Radio Guide 37-04-10.pdf - Old Time Radio Researchers Group

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Radio Guide 37-04-10.pdf - Old Time Radio Researchers Group

Thrill to the Photo-Story of Rudy Vallee's Life - a Picture Scoop!

Radio's Thrills and Entertainment-Yours in 18 Pages of Programs!


2

Mall yc.ur ballot to Ih" Slar 01 Stul Election Tellero, Rldlo Culd", 73\ Plymouth

Court, Chlca,o, IIIlnoil. Put" it on • penny pOIIC.rd. II you Wllh,

IT'S UP TO YOU!

TODAY'S radio is based

tion in the program by

on a get-together of

the studio audience; toward

a greater apprecia­

those who. on the one

hand, care enough about

tion 01 classical music.

their radio fare to let

They think Jack Benny

others know of it. and

the greatest star on the

those who. on the other

air; Guy Lombardo the

side of the bargain, want

best light orchestra conductor;

to please the greatest

Kate Smith the

number of people,

finest feminine popular

This listener - sponsor

singer; Nelson Eddy the

get - together is accomplished

greatest male classical

by radio polls and

s.inger. But the listeners

elections. One way these

themselves are not in

polls are handled is for

agreement in every case.

the radio editors to tell

They have shown that in

their own opinions. Such

the early voting in the

polls. soliciting votes from Shep Fields: He sbnds No.3 Star 01 Stars election.

radio editors only, are the

Perhaps you do not agree

New York World-TelegTam and the Hearst with these radio editors at all.

Editors' polls. The other way is more If you don't, your opportunity to do

troublesome. but more effective: it ls to go something about it is here--now! The way

to the listeners themselves, learning their to do it is to vote in the greatest listener

preferences, their desires. And the greatest poll ever conducted-the RADIO GUIDE

poll of this sort is the annual RADIO GUIDE Star of Stars Election. That will be your

Star of Stars Election.

contribution to the radio of the future. Vote

The 252 editors who voted in the most today-for greater enjoyment tomorrow!

recent World-Telegram poll think tomorrow's

radio will drift away from participa- (See Slar of Slars standings on J}(l.ge 19)

IN TH 15 155 U E

Week Ending April 10, 1937

M. L ANNEN BERG

Publisher

CURTIS !\1ITCIlELL, Editorial Director

I

I

I

I

Smash Features

Kinks and Queens

What to do about Personality

Faulu-What the Stars D:J!

by GLADYS OAKS . . . . . . . . . 3

Death Comea to , Mln.trel

The Landt Trio's TraQedy

by JAMES H, STRUT.,...... 8

Quick Trigger t.hdden

A Calling All Cars Story

by ARTHUR KENT 1-1

Network Member Stations L.og .. ..7

Norri. Goff ,nd Chester L.auck

Behind the Scenes with Lum

and AbnCT

by ELGAR BROWN ... , ... ,... 4

Ro" B,mpton

An All-American SinQer Tells

fler Life Story (Part 111). 6

Cheerio

Scoop-The Star Revealed! 21

L.OU;" Massey

VisilinQ the Westerner at

Home 22

Mu.ic of the M"ters

by CARLETON SMITH ... ,.,.. 10

Plum. and Prunes

by EVANS PLUMMER ....•.•• 11

In.ide Stuff

by MARTIN LEWIS .. " ... ". II

The Radio Week

The Latest Radio News.. . 12

Short Wavea

by CHARLES A. MORRISON 20

The Photo· Story of Rudy Vallee's

life

A Biography in PietllTes! 2..

Our April Fool Guelling Game

Fun for Radio Fans! 26

Big Moments with Blg.Tlmers ,. ~J

I

I

Stories of Neal'~by Stations 17

Slogan Contest Winners ,. 17

RADIO GUIDE'S X-Word Puzzle 18

Hits 01 the Week. . 18

Voice ot the Listener. 19

Star of Stars Standings . 19

Short-Wave Programs.. 20

Contests on the Air ...,. "U

Guessing Game Answers.. . -16

I

Sunday, April 4., 29

Monday. April 5 31

Tuesday. April 6 , , ... 34

Wednesday. April 7 36

Thursday April 8 . 39

Friday. April 9

-ll

Saturday. April 10 .

-l-l

Official Photographer: Delar.

Radio CitV. New York

Cover Portrait by Charles E. Rubino

Radio Guide ia edited and publi.hed

at 731 Plymouth Court. Chicago. 1If.

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I

BY

D

'\

.'~"

GLADYS

o YOU have those blue nights

when you lie awake hour after

hour, wondering why you acted

like a fool at just the time you wanted

to make a hit? Do you look enviously

at girls not a bit prettier or smarter

than yourself, and hs\'c to watch them

grabbing off the prizes you never win?

Lady, have you a "kink"?

Well, if you have some personality

Cailing. you're in distinguished company.

The first four up-and-coming

radio stars we queried each confessed

she'd had just such a self-handicap to

overcome before she could get her

stride. And here's their testimony:

If you hove a mother or sister or

aunt who's the most popular woman

Cor miles around, it's easy to want to

be Uk", her. It you put in your time

imitating her, instead of trying to "be

yourself," the tale of Lucy Monroe

should show you a lesson.

Lucy is the daughter of a famous

actress, Anna Laughlin, one of the

most famous soubrettes of America's

last generation.

Lucy is a tall girl, her poise and

serenil~' crowned with red-gold hair.

But when she was younger, her lo\'eliness

never satisfied her, because she

was always comparing it with her

mother's quick. gay, brunet beauty,

When she was quite young, singing

lessons developed a resment, sweet

soprano that made her teachers talk

of concert and opera. But Lucy didn't

listen, She'd always dreamed of a

success in musical comedy-like her

mother's, So she went after a job in

Ziegfeld's "Follies," and for a year was t.

a glol'illed chorus girl. );

ANNA wasn't satisfied, She knew

Lucy had unusual talent, and with

all her heart she wanted to help her.

"I'll write the managers I know,"

she said, "Pull always helps!"

But in this case pull was a boomerang,

"If you've anyone famous in

your family, don't take his introductions

to prospective bosses," advises

Lucy. "They hate to see you

because you're sent by someone to

whom they're obligated. They decide

beforehand you must be no good!"

Still, Lucy was so pretty and her

"oiee so appealing that she landed

several small parts in musical shows.

Fred Stone heard her, and asked her

to tryout for "Criss Cross." When-

r

OAKS

DO YOU IMITATE SOMEONE ELSE?

----~

,-,

,;.--;'i\ _ ~d\ ...,

ARE YOU

AFRAID OF OTHERS. OR IN THE WRONG JOB?

LEARN THE STARS'

PERSONALITY SECRETS!

\

e\'er she had a chance like that, Lucy

would spur herself on by conjuring

up visions of Anna in her he~·day.

She knows now that was why she got

small parts instead of big parts,

Lucy is a cheerful girl, but during

those years in musical comedy she

wasn't herself. She was unhappy because

of that.

The day she heard "Criss Cross" was

going to close, she came home blue as

indigo, There'd be tryouts again,

waiting around in managers' offices.

letters of introduction.

HER mother came in from shopping,

her arms full of bundles, There

was something lost-looking about the

girl sitting by the window.

"f met your old singing teacher on

the street," Anna told Lucy, dropping

things anywhere, "He says U's a

shame you're wasting yourself in

musical comedy."

So began the talk that has changed

the whole course of Lucy Monroe's

life. "I've thought and thought about

it," said Anna. "You've gone about

your work the wrong way. You

must stop trying to be like I was. I

must never give you another letter,

You must never tell another soul in

the profession you're my daughter,"

"And she was right." Lucy told me.

"To try to be like another person is to

stand eonvicted of inferiority in ~'our

own eyes."

So from then on, Lucy tried only for

serious engagements. And because

she was being herseU, the way ahead

wasn't long. In 1933 she was starred

in popular classics at the Hippodrome,

as "Marguerite" and "Juliet" and

"Nedda," Then radio! Now she is so

well established that her old kink has

ceased to be painful.

Dolly Dawn, who sounds so gay

whcn you hear her with George Hall's

ol'chestra, was once all crippled up

with a kInk that's even more common

than Lucy Monroe's, If the very mention

of looking for a job sends a

shiver coursing down your spine,

there's real psychological treasure for

you in this tale of a girl who got over

that fear.

"People told me I was silly to be

scared ot applying for jobs," said

Dolly, ''They'd say that the boss

needed me as much as I did him. But

it was pretty hard for me to believe."

But there is a way to gain poise

when you face a potential boss. George

Hall showed it to Dolly.

Dolly is a little Italian girl, born in

Newark, and christened Theresa An


WHEN you feel llke calhng an

Arkansan a hillbilly-smile.

Then play it safe and call him

a mountaineer instead.

The folks from high in the Ozarks

and the Ouachitas don't relish the hillbilly

name.

Chester ("Chel") Lauck and Norris

("Toughy") GotT (Lum and Abner of

the Coast-Io-Coast airlanes) know all

about the singular sensitiveness of

citizens in the commonwealth of Arkansas.

They have a keen insight into

the philosophy that lies behind it.

rhey know what it means, [rom personal

experience, to be held up to

national ridicule. They don't want to

ridicule anybody at any time.

Much of the success of one of radio's

permanent hit programs you can

readily trace to this deep-rooted understanding

of the genuine Arkansas

character and philosophy-with which

the program deals for firteen minutes,

five nights a week.

"We just don't think it's squareshooting

to cadge a national chuckle

at the expense of somebody's feelings

down in Arkansas," remarks tall,

lanky Chet Lauck, running a thin

hand through jet-black hair which

curls a bit wildly despite meticulous

brushing, "\Vhat's more, to picture

our Arkansas friends as nitwits or oafs

just wouldn't be authentic.

"We're willing to sacrifice a bit of

humor any day for a bit of realism.

We try to make our program amusing

through the situations we build up,

rather than through the ignorance or

obtuseness of any character. That's

how we started building five years

ago, and-we gloat a little when we

recall how we stuck to it."

A bit of gloating is pardonable. In

the five-year radio life of the Lum and

Abner show, the boys have proved

their point. Nowadays people are

laughing with them instead of at them.

They are riding high. Proof: They

have just been handed a contract renewal,

calling for nn additional year

and a half under present sponsorship,

which will net them a joint salary that

makes the income-tax collectors lie

awake at night.

THE native of Arkansas is no dumbbell,"

you are earnestly informed by

half-pint-sized Toughy Goff. One look

at his jutting jaw explains his nickname,

and his shoulders are broad

enough to carry his full share of the

burden of authoring and acting in the

skit.

"Northerners dropping into Pine

Ridge may consider the native iIIiterute,"

says Toughy, "and comparatively

speaking, he may be. But he knows

everything he needs to know. He's

entirely contented. He can tell when

nnd where the hunting is best. He

knows how' to care for his game when

he gets it. He never goes hungry.

If he must dig a well, he knows where

to start digging.

"He may not be sure who occupies

the White House just now, and he may

BEHIND THE SCENES

LAUGHS TAKE A

BACK SEAT WITH

LUM AND ABNER.

REAL OZARK LIFE

IS WHAT THEY'RE

AFTER-AND GET!

cast a vote for Lum lor president-as

Lum hoped some would after the

"campaign" we broadcast last Fall.

But in dickering for a swap, he'll

probably skin a northerner seventeen

ways from Sunday. Why, there arc

more David Harums down there than

in David's own Kentucky. They're

strictly honest, those hill folks, but

they're shrewd."

Shrewd, Mr. Goff? Ah, who are we

to argue with you-you, with your

many-figured contract in your pocket,

and every prospect of another when

that expires? Shrewd it is.

The team started by observing a

basic principle, which is to know your

subject thoroughly. Both were born

on the pine-clad slopes of the Ouachita

Mountains, in the vicinity of Mena, a

CQunty seat town of 4,000 persons in

western Arkansas. It isn't far from

Bob Burns' beloved Van Buren; and

Mena, by the way, is the county seat

of the Lum and Abner show,

-tioned every actress we could locate.

They all sounded the same: That is

to SilY, different. Different from the

women of Pine Ridge. If the listeners

accepted any of those characters as

authentic, they'd simply have to believe

that we were phonics."

"So we had to leave the femmes

right out of the script," Lauck went

on, in mock sadness. "We faced a

dreary luture--with no sex appeal!"

Other artists might have considercd

it advisable to ease up on the authenticity

and inject a strictly synthetic

Pine Ridge woman for the story's

sake. Not so Lum and Abner.

"The native friendliness of rural

America is appe


Rose Bampton's Recommended

Music Schools

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1ssons will cost too much. Any music

teacher worth having will take you at

a price ~'ou can afford. if you tell him

honestly what that price is lind if he

thinks you are worth teaching. (If

you should become famou.'!. he would

make a fortune, because other students

will flock 10 him!) Perhaps the high

school music teacher nearest you will

give you lessons. Perhaps you will

I)refer the WPA music teacher. Or

you may want to find someone else.

TO DO that do not merely ask your

friends to recommend someone,

but listen to a couple of [he tcacheT's

pllpils. You can judge by results.

If their voices arc terrible you (:crtainly

don't wallt your voice ruinl.'d

100. If on the other hand they are

Rood, it is logical to assume that the

teacher is good.

How are you to judge'! In this day L _

of radio, when all we need to do is

turn a switch to have the most glorious

\·oices of our time flood into our homes.

your taste ought to be as good as anyone's.

You learn to know beautiful

\·oices by hearing singers sing.

You shouldn·t begin to sing until

you are sixteen years old. You !'hould

go on with your regular schoolwork

I feel, and get a good cultural background

as well as a musical back·

ground. J add this by way of caution

After all, you will never become a

great singer unless you become a great

person as well. Too much sp


MAIN STREET TO BROADWAY, TO

SUCCESS-THAT WAS THE STORY

OF LANDT TRIO & WHITE UNTlL-

sing on the corner to entertain anybody,

or on front porches to entertain

the girls. They sang those hum-hum

songs. Like "Honey."

They thought they were pretty good.

So did the home folks. At parties the

boys always harmonized. Death was

far away then.

That was in 1928-the year of money

magic and financial voodooism. 19281

Herbert Hoover had just been elected

president! A new deal meant just another

card game. It was

the age of gilt and giddiness.

Prosperity was everyman's

bedfellow and

poverty was a horrid

word. America was doped

with false wealth, duped

by false prophets and

was dancing drunkenly

to the hypnotic beats

of tom-toms.

Dan Landt was 27.

Karl Landt was 21. Jack was 16. Dan,

a serious fellow, painted houses for a

living. Karl taught chemistry. Jack

studied chemistry. Just three run-ofthe-mill

brothers, loving and laughing,

quarreling and singing-and fighting

among themselves as all brothers will

do until some common enemy comes,

and then they fight together. "All for

one and one for all." Yes, they were

just ordinary brothers.

But they could sing and plunk a

ukelele. You remember the typethere

are brothers like that in every

Howard White: He played

In minor key. by earmade

the Landt Trio four

makes me feel clean. You know what

I mean."

He had a Negro friend who batted a

battered old piano in a roadhouse and

the Negro taught Howard to play.

"Just put yo' hands heah and push

on de keys," coached the Negro.

Howard put his hands there and

pushed. Music came. He was a natural

musician. He couldn't read a

word of music. He played mostly in

minor keys, improvising the bass notes

as whim and fancy directed.

"1 hit the black keys

most of the time."

And the way he hit the

black keys and the music

he coaxed out just fitted

the hum-hum "Honey"

melody of the Landt

brothers.

So it started _ three

brothers, a house-painter,

a chemist, a student-and a baker!

Howard and the brothers were asked

to sing over Scranton's stations WGBI

and WQAM:. Folks listened when they

were on the air.

"That's the Landt Trio and White,"

folks in Scranton said as they tuned

in. "Pretty good, eh?"

They had a way about them-they

could do things to music. A boomboom

here, a hum-hum there-a patter

between times and the boys lifted

RY

JAMES H.

STREET

a ditty, made it a thing of joy. And

all the lime Howard was just hitting

the black keys.

A few pennies were earned over the

home~town stations and those few

pennies put big ideas in the heads of

the Four Musketeers. Why, they reasoned,

they got paid for singing and

always they had sung for fun! In-

•••

comes to a minstrel

THIS is another lale of two cities

and Four Musketeers--"all for one

and one for all"-three brothers

and a comrade who traveled together

as wandering minstrels up the highroad

to lame, although death pointed

to detours and late dug enough pits

to ha\le crushed the spirits of less

\laliant men.

And finally when they reached the

peak of the highroad and found the

world was beating a pathway to their

door, it was death that rapped the

loudest at their porlals.

Death was the only thing the Landt

brothers and Howard White couldn't

lick.

This tale of two cities and the wandering

balladeers, the musical musketeers,

begins around the hearth of a

home in Scranton, Pa. There are

many houses in SCranton like it. There

is a porch and vines in the Summertime.

But this house really was different.

The Landt boys Ii\led there.

Everybody in town knew the Landt

boys. There were Dan and Karl and

Jack. They used to sit around the fire

and sing just to entertain themselves

and their parents. Or they would

town-plunk-plunking a ukelele and

singing those hum-hum "Honey"

songs at all the socials--kissing in the

dark and singing in the light.

Howard White knew the boys, of

course. Howard was 26. He ran a

bak2ry---


We'll show 'em. And we'll slay 'em!"

So they went around and shook

hands with their townsmen. walked

down Main Street, got on a train, went

away.

That closed the first part of this

tale of two cities. For the Landt Trio

and White were coming to the Big

Town! To New York!

Hurry up, old train-we're going to

Broadway-up the highroad together.

There was music in their hearts.

Death seemed so far away then. But

a lot of things seemed far away in

1928!

THE next day the tale of the big city

began. But the hOus':is in New

York do not have porches and vines.

And musical young men can not very

well hum-hum "Honey" on the corners

to girls-without being told to

shut up. Scranton and New York nre

in the same country, but they're not

the same.

The boys didn't get a job the Orst

day, or the second, or the third. The

same old story-round after round of

theatrical offices-the same old story.

"Sorry, nothing today."

However, the Landt boys and Howard

were not the kind to mope and

grumble and just sit still until fortune

beckoned.

"The devil with all these offices,"

said Dan, the house-painter. "Let's try

something else."

The St. Regis Hotel was being built.

A lot of things were being built in

1928. Vincent Lopez was to be master

of ceremonies at the hotel's opening.

So the Four Musketeers trouped right

up to Lopez and asked for work.

"What's your act?" asked Vincent.

"We harmonize," said the minstrels.

Wht>n Vincent heard them, he asked

quickly:

"How much do you want to sing

for me?"

The Four Musketeers had $7 be­

~ween them. Four men in New York

'n 1928 with only $7!

Vincent didn't know that.

:'Ilusketeers talked it over

hemselves.

Th,

among

"Let's ask for a lot," said Dan, the

_louse-painter. "Don't let him think

we're cheap."

They asked Vincent for $250 a

·,\'eek. The bandmaster blinked his

eyes in amazement. The boys feared

they had asked too much. Vincent

jumped at the chance--singers like

that for $250 a week in New York in

1928!

Everything looked all right to the

:\lusketeers, however, and then the

ceiling fell in. Literally. The bottom

had fallen out of business and now

the roof of the hotel feU in. The boys

got it both ways-from the bottom

and the top. Naturally, the opening of

the hotel was postponed.

"You boys should try radio," suggested

Vincent. "Go down to NBC.

Ask for an audition."

suicides. But death was a stranger to

the boys.

"All lor one and one lor all," they

said, and the world applauded. Quickly,

their lame spread. They were on

an early morning program-"Morning

Showers."

For eight years they sang on the

morning program.

Soon they became the busiest trio

on the air. Their programs called for

work on Mondays and Wednesdays

over station WEAF, and again over

the same station on Sundays. Then

there was the Monday-Wednesday­

Friday assignment over WJZ.

The Landt boys sent back to Scranton

for their mother and father and

siSler, and the Four Musketeers

bought a house in Jackson Heights,

Long Island. They all lived together.

Every morning they got up at 5 o'clock

and reached the studio at 6: 45 for an

They had expe


The

A Synopsis

Metropolitan

of '""

Opere

Artilt of the Week

DUSOLINA GIANNINI

IF

YOU happen to be in any European

capital when she sings, you'll

find her name in letters ten times

as high as those announcing the opera,

and five hours after her appearance is

billed, every seat will be sold. Along

with Gigli, Dusolina Giannini is Europe's

favorite guest-singer. Certainly

no other American singer today has

the faithful following or receives the

same serious attention on European

operatic stages. In fact, only one other

American is so widely celebrated in

European music circles-and that is

the great contralto, Marian Anderson,

who seldom sings in opera,

Miss Giannini was born in Philadelphia

and received her entire musical

education in this country. She

was taught first by her father, who

had been a tenor of note and had sung

in opera with Adellna Patti. The little

black-haired girl in pig-tails was completely

unconscious of her potentialities,

however, until the late Marcella

Sembrich heard her sing and took her

to New York to study.

Public recognition was slow after

her successful debut substituting for

Anna Case, and even today the name

of Giannini is none too well known

by her rellow countrymen. Her exemplary

musicianship and fine sense

of style arc perhaps not so highly appreciated

here because of the fact that,

in singing a variety of roles from CaTmen

to Donna Anna, she

has "focused" her voice

too sharply. It is therefore

often brilliant· and

piercing rather than

glowing and beautiful.

But, for the discriminating,

Miss Giannini reveals

a sincerity and

depth of understanding

of the music she sings

that place her in a class

by herself.

(You will hear J\,liss

Giannini on the Sunday

Evening Hour, Sunday,

April 4, 9 p,m. EST.)

The mail-bag has been

chuck-full of your letters

filled with highly interesting

comment on a

variety of subjects:

Left:

FIRST, regarding

April

LAWRENCE TIBBETT:

Miss A. Godson of

Toronto reminds me that our most

gifted baritone hu sung in Canada

and that his appearal ce as Don JU4n

de Manara next June in Covent Garden

will not be his first appearance

outside his native bnd, as I wrote a

few weeks ago. Miss Godson is right,

I simply fell a victim of the easy habit

of considering Canada and the United

States one country anu forgetting that

the boundary between is an inteTmltional

one. I myself have heard Mr.

Tibbett sing in Canad~ and that

... !5

fhe Masters

BY

Giannini.

Lawrence

CARLETON SMITH

is an experience I could not forget.

Miss Godson says, further, that "Mr.

Tibbett is a fine actor as well as singer,

and I cannot understand why his last

pictures MetTopolitan, and UndeT Your

Spell, were not hits. The singing,

surely, was glorious in each."

And it was. But the movies, no matter

how many singers succeed in them,

are primarily a medium of visual, not

aural, entertainment. The audiences

want to be delighted by an entertainin&:

and believable story. Mr. Tibbett

has simply been unfortunate in the

plots selected for him. I am told that,

during the filming of Under YOUT

Spell, he offered a substantial sum of

money to be allowed to retire from

the production. But that wasn't poss:ble.

So many complex forces go into the

making of movies that an individual

artist is at the mercy of forces entirely

beyond his control. To a large degree.

the success of every movie star depends

upon others than himself.

Remember, Miss Moore had three

flat failures before her big success.

Her singing was not much improved in

that film, One Night of Love. As a

matter of fact. her voice had actually

dwindled in size since her first pic·

tures, as had her figure, But recording

technique was better . and, as much

by accident as anything else, she happened

to be the heroine of a story

that the public liked and wanted to

believe: a poor girl, and an American.

arrived, overcoming every obstacle

OUlolina

4. RiAht:

on the Sunday Evening Hour

Tibbett: "most gifted baritone"

and joined the Metropolitan Opera.

Alas, in the movies as in the radio.

wherever a microphone is used, it is

not always the greatest artists

that

appear to best advantage and receive

the highest salaries.

• • •

SECOND, about RICHARD

STRAUSS:

Jane A. Forbes, of S1. Louis, asks

why so little of the music of Richard

Strauss is played. "We never hear his

great operas," she says, "and r am

hungry for the RosenkavalieT.

you ask somebody to play

waltzes."

• • •

• • •

• • •

Won't

lh",.

Here's your chance to please a lady,

gentlemen. But it will cost you good

money. If there's one reason more than

another why the Strauss music is not

heard, it's because the royalties are

very high. . and neither sponsors nor

radio networks like to spend any more

money than they must for the privilege

of playing music and in that, no doubt,

they are much like the rest of us!

at least,

opinion.

THIRD, about ORGAN MUSIC:

Mrs. R. A. Shreve, of Carbondale,

Illinois, says there is not sufficient

serious organ music on the air: "We

never hear the ChoTale PTeludes of

Bach, the master works of Cesar

Franck for the most complete of all instruments.

Is there no spot in the day

for such music?"

There should be, and the only outstanding

network series I know is

that or Charles Courboin over the

Mutual network. The distinguished

Belgian Organist gave a fine memorial

program last week of the works of

Charles Marie Widor, who died in

March at the age of 93, after a long

and distinguished career.

Maurice Marechal is making a transcontinental

tour next season and

should be heard over the microphone.

For that maUer, we have many fine

organists of our own. It would be

simple enough to pick up a vesper

service from any of the

great cathedrals, and unless

I am wrong such a

program would be widely

enjoyed.

FOURTH, about KIR­

STEN FLAGSTAD:

Miss Helen Mobert. of

the NBC Artists service,

assures me that Kirsten

Flagstad has no intention

of withdrawing from our

midst next year. The rumor

has been current that

the great Nor"..egian

prima donna would take

a year's rest from her

arduous labors. She is

independent of her professional

income, and

could easily do without

her earnings..

But she likes to sing.

and she will continuethat

is Miss Mober!'s stated

AND THE LAST for today. a question

about JOSEF HOFMANN;

A listener asks if I really think

him the greatest broadcasting pianist.

Yes! I most certainly do! Paderewski

and Rachmaninoff, the only other

pi.mists of Mr. Hofmann's eminence,

are not broadcasting. The emotional

quaHties in his playing vary, but he is

always moster of what he is doing.

DAS RHEINGOLD

Wolin.

Donner

Froh .

C...

Alltt.ith

M,me •

Fuolt ,

F1fntr •

Frick1

Frei1 .

Erd1

W09hnde •

WelFgunde •

Flostllilcf.

Condutlor:

By Richard Wagner

April 3, 1:50 p.m, EST

(12:50 CST; 11:50 a.m. MST; 10:50 PST)

NBC-Red Network

Artur

Fritdritll Schorr

Julius Huehn

. H1ns Cltmens

Rent H1b'th

Edll1rd H1bicil

K1rll.lulkoeuer

Norm1n Cordoo

• E......nuel List

• Kuin B'1nmll

• Dorolhee M1nski

Ooris Dot

Slel11 Andrtva

• Irr1 Ptlin1

Doris Dot

B0lI1nuy

I, 1U 0/. "'u.... R,rhud W..,er"s "Oa. Rhein·

elel," inlro


C

HICAGo.-JaCk Benny COime bad;

to his old home town. Waukegan,

Ill., last week and was treated to

11 Lindbergh reception. Why, even

NBC was talking about broadcnsting

the ballyhoo of the two Jty now; in one sat sixyear-old,

red-headed Pat. the Charle~

bois heir. He was watching McConnell

intenlly. The reason soon became apparent,

when Pat whispcred to his

grandmothel'. "That man sat down and

busted a chair, didn't he?". . I asked

Nancy if her life had been plagued by

dust-covered friends of long who

sought to be her guests for the day.

"Yes," she said, "it was terrible. But

we haven't a home phone. Most of

them called Al a1 his office in Detroit.

Some wrote me special delivery let~

tel's. I didn'l even remember many

of them." Nevertheless, Nnncy was

thrilled. Now the seats were filling.

His Honor, Mayor H. Lloyd Clawson,

of Royal Oak, had arrived. The streets

outside were jammed with automobiles

and pcol>le--curiosity seekers-auto~

the plane was delayCCl

several times and

grounded finally at

St. Louis because of

bad weather. There

she and her father

boarded a train-and

its boiler explodedl

Finally they were

under way again and

Gertrude arrived at

the Chez Paree just a

quarter - hour before

her scheduled floor

appearnnce!

Scoop: Fred Allen

is a very tired man.

and when his contract

expires carty in

July, he's expected to

journey to Hollywood

for a rest.

I'm getting tired of

writing those post~

ponement notices for

the renewed NBC

Minstrels, starring

Gene Arnold. so I'll

only repeat the net~

work's promise that

definitely, quite definitely,

the premiere is now set for

Wednesday night, April 21 . Another

delay is Little Jackie Heller's return to

the Windy City. It may be April 15 or

later before the NBC Jamboree has

him back, "Tale of Today" will be

missing Joan Blaine's voice April 4

and 11, but she'll be back in 1he show

April 18 after her southern vacation

.. Funniest master of ceremonies I've

seen or heard for years is Morey Amsterdam,

ex-A! Pearce Gangster, who

is rolling the populace onto the College

Inn dance fioor for which Trumpeter

Red Nichols and his jam band are

making the music. Baskets of plums,

Morey, and share some with Red for

his smooth swing. , . Also plums to

Hugh Studebaker for the MBS show,

"Drums of Conscience," March 21.

Top: Lovely Christina Lind,

newest singil'lg star on the ra·

dio horizon. She'; on MaS'

"1937 Radio Show." Cel'lter:

Boris Morros. Paramount music

director. with Comedian

Lynne Overman and Mary

Carlisle. who s tar red in

"P a ram 0 u n t on Parade."

Above; Fredric March, reo

cently a Radio Theater guest

in "Death Takes a Holiday."

an opportunity to

forecast each week's

winners of the J 6

major league games.

Tim and Irene,

Bunny Berigan's orchestra

and Del Sharbutt

as master of

ceremonies will make

up the talen1 roster

of a new show titled,

"Fun In Swing Time"

which makes its debut

over Mutual's

Const-to-Coast network

on Sunday,

April 18. You may

recall Tim and Irene

substi1uted for Jack

Benny last Summer

while the air comic

was vacationing.

Band Notes: Phil

Harris opens at the

swank Cocoanut

Grove in Los Angeles

on April 13. This is

the spot where Phil

first established an

enviable reputation

as an ork pilot. As

soon as the Jack Benny series is ended,

he departs for an engagement at the

Texas Fair in Dallas.. Rudy Vallee

and his boys are also scheduled for

two weeks' engagement at the Texas

Fair beginning July 12.

Pat Barnes and Nat BrusHoff's orchestra

took an audition for a chain of

stores last week. . Ed Lowry, who

was heard last year in a variety show

over NBC, will be back on the air as

emcee of a new Mutual show,

You've heard programs that are "different,

Graham," but NBC is certainly

going in for tile unusual on April 20

when it sends a short-wave program

to Africa for the sole purpose of enter~

tainint1 a hippopotamus, Ripley~it-or-

new show to start in a few weeks ...

The reports have it that Bobby Breen

leaves the Eddie Cantor show at the

end of the present series and will be

replaced by another young singer now

being heard on a West Coast airing

Ted Malone winds up his CBS se·

ries Friday. April 2 • . . Long, lean

and lanky Tiny Ruffner leaves his job

in the East and will go west to take

charge of the AI Jo1son, Joe Penner

and Milton Berle broadcasts from

Hollywood ... Ben Bernie found Flor~

ida deserted and returns to Hollywood

for his broadcast of April 13, when he

will hnve Eddie Cantor as his guest.

The Jessica Dragonette show, which

started out to present a series of light

operettas, changed its formula to a

straight musical concert because of

the limited field, .. Vivian Della Chiesa,

whose voice is one of the best on

the kilocycle band, is planning a trip

east for a few weeks, where NBC will

give her the build~up slle deserves.

This girl is destined to be one of the

big names on radio, mark my word ...

Nothing much has been said about it,

but on March 19 Amos '11.' Andy cele~

brated their ninth year in radio. Bill

Hay has been with the team since they

started on the networks in 1928.

Jack Benny's show and Phil Baker's

airing fade from the ether on June 27

for the Summer months. The boys

will be back in the Fall, but in the

mean1ime other shows will be substi~

tuted in order to hold those two valuable

network spots.

Ray Knight and his gang have been

renewed for another stanza 011 that

Sunday afternooll Mutual show .

Dit/o for the Jack Oakie CBS airing,

and the same goes for AI Jolson, which

is an entirely different show since it

has aCQu.ired the Parkyakarkus humor

... The AI Pearce and Rex Chandler

shows have also been renewed, but the

latter airing shifts from its Friday

night spot to a Saturday evening bertll.

11


CLARK GABLE ON RADIO THEATER!

'Das Rheingold'

Keeps'Met'

On Air

Despite the conclusion of the regular

New York season, opera lovers

throughout the country will ha"e an

opportunity to hear the Metropolitan

presentations this Spring as a result

of NBC's decision to broadcast the

Boston season.

First to be put on the air by the

Metropolitan company (rom the Boston

Opera House will be Richard Wagner's

masterwork "Das Rheingold,"

broadcast Saturday. April 3.

Friedrich Schorr, great Wagnerian

baritone, heads the distinguished cast.

A week later, on April 10, over the

same network, NBC will carry Mascagni's

"Cavalleria Rusticana" and

Humperdinck's fairy tale opera, "Hansel

and Grete!." Milton Cross, veteran

announcer, will go to Boston for the

programs.

"Das Rheingold" is the introductory

work ot the great Wagnerian "Ring

des Niebelungen," two parls ot which

-"Die Walkure," and "Siegfried"­

already have been presented during

the New York season.

The Humperdinck opera, "Hansel

and Gretel," traditionally given on

Christmas Eve, is the only one to be

repeated over the networks this season.

Saturday, AprIl 3

2 p.m. EST (1 CST) NBC

Edgar Guest Starts

Hew Show On April 6

Replacing "Welcome Valley" at the

same time and over the same stations,

a new Edgar Guest progTam titled "It

Can Be Done," will make its bow on

Tuesday, April 6, over the NBC-Blue

network.

Under the same sponsor as "Welcome

Valley," "It Can Be Done" will

bring to the microphone men and

women who have succeeded in the face

of great or unusual odds. Dramatizations

of incidents met in overcoming

these handicaps will be heard on each

program. Mr. Guest will continue in

readings of original poems.

First success story on the new progTam

will be presented by Dr. F. E.

Austin of Hanover, N. H., who originated

the idea of placing ant colonies

in glass-walled boxes for popular sale.

Dr. Austin will tell his own story, and

the account of some other unusual

success will be presented in dramatic

form.

Guest, "America's Poet Laureate,"

has been commuting between Detroit

his home, and Chicago, for years ~

appear on the Welcome Valley program.

Known to millions ot newspa_

per readers for his daily column of

verse, his success on the air was immediate

and lasting.

Tuesday, April 6

8:30 p.m. EST (7:30 CST) NBC

G~"~~,~~: ~,~~C'Al ,.1 EV~~,~.Sw:"~~~~!~,~:S'''' Stars In Drama

"The Life 01 Rollert Brutkner," 2 p.lII. EST E~T (8JO CST), "iSC. f W

(1 CST), "ilK. ~en Who .\,~ A.....r'n 0 ar T."me

dramatiulion. TU[SDAV, April' •

Vladimir Bren~, Ceorte Crook. 2 pll!. E!>T Colette D·.....ville. 330 pili. EST (2JO CST).

(1 CST). SBC- '\'u';c Gu.1d (Ueu. (Boliun 01'''" .\hli".e.

Ameritln Arl ASiotiUion auttion. 4:15 p,m.

EST (3:15 CST), NBC.

Shaving Contest.

~1BS.

6:15 p.m.

.

EST (5;15 CST),

AI Dully. Raymond Stoll Qulnt.l. 7 p.m. EST

(6 CST), CBS. Saturday Ni~ht S"i,,~ Clul.>

guests.

The Mills Brothers. 8 p.m. EST (7 CST).

~BC. Ed W)'nn'. (u.,t•.

Gene Arnold and Minilr.1 TrOUlle. 9 p,m. EST

(8 CST), NBC. Barn Danu ~Uts15.

SUNDAY, April 4

Jan Peeree, lnuis Purde~. rrantis Rowe. Sydney

de Vries. Hudion Carmocly, Edwina [ntis.

Junne Palmer, Louis Bav•. 12:30 p.m. EST

(11 ,30 •.m. CST), xac. Radio Cily Music

Ibll (Uests.

20Ih Anniversary World War protram.

p.m. EST (12:30 CST). CBS.

1:30

Joseph Schuster. 3 p..... EST (2 CST). CBS.

;'iew York PhilharmOflic SImphon)' Orchestra

gutsl.

"Eve 01 51. Atnn," by K.ats. 7 p.m. EST (6

CST), CBS. Columbia Work'hop dr;una'

tizati"".

Vittor Moore and Helen Broclerick. 8 p..... EST

(7 C:>'), CBS. Premiere new T..-in Stan

.........

Ceneral Molors Cnncert. 8 p..... EST (7 CST),

SBC- Xe....pol.

Ousolina Ciannini. soprano. 9 p.m. EST (8 CST),

CB". Ford Sunday Evenin! II..... nlt't,

Clad~ Swarthout, rrank Chapman. Rnllert Arm·

bruster's orthestra. 10 p.lII. EST (9 CST).

"Be. Chaneed f..... Wedn.,.lay nieht.

Cali'nrnia Cnneert. 10 P_lI!_ EST (9 C!:I'). 'iBC.

From Victoria to Ceorte V. 10JO p.m. EST (9JO

CST), XBC.

MONDAY, April 5

Helen Stansbury. 11 a.m. EST (10 CST). CB"

\I~lf3rine 01

Ed"';n C. Hill.

the Air (Utst.

12;15 p.m. EST (11:15 a.lI!.

CST). ('BS_ Pr....i"n new \l'",da)' throueh

Frid~)' ..n.-..

Live Stock Show u Columbia. Tenn,,_, 12:30

p.m. EST (11:30 a,m. CST), XBC. SUio",1

ra.m and Hom. Hou•.

Our Cal, Sunday. 12,45 p.m. EST (11 ,~5 a.m,

CST). CBS. X..... fi\"t·a· ..eek leri"".

Purl Butk. 4 p.m. EST (3 CST), CB". Gutsl,

Trusures Xext Door.

Harry C. Vavra, "Ameri,"n ('onlerntion Week."'

4:15 p.m. EST (3:15 CST). CB"

Richard Crooh. 8;30 p.m, EST (7:30 CST),

NBC. Voiu of Fi....IOne (Unt.

"Farewell To Arms" witll Clark Cable, Josephine

H\ltthinson Ind

EST (8 CST),

Adolphe Mtnjou.

CBS. Lu. R.dio

9 p.m.

Thuter

presenulion.

Arllly Day Protram. 10 p.m, EST (9 CST). ~BC-

~rttary of \\'ar Harry H. \\'00(1,,"/1,

""eaker,

Emergency Peate Clmpaign. 10:30 p.m. EST

(9:30 ('ST). :-.:ac.

Pun Phototraphers Conl.llioOl. 11 p.m. EST

(10 C!lT). 'iBC.

WEDNESDAY. Allril 7

RI/tll Cross. nov.li~l. 11 •.m EST (10 CST),

('BS. .\l"~u.ine 01 Ih. Air (u..t.

RlXhuter Civit Orche~tra. 3 p.m. EST (2 CST).

NU('

Dr. E~mond R, Lont, "Stoppin~ Tubercu1o';. II

hI Sour~e," 6:30 p.m. EST (5:30 CST),

CIIS.

[Iio Pinu. 10 p.m. EST (9 CST), NBC. Hit

Parade ~uc,t,

Frank O. Lowden, S"pr.me Court Proposal

Sl>ct


Grace Moore Takes

Over Speed Show

For Gibbons

Grace Moore again joins Ihe select

company of ranking opera and screen

artists to be heard regularly on the

air when she assumes top spot in the

"Speed Show" Saturday, April 3, replacing

Floyd Gibbons.

Vincent Lopez' Orchestra, heard on

the program since its inception last

fall, will continue to provide the music.

A 'self-made star, Miss Moore tirst

determined to reach the heights aher

a successful concert with Giovanni

Martinelli in Washington. D. C.. at the

age or seventeen. several years at

trouping followed, with their accompanying

lean limes. but after having

succeeded in getting to Europe tor

study, she was heard by Irving Berlin,

who signed her tor his successful

"Music Box Revue."

Engagements followed not only at

the Metropolitan Opera, but with opera

companies abroad. Further recognition

came through radio work and a series

of successful films.

Saturdlly. April 3

9 p.m. EST (8 CST) CBS

Pearl

On

Buck Guests

'Treasures' Shaw

Pearl Buck, noted writer and traveler,

will be the first of a group of

well-known American authors to participate

in the Treasures Next Door

program in a new series beginning

Monday.

Idea behind the new show is to promote

increased knowledge of, interest

in, American authors.

Her life in China and discussion of

her favorite books and authors will be

Miss Buck's contribution to the program.

Monday, April 5

4 p.m. EST (3 CST) CBS

BiCJCJest Art Auction

Will Be Broadcast

Auction fans who hate to miss a

sale, no matter how small, wil! have

an opportunity to be present at one

of America's biggest and most important

on Saturday, April 3, when an

American Art Association auction is

put on the air from the Anderson Galleries

in New York.

Furniture, silver, paintings and miniatures

are among the articles to go

under the hammer. The sale of many

rare historical pi(!C'fS from the collection

of Herbert Lawton of Boston will

be held during the broadcast.

Saturday, April 3

4;15 p.m. EST (3;15 CST) NBC

Woman Air Official

Gives FlyinCJ Hints

Helen Stansbury, only woman executive

in the American air transport industry,

will fill the guest pages of the

"Magazine of the Air" over the WABC­

Columbia network Monday, April 5.

Miss Stansbury, who has flown 16,000

miles in the two months since she became

director of the women's traffic

division of United Air Lines, will tell

listeners what clothes to take on flying

trips, what they will ('njoy eating, and

how they may entertain themselves

while in the air.

B. A. RoUe's instrumC'ntalists, the

regular quartet and Reed Kennedy,

baritone, will support the program. in

add;tion to the regular pre. nt


Two thugs stayed in the car. They

left the engine funning. The other

two went into the bookie's place.

Each had a gun.

"All right, you guys-line up!"

seven startled men jerked their eyes

towards the door. Seven startled men

slowly backed against the wall. For

the end of a gun-barrel can look as

big as the end of a rain-barrel, if it's

pointing at your stomach. An electric

bulb, swinging on a cord, brought out

Hnes and shades of taut cruelty on the

faces of the two gat-wielders.

"Line UP-feu'!!" The command was

a whining snarl, plenty mean. and the

snarling gunman raked his revolverslash-across

the WTist of one sIowmoving

youth. Blood Bowed. dripdrip--drip

to the 600r. Nobody noticed

it, not even the boy with the

slashed wrist.

"Where's the dough?"

The tight-faced bookie nodded towards

a drawer. He didn't gesture

with his hand. He was careful not to

do that.

One of the thugs yanked the drawer

open. He stuffed bills into his pocket.

The two of them started towards the

door, then-

"Jeez, a copper!"

Both of them saw the policeman's

blue uniform approaching the front

door. Both ran to the back door. Then,

as the officer legged around to the rear,

they doubled back, burst out the front

door and leaped into the car. It ground

away from the curb with clashing gears

-and another Detroit hold-up had

been pulled off.

A ITER it was allover, Radio Cop

Maury Madden agreed it was one of

the swellest, screaming, shooling chases

he had ever enjoyed. But just before

it started, he was laking an awful

kidding: from his buddy and bosom

pal, Radio Cop Bob Campbell.

"Of course, Officer Madden," Bob

Campbell was jibing, just before the

radio blatted, "It's a great honor for

a simple patrolman like me to be riding

with a guy that gunned it out in

a dark alley with B burglar UYld got a

citation for blOWing him to hell."

"Sure it is," growled Madden, with

a wry grin.

"Even," continued Campbell smoothly,

"if that hero happens to be an

Irish potato face."

"Which Is more-" Madden started.

Then: "Look out, Bob, that guy's in a

whale of a hurry!"

A sedan had just whined around

the corner of Detroit's Hliyes Boulevard

and Kelley Avenue. Radio Patrolman

Campbell shoved with his

foot-and the accelerated police car

spurted, swerved around a car. Campbell

could drive.

"As I was saying-" Campbell began,

eyes alert for the road. But

neither of these blithe bluccoats was

to have the last word in their goodnatured

tilt. That final word belonged

to police radio, which at that moment

snapped out a bulletin:

"Calling all cars . .. all car, ... Two

men in a large sedan jwt stuck up an

establishment at 14251 Gratiot Street

... Believed to be one more in the car

... Michigan Iicen.re ..."

Said Officer Campbell, suddenly:

Madden leaned out and beg.n firing at the fleeing ear ahead

"That's a big sedan and there are

three men in it."

Officer Madden said nothing. He

yanked out his gun. The chase was on.

The big sedan was going fast. Along

Berkshire Avenue to Harper and into

Chandler Park they tore,

siren howling.

the police

THERE was a fiash of fire from the

car ahead. A bullet struck the police

car.

"So that's what they want," growled

Madden. Very calmly and swiftly he

rolled down the right-hand window of

the car. He leaned the upper part of

his body out into the 80-mile-an-hour

gale that the car's speed was making.

And coolly, a grim boredom on his

"Irish potato face:' he began firing at

the car ahead.

"Swell!" roared Campbell, who loved

to dri\'e. For all of a sudden the sedan

ahead just didn't have any back window.

It had been shattered to bits.

"Empty!" shouted Madden, throwing

his gun down on the seat. And, driving

with one hand at 80 miles an hour,

Campbell passed his loaded gun to his

buddy. Whereupon the firing commenced

again.

Once---twice-three times the car

ahead s.....erved to escape by inches a

. crash with other cars. And twice the

police car almost had to side-step to

avoid piling up in the same way. Each

time Death was not more than a hairs

breadth away.

Then the big sedan and the little,

fleet police car approached Sbt Mile

Road. The light blinked red-the sedan's

driver gunned his motor-and

then the lid blew off. The green-light

traffic already was in the intersection.

Nothing could pre"ent a crash.

Though the sedan writhed, brakes

squealing, there was a nerve-wrench_

ing, clanging crash as it sideswiped one

YOU CAN'T BEAT RADIO, A POLICE CRUISER­

AND A COP WHO SHOOTS FAST AND STRAIGHT!

of those green-light cars. Over it went.

Campbell fought his cruiser. Somehow--only

the palron saint of good

drivers knows hOW-he managed by

braking and twisting and by sheer

chilled-steel nerve to avoid that horrible

crack-up. It was a superb piece

of driving, but that wasn't all Campbell

could do.

He was out of the police cruiser almost

as fast as Madden. The two of

them ran across that intersection, with

the lights of a score of stopped cars

playing upon them like so many spotlights.

"Wonder If any of those guys are

still ali\'e?" shouted Madden. And at

once, he got his answer.

Out of the wreck of the sedan

climbed a guy with black, bushy hair.

In his right hand was a gun. He was

scowling. He pointed his gun at the

oncoming cops.

OFFICER CAMPBELL jerked up his

revolver. He pulled the trigger.

There was a tiny, pathetic little click.

Campbell had forgotten, and who can

blame him, that he had Madden's gun

-the gun Madden had emptied when

he broke the back window of the fieeing

sedan.

For an instant-in the middle of all

that hectic action-the universe stood

still for courageous Officer Campbell.

It Isn't much fun to face a thug with a

loaded gun-when your own is empty

and useless.

The bushy-haired guy's gun went off.

But, just a split second before that

happened, Officer Madden had leveled

his revolver, pressed the trigger, even

while he sighted carefully. It was all

in one smooth line of motion and­

Officer Maury Madden's revolver went

off first.

Thal probably saved Campbell's life,

The bushy-haired guy fell on his face

--drilled through and through. He was

dead when they gol to him. Later, he

was identified as Buck Miller, exconvict

and dead shot.

BUT that was later. Right now, two

other fellows were climbing out of

that wrecked sedan. And they had

tl':eir hands in the air.

"Don't shootl" bleated one of them,

scared and trembling.

They took them, handcuffed, to the

statlonhouse-after first learning that

nobody had been hurt in the car the

bandits had sideswiped. Two very

droopy lads they were---Hymie Niskar,

slim and with a fiddle-shaped face,

Charlie Sanders, who was just a tightlipped

person without much chin. And

later on police picked up a fourth­

William Niskar, who, they believed,

was in on the hold-Up.

"Four of 'em," said sardonic Bob

Campbell. "The boys'll be able to play

bridge."

"That won't be in the sentence:' protested

Maury Madden. "And say, you

mug-what was that crack about an

Irish potato face? If I didn't have an

eye in me head-"

"Okay, okay," Campbell interrupted

airily. "Even a potato's got eyes."

And the two cops grinned at each

other. Bceause cops don't usually get

sentimental about a little thing like

saving each other's lives in the course

of duty. Especially radio oops.

14


ea t

s

er

itamin

or a e

Many People Don't Know Whether They Are

Getting All the Vitamins They Need in Their

Regular Meals-Until Bad Health Shows It.

But-by Adding ONE FOOD to Your

Diet EACH DAY, You Can Assure Yourself

an EXTRA SUPPLYof these 4 Vitamins

SHORTAGE OF

VITAMIN B

TOO LITTLE VITAMIN G

Means Poor Growth

V"du..."I"I,•• d.l.., , ,,1.11


ROMANCES

Are they pl;anninll marriage? Divorce? The

new SCREEN GUIDE keeps you advised

IMPUDENCES

What's the Idea? There MUST be a reason

for this. It'. in the new SCREEN GUIDE

IT'S NEW!

IT'S A HIT!

RECENTlY. a man was discovered who had

never seen III motion picture. Mag,nines pub.

lished stories about him. He was" freak.

YOu go to the movies, of course. You ",re entertained,

amused, relaxed. When you walk out of II

theater, you leave th"t particular show behind you.

But you don't esc",pe the influence of Hollywoodand

motion pictures.

Mother's Sunday dress is likely to follow a Holly.

wood-created fashion. Sister's hair-do probably is

copied from the coiffure of her screen favorite.

little Brother finds his heroes among the "Tanan"

Weissmullers and he-man Jack Holts; the bulk of

Father's money-when it is spent on entertainment

---goes to the movie theater.

Hollywood influences the clothes you wear, the

things you eat, the speech you use.

That is why Hollywood-and what is going on in

Hollywood-is important to you. That is why you

should know how motion pictures are made, and be

familiar with the city from which they come.

The new SCREEN GUIDE reflects the Hollywood

scene in the most revealing medium of all-in pictures.

It IS Hollywood, brought to you between the

covers of a maguine. It will keep you informed of

what is going on. It will amuse you. You can sit

down and relax in the glamor-capital of the world.

You can take a trip each month to the most fascin.

ating city in America-vacation through pictures,

just as surely as if you were there.

Probably you don't see all the new pictures. Very

few people do. You don't have to wait for the

shows you're interested in to play your neighborhood

movie house-if you read SCREEN GUIDE.

The new SCREEN GUIDE brings Hollywood to

you!

In the SCREEN GUIDE for May (now on salel

and in succeeding issues, you can-

Watch Claudette Colbert become a glamor-girl.

Spend five years with Shirley Temple.

Tour the hall bedrooms of "extra row."

Stand side by side with the stars on the sets! Go

to their exclusive parties! Vacation with them, banquet

with them! Elope with them!

Put Hollywood-the glamor-mecca of the world

-on your parlor table! The stars, the studios, the

FEEL of the entire industry is between its covers.

Read today's NEW magaline, today's HIT

magClline! Buy-

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16

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,


MORE WINNERS OF

RADIO GUIDE'S BIG

SLOGAN CONTEST

CRIME

ON

PHI L

FTER the detectives have solved the

A case the program enters its second

stage of de\·elopment. That starts

when one of the 207 OQicial Delectit"f'

correspondents runs. drives. entrains

or ftieos to the scene of the crime.

No matter whether it is in South Eagle.

Texas, or Karst's Camp. Montana. or

the heart of New York City. a correspondent

is there almost imm~iately.

He inten'iews the detectives

who solved the case. snaps his candid

camera here and there. sets up his

portable typewriter and within a short

time has a complete story of the Cflme

and its solution. with pictures. on its

way to the Chicago office of Official

Detective.

In Chicago the story is edited. illustrated,

and then started on its quick

journey through the complex process

which wHl end only when it rolls from

the mammoth presses in final printed

fonn.

Then the radio work really begins

in earnest. The editorial board of the

THE

WECK

AIR

In accordance with if.! poljell of

HE WAS "II Diavolo"-the man maga2ine and the script writers and

printing the names oj ALL the wi~neTS

in its contesu, RADIO GUIDE IS

they couldn't hang! He was the production men for the program pore

terror ot Chicago's vast Italian O\'er that issue. Some of the stories

publishing a complete luI 01 the winners

in its great Handwriting-Slogan district, a cunning. murderous rogue arc of course not fitted for radio adaptation.

Others, like the fabulous story

who headed a band of fifty of the

Dual Conte3t ,.ecentll/ concluded. Thi.!

most desperate killers in Chicago police

history. He boasted that the ~­ are radio ··naturals." And when those

of the man who couldn't be hanged.

week we lue more oj the winners of

$2 p7'iu., and witt continue un~it all

lice would never get him-and that If stories are weeded out. the script

winners" name, have been publuhed.

they did they could neverexeculc writers go into action. It is their job

Look fOT YOU" nen week.

him, bec~use he couldn't be killed b)' to reduce that story into radLo scenes

hanging!

that can be presented within a fifteenminute

period.

$2 Prize Winners

"II Diavolo" was wrong. He WllS

caught-artd he was hanged. You may It's not an easy job. Some of those

Flo~oce W. Willi...... Glenmoore Blyd.j R. have heard his macabre story over crimes ha\'e taken weeks. months. to

F. D. 3. N C"lH. P••I T--.. u...s.:,..

Ro..t. I, Plooq ml_. u.; Alboort P. 0.1...,.... your local radio station-and if you in\·estigate. But they must be reduced

109 Clo.. A ~ T ..ro"to, 001~ ea..; J. L. didn't. you missed one of the most to fifteen minutes of running time. and

Wub."'er BI2 J.,,-. E.. .5t. Loul•• 1Il.1 thrilling true detective stories ever put in that reduction the)' must not lose

Bobby J ..;'u. 211 Ear.. PI.. Mool.-,.,., AI..;

Co....laAce A. M.........yl.Pre!r1. oN R_ber. Il~.: on the air. Don't miss another one any of their essential dramatic elements.

Elhel C. Moo.... 735 1'1. arel .51.. Pb.ll&delph••• like it!

P ••; H. D. P.rker. P.....U Rd HollalWl P.t_ Brought to you b)' Official De~ective

magazine. these radiO dramatizapared

the continuity it is read by the

After the script writers have pre­

ent. N. V.: M••• E. Fit1 1d 20$ R.~ln.

Av. P ....ri•• Ill.; M••. C i'..u. Lov.n...

.!5069 Uel.ede A..... 51. Lo..i •• Mo.: M ••• Juli. tions present in thrilling form the Official Detective editorial board.

Torren.,.,. 209 E. Cupio. Morri•• 111.; FI";.... stories of actual crimes and criminals. The editors rarely change that script,

e"''''' E. Rinto..l 2771 5. Aclam. A..... M.1­

w...k... Wi..,.; R. H. Andon. 219 N. lib St.. the accounts of the solution by master but occasionally a change or an imprO\'ement

will be suggested. Some­

Cooboclon. Ohio; Ardell B.,..... HI H ..cUoo detectives of the most baffling crime~

Av... Unioo Cit,. N. J.

of our times.

times the script is scrapped and done

Ad McK."ei. Boo 614. Minot. N. O.k.;

Edn. 5. Roe. M.enoli•• 0.1.; R..... B. !lor~ In these fifteen-minute weekly radio O\'er entirely.

Z4$) Puk 51.. B..........I. Tea.; A. 0,..... dramas. you are gh'en fact material

horU 1125 Ohio 51.• Q ..locy. Ill.; M W,IIi.m

T...d.la. 1107 Pacific A...~ P ri•• Ill.:

that you can get nowhere else. Because

the OOidal Detective tran­

T gIven to the actors and produc­

HE official O.k. on the script, it is

Jooephine CriffiD. clo 5urp. 5537 eo n Av._

Chk.,.., 111.; Mi.. ea.lyl. T. Fluent, ~b.arl•• scriptions aTe prepared from actual

CilY. I•.; 5. Cbe....y. Bo" 134. 51. Cl.,••. 1'•• ;

tion m('n. Theirs is not the regular.

M.. Charla. Bol... R. F. D. 2, K.h.pall. records by the stall of the faste.stgrowing

true detective story magazine nique. The cast assembles around a

e\'erv-day broadcasting show tech­

Mo';t.; H...,.,. H. eo...t ....y. 1021 Col",:"hi.

Av. N E AII,ol•• Ca.: D..rolhy T. M,lIer. in the field today. The)' are adaptations

of stories that have appeared In ing hi!: lines, with the production man

S40'W:146tb 51.. N.w Vo.k City; O. S. H.....

table for rehearsal. each member read­

rin[lt..n. III Ku A... ~ Elm C ...v•• W. v •.;

L. R. 1....ln.IIO 5. Iltb 51 .• 51. ~o...ph. Mo.; Official Detective magazine. and they correcting. suggesting improvements

M••. E. O. J.cob..,,,. W.nby. W.Ie.: M."b.a ar~ the most accurate behind-thl!­

M...h.42$ N. Silo 51.. Ark.n... City. K..... ;

:lnd changes. and giving cues to the

Her~rt V. H.rtle)', R. F. D. I. Bo" 13~.

scenes pictures of what goes on. In sound-effects man. The)' go through

W.laon. W. V••; Oli D.;v••• 81 ":'.......'1 American police stations and detective the program at least half a dozen

51 .. No.lh.mplon. M ; ~inni. Srn'lh. 3523 bureaus today. In them are containcd

Loui.i...a times before it is good enough to

A..e~ St. LoU,", M ; M••••••I

Srnhh, 3541 S. B.nlon. K.n CIty. ~... ; material that you wiII not. cannot find record. Only endless rehearsals can

Loui. Rounuvell, 702 E. 11th 51.! C,,:f1ey y ,lle. anywhere else.

produce a top-notch performance.

K.n•.; C. W. RLch.reI....n. 16 F.,.b.,rn Ave..

When the recording is made, most

On.wa. C.n.d., H.r~'1 M. V....n,. 2217 N.

ow does Official Detective get this

5th 51.. Ha••L.b..." 1"•• : Vlclo, Dyu, 2;J3

transcription programs are finished.

Slanion St.. New Vo.k City: Wrn. A. DaY!., H first~hand factual material. usually

long before any compc~ing. mag­

Not so the Official Detective transcriptions.

The first is only an audi­

62 w.l..ul 51 5......., N. J.; Della DaY",

6;>0 Abbou St.;·M..nci.,. Ind.: F.ank C. o.vi.,

Ho" 911. 5".intfj.ld, Ohio; Olive SI..l1 DaYi•• azine has been able to ohtam It, and tion recording, made for the editors

l03 Uniyualty. W. Laf.ydl•. Ind.

put it on the air, in some cases, before of the magazine. They, and they

M.m. Cll1>e.laon, To........r, N. 0.10.; R. T. the criminals have even been sent to

Cidlu, 3637 M.plewood, 0.11... Tu.: Ch...

alone. hear this lludition record. Agai.n

F. Lan" 408 9110 51. N •• 51. 1'.le••b..." Fl••: prison?

they cI'ilicize the show, go over It

Ellub.lh P.lrner, C.I...rl Courl A"to.; n.!"" It's no accident. Endless effort and word rot· word. Sometimes, even at

tin,...e, Md.: M... C•••I. T. 1'.lmer, 495 M"!n and care is put into OOicia! Detective

transcriptions to make them the and done over as-a in. But not often­

51 .• DUI." Me.: H. E. Sllch. thIs late date. the show is scrapped

2~2 W. M.,..

St M.ndan N O.k.' F••nk Mel h......n. A.b

C;:'v., C•••:. C.....nty: Mo.; Le.li. M. C..Uin•• most authentic, most dra~atie criminal

dramatizations on the air. A corps

usually a good job has been done the

29 N. A.hl.nd. La C••n,•• III.; Aub••y \/11­

.on R F 0 2 K.ll. 111.; Ceo.,. Heuhelrn•••

Rnt time. The audition record is approved.

the master recording is made

725' S~uli. St.: Lincoln. N.b•. ; M~•. Jo•. V. of workers. including some of the ~stknown

names in radio. is responSIble rrom another complete re-enactment

Lath.arn. I Sehulh Sl~ Po•• Ja...,•• N. Yd

Her.y F. P.lm••• 24(1 Elrn 51.. W.h..h, Ind.: for their production. It includes a

Mr•. Flo••nc. E.rn 6 Kia, St .• Creenfi.ld

by the cast. The master recording

P••k. Monl~.I. Ca : V....on B. E.m.., 214 stall of script writers, expert in that goes to the transcription maker-:-and

S. SIb 51.. Millyille. N. J.: Cliffo.d 01....... form of dramatization. It includes ~ne another OQicial Detective story IS on

K".lotad. Min".; 0.10 A. Oloen, F.r,,,. F.I.I•• of the most experienced produetLon

Minn.; H. C. Lewl•• R. F. O. 6. C.ntrah••

the air!

Ill.: M••. John R. Lewl., B.lloy.... N.b•. : C. men in the business. And the actors

E Lewl. Bo. 265. Duler. N. M.: M••• and actresses who play the various ND Amenca I~kes it! T.he true-I.ife

Ti.e-lo~ ·M. B.lcolf, 306 N. Hancock. M.di_ parts have had years of network

....., Wi.c.; Sin., Mlurak. 509 E. Jell"er....n

A stories of cnme solutton are lRcreasingly

popular with radio listeners

51.• Lilli. F.ll., N. Y.; M. B. Wa......, 434 experience. They're capable of puttlR.g

S. BI.ck An.. Boum.n. Monl.; Mra. J ..hn these dramas on the air in all theIr all over the country. The editors ot

E. W ••n.r. 240 Y.lIowololle. Bl1Iln'"l M..nt.; thrilling reality.

Alfred S. Waay. 2lI20 2nd Ava~ R,chmond,

OQicial Detective are happy that it

V•. "I•• J C McWho.t••• B..ckun_ W. The program really has its beginning

in the local police stations scatappointed

duty is. being f~lfilled-the

is so. for they realize that their self­

V.:~ Ru~1i pierc•• 8" 317. C.md A.k.

"I••. A. B. Cb..hb..ek. P.etola. S. O.k.; tered about the country. It starts

E...lyn B. Cooper, Bo" 535. Fl. Pe'CII. Mo.. ~.;

M.lvio A. sa.."". 310 N. H.rMY, Av B.,,:>,I. whenever a major crime is committed

K.n••; H.....,. E. To,..•• M Lua.too A _ W'n- and ends its first phase when that

..;pe... M...... ea••: M Roy A.motron" R. R. crime is solved.

3. Ott._•• III.; Arth Homewood. 183 W.

Senec. 5'~ Sherrill. N. Y.; J_pb A. Bnum,

't I.., r

'..

How do you KNOW

you can't write?

Have you ever tried"

Have you ever attempted even the

least bit of training. under competent

guidance? .

Or have you been ~itting back as It

is so easy to do, waitinll: for the day to

come some time when )·ou will awaken.

all of a sudden. to the discovery, "I am

a writer.....

If the latter COUf"'e is the one of )'our

choosing.you probabl~' lIeeel' will tcTite.

Law)'ers mu~t be law clerks. Doctors

must be internes. Engineers must be

draftsmen. We all know that. in our

times, the egg docs come before the

chicken.

It is seldom that anyone becomes a

writer until he (or she) has been writin;:::

for some time. That is why so

man)' authors and writers spring up

out Df the newspaper business. The

day-to-day necc~sit.\· of writing-of

gathering material about which to

write-develops their talent, their in·

sight. their background and their confidence

as nothing else could.

That is why the Newspaper Institute

o[ America bases its writing instruction

on journalism-continuous writing

-the training that has produced so

many successful authors.

Learn to write by writing

N

EWSPAPER Institute training is

based on the New York Copy-Desk

Method. It starts and keeps you writ·

ing in your own home, on your own

time. Week by week you l'


KINKS

AND

QUEENS

RADIO

GU ID E'S

X-WORD

PUZZLE

(Continued from Page 3)

were in her blood, and as she grew up

she practised every new dance Cad and

lcorncd every popular tunc. Everybody

who heard her told her it was a

sin she wasn't on the stage.

But when Theresa thought of jobhunting.

her whole body grew stiff with

fear. "I can't," she'd cry, "I cant!"

The Stabile family wasn't rich.

When Theresa Ana turned sixteen, she

was expected to provide her share for

the household expenses. It almost

tore her to pieces to answer ads in the

papers, but she did it. After months

of Cailure, she managed to land a job,

and for a year she sold stockings.

Then the store staged an amateur

show, and Theresa won first prize.

One of the judges happened to be

George Hall. A seasoned talent-scout,

he saw at once that the shy little girl

had talent. But she needed experience-self-confidence.

He offered to

tuke her for an audition to a radio

station whose manager he knew.

F COURSE, she consented, but

O when the day came to keep the

appointment, her mother phoned

George Hall that she couldn't go. She

was actually sick with "job jitters."

"Never mind!" the orchestra leader

told her. "j'U come over for her!"

In the little Stabile parlor, he confronted

the terrified Theresa. "Can't

you forget yourself for a minute?" he

asked, "and think about me? I have

u bit of influence in the entertainment

world, and that's where you want to

succeed. Yet you sit there entirely regardless

of what impression you're

making on me. All you're concerned

about is yourself. You're a fool!"

His words were uncomplimentary,

but his eyes were kind.

"I can't help it," Theresa wailed. "I

just go all to pieces!"

Hall persisted. "What am I thinking

about you this minute?"

Theresa had to consider. "That I

could never make good with an


1. J~ck Benny

Z. Nelo;on Eddy

3. Frances L~ngford

4. lJnny Ross

5. Bing Crosby

6. Eddie C~ntor

7. lulu Belle

8. Rudy Vall..

9. Joan Blaine

10. Fred Allen

MUSICAL PROGRAMS

1. Eddy's Open House

Z. Show Boat

J. Music H~II

4. Your Hit PJrJde

5. HollywlHld Hotel

1. Radio Thuter

2. One Man's FJmily

3. First Nighter

4. Bambi

5. Gang Busters

6. V,i.Ilee·s Varieties

7. Wayne King

8. WLS Barn O~nce

9. Sunday E..ning Hr.

10. Breakfast Club

6. Mary Marl;n

7. Today's Children

8. Ho'lywood Hotel

g. Bachelor's Children

10. March of Time

CHILDREN'S PROGRAMS

1. Singing Lldy

5. Popeye

z.. Orphan Annie 6. Lone Ranger

J. Kaltenmeyer's Kin· 7. Horn & HudJrt

dergarten

8. Jack Armstrong

4. CoasHo·CNst on a 9. Let's Pretend

Boo

10. Oick Tracy

DANCE ORCHESTRAS

1. Wayne King

Z. Guy Lombardo

3. Shep Fields

4. Horne Heidt

5. AI Goodman

6. Rudy Vallee

7. Ben Bern,e

8. Senny Goodm~n

9. Hal Kemp

10. Eddy Ouchin

MALE POPULAR SINGERS

1. Bing Crosby

6. Ditk Powell

Z. lanny Ross

7. Rudy Vallee

3. Kenny Baker 8. Ray Heatherton

4. Nelson Eddy

9. Tony Martin

5. Frank Parker 10. Buddy Clark

FEMALE POPULAR SINGERS

I. FrJnces langford 6. MJrtha RJye

2. Kite Smith

7. GJle P~ge

3. Jeniu Oragonetle 8. Ooris Kerr

4. Harriet HilliJrd 9. Annette .Hanshaw

5. Deanna Durbin 10. Dolly Dawn

COMEDIANS OR COMEDY ACTS

I. Ja~k Benny

6. Fibller McGee

2. Eddie CJntor

7. Burns and Allen

3. Frtd Allen

8. Pitk Jnd PJt

4. lum Jnd Abner 9. Amos 'n° Andy

5. Bob Burns

10. Milton Berle

I. Don Wilson

2. Ken CUllenter

3. J'mmy Wallington

4. T,ny Rulfner

5. M~ton Cross

1. Don Ameche

2. Nels~n Eddy

~. Jack Benny

4. lanny Ross

5. Cluk GJ~le

STAR OF STARS

STANDINGS

Following ure the leaders in the Star

of Stars Election 1I0W ill progress. You

wilL find a ballot for your vote on

jJage 2 of tllis issue.

I. Helen HJyt~

2. Jeanette MUDonJld

3. Jun BIJine

4. Anne Seymo~r

S. ROSOIline Greene

PROMISING NEW STARS

l. OUnnJ Durbin

2. Bobby Breen

3. MuthJ RJye

4. Doris Kerr

S. NJdint Conner

STAR OF STARS

DRAMATIC PROGRAMS

OPERATIC & CLASSICAL SINGERS

1. Nellon Eddy 6. Lily Pons

Z. Lanny Ross

J. Jtssita DrJgoneUe

7. Gladys Swart~out

8. lawrenu Ti~belt

4. Ounna Durbin 9. Nino Mutini

5. Grace Moore 10. Richard Crooks

ANNOUNCERS

6. Hury yon Zell

7. Ktn Niles

8. GrahJm McNamti!

9. Bob Brown

10. Phil Stewut

SPORTS ANNOUNCERS

1. Ted Husing

z.. Graham McNamti!

6. Pal FIJn.gan

7. Bob Newhall

3. Bob Elson 8. Tom Manning

4. Clem McCJrthy

5. Ed Thorgerson

9. Bill Slater

10. HJI Totten

COMMENTATORS

1. BNke CJrter

6. PJuJ Sulli~Jn

z.. Lowell ThomJS 7. J~IiJn Bentley

3. Waller Wincbell 8. Gabriel Hutter

4. Edwin C. Hill 9. Floyd Gibbons

S. Jimmy Fidler 10. John B. Kennedy

ACTORS

6. Bin~ Cro~by

7. Fred MacMurrJY

8. Roller! Taylor

9. Dick Powelt

10. Michael RJffetto

ACTRESSES

6. BubarJ Luddy

7. Joan CrJwlord

8. [rene Rich

9. MyrnJ Loy

10. Elsie HilZ

6. Fred MacMurray

7. Ludlle Manners

8. Helen Jepson

9. JUk Baker

10. ChJrlit McC~rthy

VOICE OF THE LISTENER

The "Voice of the Listener" letter.

forum is a regular feature in Radio

Guide each week, offered to the readers

as a means for expressing and

e)(changing opinions about radio.

Radio Guide will pay prizes for fine

letters as follows: $10 for the best letter

each week; $5 for the next best,

and $1 for others.

THE MULTITUDE'S CHEERS

($10 Prize Letter)

Voice of the Listener: ... Out of the

big-show weller there emcrge many

programs that perhaps don't get the

loud applause and attention of the multitude.

But they are shows that make

life cheerier and,finer. Let's not overlook

them

The Carborundum Band is introduced

by an Iroquois legend each

week: a distinctive and memorable

wcekly event. "Snow Village" is

unique in radio programs because of

the wonderfUl human interest in these

homey sketches.. Each Sunday

morning, before most of us are stirl'ing,

there is a fme musical program

for children called "Pieces You Like to

Hear." And later "The World Is

Yours" dramatizes such normally dull

subjects as oysters and germs. And

Vidor Moore and Helen Broderick deserve

plenty of listeners. So, I might

whisper, do the perfectly grand thrillers,

"Lights Out" and "Witches' Tales."

Sometimes in the obscure radio features

are found those gems that illumine

the drab moments of life.­

Mrs. J. J. Kennedy, Chautauqua, New

York.

AMERICA-ON THE AIR

($5 Prize Letter)

Voice of the Listener: ... I have

long thought that one of the difficulties

which confront the Amcrican people

in being loyal and helpful to their government

has been their inability to

understand its functions and the long,

illustrious history behind such functions.

Now, through the medium of radio,

we are brought the best entertainment

which the world affords-yet we are

letting this golden opportunity of

building up our national pride slip

through our fingers. Why doesn't some

worthy sponsor start a series of programs

designed for Americans? Such

a program could include portions of

the history of the various branches

of our government; human-interest

stories about such branches; maybe introductions

and short talks by the oldest

and youngest members of each

department or bureau-the field is inexhaustible!

I'm sure the people would

appreciate such a program-because it

would give them a comprehensive

study of the now misunderstood and

oftcntimes unappreciated efforts of

those who work under the oath of allegiance

to our great Republic

-So E. JOl/es, Fort sm, Okla.

RADIO RESCUERS

VOL: Radio has eome through again!

When the school at New London,

Texas, was destroyed by an explosion,

radio stations played an important part

in the rescue work. The explosion

occurred at about 3:05 p.m. By 4 p.m.

the radio stations in thc surrounding

cities began to broadcast appeals for

doctors, nurses and supplies. By 7

o'clock a line had been arranged from

the scene o[ the disaster and transmitted

messages and descriptions of

the wounded and dead. The stations

of the East Texas Broadcasting System

broadcast 'he order of the Governor

when he ordCI'ed martial law. The

stations stayed on the air to order sup·

plies. A broadcast was madc on the

Mutual Broadcasting System and lhe

Iowa System ... The record time of

the identification shows the efficiency

of r;;!dio. We should be thankful

-Curtis Langford, Tiller, Texas.

VALE OF TEARS

Voice of th.e Listener: A radio program,

in my opinion, is prescnted to its

listeners for entertainment, enjoyment

and education. Undcl' which of

these, then, does the "Betty and Bob"

program broadcast March 16 rate'!

It is supposed to be a true-to-life

story, but why must housewives cry

into their dishpans while listening to

thc death of Bobby Druke? I wondcr

VOL: I love my radio and get a lot

of pleasure from it. But this morning

it was not pleasure. Almost from its

beginning I have followed the "Betty

and Bob" program and enjoyed it. This

morning we heard the death-bed scene

of little Bobby. I was going to shut

it off, but could not believe it would

end that way-I was sure he would

get better.

Having buried two of my own dear

children, it brought it all back, and

that heartache stayed all day. We

have our radios for amusement, something

to cheer us whcn we are lowspirited,

not to "tear us to pieces"

mentally. These serials are like a

chapter-a-day in a book, for those of

us who have no time to rcad ..

Mrs. Nora Powers, Akron Ohio.

CURT CHALLENGE

Voice of tile Listener: One of my

friends almost pulled a fast one on me.

Last night as we sat down to dinner,

Bill asked, "Can you tell in a dozen

words everything the radio does?"

r took time out for several minutes.

During that interval a few thoughts

came to my mind and hundreds of

words rushed to my tongue. Finally I

said, "The radio entertains, informs,

interprets and sells."

1 wonder whether other readers of

RlIDIO GUIDE can answer Bill in fewer

words than I did?-George Dobrow,

Chelsea, Mass.

if the author of this script realized how r-------=========;

muny mothers' sorrows were brought

buck anew by that program? The program

reaches more mothers than anyone

else because of the time it appears

on the air. I think also, I might add,

that the loss of a son or daughter

would be felt more strongly by a

mother th;;!n by anyone else of a

household . -Mrs. Genevieve Davenport,

Stanley, Wis.

Voice of the Listcner: ... I was very

sad over the death of a very dear

friend, and thinkjng I could get it off

my mind for a few minutes, I turned on

my radio. The program was "Betty and

Bob" and the sketch the one in which

the dcath of their son -Bobby took

place. Even for a person in a happy

state of mind I cannot say it would

have been pleasing to hear. As tor myself,

it was the very thing I was trying

to torget. People have so many

real troubles .. -Aleal~ Flanagan,

Wichita Faits, Texas.

VOL: ... If the ones who write these

skits can't do any better than this, I'm

beginning to believc they'rc hopeless

neurotics. My sympathy is with the

actors who have to portray such imbecilic

characters. . -Mrs. N. W.

Noel, Parkersburg, W. Va.

WISH GRATIFIED

Voice of the Listener: Has it ever

occurred to sponsors that there are

folks who like to listen to good allclassical

programs after 10 p.m.? There

seems to be an erroncous idea that all

people who enjoy fine classics in literature

and music are "old fogies"

with long faccs, who go to bed with

the chickens. "MOOn River" is one of

the few programs which offer rich,

soft, soothing music at the end of a

long tiresome day. We need more programs

of this typc, preferably featuring

pipe-organs, string or woodwind

ensembles, or even symphonies.

Thomas W. Pcrdue, Newton, IlL.

RADIO GUIOE, Editor: What a glorious

experience to turn on the radio

and find a new .symphonic hour on

Friday night! 1t is a great relief from

high-powered pep-shows and comedy,

or popular fifteen-minute programs.

. . . Although I studied music for

sixteen years, I find thc highlights

and the intercsting comments of a

well- informed music commentator

such as Carleton Smith add greatly to

my enjoyment of the stories, moods

and impressions of the music of the

masters ... -Mrs. A. E. Anderson,

Racine, Wis.

,. ..

IRR£SISTIBL£

"It is thot. And did you

ever stop to consider

how much reol pi eosure

there is in 0 packoge of

Beeman's? Five sticks of

chewing gum-pure ond

wholesome, and loaded

wilh delicious Ravor that

lash-and losls. That airtight

wropping, they tell

me, keeps it fresh and

preserve~ its delicate

Ravor. And don', forget,

each meol will be kinder

to you for Beeman's provides

0 pleasant aid

to digestion."

---

Beeman's

AIDS DIGESTION...

1'l'


Log of Short-Wav. Station.

Whole Programl Are Lilted

(lhlu701u or \bou.ud. or kll"'701...bown)

CEC. Cbll. 10.6'J IVR, I.~.. a,l

CIBO. Cud. 1.15 IVB,I.,.. 10.61

C:lRX." 11,71 1%1," ',U6

COCD. Cube. I, II 11.1, 11.10

COCO. .. 1111 UX, 16,18

COCQ, 1,75 KIO. H.wall ll.1II

C8W, Portul'.1 1,1t XXH, ,.tt

DIB. 0.r...."7 15.10 XXP. 18,03

DJC." 101 LRV, A'~1I.tl.. 16,n

WD.

llTI ax," I,M

DJL. 16.l1 LllX. 10,35

EAQ. Spl1l. I," OLlIU. C.n1looIo..kl.

'.61

.EAIAH. S"".I.k

_.."''''' 140-U ORK, BoI,ln. 10,33

FOIAA, T.klU

PCI, HoUud '.$1,15,12

GSA. .E.,lu. '" '.OS PHI," 17.'76

G5B. .. '.61 PRADO, ~udn I.U

GSC.

1.'1 P.F6, BruU '.M

GSD.

117' RAIf, ....1& •.•

GSF,

U.1t .!fl:. II.•

GSG.

11.1"1 aVlI.

4.1'71

GSH. II n an..

I.•

GSI.

UII' II'W. Pol... 11.14

GSL.

I.ll TFI.I""lud 11.S3

GSO. nil TIPG, CH,• • i... 1.41

GSP.

16,11 Tl4lfaH, .u.

:~. H..~I• .,. 16,17 TPAI. Fr._ Is,l.

'.IS TPAI, , 11."

HBl.8.-J,url&ad ItU5 TPA.. ll.n

HBL,

1140t ••

laGI, nab' '.116

~o. IRot" 11.11

HBP,

YnUB, Cua


Scoop and do",ble "OOp! No

photograph.. no ~",dlo a",dlenc•••

no Intervlew.-even

hi. name ha. been kept .._

cret! Here RADIO GUIDE

preRn'- the first publle.hed

plct",re. of CHEERIO, NBC

artllft_nd al-.o reveale hi.

nam--eharl.. K. Field.,

CHEERIO

CHIEERIO worka In the RKO

b",IIdlno acrou the street

from NeC and breakfa.ts 'n

the Radio City druO store.

Beeau.. hi. program I. ",nlformly

entertalnlno, and b.­

cau.. he doa hi. Job without

fanfare and hullabaloo.

we applaud-CHIEIERIOI


Perhaps It'

e10us as th' not •••pa.

o "d K

ranch Ii . Bar

New M vlnll-room in

exleo b

parlor of th' l,lt the

Manhatla elr home in

perfect ta~rdecta the

M_, II of Loul~

.nd

ulband of her

h • Milt Mablet

\f\s\\\ng

LoUiSE MASSEY.

at Home

1RUE WES1ERN HOSI'11 AU1'"

_1HA1'S 1HE \


TWINKLE, TWINKLE,

LITTLE STARI MITZI

MAYFAIR, petite, viva·

cious dancer and

singer in '''The Show

Is On" exclaims. ..It's

really marvelous the

way a cup of Maxwell

House refreshes you.

lt certainly helps me

OVf"r the tough spots!"

HAVE you ever noticed that you

can never smell the fragrant

aTOma of Maxwell House Coffeeuntil

you open the ron? How important

this is! For it means that

when you buy Maxwell House you

are getting every hi' of its original

roaster-fresh Oavor and goodness.

None or it has been lost. It is all

kept ror you-sealed by the fa-

EVER NOTICED THIS?

mous Vita·Fresh packing process.

in the super_vacuum can you open

with a key. That is why Maxwell

House always gives you full t.'


Rudy at the age of one and a half year"&­

His eyes had the same winning characteristica

then that they ha\le in 19371

It wa, during his early boyhood

that Rudy Vallee first began to

dream of music, of the theater

The houlte in which Rudy waa born in 1901 at 1,land

Pond, Vermont. It stili ,tand_nd the Vagabond

Lover Is \lery proud of hi, Green Mountain birthright

RudY'1 father hili always been and still is a druggilit.

Here is the Vallee Pharmacy in Westbrook with a

homecoming crowd milling around. Can you find Rudy!

Mr. Charles Vallee.

Rudy began his first

work by helping his

father In the drug

store. The now malter

showman then

dl,hed up Ice cream

at the soda fountain!

This il the Vallee family home in Westbrook, Maineas

it looks tod"y! The residents of thl, home now are

RUdy's father, Rudy's ,Ister and his sl,ter', husband

A photographer takes an Informal picture of Rudy's

parents and his lister In front of their home. Rudy's

mother, before her marriage, was Katherine Lynch


Rudy WJlS only fifteen when this

was snJlpped-but JI fine IJIxophon_

1st. They wore CJlPS In those dilys!

To SiIIve carfare when he worked tor the St,r Theater in Westbrook. Rudy

bicycled two-reel comedy film' to PortlJlnd. six miles away. to be ,hipped

to another theater_Jlnd then wearily ped,lled home. 20 cents richer!

Eighteen 'nd proud of his instrumentsl

So proud he had his picture

tJlken with JI hke outdoor background


Rudy'. mother was Jllw,ys hi.

be.t friend. Her death In 1931

WJl. the greJltest shoek of hi' life

Left to ri9ht; Rudy. his moth.

er. his f"her. ilnd his sister.

They're welcoming him home

Rudy ,nd his brother Willl,m enjoy

JI g,me of pool. "Bill," Rudy'.

conNnt companion, Is JI writer

The St,r Theater, where Rudy

polished bug Jlnd swept out

peanut shell' for $1 JI week!


OUR

OWN

Ap ri I

GUESSING GAME

. DO YOU RECOGNIZE YOUR. FAVORITE STARS? THEIR

NAMES ARE ON PAGE 46

BUT GUESS THEM FIRST!

1. These eye. recently looked down 'On .. "bundle 1rom heaven."

Also they have glanced drea",lIy at yo" from the serecn. Can

you gu•• the name? She'. the wife of " popular band leaclerl

9. One. two. three, do you N;e what we N;el The "eye," have Itand

10 doe, thl, popular ,Inger, who', heard on a program originating

In Hollywood. He', on Altalre', show--but not Fred!

2. Lovely .mlle, lan't

It? To tell you the

truth, the po..e..or

of ttl'll, .mHe ha...

voice a. beautlful!

10. "Why, little girl.

what a big mouth you

havel" ''The better to

entertain you, my

deara!" Anyway, that

could be the answer

from this r'dlo~r!

3. Here'. an ea.y onel

If you walt until "the

moon come. over

the mDunuln," and

use .. little lmag'na·

tion. you'll recognize

one of radio'.

beloved aongblrda!

5. These belong to

an opera-movieradio

Ita". She

I, named after •

beautiful and algnlflcant

flower.

Y.... ,"'ouldn't have

trouble gue••lnll

the name-or

.tudyinll the photo

7. Four lega, one

,...dlo learn. They've

been on the air for

more than seven

yu... for the Arne

_pon,or. They reo

cently moved to

Hollywood to broad·

cast their ahow,_

becauN; they liked

California climate

11. TheN; feet may

look peculiar. but

tune In their owner

lOme time. He', a

man of many daughters.

many proteges

and million, of

frlend_verywherel

8. Nlc:e bathing ault.

and er-ah---nlce--.

well, anyway. you

hear her every week

on NBC, and you en­

Joy her Ilnglng ..

much 'III you are now

enjoying this pic·

ture of her. Boy­

Page MI~et It?

6. The owner of this

Instr... ment recently

fiddled around

quite a while before

he played it.

"To Bee or not to

Bee," that wal hll

problem. He ....nk

low, but not too

low to play a solo!

4. BehInd thll dynamic: pair of handl there II Just al dynilmic a

personality. Their owner II an adventurer, newlpaperman-and

radio star. He talks Interedlngly, engagingly-and Ipeedilyl

12. The feet on the right would like to kick the ankle. on the

left, on the air, anyway. In private life they are married and

have been for a long time. They're on the air on Wednesdays'


BIG

MOMENTS

WITH

BIG

TIMERS

RADIO BRINGS

THRiLLS-BUT

is ADVENTURE

US

IT

TO

THE STARS, TOO!

The eloek', long hand reaehe, the hour-.lnd

the Shell Show I, on the 'irl That', the big moment

of the week for Ernie Wabon, mu,ic:al

dlrec:tor. He', a veterln behind -the-Ic:enea man

Above: Andre Koltel,neU, the .mo,t genlar of

mu,lc:al direeton, in a hippy moment on hi,

CBS 'how. He', the man who took Frank Bilek',

eue, prayed modern mu,ie In 'ymphonle Ityle!

Orc:heatra Leader Oule

HellOn "litting on' out"

durinlll a Baken Broadealt

r,hearaal. Perhap'

he', watc:hlng the little

lady _ HarrIet HIIII'rd!

Eddy Ouehln, pllno-playlng eoc:lety favorite,

and Ben Grauer, molt "'eraatile of Innouneere.

flee eleh other Ind I mlerophone for the Shell

Show. Thlt'e I thrill for them-and for you!

Gertrude Llwrenc:e, the

Brltl,her who Introduc:ed

John"y Green', "Body

and Soul," appeared reeently

on the air with

Rudy. Vallee', V,rletlea


THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMS

Sunday

April 4

MORNING

Time shown is EST. Add

one hour to conver~ to

Atlantic Standard Time.

7:00

WAAB·Trusur.. in Melody

7:30

WI\BX-Bom'ie Hoarke

7:45

WAAB.N~W5

8:1l0

NIlC-Goldlh"'aile E:lI,emble: Or.

j!;an & Sol(li,t,: WEAf WNAC

WT1( WUV

CIIS 0" lhc Aic Today; Orga"

!le".illo: WAlK (,,,2152)

XBr-~ldody Hour; Salon Orch.

"

I.".";", lI'A!,,,,,,tl ("0"1''''_

Inl), 0", ;;0"" f",m "WI..."

You'", lu 1.0.-.... Fred lI"t·

''''\th. I."", ,I",,",

l:~,,'11 (Donl.,"ll"

l'("ldlo

1110' Kn.

l:


Sunday

April 4

DEANNA DURBIN

C~ntor's Songbird

Sun. 8:30 p.m.

(2 p.m. Continued)

NaC n,O)r~1 \'o;ees; Noble Cain

& A C'''I>ella Choir; Munde.

lein '".rsc S.,...kine Choir:

wl::AF wrlc \\'TAR WTAG

\\C~II WGY WNAC (sw­

15.33)

'1"1", 1'''''/:''''' \\"111 l"dLl't~: ('llr·

""hllu ~.,,~ ((:r"'~h"ninoll'l:

H"I,!" II< Ihe Il"h' (Calu):

ll(>("kio" 110'''' (8th,,,,,.•,,.:

'!tll'rotl"" Child: Conl"nt·

mtlll, 1'",,1. Au/:oll(,,"

If',"n"~l; (:0 lI"w". l!".t"

(('nlu •• and ("l,e,nl>l", Sun/:

(T,.d'alko,,"'k.T).

CB'i·2Oth Ann;'-, of World War:

WEEI

Y.N.-Fr.no;. Cronin, organi.t:

KIIDO W!;,\R WAAB

CKAC-II. Lalonde & Fre,e

WBRy·ltalia.. Gondoli.u

\\ I,HZ-U. of M. Hour

W\8H-lI.Chrisrian Church

W\8);')\"\\"$; Alt. Concert

WOR-The La,nl'li~ht.r

WOHL·Slar Ou"'"

2:15

MIlSK,,\, Men: WOR WAAB

\\'SMt WRDO

CKAC-J. Donat La,,~~li~r Prgm.

WM,\S-201h Ant,h". of World War

\1'ORL·Atmeni,n \'oic~

2::m

HBC·Thaleh~r Colt My.teti~.

(Sulplone & Tar Soap):

WEAF WTlC WCSII WJAR

WGY WTAG WNAC (.w_

15.33)

CBS·Poetic St.in..., WABC

II'EEI wpno wonc WOKO

WCAU (sw.15.21.9.59)

MBS-Gre.1 MurdinJ'

WOR Varieties

3:15

WL\\'-Choral Ed,,,..

WNBX-)I.." 01 \'i,i"n

WORLet', G..I To~..'h.. r

WORL-To'n DorilL!:', Orch.

3:30

* NBC·C"mpana's Gr"nd Hol..l:

Drama; A"". 5o)'",our, L..ster

T'.malne: WEAl' WTIC WGY

WTAG WJAR WCSH WNAC

(s,," 15.33)

* NBC·lnt'l Br'ust Irom lon.

don: Ali.t.ir Cooke: WJZ

WHA\f

MBS-Rnma"tic S.r.n.d.... : WOR

WLW

WBl-Jollylim..

W)IEX·Ama\eur Son. Writ..rs'

Opportunity Co:>nle.t

WNBX·H..,.iew of Week's News

WORt.-Calt-ary T..mple Seni«

NBC·Chuchu

WJZ

3:45

~hrlin....

4:00

NBC·Ro,na"ce M.lodi..,:

Pat:e. eo"Ir., Cha•.

tnr.: Roy Shi..ItI',

WEAl' WJAIl WTAG

NIGHT

In•..

Am.riea,,~ to th.. R.,cu.. : WNBX

II'HA\I

WBZ Nalhaniel Shilhe['. Orch.

WI.W-Inlerlud.

WOR-S..renad.. to th.. Am..riean

Woman

Gore

~a..,

Oteh,:

WCSII

WGY (s"-9.53)

CBS-:'>'. Y. Philhorm"nic Sym·

ph"n)' O,..,h.· WCAU (sw·9,59)

NBC-ll.Nat'1 V"I"''': WJZ WBZ

WEAN WFEA

MBS Harold Slok...' Orch.· WOR

WLI.H WRDO WAAB WSAR

WBRY

WHA\1 Down Melody Lan..

WI.Bl·Do'-ee Fo.croft Boy.'

B.nd

WLW·To IJ.e ann"uneed

WNAC Adrian O'Br"n, tnr,

Wr-:BH·A VOl Amiga,...r

Wr;BX·N,,,,,; 51'1 Sarg.."t

WTIC·lhrllord on Ih.. Air

4:15

Wt.W·Harm"nica Ba"d

WNAC·Romance Melodi..s (NBC)

4:30

NBC·Josef Cherni.v.ky'. Musical

Cam..ra: Willi.. Morris, sop.:

"lEAF WJAR WCSH WLIV

WNAC WGY WTIC (ow.9.53)

NaC·Sen. Fi.h!ac. & Pro!. Fi~,

bolll.. ; J ..rry Sear.' Oteh.;

Kathlyn Barry, sop.; Show'

me" Qua,let: WJl WHAM

\I'FEA WEAN II'BZ

WAAB.Fav"rit.. Melodi""

WBRY-J""'enile Vari,[y H"ur

WLBZ·Main. C..ntral Oech.

WLUIGospel Family

WNBH-,6ChuT1.

NBC-l\.Catholic Hour: "lEAF

IYTAG \I'JAR II'TAM WTIC

WSM W1IIAQ WGY WCSH

(s",,9.53)

NBC·Echoes "f N.w Y"rk Town,

d,amati••tion: WJZ

* NBC,Sin Frincisco Symphony

Orch.: WEAN WFEA

MBS-1937 Radio Show (Asper·

~un,); Th'e: WNAC won WLW

\VG~

fFRa-G.atl"n O'L..ary

KDKAll.Christian End...vor

WBRY.llonolulu Trio

WBl.lla"·,,y Whipple

WGN G..ort:" Hamilton's Ordt.

\IHAM·T... Time "'.Iodiel

WIIN·Coektaii Loung..

WIXS C.pt. Eble

II'tBZ-K.. w.

WLLII Aronnd

W1IIAS·Xews:

lho Town

Teml",ralure

II',\A II-Co"nol",llt.n,

WCAU-Fr..d Ford, .[>Ort. talk

WMEX-Bil1y Gla"",,'. Funfnt WEF;l·En',mble MU'ic

WNBII,Te".n Rube'

WIIAS-Melodr Road

II':'\"BX '1.n·,; R.. eordjn~s WINS-Cunc..rt lIall

WS.-\ll To be .""o"need WI.Dl·Roy & Ral'",,,nd

WLUI E,,,b"'j' Slrin••

6:15

W",EW -IV"rds & M"sic

Me,·Perri.n BrUlhe,s: WLBl WIlDO·\'"fi~l~ 1'.-.:""

WRDO

Ne"''' WaRY II'I:-;S WIIN

KDKA·W...th.r; Bulletin; Tem.

pe,atur..

CFIlBSong, "f Y..sterday

WBl·Mu'ine: Phil IhrriO,..,: rlden Mar·

,hall, '01>.: Si."rd Nil,.en,

ba"",: IIE'\F WJAR WTI('

WGY W('SII WNAC WTAM

W~t.\Q I\'TAG (.",9.53)

* CBS·Ph'l Biur CGul1 Oill:

0.." O,adl,),', Octh.: WAnc

WMAS WFBI. WPRO WLBZ

WORC WOKO WEEI WDRC

WCAU WllAS

'11_83)

WGR (,,,,9.59·

MBS-Mu'ie Fo' Tod.y: II'NBII

WOR WAAB WBRY WLLlI

WSAR WRDO

CBC-A"d It Cam. t" Pa,s:

CRCO

CKAC·ll.Chu'eh Servie..

WIlBM-Su"day Nit:ht P~ety

(CBS)

WFEA-Thi, W",rld 01 Ours

WCN·Ev.. n."n>:

WI!N·I,,·i"~ Aaroll,,,n'$ O..h.

I-':'!.W-Solon Orch.

WNBX·Ra",lol..r'. Orch,

WNEWlrish Pr~",.

'l':45

NBC·Filch Jin~re Prgm.: Morin

Sisl..r$; R3nch Boy" WEAF

WNAC WTlC WLW WMAQ

WJAR II'CSII \\,,,y W1"A(;

II'TAM (,w-9.53) (al'" .ee 11

p.m.)

WINS-Rhumb.

Rhythm

8.0t)

* HBC·DO YOU WANT TO BE

In Actor?" (Chas. & San·

bOln): cond. h}' H..'.. n MIC'

Quarri.. : WEAF WLW WTlC

WTAG WNAC WGY \V~lAQ

WSM WTAM II'JAR \l'CSH

(''''9.53)

* CBS·1937 EomON or TWIN

Stars (Nation"-l Biscuit) I'ic·

lor Moore & 1I.\en B'oocriek,

comediall, I)a",,,,."h_ 11i."

I'u"••"d )1'. ll",wnlea tor,,·

oenl ..C....u...·!'· from .. ,

tlroa'" 1'00 )[It,1,··. "0]" )1,,,

I:h~," Irom :


* HBC,Cililornii Concerl; Sir.

ah Kreinrler, vi"li"i I; Ziron;

R",";.". "Ol'.; Arn..nd

Girard. bar,; Orrh., dir. Er·

nt,1 Gill: WJZ WeL WIl.nl

KDK,\ IIE."~ \I'FEA (",

6,11)

/l;BC·Gldd.. S"drlho,,'. '01'.,

I',."k {'hal" ,.n. bat_; Robt.

Armh',,'I.t~ O'eh. (."'al·1 Ir.

Ind"00" "'!lb ••rl•• of ~1'J.od...

I......J ". p,-,."I. In .. "rld bl­

'on (",m 11>;1, 10 ,1>0> J'I........nl

.,,,1 ~ ..."."" fron> I'" .'ud­

I" Int of tilt nriUf; WEA" WSAR WFEA

1\I (al"" at

9 p ....)

rB" le-ol BeIIMo's Orch.:

InBC

S8C :'>...... EI Chico: WEAl"

SBC Ji,nn,y JO)'" Drrh,. Wll.

~BC Jad' Btnny KPO KOA

(.10" al 1 p.m.)

CRfO T"d"r S'ri"o: Qu.rtlt

1\ BR\' Uton:-.. O"tf)', Drcb.

W(;~ K4~ K~_·. Orrh.

WLI\" Lorry .·,,~l·. Orrh.

WOR \I,trh-tn ,\;r..' Drch.

WT.\\l Dirk Fidllr'. Drch.

12:ot

SBC-O", On•.,.', Or~b.,

(BS \'in~""1 Lnprz' 0rclI.:

\\".\IK"

SBCII....ry Bu.~·. Orrh_: WJl

New" WA ..\B 11'11,\5

1V1I:"-S,,"'hine at 'lidni~ht

IVLW-Moxn Ri,·". "r.an. poeml

WMAQ-Bob Cro,b)'. Orch.

WOR CI)'(I~ Lura' Orch.

12:15

WHAS-Danet B.nd

12;30

:"BC-One "a,,,, FI1"il,' (T~n 8tt'n;' ("Ull , Orch.

WMAQ Phil Lr,-anl·. Onh_'

WORDiek Jur Drcb.

WEAl"

1:15

:'>IBS Larry F"n.k Drlh_ WLW

\\OR

WB8)l'hrk Fi>h.".·, OrIitout.

8:00

* HBC·MaltOlm CI.ire: WEAl"

CBS-:\l"rnin( Almanac: WABC

(.,,21.52)

SBC·:,>I"rn;nc !H',oli"ns, WJZ

y.S_N......, 11'£..1.:-1 IVS811

WFEA I\'CSII WLBl 1\'lUI

WSAR IVRDO

N."s' IVTAG WJAR WOR WTIC

WORC WBRY WAAB

CF"SBPr.~lItin(

CKAC-Mornino: S.....nade

WCAU·N \"oir8

WORC·Tr sur.. IlOUM

WED·Radi" Almlnlc

'/1$

W\lAS

\\11 ... \1 "Iarm a ....k

\\'JAR-Shoppinc :-IIWS

WLLlI·)for"inl Parade

WLW·lhmM ot an Ch"rch..

WXBII_',,,.ieal \1......actS

WlI\',Chandltr Chats

W'i"AC \lu";eal Clock

\\ ~BX SI"'S; Spol nasion

WORL·Btu)- Jan~ Rhod«; W:\8X'e"., Spot Hashel

WPRO:"e""; Dick Liehtrl, or· WOREd l'iu~.r.ld

Ca"iS!

WORL Sr" GooO' Illl WFEA h",-15.21)

CBS ""r"""rlla" Parad" WABC

WORC WIBX II'OKO WEEI

Inus WPRO WDRC WlBl

CKAC (0...-21.52)

cr'B\la I'mino

WBRI"-Sen..,bndy'l Birlhd.,

I\"BZ-A, Yoo Like II

WCAUTerry Gardtnrr; Morninl

M.lodin

WCSII Billy '" Bob, sketdl

WGYF;"t Prize Ki,~he" Studio

WIlAM Milady of Melody

WlW.IIQ))e ,\Iden', 1I0man.e

W~IEX.Kay &. B"ddy Arnold,

oong.

\\'NBX \I",ical Elod.tn Li~ing

9:30

:O;BCStrr.",linu" WCSfI WJAR

WTAG

CBS-l!iI (....-15,21)

• CaS·Htinz Miguint 01 th.

Air; B. A. R"lt"·1 Crdl.;

Ilero K..noMy, bar.; "Tro"b1e

House." shteh; 11.1." SI."S·

htl')·. ~,,"1 WARC II'.:EI

W\lAS IVLBZ WOIlC WFBL

CKAC WCAU WPRO (I..,

21.52\

NBC·l)a~id Hamm, .ket~h (B31).

0), WEAl" WTlC WJAR IV(;\'

WNAC I\!TAG WC:;II (IW'

15.33)

MBS,Grt Thi" To M"lil: \\'OR

IVAAB

n'CY-T"n~ of Marili",1S

CF:-IB.Qld Son(1

WBRYlVatdo S. Ne"bury, piln.

ill

WI'EA \'.".

WJAIt M.rtha & H31

WLLII·La...,...n... Premo

WLW·Li'·nlIoni'ot Vii""

IVSBXlt,'s S"-i,,g

the N.,..,

AfTERNOON'

Time shown i.! EST, Add

one hour fO convert to

At41ntic Standard Time,

12:00

* HBC'Glrl Allin., $ktlch (K..I.

1otoI): WEAr WlW (...

ISJ3)

.;

Liult Sftow

WCSH 11;10 " En.O


Monday

April 5

PHIL SPITAlHY

"H~ur of Charm" dirtdor

Mon, 4 p.m.

(12:15 p.m. Continued)

CKAC-Le Pro~umme De. t.!U"

chands de Granby

WFEA·Musical Rainbow.

WLBZ·Rhylhm Girls

WLLII.MOOerneer.

WLIV.Tom, Dirk & lIarl')'

WNBII·Chn, W. Hani.

WNBX.HillbiUy Time

\\'OIlC·LuncheOfl Music

WORL·MatinH Minstrel

WRDO·U. of M. EXlen,itll!.

1%:30

CBS·Romance of Helen TrenL

.kdch (Edna Wallace Hooper):

Virll:inia Clark: WAse

WORe WOKO WFBL WPRO

WEEI WORe WCAU (sw­

17.76·9.59)

* NBC·Nil'l Fum .. Home

Hour: WJZ waz WHAM

IVFEA ( ....·15.21)

Tbe la.g""t .t1'ft~ lI1ule ...arke!

In Ihe world wtll be ~1.11e"ing Reponers

WNOH·Farm & Home News

WNBX-Concerl Mu$ie, Peter Lor·

ing

WOR·Allie Lowe Miles Club

WORL,ConCerl Ibll

WPRO·Melodi... Old & New

3:


WTAM News; Sports

WTl(.Wricht\'ilie Clarion

6,45

• C8S·PRETTY KITTY KEllY

(Wonder 8read): WASC WEEl

WORC \\',\IAS WBinl WLLH

(also see 11:15 p.m.)

• N8C·Lowell Tn"m~s.

mental'" 'S,,~ Oill

wez WLW WTA~!

BCFlyin~ Time, sketch: W.fAR

Y,N.·Haring Results: WAAB

WXBII

1'\ens: WOR WLBZ WHAM

WINS WIlDO

CFCY llawaiians

CF)\B Mell of Vi,ion

CFHBSporU; Eb & Zeb

CHCO-Three See"t.

WIlBY·Momelll ~tusicale

\\"CAU-So,,~ F~..orites

WCSH·~lirad.. of Sport

WFEA-LegislaliH Review

WCY-Leo Bolley, sports conunen·

taMr

II'IIAS,Early E"enin


Tuesday April 6 Tuesday

JOHN S. YOUNG

"H",mmenll'ln's" InlIOIlnur

Tues. I ,.m.

MORNING

7:" a.m. EST

Cf\B·\lu.....1 Clock

\\'AAB OruJr.fast s......

\\OZ S~"'; Cu.wy J ....

WCAU:;~ Ntith""', 5;-\1

\\Ilme·ColI,,. Dnu~.

WIlAM,Pickard fl",,1,

\\LI'''-ll.F~11 Pr~)u

W.\fA$-E)e Opt-n~

W:\BXSeW'l; 5,.

WPRO-Snn

IITIC·".",,,,,,,.

, ..h

Snn. WNAC ~~"'B

M",i..1 CIo0

Nse·C'h~ rio, in,pirational tall<

& \1 .,t: WEAF WTAG WCSII

\'. 'I \\lIC WLW WCY

\ 8l • l.ioebon. 0I~r Clock Prp.

WLOZAI th. Con'ole

W:\OX-Snel & Sono.tl

WOR,Tu Held,er

WOlle \lorninc Wat.b

WPRO-Sonll of Italy

9:00

* NBC·Bruklul CllIb; Orch.;

N...., WJl WFEA (sw.15.21)

CBS ()ur Columbia; faa Mail

Dramatiution: WABC CKAC

WORC WLOZ WORC WPRO

II'Fa!. WCAU WMAS WI::I::I

«w 21.52)

Nne St ....am!i"c": WEAF WTAG

CFSOMa P~rkinl

WOH\'-Som.loody·, Birthday

WOlA. \'ou Like It

WCSllOctty &. Bob, sket.h

WGYFi"t Pri.. Kit.hen Studio

WIlA\1 11.110 PeslO'

WJAR-Shoppin~ Newl

WI.L11 Morninl Parade

WLW-llymn! of aU Churcbes

W~II:::\-Kay & Buddy Arnold,

song.

WSBIIMu,i.al M~s.all:es

WSBXN~w.

Fit:q;erald

WORL!'l.,.-a; Good Mornillg:

N,iI(hbor

WROO-M"rni... M~lodies

WSAR.Tuneful Topics

\\'TIC·Radio Buaar

9:JS

CBS.Jlck & Lor.tta CIem.nl

(Kirkman'l Soap): W....BC

("..-2152)

NBC·The 'Slre 6.ntM: WJAR

CBSII........:aIr. Council of tho!

....ir: WEl::l WORC WORC

WPRO WM....S WLal

Y.S..Gretth." Mc.MlIDen: WEAN

WSAC

CfNB-Oaot' M.....

WCAU-MOt1I. M.lodie:l; Nnrs

WCSll-On.. Cirl in a Millin"

WCY Market Bukel

\\'IIAM ")"Ilery o.ef

Wl.w.H"P" .... lden·. R_.n«

WSBHOn tll.. Mall

WNBX'){lI!ical £dIoes

WOR-Sboppin.: .nib J.an Abber

WTtCRbythm Palllde

9:30

CBS.Rkbard Wu....u. IOfIp;

S.....: W.... BC WOKO WMAS

WORC WLBl WDRC WEEI

WPRO (0..'-21.52)

NBC,Streamlinen: WCSH

Y.N.Tunn for Two: W1CC

WS....C WSAR WLLH WNOH

WROO

II..Uo, PeeD': wau WLW

CFeY-Women at Hom, llour

CK....C-Bonjour Mad....~

WBRY.Mornine Musical Rt'nl..

WBZ .... n Star \'.riet;es

WEEIMuaical Laborato..,

WGYMr. &. Mn. Wisepenny

WHAM-Mrs. Thrifty Bu)·...

WNBX.WPA Conurt

won Ora.n Recital

WOIlLJ."i$h Ilad;" Fortlm

9:4~

NBC,lIone)'DlOO"."; Crace &.

Eddie ,\lbe.t; WEAF

CB~-Ba.helor·. ChIldren, sketth

(Old O..tch Clun....): W....se

WCAU (50.21.52)

NBC Ad,la n....." St. Jobol,

coreot topin; Stwl: WJAR

\\-iAG WilC WFEA

r.s_ Oi:ri.I.nd B.nd- WLOZ

W:"BII w:ue "SAR WROO

O'XB-OrJ:an \1.lodin

WA.\BCharm Mirror

WCSII Hav, YOII Iltardr; "'....

WDRC-Du.tillr Off Fed.ral r·

thi,-... in C""n~t ....t

WEEI\lr. Sunshine

WGY'iOllr Coffee \Iu...; N"",s

WI/.\:\!·H"u.cboat lIannall

II'LOl-On, Girl ill a Millio.

WLLH-Bet.)· Ross M.todia

\\-LWKilly K....n.. Inc.

W\l,\,


WOR·'IJrlha DUlle

WORl Xe," , 1I',t Club

WPRO-Con...t Band

WTIC-Ol'Jall ~Ielodifl

2;15

CBS .-\meriun '-chor,I ,,( Ihe Ai.;

l,to.alu"" "Ilamlel" WABC

",PRO WEEI WFBl WCAU

lOlA'; WDIl(" l\lBl \\OliO

WQR(" «" 9.59 15.27)

c.'>. ,\.thu. I\·,i~hl. ltlodie., OM & New

3;4!>

* NBC-THE O·NEILLS. SKETCH

(IYory FI~kt'): WEAF WCSH

WTAG \\TAR WSAC I\TlC

WG\' WLW (s,..·1533)

I\B;'; Ib'·t \'00 Hurd' lOin.

I\'IU\I IIBZ WE-IS WFEA

(,...1511)

("Fn' F.\I\'lil)- Doclor

fF"i8·'it"

weAl' O.n Kelly. ""'P

\\"FEI :"t... \'0« ..

W\lEXlllIehi.... \"ou' Hobby

1\·SBX·Partnl·, Forum

\\OKOCocterl lIan (CBS)

4:00

i'lBC-Gta. hd. of Womftl'S

Club!. WEAF ( ....,953)

CB"-~""( & :.",.on: WEAF IVTIC

WCSII \\~AC WJAR WTAG

\\C\' (,,..-9.53)

NIK lkot U.r_ d.......: WJZ

WIlA\1 Wal

Clh p"p Conttrl; H--.,d Bar­

~_. (0,,BII·'.:....s

\\':\EW \lile Btli..,-. BaUr......

W:\BX·Jnhn A"ul. pi,ni,t

\\-OR-Insp. I\h,tt of !'Ihn \"tl~" O.ch.

\\S\I F",.nei.l Xe",; Goorge

11.11'. Oreh.

6:00

cas Dtl C..in... sonp' WABC

WOliO \\'BB'I WOU (.....

15_279.59)

NBC-(N....... WJZ only) Mtt..

"ilh WiU.....·' Oreh.: WJZ

\\\!AQ

I"BC-S..tdtr Elhtr

\\'11:\ Inq~iri... Rtporltr

WIV:iSporu, 00Jt Ounpb,.

\\\!AS .........,,; TmtptralU.t

wsax Thank \'0


Tuesday

AL PEARCE

''Watch Tht Fun Go B,"

Tu... 9 p.m.

(8;(lO ,.m. Continutd)

WIIN.Joe M.rtin, music" htalth

WINS Soti.l Ste..rit)'

WINS Am.r. Do"lin! Congr...;

TJlk

WMEX Five Star Fin.l, drama

WNBlt thnth nadio Ntw.

WNDX Ne...; Spt na,hu

'WNEW U1"bbtr Otrlman, com.·

diao

\\'OR-Esquire On lht Air

11:15

MBSLu Shtllty's Orth.: WNBH

CJ'CY Old limtn

WH.ACoId Spt;nl Band

II'GS Mu..cal MomtnU

WHN-Sn-nl~ in tAt 1iit;bt

WISS Inquirinl MlCrophont

WSI:lX Jalll x.>ion

WSEW Kay Rttd, _ani.1

WNOl( )bkt 8tbu., Oallroom

S:3t

• NBC·Wa,_ Kinfs Orcll.

(J-dy EMhff) WEAF WCSR

WJAR WTAG WNAC WTA.\I

WSM WMAQ WGY WTIC o·\ltlom~ Qi·5o-M.

WBRY)ltlodi.,. of Today

WI"EWQuiz Conl.,.t

WOR Gahritl IIntt...

WSAR )I".i....... WJZ

WI/,\\I WEAN WH:A

CBS.Jack Oak~'. eou.,;" (....

6.12)

MB:--W'allto.I,i>l'. Sinfon~II"

WOR WGN WAAB I\LLII

W".\R WBRY WDRO

cae San "int 50>01: CFeY

CRCO cr1iB

CFRB WI"'a" Campbell

CKAC Lif, of tht Party

KDKARad,o Town ~h·tl;n,

WaZ-Pla)'tr.

WUI Follin

WMEX·Diok Porttr, to'll'

WNBIlNe""

10:15

CKACNtw.

WMEX-Throu.h lhe SUJe Door

WNBII-Sinfo"iella

10:30

NBC-Jimmie Fidltr'. Hollywood

GO'I';P (Drtnd

WF..AF WNAC

wnc WJAR WMAQ WTAM

wesli WTAG WSM WLW

WGY (.",-9.53)

NBC-EmtrttnC' I'u('l' C.mlWlitn:

WFEA KOKA WEAS WIlA~1

WJZ WBl (1..-6.14)

C8S-\Iu.ios

WGX,S"othl Skits " Ik)'QRd

WGV:i~; On th, Mall

WLW·Pa,1l SolliYan, ....... _.

""",tllor

WMEX-Frank 1'1'''''''" Ordt.

WTA)I·Eactrpll from II Tron·

,~,

11:15

CBS·Pfttl)' Kill)' K,Uy (Wondtr

Broad). KSX (al,.. .t 6:45

p.m.)

NBC·Mattin.. ~ Br.... WEAF'

Danu Mu.it: WlAR \VilAS

CFRB-Armthair C1ubi lIotllQ

Summarin

KDKA Road Cod,tions; Bulktin

WAAB Jan Eun' Orth.

WG"'Kay Ky ......'. Ortll.

WLW·SIt'iD& Quarld

\nIAQI.w B..-·t Ortll,

"OR Sal Branehrynnt', Ortll.

W~}l·S_.

WTtC-~. f""", Polid! Nat'l

H_

11:30

• NBC.J 0 H H N Y PRESENTS

(Phllip Morritl; KPO KOA

hl'lO al 8 p_m_l

CBS-AI Jol..,.. (RiMoLiftbuoy),

KSX KSL (aloo al 830 p_m_)

NBC-Dream. of lolli ACO:

WEAF

I'BCJimm~' Joy'. Orcll, II'JZ

CBS-An"," Wttk', Oroh.: WADC

CRCO-Ai... Gai •. Ail"t Ttlldre.

KDKA-II. Middltman'. Orth,

WBB~INt..., TodtJ IIunltr

IVIIAM Johnn)' Lt"it' Ortll.

WLW-Diok Juretn't Oroh.

WOR-Freddy ~hr'in't Orcll.

11:45

WLW·Doo Butor'.Orell.

WMAQ-C1tm " lIarry

IVMEX-Road 10 Famt

WTIC·Or~an R,,·tr;to

12:00

CBS-Watoh tho Fun Go By

(Ford): KSX hi... at 9 p.m.)

NBC·Emtry Dout,.,II'. Orch_'

W'-'F

CBS-J",de Bonny't Orcll,: WABC

SBC-f'bil Otll"U1'. Oreh.: WJZ

N~- WHAS IBAB

WBBM Rtd S;thol" Ortll.

\\'IIAS-"'...... R_

WIIS -SuDd!ill••t Midnicht

WLW-OrJan " Poo...

WMAQ-Bob Crosby', Onll.

WOR.(;lyd. LlKn' Ortll_

WTA.\I·R.,. Purr. Orch.

1:!::JCl

CBS-Aknndtr Woollcolt (Granen

PiP'" ToI>,..«I) , KNX KSL

hi... at 130 p.....)

\\'TAM·Ditk Fidltr'. Orch.

End 01 Tu..d., ProtralllS

Wednesday April 7 Wednesday

MORNING

'/:00 un. EST

CFNB·\I"si..1 C10tk

WAAl! llrukfaSl Smiltr

WBlN_; CuriO')' Joe

WCAUSinL NtOChbor, SinI

7:15

Ntwt: CfNB WNAC

CKAC·o.tttflll EarfuU

'/:H

NBC-Morllinl GrHtu.p: WEAr

CB5-0r0:... RutiUo: IVABC

'.w 2152'

t-iBCR;H " Shint: WJZ

Y.N.·$ltppine AIonI: WHAC

WCSII

Musical Clock: WMAS WNBH

'/:45

NBC \'Diehi Ihraolla, E)'lopbOll'

i'l' N....., WJZ

Y.N_ 'n., Ph,li"ill": WLLII

WNAC WTAG

N""., WDRC WEEI WLW

8:00

NBCMakoim Claire, .tori.. "

'0"0:' WEAF

CBS·Morni'"c Alm.nae: WABC

(...·21.52)

NOC·Morni". Devotions; Vocal.

..II, Or~a"ilt; WJl

Y.N.-News: WEAN WSAR WllH

WNBII wrEA WCSH WLBl

WIlDO

N,,,,., won WTlC WTAG WORC

WJAn waltY WAAB

11:15

NBC (N.wl. WEAF only) Good

Mornino: Mtlodies: WEAr

WTIC

I\BC hland... Strtnaelen' WJl

~. N. Gtorlt " Ju..nlla, SODp:

W-;AR WNAC WTAG WNBII

WEAN WBRY WLlH WfO

l\M",nillt I)t"Ol>ORS: WCSH

"-JAR WMAS

CFSB Tht Qu,nio Mao

CK\C S.....

W,\.\B 'II"m;nl Carninl

1\ CAU !\Itlad)' I'arade

WDRC-ShOf'Ptn Sptcial

\IIEEI Carolint Cabot

II'I.B7. lime, Ttmp_ " Wnlher

WI.W Moil Bat

\\'SBX Morn. Mtttilli

WOIl NtU Vini(k; Br;,ht Spoil;

(;ardtll T.lk

36

1V0RC·Mornin~ Re,-",

WPRO.'c\'Mornine Devotion.

WRoo·Whu'l On the Air Today

8:30

NBC·Rich...d ltiberl, O'1'.o.i,t:

WJZ

NBC·Chttrio, In.piraliOllal Talk

" Mulit: WEAF WCSH WGY

WTAG WJAR \VTIC WLW

Y.N.-Fr.nti. Cronin. orJa"i.l:

WEAN WBRY WLLH WSAR

WRoo WFEA

ll.Morllill! Dtvotions: WNBII

WSBX

O'NB'IIonUnt Conl:trt

CKAC,Boajour

So,p

Vo;";os; F......,b

WCAU·S1oopy HoBo.. Boys

WEEI-llil. &r. Encor..

WHA.\I-To "- .nnounttd

WLBZ·Thouc!lts lor tht D.,

WMAS-)!tlod)' Exprtts

WNACMuli..1 Rouodop

WOR Marth. Ma"o.in,

WORL-ll.Good Chttr Str\'k,

WPRO-Entli.h Grammar Stri..

8:45

NBC·)!art;"" Bros.: WJZ

Y.N.·Frallci. Cronio. 0",,"i1l,

IVLBl

CFNBRaym"

II EU Ton'. Tuoes

WII~\1

WNOX-Son~. "

Tuwtr Clotk Prtm.

Sonnets

WOn,O.~an Hocilal

WORC·Mornin, Wu.h

WI'RO-Son,1 of Italy

9:00

.NBC·Bre.kfasl Club; Oreh.;

St...." WJ7. WFEA (s",·15.21)

CBS "u,i. in tht Air: IVFBl

WABC WDRC WMAS CKAC

WPRO WEEI (.",2152)

SBC-Strnmllntrs: W£AP' WTAG

eFeY Ra)ma.

crNB ~Ia P,rkio.

WBRY Sn!ntbod),·. Birthda}' To--­

;BXWP.\ Coftt t

WORC-30 Rh) thlllie MJnulft

WURL.J....... RadJo Fo""""

WRooSo.p ..I Totbl'

Ws'\Rlbppi...,.. liarboil'

9:45

CBS-Buhdor·. ClliLirtQ, .........

(Old D"loh CI..o.....): WABC

WCAU (,,,21.52)

NBC·Ad,l. lI01trl St, Johns.

Currtot Topit.: 1'1...... , WEAr

WTAG WTlC WFEA

'r.N.·Dixitland B.ad, WLBZ

WNBII WNAC WSAR WLLH

WROO

CfNB-Ors.n Mttodi..

WAAB·Charlll Minor

WC511.II"'t You lIurd?; N.....

WDRCDorothy Stan" pianist

WED-Tap 'Iilllt; Fa>hion R....It.

WGY-Poult.., Prem,; Noors

WHAM·llollHboat lIallll.1I

WJAR-Da,lIcilll ~Itloclits; Tradt

B~

WLW·Kitty Komt, lot.

WMAS-Today

WNBX-{;ontt1'1 Gtl:n.

WOR-J,..k &trcll. IOnCI

WORL-J.... ish "tlodin

WPRO·W_ io tht N.....

10:00

NBC-~Ir.. "1.u 01 Ih, CabbaJt

Palch, KtlCh (Old Eaelisll

Wax): WEAF WTAG W1AR

WTIC WCSII WNAC WGY

(.",·1533)

NBC-C.pt. lim Ht.lty. IItW'

commtntator (Ivory Soap),

WJZ WBl WHAM ('10'.15.21)

• CBS·Bttty & Bob, .kltch

(Gold M.dal): WABC WfBL

WOKO WDRC WEEI WPRO

WORC WCAU (.",-21.52)

NBC OreOll & de Ro\t: WFEA

C.N.·~temory Sont.; Wall.. Kiddor,

bar.' WAAB WEAN

WrEA WLLlI

Nt..·" WBRY IVNBI1

crCY-Iktl)' Moort

CFS'B-lloppy Watrior HlIlIr

CKAC·Raymar

WLBlTopie. of tht Day

WLW-Linda'. Fint Lo"t

WMASTht Morlline Carniul,

BtUt " MMtha

WNBX·:i"",s, Spot Ftao.hes

WOR-Purt Food 1l0Ut

.....ORl Stu C '>1\ $tn...

COOllrxt

WROO-Topin of tho Oay

WSAR-TIIt SlroUtr

10:15

CBS·yotltrtl OIltl...tUa, Ibteb

(GoIcI Mtdall' WABC WOKO

WFBL WEEI WDRC WPRO

\\,(AU (.~21.52)

• NBC·Dx,dol'. Own Mil Per·

kin...ktleh: WJl WIIAM

WBl (5.... 15.21)

NBC.John·, Othu Wlf•••bteh

(Louil l'hiliPl"'): WEAr WGY

WCSII WTAG IYNAC \VTIC

WJAR (110',15.33)

C.N.-Mtlotly S"Ofthtattt: WBNII

WLLII WF.AN WAAB WBRY

WFEA WRoo

CKAC-QuMtion Man

WBRY -Mu~ital '1""'1,"

WLW.B,..h.,Ior'. Childrtn

WNBX-Kiltbtll KOtIlmtnll

WORl-Wtkoont Sw«n

WSAR-I".....

10:30

NBC·Ptpptr YOIltll'l Family,

.bleb (Cam.y): WJZ WHAM

\vBZ (1..-15.21)

CBS-8ttty Croc:hr; Uymll' of

All Church.,.; Jobo K. Wat·

kinl, ntwa: WABC WOKO

WDRC WEEI WORC WPRO

WFBL WCAU (1...-21.52)

NBC-Ju,t l'l.in Bill, ""tlth (An.

.dn), WEAF WCSII WTAG

WJAR WTlC WNAC WGY

('10'-15.33)

C.N.·Marriao:t Clinic. drama'

WlBl WAAB WNBlt WlLIl

WBRY WEAN WllDO WFF.A

CKAC·l.. Stcret, dt II M.n.,ert

WlW.W, lin A~ain

WNBX.F..hion Chau••

WORL·SIOCk Marktll

WSAR.l1ome Bta..tlf,,1

10:45

* NBC·Today', Chlldren,

(Pill.bur}·) WEAF

WG\' WTAG WJAR

WI"AC ( ...... 15.33)

Jkolch

IVCSII

lYTIC

NBCKilthtn C...altade (C. F.

Mudltr Co.); C.....by G.itt,

m.t.: WJZ WIlAM \\Bl (....

15.21)

C.N_-Joho Mdtalfl Choi. Loll:

WSBII WE,\N \nAB WROO

WBR\' WUII WSAR WFEA

CKAC-)!a p,rki.n,

WLBZ-\'oict 01 tht ~lieropbOllf

WL\\'-Gosptl Sinl'"

WSBX-for ~ Only

WORL IIi, :>r~ 8., lOll

11:00

• NBC·THE D'NEILLS, SKETCH

(Ivory F1i1k..) , IVJZ WBl

WIIAM (.,,-15".21)

• CBS·H.inz Magazlnf of tI.. Air

Retd Ktnntlly, bar.; B. A.

Rolfe'. Or.h.; "Trouble

I1""H," skdch; RUlh Crll1S,

!l:u..t: WABC WI'RO WEEI

WMAS WOKO WDRC WFUL

WLBZ WCAU CKAC (I'"

21.52)

NBC-Dnid Ib."m, sk'leb.

(Bab·O) Pqo:y AU.llby; WEAF

WJAR wesil WTAG WNAC

WtlC WGY (I... 15.33)

MOS--Gtl Thin

WAAB

to MuoJc: WOR

Cf'XB·OkI Sonp

WBRY·On tht Man

WFEA Tool \\'......,"·1 Oubl

WLLH-V.ridy J>re:m.

WLWLiH Stock RtpOrt.

W~BII-Momilll Glory

WXBX.:i....; Spot flashn

WOR('·Conctrt Musi.

WORL.Nt"~; 11""1... Ad"isft

WRoo·Mnrnin! Strtoadt

WSAR-Musiul Inl...tudt

11:15

NBC·Porson.1 Colu",o of tht Air

(rblp$O): 1V11 IVBZ WHAM

WLW (5",·15.21)

• NBC·B~.kstagt Wife,

(Dr. Lyon.), WEAF

.kttch

wnc

WG\' WTAG WCSII WJAR

WNAC (sw·15.33)

crcy·Comedy Caper.

CFNO.Da"., M",i.

WNBR-Con.trt HaU

WNBX.Tonic Tunn

WORL-Enn. " &hulll

11:30

* CBS BIG SISTER. SKETCH

(Rinso): WABC WEEI II'OKO

WDRC II'MAS CKAC WCAU

WIBX

21.52)

WPRO IVLBZ (I...

• NBC·Vic &

(Criow), WJZ

Sadt.

WIIA~I

.kelth

IVBl

hw.15.21)

NBC-H"", to Bt Char....nt,

sktlth (f'tUU'PPS) WEAF

WJAR I\X.\C WTIC WCSH

WTAG WGY " ..-1533)

oS_., W,\.\B \\'"all

y.r1tly Pttlll. CfSB WSAR

erc\' -Stoek.

WBRY-Homt Folk. Frolic

IVfEA-L:\.Mid ~'ttk Strme

WLW-Gloria 0.10

WNBX-Ltr. S"in,

WOR-Marlha o..a..

I/n I


11:45

NBC.voiu of Expui~nre (Wa.e,

Peoducts), WEAl' WCSH

WJAR WGY WTIC WLW

W'fAG WNAC ('1"-15.33)

* CBS·Oe. Allan Roy Oafoe

(Lysol): IVABC WEEI WCAU

(sw·21.52)

* NBC.Edw~ed MatHugh, gosPel

sll\~~r (I\'ory So~D): IVJl

IVHAM WBl ('1".15.21)

~1BS-To be ~nnounrM: IVLBZ

WAAB WNBII IVBRY WRDO

II"SAII

CrNB·~·ews

CKAC,Vaeiety Prgm.

WDIlC·Th~ Ad-Liner

WLLlI.D,nce Dreh.

WMAS Farm & Home News

WNBX.Rhythm & Romance

WORPerin« Siste,.: WMAQ

CBS-Four Sta.., quaetet: WABC

WLBZ WCAU WDRC WFBL

WORC (sw.15.279.59)

(Continued on Next Page)

HAIR GOING?

Glover's System of Hair

Culture is based on scien.

tific findings KNOWN

to be favorable to bair

growth. It consists of

Glover'sMangeMedicine

and Massage. For the

Shampoo use Glovets

Medicated Soap. Your

Druggist sells Glovets

Mange Medicine and

Glovets Medicated Soap,

Or have your Barber give

you Glover'~.

There Is An Edition 01 Radio Guide

for Every Section 01 Noyth America

I 6/:5

37


W~E:W 11011'

Wednesday

IREENE WICKER

"TI>& Sinti.. ud,"

W~. 5:30 ,.Ill,

(S:JJ '.Ill. ContJllued)

NBC.Jac:k A..,t.oo.c, okil'td

(Wbntin), W£AF WTIC

WJAR WCSII WNAC IVTA.\!

\nAG WGY hw-953)

CFCY U,ncl. Mol

ld, .keteh:

IVAUC WOKO WOllC WPRO

II'fBL (lw.15.27)

NBC.Advenl~rt. of Dari Din.

.k.lcll (O.d ni(h): WMAQ

NBC-Old lIom.,lnd. drlma:

WJZ IVUZ

New.: wonc \Vlmy WSAR

CFCY Cecil " S.lIy

CFNB,Dance Mu"c

CPRB·Adventure Bound

CKAC-F"iruid. I'"m.

CRCO·"OII..., ..I 1'.1•• Mae(;rttor

KDKAShow ShoPlM:r

WAAB-a....ball School

WBBMMy Diuy

WCAUSen All.,. Inr. " o.-po

WEEI Jultp Tim.

WFEA-Bu(k Jone••

lloo~all

WGSMarle..,. G,..h.m, Booka·

"'Nk

WUAM Rob ll.mi"rs

WINS·Varln Snnp.um, lOop;

News

WLBl·Little Orph,n Anni.

WLLllllome P1ayltt, H,PPr O.n

WNBII popul•• Senti: Pirlr:tn

WSM f"1Danci.1 News; Geortt

HaU·. Dr(h.

6:00

NBC-Ou. A...niun $clIool.·

\\'EAF" (,w953)

CBSOtI Cnin........Ift: WABC

WF"BL WOKO WCAU ( .....

9.59,15.27)

NBC-(S..... WJZ OIlly) SW

Lft. conlr.; lIarry Kocm·,

Or'inoff, violinist

II'GN F".~d)' Martin', Oreh.

WLlI'-~lary I'oxlon'. Or(h.

WMAQ Lou are.,,', arch.

WORM." Keanf)", Oroh.

WSMN.w.; Sports Revi.".

WTAClioekey Game

Il::It

CBSR~ Nicbol,' Or(b.: WABC

!'iBe-\INlin' Hou.... dum.:

WEAF

CBSK~ \lurr~)··. Show, Kl"X

KSI. aliea),

KPO KOA (Uso .1 9 p.m.)

News: WIIN W,uB WIIAS

WBB\lAnllOU IVNks' Oreh.

IVIlNSuu,hine at \Iidnilhl

IVLW 11-1_ River. onn -"'.

WOR[ddie Duehin'. Drch.

WTA.\I·Pinky IIl1nt••·• Orch.

1%:30

NBeLithl, Out: WEAf

"Inn. tM T."lbl."' 1.110 u

authtalk ala.,. of lIMo ft"'l

('ur 01 1l1l..la. I...t


Thursday April 8 Thursday

MORNING

. 7:00 a.m. EST

CI'NB-Musleal CJ«k

\VA,\ll llreak/a.t Smile.

WIlZ New.; Curley Joe

WCAU·Sin_~. Nei~hbor, Sing

WORe-Collin Driggs, org.nist

7:15

News: CFNB WXAC

CK,\C·Cheer£ul E.null

7:30

NBC-;>,Io,,,ineker (Gold Medal);

lIyn,n. of All Churches: John

K. Watkin.. toe"·., WABC

WDRC \\IFBL WCAU WOKO

\\II'RO WORC WEEI (sw.

21.52)

NBC·Ptl,per Young'. Family,

.ketch (Camay), WJZ WIIA.\I

WOZ (.w_15.21)

)rll: WEAF

NBC.David lIarum. sketcb (Bab· co): WAHC WCAU WEEI (sw. WEAN CBS-Jack Uerch & His Roys;

0) WEAF WTI, WTAG WGY 9.59-17.76) News: Wl.BZ WOR (1'"~ls Naptha): WABC WORC

WCSH IVJAR WNAC (sw. NlJC.lJoneyboy & Sassalras: WJZ Noonday He"ue, WRDO WTAG WF'Bl. WOKO WMAS WDRC

15.33) \'_N ..llouse Party: Wl.BZ WFEA CFNB-.\Iu'ic.le WEEI WCAU WPRO (s,.·9.59.

CaS-Capti"ators' WABC (.w. WEAN WLLH WRDO WBRY CKAC-Commenl3tor 15.17)

21.52) WNBH WBHY.l.un~hoon Varieties NBC Dick Fidler's Or~h., (sw.

CB~ Mary Leo Tavlor fP~l MRS-Bide Dudley: WOR WAAB WG\' Farm I'r.o:m. 15.33)

Milk): WFBL WCAU WEEI 'Way I)o".u E..t: wnc WNAC WllAM·Curbstone Forum Y.N.-Ne"'", WTAG WTlC IVCSH

WOKO CFNB.Wa!tz Time W.lARl'"arm Chat WNAC WU.lZ WFEA WNBH

MBhc H~~lth ."...,iety WHAM To be announced WNBX-Old Favorite. WBRY-Piano Mood.

WLBZ.I'ubli~ Health Ass'n WJAR-A1ice Cornett (NBC) WaHL·Stock Markets WGY-The IIi.Boys

Wl.LH-Variety Prgm. WMAS.Rhythm in Red WSi\It.Mid d.y Melodies WJAR.News

Wt.\\'Li"e Stock Reports WNBX.New.; Sl'Ot Flashes WT1C·The rorty Ninen WNBX-:'>'e".s; Spot Flashes

WMASOude Hanon WORC-March 0/ E"ents 12:45 WOR-Dramatized Huhh Talk;

WMEX·Denti.t Says WOIIL-Ne".. NBC.Julu l.ande's Orch.: WEAl" Cheerful Tunes; Woman Re·

WNBIl-WI'A Pr(m. wSAH·Shopj>ing Guide CBS.Our Gal, Sunday, shtch porter

WNBX.News; Spot Fla.hes WTAG-I'roduce Market Rer>rt (Old E,,~li,h Floor Wax): WORl.-News; Control 01 Cancer

WOR Nell Vinick. BUUl~ 1I1~ WABC WORC WORC WOKO Society

WORC·Concert Mu.ic 12:15 WFHl. WEEI WCAU WPRO 1:15

WOIIl.-Ne".; M.n Behind the * CBS.YOUR NEWS PARADE (sw.17.76.9.59) CBS·Robert W. I/orton, "Senate

Cla.,i.. Judiciary Commltt"" Hcarine

"'"0".' (Lucky Strike Ci9arett~~); New,: WSAR WNBII Re~r'''·. WABC WOKO WEEI

" - au"ce. organ..t Edwin C. Hill, commentator: CKAC.Chanso"neUel ,.V

" WROO·Morning Serenade WABC WMAS WDnc WPRO WBRY.Women in the New, WI'RO Wl.BZ WMAS (s".-

WSAIl·Mu.ical Interlude WFBI. WEEI WCAU (.w-9.59- WCSH-Today's Almanac; Agrkul. 15,27)

11:15 1776) ture News (Continued on Nut Page)

NBC I'ersonol Cnlumn 01 th AI< ;__..:...:. .:..:.....:. ..:._..:...:..:..:.....:._.:...:..:-

(Chip.o), WJZ WBZ WLW

WHAM l.w·15.21)

• NBC·Baek.u.ge Wile,

(Ur. l.yn.): WEAF

WJAR WG\' WTAG

WNAC (lw.15.33)

CBS·Quality Twin" Ed East &

Ralph Dumke; lIelen Carroll,

'OlleS (Knox Gelatine): WABC

WOKO WEEI WCAU (sw

15.21)

CFC\'-[l.nre Parade

CFNB.D.n~e Musio

CKAC-Concert Muoio

WBHY-Mo\"ie Club

WDllCII. S. Glee Club

Wn;A-Oreatl Hr'·crie.

WLBZ.Rl,ythm Girls

\\'MAS-."ed. 0/ Women', Club'

WNBI/.Concert Hall

\\'NIlX.Tonic Tune'

WOR Kaoul Nadeau & Ordt.

WOIlL·Ci,'io Orchestra

WI'RO-Mary Dodd. $On(S

* CBS.BtC.

11 :30

SISHR, SKETCH

(Rinso), WABC WMAS CKAC

WI.BZ WDIlC WCAU WFBL

WOKO WORC WPRO WEEI

Csw.21.52)

NBC-Vic & Sade. sketch (Cris

co), WJZ WBZ WHAM (.w·

15.21 )

NBC·Betty Moore, singer: Lew

Whit~. Oroh.: WEAl'" wrSIl

IVNAC \\'JAII WGY (sw

15.m

MBS-Ilooul Nadeau " Orch.

WEAN WNBIt WBIl\' Wl.l.Il

WHDO

CFeY,Stocks

O'NB_l.unchoon ~lu~ic

WAAB-New.

WLW-Gloria Dale

WNAClnterior Occorltor

WNBX-Let'. S"in.o:

WORL-Curtai" Call

WSAR-Varidy Prgm.

WTAG Herman & Banta (NBC)

WTIC·Musical Prgm.

1l:45

* NBC·Edward MacH ugh, Go~·

t>"1 Sineer llvoH ""ap)' W-;Z

WLW \\'BZ WlIA.\1 (.w·15.21)

MANY 1937 APPOINTMENTS

OYER 42.000 APPOINTMENTS LAST GOVERNMENT YEAR

$1140 TO $2100 FIRST YEAR

INFLUENCE NOT NEEDED

Most Government u.minatlon. include MenUl Tnt.. Try younell. Answer tht 10110w;nt

problems and m.;1 at on... Our examIners w,ll correct your work, rate, .nd return it. The

r.,,,1t .hould tell you the pou,b,hty of • hith rat"'; On tht If. S. Government Exam;nat;on,

AltO ..

tl) A" Impt.mUI Is- (1) A td.. •


Thursday

April 8

{.,,9_531

S...-, WORL IISBS

("FrY-Oulporl.

CF"B-H....iian \lu,ic

WRDO

WA.\B ~Iu.ic " R....' ... '1.1","

PECCY ALLEHBY

O·~S Y"lh lhe Old :\!aster. WBRYA,-e \lana Hour

Susan Priu In "Ou,cl Hlfllm" WBZ 11,_ Fo....m

WCAl: Sleepy lluUo" Bo)·,

Thurs. 11 a.m.

WG\' Mu'iul Prem.

W~_H ';I""~ Qu.tato.n.

WIU\lH_ Burt.1I

WGY-Craot Tre",per, ....IUIIO

WJAR 1I",,~~es' Enh.nle \\ LlllGr.b B3(

(1:15 ,.m. Continuell) WLI\ "lot)- Udy

\\tW·,vlh... Ch.ndler, Jr,

NBC,D.... Ibrdinr" W,le_ .hk": I\''\IEXT_ Seu... the Aisle WXAC-Don.old \'0.. Wut

WEAF YoJAR (... 15331 IISBX.JllIl"')- P..,Ir.;ud

WXBII NOl.. " X"ln

Y.S·JOHf Jordall.. Glrl Inttrae, WORL Di Re"lnr

C_t'l "'('WI

WLW-Life of ~la1)· Sellberll

WU WUs \n'EA

W"OIl \Iu>ir.ll Build...

WSACRh)lh", in Red

~rl C." Orun Retital- IVAAB

\\,SBX Rtel Xor~O'1 Or.h,

W"BH·China Yesterd.y & T..

W"BII WBRY WLLH WSAR

WQKAd'·....1t In~ Club l"",h",,,

d.)-

wRDO

\\'0111. lo"do'n (".11",..

WXBXHits " Encores

CKAC La Chmnique F,.,..iniD'

WIlOO WHkI)' ~'ark.... Roporl

WORLeonurt lIall

1\ EEl \"ariel)· Prgm.

W!)AR·Y..... lIome &. You

\\'RDO-Yooeling R.mble...

WIIA'II Torn Crierson

1:30

WL\\' Hnlth & Ph),.iul Ed...

NBC-I.ovt '" lAun. dr.tlch \\"0\ l)ramatie Sketch

WJZ \\rEA

WOR 1"')' o.:...-n Ea.l

CBS Di"inl "-;th Gtn:t Rt(Clor, 1\'TAG,"ichlas RietuiHi, Iwor.

food IIlk. (Phlllil" SnUpI) , WTICliappy lIomem.lr.inl

WABC WCAU 11"1'110 WOKO

WORC II'Lt:! \WBl WORe

3:00

(.... -9.59-15.27)

y_~ Marj".it \Iilh' 110"" II'TIC

WSAC IHAG WCSII WEAN

NBC-Word. &. Mu~iPtnw This Week

WNBII·Love Dr.m.

WNBX-Churke-u

3:38

• NBC.vk " $.aft, ,ketch (Crls·

to); Bern.rdi", f1)·n.. ; Art

V.n H.rvey: WEAF WCSH

WT,\G \VJAR WSAC WLW

WGY wnc (:IW-953)

COSo Y.... R,.,..,.,..bo:rr: WARe

WEEI WORC WLBZ WCAU

WfaL WORC \DIAS hw.

9.59-15.27)

MBS LaF


WNBX·Your R"'l~ests

WNEW.J.ek feeney, liri.h Prim.

WOR The An,wer \la"

WROO PO!to/liee &. fUrlelions

WS~I Bill Bre""." "itht

WTAGTown Talk Bake~

WTAM Pinky lIu"te", Orch.

WTIC·Gul'H Ihe Na"'e

1:"S

* CB~.Boake larter co",mu

tator (Phi"'o): WABC WORC

WEEI

WIIAS

wraL WI'RO WBB"

WCAU (,.. -11.83-9.59)

NBC·Jerry Cooper, .....Is: WJZ

WB'

NBC-~Iilhtonn " 'I,I"lonn:

WEAF WFEA CRCO l ....iB

crcy

MBS·Plt'aYnl Vallt, Fro/ju:

WOR WLW wG:'i'

C.I'i-IA ShtUe}', Orch. WEA:"

WRDO WAAa WSAR W"'EX

WLUI

CFRB-Dexter Raodolpll

CKACOanl Ln Grilln dll Diablt

WBRY Wftkly Rui"""1 51aad

1\-L8Z·EHnilllt; Alt RUlle

WUAQ-\I_ Glow Mflodia

WMAS-Aroun.d th.t Towu

W:\M Adrian O'B",,,, tnt.

W:'i'aHr~d. Sewl

WSBXS..iq r .....,

1\'SEW·To be an_ncttl

WORC·Conlin"'tal Va""lin

WTAGMusical )foments

\\"TA:lI·Ollo Thurn'. Ord..

I\'TIC Rttl Rohen I Orch

8;00

HAVE YOU VOTEO YET In the

bi, Stir 01 Stirs eltttion7 II

no~ do 10 now b, lillint oul

the coupon whlth appel" on

Patt 2 of lhis iuue.

* HBC·RUOY YALLEE'S VARI·

et, Hour (Ro,.l CtLltln);

Edit" Btn;en. ventriloquilt;

GUMt" WEAr WLW WGY

WNAC WTAG WJAR WTIC

WS:l1 WMAQ WTAM WCSII

(lw.953)

NBC-Ro)' Sheild'l Encore Mu·

sic; Soloilt, &. Orch.: wn

WEAN WOZ WIIAM KDKA

(1".JI.87\

* CBS·A &- P Bandwagon ,la'·

ri"t Kale Smilh; GU"I; Jack

Miller'. Orch WADC II'I'RO

WWZ IVrBL WOKO WORC

WEEI WBB~l WIIAS WCAU

WBltC IDMS (.,,-6.06-11.83)

K'le Smltb I"""'"'''' lIo'T' Is'~ll

In ......".. fTOm ..,."" I·.U·

.",:. 11"1"1 l,,,,nu,,,,, ,-on·

,,"".. ' •• II... """'...."'n

"B~ 'I" i~ & \-ou WOR\' WOR

Ih,\R Wl.tH WROO WAAB

WLUI I\ROO WAAB

CBC-£~hot. of 'he ~b,'ers:

rRCO CFCY CFXB

CFRB Canadi." Mounl.ineers

CK"Ci.e Radio Thulre

WrEA :"ew. Spolli,p,1

WG:"Tora, Dick " lIury

WlI\ ,Ubum 0( So"ll:1

WI:"~ Amer. Bowline CO"lr",.

II'''BII Ln \I..nll!:nuds

II'\BX "'no,; Spol rtas.hts

W:"EWTerry " Jerry. skil

8:15

WFEA-Cold Sprins Band

WG:" "'u,i..1'I_II

WI\S lnp>irinoc'hCf'QPllone

W\BXL\Chrim..n Science

W:\EW K.) Rft)' Fen'on·. Orch,'

WABC

....NS"''' WNAC Il'rEA WSAR

IVLBZ WEAN IY.\BIl W(Sli

WTAG I\'TIC WBRY IVLLII

WROO

News: WJAR WOR WEEI

WORC WORC W~L\S CfRI:l

CKAC·Sports; Club ~13

CRCOP......t'" de Ren·.

KOKA-Sew.; D....m Ship

WUB ~Iu.ical Ruue

WBZ-X""".; Time; WeatheT;

Temperature

WCAU·Larry \';ount, _II;

Around lhe To.....

WGY·Sews; On Ihe Mall

WIIAM.Johnn)· Lewi,' Oreh.

\VHAS-He...'. 10 YOIl

WHN·CallinS All Partin

WLW-P..ul s"lliun, new. to!,S.,...., Todd Huottr

W\lAQ Jim",} JO)'S Qrch,

\\'MEX-Rh)lhm " Rom...ce

WOR K..)' K) ...r·. Orch.

WTtC·Guy t1ef the Oa,

\\'LWLnda·. Fint Love

W"AS The i\l'>rninc "Carnival;

Btlle " M.rlb

WNBX-:'i'",.; Spot. Flashes

WOR


Friday

April 9

(10:45 I.m. Continued)

* CHNS·WHAT'S NEW?

CKAC·Ma Perkins

WI.W·Gospel Singer

WNBIl·CIlling on the I.ldie.

WNBX·l.ibrary Prgm.

WORI.·Guiding Your Child'.

Mind

11:00

... NBC-THE O'NEILLS, SKETCH

(Ivory Flakes): WJl WilAM

WBZ (sw·15.21)

NBC.David Harum. shtch

(Bab·O): WEAF WCSH WGY

WNAC WTIC WJAR WTAG

(sw·15.33)

... CBS·Heinl Magazine 01 the

Air; ''Trouble House," sketch;

R""d Kennedy, bar.; B, A,

Rolfe', Orch. & Chorus; Guest:

WABC WEEI WOKO WPRO

WFBI. CKAC WCAU WI.BZ

WDRC WMAS (sw-2152)

MBS-Get Thin to Music: WOR

WMB

CFNB·Old Song.

WBRY·To be announced

WNBX.Rhythm & llomance

WORC-Mornin~ Melodie,

WPRO-New.; lIarmony I.ane

&

Sa..fra"

Mary Mulin.

Soap); Joan

NBC·Word.

(s",.15.33)

WEAN

WI.BZ

WRDO

L.cc.:.:....:"'::.::..:c::'-=::.;~_, CFNB.Birlhday Prgm.

CKAC-Stock Qualatio".

12:00

WAAB.News 01 Woman'. Club

* NBC·Girl Alone, sketch IKel WilllY·Piano Mood.

logg): WEAl' WI.W (sw·

WGY~lusicar Pr~m.

15.33)

WNBXNew.; Spot Flashn

CBS·The Gumps, 5kdch (Pebe·

WOll Mu.i. from Tua.

co): WABC WEEI WCAU

WORe·Fur Your Pleasure

(,w·17.76·9.59)

NBC·lloneyboy

WJZ

Y.N.. ~lid.day House Party:

WFEA WDRO WBRY WNBII

I\'LLH

MBS Victor lindlahr: WOR

IVAAB WEAN

Way Down East: WTlC WNAC

CFNB·Concert lIall of the Air

Walllew.; I.ittle Show

WCSII Bunetin Bo»rd

WGY.Mu5ical Pr~m.; News

WIIAM·To be announced

WJAR-Alice Cornett

WMAS·The Open Book

WNBX.New.; Spot Flashes

WORC·March 01 Events

WORl·Ne"'5

WSAR.Shopping Guide

WTAG-Pr'lduce Market Report

12:15

* CBS-YOUR NEWS PARAOE

(Lucky Strih Cigaretles). Ed·

win C. Hill, commentator:

WABC WMAS WDRC II'PRO

wt'BF WEEI WCAU (.w·959­

17.76)

* NBC·Story 01

.ketoh

(hory

%:15

CBS-American School of the Air;

Current E,'e"ts, Shepard

Ston.; Vocational Guidance,

"Is There Au)·thi"g More To

I.earnt": WABC WEEI WOKO

WCAU WI.Bl WI\1.\S WFBL

WPRO WORe WORC (sw·

959-15,27)

C-N.·l.awrence Salerno & Organ·

iSI: WBRY WNBH WAAB

WLLII II'SAR wnw

CKAC,Co'nmentair.. lymoph",

I'ar M, Claude A. Bourgeois;

Femi"i"e World

WMEX·John & lIIildred, songs

\\INAC-R.freshmelll Club

WNBX.~lonito, Vi."s the New.

WORI.,lturale.' Orch.

2:30

C.N.."lnsects & Their Sense•."

Prof. Baurne: WAAB WRDO

WNBIi WBRY WLI.H WSAR

O·NI.l-Musiul Comedy Memorie.

WMEX,SJ'mphonic Minialure

WNBX·Gregory Slone

2:45

* CBS·MYRT & MARGE,

Sketch (Super Sud5): WABC

WOKO WEEI WORC WFBI.

WDRC WlBZ WCAU WPRO

WMAS (sw·15.27·959)

C.N.·Dance Orch.: WAAB WBRY

WRDO WNBH I\'LI.H WSAR

CKAC·Ahnann of the Air

WFEA-N.",s

WNAC·Donald Van Wart

WNBX·World Peaceways

WOR·'Way I)own East

3:00

NBC·Bill Kren.' Orch.: WJZ

WFEA WIIAM (5w.15.21)

... NBC·Radio Guild, drama:WJZ

WllZ WF!::A WHAM WEAN

N'ews: WNBX WORL

CF(,YOutports 1I0ur

CFNB·Or(an Music

WAAB,M"sic & Racing Matinee

WBHY-A"e Maria Ho"r

WCAU·Sleep}· Hollow Boys

WCSlI·WI'A Musio Project

WEEIStoorie Mill.' Hour: WI.ll' WNAC (''''-15.33)

sketch WOllC (s,,-15.27)

WLLH-Yariety Prgm.

MBS-Molly of the Movie., .htch (White Naptha): WEAF WGY

WIl,\~'-Now:spaper 01 the Air \HAG WNAC WNRII WEAN

NBC· Little Orphan Annie, .ketch

WI.W.Live Stock Report.; Riv.

WTAG IVJAR WTlC WNAC

WLBZ.Noon.day Musicale

WRDO WBRY WI.UI WSAR

WAAB WEAN WOR

(O,'ahin.): I\'EAF WLW WGY

er; Wuther

Ne"'5: WEEI WNlIX

WI.W WCSII (sw.953)

WI.Ul-Shoppin~ News

CF:»B-Concert Oreh.

WTAG WJAR WCSII WTAM

WMEX.Evc & Ste"cn

WI.W·Tom, Dick & Harry CKAC-Organ Mdodies

CFN'lI.Tea Dance

CBS-Salvation Army Stall Band: WNAC WTIC (sw·9.53)

WNBH·Morning Glory

WABC WORC WIIlAS WEEI

W:»BllSurpris. Pari)'

WAAB-Consumers' Council 01 WBIlYPiano Antie.

NBC A,"-entures 01 Dad Dan,

WNBX·Ne",s; Spot F1;.shu

WDRC WOKO WU3X WFBI.

WNBX.Hilibilly Time

Massachusettes, tlak

WIIl-Homp Forum

sketch (Dari Rich)' WMAQ

WORC·Treuure Ch...t

WCAU-Women's Club 01 the Air Wl'RO (s",.15.27)

WOHI.-ThrO!\R.Weather; IIhrkd.

CFN'B.Danoe Mu'ic

1l:15

WJZ WBl wrEA WHAM (sw. II"LBl·l'. T. A. Broadcast WOlll. N'ew.; Portraits ill Music

CFIUlAdHntnre Bound

NBC·Personal Column 01 the Air

WI'RO-Airla""" to Education

15.21 )

WI.W.Yadet)· Time

CKAC-Fireside Pro::m.

(Chip.o): WJZ waz WI.W

WRDOModem Rhythms

CBS-Romanoe 01 H.lon Trent, \BIAS-Coneert Orch.

NIGHT

CRCO-lIou'e of Pcter MacGregor

WIIAM (sw.15,21)

sketch with Virginia Clark W.\IEX·StrO!


_I~_ol"" '",__,

W~_\I (;""n:~ 1l~1I', Oreh.: I'~n'

Am~ti;BIl \\'-"'S WROO

\\''''.o\R \\,8RY

Rubinoff. " ..~n- I: WIl:'i' WT..\\'

(".-:-.:or....«.1 11.11

CFRO (Iaill: Wallu.

CKAc.l""lrll","",ul \"oHhiQ

("RCO R_u.... Odd facti

KOKA-Dim••r MII'i'

WfU· \Iounl"';,,«,.

WG\" Buddy'" Gin,••

WGYLuI~b)' T.....

\\'I!\\IT...iJic:ht

Rutti...

WHAS-Ib.nk K..... Radio G."I

WISS \tildrn Ilunt; Oro"

WJAR·\\'nlh.. , 1'00 r"....ul

YlLL" Arooond lh. T_n

WLW Carl F'N.h lIuDlorliA(·~lu.iul ROllndllp

WlIiBX \lu.ical C.ab Ba~

WOR Jr. G'len: aoyl Advu,

lU.e ~tory

WPRO Fivt Star Final

WflOO Ctnlral \I..int \lelodi...

W~AR·R.dio Shop"inl Tour

W...\I '>..n Sn:r lle~llh Wftk

WTA\I S....,; ",porU

\.\'Tll· Wr,.ht'·III.. Cl..ion

6:45

• CBS.PRETTY KITTY KElLY

lWonder B.ud): W \BC WEEI

\\ORC \\'l\S waa\l WtLII

t~l.q _... 11 \5,· .. I

SSCLnlo OrpIIal. AI"1if (0.-.1·

won The to"e R.nl.... ....elch

\\ ..." J•• ~ P~ rl "Tor y Oor-

, Or1( B....dc.~lu

(K.\f L Me en Cril "u'. _I

1\ BB\! O..ey Ad.",.

WbR\' To be... eed

WF£A Ihl or \Ii..

\ICS ("huck ",...on T......

W11 \ \1 Cam..... Club 01 Ihc Air

1\'ISS"loriDr Si-1S

\\ LUI td'''e DePielro', Oreh.

W\HQ 0-.101 \lcGibmy, com·

ment"or (,>aC)

\\\!\~·M...,na

\\''>BII ~ny

Lo.. 1l...·an :"....... ; Spot Fb.h....

II'>E\\ Rich.rd Brooks, C_·

_n"-

WOR lew Gr..hildll, -_

WBRY Sc~o" Due

W(At· R. ElunJ' B.n. Sandra

" Oorit II....,....

WE£! Fllr T f",,_1 nrc

IU:Y J,... IIpa"'"

\\'1""·011 P...dt

\l ,AU A.h. 01 s.n, " All.

II itA:' D, mood Cil :"roo

\\ \I.\Q Tott.·". '!

W\US \\ P. ,\. (, ""...1

\\'\BX y .....r Rcq"",ts

\\ \I:.\\' B,ny Ou .n,

,~.

WTA\I Juni"r SaI~ly Police Club

\\ II( t'onc~rl I-'."m.

soc \lu'elO

::45

C.ba1I".os; JOfJe

Xorr~I~. bar.; R.",on Arm·

""10. I"r.; P..ul aaron. pi ·

i t 1\'>"" I\JAR \\,AG 1'0' \1

• CBS·Boake CUllBI/ r.."ch X",,",

W:'>BX,>ua! Pinl~llu

\1 '>EW ""1 Poppe..... '" :'

WORC·Amer. r ....i!y Robi.o_

1\'1"IC-Cou..1 of )I""le C""~

8:.

* NBC·IRENE RICH (WELCH

Crapee Juju); dr..nl.· \\'JZ

WBZ WHA\I \\'..\1 KOKA

« .. 11.87)

* NBC·CITIES SERVICE CON­

CUI; Lucille ~Ianntr.. !lOp.:

Quatl~l; R.....rio Boutdoa',

On:h., WEAl'" wnc \\IAC

WJAR \\'G\' WCSII W:"Ae

WMAQ \'r,A\! (~..·953)

CBS.B....d""'y V.riel.... IBi·So­

001)' Ckcar SAl.., bar "m,c.;

c.rmel. POR..,I!!. muzo,sop.;

Eli...belb lAnnox. eonlrl.IIO:

Vido< Arden'. Onh.; JU,",tJ:

WABe Wf)RC W\lAS WEEI

WFaL WOKO WBR\! WIIAS

IVCAU WPJlO WORC S·lnq"i.int 'heropho"e

WLLII Vivi." Ru,se.u, IIInU

WNRX Roy from SllIot.)' ~I'>UII'

tlin

WSEW K.. ~, Reed. " •••"i_1

WS\l·Advenlu',", 01 Si. Kinmor.

Kinik

8:3tl

* CBS-CHESTERFIELD PRGM.;

H.I K .....p· Or.II.; K.y

ThornPtOn; 1I11)·thm SiH....;

O.vid R.... WO\OC WORC

WOKO I\M-\'> WFBL WPRO

WBB\I IIIIAS

WEEl WtBl

WCU' WORC

,...6.06-11.83)

labo ""' 11:30 p.m.)

XBC·o..ath ....IIn· 0." (Bor·

:u:): WJZ \\'11."1 KDKA

WLW WBZ 10_ 11.87)

\lBS·Cnar.. SocIo-ro DirK":

\\"AAB wEA" W'>BII WBRY

WOR WLLH \\-.....~R WRDO

CRCO ("f':"B un

(FRB From th~ \111_ Lob.....,.

wrEA f''"IIfo.a! \lu P'0Jt '>u R","...,,,,...·, Oreh.

\\ \lEX Ou",. RKocdinl

W'>HI' Qui~ ("oo,lttl

9:15

e,'> ....id Oi..., "IIff ("il) Xt\O.

WII:'> !rvi,-~ A• ...,"......·• Or,-\C W1'A.\1

W\lAQ WJAR wnc WCY

(,... 953) f.I... l::W Beverly lIill., Holh'wood

reporler

9:45

C.S Ilo~i,,~ Bo"I' WSAR \\'AAB

11'1.1.11 11'IlJlY IIH:A \\Rno

W\llil

WGN '>~w.; SIIO.t. Shou

W'l~' lin" AClh".', O.ch.

WNEI\'·O,".e Parad.

10:00

• NBC·RALEIGH AND KOOL

Show ,tarri"l Ja.k Pu.1 ..

llarOIl \lOllchau.... w,th "Shar.

lie" (Clilf 11311); \I0.ton

8owe. In•. ; Tommy Oo...y'.

Oreh.; I'aul St~w••t, ...nounc·

er: WJl Will KDKA WEAS

WIlA\! (,,, 6,11)

• N8C·C.mpana·s r'.,t Nlghlt.,

Slarrini \)on Ame.he '" Ba.

bar. Luddy, WEAf' WUC

W('SII \\'TAG WSAC WtW

WJAR WC\' WTA\I W~IAQ

\I~.\I h .... 9,53)

• CBS·Philadelphia O'th.; Glint

('"nd I B... ,~i,," Strivce)

W,\Bf' \\OKO Wr81. WBB'I

WPRO WEEI

t-" 6.12 6.061

"'"AS Wc."U

.\lB.... llucu \1."'111', Orch. WOR

\\G'>

(,BC To ht: .,,_......1 CfSB

fR("O

e,s 8

U" thH

SCIENTIFIC AERIAL

With the Dual Connection

_ ....-. ".._ -..._ .

S8('RII""1I Fri,,,I'. Orch : WEAF

(U~ E,ld;" Du~hin'. Orch.:

WABC

CR('O My.t~ry PI.y

KOKA lIerma" Mi,ldl"",an's Or·

~he.t'"

WBBM·N~wJ, Todd Iiollter

\IUl·Sympbonic 1I00r (~BC)

II'GY·P,,,I Kaill', Orch.

WLIY SaIUI" to \Ia

\\ BBM Rn '> ..h..I.· Orch.

\\EEI '>ye ~byb"" Orch.

InlX ..." • .hI,,,,, .1 \I.air"t

WLW.Orr.n " Poews

\\OR Carl llaff Or....

\\T\'1,11a1 GoooIat.n·, o,.h.

Elld .1 Frida, p.otram1

00

1

110\1• .,..-.-__"" • ..., &11__,"'"' ,

T1II. -,.1 ..n" 1..._,.,__ "" __ to 0_.', 'J...

0000 rl.• lftoldo 11>0 .- _ ~ _ ot TI.. _ l:t _ .. .. •

NO OSCILLATI1"I'G OR WHISTLL....O ~

"'1 l'll:AL u.... ~or .... _ .._Ilk ~ _ .... PMl>IId

• ....,., l'll.,...,.., 11\1.1 __ .. -to- _1__ IaoWo

...... __l,J _od ._ cIfa1to


Saturday April 10 Saturday

MARY EASTMAN

"Silurd.y Hig~t Sertn.dt" sop'

rano

S.t. 9:30 p.m.

MORNING

';00 a.m. EST

CFNIL"usieal CI(>(;k

WAAB·Brukfast Smile'

WBZ-News; Mu,i.a] Clook

WCAU-Sinli'. N.ili'hoor, S;n~

7; 1:>

News, CFNlI WNAC

WCAU-Orli'an MelQ'ning nevolions

WNBX·Morn. MinSlrels

WPRU-Sun,hi"t Corner

7;311

NBC.Morninli' Gr""ti"li'"' WEAF

CBS-Orgall 1I.,'.ill., WAlK (sw·

11.52)

NBC,Ri•• &. Shill.: WJZ

Musical CIek: WMAS IYNBH

n'NB-The Listeninl Post

WCAU·News

Wnnt-Show"" Sl"'dal

WEEI-Conllnunily Note Book

WGY.Happy Hank

II/lAM Dale Line.

WJAR-C.refret CalN'r.

WLtH·Wake Up &. Sinll"

\1'lIY·Swing Time

WNAC,Sleppinlt Alnnt

WNBX-K"ntucky Club

WOR·Vinctnt Sore)". Orch.

WORt.-Mornin'l' Sal"te

WPRQ.Brukfast Club

WSAR-Early Birds

\\,TAG·Organ R~ital

7:45

NBC·Yoichi liir.oka, xylophon.

ist; News: WJZ

Y.N.-The Phili.tine: IVTAG

WNAC WLUI

News; W[IRC WEEl WLW

CKAC-Cheerful Eadull

WAAB·.o.MoFlli,,~ Watch

WCAU-Breakfast Table Hhythms

WGY-Musical Clock

WHAM-Alarm C10B Il.ppy II'a"ior Ilour

CKAC-Poemes SJ'mphoniques

WAAB·Joh" Matc.lrs Choir

..."

WCSII "lat. pubr;c Il..lth Talk

WGY·6Morn;ng Devotion.

WHAM Torn GrierJOn

\\'MAS·The Morning Carni,.al

WNBX.N.w.; Spot .1..h..

WOR,Tex Fletcher

WOllL "'cws; Common Sen.e

Contract

WSAR.Tlle Stroll.r

10:15

NBC·\"... Family: WEAF WCSH

WnG WTIC WGY WSAC

(sw.I5.33)

CBS· Richard M.x....II. sonu:

II'ABC WDIlC WORC CKAC

WCAU (,w.2J.52)

NBC·R.;sing Your Parents; Juv.

"nile Forum COl1aucte"til

1""""'" " 1l1"d"mllh uro~ram

I,n-Iwlh,~: \;o,,"ta for Flnl.

and 1'1""0: Yo" • ..,"U .fl~r

t",t, I", fI"ld"dl... 1n{' or"h"'lra.

NBC-Rex B.ttle's Ensemble:

WEAF WCSII

Y.N.-La Ro,. Prgm.: WAAB

WEAN

News: WOH WLBZ WBRY

Noon·day Revue: WRDO WTAG

O'C\'B-Musicale

CKAC I'esli"al of Chamber 'tusic

(CBS)

WEEI·The Gools

WGY.·arm Prl:m,

WJAR·hrm Chat

WLLIl-Qucstion Box

WMAS-1\e"-.; Temperalure

WNAC,Mu,ical Iloundul'

II'NBX·Old Favorites

II'OIlL-St""k Markel<

WPRO,G...,. Hall's Orch.; News

WSAHMid Day Mdodies

WT1C·Conue:ti,ut Staate College

12:45

NBC-R.x Balli.', Orch.: WJ,\R

W1\AC

~.,.,", II'C,\U II'NBli WSAII

CKAC-Variel)" I'rgm.

WBRY·l.unch...,,, Varieties

WCSH·To be annou",.d

WU!Z.Noonday Revue

WLUIN.ws; ~hOPl'ing New!

WI'iBX·t""," Fb'hes

WOIl I]oward tanin & Orch.

WOHL·Farr BrOlher, Orch.

1:01)

NBC-(News, WEAF" only) Whit·

ney !::nse,nhle: WEAF

CBS·Mount ;;1. Jo'eph Glee

("Iuh: WABC \1,,1,1,;; II'I'HO

WCAU (,,,15.279.59)

Y."'.Ne"'s: WCSH WFEA

11'I.BZ II'SAC WLl.II WRDO

WSAR I\'NBII WEAN"

CF1\B·AIl lIequesl I'.glll.

CKAC-Stock QUOlalimlO

WAAB.News of Woma,,'s Club;s

WHRY l'i,,,o Moods

WG \' Iii Boys, songs

WJAn·Ne,.o

WNBX-.'\ews; Spol Flashe.

WORC-For Your I'l•.,ure

WORl,Xe",s; Control of Cancer

;;.xiely

WTAG-New.

wnc·se,.'s '" Markol Report

1,15

NBC· Whitney Errsembl.: WJAR

\\"TAG

CB;;-Bob & Vera: WABC WOKO

WPHO WEEI W~IAS WDRC

WI.BZ WORC (.w.15.27)

MBSPet Club: WOH WAAB

Y.N.-So"g Picture", WNAC

W~BII WBRY WRDO

CKAC-A~ricultu.ral Talk

WCAU-Our I'ublic ~hoJs

\\CSIINe",'

II'EAN.Talkin~ On the Sidcwalk

Wt'EA Exl.n,ion S.,,-ice

WGY-Stock lIeports

WlLII·Shopping News

WNBX·Duke EI~"gto"

WORL-London C.llin~

WSAR-Your [lome'" YOIl

1:30

NBC-Nal'l Federation of 'lusie

Clubs: WE,\F WJAR WCSll

WGl' II'TAG

CBS·£d;""",'r. s,.". m"·,·IOJ'­

IA'Ot",I,1 ~".-I" .._ Tl'" ",,''Owl

01",r. ",111 he "'('",'.11".1.

n",th·an"".'· 'no ,·".1: !\$; Tom Doring'.

Orcll.

\1'SAIl·Texas Slim

2:15

CBS-So"i.1 S••urity

II'm. Gre.n. Pre,.,

Luncheon;

A. ~•• L._

Spkr.: WABC WPHO II'FBI.

II'DRC WLBZ WORC WEEI

WMAS WOI\O WCAU (,w.

959.15.27)

CKAC·Feminine World

WNBX·.\lonitor View, tho New.

WSARBob ~loGrew's Orch.

2:3l1

NBC·Walter Blauluss' Orch.;

Gale I'age, conlrallo,; Escorts

& Bettr: wn \\'lIMI WEAN

WFEA \V8l (,,,-15.21)

CBS·Da"cepators: II'ABC WPHO

WDRC \VI.Bl WORC WEEl

WFBL WMAS WOKO WC,\U

(.w9_59 15_27)

MBS·lnt'l 1I0use: WOR WNBll

\\'LI.II WBRY 11"11])0 WSAR

CFNB·To be .nnounced

WCAU·Debate

WMEXI'ublic Educalion A..'~

Luncheon

WNBX·Windsor Pals

2:45

CKAC-Dan'cepato," (CBS)

WNBX.Battle of Music

WOHI.·\odelin~ Co",~irl

II'pRO·George Do'·e. tnt.

3 :00

NBCBob Crosby's Orch.: WJZ

\\'Bl WEAN II'FEA WHAM

(ow.15.21)

CBS·Do"·n by lierman's: WABC

WORC WQKO WFBL WlBZ

WORC WPIIO WMAS WEEI

WCAU CKAC (,w.15.27.959)

MilS Dick Stabile·, Orch.: \\'U.H

II'BRY WRUO \\'1>B][ WSAR

WOR

Cn~B-Tea

Donce

W1\BX·X...·s

II'ORL-Xe,,·s; Portraits in Musio

3,15

CKAC-Art Shaw', Orch. (CBS)

WNBX·Lawrence QUiUlet

WORl.-Se.rch for S...een Tolent

3:30

NBC·Sair Lee, contralto; Jack

Baker, tnr.; Marl,,,,-e & l.y.

0", piano duo; 1I01l)'wd

Hi~h Halters; Harry Kogen'.

Orch.: WJZ II'BZ WEAN

IVFEA WHAM (sw.15.21)

CBS-I)elli. of (·om",,,,,. Stries:

WABC WEEl W'IAS WDRC

WLBZ II'CAU WFBL (ow·

15.27·9.59)

MBSOr.~an Recit"l: WOR WI.LH

WBRY WHDO II'NIlH WSAR

CFCY..\lusicolor

Ct"NB·Orgon Mu,ic

CKAC.S}'mphon.tle

II'AAB,Sammr Ka)'e's Orch.

* WDEV·MOVIE GOSSIP (550

kc.l

IVMEX-iligh School Amat.ur

ilouc

WXBX.Hol>ert lIilliond

WPIlOGeorge Uove, songs

3:45

CBSCI}'de B,rri., bar.: WAIlC

WMAS WORC WOKO WEEI

WDRC CKAC WCAU WLBZ

(s",9.59·15.27)

CFNB-~e\\"

\\'NBX-All>ert Wallace Concerl

WORL·,\I",ic & Flo",ers

\\'PIIO-Borr~or Hul>e'

4:00

C6:;_70Ih Anni"e"ory of Cin­

,inn.ti Con'''''ator;- of Mu,ic:

II'ABC WOKO WPRO C]{,\C

WFBl WEEI WORC WORC

lI"'IAS II·I.BZ (,,, 15,27)

NBC·Chick Webb's Ord": WJZ

WIIA" WEAN WFEA KOKA

WBZ (sw.15.21)

'lBS·I...., Freoub,r~'s Orch.:

WOR WKBH WBRY WROO

II'lBZ Wttll WSAR

6/20 )


N"," W»;BX \\ORL

O'XB 1I.".ii.n 'I:, A",eric~n l.e~jon Au~iljH)'

Prtlll,: Mr,,,

W8RY \l'LLH WRDQ WORLXe.,,; Time 10 D.nce

To be .nnounced: WBI WLW WPRO->':"",.; Sporll Slants

DiI.T"iliehl T.......; Sport.

CKAC-Sow:i.a.1 Announ_nU 6:15

WAAS l>Iu ie & R.ri,,, Ilati,,« NBCTop Ilalter'~ Orcl,.:. WEU'

W8B" D. A. R. WJAR wCSlr'("'iIJ'l953) -

\\ n:,\ OaHU H"... C8S Am.".iun ~""n A..xihry

\\'GY-Oandu. th II~c.... Pl'llm.; ~I",. (). u'1\' H.hn:

1\11>': Pia.... Duo; 501.1('1

WEEI WORC

WI.>;S-Coo:lO"K

WSAlllI.lian Prg",.

('KAC·llu,it School

WTAG·lllue Room Echoe. KOKA-One Minute Sermon.

wnc C.mpu. Jeoter.

WOBIl·u.. Frand.. or~.ni,t

5:15 1I'0l-O'Lury·. lri,h IIi"Hrel.

NBC To be .n"ou"o.eh.nll Li~b.t.

WI'F:ATha"k You Slu,ia

WCNBoh EIt>ud) \OiLh Gnh... \lcl'.

m«; Don \"OOO"h«, Orrh.•

WJl WBl \\H,\\1 KOKA

I -11,871

I'n '_ "I Ed WT"" '.... I~h(

.m ,~. "ron.t., ..... 1t.>lolo.

"In.. ' ••"'.

CBC-Colten' S.turday I'iCht:

UNB CFCY CRCO

\lBS Oen.~ "enuU', Prem.·

WAA8 WBRY \\"EAN WNBII

WOR \\'SAR WLUI WRDO

(I\ACRadio O"'i"eltn

II"FEA New, Spo,light

WGN-Tom. Dick &. lI.rry

WIlNWillml Keller', Oreh.

WINS-A mer. BowlinK Co,,~r...

IIMASII H.ppened Thi, Week

WSBX-Scw.; ';1>01 flash...

WSBX·~'e...-.

WSII francis Cr.i~·. Or..h.

8:15

II"FEA-Cold Spri"J Band

WGN-Musiul Ilomentl

WIlX-C.pl. Willi.. Ii,hinl nnrs

W/oIAS-);"",

WI"'S-Inquiri~, 'hcrophone

WIIEX-AIIIer. :\I.1e Quattfl

II SOX·Per" CCC 80)-.

WNEW-Rb)"thlll Dandl"

WS\lllil1lop Harmonittft

8:30

NOC-~Iendith Will.on'. Ord.:

WJZ IVrEA \VIIAM WBZ

* CBS·JOHNNY PRESENTS

(Philip Moni1); Pbil Ouey.

bar,; ~'ixed En,emble; Charln

Martin', Cir~u,,,,t.nti.1 Evi.

dence, "It Mig:ht lIa.. ~ lIap·

&.

p010 .,,", 'tlu t""lr

.11Ihl'Ol1(h ",_ ""'.Ird. 1·lIl·

" ....U1 .1 .In_tlu, 'T"", 1>1

pl.11111( m"d.. ""ml,rI_"" 1M

.-\lIIer\


.....

SATURDAY

PROGRAMS

(continued)

"an .\ , ,.•"h' , ~ • I~ ,>" ...

.MI r Joss. for Ihe new 1937

Studobaker. COOl.,,, dose on Monday followint;

each broadc'SI.

WEDNESDAY

10 p..... EST (9 CST), NBC net"'ork.. Your lIit

Pando. F1.t fift)· ti.. of eiKaretll'S lor IUnsmr

IhrlOO kadin!!, hit sone' of ..'HIt.

THURSDAY

10 p..... EST (9 CST). CBS nelw....k. Your True

Ad'·eolures. Monlhl)' rrand prize of $250, and

w«kly priJe of $25. for bOlt "Tru. Adv.nturft"

,tory contributed b,· li~ten.n and used on pro·

I'"a",.

FRIDAY

8:15 ,.m. EST (7:15 CST), NBC network.

Siogint Sam AUlomobile, 4 nsh .nd 200 mer·

ehandise pri~es a...arded nch wlOOk 10 persons

ON

TH E

AIR

..ho vOle on produft Frid.y 01 followin,

WHk.

SATURDAY

8 , ..... EST (7 CST). CBS oet...ork. Prol.,,,,,r

Quia. 6 yriJOi 01 $25 e.ch ti,.n "lOOkly for bOIl

list. t>f 5 qu.,lioons and aDS"'", 10 be used on

~a",. A110 83 ...lu~blo merch.ndise .nd

950 usb prius f.... fillinr in mi••in!!' ..'....d. on

official entry blank. This «Intesl .los.os June 6,

1937.

10 ,.m. EST (9 CST>. CBS network. Your Hil

Parade. S....e cootesl as Wednesd.y.

Answers to "Our Own April

Fool Guessing Game"

Pages 26 and 27

Following are the names of the Tadio

stan pictured in. part on pages 26 and

21 oJ this issue. If you haven't tested

yourself on these pictures. don't look

at the names below-tum to the pictures

and tTlI lIooT skill! If lIoo've al­

Teadll tried, here aTe the right alUWen!

ATe thell the ones 1100 guessed?

1. Hlrrittl HiIIilrd

2. Yivlan Delli Chi~

3. Kale Smith

4. Floyd Gibbons

5". Lily Pons

6. Jack Benny

7. AmO! 'n' Andy

I. Dorothy P~ge

9. Conrad Thib.ult

10. Mirtha Raye

II. Edditt C.nlor

12. Frtd Alien and

Port1~nd Hoffa

IH

HEXT

\\'~ polll lol. 11 12lJ1'ln 3 w""a.

fo. nc-epl",...t ··cell•• erp"

pol...lf'


MAN CAN NOW

TALK WITH GOD

Says Noted Psychologist

"A new and revolutionary religious

teaching based entirely on the misunderstood

sayings of the GaHlean Carpenter.

and designed to show how we may find,

\mderstand and use the same identical

power which Jesus used in performing

His so-called Miracles," is attractlng

world wide attention to its founder. Dr.

Prank B. Robinson. noted psychologist.

author and lecturer.

·'Psychiana," this new psychological religion,

believes and teaches that it is today

possible for every normal human be·

ing. understanding spiritual law as Christ

understood it, "to duplicate every work

that the Carpenter of Galilee ever did"­

it believes and teaches that when He said.

"the things that I do shall ye do also," He

meant what He said and meant it literally

to nil mankind. through all the ages.

Dr. Robinson has prepared a 6000 word

treatise on "Psychlana,"' in which he

tells about hiS long searCh for the Truth.

how hc finally came to the full reallza·

tion of an Unseell Power or force "so

dynamic in itself that all other powers

and fOL'ces fade into insignificance beside

iV'-how he learncd to commune directly

with the Living- God. using this mighty,

never-failing power to demonstrate

health. happlncss and financial success.

and how any normal being may find and

use It as Jesus did. He Is now offering

this treatise free to every reader of this

msgazlne who writes him.

H you want to read this "highly interesting.

revolutionary and fascinating

story of the discovery of a great Truth."

just send your name and address to

Dr. Frank B. Robinson. 403·4th Street.

Moscow. IdahO, It will be sent free and

post paid Without cost or obligation.

Write the Doctor today.-Copyright 1935.

Dr. Frank B. Robinson.-Advertisement.

MASTER MUSICIANS

TEACH YOU ~azl~m':.'~_~~~-;:~; I~

BY M A I L ~~~~~~. ::::~;,;r~~I::'''';I~~~::

r:;rnB:~~: ~~:~\~r~r,~':.h~7:..'-i~.;~:';.1 t:;:;i

Of ootft. 300,000..1l0lll:' __~" ••'II"O'''''''I",I."..........,,,·. ""I>-'>'.n

...h houl"'ol, .I.~'" _ TlIH\I.IS Y'jI""0'1 W, ... J~rn

!l,._,-l"" WIiIO 12(;fl

W,-'t Yo. \1','Wl

WilT

.".1'Q

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11i" ~.

~'"Irmo""

W'-'I I'". W.llll" ,,"If)

f·,,"W,,),... WllWO lLflO

'-ll"' "nl'l 11ay ,

1:"",,,I,,,r,, WHlO: lHQ

1t9()

11::0)

o:,..."t roll.

Il",,1-I'''rl: "nW .11.)' ,

'I""l'e~a Wll\W :,SO

T"",nto ,·.'1l11 ~'~1

T"",, 1''1"1'', 1~,lI)

\",;"a Will:" It,OI

11"0'''' \\' .\I·U HC~)

"olm Il,·ad, \IT~,j It'll)

" 11·1,,·.. 1I,,~ WI\'\'" l1tll1

11";'-"110 KFI1 l:lIIti

II"ln_,g,,_"~I,'m W"'J>: 1310

\\"1""11,, f'.IJ~ Kt:h"H :,7,j

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S'atio"

'·F.I'­

-


WOMEN THEMSElVES PROVE NEW KIND

OF 15~

THOUSANDS

NOW PREFER

INEXPENSIVE

ClOPAYS FOR

EVERY ROOM

After Eye.Opening

Test!

"We wouldn't have believed that a 1St

window shade could actually look even better

than a $1.50 cloth shade ... until we

saw them side by side and chose the 15c

shade in preference I" ... said women who

made this test.

CLOPAV'S beautiful Lintone finish

now gives these amazing 15c shades the

luxurious appearance of window shades

that sell at ten times their price! A saving

of $1.35 on beautiful new shades for

ellery window. You really get 10 gorgeous

CLOPAY shades ..• for the price of one

ordinary shade I

2 Years Wear and More!

Now, thanks to CLOPAYS, it costs you

less than 7c a year to keep your windows

in beautiful shades. For 1St CLOPAYS

give 2 years wear and morel (And thousands

of women report more than FIVE

years wear!) And stay looking-like-new

longer than ordinary shades . . . because

their patented material doesn't crack, pinhole

or fray! And hangs so beautifully!

No tacks or tools to fuss with. .

CLQPAV'S patented gummed strip makes

them easy to attach - in a few seconds.

Anyone can do it. Millions are doing it.

SHADE lOO SliKE H.5D!

THIS WINDOW SHADE

*30ulo14

NiSIOOk illor

CosIly C/olh

~

IS IT "LINEN"?

Here's New

Window Shade You

Can

SCRUB!

45c FARRAY

No more high prices for window shades

you can wash ... women are resolving!

A new window shade creation FABRAY

•.. washes as easily as tile with soap

and water! Yet only -4Sc for the 36" x 6'

size, complete on roller. Made on a

patented base that gives them a wonderful

silky texture. Wears amazingly

. _ . because FABRAY has no filler to fall

out ... doesn't crack, fray or pinhole.

You'U see them in the finest homes . _ .

and on display in leading Stores through_

out the country.

CtJltJrt "


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