnebel, Institute for Water Management,

Hydrology and Hydraulic Engineering, Austria (Invited Speaker)

09:35 US Gulf States Assessment of Rehabilitation and Reconstruction

Costs for Hurricane-Affected Wastewater Systems. Dr. James

Clark, Black & Veatch Corporation, USA (Invited Speaker)

10:00 Follow-up Questions

10:10 Flood Risk Assessment and Management in Ukranian Part of

Tisza River Basin. Mr. Alexei Iarochevitch, Ukrainian Centre

for Environmental and Water Projects

10:20 Implementation of Multipurpose Strategies to Mitigate

Extreme Events and Sustainable Water and Sanitation

Services in Sri Lanka. Mr. Meegasmullage Sirisena, Ministry

of Irrigation and Water Management, Sri Lanka

10:30 Coffee Break

11:00 Emergency Sanitation Measures for Disaster Management.

Dr Bindeshwar Pathak, India

11:10 Disappearing Lands: Supporting Communities Affected by River

Erosion. Mr. Nazmul Islam Chowdhury, Practical Action-Bangladesh

11:20 Follow-up Questions

12:00 Lunch

13:30 Ensuring Access to Proper Sanitation during Extreme Events:

A Tsunami Perspective. Mr. Missaka Hettiarachchi, Chemical

and Process Engineering, Sri Lanka

13:40 Management of Impacts of Large-scale Accident at Municipal

Wastewater Treatment Plant. Dr. Volodymyr Kuznyetsov,

Ministry of Environment, Ukraine

13:50 Exploring a New Approach to Water Systems Rehabilitation

in War-affected Cities. Mr. Jean-Francois Pinera, Water

Engineering and Development Centre, UK

14:00 Follow-up Questions

14:30 Commentator’s Response

14:35 Dialogue and Conclusions

54


Seminars

Hydro-Hegemony

Convenors: King’s College London, London Water Research Group, Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI)

and the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida)

This seminar will provide analytical tools to enable

progress to be made by those responsible for projecting the

concerns of individual riparians. It will also help those who

have been immersed in the confusing world of trying to

interpret relations over shared waters in circumstances of

asymmetric power relations. Very inadequate theory has

been developed in the fields of international relations and

international law. There has been endless frustration for all

concerned with transboundary water relations.

The concepts of hydro-hegemony developed in the recent

past have rejuvenated an element of the social science

community concerned with transboundary relations.

These ideas are beginning to impact the wider discourse

on who gets what in transboundary settings. The seminar

will present the latest theorising on hydro-hegemony and

counter-hegemony. It will show that just as history is written

by the victor, so transboundary relations are directed

by the basin hegemon. The hegemonised have to achieve

a new basis for engagement which is much more related

to power than principle. The first part of the seminar will

deal with these determining contextual discursive issues.

The second part will use the analytical frameworks of

hegemony and counter-hegemony to reveal the nature of

transboundary relations in four river basins through the

contributions of key riparians.

Thursday

24 August

Photo: Mats Lannerstad

Friday

25 August

Programme Thursday 24 August, 09:00–15:30 Norra Latin, Room 253

Chairs: Dr. Anders Jägerskog, SIWI, and Prof. John Anthony Allan,

King’s College London, UK

09:00 Introductory Framework

• Introduction. Dr. Anders Jägerskog, SIWI, and

Prof. John Anthony Allan, King’s College London, UK

• Power, Hegemony and Water Conflict Analysis.

Dr. Mark Zeitoun, King’s College London, UK

• Multiple Layers of Hydro-Hegemony. Mr. Jeroen Warner,

Wageningen University, The Netherlands

• Counter Hydro-Hegemony in the Nile River Basin.

Ms. Ana Cascao, King’s College London, UK

• Hydro-Hegemony and International Water Law.

Mr. Melvin Woodhouse, UNESCO Centre for Water Law,

Dundee University, UK

• Question and Answer Period

10:45 Coffee Break

11:00 Panel Discussion: Hydro-Hegemony on the Jordan

Mediator: Dr. Mark Zeitoun, King’s College London, UK

Discussants and Panellists: Representatives from the

respective states (tbc)

13:00 Lunch

14:00 Panel Discussion: Hydro-Hegemony on the Ganges

Mediator: Dr. Anthony Turton, Council of Scientific and

Industrial Research, South Africa

Discussants:

• Dr. David Grey, The World Bank (tbc)

• Dr. Jerome Delli-Priscoli, US Army Corps of Engineers, Institute

for Water Resources, USA (tbc)

Panellists:

• Dr. Dipak Gyawali, Former Minister of Water, Nepal

• Dr. Daanish Mustafa, King’s College London, UK

• Mr. Narasimah Rao Chilukuri, National Level Monitor under

the Ministry of Rural Development of the Government of India

• Prof. Habibur Rahman, Bangladesh University of Environmental

Engineering, Bangladesh (tbc)

• Mr. Hafiz Uddin Ahmad, Hon. Minister for Water Resources of

Bangladesh

15:15 Closing Remarks

Dr. Anders Jägerskog, SIWI

Prof. John Anthony Allan, King’s College London, UK

15:30 End of Seminar

55

Saturday

26 August

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


Thursday 24 August

National IWRM Planning Processes

– Examples from the Ground

Convenors: Global Water Partnership (GWP) and Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI)

In a world where both governments and citizens are used

to working in sectoral and hierarchical systems, Integrated

Water Resources Management (IWRM) strategy and

plan preparation may come as something new since the

process encompasses broad stakeholder participation and

integration, both horizontally and vertically.

Since late 2003, several donors and countries have

turned to GWP asking for help to facilitate national

IWRM planning processes that are being undertaken to

meet the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development

(WSSD) target of preparing national IWRM and

Water Efficiency Plans by 2005.

GWP through its network of regional and country

water partnerships as well as other organisations (like

UNDP, etc) help governments with their IWRM planning

processes by supporting multi-stakeholder platforms

that bring together and build consensus among the different

ministries, sectors and other stakeholders in water.

Simply put, a national IWRM strategy or plan is a

roadmap of the changes needed for better water management.

The plan clearly defines achievable actions as well

as responsibilities and time frames for implementation.

Long before the first strategy or plan are completed and

approved, however, the questions of how to finance and

implement it are to be tackled.

This session will outline some of the experiences and

challenges being gained in countries and regions where

IWRM planning programmes are currently underway.

The objective is to present and share experiences regarding

the role of the GWP network and the approach being

used to facilitate the preparation of national IWRM

plans; discuss how to prepare for the implementation of

the IWRM strategy or plan; and discuss and review the

approach being followed in the presented cases.

The expected outputs of the session are improved understanding

of what facilitation and support to the government’s

IWRM planning process means in practice and

recommendations for the implementation and financing

of the IWRM plan.

Photo: SIWI

Programme Thursday 24 August, 09:00–12:00 Folkets Hus, Room 307

Chair: Mr. Alan Hall, GWP

09:00 Introduction. Ms. Margaret Catley-Carlson, Chair of the GWP

09:15 GWP and its Facilitation of the IWRM Planning Process:

• The Role of GWP in the IWRM Planning Process and

Key Lessons Learned So Far. Mr. Alex Simalabwi, GWP

Southern Africa

• How the Indonesia Country Water Partnership is Contributing

to Put IWRM into Practice. Mr. Ir. Raymond Kemur, Ministry

for Water, Indonesia

09:35 Panel Commentary and Plenary Discussion (Panel Composed

of 5 Experts)

10:30 Coffee Break

10:45 Preparations for the Implementation of the IWRM Plan

– Case Studies:

• How the IWRM has Added Value to the National Development

Plan and How the Government is Planning to Finance it.

Mr. Muhabi Lungu, Principal Planner Ministry of Finance and

National Planning, Zambia

• How the IWRM Planning Process is Strengthening Water

Resources Management at the National and River Basin Level.

Mr. Amirkhan Kenshimov, Project Director, Deputy Chair of

the Water Resources Committee of Kazakhstan

11:05 Panel Commentary and Plenary Discussion

(Panel Composed of 5 Experts)

11:55 Wrap-up and Closing of the Session by the Chair

12:00 Close

56


The Stockholm Water Prize Laureates Seminar:

Challenges and Opportunities

within the Water Sector

Convenor: Stockholm Water Foundation

Photo: SIWI

The 2006 World Water Week in Stockholm has the

unique honour of hosting the first-ever Stockholm Water

Prize Laureates Seminar. The Stockholm Water Prize has

been awarded annually since 1991 by the Stockholm Water

Foundation and honours outstanding efforts on behalf of

the world’s water environment and all that depends upon

it. This year, eight Laureates will provide their unique

perspectives on the “Challenges and Opportunities within

the Water Sector”. Collectively, the Laureates have

shown that human ingenuity, technical innovation, scientific

curiosity and sincere engagement can indeed make

a difference. By helping to protect, conserve and make

available our precious water resources, the Laureates have

helped ensure that the lives of people are improved and

that critical aquatic and terrestrial resources remain for

future generations.

Thursday

24 August

Photos: Private

W. Mitsch S.E. Jørgensen S. Narain P. Wilderer J. Imberger K. Asmal

Programme Thursday 24 August 24, 09:00–13:00 Norra Latin, Pelarsalen

Moderator: Mr. Henrik Ekman, Scientific Journalist

09:00 Introduction. Mr. Ulf Ehlin, Scientific Director, SIWI

• Trans-disciplinary Approach to Water Supply and Sanitation.

Prof. Peter A. Wilderer, Technical University of Munich,

Germany, and 2003 Stockholm Water Prize Laureate

• Active Wastewater Construction – Turning the Point of View.

Prof. Mogens Henze, Technical University of Denmark, the 1992

Stockholm Water Prize Laureate

• Reinventing the Water and Waste Paradigm for the South.

Ms. Sunita Narain, Centre for Science and Environment, New

Delhi, India, the 2005 Stockholm Water Prize Laureate

• Accountability – Citizens Demanding their Right to Water and

Sanitation. Ms. Barbara Frost, Chief Executive, WaterAid, the

1995 Stockholm Water Prize Laureate

• The World Commission on Dams Report: A Lost Cause?

Prof. Kader Asmal, M.P., Parliament of the Republic of South

Africa, and 2000 Stockholm Water Prize Laureate

B. Frost

M. Henze

10:45 Coffee

• The Applications of Ecological Principles in Water Management.

Prof. Sven Erik Jørgensen, Danish University of Pharmaceutical

Sciences, and 2004 Stockholm Water Prize Laureate

• Ecological and Social Complexity in Restoring Water Resources

Coastal Louisiana and the Mississippi River Basin in USA, and

the Mesopotamian Marshlands of Iraq. Prof. William Mitsch,

The Ohio State University, USA, and 2004 Stockholm Water

Prize Laureate

• The Constancy of Change: Disengaging from Reality.

Prof. Jörg Imberger, University of Western Australia, and 1996

Stockholm Water Prize Laureate

12:00 Questions and Discussion

13:00 End

57

Friday

25 August

Saturday

26 August

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


Thursday 24 August

Managing Freshwater Ecosystems to Reach the MDGs

Convenors: Swedish Society for Nature Conservation (SSNC) and World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) Sweden

According to research by The World Conservation Union

(IUCN), goods and services derived from inland waters

(such as food and drinking water), water filtration and

flood control have an estimated global value of several trillion

US dollars. The importance of freshwater ecosystems

cannot be underestimated, particularly for the poor, whose

very livelihoods often depend on the services they provide.

Yet, a fear exists that meeting the Millennium Development

Goals (MDGs) on water, food and sanitation for the

poor might mean a massive surge in developing large-scale

water infrastructure as a means to provide these services.

Recent reviews of such infrastructure have highlighted their

technical, economic, environmental and social failures.

Freshwater ecosystems have the greatest biodiversity

per unit area of habitat of any biome on Earth. At the

same time The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment has

identified inland waters as suffering from the greatest loss

of biodiversity due to large water infrastructure projects

and other impacts. This seminar aims to present and discuss

different views on how freshwater ecosystems can be

managed in order to continue to sustain local livelihoods

and how a widespread implementation of affordable, decentralised

and environmentally sustainable, small-scale

infrastructure for delivering water and energy services is a

prerequisite to achieving the MDGs.

Programme Thursday 24 August, 08:30–12:15

Norra Latin, Music Room 456

Chair: Mr. Michael Löfroth, WWF Sweden

Rapporteur: Mr.Göran Ek, SSNC

08:30 Opening. Prof. Malin Falkenmark, Stockholm International

Water Institute (SIWI)

08:45 The Extent of River Fragmentation in the World and its

Effects on Freshwater Ecosystems. Prof. Christer Nilsson,

Umeå University, Sweden

09:15 The Importance of Freshwater Ecosystems for the Livelihoods

of Local Communities – A Case Study from the Mekong

Region. Ms. Pianporn Deetes, South East Asia Rivers Network,

Thailand

10:00 How Does Ecosystem Conservation Contribute to Poverty

Reduction on the Ground and How Can This be Integrated

in PRPS? Dr. Christopher E. Williams, Global Freshwater

Programme, WWF

10:30 Making Infrastructure Work for the Poor. Ms. Ann Kathrin

Schneider, International Rivers Network

11:00 Moving Towards Hunger Alleviation In a World With

Closing Rivers – Time for Ecohydrological Realism.

Prof. Malin Falkenmark, SIWI

11:45 Plenary Discussion

12:15 End

Photo: Jan Lundqvist, SIWI

58


Photos: Michael Moore, SIWI and Jan Lundqvist, SIWI

Promoting IWRM Beyond Borders:

Transboundary Waters and Human Development

Convenors: UNDP Human Development Report Office and Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI)

Thursday

24 August

Much progress has been made to promote Integrated Water

Resources Management (IWRM) at the national level.

However, a large and growing proportion of the world’s

population lives in transboundary water basins. Countries

will face both increasing competition for shared waters as

well as suffer the negative externalities of basin mismanagement.

Despite instances of inter-state cooperation, the

institutional framework to manage growing competition

in a manner that is consistent with human development

is missing. River basins are ecosystems and the most appropriate

level of water management is at the basin level.

This seminar will probe how IWRM can be extended

beyond borders. It will propose and discuss how institutional

mandates can be extended and deepened and the

changes needed in institutional design. It will also investigate

the extent to which basin-level management can

be a source of regional human development. The issues

discussed in this seminar form an integral part of the upcoming

UNDP Human Development Report.

Programme Thursday 24 August, 13:30–15:00

Folkets Hus, Room 307

Chair: Dr. Anders Jägerskog, SIWI

13:30 Welcome. Mr. Anders Berntell, SIWI

13:35 Address. Ms. Carin Jämtin, Minister for International

Development Cooperation, Deputy Minister for Foreign

Affairs, Sweden

13:45 Introduction and Overview of HDR 2006.

Mr. Kevin Watkins, Director, Human Development

Report Office, UNDP

14:00 Projecting IWRM Beyond Borders. Mr. Arunabha Ghosh,

Co-author, Human Development Report 2006

14:15 Substantive Comment: Challenges of Harnessing

Hydrological Interdependence for Human Development.

Prof. Malin Falkenmark, SIWI

14:30 Substantive Comment: Challenges of Building Effective

River Basin Institutions. Dr. David Phillips, Consultant,

France

14:45 General Discussion: Focus on Specific Cases; Agenda

for Policy Change

15:05 Conclusions: Mr. Kevin Watkins, UNDP and

Mr. Anders Berntell, SIWI

15:15 Close

59

Friday

25 August

Saturday

26 August

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


Thursday 24 August

Side Events

Side Events on 24 August

12:15–13:15 Folkets Hus, Room 307

What can CSD 2008

do for the Water Agenda?

Convenors: Stakeholder Forum for a Sustainable Future

and the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI)

chair: Amb. Viveka Bohn, Sweden

The first cycle of the UN Commission for Sustainable

Development (CSD) was completed in 2006 and dealt

with water and sanitation. There was some concern that

this CSD “water cycle” did not fulfil expectations that

had been raised in Johannesburg or at CSD 2005. One of

the outcomes was that CSD would again look at progress

at CSD 2008. This side event will start to try and map

out what that might look like. Side event speakers include

Ms. Margaret Catley-Carlson, Chair, Global Water

Partnership; Mr. Felix Dodds, Executive Director, Stakeholder

Forum for a Sustainable Future; and Mr. Johan

Kuylenstierna, Project Director, SIWI.

12:15–13:15 Norra Latin, Music Room 456

Wetlands, Water, Sanitation

and Livelihoods

Convenor: Wetlands International, WASTE Advisers on

Urban Environment and Development, IRC International

Water and Sanitation Centre

Previous international meetings have noted the interdependent

relationship between ecosystems, health, human

well-being and economic growth. However there has been

relatively little implementation of this principle and many

still view water for people and water for the environment

as two separate and often conflicting aims. The workshop

will focus on the development of an initiative where water

and sanitation experts and sector representatives can

learn about and develop an integrated approach addressing

relationships between wetlands, water, sanitation and

livelihoods. The side event will present and discuss the

effect on wetlands where this is not taken into account.

12:15–13:15 Folkets Hus, Room 203

Water for Food, Water for Life:

Influencing What Happens Next

Presenting Results of the Comprehensive Assessment of

Water Management in Agriculture

Convenor: The Comprehensive Assessment of Water

Management in Agriculture (CA)

How can we produce enough food for 2 to 3 billion more

people, and meet the Millennium Development Goals

(MDGs) on poverty, hunger and environment? How

much more water will we need? Where will it come from?

What type of water management? How well did we manage

water for food so far? This side event will explore

these questions through the presentation of the results of

the Comprehensive Assessment of Water Management in

Agriculture.

12:15–13:15 Folkets Hus, Room 300

Baltic 21 Lighthouse Projects – Advancing

Sustainable Development in Action

Convenor: Baltic 21

Baltic 21 will present information about its innovative

water-related Lighthouse Projects, which each play an important

role in realising a common vision of a Baltic Sea

Eco-region. Lighthouse Projects (LHP) are designed to

demonstrate sustainable development in practice and to

produce region-wide results. The LHP concept encompasses

the objectives of ensuring high project visibility,

the participation of as many stakeholders from as many

countries and sectors as possible, and the broader application

of existing and new solutions. Baltic 21 is a regional

multi-stakeholder process for sustainable development.

For more information please visit the Baltic 21 LHP

webpage http://www.baltic21.org/?lhp.

60


Award Ceremony

Stockholm Water Prize

Award Ceremony

Thursday 24 August, 16:30

Stockholm City Hall

The Stockholm Water Prize is presented annually to an individual,

institution or organisation for outstanding waterrelated

activities. The activities can be within the fields of

education and awareness raising, human and international

relations, research, water management or water-related aid

and development activities in developing countries.

The Stockholm Water Prize was first presented in 1991

and includes a usd 150,000 award and an Orrefors crystal

sculpture. The Stockholm Water Prize Laureate is announced

each March in connection with the UN World

Water Day and honoured each August at a Royal Prize

Ceremony and Banquet in the Stockholm City Hall during

the World Water Week in Stockholm. Founders of

the Stockholm Water Prize are Swedish and international

companies in cooperation with the City of Stockholm.

Stockholm Water Prize Laureates have over the years

represented many water-related activities, professions and

scientific disciplines and have come from around the

world. Any activity or actor which contributes broadly

to the conservation and protection of the world’s water

resources, and to improved water conditions which contribute

to the health and welfare of the planet’s inhabitants

and our ecosystems, is eligible to be nominated for

the Stockholm Water Prize.

An international nominating committee appointed

by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences reviews the

nominations and proposes the candidate.

H.M. King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden is the Patron of

the Stockholm Water Prize. This year, the prize will be

presented by H.R.H. Crown Princess Victoria of Sweden.

Professor Asit K. Biswas, a tireless water proponent who

constantly challenges the “status quo“ and who helped

foster a critical re-think among United Nations agencies,

national governments, professional associations and others

about how to improve delivery of water and sanitation services

and management of our water resources, is the 2006

Stockholm Water Prize Laureate. Professor Biswas will also

have the honour of addressing the Opening Plenary Session,

the Stockholm Junior Water Prize Ceremony and the

Founders Seminar.

Photo: SIWI

Thursday

24 August

Friday

August 25

Aquatic Adventure

Thursday 24 August, 17:30–21:00

The Aquaria Water Museum in Stockholm invites World

Water Week participants to its unique environment. Experience

the day-night simulation of a real tropical rainforest

ecosystem, explore a magnificent coral reef with

sharks, mangroves and see the unique salmon hatchery

where fish come directly from the Baltic Sea into the museum

for spawning. A light meal is served and the beautiful

surroundings at the shoreline guarantee an interesting

and relaxing evening.

Social Activity

Price: 350 sek (light meal included)

Roundtrip transportation provided from the Stockholm

City Conference Centre.

61

Photo: David Mårding

Saturday

August 26

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


Friday 25 August

World Water Week Closing Plenary Day

Congress Hall

Plenary Session

Chair: Prof. Peter Rogers, Harvard University, USA

09:00 Singapore’s Experience in Integrated

Water Resources Management

Mr. Khoo Teng Chye, Chief Executive, Public Utilities

Board, Singapore

09:20 Sharing Benefits and Responsibilities

– The Role of Science in Water Management in Africa.

Dr. Akissa Bahri, International Water Management

Institute (IWMI), Director for Africa, IWMI Regional

Office, Ghana

09:40 Prof. Saif-ud-Din Soz, Union Minister of

Water Resources, India

10:00 Coffee Break

Closing Session

Chair: Mr. Anders Berntell, Executive Director, Stockholm

International Water Institute (SIWI)

10:30 The Swedish Baltic Sea Water Award Presentation

Ms. Cecilia Björner, Director General, Ministry for

Foreign Affairs, Sweden

10:45 Best Poster Award

Mr. Claus Hagebro, Scientific Programme Committee Member

11:00 Personal Reflections from the Week

Prof. Malin Falkenmark, Stockholm International Water

Institute (SIWI)

11:10 World Water Week Synthesis Panel

12:45 Closing Address

Mr. Anders Berntell, Executive Director, Stockholm

International Water Institute (SIWI)

12:55 The 2006 World Water Week in Pictures

13:00 End of Closing Session

Photos: SIWI

62


Seminars

Photo: Jan Lundqvist, SIWI

Challenges in Governance of Water

Convenors: Global Water Partnership (GWP) – Eastern Africa and GWP – Western Africa

Poor governance causes short and long-term problems regarding

issues intimately connected to water, from health

and food security, to economic development, land use and

the preservation of the natural ecosystems on which the

water resources depend. In East Africa, it has been linked

to drought, where there has been huge felling of forests

for charcoal production and fuel wood. Also, countries in

West Africa are affected by ineffective water governance:

inadequate water regimes, water pollution and problems

linked to fishing, erosion, flooding, clearance and fire because

of over exploitation.

The European Community has given GWP funds to

implement the Programme for Water Governance in East

and West Africa (PfWG). The programme aims to address

some of the inconsistencies that exist in the planning

and management of water resources in seven East

and West African countries. Improved water governance

will be promoted through enhancing the participation of

all stakeholders by facilitating the development of an enabling

environment that promotes interaction and discussions

across all levels of stakeholders. These include poli-

ticians, decision makers, policy makers, managers, water

users, civil society, researchers and financiers.

The purpose of the session is to build on the PfWG

programme and to discuss findings and case studies aiming

at the expansion of the dialogue on water governance.

The objective is to present and discuss the approach being

used by GWP to: assess the water governance situation

at the regional and country level; present case studies on

the current lessons learnt for improved water governance;

discuss the main findings and challenges in water governance

in East and West Africa, building on the lessons

learned of theProgramme for Effective Water Governance”;

and identify a road map for programmes to improve

water governance in the two regions.

The expected outputs of the session are an improved

understanding of the main water governance challenges in

East and West Africa, and recommendations for a way forward

and an agreement on the approach towards designing

programmes for improving water management in East and

West Africa.

Thursday

24 August

Friday

25 August

Saturday

26 August

Programme Friday 25 August, 13:45–17:00 Folkets Hus, Room 300

13:45 Introduction by Chair. Mr. Johan Holmberg, SIWI and

Mr. Alan Hall, GWP

13:50 Introduction of Panel of Experts

• Mr. Andre Liebert, European Union Water Initiative (EUWI)

• Dr. Barbara van Koppen, International Water Management

Institute (IWMI)

• Executive Director, Mr. Audace Ndayizeye MBE tbc

• Ms. Audrey Nepveu, International Fund for Agricultural

Development (IFAD)

14:00 Background to the Methodology and Processes for PfWG

Programme. Mr. Simon Thuo, GWP Eastern Africa and

Mr. Dam Mogbante, GWP Western Africa

14:20 Keynote Presentation: Democratisation Process and Impacts

on Sustainable Water Management. Ms. Rasha Omar, IFAD

14:40 Coffee Break

15:00 Case Study Presentations from the PfWG Programme:

• Arbitration in Water Conflicts as an Alternative to Litigation.

Ms. Elizabeth Nkini, Ministry of Water & Livestock

Development, Tanzania

• Local Governance to Secure Access to Land and Water in

Lower Gash Watershed, Sudan. Hon. Louis Opange, MP,

Natural Resources Committee, Uganda

• Building Coalitions to Protect Natural Resources.

Mr. Hadley Becha, Wetlands Forum, EAWLS, Kenya

• Summary of Lessons and Future Actions. Mr. Jason Oyugi,

GWP Eastern Africa

15:45 Commentary by Panel and Discussions from Floor

16:45 Closing Remarks by Chair

63

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


Friday 25 August

The IWRM 2005 Target

– Indicators of Implementation

Convenors: UNEP Collaborating Centre on Water and Environment (UCC-Water)

in cooperation with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Danida, Denmark

A survey in 2005 of 95 countries undertaken by the Global

Water Partnership showed that Integrated Water

Resources Management (IWRM) plans are in place or

under preparation in many countries. While the IWRM

planning process is important, it is the actual implementation

of the plans that counts: new policies and laws, reforming

the institutions at the central and decentralised

level, building the human capacities and taking action at

the local level. In 2008 all countries will be requested by

the United Nations to report their progress towards the

IWRM 2005 Target to CSD.

The seminar will present how countries have monitored

the actual implementation of IWRM, how regional institutions

and donors have supported or plan to support this

process and discuss how future monitoring systems and

indicators of IWRM implementation could support the

implementation of IWRM.

Programme Friday 25 August, 13:30–17:00 Folkets Hus, Room 307

Chair: Prof. Torkil Jønch-Clausen, Senior Adviser, UNEP

13:30 Presentation of the Global Progress Towards IWRM 2005

Target and the Challenges in Monitoring the Progress and

Reporting to CSD. Mr. Niels Ipsen, UCC-Water, Denmark

13:45 Indicators of IWRM Implementation

• In Central Asia, with Focus on the Development and Implementation

of IWRM Policies and Laws. Dr. Vadim Sokolov,

GWP Caucasus and Central Asia (CACENA), Uzbekistan

• In West Africa, with Focus on the Progress in the Institutional

Reform Processes and Development of Human Capacities.

Mr. Rui Silva, The Economic Community of West African

States (ECOWAS)

• In Central America with Focus on the Integration of IWRM

Principles and Environmental Aspects in the Water Sector Policies

and Plans. tbc, Central America

14:30 Development of Indicators of IWRM Implementation – Short

Introductory Presentations Followed by Panel Discussion

• Monitoring of Implementation of IWRM – Examples on

How Donors Support the Development of National IWRM

Monitoring Systems. Mr. Jan Møller Hansen, Danida

• Indicators for IWRM in the World Water Development

Report. Mr. Carlos Fernandez-Jauregui, World Water

Assessment Programme

• Monitoring of IWRM Implementation, FAO Experiences

and Plans. FAO (tbc)

• Targeting, Monitoring and Reporting Activities in the Water

Sector. Dr. Daniel Zimmer, World Water Council (WWC)

• Monitoring the Implementation of IWRM – Experiences

and Challenges and the Use of Indicators.

Mr. Palle Lindgaard-Jørgensen, UCC-Water, Denmark

15:45 Panel Discussion: Indicators of IWRM Implementation

– The Way Forward

16:30 Closure of Seminar

Photo: SIWI

64


Award Ceremony

Swedish Baltic

Sea Water Award

Friday 25 August, 10:30

Congess Hall

The Swedish Baltic Sea Water Award is a regional award

for water stewardship and recognises direct and practical

efforts which contribute to improved water quality in

the Baltic Sea. Given by Sweden’s Ministry for Foreign

Affairs, the award is seen as an appreciation for what individuals,

corporations, non-governmental organisations

and municipalities have done to help improve the Baltic

Sea’s water environment.

The Swedish Baltic Sea Water Award was established

in 1999 and is presented during the World Water Week

in Stockholm each August. The award winner receives a

sek 100,000 prize sum, crystal sculpture, diploma and

travel and accommodation to participate in the activities

during the World Water Week.

A jury appointed by the Swedish Government reviews

the nominations and selects the winner, which can come

from any of the Baltic Sea countries.

For setting the bar for individual philanthropy so high

in pursuit of his dream of an improved Baltic Sea water

environment, Swedish financier Björn Carlson will receive

the 2006 Swedish Baltic Sea Water Award.

The 2006 award is in honour of Mr. Carlson’s 2005

personal donation of sek 500 million (usd 62.6 million)

for interdisciplinary projects and creative initiatives that

support direct and practical efforts which contribute to

improved water quality in the Baltic Sea. The funds are

administered by the newly founded Björn Carlson Foundation

for the Baltic Sea.

Ms. Cecilia Björner, Director-General, Ministry for

Foreign Affairs, Sweden, will present the award.

World Water Week

Best Poster Award Friday 25 August, 10:45 Congess Hall

Posters presented during the World Water Week in

Stockholm have always been an important component

of the overall World Water Week programme. Special

efforts are made to make them accessible to participants

and incorporated into the deliberations taking place

during the week.

The posters will be displayed during the poster sessions

arranged on Tuesday and Wednesday where the author(s)

Photo: Stephanie Blenckner, SIWI

will be given an opportunity to highlight the key points

of the poster, respond to queries and otherwise interact

with other participants. Poster abstracts are published in

the abstract volume.

The winner receives a diploma as well as complimentary

registration plus travel and accommodation for one

person for the 2007 World Water Week.

65

Friday

25 August

Saturday

26 August

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


Saturday 26 August

Hard or Soft Landing in Closing Basins?

Coping with Quantity and Quality Challenges

Co-convenor: The Comprehensive Assessment of Water Management in Agriculture (CA), the CGIAR Challenge

Program on Water and Food (CPWF) and Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI)

As societies develop, water resources in a basin are increasingly

used, polluted and controlled. As water is diverted

and consumed for agricultural, domestic and industrial

purposes, streamflow is increasingly depleted, reducing

downstream usefulness and the ability to meet environmental

flow requirements. Basins are said to be closed

when depletion exceeds the amount required for environmental

needs. Over-appropriation of river flow is already

widespread. Groundwater depletion and pollution threaten

the water resource base; sediment flushing and salin-

ity intrusion threaten further the health of the freshwater

and coastal ecosystems. Society adapts through planned

and unplanned reallocation of the water resource, further

complicating upstream-downstream relations. A question

is whether the resource base will fail causing undue

hardship in a closed basin, or whether and how society

can adapt for a soft landing.

The 2006 SIWI Seminar will address emerging development

challenges, paying particular attention to efforts to

achieve the Millennium Development Goals.

Photos: Mats Lannerstad

Programme Saturday 26 August, 09:00–17:00 Folkets Hus, Room 307

09:00 Welcome

09:15 Introduction by Keynote Speaker: Hard or Soft Landing in

Closing Basins. Dr. David Molden, International Water

Management Association (IWMI)

09:45 Session 1: Development of Closed Basins – Why do Basins

Close, and What are Symptoms of Closure?

Jordan Basin: The Process of Basin Closure.

Dr. Jean-Phillipe Venot, IWMI

10:05 Olifants Basin: The Process of Basin Closure. Washy Nyabeze,

Makgaleng Projects, South Africa

10:30 Coffee

11:00 Large-scale Groundwater Withdrawal and Basin Closure: Case

Study on Upper Musi Basin, India. Venkateswara Rao, India

11:20 Moving Upstream: Dynamics in Bhavani Basin, India:

Planned and Spontaneous Intensification in Water Use. Prof.

Jan Lundqvist, SIWI, and Mr. Mats Lannerstad, Linköping

University, Sweden

11:40 Future Biomass Energy Supply: The Consumptive Water Use

Perspective. Dr. Göran Berndes, Chalmers University, Sweden

12:00 Lunch

13:30 Session 2: Social and Ecological Impacts of Closure

– Adaptation Processes to Come to a Soft Landing

Basin Closure and Environmental Flow Requirements.

Dr. Vladimir Smakhtin, IWMI

13:50 Basin Closure and Surface Water Allocations in the

Lerma-Chapala Basin, Mexico. Mr. Flip Wester, Wageningen

University, The Netherlands

14:10 Meeting the River Depletion in the Yellow River. Dr. Hong

Yang, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology

14:30 Coffee

15:00 Large-scale Conjunctive Surface, Groundwater and

Hydropower Development in India: The Swadeshi Ganga

Water Machine. Prof. Mahesh C. Chaturvedi, Indian National

Academy of Engineering

15:20 Why Enough is Not Enough: The Societal Determinants of

River Basin Closing. Dr. Francois Molle, IWMI

15:40 Session 3: General Discussion

16:50 Conclusions

17:00 End of Session

66


Social Activity

Technical Tours

Hammarby Sjöstad

– The Eco-cycle City Area

Saturday 26 August, 09:00–13:00

This new residential area represents the most advanced

eco-cycle oriented city planning project in Stockholm.

High environmental goals have been set for energy, water,

sewage and solid waste management. Building material

and processes have been selected in order not to harm

the environment. New high-tech solutions are being used

to generate energy, handle solid waste and save water.

Stormwater is taken care of and treated so that it will be a

clean, attractive contribution to the area. The spectacular

glasshouse is the advanced information and communication

centre for inhabitants, building companies, etc.

Price: 350 sek (lunch included)

Photo: Erik Freudenthal

Water and Regional Spatial Planning in

the City of Stockholm

Photo: SIWI

Sätra Gård

– Recycling Thinking and Methods

Saturday 26 August, 09:00–13:00

In a beautiful natural environment near to Stockholm is

Sätra Gård. Here, very near to the Högbytorps waste treatment

facility, Ragn-Sells operates a unique conference facility

that offers the latest in modern, holistic recycling thinking

and methods. Sätra Gård is a complete experience which is

based on three cornerstones: education, development and

experience. World Water Week participants are welcome to

see how residual products and waste are handled and refined

in a problem-free manner and used as secondary raw material,

fuel and soil conditioner. Don’t miss the opportunity to

see recycling principles in action through waste minimisation,

source separation, reuse and recycling (including energy

recovery) and safe disposal of untreatable wastes. All

of this is on display at Sätra Gård.

Price: 350 sek (lunch included)

Saturday 26 August, 09:00–13:00

The Office of Regional Planning and Urban Transportation

(RTK) is responsible for regional spatial planning

in the Stockholm County and will present how water issues

are represented in the Regional Development Plan

for the Stockholm region. A look at the demands placed

by the EU Water Framework Directive will also be a part

of the discussion. RTK also deals with issues concerning

the environment, nature conservation, rural areas and the

Stockholm archipelago, including monitoring and initiation

of structural issues for Stockholm County and the

region around Lake Mälaren. RTK also cooperates internationally

within the area of regional development.

Price: 350 sek (lunch included)

67

Photo: Erik Sunna

Saturday

26 August

Special Sessions Poster Sessions General

Information


Special Sessions

Photos: SIWI, Frida Lanshammar, SIWI,

and Mats Lannerstad

Celebrating 10 Years of

the Global Water Partnership

Convenor: Global Water Partnership (GWP)

18-20 August: Consulting Partners Meeting

20 August: 10th Anniversary Celebration 18:00–19:30

Norra Latin, Aulan

Conceived in 1995 and launched in 1996, the Global Water

Partnership (GWP) will be celebrating its 10th anniversary

on August 20, 2006.

The idea of the GWP grew out of the United Nations

Conference on Environment and Development

(UNCED) held in Rio de Janeiro in June 1992 – where

water was recognised as a scarce resource, an integral

part of the ecosystem and a social and economic good.

The conference highlighted the fragmentation of responsibilities

for water resources development among sectoral

agencies and called for effective implementation and

coordination mechanisms to promote Integrated Water

Resources Management based on public participation

– including that of women, youth, indigenous people and

local communities – in water management policy- and

decision-making.

Created in response to this call, the GWP advocated an

approach to better water resources management that brings

more integration among the water user sectors, more value

ascribed to the resource, more financially sustainable systems,

more attention to management processes including

better laws and consultation with those involved in water

resources development, management and use. To get this

process going, the GWP established a worldwide network

of believers by bringing water experts from several countries

together at the regional level. Now, ten years on, broad

multi-stakeholder water partnerships have been established

in fourteen regions and in over fifty countries.

The resulting efforts of these partnerships, together with

many others, have indeed succeeded in contributing towards

raising water higher on political agendas around the

world. And ultimately, in a bold, ambitious leap of faith by

those participating in the 2002 World Summit for Sustainable

Development, a call for national IWRM and Water

Efficiency Plans to be developed by 2005 was made.

Though this target was practically impossible to fully

reach within the given three year period, it has created a

momentum and good progress is being made everywhere:

the second informal survey undertaken by GWP at the end

of 2005 on the status of IWRM planning suggests that over

three quarters of the countries surveyed have either completed

or have a process in place to prepare their national

plans. The challenge today is how to keep this momentum

going and ensuring continuous efforts are made towards

achieving the Millennium Development Goals.

The GWP itself has been directly involved in these efforts,

helping governments by facilitating their planning

processes in fourteen countries, mostly in Africa. Though

an advocacy and awareness organisation, the GWP had a

moral duty to respond to these requests for practical support.

With sustainability in mind, the GWP has focused

on the local ownership and experience needed.

In the Consulting Partners meeting that will be held

on August 18 and 20 – prior to the Anniversary – the

GWP will be looking ahead and, based on the lessons

learned and the momentum that the 2005 target has

raised, identify what GWP can do and what is required

to keep this process going – a process that in many cases

has just started and in need of more support.

The Anniversary celebration will reflect on GWP’s contributions,

big or small, and those who made it possible.

Our patrons, donors, ministers and friends world wide will

celebrate with us and we look forward to seeing you there.

68


The Comprehensive Assessment of Water Management in Agriculture,

and the CGIAR Challenge Program on Water and Food

From Assessment to Research and Actions

Developing and managing water resources to help end

poverty and hunger, feed an additional 2 billion people,

while reversing trends of ecosystem degradation presents

the most significant water challenge of our time. Despite

great gains in food production, the use of water for food

security and poverty reduction remains unfinished business

for millions of rural poor. The dilemma posed by

this challenge is that more people will require more water

for agriculture, yet the way in which people use water

in agriculture is the most important driver of ecosystem

degradation. Taking up this challenge will lead us toward

attaining the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)

on poverty, hunger and environment.

Sharply diverging views exist on the water-food-ecosystem

choices. Some place emphasis on developing more

water through large infrastructure to relieve scarcity, to

fuel economic growth, and as a way to relieve pressure

on the environment. At the other end of the spectrum is

a call for a halt to agricultural and hydraulic infrastructure

expansion, and promotion of practices that restore

ecosystems to their original balance. The divergence of

positions is exacerbated by differences in language and

approach used to describe the situation. There is growing

interest for common ground. The Comprehensive Assessment

of Water Management in Agriculture (the CA) was

formed to bring these diverse views together.

Over the past five years, the CA has critically evaluated

the benefits, costs and impacts of 50 years of water development,

the water management challenges communities

are facing today, and solutions people have developed. The

results of these findings will be presented and discussed

during the 2006 World Water Week in Stockholm. The

overarching picture of the water-food-livelihoods-environment

nexus offered by the CA enables the CGIAR

Challenge Program on Water and Food (CPWF) to put

results into action by investing in research that leads to

better management and investment decisions in water

and agriculture and aims to address both human and environmental

water needs.

Special Session

Photo: Mats Lannerstad

Poster Sessions

69

General

Information


Special Sessions

Multi-scale Water Governance

Convenors: The Comprehensive Assessment of Water Management in Agriculture (CA) and

the CGIAR Challenge Program on Water and Food (CPWF)

As water moves through the landscape, it presents opportunities

and/or imposes sustainable development

challenges at different scales – local, catchment, sub-basin,

basin, national and regional. A suite of governance

mechanisms applied at different scales are required to

address conflicts associated with the development, allocation,

use and management of water resources by diverse

stakeholders with different perceptions, interests,

values and influence.

The objective of this seminar is to explore opportunities

for ensuring that institutional mechanisms applied at

different scales are coherent, supportive and lead to improving

water governance. The seminar presentations will

(a) highlight governance challenges and opportunities at

different scales, (b) illustrate how governance at one scale

affects governance at the next scale, and (c) share success

stories in multi-scale water governance. After the presentations,

the participants will discuss the way forward with

reference to (a) dissemination and application of available

knowledge and (b) knowledge gaps and priorities.

Programme Tuesday 22 August, 09:00–12:00

Folkets Hus, Room 203

Co-chairs: Dr. Claudia Ringler, International Food Policy

Research Institute (IFPRI), USA; Dr. Francis Gichuki, IWMI

Sri Lanka; and Dr. Veliyil Vasu Sugunan, WorldFish Center

(ICLARM), Egypt

09:00 Opening Remarks

09:05 Indigenous Voices in Transboundary Water Management,

Limpopo River Basin, South Africa. Dr. Jaqui Goldin, African

Water Issues Research Unit, University of Pretoria, South Africa

09:25 Governance and Poverty, Insights from the SCALES Project

in the Andes. Dr. Nancy Johnson, Leader, Water and People in

Catchments Research Theme, CGIAR Challenge Program on

Water and Food; International Center for Tropical Agriculture

(CIAT), Colombia

09:45 Governance and Poverty, Insights from the SCALES

Project in the Nyando Sub-basin of Nile Basin. Dr. Brent

Swallow, Principal Economist and Theme Leader, World

Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF)

10:05 Discussion

10:20 Coffee Break

10:50 Governance Issues Viewed Through a Fishing Net:

Including Fisherfolk in the Debate. Dr. Christophe Béné,

Portfolio Director, West and Central Africa, WorldFish

Center, Egypt

11:10 The Need for Adaptive and Multi-scale Governance in

Times of Increasing Uncertainties. Prof. Claudia Pahl-Wostl,

University of Osnabrück, Germany

11:30 Discussion

11:45 Concluding Remarks

12:00 End of Seminar

Photo: Mats Lannerstad

70


Photo: Mats Lannerstad

Practical Implementation of IWRM in Africa

Convenors: The CGIAR Challenge Programme on Water and Food (CPWF) and the European Union Water Initiative

The concept of Integrated Water Resources Management

(IWRM) has polarised researchers and development

practitioners alike into those who advocate strongly the

idea and practice and those who are critical of its “blueprint”

like application to diverse settings. This seminar

aims to share IWRM experiences in Africa and explore

its impact on access to safe water, sustainable sanitation

and food security in the region.

The overall objective of the workshop is to address barriers

for the promotion of a knowledge-based approach to

adaptive IWRM.

Specific objectives are to:

• Review the progress made towards practical implementation

of IWRM

• Identify how CPWF research can contribute to the

generation and application of the required knowledge.

• Identify how EUWI research efforts can generate momentum

for capacity building and research-practice

interfaces needed for the implementation of adaptive

IWRM.

• Identify specific joint initiatives that EUWI and

CPWF could undertake together (including other

strategic partnerships) to better integrate IWRM implementation.

The expected result of the seminar is the initiation of the

production of guidelines for adapting IWRM research to

real life planning and implementation scenarios.

Programme Tuesday 22 August, 13.30–17.30 Folkets Hus, Lilla Teatern

13:30 Introduction and Welcome

13:45 Session 1: Understanding Current State of Progress in

Implementing IWRM Approaches, Constraints and

Opportunities: A Practitioner’s Perspective

Chair: Dr. Chris Dickens, Institute of Natural Resources,

South Africa

• Hurdles and Progress Made in Implementing IWRM in Eastern

Africa. Mr. Simon Thuo, Global Water Partnership-East Africa

• Implementing IWRM in Ghana: Challenges and Progress. Dr.

Charles Biney, Water Resources Commission, Ghana

14:15 Session 2: Exploring the Contributions of CPWF in Promoting

IWRM Approaches in Africa

Chair: Dr. Alain Vidal, CPWF Management Team and EUWI

Research Working Group

• IWRM, Water Productivity and Poverty Reduction: Understanding

Linkages and Potential Interventions for Catalyzing

Change. Dr. Francis Gichuki, IWMI Sri Lanka

• African Models of Transboundary Governance. Dr. Amy Sullivan,

IWMI, South Africa

• Small Multi-Purpose Reservoir Ensemble Planning. Dr. Mark

Andreini, IWMI, Ghana

15:00 Coffee Break

15:15 Session 3: Exploring the Contributions of EUWI in

Promoting IWRM Approaches in Africa

Chair: Mr. Zissimos Vergos, European Commission, Directorate

General for Research and EUWI Research Working Group

• The Case of Orange River Basin in Southern Africa (NEWater

Project). Dr. Chris Dickens, Institute of Natural Resources,

South Africa

• The Case of Nile River Basin (NEWater project). tbc

• The Case of Oueme River Basin, Benin (Rivertwin project).

Prof. Karl Stahr, University of Hohenheim, Germany

16:00 Group Discussions

• The participants will work in three groups to deliberate on the

recommendations and the way forward for practical implementation

of IWRM at the three scales: (a) system level with

emphasis on agricultural water; (b) river basin level; and (c) national/regional/continental

levels. They will also highlight how

the knowledge being generated by CPWF and EUWI should

be transformed into practical recommendations and applied.

• A relevant guidance text shall be prepared in collaboration

between CPWF and EUWI appointed resource persons.

17:00 Synthesis from Groups and Workshop Conclusions

17:30 Close

71

Special Sessions

Poster Sessions

General

Information


Special Sessions

Turning Assessment Findings into Action:

Results of The Comprehensive Assessment On

Water Management In Agriculture (CA)

Convenors: The Comprehensive Assessment on Water Management in Agriculture (CA) and

the CGIAR Challenge Program on Water and Food (CPWF)

Photo: SIWI

Key findings of the CA will be presented and illustrated

by action oriented research of the Challenge Program on

Water and Food (CPWF) and projects by others. The

programme will feature ample discussion on the results

and debate around contentious issues that emerge. The

day will feature presentations and dialogues on effective

water management actions in agriculture to end poverty

and enhance equity; the relative role of rainfed and irrigated

agriculture; the amount and type of investments in

water management; and decentralisation and the role of

the state. The seminar, co-sponsored by the CA and the

CPWF, brings new thinking for research and action.

Programme Thursday 24 August, 09:00–15:30 Folkets Hus, Congress Hall C

Chairs: Ms. Eiman Karar, Director, Water Resource Management,

Water Research Commission, South Africa, and Dr. Peter

Bridgewater, Secretary General of RAMSAR Secretariat

Rapporteurs: Ms. Domitille Vallee and Dr. Lisa Schipper,

CA Secretariat

Note: Presentations will be short to allow for many opportunities for active

interaction with the audience. Most of the field projects presented

are supported by the Challenge Program on Water for Food.

09:00 Taking the Comprehensive Assessment on Water Management

in Agriculture from Research to Action

Welcome. Ms. Eiman Karar, Water Research Commission,

South Africa

Keynote Speech: Water for Food, Water for Life, What an

Assessment Enables Us to Say. Dr. David Molden, Coordinator

of the CA, Sri Lanka

Discussion: ‘Futures for Agricultural Water Management’

Panel Discussion: From Assessment to Action: The How’s.

• Dr. Jonathan Woolley, CPWF

• Dr. Akissa Bahri, IWMI, Ghana

• Dr. Theib Oweis, International Center for Agricultural Research

in the Dry Areas, Syria

• Dr. Suhas Wani, International Crops Research Institute for the

Semi-Arid Tropics, India

10:00 Message 1: Investment Choices in Water Management for

Agriculture: A Continuum of Options

Introduction by Chair. Ms. Eiman Karar, Water Research

Commission, South Africa

• From Blue to Green Water: A Continuum of Options Today

and in the Future. Mr. Jean Marc Faures, Food and Agricultural

Organization

• The Significance and Challenges of Informal Irrigation Sector

with Low-quality Water. Examples from Urban and Peri-urban

West Africa. Dr. Pay Dreschel, IWMI, Ghana

Discussion: Rethinking our Investment Choices

10:30 Coffee Break

10:45 Message 2: Promising Pathways for Poverty Reduction

• Unlock the Potential of Rainfed Farming Targeting

Smallholders. Dr. Johan Rockström, Executive Director,

Stockholm Environment Institute, Sweden

• Promising Pathways for Poverty Reduction, Integrating Social

Justice, Equity, Health and Investing in Multiple Use Systems.

Dr. Barbara van Koppen, Lead CPWF-MUS Project

• Focus on One of the Poorest Groups, the Herders: From Assessment

to Action Example from Research in the Nile. Dr. Don

Peden, International Livestock Research Institute, Ethiopia

• Healthy Ecosystems and Farming Systems to Support Fisheries

and Livelihoods. Dr. Veliyil Vasu Sugunan, WorldFish Center

(ICLARM), Egypt

Questions and Discussions

12:00 Lunch Break

13:30 Message 3: Agriculture can Support Healthy Ecosystems

and Livelihoods

• Introduction of the Two Next Sessions. Dr. Peter Bridgewater,

RAMSAR

• Multifunctionality of Agro-ecosystems. Dr. Line Gordon,

Stockholm University, Sweden

• Managing Irrigated Rice as a Human Made Wetland and

Promoting Synergies with Aquaculture. Dr. Bas Bouman, I

nternational Rice Research Institute, Philippines

• Conserving Water, Managing the Land: Benefits for Smallholders

and the Environment. Dr. Deborah Bossio, IWMI, Sri Lanka

• Brainstorming on “Approaches in Agriculture to Support

Ecosystem Services”

14:30 Message 4: Stimulating a Shift in Thinking and Change

in Water Management in Agriculture

• Looking at River Basins Differently to Stimulate Change.

Dr. Francois Molle, IRD/IWMI, France

• Social Learning to Stimulate Shift in Thinking and Adaptation

in Societies, Example from Latin America. Dr. Nancy Johnson,

International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Colombia

• Training Women in Water and Soil and its Impacts on

Management, Example from Uganda. Ms. Josephine Kizza,

Saint Jude Family Project, Uganda

• Conclusions and Brainstorming on Next Steps: Strategies for Outreach,

Capacity Building and Awareness Raising as Critical Pathways

15:30 Close

72


Drought, Risk and Management for

Agricultural Water Use

Convenors: The Comprehensive Assessment of Water Management in

Agriculture (CA) and the CGIAR Challenge Program on Water and Food (CPWF)

Drought risk is a major impediment to development of

rural livelihoods. The mere expectation of drought prevents

farmers from investing in ways that would otherwise

improve livelihoods, such as diversifying into high

value crops, increasing fertiliser use or improving local

infrastructure. Farmers adopt a range of strategies to cope

with risk, including avoidance, management or risk-sharing.

The impact of these strategies on long-term development

is examined, together with options for intervention

through financial and policy instruments.

Programme Friday 25 August, 13:30–17:00 Folkets Hus, Room 203

Chairs:Dr. Alok Sikka, CPWF-IGB Unit, Patna, India and Dr. Claudia

Ringler, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), USA

13:30 Risk and Uncertainty Analysis in Water Allocation and

Agricultural Water Management. Dr. Rajendra Singh and Dr.

Narendra S. Raghuwanshi, Indian Institute of Technology,

Kharagpur

13:50 Dynamic Decision Making for Sustainable Water Resources

Management Under Risk and Uncertainty: Concept and a

Case Study. Prof. Bruce Lankford, School of Development

Studies, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK

14:10 Coping with Risk and Uncertainty Under Extreme Weather

Conditions. (tbc)

14:30 Discussion

14:45 Coffee Break

15:15 Water Scarcity, Water Quality – Risks for Food Consumption:

A Discussion. Ms. Puja Jawahar and Dr. Claudia Ringler,

IFPRI, USA

15:35 Decision Support Systems to Enable Better Management of Water

Use in Agriculture Under Uncertainty. Dr. Alok Sikka and Dr. Adlul

Islam, CPWF-IGB Unit, Patna, India, Dr. Balaji Rajagopalan, University

of Colorado, Boulder, USA, and Dr. A. Haris, Patna, India

15:55 Financial Instruments to Cope with Drought Risk in Agriculture.

Dr. Simon Cook, CGIAR Challenge Program on Water

and Food, Sri Lanka

16:15 Discussion

16:30 General Discussion and Conclusions

17:00 End

Special Sessions

Photo: SIWI

Poster Sessions

73

General

Information


Special Sessions

EU Water Initiative Partners Meeting

Convenor: European Commission

Supported by the Swedish Water House

The EU Water Initiative was launched at the 2002 World

Summit on Sustainable Development as a contribution

to achievement of the Millennium Development Goals

for drinking water and sanitation, within the context of

an integrated approach to water resources management.

It is intended as a catalyst and a foundation for action.

A multi-stakeholder process mobilising partners from

governments, IFIs and donors, civil society organisations,

water users and the water industry, both in Europe and

in partner countries, facilitates progress and coordinates

the efforts of all actors involved. The meeting consists of

three sessions.

Infrastructure and Water

and Sanitation Services for the Poor

This session will be focused around the EU Strategy for

Africa and the EU-Africa Partnership on Infrastructure.

The Partnership, a joint EU effort, responds to the

development goals of the African Union and its New Partnership

for Africa’s Development (NEPAD). It aims to

substantially increase EU investment in African infrastructure

and to support programmes that facilitate interconnectivity

at a continental and regional level. It will

encompass transboundary, regional and national infrastructure

in the widest sense: transport networks, water

and energy infrastructure and connections as well as telecommunication

networks. In water, activities will be focused

on regional water issues – cooperation on the use

of the resources of shared rivers, respecting the needs of

all stakeholders, developing rivers and water infrastructure

to reduce vulnerability to droughts, better manage

floods, to ensure more water, more food and more electricity,

and to do so in a way that respects the needs of the

river system itself. This means building a strong foundation

for cooperative action and for future investment

projects to follow the decision making framework of the

World Commission on Dams Report of 2000.

Photos: EC-ECHO-François

Goemans, and EU

Audiovisual Library

Programme Tuesday 22 August, 09:30–12:30

Folkets Hus, Lilla Teatern

Chair: Dr. Henry Ntale, Chair of African Ministers’ Council on

Water Technical Advisory Committee

Rapporteur: tbc

09:30 Introduction by Chair

09:35 The EU-Africa Infrastructure Partnership. Presentation

by European Commission

10:55 Priorities of AU-NEPAD-AMCOW. Presentation by

AMCOW/NEPAD

10:15 Finance Better Reaching the Poor Through More Innovation.

The European Investment Bank New Approach.

Mr. José Frade, European Investment Bank

10:35 Stakeholder Involvement in Planning and Development of

Water Infrastructure. Dr. Edward Kairu, Chair of Africa Civil

Society Network on Water and Sanitation (ANEW) (tbc)

11:00 Discussion: How can the EUWI Help to Build a Strong

Foundation for Cooperative Action and for Future

Investment Projects in the Water Sector?

12:15 Conclusions and Wrap-up

74


Moving the EUWI Forward

– Monitoring, Alignment

and Harmonisation

There have been calls for a strengthening of the activities

and accountability of the EU Water Initiative, including

the setting of tough measurable targets for its impact and

for the publishing of regular six-month progress reports.

This session will review the development of a monitoring

system for the EUWI, how this needs to be linked to the

achievement of objectives on aid effectiveness and how

reporting may be enhanced.

Photo: SIWI

Programme Wednesday 23 August, 14:00-17:30

Folkets Hus, Lilla Teatern

Chair: Representative of the Italian Foreign Ministry (TBC)

Rapporteur: Mr. Johan Holmberg, Stockholm International

Water Institute (SIWI)

14:00 Introduction by Chair

14:10 Development of a Monitoring Methodology for the EUWI.

Presentation by Italy, Chair of the EUWI Monitoring

Working Group

14:40 NGO Contributions to Monitoring the EUWI. Presentation

by Tear Fund/WaterAid

15:10 Linking the EUWI to the Paris Declaration and Regional

Monitoring Initiatives. Dr. Andrew Cotton, Water,

Engineering and Development Centre (WEDC), UK

15:40 Discussion

17:00 Conclusions and Wrap-up

EU Water Initiative

Multi-stakeholder Forum

The 2006 Multi-stakeholder Forum will provide a review

of progress made by the EUWI during 2005/6, followed

by discussion on the main issues and problems and endorsement

of plans for 2007. As in previous years, the

Forum will be held in the context of the World Water

Week to further mobilise EUWI partners, to attract new

ones and to develop synergies with other international

processes.

Programme Thursday 24 August, 09:30–12:30

Folkets Hus, Lilla Teatern

Chair: European Commission

Discussion Facilitator: Mr. Paul van Koppen, IRC International

Water and Sanitation Centre

09:30 Welcome and Introduction by Chair

09:35 Keynote Address

09:50 Review of EUWI Activities 2005/6

Presentation by EUWI Secretariat

10:20 Discussion

10:50 The Way Forward

Review of EUWI. Presentation by Representative from UK of

the Inception Report of a Study Looking at the Strategy and

Governance of the EUWI

Presentations by the Leads of the Regional Components of the EUWI

on their Forward Strategy and Work Plan:

• Eastern Europe, Caucasus and Central Asia (EECCA)

Component (Commission ENV)

• Mediterranean (MED) Component (Greece)

• Latin America (Spain)

• Africa (Germany/AMCOW)

11:45 Discussion

12:30 Conclusions and Wrap-up

75

Special Sessions

Poster Sessions

General

Information


Poster Sessions

Poster Sessions

Photo: SIWI

Tuesday 22 August

Wednesday 23 August

17:00–18:45 Folkets Hus, Glas Hall A + B

Posters presented during the World Water Week have

always been an important component of the overall programme.

Special efforts are made to make them accessible

to participants and incorporated into the deliberations

taking place during the World Water Week.

Posters follow the same themes as the individual workshops,

and this year they will be displayed all week in

highly visible areas of the World Water Week venue. In

addition, two time slots have been set aside when the authors

will be available at their posters in order to provide

short introductions and comments. The first opportunity

will be on Tuesday, August 22, at 17:00 and the second

opportunity will be on Wednesday, August 23, also at

17:00. The poster sessions take place when there are no

workshops and seminars, and refreshments will be served

in connection with the presentations. In preparation for

the poster presentations, the chairs of the different workshops

will provide an overview of the posters in their respective

workshop sessions.

Best Poster Award

The Best Poster Award will be presented during the closing

plenary session on August 25.

Workshop 1:

Tools for Benefit Sharing

in Transboundary Settings

• European Funds as a Tool for Strengthening Transnational

Cooperation in the Field of Water Management

in the Scheldt River Basin District. Ms.

Veronique Van Den Langenbergh and Mr. Michiel Van

Peteghem, Flemish Environment Agency, Belgium

• Cooperation for Development: Emerging Frameworks

for Sharing Benefits in The Euphrates-Tigris

River Basin. Dr. Aysegul Kibaroglu, Middle East

Technical University, Turkey

• Politics, Economics, Stakeholder Benefits, and Transboundary

Ground Water: Lessons from North America.

Dr. Michael Campana, Oregon State University, USA

• Laying the Basis for a Future Transboundary Management

of the Volta Basin in West Africa – the Case

of the Volta Water Governance Project. Mr. Kwame

Odame-Ababio, IUCN-BRAO, Burkina Faso

• Planning in Transboundary Water Basins as a Tool

for Sustainable Water Management. Ms. Natalia

Alexeeva, Center for Transboundary Cooperation

– St. Petersburg, Russian Federation

• Towards Hydropolitical Cooperation in the Nile Basin:

Win-Win Projects between Sudan and Ethiopia

to Transform Conflicts. Mr. Mohammed Abbas, Ministry

of Irrigation and Water Resources, Sudan

• The Disputed Silala River Basin: A Catalyst for Cooperation?

Mr. Joshua Newton, UPTW, USA

• Reducing the Transboundary Degradation of Kura-

Aras River Basin in South Caucasus. Dr. Lazlo Iritz,

Sweco International, Sweden

76


• Africa’s Lakes: An Atlas of Our Changing Environment.

UNEP’s representative

Workshop 3:

Economic Instruments

WaterAid – The Empty Glass Campaign. Ms. Sally

Warren, WaterAid, UK

• FEASIBLE – A Tool to Improve Environmental Financing.

Dr. Peter Maksimenko, COWI, Russian

Federation

• Cost-benefit Analysis: Economic Instrument for Establishing

Benefits and Responsibilities in Water Management-based

on Examples from Argentina. Ms. Maria

Onestini, Centro de Estudios Ambientales (CEDEA),

Argentina

• Event-driven Indexed Drought Insurance Instruments

for Poor Farmers. Dr. Simon Cook, CIAT, Colombia

• Poverty Reduction Through Attitudinal Change. Mr.

Reynolds Shula, Agric. Support Programme, Zambia

Workshop 4:

Benefits and Responsibilities of Decentralised

and Centralised Approaches for

Management of Water and Wastewater

• Challenges to Water Allocation Reform. Ms. Noxolo

Ncapayi, Department of Water Affairs and Forrestry,

South Africa

• The Cathedral and the Bazaar: An Examination of

Centralised and Distributed Models of River Basin

Management. Dr. Bruce Lankford, University of East

Anglia, UK

• Harnessing the Potential of Water for Improved Livelihoods

in a Rural Household in Pretoria, South Africa.

Ms. Stellamaris Sendagi, Makerere University, Uganda

• Planning and Implementation of Ecological Sanitation

Projects. Dr. Christine Werner, Deutsche Gesellschaft

für Technische Zusammenarbeit GmbH, Germany

• About Horizontal and Vertical Integration for Water

Governance in Central Asia. Dr. Vadim Sokolov, Scientific-Information

Center ICWC, Uzbekistan

Workshop 5:

Decision Support Systems and IWRM

• Improving Software for Decision Support Systems of

Dnieper River. Mrs. Nataliia Rozhenko, Frantsevich Institute

for Problems of Materials Science of NASU, Ukraine

• Development of a Portfolio of Computational and

Participatory Tools for Lower Mekong Basin. Dr. Juha

Sarkkula, Finnish Environment Institute

Water Supply: A Gift from God or Does it Come

with a Cost? Ms. Clarence Mazambani, Desert Research

Foundation of Namibia

• Industrial Enterprises and Public Participation in the

IWRM Bulgaria. Ms. Milkana Mochurova, Bulgarian

Academy of Sciences

• Mapping of Local Water Supply Coverage – A Case

Study from the Lake Kiyanja Watershed, Masindi

District, Uganda. Mr. Andrew Quin, KTH, Sweden

• RIVERTWIN – Development of a Regional Model

for Integrated Management of Water Resources. Prof.

Dr. Karl Stahr, University of Hohenheim, Germany

• Decision Support Systems, IWRM and INMAS, Towards

a Full Integration of All Stakeholders in to the

IWRM in Sri Lanka. Mr. Meegasmullage Sirisena, Ministry

of Irrigation and Water Managment, Sri Lanka

• Widening the Scope of IWRM from Natural to Socio-

Economic Watersheds – The Conceptual Framework

of a Research Network in the Jordan Valley. Dr. Heinz-

Peter Wolff, University of Hohenheim, Germany

• A Bayesian Approach to IWRM Policy Analysis: The

Mekong Case. Dr. Olli Varis (co-author: Mr. Marko Keskinen),

Helsinki University of Technology, Finland

Workshop 6:

Changing Diets and Their Implications

for Water, Land and Livelihoods

• Improving the Diet of the People through Poverty

Reduction from Freshwater Stimulated Livestock,

Fish and Crop Production. Mr. Ephraim Okpoko, Anambra

State University of Science and Technology,

Nigeria

• Changing Diets and their Implications for Water,

Land and Livelihoods: Case study from Lake Victoria

Basin. Mr. Stephen Byekwaso, Rural Community

Environmental Advocacy, Uganda

• Coping with Floods for Livelihoods. Mr. Rudolph

Cleveringa, International Fund for Agricultural Development

• Multi-purpose Use of Runoff Water as a Community

Initiative to Improve Livelihoods. Ms. Mary Namwebe,

Uganda

• The State of Fishery and Aquaculture and Hydroecological-economical

Conditions for their Development

in Amudarya River Basin, Central Asia. Prof.

Poster Sessions

77

General

Information


Poster Sessions

Bakhtiyor Karimov, Institute of Water Problems of

Uzbekistan Academy of Sciences

Workshop 7:

Sharing the Benefits of Ecosystem

Services and the Costs of Ecosystem

Degradation

• Sharing the Benefits of Ecosystem Services and the

Cost of Ecosystem Degradation. (Lake Victoria is

Deteriorating Now). Mr. Hussein Ssezibwa, Uganda

• Preparing the Amazon Ecosystems for the Changing

Climate. Mr. Veli Albert Kallio, Isthmuses’ Protection

Campaign of the Arctic and North Atlantic

Oceans, UK

• Ecosystem Degradation and Associated Costs Due

to Groundwater Extraction in Bangladesh. Prof. M.

Habibur Rahman, Bangladesh University of Environmental

Engineering

• Willingness to Pay (WTP) Approach, a Tool in Understanding

Benefits and Cost of Degradation of

Ecosystem. Mr. W. D. L. Stanley, Sri Lanka

• The Experience and Challenge of Community Based

Fishery Management in Lake Saroma: Toward Multi-Stakeholder

Governance. Dr. Kaori Fujita, St. Andrew’s

(Momoyama Gakuin) University, Japan

• Benefits of Ecosystems in Flood & Storm Moderations

and the Costs of Degradation: Case Studies of

Hurricane Katrina and South East Asia Tsunami.

Mr. Monirul Mirza, Adaption & Impacts Research

Group, Canada

• Collaborative Suite, a Tool for River Basin’s Planning.

(Pantanal Project – Brasil, Bolivia and Paraguay – As

an Example). Dr. Antonio Giles, Green Cross, Brazil

Workshop 8:

Large Lakes as Drivers for Regional

Development

• The Methodology of Long-range Forecast of the Level

and Water Balance Components of the Lakes Accounting

the Periodicities in their Time Series. Dr. Alexey Babkin,

State Hydrological Institute, Russian Federation

• Effects of Human Activity to Sustainable Fisheries for

Regional Development at Katosi Landing Site, Lake

Victoria. Ms. Carolyne E. Nabalema, Katosi Women

Fishing & Development Association, Uganda

• Inflatable Barrier at Ramspol, The Netherlands. Ms.

Tatiana Bogdanova, Waterboard Groot Salland, The

Netherlands

• Remotely Sensed Data for Support of Monitoring,

Management and Protection of Lake Ladoga Coastal

Zone and Water Environment. Dr. Leontina Sukhacheva,

Institute of Remote Sensing Methods, Russian

Federation

• The Largest Lake of Belarus Naroch and Its Regional

Problems of Recreation and Tourist Industry. Ms.

Hanna Varabyova, Republican Hydrometeorological

Centre, Belarus

• Bottom Sediments in the Pollution Control Program

for Lake Ladoga. Dr. Sviatoslav Usenkov, St. Petersburg

State University, Russian Federation

• Arnasay Lake System; One Example for Large Human

Made Lakes of the Aral Sea Basin – Hydroecology,

Biodiversity and Bioproductivity Studies. Prof.

Bakhtiyor Karimov, Institute of Water Problems of

Uzbekistan Academy of Sciences

• Lakes Basin Management in Venezuela: A Case Study

from the Valencia and Maracaibo Lakes. Mr. Crisanto Silva

Aguilera, Technical University of Darmstadt, Germany

• Lake Victoria. Ms. Maria Onyango, Maseno University,

Kenya

• Large Lakes as Drivers for Regional Development: A

Case Example of Lake Chad Basin of Nigeria. Ms.

Elizabeth Okoro, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Awka,

Nigeria

Workshop 9:

Safe Water Storage and Regulation

During Floods and Droughts

• Reservoir Regulation under Conflicting Flood and

Conservation Storage Demands. Mr. H. K. Varma,

Central Water Commission, India

• Impact of Seasonal Changes of the Ecological Condition

of Water Storage on Drinking Water Quality.

Prof. Nataliya Klymenko, Ukrainan National Academy

of Sciences

• Are Floods and Droughts the Fate of Turkey? Mr. Hasan

Basri Yuksel, State Hydraulic Works (DSI), Turkey

• Irrigation and Flood Control Strategies in Southern

Indian State. Dr. Joseph Sebastian Paimpillil, Center for

Earth Research and Environment Management, India

• Transboundary Floods: Conflict, Vulnerability and

Adaptability. Ms. Marloes Bakker, Oregon State University,

USA

• Living with the Drought: Strategies for Brazilian

78


Semiarid Region. Mr. André Teixeira Hernandes, São

Carlos Federal University, Brazil

• Alluvial Aquifers as Potential Safe Water Storage in

Semi Arid Areas: Case Study of the Lower Mzingwane

Catchment, Limpopo Basin, Zimbabwe. Mr.

William Moyce, University of Zimbabwe

Workshop 10:

Extreme Events and Sustainable Water

and Sanitation Services

• Supply of Water for Human Consumption in Extreme

Situations and Barren Zones by Means of Generators

by Condensation of Potable Water. Mr. Enrique Veiga-

Gonzales and Mr. Juan Veiga Bastos, Asesoramiento

Frigorifico S.L., Spain

• Flood Management Approaches, a Case of Crisis

Management Versus Risk Management. Dr. Farhad

Yazdandoost, Water Research Institute, Iran

• Alternative Energy Reverse Osmosis for Water Potabilization

during Extreme Natural Events. Dr. Belzahet

Trevino, Instituto del Agua del Estado de Nuevo

Leon, Mexico

• Improving Water Management and Sanitation in Rural

Area in Ukraine: Role of Extension Service. Prof.

Valentyna Pidlisnyuk, National Agricultural University,

Ukraine

• Sustainability in the Guanabara Water Basin (Rio de

Janeiro Metropolitan Area): Case Study of the Guanabara

Bay Cleaning Programme Implementation

and Impacts. Mr. Victor Silva, The Royal Danish

Academy of Fine Arts, Denmark

• Lessons from Using PUR-Purifier of Water for Providing

Safe Household Water in Emergency Situations

Dr. Peter R. White, Procter & Gamble, UK

Water Disasters in Sri Lanka in the Recent Past. Mr.

L.W. Seneviratne, Irrigation Department/NWS &

DB, Sri Lanka

• Application and Development of Emergency Water

Purification Plants in Tsunami-affected areas in Sri

Lanka. Prof. Dietrich Maier, International Water Aid

Organization, Germany

• Vulnerability of Sanitation Systems and Sustainable

Alternatives Available. Dr. Arno Rosemarin, Stockolm

Environment Institute, Sweden

• Impact of Tsunami in Coastal Tamilnadu (India) and

Sustainable Water and Sanitation Services. Mr. Palaniappan

Gomathinayagam, India

SIWI Seminar for Young Water Professionals:

Co-management of Water for

Livelihoods and Ecosystems

• The Wise Use Principle: When Words of Wisdom

are Confronted with Reality. Dr. Sebastià Semene

Guitart, The Ramsar Convention, Switzerland

• Resource Recovery, Ecosystem Conservation and

Livelihood Options in Bengal Deltic Region. Ms.

Arunima Guha, Centre for Built Environment, India

• Adoption of Rainwater Harvesting to Mitigate the

Impacts of Land Cover Changes on the Local Hydrology

– Case Study of Lare Division in Kenya. Mr.

Joseph Sang, Regional Land Management Unit (REL-

MA) in ICRAF, Kenya

• Revival of Lake Ecosystem for Enhancing Livelihood

Options through Co-management of Kondakarla

Ava Wetland, India. Ms. Jayati Chourey, Indian Institute

of Forest Management, India

• Integrating Human and Ecological Dimensions: The

Principle of Equitable and Reasonable Utilization

and Participation in the UN Watercourse Convention.

Mr. Christian Behrmann, Augsburg University,

Belgium

• Managing Sydney’s River Systems – It’s Not Technology,

It’s The Ideology That Needs Changing! Mr. Amit

Chanan, Kogarah Municipal Council, Australia

• Knowledge Management in Water(shed) Management.

Dr. Ramkumar Bendapudi, Intercooperation, India

• Groundwater Management in Iraq, Using Remote

Sensing Technology: A Means for Combating the

Desertification. Prof. Moutaz Al-Dabbas, Baghdad

University, Iraq

Stockholm Junior Water Prize

Finalist Posters

• Argentina

Bio-controlling Fish – an Option to Control Vector

Transmitted Illnesses

• Australia

The Sustainability of the Brisbane River for Recreational

and Commercial Use

• Benin

Every Drop is Important

• Cameroon

Community Health Education and School Sanitation

(CHESS) Project: A Youth Audience Approach

Poster Sessions

79

General

Information


• Canada

Living in the Sydney Tar Ponds – an Analysis of the

Microbial Community

• Chile

Cultivating the Desert with Sea Water

• China

Research and Experiment in Technologies for Ecological

Restoration of Urban Polluted Rivers

• Denmark

Fertilizer against Global Heating

• Estonia

Water Quality in Blueberry Plantations and Natural

Bog Areas

• Finland

A Comparison of the Effects Glucose and Fructose

Have on the Growth Rate of Activated Sludge Process

• France

When CO 2 Cares About H 2

O – Learn About Water

While We Learn Our Trade

• Germany

Annual Invasion of “Blue Poison Dwarfs” – Algal

Blooms in the Lake Banter See

• India

Ou Lota (a liane of Tetracera sarmentosa) – An alternative

Source of Potable Water

• Israel

A Modular System, Made of a Floating Stable Impervious

Fence and Magnetic Receivers, for Containing

and Collecting Oil Slicks Leaked by Tankers on the

Sea Surface

• Italy

The Water of the Hill

• Japan

A Tiny Case with Big Possibilities – Environment

Friendly and Water Conserving Nursing Method for

Rice Seedling Production

• Latvia

The Investigation of Jugla Lake Water Composition

• Mexico

Elimination of NOx though Reactive Barriers of Fe (0)

• Nigeria

The Roles of Youths and Children in Water Supplies

and Management in the Peri-Urban and Rural Areas

of Anambra State, Nigeria

• Norway

Rovebekken – Who Should Take Responsibility for

the Environment in the Rovebekk?

• Poland

Water Shortage Concerns You – Let’s Help

• Russia

How to Preserve River Island Ecosystems for People

and for Nature?

• South Africa

Improvement of Grey Water – Plant Tea

• Spain

Sea Pollution by Zinc Chloride Effects of Sea Pollution

by Zinc Chloride on the Embryonic Development

of Mytilus sp.

• Sri Lanka

Water Conservation in Paddy Cultivation

• Sweden

The Quantity of Bacteria in Drinking Water at Various

Temperatures - A Comparison Between “Cooler”

Drinking Water and Tap Water

• Ukraine

Device for Electrochemical Treatment of Industrial

Wastewater with Environmentally Clean Inexhaustible

Energy Source

• USA

A Tale of Two Oysters – A Vital Management Issue

for the Chesapeake Bay

• Vietnam

Solution – Improving Traditional Filter with the Use

of Cyperus Inoolucratus and Flocculant Substance

Photo: Mats Kullberg

80


General Information

The 2006 World Water Week in Stockholm takes place

August 20–26, 2006, mainly at the Stockholm City Conference

Centre, which is conveniently located in central

Stockholm and consists of two venues, “Folkets Hus” and

“Norra Latin”. A number of activities are located at other

venues, as listed in this programme.

Registration/Information Desk

The Registration/Information Desk is located just outside

of the main plenary hall in the Stockholm City Conference

Centre/Folkets Hus, Barnhusgatan 12–14. Representatives

of the Stockholm Convention Bureau are on

hand to answer questions about registration and tickets,

Stockholm and much more.

The registration desk will be open:

Saturday, 19 August 15.00–17.00

Sunday, 20 August 08.00–18.00

Monday, 21 August 08.00–18.00

Tuesday, 22 August 08.00–18.00

Wednesday, 23 August 08.00–18.00

Thursday, 24 August 08.00–18.00

Friday, 25 August 08.00–15.00

Saturday, 26 August 08.00–13.00

World Water Week Secretariat

The Secretariat, Room 201, handles all logistical and programme-related

details during the World Water Week.

During the World Water Week, August 2006:

City Conference Centre/Folkets Hus, Room 201

Barnhusgatan 12–14; PO Box 70471

SE-107 26 Stockholm, Sweden

Tel: +46 8 506 166 00, Fax: +46 8 10 90 71

Computer Resource Room

In connection to the Secretariat is a Computer Resource

Room (Room 401), where attendees can read and send

e-mail and print out documents. A wireless network is

available in the entire building.

SIWI Publications and Other General Information

A wide variety of SIWI research publications, reports and

other material will be available for free all week at the information

table across from the Registration/Information

Desk. Take some for yourself and for your colleagues!

Speaker Ready Room

Workshop speakers can check their slides and overhead

projections in Room 202, the Speaker Ready Room. This

should be done the day before the actual presentation. Mr.

Erik Freudenthal and his staff in Room 202 can assist and

answer any questions related to visual presentations.

Press Room

A fully staffed press room is available to accredited journalists,

who can get assistance with interview requests,

Photo: SIWI

81

General

Information


for instance at the Central Railway Station, open daily

08:00–21:00. Ask the concierge at your hotel for the location

and opening hours of the exchange office closest to

your hotel. At Arlanda Airport you will find the exchange

offices in the terminals 2 and 5.

Telephone

Payphones are available at the City Conference Centre/Folkets

Hus both for local and long-distance calls.

Credit card phones are available throughout the city and

also at the conference venue. Mobile telephones must be

switched off during all meetings.

Emergency

In an emergency situation, you should contact the Swedish

Police by phoning ”112”. This emergency number is

for use when an immediate response is required. In nonemergency

situations, call the Stockholm police or visit

the nearest police station.

Photo: SIWI

work in a quiet environment, obtain information on

scheduled press events, or enjoy a cup of coffee. The press

accreditation and work room is Room 204. Room 206 is

also a work room for press when not booked for private

interviews or hosting press events.

Language

English is the official language and will be used for all

presentations and printed material. Simultaneous interpretation

will not be available.

Insurance

Neither the organisers of the event nor the Stockholm

Convention Bureau, StoCon, accept any liability for personal

injuries sustained, or for loss or damage to property

belonging to participants, either during or as a result of

the meeting.

Credit Cards

Most hotels, restaurants and shops in Stockholm accept

the major credit cards.

Banking and Exchange Facilities

There are a number of exchange offices in Stockholm,

Useful numbers:

Emergency phone number: 112

Stockholm County Police phone number: 401 00 00

Fire emergency phone number: 454 87 00

Ambulance phone number: 112

Stockholm Water Front World Water Week Daily

Keep informed all week long with the World Water Week

Daily, a special edition of Stockholm Water Front which will

present highlights and summaries events during the week.

After the World Water Week:

Stockholm International Water Institute

Drottninggatan 33

se-111 51 Stockholm, Sweden

Tel: +46 8 522 139 60, Fax: +46 8 522 139 61

E-mail: sympos@siwi.org

Organisers

The Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) organises

and hosts the World Water Week in Stockholm.

SIWI is comprised of Mr. Anders Berntell, Executive Director;

Ms. Gunnel Sundbom, Director, Stockholm Water

Prize; Ms. Katarina Andrzejewska, Coordinator, World

Water Week; Ms. Britt-Louise Andersson, Communications

Manager; Mr. Ulf Ehlin, Scientific Director; Ms.

Malin Falkenmark, Professor; Mr. Johan Holmberg, Project

Coordinator; Dr. Anders Jägerskog, Project Manager;

Ms. Kerstin Harnesk, Head of Administration; Mr. Stefan

Heilscher, Administrative Officer; Ms. Pernilla Kontio,

82


Administrative Officer; Mr. Johan Kuylenstierna, Project

Director and Manager, Swedish Water House; Ms. Frida

Lanshammar, Manager, Stockholm Junior Water Prize;

Ms. Rebecca Löfgren, Project Administrator; Prof. Jan Lundqvist,

Scientific Program Committee Chair; Mr. Manfred

Matz, Project Director; Mr. Michael Moore, Project Administrator;

Ms. Adèle Skogsfors, Project Assistant; Ms.

Maria Stenström, Communications Manager; Dr. Håkan

Tropp, Project Director, UNDP Water Governance Facility

at SIWI; and Mr. David Trouba, Communications

Manager.

SIWI’s summer assistants: Mr. Henrik Alsterbo, Ms.

Annika Börje (intern), Ms. Hedvig Berntell, Ms. Bianca

Dochtorowic, Ms. Lotten Hubendick, Mr. Anders Sandstedt

and Ms. Elin Weyler.

SIWI would like to thank Mr. Erik Freudenthal of the

Stockholm Water Company, Ms. Helena Stark and the staff

at the Stockholm Convention Bureau, Ms. Marie Györi at

Quadrata, and Mr. Erik Kristensen at Eriks Evenemang.

EU Water Initiative Meetings – Practical Information

The Meetings on the EU Water Initiative will take place

August 22–24, 2006. The sessions are free of charge.

Venue

The meetings on the EU Water Initiative will take place

at Stockholm City Conference Centre/Folkets Hus,

Barnhusgatan 12–14, in central Stockholm. The meetings

will be held in the room “Lilla Teatern”.

Registration Desk– EU Water Initiative Meetings

The registration desk at the Stockholm City Conference

Centre/Folkets Hus will be open near the room “Lilla

Teatern” at these times:

Tuesday 22 August 08:00–10:00

Wednesday 23 August 13:30–15:00

Thursday 24 August 08:30–10:00

During the Meetings August 23–25:

City Conference Centre/Folkets Hus, Room 201

Barnhusgatan 12–14, PO Box 70471

se-107 26 Stockholm, Sweden

Tel: +46 8 506 166 00, Fax: +46 8 10 90 71

Photo: SIWI

83

General

Information


design Quadrata

World Water Week in Stockholm

Building Capacity – Promoting Partnership

– Reviewing Implementation

The World Water Week in Stockholm is the leading annual

global meeting place for capacity-building, partnership-building

and follow-up on the implementation of

international processes and programmes in water and development.

It includes topical plenary sessions and panel

debates, scientific workshops, independently organised

seminars and side events, exhibitions and festive prize

ceremonies honouring excellence in the water field. Stockholm:

it’s the meeting place for experts from businesses,

governments, the water management and science sectors,

inter-governmental organisations, NGOS, research and

training institutions and United Nations agencies.

www.worldwaterweek.org

STOCKHOLM INTERNATIONAL WATER INSTITUTE, SIW I

DROTTNINGGATAN 33, SE-111 51 STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN

PHONE +46 8 522 139 60 ✦ FAX +46 8 522 139 61 ✦ siwi@siwi.org ✦ www.siwi.org