Your Guide to Design and Fine Arts (2663 KB) - Massey University

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Your Guide to Design and Fine Arts (2663 KB) - Massey University

YOUR GUIDE TO

DESIGN AND FINE ARTS

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN,

FASHION DESIGN, FINE ARTS,

PHOTOGRAPHY, SPATIAL DESIGN,

TEXTILE DESIGN,

VISUAL COMMUNICATION

DESIGN

CLASS OF 2013


CONTENTS

COVER PHOTO: TE ARA HIHIKO: CREATIVE ARTS

BUILDING A world first, this building combines

Massey’s creative vision with innovative

architectural design and advanced seismic

engineering, and offers a multifaceted art and

design facility that will sustain and inspire Kiwi

creativity for generations to come.

Project partners: Massey University, Athfield

Architects, Dunning Thornton and Arrow

International.

2 COLLEGE OF CREATIVE ARTS (CoCA)

AND ITS QUALIFICATIONS

4 SELECTION PROCESS

7 DEGREES

8 BACHELOR OF DESIGN (HONOURS)

13 Fashion Design

14 Industrial Design

17 Photography

19 Spatial Design

21 Textile Design

23 Visual Communication Design

24 BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS (HONOURS)

28 OTHER COURSES

UPDATED APRIL 2013

Please note: The information contained in

this publication is indicative of the offerings

available in 2014 and subsequent years. This

information is correct at the time of going to press,

but may be subject to change. While all reasonable

efforts will be made to ensure listed programmes are

offered and regulations are up to date, the University

reserves the right to change the content or method

of presentation, or to withdraw any qualification or

part thereof, or impose limitations on enrolments

should circumstances require this.

28 DIPLOMA IN PHOTOGRAPHY

29 GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN DESIGN

30 CERTIFICATE IN ART AND DESIGN STUDIES

31 CONTACTING MASSEY FOR MORE INFORMATION

YOUR GUIDE TO DESIGN AND FINE ARTS

1


2

MASSEY UNIVERSITY

COLLEGE OF

CREATIVE ARTS

TOI RAUWHARANGI

‘MAI TE PO, KI TE AO MARAMA’

– FROM NOVICE TO EXPERT

Massey’s College of Creative Arts (CoCA) in Wellington is

where many of New Zealand’s best designers and artists

begin their careers. It’s a place where you can mix with

top students from all over the country, and beyond, who

are similarly obsessed with art and design. It’s a place

where creativity has no limits and you’re valued for the

independent development and expression of your ideas. It’s

where you’re inspired by artists, designers and academics

of national and international distinction, who believe

passionately in fostering local talent. All based in the

thriving cultural hub of Wellington, the creative capital of

New Zealand.

The reputation of Massey’s creative arts programmes

is well maintained by our students, who win national

and international awards even while studying. They are

well represented in the student section of the Designers

Institute of New Zealand Best Design Awards, the

Dyson Product and Electrolux Design awards, and at the

annual World of Wearable Arts showcase. CoCA is also

the highest-ranking art and design school in Australia-

New Zealand according to the Red Dot Design Awards

in Germany. Examples of student work can be found at

creative.massey.ac.nz

All CoCA qualifications provide a high-level professional

education that equips you with the skills to make a

difference in the world. At CoCA we believe there are

five attributes that will ensure you are successful in the

industries of the 21st century. In fact we are so inspired by

these we have had them embedded in the walls of Te Ara

Hihiko, our brand new creative arts building:

{ Creativity – Toi

Virtuosity – Mohio

Understanding – Matauranga

Autonomy – Mana

Connectedness – Whanaungatanga.

The College is comprised of the School of Design and School

of Art, both tracing their history back to 1886.

YOUR GUIDE TO DESIGN AND FINE ARTS

SCHOOL OF DESIGN

The School of Design offered the first design degrees in

New Zealand in the early 1990s. The school continues

to receive international recognition for the quality of

its graduates across an extensive range of design

specialisations and has alumni engaged at the highest level

in creative industries around the world.

Qualifications offered include a Bachelor of Design with

Honours, a Bachelor of Design, a Graduate Diploma

in Design, a Certificate in Art and Design Studies, a

Postgraduate Diploma in Design, Master of Design, Master

of Fine Arts (in design), Master of Philosophy and the

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD).

SCHOOL OF ART

The School of Art is made up of photographers, artists,

researchers and curators who are held in high esteem

across the world. Unlike any other art school in New

Zealand, it is also a centre for teaching and research

excellence in the field of visual and material culture, which

explores the uses and meanings of images, objects and

spaces shaping everyday life.

Qualifications offered include a Bachelor of Fine Arts

with Honours, a Bachelor of Fine Arts, a Postgraduate

Diploma in Fine Arts, a Postgraduate Diploma and an MA

in Visual and Material Culture, Master of Fine Arts, Master

of Philosophy and a Doctor of Philosophy (Photography

students enrol in a Bachelor of Design with Honours).


SUBJECTS AVAILABLE

CoCA offers New Zealand’s most comprehensive range

of subjects within the fields of design and fine arts, with

a worldwide reputation for excellence in research-led

creative practice. There are opportunities to progress from

undergraduate study to postgraduate study in fine arts,

design, and visual and material culture.

Subject areas include: industrial design; spatial design;

textile design; fashion design; photography; visual

communication design (including advertising, digital media,

illustration and graphic design); Toi Atea: Māori art and

design; visual and material culture, critical and contextual

studies and fine arts (including contemporary art practices;

drawing; painting; photography; and sculpture).

This guide covers undergraduate qualifications.

For information on postgraduate study at CoCA, see:

creative.massey.ac.nz

ART AND DESIGN

CAREERS

Art and design graduates can be found in today’s

workplace as product designers, graphic designers,

advertising executives, visual effects artists, curators,

stylists, textile designers, interior designers, copywriters,

arts administrators, communication specialists, art directors,

animation and interactive media designers, professional artists,

events coordinators, web designers, concept artists, videographers,

photographers, fashion designers, transport designers, multi-media

artists, filmmakers, directors, illustrators, furniture designers, teachers,

researchers, writers, historians, critics and art gallery owners, just

to mention a few! Outside the creative industries designers and

artists are also valued as inventors and explorers across

a broad spectrum of industries from engineering and

building, to policy analysis and human resource

management. Many art and design graduates

are entrepreneurial and run their

own businesses.

What facilities will I have access to?

At Massey you’ll have access to first rate facilities and

equipment. The College has numerous dedicated computer

laboratories and workshops equipped with high-quality

industry-standard machinery and equipment. These include

laser and water-jet cutters, a state of the art green-screen

room, a fully equipped digital audio lab, and a multipurpose

performance and gallery space – for use by students and

industry partners. It is also home to Australasia’s first MITaligned

Fab Lab (digital fabrication facility).

Why are the Massey degrees four years?

Massey’s CoCA degrees are professional degrees

providing extended knowledge and skills (in much the same

way as engineering and law are professional degrees).

Your fourth year will include an option to complete an

honours degree that may lead on to a research masters

degree. Graduates with the four-year Massey degree are

highly regarded by employers for their superior knowledge,

skills, problem solving, and creative abilities.

Can I do any of my study overseas?

Yes. You can apply for Massey’s student exchange

programme, which enables you to go to a partner university

for a period of study (usually one semester) in the second

or third year of your degree.

FAQS

What can a design or fine art degree lead to?

In today’s world it is highly likely that you’ll have multiple

careers rather than just one job, and many of the jobs you

will be employed in over your lifetime don’t even exist yet!

Currently employers are looking for workers who offer

the best skills for success: versatility, critical thinking and

creativity are highly sought-after talents.

When do I have to decide my major area of study?

When you apply you’re invited to identify your area of

interest. As Part I is an exploratory year, during Semester

Two you will be asked to apply for entry into your chosen

major. Should the number of applicants be more than the

number of places available in the major, students will be

offered places according to their achievement in Part I.

YOUR GUIDE TO DESIGN AND FINE ARTS

3


4

ENTRY TO UNIVERSITY ART AND DESIGN

PROGRAMMES

There are three aspects to enrolment for CoCA students:

Admission to the University, selection for programmes,

and enrolment for the papers.

All CoCA students must be aged 16 years on the date

their programme begins. Before enrolment in College

programmes can be confirmed, applicants must meet the

standard criteria for entry to university (please refer to the

Massey website at enrol.massey.ac.nz for details). Once

you have been accepted into the programme you will be

able to enrol in papers of your choice.

SELECTION FOR ART AND DESIGN

PROGRAMMES

Selection for entry into art and design programmes is

based on the submission of a portfolio of art or design work

to the College, which is assessed alongside your overall

academic ability.

{ Applications for the 2014 academic year will be

accepted from July 1 – October 1, 2013. These must

include the completed selected entry form and the

application fees

NB If you are applying to study design you must also

send your portfolio with your forms

Selection for Fine Arts also includes an interview.

These are held in Wellington but can be undertaken

by phone or Skype if required. Applicants will be

notified of a time and location

NB If you are applying to study fine arts you must

bring your portfolio to your interview.

Selection takes time, with careful consideration given to

each application. The results of your application will be

returned as soon as possible after receiving and assessing

your portfolio, with latest results announced in mid

December.

Applications received after October 1 may be accepted

(subject to availability) but potential applicants are strongly

urged to contact the College by the due date. Unforeseen

late applications may be wait-listed and decisions

regarding entry may not be made until late January 2014.

YOUR GUIDE TO DESIGN AND FINE ARTS

ART AND DESIGN PORTFOLIO REQUIREMENTS

Art and Design portfolios should be submitted in an A4

art folder, they must include 12 -24 A4 pages (high quality

colour reproductions) of recent art or design work. As

an option you can provide your portfolio on a USB stick.

Movies can be included but must be in QuickTime format.

We DO NOT accept DVDs, CDs or links to websites.

DESIGN PORTFOLIO REQUIREMENTS

Your portfolio should show clearly and persuasively your

potential to successfully study design and will be assessed

alongside your overall academic ability. Three-dimensional

work should be documented photographically – originals

should not be submitted. We DO NOT accept CDs, DVDs or

links to websites.

College assessors are looking for evidence of the

following:

{ An ability to generate, explore and develop ideas

The ability to transform ideas into a finished work

A degree of sophistication and sensitivity in handling

and investigating media, materials, techniques and

technologies

Your potential to successfully study design.

Your portfolio must include:

12-24 A4 pages (high quality colour reproductions) of

recent design work, such as drawings, designs, paintings,

photographs, documentation of fashion projects or

design prototypes or sculpture. You can also include

developmental work, such as reproductions of workbook

pages, developmental drawings or images, digital or

conventional photographic contact sheets, and screen

captures in the case of digital work. These should be

annotated with short explanations of the ideas behind the

work and how the ideas were translated into their final

form.

Photographs and/or colour prints of work submitted for

NCEA are acceptable.

FINE ARTS PORTFOLIO REQUIREMENTS

Assessors look for indications of your potential and the

degree of exploration and conceptualisation of ideas,

your capacity to think in divergent and innovative ways,

and evidence of the evolution of ideas through preliminary

plans, working sketches, journals, visual records and

documentation.


It is valuable to include work that has been self-initiated

as an indication that you are determined to pursue art

interests in a range of circumstances.

Your interview is also an opportunity to ask questions about

the programme.

College assessors are looking for evidence of the

following:

{ Originality, versatility, enterprise, inventiveness, and a

commitment to creative fine art activity

Artistic achievement and a level of investigation with

particular media

A degree of sophistication and sensitivity in handling

media and evidence of industry

Sustained practice and familiarity with visual media.

Your portfolio must include:

12-24 A4 pages (high quality colour reproductions) of your

recent artwork, including at least four workbook pages.

It can include photographs, reproductions of drawings,

paintings and documentation of performance, sculptural

or installation works that you think are visually informative

about you and your art.

Digital work can be supplied on a USB stick. The selection

process does not consider items such as art history

assignments or testimonials.

APPLICATION PROCESS SUMMARY

1. Complete the selected entry programme application

by downloading it from the Massey website at

enrol.massey.ac.nz> download enrolment

forms>selected entry forms or request a printed form

by phoning 0800 MASSEY.

2. Design applicants: Submit your application form to

the College Office in Wellington with your portfolio

and application fee by October 1, 2013.

Fine Arts applicants: Submit your application to the

College Office in Wellington with your application

fee by October 1, 2013. Attend an interview by

arrangement, bringing your portfolio with you.

For 2014 application fees please go to: fees.massey.

ac.nz>Non-tuition fees> Administration fees.

3. Portfolios will be acknowledged on receipt. While the

College has a well-established tracking process for

all portfolios received, it does not accept liability for

loss of, or damage to, portfolios. Portfolios and their

contents must be clearly labeled – please be sure to

label every separate piece with your name.

4. Application results will be mailed out in the first half

of December 2013.

5. For those awaiting Year 13 NCEA results, provisional

acceptance is subject to gaining admission to the

University and cannot be confirmed until results

are known. Applicants who are not successful in

obtaining admission to university will be contacted in

January about alternative programmes.

DESIGN & FINE ARTS APPLICATIONS

POSTAL ADDRESS

College of Creative Arts

Massey University

Private Box 756

Wellington 6140

COURIER OR DELIVERY ADDRESS

Student Central

Massey University Wellington Campus

Entrance A, Wallace Street, Wellington

ENROLMENT ENQUIRIES

College of Creative Arts

Massey University

Phone: 0800 MASSEY

Text: 5222

E-mail: creative@massey.ac.nz

Website: creative.massey.ac.nz

KEEP IN TOUCH

Facebook: facebook.com/cocamassey

Twitter: @cocamassey

ALANA MAYS, ILLUSTRATION

YOUR GUIDE TO DESIGN AND FINE ARTS

5


REBEKAH CHONG AND ZARA MANN, DIGITAL MEDIA


DEGREES AT

THE COLLEGE OF

CREATIVE ARTS

GRADUATING WITH A DESIGN OR

FINE ART DEGREE FROM MASSEY

WILL PUT YOU AMONGST SOME

OF NEW ZEALAND’S MOST

SUCCESSFUL DESIGNERS,

AND SET YOU ON A PATH

TO A VARIETY OF CREATIVE

INDUSTRIES.

You’ll mix with other passionate, art and design-obsessed students.

You’ll be encouraged to be creative with your non-conformist ideas,

and valued for independent development and expression. You’ll be

taught by artists, designers and other creative practitioners in touch

with the wider art and design worlds, both in New Zealand and

abroad.

YOUR GUIDE TO DESIGN AND FINE ARTS

7


ISH DONEY, PHOTOGRAPHY

BACHELOR OF DESIGN (HONOURS)

BDes (Hons) / BDes

8

YOUR GUIDE TO DESIGN AND FINE ARTS

DURATION

4 YEARS FULL-TIME

AVAILABLE

WELLINGTON (FASHION, FASHION

DESIGN AND BUSINESS, INDUSTRIAL

DESIGN, PHOTOGRAPHY, SPATIAL

DESIGN, TEXTILE DESIGN, AND VISUAL

COMMUNICATION DESIGN)

THIS DEGREE INTRODUCES YOU TO A VARIETY OF DESIGN

DISCIPLINES BEFORE FOCUSING ON ONE AREA THAT WILL BE

YOUR MAJOR SUBJECT.

Graduates with a design degree from Massey enter creative

industries with a well rounded skill-set, ready to take part in

the development of new products, communications and ideas

that will shape and define the lives of future generations.

Massey Wellington’s School of Design established New

Zealand’s first design degree programme almost 20 years ago,

and has an extensive pedigree as a leading design school. It

offers the widest range of coordinated majors in New Zealand

and with the adjacent School of Art, offers the opportunity for

students to include fine arts elective papers in their design

degree.


DEGREES

QUALIFICATION OVERVIEW

To be a successful designer requires a good knowledge of

the world. There is no set education background required

but you’ll find yourself well prepared for degree study if you

include art, design or technology subjects, English, classical

studies, history, economics, sciences, or mathematics in

your high school study.

The Bachelor of Design (Honours) and Bachelor of Design

are future-focused degrees that prepare you for a diverse

range of creative careers. You can major in fashion design,

fashion and business, industrial design, photography, spatial

design, textile design or visual communication design.

With a solid and prestigious history the design degree is

taught in an innovative manner, reflecting the latest research

in design education and the reality of 21st century creative

industries. Designers are increasingly expected to move

seamlessly across disciplines, and intelligently apply both

specialist and transferable knowledge and skills to a host of

new issues. Although the future career ‘landscape’ is hard

to predict, it is clear that qualifications that foster flexibility,

collaboration and trans-disciplinary approaches will have

the edge.

Most of your classes will be in a studio, where you’ll

be immersed in hands-on doing and making, as well as

discussion and debate. Critical thinking and practical skills

go hand-in-hand throughout all our art and design courses.

Most papers are internally assessed through projects that

include design work, and the associated research and

development. Some papers also require attendance at

lectures, tutorials and seminars where assessments can

include essays, tests and reports.

Examples of student work from each major is available at

creative.massey.ac.nz

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

As a Bachelor of Design graduate you will

have a solid grounding in creative problem

solving, a strong research ethos, an ability to think

analytically, and above all, design expertise. You will also

have an approach to design that helps you pursue design

careers and make cross-disciplinary connections with art,

culture and technology in your daily work as a designer.

You will be well equipped for professional design practice

and a range of industry, business and marketing-related

activities. You will also be able to continue with postgraduate

study and research in New Zealand or internationally

(see individual majors for more career information).

PLANNING YOUR DEGREE

All design degree students in the college initially enrol in a

Bachelor of Design with Honours.

Towards the end of Year Three, you and your academic

advisers decide whether you will continue with the Bachelor

of Design (Honours) or complete a Bachelor of Design,

which is less research-focused.

The degree is made up of separate courses called ‘papers’,

the size of which is defined by the credit value. In the first

year you’ll take eight 15-credit papers, making a total of 120

BDes (Hons) and BDes Structure

either

or

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 BDes(Hons) Year 4 BDes

Semester

1

Semester

2

Semester

1

Semester

2

Semester

1

Semester

2

Semester

1

Semester

2

Semester

1

Semester

2

Studio I

Studio I

Studio I

Studio I

Design

Studio IIA

(major)

Design

Studio IIB

(major)

Design

Studio IIIA

(major)

Design

Studio IIIB

(major)

Research

&

Development

Research

Project

Elective

Elective

Studio

Project

Critical &

Contextual

Studies

Critical &

Contextual

Studies

Critical &

Contextual

Studies

Critical &

Contextual

Studies*

Critical &

Contextual

Studies

Critical &

Contextual

Studies**

Elective

(400-level)

Elective

Elective Elective Elective Elective Elective Elective

Elective

(400-level)

External

focus ***

Elective

External

focus ***

* or Creative Industries ** or Creative Enterprise *** Creative Futures or Exhibition or

Creative Exposition

YOUR GUIDE TO DESIGN AND FINE ARTS

9


credits. You should aim for 60 credits per semester and make

sure you include papers that are prerequisites for the next

level of papers you wish to study. To complete your degree

you will need a total of 480 credits, which corresponds to

four years of full-time study.

In Years Two to Four you will choose to focus on a particular

field of design which will then become your major. Each

major is made up of a specific group of core papers.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

Year One of the programme helps you to make the transition

to tertiary education. Through work in our design studios

you will be introduced to general art and design knowledge

and skills. Here you will develop core competencies and

practices. You’ll explore a range of design specialisations,

gain an understanding of the breadth of design and make an

informed decision about your future pathway. You also start

to explore historical and cultural aspects of art and design.

In Years Two and Three, you develop and consolidate

your specialisation-specific knowledge and skills. This

will be supplemented by electives appropriate to your

selected pathway. You’ll produce innovative and creative

responses to studio project briefs and generate ideas with

increasing independence as your study progresses. You will

increasingly work on ‘live briefs’ – real world work for real

clients – which fit with the structured learning objectives of

the curriculum. You will develop a deeper understanding of

the historic, social and cultural context of art and design,

and have the option to take papers about the business

aspects of art and design.

In Year Four, you either complete your Bachelor of Design

with Honours, or a Bachelor of Design.

In the Bachelor of Design with Honours, the focus in the final

year is on further extending expertise, and on research and

its application to design in your area of specialisation. All 120

credits of study are at 400-level. You’ll undertake an approved

supervised design research project, which includes

creative practice. Through this research project, you must

demonstrate innovation and creativity, critical analysis

and reasoning, selectivity, intellectual independence, and

sophisticated communication and presentation skills in

media appropriate to your specialisation.

In the less research-focused pathway of the Bachelor of

Design you select further elective papers and undertake a

major studio project applying technologies, media, materials

and techniques in the context of your specialisation.

In the final semester of your final year, all students are

required to take an External Focus paper. This is the

sharp end of your four years of preparation for a creative

career, and we encourage you to construct an active

strategy for promoting yourself and your work persuasively

in your chosen path, be it entrepreneurial and industry

environments, exhibition or writing/creative research.

CORE STUDIO PAPERS

The structure of core studio papers is one of the most

innovative and forward-thinking aspects of studying design

at Massey.

In your first year, you choose four Studio I papers from nine

on offer, covering design and art. Each paper is taught as a

six-week block.

Studio I papers are required for particular majors (see later

in this guide for details on each major). By the end of the

year you will have sampled several different approaches to

design challenges and be able to make an informed choice

about your major. Even if you are very clear on your major

from the start, this curriculum emulates what’s happening in

the creative industries, with increasing levels of teamwork

and collaboration across disciplines.

Each Studio I paper fosters creative and analytical thinking

skills, idea generation and visualisation common to art and

design practice. It also focuses on specific techniques, skills

and processes as follows:

Studio I paper

Art Lab

Art Place

Dress

Lens

Material

Object

Screen

Space

Type

Focus on

Art-making across different media.

Art-making in relation to site and context.

Creatively dressing bodies and fashioning

garments.

Photographic image-making.

Investigation of materials, form, surface,

image and pattern for the design and

making of textiles.

3D form-giving, resourceful making and

user experience.

Digital screen areas such as video, web,

animation, interaction and emerging

technologies.

Definition and investigation of physical,

temporal and digital spatial environments

and their inhabitation.

Print-oriented communication

environments.

After Year One, about half your course work is undertaken

through core studio papers. In these courses all design

students in your year group share an overarching project

brief. You learn common things (knowledge, skills,

technology and tools) that are essential for every designer

regardless of specialty. Different majors address the brief

according to their particular field, with an emphasis on

integrated project-based learning, concentrated in the

studio. For example, if you all had a brief about issues of

identity, a fashion student may design a garment that plays

with gender identity, a visual communication design student

10

YOUR GUIDE TO DESIGN AND FINE ARTS


DEGREES

might create a corporate brand identity, and a spatial design

student could explore the design of a retail environment.

During the project and at completion, you meet with students

from across the majors to share your work and see how

they have worked with the same issue. As a rule of thumb,

you’ll find yourself spending about one-third of your time in

core papers learning shared skills and two-thirds of the time

learning specialist skills.

This future-focused approach is internationally respected,

and prepares you well for a long and varied career in a

global market. Young designers trained at Massey learn to

see how their field fits within the broader design context;

offer and receive feedback from a wide range of specialists;

understand how different designers can work together

to address an issue and collaborate with others in multidisciplinary

teams.

For more details on the specifics you learn in each major,

please see the relevant section of this guide:

Page

Fashion Design 13

Fashion Design and Business 13

Industrial Design 14

Photography 17

Spatial Design 19

Textile Design 21

Visual Communication Design 23

CRITICAL AND CONTEXTUAL STUDIES

All design degree students, regardless of their major, take

papers in critical and contextual studies. This trains you

in critical analysis of art, design and visual and material

culture. It helps you develop expertise in writing essays and

reports.

ELECTIVES

Throughout your degree, you’ll choose elective papers.

Each elective is 15 credits. This is where you get to really

customise your qualification to support your particular

interests or potential career focus.

Examples of introductory (100-level) electives offered in the

College of Creative Arts are:

{ Coding for Creative Practice

Video and Sound

Digital Fabrication

Apparel Pattern Development

Apparel Construction

Photography as an Agent of Change

Social Media Culture

Printmaking.

At higher levels, the college also offers a wide range of

electives. And at all levels, you can take electives from

other colleges at Massey, such as business, humanities or

music, provided you meet their requirements. You can even

structure your electives to develop a ‘minor’ (a coherent

collection of papers in another discipline, though fewer and

less advanced than your major). For example, you might

complete a BDes majoring in industrial design with a minor

in marketing.

There are no required electives for any major, but electives

at 200-level and above sometimes have prerequisites (papers

you have to do first) because they build on previous work.

Academic Advising in September each year is a great time

to discuss your choices in detail, or contact the college

office at any time.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Phone: 0800 MASSEY

Text: 5222

E-mail: creative@massey.ac.nz

Website: creative.massey.ac.nz

BUSINESS PAPERS

In Years Two and Three, you have the option of doing papers

in art and design business, which develop your knowledge

of creative business leadership, industry and professional

practice. You can integrate further business papers by taking

electives from the College of Business, and we offer New

Zealand’s only joint major in Fashion Design and Business.

All design students must also complete a compulsory

External Focus component in Year Four, in preparation for

their chosen career pathway.

YOUR GUIDE TO DESIGN AND FINE ARTS

11


12

YOUR GUIDE TO DESIGN AND FINE ARTS

STEVE HALL, FASHION DESIGN


DEGREES

FASHION DESIGN; FASHION DESIGN & BUSINESS

BDes (Hons) / BDes

DURATION

4 YEARS FULL-TIME

AVAILABLE

WELLINGTON

THIS LONG-STANDING NATIONALLY AND INTERNATIONALLY-RECOGNISED

DEGREE HAS BEEN THE LAUNCHING PAD FOR SCORES OF SUCCESSFUL FASHION

DESIGNERS NOW OWNING OR WORKING IN MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR FASHION

BUSINESSES.

A fashion design major prepares students for a broad range of opportunities and roles in the

creation and sale of apparel both locally and internationally. You can choose either a fashion

design major or New Zealand’s only joint Fashion Design and Business major.

OVERVIEW

The objective of the fashion design major is to produce

innovative designers with a broad-based design education

and an interactive approach to apparel design, manufacturing

technology, local and global fashion markets. Our students

also have the ability to respond sensitively to socio-cultural

and environmental issues.

Your degree-level study of fashion design will include creative

design of apparel, skills in producing patterns and prototypes,

knowledge of textile materials, market and trend analysis,

and the development of an ability to position fashion products

in the marketplace. You’ll have opportunities to enter fashion

design competitions and even for internship placement in

industry.

The Fashion Design and Business joint major provides a

creative design education aligned with forward-thinking

business strategy for a progressive global market - ideal

for those who aspire to be involved at the business end of

fashion design. Any business major can be combined with

the core fashion design papers although the most likely are

communication, entrepreneurship and small business, or

marketing.

STRUCTURE OF THE MAJORS

The fashion design major lets fashion students have some

flexibility in pursuing fashion alongside other design areas or

as a joint degree with a business major. It is unique in New

Zealand in providing routes for fashion students to incorporate

other design disciplines up to at least 300-level. Fashion

design papers, as electives, are also open to students in other

design majors.

Year One of the programme consists of design studio papers,

which must include Studio I - Dress, critical and contextual

studies, and two elective papers (see pages 9-11).

Year Two focuses on fashion design and supporting technical

subjects. You’ll get a grounding in fashion design, history,

materials, pattern development and garment production.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

These majors develop both academic

understanding and the innovative and

practical skills required for careers in fashion

design and broader design businesses. Graduates go on

to develop their own labels, while others work in design,

production, marketing, merchandising and more. The

qualification can be used as entry to fashion design and

brand development in diverse areas from high fashion to

sports, corporate and other specialised clothing, in costume

for stage and film, and in production planning and quality

assurance roles amongst others. Graduates may also

continue on to postgraduate study.

In Year Three, you’ll learn further fashion-specific knowledge

and skills, and integrate all aspects in an extensive fashion

product design project.

If you are doing the joint fashion and business major, you

should select papers from the business majors offered in the

Bachelor of Business Studies.

The opportunity for an internship in a fashion-related

business in Part Three or Part Four can provide you with

experience of a vocational area prior to completion of your

degree.

In the fourth year of the programme you will develop and

undertake a research-based major project (BDes Honours

students) that may result in a collection, or you may choose

to do a studio project (BDes students) that may result in a

mini-collection. The degree is completed with papers from

those offered in business or specialist design and theoretical

studies.

YOUR GUIDE TO DESIGN AND FINE ARTS

13


INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

BDes (Hons) / BDes

DURATION

4 YEARS FULL-TIME

AVAILABLE

WELLINGTON

THIS DEGREE INCORPORATES INNOVATIVE THINKING, PRACTICAL DESIGN AND

NEW TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF PRODUCTS, EQUIPMENT AND

FURNITURE TO MEET THE SOCIAL, CULTURAL, ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL NEEDS

OF CONTEMPORARY AND FUTURE SOCIETIES.

The industrial design major is noted for the number of students who have won prestigious national

and international design competitions. Graduates are working in consumer product companies such

as Fisher & Paykel, Nike and Apple, and creative industries like Weta Workshop.

OVERVIEW

Industrial design is a great choice if you enjoy being creative

and making three-dimensional objects. The programme

focuses on designing desirable, innovative products

that humanise new and existing technologies as well as

enhancing our lives. Industrial designers are interested in

the design of products, the experiences of people who use

these products and the systems in which these products

play a part. Through the programme you will research and

design a diverse range of items from tools to kitchenware,

jewellery to sporting goods, furniture to agricultural

equipment. Your learning is mostly studio-based, and you will

use both traditional and digital processes to explore design

ideas. Through drawings and models you’ll refine these ideas

into desirable, responsible products.

This programme helps you learn how to conduct yourself

as a design professional, and how the effective use of good

design is an essential element in business success.

The second year of the programme introduces specialist

material and studio work including model making,

history, materials and processes, ergonomics and visual

communication (including drawing and rendering).

In the third year of the programme you’ll undertake advanced

studio design projects. You’ll study theory and criticism,

materials and processes, and visual communication.

In the fourth year of the programme you’ll develop

and undertake individual research assignments, study

professional practice and complete a design research (BDes

Hons students) or studio project (BDes students). We also

encourage our students to enter a national or international

design competition.

Throughout your degree, you will work with students

from other majors in core studio papers, and critical and

contextual studies, and have a wide choice of electives open

to all design students.

The objective of the programme is to produce internationally

competitive, innovative product designers who will

contribute to the shape of the future. Our focus is on helping

our graduates become professionals who explore new ways

of designing and integrating the needs of society, culture and

the environment.

STRUCTURE OF THE MAJOR

Throughout the programme you will develop a rich

understanding of design for desirability, usability and

experience. Your skill in translating those attributes into

products, furniture and systems will improve in leaps and

bounds.

Year One of the programme consists of design studio papers,

which must include Studio I - Object, critical and contextual

studies, and two elective papers (see pages 9-11).

RAQUE KUNZ, INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

14

YOUR GUIDE TO DESIGN AND FINE ARTS


DEGREES

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Our graduates are well prepared for professional design career

opportunities in a variety of fields including product design

consultancies, design teams in manufacturing industries,

architectural practices, social services departments, and

industrial policy development in private and public corporations.

Graduates typically start their careers employed as design

assistants or junior designers and progress through to senior or

management positions in private practices, or in manufacturing

and construction industries. Some have become directors of

successful export-focused manufacturing businesses, or design

consultants here and internationally. Many of our students

continue on to postgraduate studies, further developing their

design abilities, knowledge, and research interests and skills.

MATT MCKINLEY

MDes 2009

I graduated from Massey in 2008 and having come

away with some success (Student category Gold at

the Best awards, Dyson award NZ finalist) I decided

to make the leap into doing my masters the following

year. Pursuing masters study was a big decision for

me as the prospect of being poor and sleepless for a

further year was uninspiring!

Ultimately the deal was made more appealing to me

by the prospect of a dual sponsorship deal with the

University’s Affect Research Centre and Gallagher

Group, the Hamilton-based technology company, which

allowed me to achieve the higher qualification while

also gaining some valuable industry experience.

Masters study, like the bachelor degree, was a damn

tough time but it turned out to be one of the better

decisions I’ve ever made. I graduated with Distinction,

and subsequently secured employment with Gallagher

as the company’s sole in-house Industrial Designer

where I have had the opportunity to develop my

Masters project further, and even get my name listed

on a couple of international patents!

I’ve been employed at Gallagher for four years now and

during that time I’ve been lucky enough to perform field

research with a variety of end users throughout the

world, develop a wide range of innovative and exciting

new products, and see the products I’ve helped to

create enhance people’s lives out in the real world.

MATT MCKINLEY, AWARD-WINNING GALLAGHER MULTI STRAND GATE

YOUR GUIDE TO DESIGN AND FINE ARTS

15


DEGREES

PHOTOGRAPHY

BDes (Hons) / BDes

DURATION

4 YEARS FULL-TIME

AVAILABLE

WELLINGTON

PHOTOGRAPHY IS A DYNAMIC DISCIPLINE WITH MULTIPLE CAREER OPTIONS.

GRADUATES PERFORM AT THE TOP OF THEIR FIELDS IN COMMERCIAL, FASHION,

PORTRAITURE AND DOCUMENTARY PHOTOGRAPHY.

At Massey, photography is taught by some of New Zealand’s leading photographic practitioners with

significant research profiles. Our facilities include professional studios, state-of-the-art digital suites

and printers with technical support in addition to alternative and historical wet-based photographic

processes.

OVERVIEW

With a major in photography you will have a broad-based

platform of photographic theory and practice from which

you can respond ethically, conceptually and creatively to

personal and client communication needs.

We encourage thematic approaches to photography

throughout the degree. This means you may find yourself

working in a range of photographic genres including,

but not limited to, traditional genres of documentary

photography, fine art photography, portraiture, still-life,

fashion and architecture, but also evolving and experimental

photographic methodologies, such as film/photography

cross-overs and installation-based photographic practices.

STRUCTURE OF THE MAJOR

Year One of the programme consists of design studio papers,

which must include Studio I - Lens, critical and contextual

studies, and two elective papers (see pages 9-11).

During Years Two to Four, you’ll explore different approaches

to photography and be encouraged to pursue and articulate

concepts that express your ideas.

Themes include:

{ ‘The Society of the Spectacle’: Media and Consumer

Imagery

Place and Site

Presentation and installation for photographers.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Your photography major will help you develop skills to

apply in diverse fields. Wherever visual documentation

and communication are needed, there are roles for

photographers. Our graduates are employed in a number of

areas such as advertising, the photographic arts, writing on

photography, photographic conservation, the film industry,

research facilities, working specifically in fashion, corporate

promotion, illustration, photographing products from food

to buildings, and on publications such as newspapers

and magazines. Graduates are also employed to apply the

documentation aspects of photography in such disciplines

as medicine, science, forensic science, archaeology and

anthropology.

Each year, your understanding of photographs will be

extended and augmented by your studies in history and

criticism. These studies will contribute to your understanding

of contemporary and historical practice and critical thinking

in relation to photographic work.

Throughout your degree, you will work with students

from other majors in core studio papers, and critical and

contextual studies, and have a wide choice of electives open

to all design students.

In Year Four BDes (Hons) students will pursue research topics

in photography where significant emphasis is placed on

research skills and procedures as well as the development

and completion of an individual research project. BDes

students will pursue studio-based projects.

YOUR GUIDE TO DESIGN AND FINE ARTS

17

CHRISTINA PERSEN, PHOTOGRAPHY


DEGREES

SPATIAL DESIGN

BDes (Hons) / BDes

DURATION

4 YEARS FULL-TIME

AVAILABLE

WELLINGTON

SPATIAL DESIGN FOCUSES ON THE CREATION AND MANIPULATION OF PLACES

AND SPACES WITHIN WHICH PEOPLE PLAY OUT THEIR DAILY LIVES, DESIRES AND

SOCIAL ENCOUNTERS.

Spatial design is a complex field integrating space, lighting and technology with human habitation.

This degree requires an awareness of our visual culture and the world around us, as it combines

pragmatic requirements with poetic ideas.

OVERVIEW

Spatial design deals with a broad range of spaces and events

encountered in daily life. From a commercial building interior

to the interior of a home, public building or mode of transport,

from an exhibition stand, theatre set or piece of furniture,

spatial design can improve the standard and quality of our

lives, and enrich our culture and national identity, while also

contributing strongly to business success.

The spatial design major lets you integrate spatial design

studies with a range of other design, technical, and social

disciplines in the School of Design and the wider University, to

create an individual course of study.

You’ll be able to structure your electives with a view to working

in fields such as exhibition, theatre, film, video, new electronic

media and virtual environments.

Our students have participated in international symposia

on spatial and performance design, working alongside

professional designers and artists in locations such as Rome

and Prague.

STRUCTURE OF THE MAJOR

Year One of the programme consists of design studio papers,

which must include Studio I - Space, critical and contextual

studies, and two elective papers (see pages 9-11).

The second year introduces specialist subject material in

spatial design studio, history, materials and making, human

factors and visual communication (including drawing, digital

rendering and model making).

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

The Spatial Design major can be used as an entrance to

professional design practice. It is also an appropriate tertiary

degree to go on to a variety of career opportunities in fields

like performance design, exhibition design, digital spatial

design and game design.

Graduates begin their careers as design assistants and

can progress through to senior or management positions in

private practices, or in service and construction industries.

Our graduates have worked with performance designers

and costume designers as well as at Weta Workshop.

Some have become directors of successful interior design

businesses, or design consultants working in diverse areas

such as retail, entertainment and the visual arts around the

world.

In the fourth year of the programme you’ll develop and

undertake an individual research assignment, and complete

a major design project.

Throughout your degree, you will work with students

from other majors in core studio papers, and critical and

contextual studies, and have a wide choice of electives open

to all design students.

In the third year of the programme, you will undertake

advanced studio design projects, and study theory and

criticism, professional practice, fabrication systems,

technology and visual communication.

YOUR GUIDE TO DESIGN AND FINE ARTS

19

RITA SCHOOLEY, SPATIAL DESIGN


DEGREES

TEXTILE DESIGN

BDes (Hons) / BDes

DURATION

4 YEARS FULL-TIME

AVAILABLE

WELLINGTON

MASSEY’S TEXTILE DESIGN PROGRAMME REPRESENTS THE BREADTH AND

DEPTH OF TEXTILES IN THE 21ST CENTURY BY EMBRACING THE LIMITLESS

POSSIBILITIES IN NEW CONCEPTUAL AND TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCES.

As a textile design student you’ll develop skills in colour, texture, pattern and surface applications

along with a rich mix of studio processes in print, dye, weave, knit and mixed-media. You’ll graduate

with career possibilities in fashion and interior industries as well as art and design galleries.

OVERVIEW

The textile design programme is very flexible and offers a

range of studio opportunities including screen and digital

fabric printing, sustainable colouration, mixed media, digital

knit, weave and web design. We’ll provide you with an

intellectual and creative environment that encourages critical

debate to help focus and contextualise your work. We’ll

train you to create opportunities, identify new concepts, and

participate in the global industry.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Our graduates have pursued careers a vast array of

disciplines. These include designing wall coverings,

furnishings and apparel fabrics, art and design for films and

theatre, secondary and tertiary education, consulting for

colour and lifestyle trend predictions, as well as styling in the

marketing and merchandising industry sectors.

Design development across disciplines is encouraged,

drawing on well-established links with creative, commercial,

cultural and heritage organisations. Our students and

graduates achieve outstanding success in New Zealand and

international competitions such as the World of Wearable

Arts, and the International Society of Dyers and Colourists

Awards.

STRUCTURE OF THE MAJOR

Year One of the programme consists of design studio papers,

which must include Studio I - Material, critical and contextual

studies, and two elective papers (see pages 9-11).

Year Two introduces textile design process and specific skills

and techniques.

In Year Three, we are supported by several industries

providing opportunities to orientate designs for specific

applications. We also offer an internship elective.

The fourth year programme encourages you to undertake an

individual research project, alongside business studies.

Throughout your degree, you will work with students from

other majors in core studio papers, and critical and contextual

studies, and have a wide choice of electives open to all design

students.

LARA JONES, TEXTILE DESIGN

YOUR GUIDE TO DESIGN AND FINE ARTS

21

CHLOE MEHRTENS, TEXTILE DESIGN


DEGREES

VISUAL COMMUNICATION DESIGN

BDes (Hons) / BDes

DURATION

4 YEARS FULL-TIME

AVAILABLE

WELLINGTON

AS A VISUAL COMMUNICATION DESIGN STUDENT YOU’LL EXPERIENCE A

BALANCE OF HIGH QUALITY PRACTICE AND RESEARCH PROVIDING LIFE-LONG

LEARNING SKILLS AND A MULTIPLICITY OF CAREER OPPORTUNITIES.

Visual communication design not only includes graphic design, advertising, illustration, and digital

media, but also other innovative combinations initiated by staff and students to explore any and all

aspects of visual communication required by today’s and tomorrow’s societies.

OVERVIEW

Visual communication design is focused on the

communication of ideas through different visual media,

embracing digital technology as well as traditional media.

Students develop core skills in visual language, research,

synthesis, creative ideation and evaluation. You learn about

market factors (client, audience, competitive positioning, trend

analysis), contextual themes (identity, representation, power),

social responsibility, professional practice (entrepreneurship,

employment, self-employment, collaboration, presentation)

and the impacts of emergent technologies. You also develop

specialist skills within and across the spectrum of visual

communication design practice, including but not constrained

to the fields of digital media, graphic design, illustration and

advertising.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Graduates with Massey visual communication design

degrees work in a wide range of professions in New

Zealand, Australia, Hong Kong, the US and Europe. They

work for design firms and consultancies, advertising

agencies, computer and web design firms, film studios,

postproduction companies, as publication designers,

freelance illustrators and designers, as well as setting up

their own successful companies.

STRUCTURE OF THE MAJOR

Year One of the programme consists of design studio papers,

which must include either Studio I – Screen or Studio I – Type,

critical and contextual studies, and two elective papers (see

pages 9-11).

In the second year you get to grips with the principles of

visual communication design and a range of specific skills,

processes and technologies.

In the third year you can further develop your skills in such

areas as graphic design, typography, advertising, computer

animation, interactivity, digital video design, and web design.

The fourth year of the programme extends your knowledge

and creativity and integrates individual subjects in a research

or studio project.

Throughout your degree, you will work with students from

other majors in core studio papers, and critical and contextual

studies, and have a wide choice of electives open to all design

students.

CLARE CATO, VISUAL COMMUNICATION DESIGN

SARAH CANTILLON AND JESSICA TAYLOR,

VISUAL COMMUNICATION DESIGN

YOUR GUIDE TO DESIGN AND FINE ARTS

23


MICK HUBERTUS, FINE ARTS

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS (HONOURS)

BFA (Hons) / BFA

24

YOUR GUIDE TO DESIGN AND FINE ARTS

DURATION

4 YEARS FULL-TIME

AVAILABLE

WELLINGTON

THE BFA OFFERS A BROAD BASE OF THEORY, SKILLS AND

CREATIVE PRACTICE THROUGH INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIOS

AND FOCUSED WORKSHOPS. STUDENTS DEVELOP EXPERTISE

WITH FINE ARTS MEDIA THAT CAN BE APPLIED IN A VARIETY

OF CONTEXTS THROUGHOUT THEIR CAREERS.

Massey Wellington is home to the most innovative university art

school in New Zealand. Students become inventive, critical,

self-aware and self-reliant artists, who can work in careers

wherever creative problem-solving is valued. At the School of Art,

you’ll meet visiting artists, curators and writers, experiment with

trans-disciplinary approaches through common papers and

shared projects with the School of Design, and broaden your

horizons through international study tours.


DEGREES

QUALIFICATION OVERVIEW

The degree programme is centred in a contemporary

studio environment where you can experience a wide

range of approaches to making art. Artists at the cutting

edge of contemporary art research and practice will be

available to guide you as you develop your own fresh and

multidisciplinary approach to new work. You’ll also take a

series of focused and challenging critical studies papers

that further examine ways to produce, reflect on and critique

art.

The School of Art emphasises a contextual, site-responsive

mode of making art, and does not prioritise any style or

media. The Bachelor of Fine Arts (Honours) and the Bachelor

of Fine Arts equip you to follow your own creative enquiry

through whatever is the most compelling medium for you.

In the Bachelor of Fine Arts, you’ll focus on practicebased

work in your final year. In the Bachelor of Fine Arts

(Hons) there is a stronger research focus with a research

requirement with seminar programmes supporting the

development of independent project work.

See pages 4-6 for details about selected entry applications.

PLANNING YOUR DEGREE

All fine arts degree students initially enrol in a Bachelor of

Fine Arts with Honours.

In Year Three, you and your academic advisers decide

whether you will continue with the Bachelor of Fine Arts

(Honours) or complete a Bachelor of Fine Arts, which is

less research-focused. Honours students must successfully

complete Introduction to Fine Art Research in the second

half of Year Three.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

The Bachelor of Fine Arts can start you on your

path as a professional artist. It is also a steppingstone

for a career in allied fields such as art education, arts

administration and involvement in a wide array of creative

industries where problem-solving and collaborative skills

are increasingly in demand. Graduates with honours may

also continue on to postgraduate studies in fine arts to

further develop their knowledge, research interests and

skills, or move into related fields such as Massey University’s

Postgraduate Diploma in Visual and Material Culture or

Museum Studies.

The degree is made up of separate courses called ‘papers’,

the size of which is defined by the credit value. In the first

year you’ll take eight 15-credit papers, making a total of 120

credits. You should aim for 60 credits per semester and make

sure you include papers that are prerequisites for the next

level of papers you wish to study. To complete your degree

you will need a total of 480 credits, which corresponds to

four years of full-time study.

In Year One, you will study with other aspiring artists and

designers in papers that cover all students in their first year

at the College of Creative Arts. Everyone selects studio

papers covering several art and design disciplines. This

helps you see the potential of different approaches, and sets

the foundations for collaborative projects.

BFA(Hons) and BFA Structure

either

or

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 BFA(Hons) Year 4 BFA

Semester

1

Semester

2

Semester

1

Semester

2

Semester

1

Semester

2

Semester

1

Semester

2

Semester

1

Semester

2

Studio I

Studio I

Studio I

Studio I

Art Studio

I

Art Studio

II

Art Studio

III

Art Studio

IV

Art Studio

Research

Art Studio

V

Art Studio

Practice

Art Studio

V

Critical &

Contextual

Studies

Critical &

Contextual

Studies

Critical &

Contextual

Studies

Critical &

Contextual

Studies*

Critical &

Contextual

Studies

Critical &

Contextual

Studies**

Research

Seminar

15 credits

Elective

Elective Elective Elective Elective Elective

Introduction

to Fine Arts

Research;

or an Elective

Elective

(400-level)

External

focus ***

Elective

External

focus ***

* or Creative Industries ** or Creative Enterprise *** Creative Futures or Exhibition or

Creative Exposition

YOUR GUIDE TO DESIGN AND FINE ARTS

25


In later years, you will carve your own niche through your

response to the core art studio papers and your particular

choice of electives.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

Year One introduces fine arts and design students to the

principles, processes and practices of art and design

through investigation, conceptual development and

experimentation.

In Years Two to Four, fine arts students have their own

dedicated studio space in the School of Art and become

increasingly independent in their approach to their studio

work as they progress through the degree.

Art studio papers focus on the methods and ideas of

contemporary art production, through which you will

develop and refine your own body of work. The studios

are taught with an interdisciplinary philosophy, and are

supported by media and technical workshops that facilitate

each student’s individual development.

Studio courses are underpinned by innovative critical and

contextual studies courses, taught across the Schools of

Art and Design, in which you can develop your knowledge

of the historical, social and cultural context of art and

design.

In Year Four, you either complete your Bachelor of Fine

Arts with Honours, or a Bachelor of Fine Arts.

In the Bachelor of Fine Arts with Honours, the focus

in the final year is on further extending expertise, and

on art studio research. All 120 credits of study are at

400-level, and must include a fine arts research seminar

paper addressing critical issues in the production of art

and culture. You’ll undertake an approved supervised art

research project, which includes creative practice.

In the less research-focused pathway of the Bachelor of

Fine Arts you select further elective papers and undertake

a major studio project.

In the final semester of your final year, all students take an

External Focus paper. You can do this through exhibition,

creative exposition, or the more entrepreneurial/industryfocused

‘creative futures’ paper.

CORE STUDIO PAPERS

In your first year, you choose four Studio I papers from nine

on offer, covering art and design. Each paper is taught as a

six-week block.

Each Studio I paper fosters creative and analytical thinking

skills, idea generation and visualisation common to art and

design practice, but also develops specific techniques,

skills and processes. To advance in fine arts, you need to

pass either Studio I – Art Lab or Studio I – Art Place.

Studio I paper Focus on

Art Lab

Art-making across different media.

Art Place Art-making in relation to site and

context.

Dress

Creatively dressing bodies and

fashioning garments.

Lens

Photographic image-making.

Material Investigation of materials, form, surface,

image and pattern for the design and

making of textiles.

Object

3D form-giving, resourceful making and

user experience.

Screen

Digital screen areas such as video, web,

animation, interaction and emerging

technologies.

Space

Definition and investigation of

physical, temporal and digital spatial

environments and their inhabitation.

Type

Print-oriented communication

environments.

After Year One, about half your course work each year

will be through your core art studio papers, where you will

experiment and develop your practice and produce bodies

of new work.

CRITICAL AND CONTEXTUAL STUDIES

Critical and contextual studies will train you in the critical

analysis of art, design and visual and material culture. It

helps you develop expertise in writing essays and reports.

THE ‘BUSINESS’ OF ART

In Years Two and Three, you have the option of doing

papers in art and design business, which develop your

knowledge of creative business leadership, industry and

professional practice. You can integrate further business

papers by taking electives from the College of Business.

All fine arts students must also complete a compulsory

External Focus component in Year Four, in preparation for

their chosen career pathway. Here you focus on projecting

yourself and your art practice externally, whether through

exhibition or writing about art and culture.

26

YOUR GUIDE TO DESIGN AND FINE ARTS


DEGREES

ELECTIVES

Throughout your degree, you’ll choose elective papers.

Each elective is 15 credits, and you can select those that

align with your interests and future direction.

Year One electives offered by the School of Art tend to

focus on specific media or technical approaches to artmaking,

such as Introduction to Painting, Introduction to

Sculpture, Drawing, Drawing the Body, and Māori Art and

Design Studio: Toi Atea.

Electives also develop out of the research interests of our

staff. Projects in these papers change from semester to

semester and year to year, addressing titles as diverse as

performance, sculpture and site, self-published fanzines,

and the unusual ‘Conceptualisms, Conspiracies and

Counter-histories’.

In addition, you can take electives from the School of

Design, and from other colleges at Massey, such as

business, humanities or music, provided you meet their

requirements.

Academic Advising in September each year is a great time

to discuss your choices in detail, or contact the college

office at any time.

BRONWYN

HOLLOWAY-SMITH

BFA (Hons) 2006

Graduating from Massey University School of Fine Arts

left me with a strong passion for the arts. Seven years

later and I’m living a happily multifarious life – making

my own work, supporting the work of others, and using

art as a platform to critically think, write and talk about

big future issues. A few highlights so far include:

{ Working as Project Coordinator for the One Day

Sculpture public art series.

Serving for 4 years as a trustee for Enjoy Public

Art Gallery. Connecting with Artist Run Initiatives

overseas and subsequently exhibiting in Chicago,

Tokyo, and Melbourne.

Cofounding and directing the Creative Freedom

Foundation: a not-for-profit New Zealand

artist’s copyright advocacy group. In 2009, I was

spokesperson for the CFF-led “internet blackout”

online public protest that gained significant

media attention in NZ and overseas, paving the

way for high-profile 2012 SOPA/PIPA blackout

protests in the USA.

Making the NZ National Business Review’s

2009 list of the “25 Most Powerful People In

Technology”.

Being selected as one of the first artists to create

a billboard artwork for Wellington City Council’s

Ghuznee St Art Billboard series.

Working with the acclaimed public art

commissioning group ‘Letting Space’ to realise

the Pioneer City showroom and website – a major

installation in downtown Wellington in 2012.

Being included in The Obstinate Object – a major

survey of contemporary NZ sculpture at City

Gallery Wellington.

Working with AUT’s CoLab research centre to

develop a video work for Air New Zealand’s

Inflight Entertainment programme. The work was

screened on all Air NZ international flights for

three months in early 2013.

Winning the biannual New Zealand Open Source

Arts Award two years running: once in 2010 for

my project Ghosts In The Form Of Gifts and again

in 2012 for Whisper Down The Lane.

Being accepted into Harvard to study a copyright

course through the online education network

EdX.

BRONWYN HOLLOWAY-SMITH,

PIONEER CITY 2010

YOUR GUIDE TO DESIGN AND FINE ARTS

27


DIPLOMA IN PHOTOGRAPHY

DipPhoto

DURATION

2 YEARS OF

FULL-TIME STUDY

AVAILABLE

WELLINGTON

THE DIPLOMA IN PHOTOGRAPHY SPANS THE MAJOR CONCEPTS AND SKILLS

ASSOCIATED WITH PROFESSIONAL AND DOCUMENTARY PHOTOGRAPHY, EXHIBITION

SKILLS, AND ELECTRONIC IMAGING.

The DipPhoto is an intensive two-year full time course.

QUALIFICATION OVERVIEW

The Diploma in Photography principally emphasises the

practical aspects of photography. The first year introduces

you to the studio, the darkroom and the digital environment,

while engaging with portraiture, the street, digital montage

and documentary photography. In the second year you

will extend your practice and develop in-depth individual

photography projects in the areas you are most interested in

pursuing.

YEAR ONE

Studio Photography

Photographic Documentary

Photographic Communication.

YEAR TWO

Photographic Technologies

Photographic Practices

Collaborative Photographic Project.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Entry is based on the standard requirements for entry

to the University (refer to website for details) and on the

assessment of a portfolio of work (see page 4 – ‘Design

Portfolio Requirements’). Applications and portfolios are due

by October 1, 2013.

FAB LAB WELLINGTON

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YOUR GUIDE TO DESIGN AND FINE ARTS


OTHER COURSES

GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN DESIGN

GradDipDes

DURATION

EQUIVALENT TO 1 YEAR

OF FULL-TIME

AVAILABLE

WELLINGTON

THIS COURSE PROVIDES FURTHER EDUCATION FOR:

{ Holders of a degree in another discipline considering a change of career path

Experienced designers who want to update their skills on a part-time basis

Holders of design diplomas who want to enrol for a Postgraduate Diploma or Master of Design

Those who want to enhance their qualifications with a coherent series of papers in a specific

area of design.

QUALIFICATION OVERVIEW

The Graduate Diploma in Design provides an opportunity

for students who have already completed a degree to add

an additional subject area to their learning. It consists of

120 credits of 200 and 300-level papers from the Bachelor

of Design schedule of papers. The programme is extremely

flexible and you can plan a graduate diploma to meet your

personal aptitudes and aspirations, from one of more than

ten design subject areas.

PLANNING YOUR GRADUATE DIPLOMA

Before you enrol in papers for a graduate diploma you

should discuss and gain approval for your proposed study

with an academic staff member. To complete the graduate

diploma, you’ll need to select papers to the value of 120

credits from the wide range of papers for the Bachelor of

Design at 200, 300 or 400-level. At least 75 credits must be

at 300-level (third year) or above. Students usually select a

coherent set of papers that enables them to consolidate and

develop core knowledge and skills beginning with 200-level

papers. These are often prerequisites for the 300-level

papers. The best way to take the programme is part-time

as there may be limitations on the availability of 300-level

papers in the second semester.

Some papers have prerequisites, ie other papers that

need to be completed first. For this reason you may be

required to complete 100-level papers in addition to the

papers comprising your graduate diploma. Depending on

your previous experience or study, and the quality of your

portfolio, you may be granted an exemption from these

prerequisite papers on application to the relevant Head of

Department.

A graduate diploma endorsed in a particular discipline can

be achieved by including 75 credits from the major core

papers. Alternatively the graduate diploma may be studied

without an endorsement by taking papers across a range of

design disciplines.

Completion of your graduate diploma may require study to

be spread over at least two years because of prerequisite

requirements, and the semester in which papers are offered.

Some papers are subject to limitations on enrolments.

Priority is given to Bachelor of Design students.

If you are planning to use the graduate diploma as

preparation for postgraduate study in design you should

consult design staff before you enrol.

PAPERS

Papers are those listed in the Bachelor of Design schedules

and information is available from the College of Creative Arts

Office. Please refer to the Massey website for the full list of

Bachelor of Design papers and prescriptions.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

The Graduate Diploma in Design is open to holders of a

Bachelor’s degree. Applicants who do not have a degree

may apply to be admitted with equivalent status on the

basis of practical, professional or scholarly experience, for

example, an appropriate diploma plus work experience or

substantial relevant professional experience. Applicants are

required to submit a portfolio of work to demonstrate they

are at the standard necessary to undertake work at 200-level

(second year) and beyond. Please forward your application

and portfolio to us by November 15, 2013.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

The Graduate Diploma in Design tends to be used by

people who want to extend their career options, or who

want to fulfil personal creative goals. It is not uncommon

to find those pursing the programme have arts, science,

marketing or other business degrees. On completion of

the diploma graduates are extremely well design-informed

in their chosen subject area and go on to make extended

contributions to their primary career area, use it to change

career paths, or pursue personal interests.

YOUR GUIDE TO DESIGN AND FINE ARTS

29


CERTIFICATE IN ART AND DESIGN STUDIES

CertArtDesStud

DURATION

EQUIVALENT

TO 1 YEAR OF

FULL-TIME STUDY

AVAILABLE

WELLINGTON

THE CERTIFICATE IS FOR THOSE WHO WANT TO STUDY ART OR DESIGN AT UNIVERSITY

LEVEL WITHOUT UNDERTAKING AN ENTIRE FOUR-YEAR DESIGN OR FINE ARTS DEGREE.

It is particularly suited to part-time study and may later be surrendered for credit towards design or

fine arts degree programmes.

QUALIFICATION OVERVIEW

The certificate consists of degree-level papers worth a

total of 120 credits, which is the equivalent of one year’s

full-time study. A range of design and fine arts topics are

offered.

If you hold a Certificate in Art and Design Studies and you

go on to enrol for a Massey degree in fine arts or design,

on surrendering the certificate, you can have papers

you’ve already passed credited towards your degree. You

would also need to complete the core papers that are not

included in the certificate and meet the credit total for

the degree. Papers passed for the certificate may also

be credited to other degrees if it is permitted under the

regulations for those degrees.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Applicants must meet the university admission

requirements these can be found on our website at

enrol.massey.ac.nz. It does not require the submission of

a portfolio (refer to website for information on admission

to the University). However, enrolment in papers from the

Bachelor of Design or Bachelor of Fine Arts that are not on

the schedule will be subject to submission of a satisfactory

portfolio of work, approval of the Academic Registrar and

space being available in any papers for which there are

enrolment limitations in place. Applications are due by

October 1, 2013.

PLANNING YOUR STUDY

The certificate is comprised of eight 15-credit papers

chosen from the certificate schedule. Please refer to

the Massey website for full details of the schedule and

prescriptions for the papers. It may also include up to 45

credits of relevant papers from other degrees such as the

Bachelor of Arts. With Academic Registrar’s approval,

other papers from the Bachelor of Design or Bachelor of

Fine Arts in photography, textile design, fashion design,

industrial design, spatial design and visual communication

design may be included.

Some of the papers listed on the schedule have

prerequisites (papers that need to be passed first), some

require approval of a portfolio of work and some have

limits on enrolments. If you are likely to want to complete a

degree in the future, consider making an application to the

Bachelor of Design or Fine Arts rather than the certificate

as this may enable you to complete all the core papers

for Part One of your chosen degree within your certificate

programme.

30

YOUR GUIDE TO DESIGN AND FINE ARTS


CONTACTING MASSEY FOR MORE INFORMATION

MORE INFORMATION

COLLEGE OF CREATIVE ARTS

Massey University

Private Box 756

Wellington 6140

DELIVERY ADDRESS

Student Central

Massey University Wellington Campus

Entrance A, Wallace Street, Wellington

E-mail:

Website:

creative@massey.ac.nz

creative.massey.ac.nz

THE MASSEY UNIVERSITY WEBSITE

The Massey University website is full of useful information

covering everything you need to know – from what each

campus has to offer, their departments and programmes,

scholarships, events, accommodation and plenty more.

And don’t forget to bookmark the Massey site – it’s constantly

being updated with the latest information.

ENGINE OF THE NEW NEW ZEALAND

WEBSITE

ENGINE.AC.NZ

If you’re unsure what you’d like to study, head to the

engine.ac.nz website. There are stories of inspiring

people who have great careers, and have an impact on

New Zealand and the world. They might just give you the

inspiration you’ve been looking for! You can find out how to

follow in their footsteps, what you’d need to study and what

being at university will actually be like. You’ll find out how

you can join the ‘Engine of the new New Zealandand have

a real impact on New Zealand, and the world!

CALL OUR CONTACT CENTRE

If you’d rather speak to a real person feel free to give our

friendly contact centre staff a call on 0800 MASSEY.

Or, if you’d like to actually see a real person drop in to our

campuses in Albany, Palmerston North or Wellington.

WE HAVE STUDENT ADVISERS

We have heaps of people available to answer any

questions you may have about studying at Massey.

We understand it is a big decision. To speak to someone,

or to get someone to visit your school or workplace:

Phone: 0800 MASSEY

Text: 5222

Email: contact@massey.ac.nz

Dedicated International, Māori and Pasifika student

advisers are also available.

MASSEY ‘YOUR GUIDE TO’ BOOKS

Massey produces a range of ‘Your Guide To’ books grouped

around particular interest areas. They provide details of

entry requirements, majors, course structures and career

outcomes covering all our programmes.

To obtain copies of ‘Your Guide to’ books:

Download them at publications.massey.ac.nz

Phone: 0800 MASSEY

Text: 5222

Email: contact@massey.ac.nz

EVENTS

Another great way to see for yourself what life and study

is like at Massey is at one of our open days. You’ll learn

about Massey’s programmes, career opportunities,

accommodation options, campus facilities, and get to talk to

lecturers and current students.

For more information see masseyopendays.ac.nz

Massey also has stands at various career and tertiary

education expos held all over New Zealand (and beyond).

If you want to know where you’ll see us next,

call 0800 MASSEY, text 5222, email contact@massey.ac.nz

or visit events.massey.ac.nz

FACEBOOK

We have our own Facebook page which you can join to

keep up to date with what is happening at Massey before

you come to study with us.

To like our page: facebook.com/masseyuniversity

TWITTER

You can also follow us on Twitter

twitter.com/massey_uni

YOUR GUIDE TO DESIGN AND FINE ARTS

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OPEN LAB DESIGN STUDIO

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