Wheat Initiative progress report May 2012 (PDF 646KB)

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Wheat Initiative progress report May 2012 (PDF 646KB)

Development of the Wheat Initiative

Progress report

May 10, 2012

Summary:

Following the successful launch of the Wheat Initiative in Paris, on September 15, 2011,

a number of actions were engaged to enforce it (see Table 1).

The Wheat Initiative was presented in several meetings, and always received very

positive feedback.

A letter was sent last November to the G20 Agricultural Ministries to ask them to

designate representatives for the Institutions’ Coordination Committee and for the

Research Committee. We received positive answers from Argentina, Australia, Canada,

China, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Spain, UK and USA. Despite a reminder sent last

January, a number of G20 countries have not replied yet but we hope that they will soon

join us.

In the meantime, we drafted a Consortium Agreement that describes the aim of the

Wheat Initiative and the role of its different committees to be sent with a Memorandum

of Understanding to non-­‐G20 countries and stakeholders this coming month. This will

allow all countries and stakeholders having manifested their interest to the Wheat

Initiative to join in and contribute financially to its development. We hope to receive

enough positive answers to be able to set up the Institutions’ Coordination Committee

and the Research Committee before this summer and hold meetings for these

committees in the last trimester of 2012.

BBSRC, CIMMYT and INRA committed themselves to further support the development of

Wheat Initiative in the next three years by funding together a project manager who will

be recruited in June to help the International Scientific Coordinator.

The Interim Scientific Board met for the first time last January at PAG, San Diego and will

meet again in Fargo, June 29-­‐30. Peter Langridge, who was instrumental in submitting

the Wheat Initiative proposal to the G20 member states last year was elected Chair of

the Interim Scientific Board. The Interim Scientific Board will draft a first version of a

vision paper for international wheat research that will be submitted to and enriched by

the Research Committee upon its creation.

Wheat Initiative

Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique - 147, rue de l’Université 75338 Paris Cedex 07 - France

Tel: 01 42 75 92 53 – Email: wheat.initiative@versailles.inra.fr


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The Interim Scientific Board decided to set up an Expert Working Group to work on the

establishment of a global Wheat Information System. The coordination of the EWG was

given to Hadi Quesneville (France) and Mario Caccamo (UK). Hadi and Mario, with the

help of international experts, set up a survey to consult the research community on their

needs and expectations. A report will be sent to the Interim Scientific Board at the end of

March and the Wheat Information System EWG, bringing together experts in IT and

biologists, will be constituted soon after.

Luigi Cattivelli and Roberto Tuberosa (Italy), announced at PAG 2012 last January their

intention to set up an EWG on Durum Wheat. A short proposal outlining the purpose of

this EWG will be sent to the research community after approval by the Interim Scientific

Board.

Lastly, BBSRC has been developing a website for the Wheat Initiative, to provide

information about the Wheat Initiative actions, news about wheat research in different

countries, access to different wheat databases… and working space for the Wheat

Initiative Committees. We are planning to launch the website next June to keep

everybody posted of the development of the Wheat Initiative and to provide the

research community access to useful information. In the meantime, basic information

about the Wheat Initiative can be found at

http://urgi.versailles.inra.fr/Species/Wheat/Projects2/Wheat-­‐Initiative.


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Table 1: Activities of the Wheat Initiative

Actions

Report on April 6, 2012

Kick-­‐off meeting, Paris, September 125 attendees from 24 countries, including

15, 2011

scientists, countries, institutions, stakeholders.

Executive summary sent to the G20 agricultural

sherpas on September 29, 2011 by the French

Proposal of Concerted Support

Action for the KBBE 2013 call

(FP7)

Presentation of the Wheat

Initiative

Follow up invitation to national

bodies and identification of

national representatives

Ministry of Agriculture (see Appendix 1).

Received by the European Commission (see

Appendix 2).

H. Lucas:

-­‐ Re-­‐energising Global Agricultural Productivity,

Australia and France, 13 October 2011, Brussels. A

seminar addressing themes from the 2011 G20

Agriculture Ministers’ Action Plan

-­‐INTA (Argentina) delegation visit to INRA, October

28, 2011

-­‐ PAG 2012 (San Diego), January 2012

-­‐ Cereales Vallee (Competitivity cluster), Clermont-­‐

Fd, France, February 28, 2012

-­‐ Fascination of Plants –Opportunities for Europe,

European Parlement, May 9, 2012


Letter sent on November, 16, 2011 to the G20

agricultural ministries asking them to identify

research/funding organisation(s) to participate in

the Institutions’ Coordination Committee and to

designate their national representative in the

research committee.

Reminder sent January, 20, 2012 to Agricultural

Attachés in French embassies asking them to follow

on the process.

Positive answers received from:

Argentina, Australia, Canada, China, France,

Germany, Italy, Japan, Spain, UK, USA (see Appendix

3).

Follow up invitation to non-­‐G20

countries, international

organisations, to industries and

farmers/growers associations

Commitment of INRA, BBSRC and CIMMYT to

contribute to the first 3 yrs of the Wheat Initiative for

30 000 €/yr each for administrative support (on top

of in-­‐kind contributions).

To be done in May 2012


3


Written framework for

governance and operation of the

Wheat Initiative (based on launch

presentation and discussions) so

members know what they are

paying for.

Development of firm membership

proposals and funding

arrangements

Establishment of Institutions’

Coordination Committee

Establishment of Research

Committee

Establishment of Expert Working

Groups

Draft of consortium agreement written and agreed

by INRA, BBSRC and CIMMYT.

MoU linked to draft consortium agreement (needed

to recover the membership fees), with the aim to

agree on a full consortium agreement within a year,

signed by Australia, UK, CIMMYT (see appendix 4).

Sending of MoU and invoice for membership fees

(March-­‐April).

Will be established when a sufficient number of

membership fees will be received.

Will be established when a sufficient number of

membership fees will be received.

EWG on a Wheat Information System set up in

December 2011: coordinators: Hadi Quesneville (FR)

and Mario Caccamo (UK).

-­‐ Survey sent to international community in

December 2011.

-­‐ Presentation at PAG 2012

-­‐ Analysis of Survey sent to the Scientific Board

end March 2012.

-­‐ Mario and Hadi will present the analysis and

their ideas to go forward to the next Scientific

Board (Fargo, US, June 2012).

EWG to be set up on Durum Wheat (announcement

made at PAG, January 2012): coordinators Luigi

Cattivelli and Roberto Tuberosa (Italy).

EWGs on phenotyping and breeding methods to be

set up.

IWGSC as an EWG to be decided in June, 2012.

Membership, Chairperson and

establishment of Scientific Board

Web site design, commissioning

and handling of content

management

Wheat Initiative logo

Plans for development of vision

paper and strategic plan for

consultation


Interim scientific board established : G. Moore, C.

Feuillet, S. Baenziger, C. Pozniak, P. Langridge, Hans

Braun.

Chair elected by the Board: P. Langridge.

2 more Board members to be elected at the first

Research Committee meeting.

First version of Website key pages sent January 13

by BBSRC. Launch planned in June 2012

Agreed by the Scientific Board.

H. Lucas will draft a framework of the Vision Paper

to be discussed by the Scientific Board in June 2012

and submitted to the Research Committee upon its

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creation.

Meetings of the different

committees

Interim Scientific Board:

-­‐ January 2012, PAG, San Diego, USA

-­‐ June 29-­‐30, 2012, Fargo, USA

Research Committee: to be determined (last

trimester 2012)

Institutions’ Coordination Committee: to be

determined (last trimester 2012)

EWGs: to be determined by the coordinators


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Appendix 1

International Research Initiative for Wheat Improvement

Kick-­‐off meeting, Paris, September 15, 2011

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The official launch of the International Research Initiative for Wheat Improvement

(hereafter called Wheat Initiative), adopted by the G20 agricultural ministers last June,

took place on the 15th of September at the French Ministry of Agriculture. This meeting

brought together 125 attendees coming from 24 different countries (see list of attendees

in appendix 1), including 56 scientists, 46 representatives from countries or institutions,

22 representatives from private companies and other stakeholders, and one science

journalist. This very large audience illustrated the interest of the different categories of

stakeholders worldwide (research community, funding and research organisations,

agro-­‐industry, growers associations), as well as of different countries that send

representatives to the meeting. The organisers and speakers of the meeting were

thanked and congratulated for the quality of the organisation, talks and discussions.

After a welcome address by the French Ministry of Agriculture, Bruno Le Maire, and a

general introduction given by Marion Guillou (INRA CEO) on the future of agricultural

research, 6 scientific leaders from different countries and background (HJ Braun,

CIMMYT-­‐Mexico; I. Sharma, ICAR–India; J. Dubcowsky, Uni. Davis-­‐USA; C. Feuillet, INRA-­‐

France; I. King, Uni. Notthingham-­‐UK; P. Langridge, ACPFG-­‐Australia) gave very

inspiring talks on the challenges faced by the world scientific community working on

wheat (see programme in appendix 2). These talks insisted on the urgent need to

increase wheat production at the world level to answer the needs of the growing

population and ensure food security despite of global change. They identified major

bottlenecks to overcome in the years to come and addressed the main areas of research

necessitating cooperation between countries, i.e. genetics, genomics and agronomy.

They insisted on the importance of collaborative research at the international level and

the need to share genetic resources, data, methods and knowledge to answer the

challenges more efficiently. They also emphasized the need for a more significant

funding of wheat research globally to diminish the discrepancy between the importance

of wheat as a major staple in the world and the current low investment in wheat

research and development. Each talk was followed by a short but very lively discussion

with the audience.

Hélène Lucas (INRA, France) presented then the rationale of the Wheat Initiative, its

aims and scope, and how it will complement and add value to the ongoing research

efforts on wheat in different countries and in the frame of the CGIAR global WHEAT

programme. A governance framework and means to ensure self-­‐funding of the initiative

were proposed for discussion to the assembly. The originality of the Wheat Initiative lies

on the links it will create between the research community and the funders at the

international level. In addition to a better understanding of the strategic orientations

and funding needs recommended by the research community, improved knowledge

among the funders of their current investments and future plans and the opportunity to

work together will add value and is likely to enhance long term funding of wheat

research.


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The general discussion was opened by S. Visscher (BBSRC, UK), G. Riba (INRA, France)

and H. Braun (CIMMYT, Mexico), who expressed their expectations for the Wheat

Initiative and their views on how it will help wheat research on a global scale. The

participants to the meeting underlined the importance of the Wheat Initiative and

agreed with its general objectives and the organisation framework. It was stated that the

private and public research shared common interest and that the Wheat Initiative

provided an interesting framework to collaborate more closely despite of the concerns

raised by ownership and intellectual property.

The composition of the Interim Scientific Board was not questioned, although it seemed

important to complete it with an expert in agronomy/cropping systems.

Farmers/growers associations were asked to be included in the Research Committee,

and it was mentioned that it would be important to find ways to involve the chain value

industry into wheat research funding.

Specific contributions from the audience emphasized the need to identity major gaps to

set up a truly international strategy and to focus on specific points at the beginning of

the Wheat Initiative in order to achieve results in the five first years of its existence.

Free data access and the building of a centralised information system for wheat research

were identified as a one of the areas in which an international effort with long-­‐term

commitment should be made immediately. An Expert Working Group dedicated to this

topic will be set up rapidly.

The need for a specific budget for the Wheat Initiative was recognised, covering in

particular the running costs of the Scientific Board and the organisation of workshops, in

addition to the creation of a website (that will be used as a means of communication and

will provide work space for the different committees) and the salaries of the scientific

coordinator and assistant(s) that will be provided as in-­‐kind contribution by INRA,

BBSRC and CIMMYT in the first 4 years of the initiative. The contributions suggested per

participating country and per year (10 000 € for G20/OECD countries and 2 000 € for

non G20/OECD countries) was found appropriate. It was suggested that private

companies should contribute according to their size (20 000 – 5 000 €).

Due to the large differences in the organisation of the national research and funding

systems in different countries, it was decided to let each participating country decide

which organisation will contribute financially to the Wheat Initiative, given that this

financial contribution will open access to representation in the Research Committee and

in the Institutions’ Coordination Committee. A request will be addressed by the

Scientific Coordinator to the G20 Agricultural Ministries to identify the national

organisation(s) that will contribute the annual membership fee to the Wheat Initiative,

and to which an invoice will be addressed. A scientific leader who will represent the

collective view of the national research community in the Research Committee will be

identified in each country, the name and contact address of whom will have to be sent to

the Scientific Coordinator with an official letter of designation by the competent

authorities before the end of 2011.


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Appendix 1: WHEAT INITIATIVE kick-off meeting , Paris, September 15, final list of attendees










































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9


10


11


12


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Appendix 2 : programme of the WHEAT INITIATIVE kick-off meeting

Launch of the International Research Initiative for Wheat Improvement

__________________________________

Ministry of Agriculture, Food, Fisheries, Rural Development

and Territorial Planning

78 rue de Varenne, Paris, France

15th September 2011, 9:30-­‐17:30

________________________________

Gambetta Conference room

9h00 -­‐ Registration and coffee

9h30 -­‐ Welcome

Bruno Le Maire (French Agricultural Minister)

9h40 -­‐ Introduction : What future for Agricultural Research

Marion Guillou (INRA CEO, France)

Major challenges for wheat research – Session 1

Chair: Michael Baum (ICARDA)

10h00 -­‐ Wheat to feed the world

Hans-­‐Joachim Braun (CIMMYT, Mexico)

10h30 -­‐ Wheat production in South-­‐Asia and adaptation to climate change

Indu Sharma (ICAR, India)

11h00 -­‐ What has wheat to offer to the general science community?

Jorge Dubcosky (University Davis, USA)

11h30 -­‐ What genomics can contribute to wheat research

Catherine Feuillet (INRA, France)

12h00 – 13h30 : Lunch

Major challenges for wheat research – Session 2

Chair: Mark Sorrels (Cornell University, USA)

13h30 -­‐ Exploiting wheat genetic diversity in science and breeding

Ian King (University of Nottingham, UK)

14h00 -­‐ Measuring and assessing wheat phenotypes -­‐ Future of wheat breeding

Peter Langridge (ACPFG, Australia)

15h00-­‐15h15: Coffee break

How will the International Research Initiative for Wheat Improvement (IRIWI) address these

challenges?

Chairs: Steve Visscher (BBSRC, UK), Guy Riba (INRA, France), Hans Braun (CIMMYT)

15h15: Presentation of the International Research Initiative for Wheat Improvement -­‐propositions for

governance structure and first actions

Hélène Lucas (INRA, France)

15h45: General Discussion

17h30: End of the meeting.


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Appendix 2:

SUGGESTED 2013 TOPIC – FP7 PROGRAMME COOPERATION – Theme 2, KBBE

CONTACT INFORMATION

Date: 26/08/2011

Name of the potential coordinator: H. Lucas, INRA

Consortium - Main potential partners: UK, Germany, Italy, Spain, Czech Republic, Hungary,

Turkey, USA, India, China, Japan, Brazil, Argentina, Mexico, Russia, Japan, Mediterranean

Partner Countries (MPC), Cimmyt (CGIAR),

Theme 2 – Food, agriculture and fisheries, and biotechnology

Activity 2.1 – Sustainable production and management of biological resources

from land, forest and aquatic environment

Area 2.1.2: increased sustainability of all production systems; plant heath and

crop protection

KBBE – Coverage 2007-­‐2013 and relation with Gap Identified in Reflection Paper,

12/10/10: “Further research efforts are required in view of providing adapted solutions to

increase the resilience and productivity of diverse and mixed systems (cropping/livestock)”

Title: International research cooperation for wheat improvement -­‐ IRCWI

Introduction:

With changing diets and growing world population, rising prices for fertilizers and

pesticides, increasing competition between food and no-­‐food uses, and the negative

effects of increased temperature, drought, soil salinization and ozone resulting from

climate change, world wheat production has not met demand in 6 of the past 10 years

and yet by 2050 demand is expected to increase by at least 70%. Durum and bread

wheat play a key role as a staple in a lot of countries. Annual wheat yield increase must

jump from the current level below 1% to at least 1.7% to meet demand trends. As part of

the global response to the major food security challenge over the next 40 years,

international coordination of wheat research is urgently needed to avoid duplication of

efforts, increase economic efficiency, and add value to the existing national or

international public and private initiatives. The G20 agricultural ministers decided in

June 2011 to launch the International Research Initiative for Wheat Improvement

(IRIWI) to avoid duplication of efforts and add value to the existing public and private

initiatives. The purpose of this topic is to support coordination between national and

international research programmes on bread and durum wheat in the fields of

genomics, genetics and agronomy, and facilitate international collaborations after the

initial 2 first years of existence of the IRIWI.

Innovative character and solution to problems:

Coordination and cooperation will be facilitated by: providing a forum to identify

synergies and encourage collaborations among major nationally, regionally and


15


internationally funded wheat programs; facilitating open communication and exchange

of ideas as well as exchange of germplasm, data and materials; developing and

sustaining publicly available integrated databases; recommending minimum data-­reporting

standards and developing protocols to allow consistency for screening and

analysis; monitoring progress of scientific activities; establishing and updating priorities

for wheat research; formulating and communicating strategies to increase food security,

nutritional value and safety in a rapidly changing environment, while taking into

account societal demands for sustainable and resilient agricultural production systems.

Justification:

Coordination is critical to ensure that all countries have access to technological advances

to increase the speed and sophistication of wheat improvement. This will ensure that

wheat research and improvement programmes will be carried out synergistically.

Europe has a major role to play in this worldwide coordination due to its international

leadership in wheat genomics research and the importance of wheat to its global

economy.

Funding scheme: Coordination and Support Action (Support)

Expected impact:

- Development and enrichment of a dedicated wheat information system to easily

access and exploit all publicly available data (phenotypes, genome sequence,

various –omics datasets, genetic and physical maps, genetic resources,

bioinformatics tools…)

- Generation and sharing of a broad range of tools, methods and results that will

enable breeders to take full advantage of genomics-­‐assisted approaches and

agronomists to implement resource conserving/precision agriculture :

phenotyping networks, minimum standards for reporting data and results;

common genotyping tolls and reference genotypes, etc…

- Development of joint innovative research plans

- Formulation of research strategies for future research


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Appendix 3: Representatives designation by the G20 countries

Country/

International

research

organisation

Argentina

Representing

Institution

Instituto Nacional de

Tecnologia Agropecuaria

(INTA), and CONICET

Representative in the

Institutions'

Coordination

Committee

Representative in

the Research

Committee

Marcelo

Helguera/Viviana

Echenique

Comments

Australia

Grains Research and

Development

Corporation (GRDC)

Mr John Harvey

Managing Director,

GR&DC

Peter Langridge

MoU signed

Canada

China

Agriculture and Agri-­‐

Food Canada

Chinese Academy of

Agricultural Sciences

(CAAS)

M. Stephen Morgan

Jones,

Director General,

Science partnership

Curtis Pozniak

Zhang Xueyong

France

National Institute for

Agricultural Research

(INRA)

François Houllier,

Deputy Director

General

Catherine Feuillet

Commitment for 30

k€/yr for 3 yrs

Germany

Federal Ministry of Food,

agriculture and

consumer protection

Mrs Bettina Pellio

Federal Office for

Agriculture and Food

Frank Ordon

Italy

Ministero delle politiche

Agricole Alimentari e

Forestali ( MiPAAF)

Dr. Franca Melillo

Luigi Cativelli

Japan

Ministry of Agriculture,

Forestry and Ficheries

(MAFF)

Takashi Yano / Takuji

Tonooka

Masaru Iwagana

Spain

UK

USA

Brasil

India

Indonesia

Mexico

Saudi Arabia

South Africa

South Corea

Saudi Arabia

Instituto Nacional de

Investigacion y

Technologia Agraria y

Alimentaria (INIA)

Biotechnology and

Biological Research

Council (BBSRC)

Steve Visscher,

Deputy Chief Executive

& Chief Operating

Officer

Concepcio Royo

Calpe

Graham Moore

MoU signed

Commitment for 30

k€/yr for 3 yrs

Commitment for

membership fees.


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Russia

Turkey

UE

CIMMYT

Tom Lumpkin,

Director General

Hans Braun

MoU signed

Commitment for 30

k€/yr for 3 yrs


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Appendix 4 : MoU and Draft of Consortium Agreement

Memorandum of Understanding – Launch of the Wheat Initiative

Between:

French National Institute for Agricultural Research

Public Scientific and Technical Research Establishment

Having its registered office at: 147 rue de l’Université

75338 Paris Cedex 07

France

Represented by:

Marion Guillou

Function:

President

Hereinafter referred to as “INRA”

AND

[Name of Institution 2]

[Legal statute]

Having its registered office at: [address line 1]

[address line 2]

[country]

Represented by:

[Representative name]

Function:

[Function of the representative]

Hereinafter referred to as “[xxx]”

Hereinafter INRA and Agriculture and [xxx] are individually referred to as a “Party” and

collectively as the “Parties”.

WHEREAS:

A. Following the meeting of the G20 Agriculture Ministers in Paris the 22 nd and 23 rd

of June 2011 (http://agriculture.gouv.fr/G20-­‐agriculture), an action plan on food

price volatility and agriculture was adopted by the G20 member states. In this

framework, it was decided to launch an International Research Initiative for

Wheat Improvement which main objectives are to:

- Cooperate in world-­‐wide bread and durum wheat improvement research

efforts in the field of genomics, genetics and agronomy, to increase food

security, wheat nutritional value and safety while taking into account

societal demands for sustainable and resilient agricultural production

systems;

- Provide a forum to identify synergies and encourage collaborations among

major nationally, regionally and internationally (public and private) funded

wheat programs with the result of maximising opportunities for gaining

added-­‐value internationally;

- Facilitate open communication and exchange of germplasm, data and

materials in accordance with the International Treaty on Plant Genetic


19


Resources for Food and Agriculture (ITPGRFA) and facilitate exchange of

ideas within the wheat research community;

- Support the development of publicly available integrated databases and

platforms;

- Recommend minimum data-­‐reporting standards and develop protocols to

allow consistency for screening and analyses;

- Organize knowledge transfer and capacity building;

- Monitor and summarize progress of scientific activities;

- Establish and periodically update priorities for wheat research of global

relevance;

- Communicate to national and international funding agencies as well as to

agricultural ministries the needs of the wheat research community of

participating nations.

B. The International Research Initiative for Wheat Improvement, shortened as the

Wheat Initiative”, was launched the 15 th of September 2011 in Paris, during a

kick-­‐off meeting bringing together more than 120 scientists and representatives

from 73 public and private organisations from 24 different countries.

C. INRA was designated as the Managing Institution of the Wheat Initiative and

therefore is in charge of the legal and administrative tasks. In order to ensure a

smooth launch of the Wheat Initiative, INRA has decided to engage from 2012

and until the end of 2015 an annual budget of 30 000 € (instead of 10 000 €) for

the Wheat Initiative, plus the salary of its agent, Hélène Lucas, appointed as the

International Scientific Coordinator of the Wheat Initiative until the end of 2015.

D. INRA is contacting each country involved in the Wheat Initiative in order to

identify the legal entity that will participate in this project, and sign with it a

bilateral Memorandum of Understanding in order to quickly start the operations

of the Wheat Initiative.

E. [xxx] has been designated by its country to be its representative for the Wheat

Initiative, and is willing to quickly engage funding in order not to delay the work to be

performed.

NOW THEREFORE THE PARTIES AGREES AS FOLLOW:

Article 1

Enforceability of this Memorandum of Understanding

This Memorandum of Understanding (the “MoU”) only states the wishes and moral

commitment of the Parties regarding the Wheat Initiative. It is not legally binding.

Therefore if a Party does not fulfil its commitments as described under this MoU, such as

the payment of its annual contribution to the budget of the Wheat Initiative, no

prosecution will be made.

Article 2

Annual contribution to the Wheat Initiative budget

For three years from the 1 st January 2012 and up to the 31 st December 2014, [xxx] will

contribute to the budget of the Wheat Initiative in the form of an annual membership fee.


20


Following the signature of this MoU and at the beginning of following years, INRA will send

an invoice to [xxx] to collect this membership fee.

The amount of the annual membership fee of [xxx] will be 10 000 €, for the standard

annual contribution as a G20 member state institution.

[xxx] may, at its own discretion and subject to its relevant domestic laws and regulations,

voluntary contribute extra funds, personnel and/or other resources such as to support

the Wheat Initiative activities.

VAT will not be applied as nobody will benefit of a direct individualised counterpart

from the activities of the Wheat Initiative, as these membership fees will serve only the

global objectives of the Wheat Initiative.

Article 3

Management of the Wheat Initiative and conclusion of a

Consortium Agreement

The purpose of this MoU being only to unlock the first funds needed for the start-­‐up of

the Wheat Initiative, the Parties agree that the conclusion of a Consortium Agreement,

signed between all the Parties involved, will be needed to give a satisfactory legal and

management framework.

Attached under Appendix 1, a proposition of Consortium Agreement will be discussed

between the parties involved and once agreed and signed, notably by INRA and [xxx], it will

supersede the present MoU.

Meanwhile, the principles described in this proposition of Consortium Agreement will

be applied as long as the Parties agree so – but none of these principles will be deemed

to be compulsory or enforceable against any other Party or third party such as another

participant of the Wheat Initiative having signed a similar MoU with INRA.

As a consequence of the signature of this MoU, [xxx] will be invited to name its

representatives in the Committees of the Wheat Initiative where it is entitled to participate

(namely the Institutions’ Coordination Committee and Research Committee) if he has not

already done so.

Signed at Paris, the [date],

For INRA

For [xxx]

Marion Guillou

President

[signatory name]

[function]


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Appendix 1

Draft of the Wheat Initiative Consortium Agreement (v 2.2)

Between the following Institutions:

[Name of Institution 1]

[Legal statute]

Having its registered office at: [address line 1]

[address line 2]

[country]

Represented by:

[Representative name]

Function:

[Function of the representative]

Hereinafter referred to as “[acronym]”

AND

[Name of Institution 2]

[Legal statute]

Having its registered office at: [address line 1]

[address line 2]

[country]

Represented by:

[Representative name]

Function:

[Function of the representative]

Hereinafter referred to as “[acronym]”

AND

(…)

And the following Stakeholders:

[Name of Stakeholder 1]

[Legal statute]

Having its registered office at: [address line 1]

[address line 2]

[country]

Represented by:

[Representative name]

Function:

[Function of the representative]

Hereinafter referred to as “[acronym]”

AND

[Name of Stakeholder 2]

[Legal statute]

Having its registered office at: [address line 1]

[address line 2]

[country]

Represented by:

[Representative name]

Function:

[Function of the representative]

Hereinafter referred to as “[acronym]”


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AND

(…)

Hereinafter the Institutions and the Stakeholders are individually referred to as a “Party”

and collectively as the “Parties”.

WHEREAS:

F. Following the meeting of the G20 Agriculture Ministers in Paris the 22 nd and 23 rd

of June 2011 (http://agriculture.gouv.fr/G20-­‐agriculture), an action plan on food

price volatility and agriculture was adopted by the G20 member states. In this

framework, it was decided to launch an International Research Initiative for

Wheat Improvement which main objectives are to:

- Cooperate in world-­‐wide bread and durum wheat improvement research

efforts in the field of genomics, genetics and agronomy, to increase food

security, wheat nutritional value and safety while taking into account

societal demands for sustainable and resilient agricultural production

systems;

- Provide a forum to identify synergies and encourage collaborations among

major nationally, regionally and internationally (public and private) funded

wheat programs with the result of maximising opportunities for gaining

added-­‐value internationally;

- Facilitate open communication and exchange of germplasm, data and

materials in accordance with the International Treaty on Plant Genetic

Resources for Food and Agriculture (ITPGRFA) and facilitate exchange of

ideas within the wheat research community;

- Support the development of publicly available integrated databases and

platforms;

- Recommend minimum data-­‐reporting standards and develop protocols to

allow consistency for screening and analyses;

- Organize knowledge transfer and capacity building;

- Monitor and summarize progress of scientific activities;

- Establish and periodically update priorities for wheat research of global

relevance;

- Communicate to national and international funding agencies as well as to

agricultural ministries the needs of the wheat research community of

participating nations.

G. The International Research Initiative for Wheat Improvement, shortened as the

Wheat Initiative”, was launched the 15 th of September 2011 in Paris, during a

kick-­‐off meeting bringing together more than 120 scientists and representatives

from 73 public and private organisations from 24 different countries.

NOW THEREFORE the Parties agree to sign a Consortium Agreement that defines their

roles, rights and obligations in order to make the Wheat Initiative a successful and

fruitful initiative to meet the challenges of food security in the 21 st century.


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Article 1

Definitions

In order to facilitate the interpretation of this Consortium Agreement, the following

definitions will be used as follows (with their first letter capitalised and used in the

plural form if needed):

Committee Means any committee of the Wheat Initiative, i.e. the Institutions’

Coordination Committee, the Research Committee, the Scientific

Board and the Expert Working Groups.

Consortium Means all the Parties in the Consortium Agreement.

Consortium Means the present Consortium Agreement.

Agreement

Dissemination Means the disclosure of Knowledge by any appropriate means.

Effective Date Means date of the start of the Consortium Agreement, which is: 15 th

September 2011

Institution Means a Party being either the official representative of its country,

such as a ministry, a funding agency or a public research institute; or

being an international research centre, such as a centre of the

Consultative Group of International Agricultural Research (CGIAR).

Each participating country will be represented in the Wheat Initiative

by only one Institution.

Knowledge Means all the results, including information, reports, scientific papers,

whether or not they can be protected, arising from the work

performed in the Wheat Initiative, as well as copyrights or rights

Managing

Institution

Party

Pre-­‐existing

Know-­‐how

Stakeholder

Subcontractor

pertaining to such results.

Means the Institution to which the International Scientific

Coordinator is attached and which manages under her/his control the

budget of the Wheat Initiative.

Means a signatory of the Consortium Agreement.

Means the information which is held by the Parties prior to the start

date of this Consortium Agreement or which is developed thereafter

but outside of the Wheat Initiative and is not a Knowledge, as well as

copyrights or rights pertaining to such information following

applications for, or the issue of, patents, designs, or similar forms of

protection.

Means a Party not being an Institution but a member of the industry

or of the civil society such as a seed company, a growers or farmers

association, etc. interested in participating to the Wheat Initiative.

Means a contractor being a third party who is engaged on a pure

work order basis for the sole purpose of performing some of any

Party’s tasks or part thereof, on such Party’s behalf for monetary

consideration pursuant to a subcontracting agreement.

Article 2

Principles of governance of the Wheat Initiative


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The Wheat Initiative is governed following principles of:

• Synergy through collaboration;

• Transparency;

• Sharing;

• Inclusivity;

• Engagement.

Article 3

Purpose of the Consortium Agreement

The purpose of the Consortium Agreement is to set forth the basic principles

concerning:

• Rights and duties of the Parties over the Wheat Initiative, its Knowledge and its

Dissemination

• Organisation of the management of the Wheat Initiative

• Use and control of the Wheat Initiative’s budget

• Transformation of the Wheat Initiative recommendations into operational actions

Article 4

Scope and financial resources of the Wheat Initiative

4.1. Scope of the Wheat Initiative

The purpose of the Wheat Initiative is to coordinate wheat research programmes at the

international level in order to avoid duplication of research efforts, increase economic

efficiencies and add value to the existing national or international public and private

initiatives. This will ensure that wheat research and improvement programmes are

carried out synergistically to increase food security, nutritional value and safety in a

rapidly changing environment, while taking into account societal demands for

sustainable and resilient agricultural production systems.

4.2. Financial resources

Each Party, starting from the 1 st January 2012, will yearly contribute to the budget of the

Wheat Initiative in the form of a membership fee.

At the beginning of each year, the Secretariat will send an invoice on the name of the

Managing Institution to each Party to collect their participation to the budget of the

Wheat Initiative.

The amount of annual contributions will be as follows:

- For Institutions:

§ Based in G20 members States and/or OCDE member States :

10,000€

§

§

Being an international research centre: 5,000 €

For the others (non-­‐G20 and non-­‐OCDE member States and non-­international

research centre): 2,000 €

- For Stakeholders:

§ With an annual turnover (including all the companies of the group)

larger than 500 million €: 20,000 €

§ Between 50 up to 500 million € : 10,000 €

§ Under 50 million € : 5,000 €


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Subject to approval of the Institutions’ Coordination Committee, the annual contribution of an

Institution may be waived in case of in-kind contribution, with the exception of the Secretariat

salaries, providing the cost of such in-kind contribution amounts to at least the annual

membership fee.

Any Party may, at its own discretion and subject to its relevant domestic laws and regulations,

voluntary contribute extra funds, personnel and/or other resources such as to support the

Wheat Initiative activities.

Unless contrary local law applicable to the Managing Institution, the VAT will not be

applied to these contributions as no Stakeholder will benefit of a direct individualised

counterpart from the activities of the Wheat Initiative, as these contributions will serve

only the global objectives of the Wheat Initiative as exposed under article 4.1.

For the year 2011, no participation will be requested – however the Parties are

welcomed to give a voluntary participation in order to help covering the first costs of the

Wheat Initiative. In that case they will contact the International Scientific Coordinator

which will then ask the Managing Institution to issue an invoice.

The financial resources of the Wheat Initiative will be managed by the Managing

Institution, under the direct control and direction of the International Scientific

Coordinator. In case of change of Managing Institution, the remaining budget of the

Wheat Initiative will be wired to the new Managing Institution within two months from

the change of the Managing Institution.

4.3. Additional resources for the start of the Wheat Initiative

In order to ensure a sufficient funding of the Wheat Initiative during the launch phase,

INRA (France), BBSRC (UK) and CIMMYT will give additional in-­‐kind and financial

contributions for the work of the Committees during the first 4 years – therefore until

31 December 2015. This support is in respect of the salary and associated indirect costs

of the International Scientific coordinator and other direct support staff from INRA,

BBSRC and/or CIMMYT. These costs will not be deducted from the contributions defined

under article 4.2.

The total amount of these extra contributions will be defined freely between these

Parties in order to ensure a smooth establishment of the Wheat Initiative.

Article 5

Institutions’ Coordination Committee

5.1. Composition

5.1.1. Composition

The Institutions’ Coordination Committee brings together representatives of research

funding agencies and research organisations of participating countries. It is composed of

one representative of each participating country to the Wheat Initiative and one per

CGIAR’s participating centre.

The Institutions are free to change their representative in the Institutions’ Coordination

Committee, provided prior information to the International Scientific Coordinator.

Nonetheless, in order to ensure the good fulfilment of the missions of the Wheat

Initiative, the Institutions will constrain themselves to keep as much as possible a

continuity in their representation. However, in case of temporary unavailability, a


26


member of the Institution’s Coordination Committee may send another person of its

country with a power of attorney.

The members of the Institutions’ Coordination Committee may invite an internal or

external expert as guest to assist them in their representation to the Wheat Initiative,

such as a representative of their national funding agency/ public research organisation.

Representatives of the World Bank, United Nations, European Union and of the Food and

Agriculture Organisation (FAO) will be invited as observers, as well as charitable and

other transnational funding organisations.

The Scientific Board and the Secretariat will be regular guests of the Institutions’

Coordination Committee.

5.1.2. Chairperson and Co-Chairperson

The members of the Institutions’ Coordination Committee will elect one of them as

Chairperson and another one as Co-­‐Chairperson of the Institutions’ Coordination

Committee no later than the day of their first meeting. They will be nominated for three

years, renewable once.

The Chairperson will be responsible for the organisation of meetings and will chair them.

The Chairperson will also represent the Institutions’ Coordination Committee in the

other Committees and in front of third parties.

In the case where the Chairperson is unavailable, its tasks and missions will be executed

by the Co-­‐Chairperson.

5.2. Frequency of meetings

The Institutions’ Coordination Committee will meet:

• At least once a year, in principle at request of its Chairperson, or at any other time when

necessary, at request of at least one third of its members or at the request of the

Scientific Board, at times and places to be determined by the Institutions’ Coordination

Committee. Meetings shall be convened by the Chairperson with a prior notice of at

least one month and with an agenda and any documentation required for dealing with

items on the agenda;

• The annual meeting will take place physically, but extraordinary meetings may take

place via teleconference;

• The Institutions’ Coordination Committee may issue decisions and/or advices on urgent

matters setting forth the decision and/or advice so taken by way of written consents,

including electronic means of communication (such as exchange of emails or use of a

web collaborative platform). The responses to the written consultations will have to be

done within one month and the rules of 5.3.2 will also apply mutatis mutandis (i.e. the

total number of responses within this delay will form the quorum). In case of

emergency, the delay for response may be reduced to 2 weeks. These decisions or

advices will be annexed in the minutes of the next meeting.

5.3. Role and mission

5.3.1. Competence

The Institutions’ Coordination Committee is the forum where the Wheat Initiative’s

participating countries, through their Institutions, discuss the implementation of the

recommendations and propositions made by the Research Committee.


27


Its role is to:

• Provide information on national and transnational funding programmes

• Receive and approve reports on wheat research strategic orientations and their

funding needs

• Coordinate funding to add value to national investments

• Approve the annual budget of the Wheat Initiative and its execution

• Propose the constitution of Expert Working Groups in its area of competence, and

approves their Chairperson and Co-­‐Chairperson.

• Review the outputs from the Expert Working Groups

5.3.2. Decisions and quorum

The Institutions’ Coordination Committee takes its decisions consensually. However, for

specific topics and in the case where the fate of a proposal is discussed and does not

make unanimity, the Chairperson may ask for a vote, where the decision will be adopted

at the simple majority, except in the cases below:

• At the two third majority:

- Election of Chair and Co-Chairperson of the Institutions’ Coordination

Committee

- Participation of new members (either public or private) to the Wheat Initiative

upon proposal of the Scientific Board,

- After prior consultation of the Research Committee, exclusion of a Party

according to the procedure described under article 15.12 – but minus the vote

of the concerned Party if it is member of the Institutions’ Coordination

Committee

- Proposing of settlement to the Parties in case of disagreement between any

Parties as exposed under article 15.7.2.

The Institutions’ Coordination Committee shall be deemed to be rightly met if the two

third of its members are presents or represented. A member of the Institutions’

Coordination Committee may give a power of attorney to another member; however one

cannot accept more than three powers of attorney at a time.

Article 6

Research Committee

6.1. Composition

6.1.1. Composition

The Research Committee is composed of one representative from each Institution and

Stakeholder.

The Parties are free to appoint their representative. However, due to the specific tasks of

this Committee, the appointment of a leading scientist of its personnel or country is

highly recommended. The Institutions’ representatives are expected to represent more

than their Party and the collective view of the wheat public research community of their

country. The members of the Research Committee will be appointed for a renewable

three years period. However in case of temporary unavailability, a member of the


28


Research Committee may send another person of its country/Institution or Stakeholder

with a power of attorney.

The Scientific Board and the Secretariat will be regular guests of the Research

Committee.

6.1.2. Chairperson and Co-Chairperson

The members of the Research Committee will elect one of them as Chairperson and

another one as Co-­‐Chairperson of the Research Committee no later than the day of their

first meeting. (S)he will be nominated for three years renewable once.

The Chairperson will be responsible for the organisation of meetings and chair them.

The Chairperson will also represent the Research Committee in the other Committees

and in front of third parties.

In the case where the Chairperson is unavailable, its tasks and missions will be executed

by the Co-­‐Chairperson.

6.2. Frequency of meetings

The Research Committee will meet:

• At least once a year, in principle at request of its Chairperson, or at any other time when

necessary at request of the majority of its members or at the request of the Scientific

Board. Meetings shall be convened by the Chairperson with a prior notice of at least one

month and with an agenda and any documentation required for dealing with items on the

agenda;

• The annual meeting will take place physically, at times and places to be determined by

the Scientific Board, but extraordinary meetings may take place via teleconference;

• The Research Committee may issue decisions and/or advices on urgent matters setting

forth the decision and/or advice so taken by way of written consents, including

electronic means of communication (such as exchange of emails or use of a web

collaborative platform). The responses to the written consultations will have to be done

within one month and the rules of 6.3.2 will also apply mutatis mutandis (i.e. the total

number of responses within this delay will form the quorum). In case of emergency, the

delay for response may be reduced to 2 weeks. These decisions or advices will be

annexed in the minutes of the next meeting.

6.3. Role and mission

6.3.1. Competence

The Research Committee is in charge to oversee the development of the vision and

strategy of the Wheat Initiative and to monitor their implementation.

Its role is to:

• Contribute to and approve strategic documents such as vision papers and

research agendas and their updates before submission to the Institutions’

Coordination Committee and dissemination.

• Suggest coordination and collaboration in specific areas of research

• Propose the constitution of Expert Working Groups in its area of competence, and

approve their Chairperson and Co-­‐Chairperson.

• Review the outputs from the Expert Working Groups

• Provide updates on national research efforts relevant to the Wheat Initiative


29


• Discuss the annual budget of the Wheat Initiative

• Suggest new areas of activities for the Wheat Initiative

6.3.2. Decisions and quorum

The Research Committee takes its decisions consensually. However, for specific topics

and in the case where the fate of a proposal is discussed and does not make unanimity,

the Chairperson may ask for a vote, where the decision will be adopted at the simple

majority, except in the cases below where they will be voted at the two third majority:

- Election of the Chair and Co-Chairperson of the Research Committee

- Election of the Scientific Board members

- Advice to the Institutions’ Coordination Committee regarding the exclusion of

a Party – but minus the vote of the concerned Party

- Proposing of settlement in case of disagreement between any Parties as

exposed under article 15.7.2

The Research Committee shall be deemed to be rightly met if the two third of its

members are present or represented. A member of the Research Committee may give a

power of attorney to another member; however one cannot accept more than three

powers of attorney at a time.

Article 7

Scientific Board

7.1. Composition

7.1.1. General rules

The Scientific Board is composed of nine members:

• Eight elected by the Research Committee from either the Research Committee’s

members or from the Chairperson or Co-­‐Chairperson of any of the Expert

Working Groups running at the time of appointment with at least one

representative from the private industry / stakeholders, covering as much as

possible the thematic and geographic areas of the Wheat Initiative; and

• The International Scientific Coordinator.

Nevertheless, for the start of the Wheat Initiative, the six first members of the Scientific

Board will be:

• S. Baenzinger (University of Nebraska, USA),

• H. Braun (CIMMYT, Mexico),

• C. Feuillet (INRA, France),

• P. Langridge (ACPFG, Australia),

• G. Moore (BBSRC, United Kingdom),

• C. Pozniak (University of Saskatoon, Canada).

The two other first members of the Scientific Board will be elected by the Research

Committee at its first meeting.

The secretariat will be regular guest of the Scientific Board. The Chairperson of the

Institutions’ Coordination Committee will be invited as observer.


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7.1.2. Election and renewal of Scientific Board members

The members of the Scientific Board will be appointed for a one-­‐time renewable three

year period. For the avoidance of doubt, the members of the Scientific Board, being no

more either a Research Committee’s member or member of a running Expert Working

Group at the date of renewing of their position as Scientific Board member, are eligible

for renewal by the Research Committee. Furthermore, despite that at the end of its

second mandate a person being member of the Scientific Board cannot be renewed for a

third time, that person will be allowed to be again a Scientific Board’s member three

years later.

In order to maintain its continuity, the members of the Scientific Board will be renewed

by the Research Committee in part every year, as follows:

• First year: election of the missing two members, as exposed under 7.1.1

• Second year: election or renewal of three members among the six persons named

in 7.1.1 – chosen either by themselves or chosen randomly by the Scientific

Coordinator

• Third year: election or renewal of three members from the remaining and not yet

renewed persons named in 7.1.1

• From the fourth year, the election/renewal will follow the same rules on a three-­year

period: two members the first year and then three members each of the

following two years.

If during its mandate a Scientific Board member resigns, (s)he will be replaced by a

person elected by the Research Committee for the remaining mandate’s term.

7.1.3. Chairperson and Co-Chairperson

The members of the Scientific Board will elect one of them as Chairperson and another

one as Co-­‐Chairperson of the Scientific Board no later than the day of their first meeting.

(S)he will be nominated for three years renewable once. The International Scientific

Coordinator cannot be elected as Chairperson or Co-­‐Chairperson.

The Chairperson will be responsible for the organisation of meetings and chair them.

The Chairperson will also represent the Scientific Board in the other Committees and in

front of third parties.

In the case where the Chairperson is unavailable, its tasks and missions will be executed

by the Co-­‐Chairperson.

7.2. Frequency of meetings

The Scientific Board will meet:

• At least twice a year, in principle at request of its Chairperson, or at any other time when

necessary at request of the majority of its members. Meetings shall be convened by the

Chairperson with a prior notice of at least one month and with an agenda and any

documentation required for dealing with items on the agenda;

• The meetings will take place physically, at times and places to be determined by the

International Scientific Coordinator, or via teleconference;

• The Scientific Board may issue decisions and/or advices on urgent matters setting forth

the decision and/or advice so taken by way of written consents, including electronic

means of communication (such as exchange of emails or use of a web collaborative

platform). The responses to the written consultations will have to be done within one


31


month and the rules of 7.3 will also apply mutatis mutandis (i.e. the total number of

responses within this delay will form the quorum). In case of emergency, the delay for

response may be reduced to 2 weeks. These decisions or advices will be annexed in the

minute of the next meeting.

7.3. Role and mission

The Scientific Board provides strategic leadership and develops vision, strategy and

priority documents.

It identifies new partners to the Wheat Initiative and proposes their adhesion to the

Institutions’ Coordination Committee.

It liaises with the Institutions’ Coordination Committee, the Research Committee and the

Expert Working Groups.

It is in charge of the organisation of a biannual International Wheat Research

Conference, in coordination with the International Wheat Genetics Symposium and

International Wheat Conference.

It appoints the International Scientific Coordinator, after proposal of the Institutions’

Coordination Committee.

The Scientific Board shall be deemed to be rightly met if two thirds of its members are

present or represented. A member of the Scientific Board may give a power of attorney

to another member; however one cannot accept more than one power of attorney at a

time.

The Scientific Board takes its decisions consensually. However, in the case where the

fate of a proposal is discussed and does not make unanimity, the Chairperson may ask

for a vote where the decision will be adopted at the simple majority of the present or

represented.

Article 8

Expert Working Groups

8.1. Composition and Chairperson

Expert Working Groups are Committees that are created on the basis of a need by either

the Institutions’ Coordination Committee or by the Research Committee – which only

decide on the topic of the Expert Working Groups and approve its Chairperson and co-­‐

Chairperson.

Thereafter, the Chairperson of an Expert Working Group is free to organise its Expert

Working Group and to invite any person (s)he feels fit for the tasks to be performed

within.

The Expert Working Group will last for the duration of the tasks for which it was created

for.

8.2. Frequency of meetings

The Expert Working Groups will meet:

• As required, in principle at request of its Chairperson, or at any other time when

necessary at request of the majority of its members or at the request of the Committee

by which it was created. Meetings shall be convened by the Chairperson with a prior

notice of at least one month and with an agenda and any documentation required for

dealing with items on the agenda;


32


• Its meetings may take place physically, at times and places to be determined by the

Chairperson, or via teleconference;

• Each Expert Research Group will report its activities to the Scientific Board in a

standard format every six months for dissemination to the Research Committee and the

Institutions’ Coordination Committee.

• The daily work of the Expert Working Groups is managed through a collaborative

internet platform provided by the Secretariat, which facilitates the exchange of ideas and

the drafting and revision of position papers.

8.3. Role and mission

The Expert Working Groups delivers state of the art, gap analysis and recommendations

addressing the specific research or organisational areas for which they were created.

There is neither quorum nor voting rules for Expert Working Groups. Dissenting

opinions must be properly addressed and explained in its reports should they be

expressed by any of its members.

Article 9

International Scientific Coordinator

9.1. Appointment of the International Scientific Coordinator

The International Scientific Coordinator is appointed by the Scientific Board upon the

proposal of an Institution. (S)he is appointed for a renewable 4 years period.

When the appointment/renewing of the International Scientific Coordinator’s mandate

is to be on the agenda of the next Scientific Board meeting, information will be provided

to the Institutions, that will have to indicate the Scientific Board at least three months

before that meeting if they want to present a candidate for this position. Immediately

after this deadline, information will be given to all Institutions of the received

candidatures, with another one month grace period to give the other members the

opportunity to present their candidatures or to those who proposed theirs to change

their person or remove their candidature. One month before that meeting, the

candidates will have to send the Scientific Board their motivation letters for that

position, which will be circulated together with the agenda of the next meeting by the

Scientific Board.

The Institutions will be free to propose as International Scientific Coordinator a person

being of their personnel, or another recognised expert of their country.

The Wheat Initiative budget will be managed by the International Scientific

Coordinator’s supporting Institution which will therefore be the Managing Institution.

Therefore the Managing Institution will be receiving and managing the Wheat

Initiative’s budget on behalf of all the Parties and under the direction of the

International Scientific Coordinator.

If the International Scientific Coordinator resigns, its interim will be executed by the

Scientific Board’s Chairperson. The Scientific Board will thereafter, at its choice, either

name another person proposed by the Managing Institution as International Scientific

Coordinator for the remaining term, or launch the usual procedure of appointment as

above-­‐described.

In all cases, the renewal or appointment of an International Scientific Coordinator must

be done at least three months before the term of the actual International Scientific

Coordinator’s mandate or three months after its resignation.


33


Notwithstanding the foregoing, until the end of 2015, the Parties agree that the

International Scientific Coordinator will be Hélène Lucas and the Managing Institution

will be INRA.

9.2. Role and mission

The International Scientific Coordinator is in charge of the day-­‐to-­‐day management of

the Wheat Initiative, which includes in particular to:

• Provide support to the development of the vision and strategy. (S)he produces

drafts, manages consultations ;

• Represent the Wheat Initiative in front of third parties, especially in all kind of

forums;

• Oversees the establishment, population and management of the Wheat

Initiative’s website, with the help of the Secretariat;

• Produce an e-­‐newsletter to inform and update the Parties and the research

community;

• Organize meetings, provide secretariats and any kind related support for the

Committees;

• Prepare and execute the budget after approval by the Institution’s Coordination

Committee

• Manage the Secretariat

Article 10 Secretariat

The Secretariat is composed of the required personnel for the International Scientific

Coordinator to properly perform its tasks and is expected to be composed of at least one

or two persons. The Secretariat is managed by the International Scientific Coordinator

who is therefore responsible of the good performance of its tasks.

The Secretariat is composed of personnel of the Parties (permanent or non-­‐permanent)

or outsourced, all appointed by the International Scientific Coordinator. The costs of the

Secretariat will be paid on the Wheat Initiative’s budget only for those incurred by the

Managing Institution (including the costs of its Subcontractor(s) involved in the

Secretariat activities).

The focus of the Secretariat is administrative. Its role includes in particular to:

• Organise and provide administrative support for the meetings of the different

Committees, draft the minutes of the Institutions’ Coordination Committees, the

Research Committee and the Scientific Board meetings

• Follow the execution of the budget

• Maintain a website for the Wheat Initiative

• Maintain a international database of wheat scientists

• Facilitate communications within the Wheat Initiative and outreach activities

• Ensure the administrative continuity of the Wheat Initiative

Article 11 Organisation of meetings and minutes

11.1. Organisation of meetings and related expenses

The meetings of the Committees may be materially organised, following a Committee’s

Chairperson request, by the Secretariat, after prior agreement of the International

Scientific Coordinator.


34


The International Scientific Coordinator will, in the framework of its budget preparation

and execution, annually fix the rules regarding the Wheat Initiative’s meetings costs in

order to ensure a wise and efficient use of the budget.

11.2. Minutes of meetings

Within one month after each meeting of a Committee, its Chairperson will draft the

minutes and send them to its respective members. The members of the Committee will

then have one month to give their comments. Thereafter the Chairperson will send the

final version of the minutes to the members of the Committee and to the International

Scientific Coordinator.

The Chairperson may ask the International Scientific Coordinator to provide Secretariat

support for the drafting and circulation of the minutes.

Article 12 Confidentiality

Because of the nature of the Wheat Initiative which is before all an open forum where

Institutions, Stakeholders and the whole scientific community are wishing to speak

freely and exchange information without suffering any constrains, all the information

exchanged between the Parties in the framework of the activities of the Wheat Initiative,

and notably during the Committees’ meetings will be deemed not to be confidential.

Nevertheless, if some Parties are wishing to exchange confidential information in the

framework of the activities of the Wheat Initiative they will have to sign, at their

initiative, specific confidentiality agreements.

Article 13 Publication

13.1. General principle

The Knowledge generated in the performance of the Wheat Initiative, including notably

all the reports and papers drafted by or for the Committees are aimed to be publicly

available.

However the Wheat Initiative will not publish a report or a paper produced by a

Committee as long as it is not in its final and approved form.

External communication made on behalf of the Wheat Initiative will be approved by the

Scientific Board.

13.2. Modalities of publications

In order the publications of the Wheat Initiative to be widely disseminated, the

International Scientific Coordinator or the Parties will endeavour to disseminate them

under either a Creative Commons Attribution-­‐ShareAlike 3.0 Unported licence (CC BY-­‐

SA 3.0) 1 or, especially (but not compulsory) for the reports performed for or by a

Committee, under a Creative Commons Attribution-­‐NoDerivs 3.0 Unported license (CC

BY-­‐ND 3.0) 2 (to prohibit derivative works).

By exception, if a publication on a Wheat Initiative Knowledge is expected to be made in

a subscription-­‐based journal, the concerned Party(ies), or by default the International

1 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-­‐sa/3.0/

2 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-­‐nd/3.0/


35


Scientific Coordinator will make its best (but without engagement of success) in order to

negotiate with the editor the right to make such publication freely available under one of

the aforementioned Creative Commons licence, one year after its publication,.

Article 14 Intellectual property

All Knowledge produced within the performance of the Wheat Initiative – which will

mainly consist of coordination activities – is deemed to be published or be freely

available.

For the avoidance of doubt, all matters related to intellectual property arising from

further research and development collaborative activities between some or all of the

Parties involved in the Wheat Initiative are outside of the scope of this Agreement and

will be addressed in the consortium agreements covering these activities and signed by

the concerned Parties.

Article 15 Miscellaneous provisions

15.1. Content of the agreement

This Consortium Agreement and its annexes shall constitute the entire agreement

among the Parties in respect of the Wheat Initiative, and supersede all previous

negotiations, commitments and documents concerning the Wheat Initiative including

any memorandum of understanding among some or all of the Parties (whether or not

with others) which relate to the Wheat Initiative.

15.2. Transfer or Assignment

No Party shall, without prior written unanimous consent of the Institutions’

Coordination Committee assign or otherwise transfer partially or totally any of its rights

or obligations under this Consortium Agreement, unless otherwise agreed in this

contract. Such consent shall not be unreasonably withheld, if such assignment or

transfer is made to the benefit of an Affiliate of that Party.

15.3. Liability and warranty

15.3.1. General Principles

Each Party shall be solely liable for damage resulting from the performance of its work,

subject to the conditions of this Consortium Agreement.

Nothing contained in this Consortium Agreement shall be deemed to be a representation

or warranty, expressed or implied, by a Party hereto that the Knowledge or the Pre-­‐

Existing Know-­‐how are or will be valid or will afford proper protection or will be

commercially exploitable or of any other value or that their exploitation will not infringe

the rights of any third party.

Each Party is in charge of its own personnel insurance coverage according to its national

applicable law including social security law and accident at work and occupational

diseases regulations. Each Party is liable for any damages caused by its own personnel.

Each employer performs its own formalities.


36


Self-­‐insured public bodies will assume themselves the financial consequences of their

liability. Each Party shall be under no liability other than as stated in this article 15.3,

and no warranty condition or representation of any kind is made, given or to be implied.

15.3.2. Exclusion of indirect damages

No Party shall be liable to any other Party for indirect or consequential loss or damages

such as loss of profit, loss of revenue, or loss of contracts or a similar loss or damage.

The aforesaid limitations of liability shall not apply to acts of gross negligence or

intentional misconduct.

Each Participant which uses Knowledge resulting from the Wheat Initiative and/or Pre-­existing

Know-­‐how, whether owned by such Participant or obtained by it from another

Participant according to the term of this Consortium Agreement, shall be solely liable for

any loss, damage, or injury to third parties resulting from such use.

15.3.3. Liability towards third parties

Subject always to such other undertakings and warranties as are provided for in this

Consortium Agreement, each Party shall be solely liable for any loss, damage or injury to

third parties resulting solely from the performance or non-­‐performance of its work.

15.3.4. Liability for Subcontractors, third parties

Each Party shall remain fully responsible for the performance of:

a) any part of its work;

b) its obligations under this Consortium Agreement:

- by any Subcontractor;

- by third parties which contribute to the Wheat Initiative on the basis of an

agreement between itself and such third party.

Therefore, said Party shall ensure that such subcontract or agreement fully complies

with the requirements of this Consortium Agreement.

15.4. Effectiveness, term and surviving of the Consortium Agreement

This Consortium Agreement shall enter into force at the Effective Date.

This Consortium Agreement shall expire at the end of the Wheat Initiative by decision of

the Institutions’ Coordination Committee at its last meeting.

Nonetheless, articles 12 to 14 shall survive the term of this Consortium Agreement.

15.5. Language

This Consortium Agreement is drawn up in the English language, which shall govern all

documents, notices and meetings, for its application and/or extension or in any other

way relative thereto.

15.6. Force Majeure

15.6.1. Definition


37


The Parties shall not be liable for any failure to perform this Consortium Agreement, to

the extent that such failure is caused by any reason beyond the Parties’ control, or by

reason of any of the following: labour disturbances or labour disputes of any kind,

accidents, failures of any governmental approval, civil disorders, acts of aggression,

energy or other conservation measures failures of utilities, mechanical breakdowns,

material shortage, disease or similar circumstances.

15.6.2. Obligations

The Party referring to the Force Majeure shall give prompt notice to the International

Scientific Coordinator and the other Parties and use all reasonable endeavours to avoid

or remove such causes of non-­‐performance, mitigate the effects of such causes and

resume performance as soon as such causes are removed.

15.6.3. Effects of the Force Majeure

The performance of obligations obstructed by Force Majeure will be suspended as long

as the event lasts, the end of said obstructing event will be notified to the other Parties

according to the same procedure as in article 15.6.2.

The Parties shall discuss in good faith the possibilities of a transfer of tasks affected by

the event. Such discussions shall commence as soon as reasonably possible. If such Force

Majeure event is not overcome within six weeks after such notification, the transfer of

tasks shall be carried out. In that case, the Party victim of Force Majeure, if it has no

other choice, will be authorised to leave the Consortium Agreement without any penalty.

15.6.4. Non-respect of the obligation of notification

Any Party not respecting the above notification procedure as described in articles 15.6.2

and 15.6.3 will not be able to refer to Force Majeure.

15.7. Governing law and disputes resolution

15.7.1. Governing law

This Consortium Agreement shall be governed and construed in accordance with law of

the competent jurisdiction as defined under article 15.7.3.

15.7.2. Pre-contentious

In the event of any dispute between the Parties arising in connection with this

Consortium Agreement, including any question regarding its existence, validity or

termination, the Parties shall use all reasonable endeavours to firstly resolve the

problem on an amicable basis.

Therefore, the Parties agree to expose their problems firstly to the Scientific Board, then

to the Institutions’ Coordination Committee which will both attempt to make

recommendations by consent of the Parties concerned.

15.7.3. Competent jurisdiction


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If, subsequently, the Parties are not able to settle their disputes in an amicable way, such

disputes shall then be submitted to the court of the jurisdiction of the Managing

Institution.

15.8. Severability

If any provision of this Consortium Agreement is invalid or unenforceable under the

governing law as defined under article 15.7.3, all other provisions shall nevertheless

continue in full force and effect. All Parties agree to replace such unenforceable or

nugatory clause or part of this Consortium Agreement by a new clause to be negotiated

in good faith, which covers the economic content of the invalid clause as far as possible.

This may also be applicable in the case of a supplementary interpretation of this

Consortium Agreement.

15.9. Notices

Unless a specific form or manner expressed in this Consortium Agreement, notices to be

given in this Consortium Agreement shall be in writing, signed by the Party giving notice,

and shall be sent to the address of the Party(ies) to be notified or to such address as a

Party may specify later. Notice shall be deemed given upon physical delivery of the

notice to the Party addressed in the notice.

15.10. Access by new Parties

After former approval of the Institutions’ Coordination Committee as exposed under

article 5.3.2, the accession of a new Party will be executed through the signature of an

Accession Form (as attached under Annex 1) signed between it and the Managing

Institution. The date of effect of such accession will be the date of last signature of the

Accession Form.

15.11. Withdrawal of a Participant

15.11.1. Procedure of withdrawal

Any Party may request to terminate its participation to the Wheat Initiative and to this

Consortium Agreement, by giving three (3) months prior written notice of termination

to the International Scientific Coordinator, by registered mail with acknowledgement of

receipt, indicating the reasons for termination.

This withdrawal will be notified by the International Scientific Coordinator to the other

Parties.

15.11.2. Consequences of withdrawal

The withdrawing Party agrees to provide justifications in connection with the period

during which it participated in the Wheat Initiative and any other element required to

prepare the Wheat Initiative Reports, even after the date of its withdrawal.

15.12. Exclusion of a Party

In case of substantial breach of its obligations pursuant to this Consortium Agreement,

the exclusion of a Party may be decided, after advice of the Research Committee, by the


39


Institutions’ Coordination Committee by unanimous vote minus the vote of the

concerned Party if it has a representative in that Committee.

The exclusion of a Party shall have the same consequences as a withdrawal without

prejudice to damages that can be requested to the excluded Party by the other Parties.

15.13. Execution and signature of the Consortium Agreement

INRA has to produce a final version of the CA with the appropriate number [xx] of

signature pages, a distinctive identification code on each page, pages numbering and has

to send this in a read-­‐only format (e.g. pdf) to all Parties.

Each Party shall print and sign its signature page of this final version in [xx] copies and

send them to INRA.

INRA shall collect the signed signature pages and have an obligation to send a full copy

of this Consortium Agreement together with the signature page of all the Parties to each

Party within thirty (30) days of receipt of the last signed signature page.

Each copy of the Consortium Agreement together with the signed signature pages of all

Parties shall constitute an original and all of which together shall constitute but one and

the same instrument in respect to the contractual relationship between the Parties.

No waiver by any Party in one or more instances of any of the provisions of this

Consortium Agreement or a breach thereof establish a precedent for any instance in

respect with this or any other provision. Furthermore, in case of waiver in a particular

provision, all other provisions of this Consortium Agreement will continue in full force

and effect.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the Parties hereto have caused their duly authorized officer to

execute and deliver this Consortium Agreement made in [xx] original copies, the [date of

signature].


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For [Name of the Party]

[Signatory Name]

[Function]


41


Annex 1 – Adhesion form of a new Party

Accession of a new Party to the Wheat Initiative

Consortium Agreement, version […, YYYY-MM-DD]

[OFFICIAL NAME OF THE NEW PARTY]

Hereby consents to become a Party to the Consortium Agreement identified above and accepts

all the rights and obligations of a Party and as [an Institution / a Stakeholder] starting from the

[date].

[OFFICIAL NAME OF THE MANAGING INSTITUTION]

Hereby certifies that the Consortium, through its Institutions’ Coordination Committee has

accepted in the meeting held on [date] the accession of [the name of the new Party] to the

Consortium starting from the [date].

This Accession document has been done in 2 originals to be duly signed by the undersigned

authorised representatives.

[Date and Place]

[INSERT NAME OF THE NEW PARTY]

Signature(s)

Name(s)

Title(s)

[Date and Place]

[INSERT NAME OF THE MANAGING INSTITUTION]

Signature(s)

Name(s)

Title(s)


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