CQUniversity Annual Report - Central Queensland University

parliament.qld.gov.au

CQUniversity Annual Report - Central Queensland University

CQUniversity

A N N U A L

R E P O R T

2012 | vol.1


CONTENTS TS

8 March 2013

The Honourable John-Paul Langbroek MP

Minister for Education, Training and Employment

PO Box 15033

CITY EAST QLD 4002

Dear Minister

I am pleased to present the Annual Report 2012

and financial statements for Central Queensland

University.

I certify that this Annual Report complies with:

• The prescribed requirements of the Financial

Accountability Act 2009 and the Financial and

Performance Management Standard 2009, and

• The detailed requirements set out in the Annual

report requirements for Queensland Government

agencies.

A checklist outlining the annual reporting

requirements can be accessed at www.cqu.edu.au/

about-us/governance/annual-report.

Yours sincerely

From the Chancellor 2

Vice-Chancellor and President’s Review of 2012 4

Our Future 8

Our Organisation and Structure 10

Our Strategic Plan 20

Our Activities in Review 24

Our Corporate Governance 48

Our Financial Performance 60

Our Campus Contact Details 64

Glossary 66

Appendices vol.2

– Financial Statements

RC

R.C. . Fritschy

Chancellor

jn12-0873

Distribution

This report is available for download from the

CQUniversity website, or by contacting CQUniversity

by email, telephone or fax to request a hard copy.

Contact officer

Ms Jenny Roberts

University Secretary

CQUniversity Australia

Bruce Highway

Rockhampton Qld 4702

Australia

Telephone: +61 7 4930 6903

Fax: +61 7 4930 9438

Email: j.roberts@cqu.edu.au

Website: www.cqu.edu.au

Annual Report website:

www.cqu.edu.au/about-us/governance/annual-report

Feedback in writing to the above address is invited.

Interpreter

CQUniversity is committed to

providing accessible services

to people from culturally and

linguistically diverse backgrounds. If you have

difficulty in understanding the Annual Report, you

can contact CQUniversity on +61 7 4930 9777

and we will arrange an interpreter to effectively

communicate the report to you.

CQUniversity Annual Report 2012

ISSN 1839-2636

Produced: Corporate Governance Division.

Additional published information

Additional published information on CQUniversity’s

information systems and recordkeeping, consultancies

and overseas travel (staff and student) can be accessed

from the Annual Report website: www.cqu.edu.au/

about-us/governance/annual-report.

Acknowledgement

CQUniversity recognises that its campuses are

situated on Country for which Aboriginal people have

been custodians for many centuries. The University

therefore pays its respects to the Elders, past, present

and future for they hold the memories, the traditions,

the culture and hopes of Indigenous Australia.

Copyright

© Central Queensland University 2013


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

AT A GLANCE

1

Student body 18 760

Staff (full-time equivalent) 1456

Students graduating 4275

Alumni 72 071

Schools 6

Student residences 2

Undergraduate qualifications 172

available

Postgraduate qualifications 161

available

Research qualifications 17

Non-award qualifications 30

Locations 12

Research Centres 4

Distance Education Study 5

Centres

Revenue $250.866m

Capital expenditure $32.410m

Total assets $341.686m

COVER DESIGN

An artist’s impression of the façade of the

CQUniversity Health Clinic, Rockhampton. The

abstract geometric design, by Brisbane-based

architectural firm Reddog, reflects the forms

and palette of yellows and creams of the many

eucalyptus trees surrounding the clinic entrance.

CQUniversity Rockhampton is home to the $7m

CQUniversity Health Clinic, a public access

clinic with the dual aim of providing improved

health care outcomes for people in Central

Queensland, and skilling up the region’s future

health workforce.

The clinic, made possible through $6.6m in

Health Workforce Australia funding, represents

the first stage in a longer term plan to greatly

expand CQUniversity’s clinical facilities.

Health services at the clinic – in areas including

occupational therapy, podiatry, physiotherapy

and speech pathology – are delivered through

a partnership with Central Queensland Hospital

and Health Services (CQHHS), a Queensland

Government initiative.

The CQHHS team located at the clinic provides

health care services for up to 160 clients a day

and supports clinical placements for up to 200

students annually.

The clinic also houses teaching facilities for

CQUniversity’s Bachelor of Oral Health.

A $16m ‘stage two’ of the clinic is planned

for construction from 2013, and will include

additional clinic space, as well as teaching

spaces to train and educate allied health

students from CQUniversity and other

universities around Australia.

OBJECTIVES OF OUR ANNUAL REPORT

This Annual Report describes the University’s

performance, achievements, outlook and

financial position for the calendar year 2012.

It meets the University’s formal reporting

requirements to the Queensland Minister for

Education, Training and Employment. The report

is also of interest to Members of Parliament,

University staff, students, prospective students,

key stakeholders, other universities, researchers

and other members of our community.

ABOUT CQUNIVERSITY

Central Queensland University is known as

CQUniversity Australia. The University’s image

emphasises its strong connection to Central

Queensland and acknowledges its national

presence and position in the international

higher education sector.

CQUniversity engages with communities

across Queensland, New South Wales, South

Australia, Victoria and Western Australia,

providing research, educational services

and products to around 19 000 students and

other customers across 12 campuses and

learning sites and by distance education.

Established as the Queensland Institute of

Technology (Capricornia) in Rockhampton in

1967, CQUniversity provides access to higher

education for people of all backgrounds and

ages. The University works closely with

individuals and organisations to help them

follow their dreams and achieve their goals.


2

From the

Chancellor

‘OUTSTANDING

PROGRESS WAS

MADE IN 2012

TOWARDS

CQUNIVERSITY

FULFILLING

ITS STRATEGIC

GOAL OF

BECOMING

A RESEARCH-

FOCUSED

UNIVERSITY’


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

FROM THE CHANCELLOR

As Chancellor of CQUniversity, I am pleased to present the Annual Report 2012 for CQUniversity.

CQUniversity is governed by the Council of Central Queensland University which has

shown exceptional commitment to the University throughout 2012. I sincerely thank

Council members for giving their valuable free time and expertise in progressing the

University’s 10-year Renewal Plan towards becoming a ‘great’ university.

Outstanding progress was made in 2012 towards CQUniversity fulfi lling its strategic

goal of becoming a research-focused university. The University outcomes for the 2012

Australian Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) demonstrated CQUniversity’s high level of expertise and accomplishment across

a range of fields. CQUniversity achieved three 2-digit fi elds of research greater than or equal to World Standard, and four 4-digit fi elds

of research greater than or equal to World Standard. In the Australian Higher Education Supplement CQUniversity was identifi ed as

one of the most substantial shifts between ERA 2010 and ERA 2012, being ranked 21st amongst Australian research institutions. These

outcomes highlighted what CQUniversity already knew, but they have served to reinforce the successes CQUniversity is having in its

research resurgence.

The University’s investment in infrastructure on campuses across its Australian footprint has seen new buildings and major refurbishments

being finalised throughout the year. The outstanding results of these projects are a testament to the dedication and commitment of

University staff in pursuing fi rst-class facilities for CQUniversity students, staff and the community. The University has been able to fund

these improvements whilst dealing with the downturn in international student numbers.

CQUniversity’s program renewal has seen considerable new course offerings being expanded into new areas such as Physiotherapy, Podiatry

and Sonography. These offerings meet the unique skills needs of each of the communities CQUniversity serves.

CQUniversity’s Art Collection has grown to become a signifi cant cultural resource, encompassing more than 500 works by Australian artists

from the colonial period to the present, as well as holdings of Indigenous artworks and artefacts from Australia, Fiji, New Zealand and Canada.

In October this year, the University had the pleasure of accepting Richard Dunlop’s donation of his painting Iron Ore 2 – a major artwork in his

characteristic lyrical style, presenting a shimmering vision of the Australian outback

I congratulate and thank members of Council and CQUniversity staff for their commitment and dedication in being part of CQUniversity’s

journey in becoming a ‘great’ university and look forward to CQUniversity’s continuing achievement in engagement, quality student

experiences, being an inclusive university, being a leading distance education provider, being a research-focused university, a national

university and a university that gives back.

3

FROM THE CHANCELLOR

RC Fritschy

Chancellor


4

Vice-Chancellor

and President’s

Review of 2012

‘CQUNIVERSITY

IS NOW ONE

OF AUSTRALIA’S

FASTEST

GROWING

UNIVERSITIES’


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

VICE-CHANCELLOR AND

PRESIDENT’S REVIEW

Looking back on 2012 there is no doubt the year has been one of the most successful in

CQUniversity’s history. The University has invested heavily in new facilities, new programs

and new academic and research talent, and while this has caused the University to

delve into its funding reserves, we see these activities as an investment in our future

sustainability. Since embarking on an ambitious renewal plan in 2009, CQUniversity is

well on its way to becoming one of Australia’s strongest regional universities. Based on

the following achievements our future is looking very bright and we are well on track to

becoming a great university by 2020.

DUAL SECTOR APPROVAL

The Queensland Government gave fi nal approval for the merger between CQUniversity and Central Queensland Institute of TAFE

(CQ TAFE), removing one of the last hurdles for the creation of Queensland’s fi rst dual sector university. After more than two years of

negotiations, this move sets the stage for CQUniversity to revolutionise the delivery of higher education and vocational education and

training in Central Queensland.

INVESTMENT IN INFRASTRUCTURE

In the past year CQUniversity has extended the Noosa campus ($2.5m) and opened a refurbished Rockhampton Library ($6.4m) and

Engineering Precinct ($10.7m). A distance education study centre was also opened in Cairns to support the learning needs of our

distance education students in Far North Queensland. In 2013, CQUniversity plans to continue this investment by opening further distance

education study centres at our metropolitan campuses and developing a $16m Engineering Precinct in Mackay and an Accident Forensics

Lab in Bundaberg.

5

VICE-CHANCELLOR AND PRESIDENT’S REVIEW OF 2012

CQUNIVERSITY HEALTH CLINIC

Stage 1 of the $7m CQUniversity Health Clinic was opened in Rockhampton in August 2012, thanks in large part to funding provided by Health

Workforce Australia. This clinic has the dual aim of providing improved health care outcomes for people in Central Queensland, and skilling up

the region’s future health workforce. Service provision by the Central Queensland Hospital and Health Service team located in the CQUniversity

Health Clinic is estimated to provide health care for up to 160 clients per day along with supporting the clinical placements of up to 200

students annually.

ENGAGEMENT

A number of initiatives have been set in place in relation to CQUniversity’s engagement agenda in 2012, including the appointment of a Pro Vice-

Chancellor and BMA Chair (Indigenous Engagement), Professor Bronwyn Fredericks. Professor Fredericks will work closely with CQUniversity’s Pro

Vice-Chancellor (Community and Engagement) and our industry partners to implement new programs and oversee existing engagement activities

which aim to improve education outcomes for Indigenous students and engagement with Indigenous communities.

RESEARCH

CQUniversity’s signifi cant investment in research is beginning to pay off, with CQUniversity researchers acquiring more than $1.3m in

competitive research grants in 2012 and a total research income of $7.1m. The latest fi ndings based on the Excellence in Research for Australia

(ERA) indicated that CQUniversity has performed at or well above world standard in four areas of research – Nursing, Applied Mathematics,

Agriculture and Land Management and Other Medical and Health Sciences. Our research activity, measured by income and outputs this year, is

growing substantially.

AUSTRALIA’S FASTEST GROWING REGIONAL UNIVERSITY

Due to a number of exciting new program offerings and investment in our national campus footprint CQUniversity is now one of Australia’s fastest

growing regional universities. Strong partnerships with industry have also enabled us to provide students with work integrated learning options,

ensuring they are completely ‘work ready’ when they graduate.


6

VICE-CHANCELLOR AND PRESIDENT’S REVIEW OF 2012

STAFF RECOGNITION

Several CQUniversity staff members have received grant funding for innovative research projects and two of our staff members, Professor

Kerry Reid-Searl and Ms Sherie Elliott, were recognised with Australian Government Offi ce for Learning and Teaching citations for outstanding

contributions to student learning. Professor Reid-Searl was also recognised with a prestigious national award for University Teaching Excellence.

As always, none of these achievements would be possible without the hard work and dedication of CQUnivesity staff, and of course the continued

support of our students and wider community, without whom we wouldn’t have reason to keep striving towards excellence. I am very much

looking forward to building on this momentum in 2013.

Professor Scott Bowman

Vice-Chancellor and President


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

A SELECTION OF ARTWORK FROM

CQUNIVERSITY’S ART COLLECTION

7

VICE-CHANCELLOR AND PRESIDENT’S REVIEW OF 2012

Richard Dunlop (1960– ) Iron Ore 2 oil on Belgian linen 183 x 183 cm. Donated 2012 through the Australian Government’s Cultural Gifts Program

by Richard Dunlop in memory of Herbert George Dunlop, born in Rockhampton.

Peter Anderson (1956– ) Southern Approach, Campbell Island oil on canvas 128 x 180 cm. Purchased 2012 by CQUniversity through the

Vice-Chancellor’s Initiative Fund.


8

Our Future

‘CQUNIVERSITY

WILL BE

RECOGNISED

AS ONE OF

AUSTRALIA’S

TRULY GREAT

UNIVERSITIES

BY 2020’


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

STRONG TO GREAT

CQUNIVERSITY RECOGNISED AS ONE OF AUSTRALIA’S TRULY

GREAT UNIVERSITIES BY 2020

9

OUR FUTURE

By 2020, CQUniversity will be recognised as one of Australia’s

great universities. It will be Australia’s most engaged university by

partnering with its students, staff, alumni and all of the communities

and industries it serves.

By partnering with its communities, the University will have a positive

impact on the communities it serves and enable them to reach their

goals, and vice versa. In doing this, CQUniversity will have reached its

primary objective.

CQUniversity will provide the highest quality student experience

possible. We will offer a great learning and teaching experience

for our students. A primary focus of the student experience will be

the innovative and student-centred ways in which the University

engages with its students. Our learning activities will be focussed

on authentic learning, which is informed by collaboration with

employers and our communities.

CQUniversity will be an inclusive university. It will be known as

the university that prides itself on the types of students it embraces,

rather than one which defi nes its success on its elitism and exclusivity.

The University will have grown in stature but it will not have forgotten

its roots. It will be proud of the diverse range of students it attracts

and helps succeed. CQUniversity will provide a comprehensive range

of post-school education and training and ensure multiple pathways

are available for its students spanning from enabling, to vocational

education and training (VET), to higher education. Students will be

enabled to reach their full potential and have clear pathways between

all parts of the University. The University will be a leading provider

of VET through delivery at its campuses and via distance education,

and will form partnerships throughout Australia and internationally to

enable communities to meet their post-school educational needs.

CQUniversity will be a university that celebrates all of its students’

successes equally regardless of the nature of their endeavours. By

being an inclusive university it will engage with the widest possible

spectrum of students and will break down barriers between them.

CQUniversity will be one of Australia’s leading distance education

providers. The University will be one of the largest providers of

distance education and training in terms of student numbers and one

of the best in terms of student satisfaction. Through being Australia’s

leading provider of distance education, the University will be engaging

with many students who would not otherwise have access to its

quality education and training.

No university can be truly great unless it is a research-focused

university. CQUniversity will be such a university. It will be a

university that knows its power of place and uses it to contribute to

stronger, more vibrant communities through the engaged research it

undertakes. Research will be focused on areas where the greatest

contributions to our communities can be made.

CQUniversity will be a university that gives back. The University

will demonstrate a distinct moral, ethical conscience and a strong

ethos of philanthropy and humanity that inspires our students, staff

and communities. The University will contribute to the development

of all its communities including those overseas. The University will

utilise its student, staff, physical and fi nancial resources to make

the communities it serves – both locally and globally – better

places to live, work and learn. The University will focus its giving

on underserved communities. By being a university that gives

back, CQUniversity will engage with many people who are often

forgotten by others.

CQUniversity will be a national university. It will be a

university with a physical presence right across Australia.

While its foundations and origins are in Central Queensland,

CQUniversity will provide quality education and training in

campuses and study centres across the country. By operating

as a national university, CQUniversity will engage with

communities outside of its traditional base. All campuses will

be a mix of Australian and international students; by being a

national university CQUniversity will engage with people around

the nation – and the world – by exporting its power of place.

The new Multi-Faith Centre at CQUniversity Rockhampton provides a location

where students and staff can gather for prayer and meditation.

CQuniversity’s $1.8m partnership with mining giant BHP Billiton Mitsubishi

Alliance (BMA), to fund a BMA Chair in Indigenous Engagement and a number

of student scholarships, was welcomed in April 2012 with the help

of the Darumbal Waru dance group.


10

Our

Organisation

and Structure

OUR VISION, VALUES, MISSION AND 11

OBJECTIVES

OUR CAMPUSES AND DIVISIONS 13

OUR ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE 18

OUR MANAGEMENT STRUCTURE 19

‘ENGAGEMENT

WILL BECOME

THE DRIVING

FORCE THAT

DIRECTS THE

ACTIVITIES

OF THE

UNIVERSITY’


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

OUR VISION, VALUES, MISSION AND

OBJECTIVES

OUR VISION

Our vision is for CQUniversity Australia to become one of

Australia’s truly great universities through partnership with

industry, students and the community.

Our greatness will be demonstrated through engagement

in Learning and Teaching, Research and Innovation, and our

Communities.

OUR VALUES

CQUniversity has organisational values which underpin its daily

activities. The University’s Code of Conduct is one way in which

CQUniversity puts its collective values into practice. The Code

is a statement of principles designed to inform the actions of all

members and to establish and guide what conduct is expected and

what conduct is to be avoided. CQUniversity has fi ve core values:

11

OUR ORGANISATION AND STRUCTURE

OUR MISSION

Engagement will become the dominant methodology and

driving force that directs the activities of the University to fulfi l

its vision to enable stakeholders, partners, communities and

students to ‘be what they want to be’.

Engagement underpins the relationships between CQUniversity

and its communities (local, regional, state, national,

international) for the mutually benefi cial exchange of knowledge

and resources in a context of partnership and reciprocity.

Our promise is to collaborate with our communities to assure

our mutual wellbeing.

Our partnerships will address community identifi ed needs,

enhance community wellbeing, deepen students’ civic and

academic learning, enrich the scholarship of the organisation

and lead to discovery in the co-creation of knowledge.

Ultimately, engagement at CQUniversity aims to support the

development of sustainable communities and an equally

sustainable university.

ENGAGEMENT

We connect to our

stakeholders and

communities by having

strong relationships and

productive partnerships

which deliver mutually

benefi cial outcomes.

A CAN-DO

APPROACH

We focus on and achieve

our goals, we ‘think

big’, aspire to greatness

and apply innovation in

everything we do.

LEADERSHIP

We lead by consistently

demonstrating

excellence in learning

and teaching, research,

engagement and

governance.

INCLUSIVENESS

We respect and seek

full participation from,

and engagement with,

all staff, students and

the community without

discrimination toward

any individual or group.

OPENNESS

We promote transparency

in processes, procedures

and decision-making and

emphasise consistency,

fairness and probity

as integral to our

relationships, individual

and collective, with all

stakeholders.


12

OUR ORGANISATION AND STRUCTURE

OUR OBJECTIVES

WHEN WE HAVE ACHIEVED OUR ASPIRATIONS

FOR ENGAGEMENT, LEARNING AND TEACHING,

RESEARCH AND INNOVATION, AND ENTERPRISE:

We will be assured

1 of continued growth

and sustainability through

our academic offerings

which are flexible and

responsive to the needs

of our current and future

students, communities

and employers.

We will be

8 renowned for

actively contributing to the

development of industries

and the communities in

which we reside through

staff membership and

participation in community

groups, committees,

boards, professional

bodies and community

volunteer work.

9

We will be

acknowledged for

providing CQUniversity

facilities and resources to

community and industry

groups and events.

2

. We will be a

highly inclusive

organisation. Our

inclusivity will be

access, support,

work-integrated learning

and workplace-ready

graduates. International,

intercultural and

Indigenous perspectives

will be evidenced in our

academic offerings.

We will be known

7 as the preferred

organisation for research

leaders and students

based on our quality

research facilities and

programs. Our research

staff and graduates will be

acknowledged as experts

in their field, supported in

entrepreneurial activities,

and contribute to the key

research areas within the

University.

We will be

10 well-known for

creating an environment

that attracts high

quality staff, has a

strong leadership

culture, recognises and

rewards good practice,

and maintains an

effective governance

and management

structure with clear

accountabilities

and commitment to

continuous improvement.

We will be regarded

3 as an organisation

of choice by students and

staff, recognised for our

high quality teaching and

research, and for offering

programs across the full

span of the Australian

Qualifi cations Framework

We will be

6 acclaimed for fi ve

areas of research that

are rated as world class,

including two areas with

international prestige

ratings.

We will be

11 leaders in the

provision of quality

physical infrastructure

and information

and communication

technology systems

that support the core

business of the University

and provide a safe

and environmentally

sustainable environment.

We will be

4 acknowledged

for our leadership in

learning and teaching and

research by consistently

demonstrating excellence

through program

offerings and quality

staff.

We will be

5 renowned for

excellence in research,

both fundamental and

applied, that contributes to

knowledge and innovation

in priority areas.

We will be

12 recognised

for our relationships

with local, national

and internationally

signifi cant partners,

our ability to attract

philanthropic support and

our contribution to our

communities and society.

WE WILL BE ONE OF AUSTRALIA’S GREAT

UNIVERSITIES. WE WILL BE WELL RESPECTED AND

A ROLE MODEL TO OTHER HIGHER EDUCATION

PROVIDERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD.


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

OUR CAMPUSES AND DIVISIONS

CQUNIVERSITY CAMPUSES

CQUNIVERSITY APPLETON INSTITUTE

CQUniversity Appleton Institute is a multidisciplinary research hub

and distance education study centre in Adelaide, South Australia,

established in January 2012. The Institute is overseen by fatigue

and human factors expert Professor Drew Dawson and consists of

a varied 30-person team with excellence in research, teaching and

community engagement across a range of scientifi c areas including

sleep and biological rhythms, applied psychology, occupational health

and safety, human factors, risk management and cultural anthropology.

Starting in 2013, the CQUniversity Appleton Institute will be involved

in providing several CQUniversity courses as a new distance education

study centre. The courses include a Master and Graduate Diploma

of Rail Safety Management, Graduate Certifi cate in Fatigue Risk

Management, and the supervision of honours and PhD students in

Psychology and General Science.

13

OUR ORGANISATION AND STRUCTURE

CQUNIVERSITY BRISBANE

Over the past 12 months, there has been further diversification of

students represented on the CQUniversity Brisbane campus as Term 1,

2012 saw the successful introduction of undergraduate Commonwealth

supported places on metropolitan campuses. Given minimal lead

time for Queensland Tertiary Admissions Centre (QTAC) listing and

promotional activities, 94 domestic students have already enrolled at

the campus in our undergraduate programs, which has offset the much

publicised downturn in international student enrolments.

CQUniversity Brisbane’s convenient CBD location, modern facilities

and quality supportive learning environment continue to attract

both domestic and international students alike. With the recent

establishment of our distance education study centre, we are also

committed to supporting and assisting our distance education students

in South East Queensland, including hosting of residential sessions and

orientation programs for this student cohort.

CQUniversity Brisbane will continue to increase student enrolments

into 2013 with good initial interest in all programs, but particularly in

the Bachelor of Medical Sonography / Graduate Diploma of Medical

Sonography to be introduced in Brisbane from Term 1, 2013.

CQUNIVERSITY BUNDABERG

There has been signifi cant growth at CQUniversity Bundaberg in 2012,

as a result of the introduction of new programs in Accident Forensics,

the full Psychology degree and the Food and Agricultural Science

major of the Applied Science degree. Also during the year signifi cant

planning has occurred for the introduction of the Engineering degree

and programs in Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy to commence

in 2013. Record numbers of students in higher degrees were registered

in 2012, and the research quantum continues to grow on the campus.

During the year the University signed an agreement with the Australian

Flight Academy which will bring signifi cant numbers of international

students to Bundaberg. This will give a strong impetus to our Aviation

program to complement Accident Forensics.

Construction started on the Autism Early Intervention Outcomes

Unit (AEIOU) Foundation facility on campus with the fi rst enrolments

scheduled for 2013.

Katie Clarke shows off the moves that made her a karate world champion.

She hopes to continue with her theatre degree once she's had the chance

to explore opportunities to become a martial arts film star, actor or stunt

performer.

In March 2012, the Bundaberg Regional Council declared Bundaberg

to be Queensland’s fi rst “University City”. This was linked to the

University signing an accord with the Council. The Accord expressed

both organisations’ intention to work more closely together to meet

the needs of our community. As an initial tangible expression of this

Accord, the Council has offered three scholarships for Bundaberg

students commencing with the new Engineering program in 2013.

In 2012, CQUniversity Bundaberg became the fi rst individual campus

member of Engagement Australia. This is in line with the University’s

engagement imperative and recognises the commitment of staff to be

better practitioners in the engagement arena.

CQUNIVERSITY CAIRNS DISTANCE

EDUCATION STUDY CENTRE

CQUniversity’s Cairns distance education study centre opened in

August 2012. The fi rst of its kind for the University, the centre provides

the region’s 350 current CQUniversity distance students with access

to a range of facilities and services including computers, printers and

internet along with the opportunity to form study groups, use meeting

rooms, and access video conferencing facilities and face-to-face

support. In addition, prospective students can attend information

sessions, access assistance with enrolment and obtain guidance for

their studies from the supportive staff and student ambassadors on

hand. During the fi rst four months of operation the centre welcomed

over 500 current and prospective students. The centre extended its

operating hours to Saturdays to meet the increasing student demand.


14

OUR ORGANISATION AND STRUCTURE

CQUNIVERSITY GOLD COAST

In August 2012, CQUniversity made the decision to teach out current

enrolled students at CQUniversity’s Gold Coast campus, and to

discontinue accepting new students to its programs with a view

to fully closing the campus in 2014. The management and staff of

CQUniversity’s Gold Coast campus are committed to ensuring that

no student is academically or fi nancially impacted by this decision

and it will continue to provide high level support to all students to

ensure they are given every opportunity to successfully complete their

CQUniversity degree at CQUniversity Gold Coast within the specifi ed

program duration.

Vice-Chancellor and President, Professor Scott Bowman (dressed as the Stig),

promotes the importance of road safety to CQUniversity staff members.

CQUNIVERSITY EMERALD

CQUniversity Emerald is located in the grounds of the Australian

Agricultural College and provides a friendly and open environment which

encourages a close working relationship between staff and students.

CQUniversity Emerald is seen as a support centre for many regional

and remote students who are studying distance education and wish to

access its facilities, resources and staff.

Situated in a town of 14 000, CQUniversity Emerald provides its

facilities, support and education services to business, industry, schools

and community members across the region.

CQUNIVERSITY GLADSTONE

Located at the Gladstone Marina, CQUniversity Gladstone provides

an appealing learning environment for a range of bridging courses,

undergraduate, postgraduate and research degrees. CQUniversity

fi rst opened its doors in Gladstone in 1978 at its Dawson Highway

premises. The intent to service the Gladstone community through

industry-relevant education and research has remained unchanged

in the intervening years. In 2013, the campus celebrates 35 years

of continuous service. CQUniversity Gladstone is home to two

research centres: the Centre for Environmental Management and

the Engineering Centre. Researchers from CQUniversity contribute to

the community by providing developmental research for industry and

monitoring the environmental health of the Gladstone area, including

the waters of Gladstone harbour and the Rodds Bay dugong sanctuary.

The Gladstone area is a resource-rich region of diversity where tourism,

community and industry co-exist in harmony, retaining an agreeable

lifestyle and environment balance. The Gladstone Region is home to

over 62 000 people and is best known for its strong industrial base.

CQUNIVERSITY MACKAY

CQUniversity Mackay is one of the University’s fastest growing

campuses, positioned in a region of Central Queensland which heavily

services the mining and resources industries.

Given CQUniversity’s Mackay campus geographical location, the

University has been well placed to provide education, training,

research and support services related to those industries.

The campus has welcomed more than $25m worth of infrastructure

over the past three years including state-of-the art Medical Imaging

and Sonography laboratories, Chiropractic facilities, Nursing and

Midwifery laboratories, a new Library and Information Technology

Resource Centre and modern student accommodation.

Further campus developments are underway with plans for a $16.6m

Engineering precinct, while plans for the proposed Mackay Regional

Sporting Precinct are well advanced.

CQUNIVERSITY MELBOURNE

CQUniversity Melbourne has had a challenging year with changes in

the international student recruitment environment resulting in reduced

student numbers. Further engagement with on-shore recruitment

agents and overseas recruitment activity is expected to result in

improvements to international student numbers over the course of the

next year.

In early 2013, the campus will introduce new programs including

Sonography, Professional Communication and Vocational Education

to sit alongside ongoing, core programs in ELICOS, Business and

Information Technology. These program developments coupled with the

opening of the distance education study centre will see an increasing

number of domestic students on the campus, bringing further diversity

to the current multi-national cohort.

Marketing activity focussed on creating greater awareness of the

University brand in Victoria, together with further expansion in program

offerings, will see a broader range of courses and markets for the

campus in the second half of 2013.


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

15

CQUNIVERSITY NOOSA

CQUniversity Noosa has experienced a surge in growth in the last

12 months with a $2.5m facilities’ expansion; new program offerings

in Law, Tourism, Music, Multimedia and Creative Industries, as

well as internal offerings in Nursing and Access programs; and the

establishment of Noosa as a research-intensive campus with fi ve

Professors, two Associate Professors, fi ve Senior Lecturers, and over

35 research higher degree students.

CQUniversity Noosa anticipates continued growth through building

capacity and capability by increasing program offerings; extending

campus research specialisations and community partnerships;

developing international student programs in this desirable beachside

destination; and seeking opportunities for commercialisation through,

for example, CQUniversity’s Noosa campus eye tracking facility.

OUR ORGANISATION AND STRUCTURE

CQUNIVERSITY ROCKHAMPTON

CQUniversity Rockhampton is a popular choice for international

students seeking a traditional campus experience in a unique

Australian setting. It is also CQUniversity’s founding campus and

central administrative hub providing a service community for the

largely rural Central Queensland region. The campus has lush gardens

and provides a tranquil and picturesque environment to study in.

CQUniversity’s Rockhampton campus facilities include a newly

refurbished library, cafeteria, sports centre, refectory, computer labs,

modern lecture theatres, 25 metre swimming pool, athletics oval and

well equipped gymnasium and more. The campus boasts an Allied

Health clinic which serves the greater public and provides students

with hands-on practical learning experiences.

The new Multi-Faith Centre at CQUniversity Rockhampton provides a

location where students and staff can gather for prayer and meditation.

The Multi-Faith Centre is available for people of all faiths and even

people of no faith seeking deeper meaning, refl ection, understanding,

tolerance and respect.

Staff and the community are able to take advantage of the newly

established Corporate Events Conference Centre which is available for

internal and external conferences.

The Rockhampton Student Residence is located at CQUniversity’s

Rockhampton campus and provides on-campus accommodation for

350 students.

CQUNIVERSITY SYDNEY

In early 2012, CQUniversity Sydney launched a unique medical

Sonography program. The modern six-bed medical sonography facility

features state-of-the-art digital technology and simulated learning

clinics. It has advanced 3D/4D-capable Philips ultrasound units worth

$450 000, 10 ‘Phantom’ body torso training units worth $75 000 and a

$1.5m multifunctional laboratory. As this is Australia’s only Sonography

program available for undergraduate entry (with postgraduate exit),

there’s been an enthusiastic response from students keen to help

relieve a critical health workforce shortage. Students gain extensive

clinical experience with established sonography professionals.

The CQUni Community Sports Centre in Rockhampton hosted a

fledgling roller derby competition for regional teams.

CQUniversity Sydney continues to have a strong commitment to

engagement across a range of activities. Projects include a staff

member volunteering each week at the Centre of Indigenous

Excellence in Redfern which helps primary school children improve

their literacy skills. This program is run by the Exodus Foundation,

using the Multilit reading program. Another project with the Exodus

Foundation involves staff and students from CQUniversity Sydney

volunteering each month to feed the homeless (around 250 people

each day) at their Loaves and Fishes Restaurant in Ashfi eld. Further,

students have also been placed in volunteer positions with The Smith

Family, St Vincent de Paul Society and the Centre for Volunteering.

For the fifth year in a row, CQUniversity Sydney has been a Tax Help

Centre where students volunteer to provide free and confidential service

to assist low-income earners (such as other CQUniversity students) to

complete their tax returns during tax time. Students are fully trained,

accredited and supported by the Australian Taxation Office.

GERALDTON UNIVERSITIES CENTRE

CQUniversity commenced supported distance education in conjunction

with the Geraldton Universities Centre, Geraldton in July 2011.

Geraldton is located in Western Australia’s mid west region, 424 klms

north of Perth.

The Centre provides on campus support for distance education students

enrolled in six CQUniversity programs including five undergraduate

programs and the Skills for Tertiary Education Preparatory Studies

(STEPS) bridging program. Commencing with Accounting and Business

in 2011, the undergraduate program offerings expanded to Primary and

Early Childhood Education and Psychology in 2012.

The Centre provides CQUniversity students with access to a range

of facilities including on-campus student amenities, local library

resources, computers, printers and internet services. Other services

include face-to-face support, assistance with enrolment and

orientation days.


16

OUR ORGANISATION AND STRUCTURE

CQUNIVERSITY DIVISIONS

ACADEMIC AND RESEARCH DIVISION

CQUniversity is committed to becoming a great regional university

through productive engagement in partnerships with industry,

government and the community that support excellence in learning and

teaching, research and innovation.

The Division’s mission is to grow engaged research and improve

the quality of teaching and learning across CQUniversity Australia.

The Division takes a leadership role in professional development for

teachers, researchers and supervisors in higher education and has a

particular focus on developing quality distance education.

The Office of Learning and Teaching, the Office of Research and the School

of Graduate Research, Institutes and Centres are hosted in the Division,

and work in partnership with other divisions to achieve the University’s

goals in increasing research output and developing quality teaching.

The Office of Indigenous Engagement was created in 2012 and

Nulloo Yumbah restructured to provide better education and research

opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students.

The Office of Community and Engagement leads and develops external

partnerships which are maintained through learning, teaching and research

activities. Regional engagement committees are managed through each

Head of Campus for the University’s significant regional footprint.

Responsibility for leading, developing and sustaining partnerships

rests largely with the Division’s Offi ce of Community and Engagement

in partnership with the Heads of Campus in each city campus and all

areas of the University.

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE DIVISION

The Corporate Governance Division is committed to providing the

highest standards of corporate governance to the University’s

governing bodies such as the University Council and Academic Board.

These bodies lead the University in establishing quality assurance and

improvement that is transparent, measurable and appropriate across

the organisation. The Division is focused on supporting the students’

learning journey from commencement to graduation and beyond.

The Division comprises four directorates:

The Governance Directorate is responsible for activities relevant

to the University’s governance and recordkeeping requirements in

accordance with legislation and Australian/international standards, the

facilitation of the operations of the committees of the University, and

the management of the University’s policy systems.

The Academic Registrar’s Directorate manages the activities related to

student academic and administrative management, including the full range

of student access, development, personal and accommodation services,

student complaints and student misconduct matters. The Directorate

includes the Student Business Centre, Course Information Centre, Student

Contact Centre, Student Support Centre, student accommodation in

Mackay and at the Capricornia College in Rockhampton.

The Audit and Advisory Directorate is responsible for providing

specialist assurance and advisory services to senior management

and staff in relation to audit and the management and mitigation of

risk, and for establishing and guiding the Internal Audit strategy and

managing the University’s Internal Audit program.

The Corporate Communications Directorate is responsible for

promoting, supporting and enhancing the University’s reputation,

activities and achievements, through strategic communications and

organising University corporate events.

FINANCE DIVISION

The Finance Division is comprised of the Financial Services Directorate

and the Corporate Strategy and Planning Directorate. Together they

are responsible for the University’s planning and fi nancial management

including risk management. The Division has numerous internal

reporting obligations to the University Council and committees, and

external reporting obligations to the State and Federal governments.

The Corporate Strategy and Planning Directorate is responsible for

ensuring that the University has properly functioning risk management

and strategic planning frameworks. The Financial Services Directorate

is responsible for ensuring the University’s fi nancial reporting

obligations are met and that the University’s fi nance systems are

operating effi ciently, effectively and economically.

As the University transitions from ‘Strong to Great’ the Financial

Services Directorate is taking great strides to ensure that it provides

the support and service that the University requires for its ongoing

growth and the proposed merger with CQ TAFE.

In 2012, the Budget and Performance Reporting Team concentrated

on the TM1 enhancement project. IBM Cognos TM1 provides the

University with a dynamic environment for developing timely, reliable

forecasts and budgets. The further enhancement of the planning tool

this year enables the organisation to rapidly analyse data, model

business requirements and use the results to budget and forecast with

confi dence for better decision-making and outcomes.

The Corporate Strategy and Planning Directorate continues its journey

within the University of embedding an integrated planning and risk

framework that has a continuous improvement philosophy. This process

is dynamic and allows the organisation to be responsive, proactive

and fl exible in its approach to business opportunities. The University

has been able to mitigate and plan for rapid expansion utilising this

integrated approach.

As part of the Division’s ongoing commitment to provide better service

to the University and the community a Systems Improvement Project

was established which has identifi ed a number of enhancements.

The Financial Services Directorate continues to review and improve

processes to further assist the growing University.

HIGHER EDUCATION DIVISION

The Higher Education Division was created in July 2012 with the

amalgamation of the former faculties – the Faculty of Arts, Business,

Informatics and Education and the Faculty of Sciences, Engineering and

Health. Establishment of the Higher Education Division facilitates a

unifi ed approach across the schools, with enhancement of cross-school


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

and cross-discipline collaboration. The schools are the fundamental

operational units of the Division and are committed to achieving

growth in student numbers, improving the quality of teaching and

learning and the fostering of a strong research culture. The Higher

Education Division continued to build on the signifi cant growth

achieved by the former faculties in domestic student enrolments,

new program offerings and in forging partnerships with industry,

community and government.

The Higher Education Division has six Schools:

• Nursing and Midwifery

• Engineering and Technology

• Education and the Arts

• Medical and Applied Sciences

• Business and Law

• Human, Health and Social Sciences

INTERNATIONAL AND SERVICES DIVISION

The International and Services Division was created in early 2012

following an amalgamation of the former University Services and

International portfolios. It also has a close relationship with the

CQUniversity-owned C Management Services Pty Ltd business,

which currently operates four metropolitan campuses (Brisbane,

Gold Coast, Sydney, Melbourne), and provides the majority of

educational delivery to international students.

Directorates within this portfolio include Marketing, Facilities

Management, Information Technology, People and Culture,

Library, International and the Print Management Unit. The Division

forms the foundation of professional services which underpin

the successful delivery of teaching and research. The Division is

therefore primarily focused on partnerships, engagement and the

need for exceptional customer service to internal and external

stakeholders. In particular, the Division has extended facilities

on numerous campuses to enable new research and teaching

activities to occur, and has provided targeted marketing which has

assisted strong growth in domestic enrolments.

Innovative approaches in infrastructure, technology, professional

and administrative services have been a key feature of Divisional

operations. Highly competent staff assisted by continually

improving systems and procedures have ensured the effi cient and

strategic use of resources to optimise the effectiveness of the

overall University model. 2012 in particular has been distinguished

by advances in cross-unit and inter-organisational cooperation;

leveraging a wide skill base to enhance service delivery.

The International and Services Division is known for its ability to

innovate and counter challenges in the most responsive and effective

manner. This requires both a proactive approach to core operations

and a solutions-based approach to risk and continuity management.

Importantly, this is particularly crucial when recognising that the

Division operates across a wide campus portfolio; counteracting the

difficulties of distance, and maximising the key benefits it provides.

CQUniversity hosted author and television celebrity Tiffiny Hall from The Biggest

Loser Australia who visited CQUniversity Rockhampton to promote her new book

and to speak about health and fitness among young people.

INDUSTRY, VOCATIONAL TRAINING AND

ACCESS EDUCATION DIVISION

The Industry, Vocational Training and Access Education Division

was established in 2012 to lead the University to its vision of

becoming Queensland’s fi rst dual sector university. The Division

champions an integrated approach to education and training across

the University and plays a pivotal role by seeking improved ways

to engage with students, industry, community, government and

University interests.

In addition to providing strategic leadership to the proposed merger

of the University and CQ TAFE, the Industry, Vocational Training

and Access Education Division is leading the expansion of the

University’s vocational education and training (VET) and distance

programs throughout Australia. The Division has management

oversight of CQUniversity’s subsidiary company Health Train

Education Services Pty Ltd, which operates as a private registered

training organisation ‘HealthTrain’ delivering VET programs.

This will be achieved by creating and promoting a framework

of innovative and seamless pathway opportunities between

vocational and academic learning, through which the University

can develop and deliver vocational education and training.

CQUniversity is building upon the success of its enabling programs

to support access into new pathways.

The Division’s commercial arm, the Queensland Centre for

Professional Development (QCPD), provides business support to the

Schools on behalf of the University which will drive a commercial

approach. Through our engagement with industry, we provide

new opportunities for the University to develop its national and

international capabilities.

By establishing a research symposium and a research scholarship,

the Division is promoting a dual sector research agenda within

the University and is actively supporting the goal of being a great

research-focussed dual sector university.

17

OUR ORGANISATION AND STRUCTURE


18

OUR ORGANISATION AND STRUCTURE

OUR ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE

AS AT 31 DECEMBER 2012

Vice-Chancellor and President

Professor Scott Bowman

Deputy

Deputy

Deputy

Vice-Chancellor

Vice-Chancellor

Vice-Chancellor

Deputy

Chief Financial

(International and

(Academic and

(Industry and

Vice-Chancellor

Officer and CFO,

Services) and CEO,

Research)

Vocational Education

(Higher Education)

C Management

C Management

Services Pty Ltd

Professor Hilary

and Training)

Services Pty Ltd

Professor Graham Pegg

Mr David Turner

Winchester

Mr Nik Babovic

Mr Alastair Dawson

University Secretary

Ms Jenny Roberts

Academic and

Research Division

International and

Services Division

Industry, Vocational

Training and Access

Education Division

Higher Education

Division

Finance Division

Corporate

Governance Division


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

OUR MANAGEMENT STRUCTURE

The Vice-Chancellor and President, Professor Scott Bowman, is the University’s Chief Executive Offi cer. He works in collaboration with the

University Council, of which he is a member, and also with a wide range of internal and external stakeholders to provide overall leadership

and directions for the University. The Vice-Chancellor and President is appointed by the University Council and is responsible to the Council,

through the Chancellor, for the leadership and management of the University. He is supported in this task by the University Executives,

comprising the following senior members of staff:

VICE-CHANCELLOR AND

PRESIDENT

Professor Scott Bowman

TDCR, DCR, HDCR CollRadiog,

FAETC City&Guilds, MArts GuildHall,

MBusAdmin USC, PhD OpenUK, FAIM

DEPUTY VICE-CHANCELLOR

(ACADEMIC AND RESEARCH)

Professor Hilary Winchester

MA, D.Phil Oxen FAICD

DEPUTY VICE-

CHANCELLOR (HIGHER

EDUCATION)

Professor Graham Pegg

BSc (Hons), PhD, C.Chem JCU

19

OUR ORGANISATION AND STRUCTURE

DEPUTY VICE-CHANCELLOR

(INTERNATIONAL AND SERVICES)

AND CEO, C MANAGEMENT

SERVICES PTY LTD

Mr Alastair Dawson

BA DDIAE, MBA CQU, MAICD, FAIM

DEPUTY VICE-CHANCELLOR

(INDUSTRY AND VOCATIONAL

EDUCATION AND TRAINING)

Mr Nik Babovic

BEd QUT, MBA GradDipBusMgt GCIT

UNIVERSITY SECRETARY

Ms Jenny Roberts

BBusAdmin CQU, GAICD

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

AND CFO, C MANAGEMENT

SERVICES PTY LTD

Mr David Turner

CA, BComm Qld


20

Our Strategic

Plan

‘CQUNIVERSITY

WILL HAVE

A POSITIVE

CULTURE

WHICH

VALUES STAFF,

STUDENTS,

COMMUNITIES

AND INDUSTRY

PARTNERS’


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

CQUNIVERSITY STRATEGIC PLAN

ENGAGEMENT

OUR AIM

We will engage in all areas of endeavour. Our interactions with

our communities will drive our Learning and Teaching, Research

and Innovation, and Enterprise. Through these interactions, we will

identify and address the needs of our communities, industry and the

University which deepens our students’ civic and academic learning,

and enhances community wellbeing. We will also enrich our

scholarship and research in a way that benefits both the University

and our stakeholders.

ENGAGED LEARNING AND

TEACHING

OUR AIM

CQUniversity will attract and retain more students, helping them

to achieve their educational goals regardless of their cultural and

family background or their country of origin. We will offer a range

of ways for students to access higher education and reach their

educational potential. We will provide a stimulating environment

that promotes and supports learner engagement utilising

appropriate technology and infrastructure.

21

OUR STRATEGIC PLAN

OUR APPROACH

STRENGTHENING AND BUILDING OUR

RELATIONSHIPS

We will work with our diverse communities within our multi-city

campus footprint to build long and enduring relationships. We will

focus on developing knowledge, skills and innovations by providing

education, professional development and research that meets the

needs of our regional workforce and industry. We will value and

engage with our stakeholders everywhere; draw on community and

industry expertise and knowledge; encourage the active participation

of all stakeholders; and acknowledge their contributions.

Our relationships will strengthen as we take on a more active role

in promoting educational, social, cultural and economic wellbeing.

CONTRIBUTING TO GROWTH

We will develop regional, national and international partnerships that

will contribute to the professional and educational growth of all our

staff and students. We will support the development and recognition

of outstanding teachers, and establish research fellowships and

support for new researchers at higher degree, postdoctoral and early

career levels.

OPEN CAMPUSES

We will become a vital part of the life and culture of our

communities by offering our campuses and facilities to

stakeholders, educational partners, and community and industry

groups for events and activities.

ENGAGED SERVICE

CQUniversity will encourage staff and students to participate in

both internal and external committees, boards and professional

associations, and to volunteer for community work. By sharing our

knowledge, skills and innovations we aim to support the development

of sustainable communities and a sustainable University.

OUR APPROACH

FACILITATING STUDENT ACCESS, PARTICIPATION

AND SUCCESS

Our academic offerings will meet the needs of our diverse student

profile. We are focussed on making the University more accessible

and relevant to all people, especially those from under-represented,

Indigenous and culturally diverse backgrounds and who do not have

the resources, prerequisite knowledge or skills to undertake higher

education. We will seek to incorporate international, intercultural

and Indigenous perspectives into our programs.

PROVIDING STUDENT SUPPORT

All our staff will focus on supporting the learning journey of our

students and will provide prompt, effi cient and effective service.

Our systems will facilitate the work of academics and the learning

experiences of our students.

We will offer preparatory programs and services to help students

develop the skills they need for university studies. We will provide

equitable access to our programs, and learning opportunities that

will enable our students to succeed in their study.

Through engagement with our students, we will provide them with

the support they need to reach their full academic potential.

CQUniversity will have a reputation for producing workplaceready

graduates.

ACHIEVING TEACHING EXCELLENCE

We will achieve learning and teaching excellence and leadership

through the development of our staff across our multi-city campuses.

We will optimise students’ learning journey by providing a stimulating

and engaging environment that fosters their different learning styles.

We will identify and reward teaching leaders. We will provide

support to enable staff to engage in the scholarship of learning

and teaching, develop innovative pedagogical practices and build

capacity in curriculum design.

COMMITMENT TO ENHANCEMENT

We are committed to providing high quality learning experiences for all

students by listening to their views and enhancing academic offerings

through systematic evaluation and review of our programs and courses.

We will benchmark our performance against other organisations in the

sector and gather feedback from our industry and community partners to

ensure we are building on current good practice.


22

OUR STRATEGIC PLAN

ENGAGED RESEARCH AND

INNOVATION

OUR AIM

CQUniversity will conduct both fundamental and applied

research in selected priority areas. We will aim to help improve

the economies of regions and nations by collaborating in

research projects, developing knowledge, promoting innovation

and being entrepreneurial.

ENGAGED ENTERPRISE

OUR AIM

CQUniversity will have a positive culture which supports people

and capability, manages performance, and values the University’s

staff, students, communities and industry partners. We are

committed to high standards of governance and a continuing quest

for quality. Our fi nancial, physical, management and information

technology systems and infrastructure supports the University’s

core business.

OUR APPROACH

CHAMPIONING RESEARCH

We will engage with regional, national and international research

communities and industry partners to increase our research activity

and offer outstanding research programs for staff and students. We

will attain research excellence by engaging and retaining research

stars in priority areas.

REWARDING AND SUPPORTING RESEARCH

EXCELLENCE

Through our research institutes and centres, we will support

research excellence in those priority areas that contribute to

the needs of the communities we serve. We will encourage and

support a culture of research by identifying and rewarding research

leaders, promoting scholarly activities, mentoring emerging

researchers and fostering an environment of active enquiry and

innovation.

IMPROVING RESEARCH PERFORMANCE

EXCELLENCE

Through our research institutes and centres we will improve

the University’s research funding and performance outcomes by

developing strategic partnerships in our priority research areas. We

will invest in critical areas of growth and leverage our investment

to achieve greater outcomes. In this way, we will improve our

research ranking against other Australian and international

universities.

DEVELOPING RESEARCH SKILLS EXCELLENCE

By engaging with our research students and providing quality

research supervision, we will enable our students to develop

the knowledge and skills they need to achieve exceptional

research outcomes.

OUR APPROACH

STUDENTS

CQUniversity’s people, services and systems will focus on supporting

the students’ learning journey from commencement to graduation

and beyond. We will provide quality library and information services,

support programs and counselling to all students of the CQUniversity,

regardless of their location or mode of study. We are committed

to ensuring that students’ experiences are positive and rewarding.

We are proud of our students and our graduates and will strive to

develop lifelong partnerships and promote philanthropic relationships

with our alumni.

INTERNAL STAKEHOLDERS

CQUniversity’s employees are the key to delivering our promise

to our stakeholders. Our workforce will conduct core business

effectively and be appropriate for the size and complexity of the

University. We will provide career development and leadership

opportunities for all staff in the form of training, professional

development, mentoring and support.

Through our service divisions we will provide innovative facilities,

systems and equipment that compare well with other organisations

in the university sector. Our physical infrastructure and systems for

information and communication technology will provide an interactive

learning and research experience for our students and staff.

We will provide a safe environment for staff, students and visitors on

all our multi-city campuses. We will create a culture of environmental

sustainability that will be reflected in our infrastructure, as well as

our energy, water and waste management practices.

CQUniversity will have high standards of corporate governance

from governing bodies such as the University Council and Academic

Board. These bodies will lead the University in establishing quality

assurance and improvement that is transparent, measurable and

appropriate across the organisation.

EXTERNAL STAKEHOLDERS

We will contribute to the economic success of our regions by sharing

CQUniversity’s expertise and knowledge with our communities.

We will become a vital part of the life and culture of our

communities by providing our stakeholders, educational partners,

industry groups and community organisations with access to our

campuses and facilities for their events and activities.


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

23

OUR STRATEGIC PLAN

Allied Health programs are now among the most popular for new students.

Miners praise paramedics

Beaconsfield miners Todd Russell and Brant Webb talked about the vital role paramedics played in their rescue back in 2006 during a forum at CQUniversity

Rockhampton. The two ordinary blokes, who found themselves trapped in a Tasmanian mine shaft for two weeks, were the official guests at the launch of

CQUniversity’s Bachelor of Paramedic Science program. “The job they did in keeping us sane while we were trapped was exceptional,” said Brant.


24

Review of

Our Activities

ENGAGED LEARNING AND TEACHING 25

ENGAGED RESEARCH AND INNOVATION 28

ENGAGEMENT 32

ENGAGED ENTERPRISE 35

‘CQUNIVERSITY

GRADUATES

CONTINUE TO

HAVE ONE OF

THE HIGHEST

EMPLOYMENT

RATES IN THE

COUNTRY’


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

ENGAGED LEARNING AND TEACHING

OUR AIM: CQUniversity will attract and retain more students, helping them to achieve their educational goals regardless of their cultural

and family background or their country of origin. We will offer a range of ways for students to access higher education and reach their

educational potential. We will provide a stimulating environment that promotes and supports learner engagement utilising appropriate

technology and infrastructure.

ACHIEVING TEACHING EXCELLENCE

In 2012, the University maintained a focus on providing opportunities

for academic staff development. This included a restructured

orientation program for new academic staff and a revised Graduate

Certificate in Tertiary Education, with courses modified to better meet

the needs of CQUniversity’s academic staff. A number of learning and

teaching seminars were held in support of the assessment, engaged

learning and teaching, and teaching for success themes with speakers

from CQUniversity, across Australia and further afield, including

Visiting Professor Jonathan Weyers from Dundee University, Scotland.

The scholarship of learning and teaching is promoted through the

activities of the University’s two education research centres: the

Learning and Teaching Education Research Centre (LTERC) and the

International Education Research Centre (IERC) which together have

over 100 members with shared interests in a wide range of aspects of

research and scholarship.

The University supports a number of Communities of Practice (COP) that

enable staff with shared interests to exchange ideas and formulate plans

to achieve outcomes on topics that have a direct impact on learning

and teaching, including aspects such as the first-year experience,

work-related learning and learning through simulation and teamwork.

The University hosted its Learning and Teaching Showcase in November

and produced a new issue of its learning and teaching magazine,

Learn, which aims to share good practice among staff through raising

awareness of the University’s teaching activities and successes.

CQUniversity recognises and supports staff for their contributions

to learning and teaching excellence and innovation through grants

and awards. The University’s Learning and Teaching Grants play an

important role in enabling staff to develop and test new ideas, aiming

to enhance learning and teaching practices to achieve better learning

outcomes for students. They also serve as a springboard for external

national grant applications. Nine Learning and Teaching Grants were

awarded in 2012.

The University’s Learning and Teaching Awards are designed to support

applications through a tiered process that can result in a national

citation or award. In 2012, four Learning and Teaching Awards were

presented. The University also celebrated the success of Professor

Kerry Reid-Searl and Ms Sherie Elliott, who both received a Citation

for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning from the Federal

Government’s Office for Learning and Teaching. In addition

Professor Reid-Searl was presented with a national award for

Teaching Excellence particularly related to her ground-breaking

work in nursing simulation – this award was given to only 10

academic staff in 2012 and is the first time that a CQUniversity

staff member has received this award. Mr Nicholas Ralph

from CQUniversity Noosa won the Australian Nurse of the

Year (Innovation in Nursing) Award in 2012 for his work on

mobile clinical learning. In addition, CQUniversity staff were

successful in securing a share of $509 000 for two Innovation

and Development Grants approved and funded by the Office for

Learning and Teaching (DIISRTE).

In 2012, the Industry, Vocational Training and Access Education

Division established an Academic Articulation Steering Committee

jointly chaired by CQUniversity and CQ TAFE. Working toward the

University’s aim to become a dual sector university, the Committee

developed new pathways for trades and vocational students

into CQUniversity degrees and began the development of new

CQUniversity degrees with embedded diploma outcomes.

The Committee established 11 new dual awards, each with two

components: a vocational diploma and a university degree. Credit

articulation pathways towards the degree component are clear and the

dual offers provide direct entry into CQUniversity degrees, removing

the need for students to reapply through QTAC the dual offers also

provide interim exit points, with different qualification levels.

CQUniversity is the first university in Australia to appoint an Aboriginal or

Torres Strait Islander person as Chair of its Academic Board. The Pro Vice-

Chancellor and BMA Chair (Indigenous Engagement), Professor Bronwyn

Fredericks, has recently been appointed to the role for three years.

Additionally, the Office of Indigenous Engagement has worked with

Deans of Schools to increase their knowledge and capacity to deliver

Indigenous-specific content within courses as well as improve their

engagement of and service delivery to Indigenous students and

communities. An example of this is working with the Dean of Education

to increase the capacity of Education students to teach Indigenous

history, as well as teach Indigenous students. This is a requirement of

Education graduates in coming years. This work has also extended to

working collaboratively to participate in the national More Aboriginal

and Torres Strait Islander Teachers Initiative (MATSITI).

25

REVIEW OF OUR ACTIVITIES


26

REVIEW OF OUR ACTIVITIES

COMMITMENT TO ENHANCEMENT

The University participated in the Australian Graduate Survey (AGS)

to monitor graduates’ perceptions of their learning experience.

CQUniversity graduates continue to have one of the highest employment

rates in the country. The results of the 2012 Australian Graduate Survey

(AGS) showed that 87.7% of CQUniversity bachelor degree graduates

were in full-time employment at the time of the survey. This compared

with the national average of 76.1%.

technologies. The transition from Moodle 1.9 to Moodle 2.2 enabled

new technologies to be introduced, including Blackboard Collaborate

(a virtual live classroom), Mahara (an e-portfolio web application), and

Camtasia, used for video screen recording. Best practice on distance

and on-campus education is now recognised through a new ‘student

voice’ award, based on student feedback through course evaluation

surveys.

This data is based on the percentage of Australian citizens and

permanent residents only, bachelor degree graduates available for

full-time employment that completed the requirements for their awards

in the calendar year 2011 and gaining full-time employment within four

months of completing their degree (source: CQUniversity Institutional

Table 2012 B1 and National Table 2012 B1 as provided by Graduate

Careers Australia [GCA]).

Evaluations of all courses each term are carried out through the Moodle

learning management system. A number of improvements have been

introduced during 2012, including enhanced reporting through the

University’s Academic Dashboards. Overall, the response rates across

all courses and cohorts have risen from 29% in Term 2, 2011 to 48% in

Term 2, 2012 in line with the University’s performance target of 50%

response rate. This is a major achievement for students and staff across

the University and it ensures that the student voice is heard effectively,

enabling staff to close the loop with students to explain how their

feedback has helped courses to improve.

The University also hosted the 2012 Australasian Higher Education

Evaluation Forum (AHEEF), with over 50 participants from Australia,

New Zealand and overseas under the title: Embedding an Internal

Evaluation Culture, with several speakers from CQUniversity discussing

a range of topics relevant to learning and teaching.

The Educational Development team in CQUniversity’s Office of Learning

and Teaching continues to work in partnership with academic staff to

develop new programs and courses and those programs undergoing

five-yearly reviews. The team also provides support to staff who wish to

address strategic aspects and new approaches to learning and teaching,

or those who wish to refresh their knowledge and skills through

workshops and other professional development activities, including

the introduction of Moodle 2, in collaboration with colleagues in the

Information Technology Directorate.

The University’s reporting systems continue to be developed through its

Academic Dashboards, with revised features for course and program

performance, attrition and course evaluations. An ongoing focus on

attrition has been maintained through regular reporting to Academic

Board, with a number of projects at school/program level focussed on

improving retention and reducing attrition, funded through the Higher

Education Participation and Partnerships Program (HEPPP).

The University continues to develop its capabilities in relation to online

learning, with a project to enhance distance education provision, in

line with its aim to become a leading distance education provider in

Australia. A set of principles and standards has been developed by

the Deans of Schools and others, aiming to facilitate the transition

from the traditional print-based educational model to a more

interactive and connected model supported by appropriate educational

The Office of Learning and Teaching has developed new resources to

support staff in their learning and teaching practice. This includes the

introduction of the ‘Great Guide’ series, with titles covering study at

university (for students), learning outcomes and internationalisation

of the curriculum. One-page resources have been developed and

promulgated to provide ‘Ten Top Tips’ on a range of topics, including

using assessment criteria, setting exams, giving feedback and teaching

first-year students.

PREPARING STUDENTS FOR A GLOBAL

WORKFORCE

The University has long recognised the importance of cultural

awareness and preparation for a global workforce. It has formally

recognised Cross-Cultural Competence as one of its seven core

graduate attributes, and is further embedding internationalisation in its

program content.

As an important aspect of internationalisation, students are being

encouraged, and are actively participating in short-term or full-semester

Outbound Mobility, and the International Directorate has made available

generous scholarships to support students.

Key considerations of the Outbound Program are:

• learning another culture.

• being aware of the needs of others, in developing a ‘giving’ culture.

Further to this, and in an example of linking learning and teaching to

community engagement, a group of Nursing and Midwifery students

has again in 2012 travelled to Nepal to learn about delivering their

professional services when not supported with the Australian access to

medicines and technology, and have been able to donate much needed

supplies to those centres within which they have worked.

Additionally:

• for the fi rst time in 2012, a group of Education students and staff

travelled to India to provide support to the Salaam Baalak Trust;

and

• our paramedic students were able to participate in a tour to New

York to learn about crisis response and disaster management,

thanks to the linkages developed by CQUniversity’s Professor Brian

Maguire.


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

27

FACILITIES AND INFRASTRUCTURE

During 2012, investment in services, infrastructure and facilities

has enabled the significant expansion of program offerings to the

University’s current and future student cohort, as well as step-change

improvements in the delivery of available services across the campus

portfolio. The University has continued its strategy of infrastructure

investment as part of the renewal program and Strong to Great initiative

in 2012, ensuring that there is a clear focus on multi-city development.

REVIEW OF OUR ACTIVITIES

TABLE 1: BUILDINGS INFRASTRUCTURE HIGHLIGHTS FOR

LEARNING AND TEACHING IN 2012

Campus Description Cost/Budget

Rockhampton Final completion of Engineering

$10.7m

refurbishment B28/29

Allied Health Clinic – Stage 1 construction $6.6m

Allied Health Laboratories B7/8/9

$1.3m

Campus realignment

$0.2m

Mackay Nursing Laboratory, teaching and staff $0.3m

spaces

Chiropractic Laboratory, teaching and staff $0.1m

spaces

Noosa Final completion of campus expansion (Inc. $2.7m

Nursing)

Cairns Distance education study centre $0.3m

Sydney Sonography Laboratory, teaching and staff $1.1m

spaces

Melbourne Campus upgrades and improvements $0.1m

Various Master planning activities – Rockhampton

and Melbourne

Upgrades to security systems including

surveillance

Music lecturers Peter McKenzie and Derrin Kerr prepare for class.

The strong connection between physical building infrastructure and

information technology and systems has created excellent learning and

teaching outcomes for the University during 2012 and beyond. Service

delivery areas are working together in more strategic ways to create

physical and online learning environments which exceed the needs of

the modern student, helping to create workplace-ready graduates.

Collaborative learning spaces have become feature facilities

at various campuses. These spaces use technology and fl exible

configuration to promote group work and remote collaboration across

the University’s campuses to improve learning outcomes through

facilitated peer-to-peer learning. Within Rockhampton and Noosa,

the collaborative spaces are either included within or are located

adjacent to the campus libraries - a symbiotic relationship which

works to further enhance student success. Once again during 2012, the

library has been showcased as a key learning and teaching partner for

students and staff alike, with the results of client satisfaction surveys

setting new Australasian benchmarks in fi ve best-practice categories.

Reliability and performance of online learning and teaching systems

has been significantly bolstered by the execution of major upgrades to

underlying infrastructure including enterprise storage, core network and

learning management system software (Moodle 2.2) and associated

Indigenous graduates are presented with special sashes before each

graduation ceremony.

tools. Additionally, new core video servers have been implemented to

support significant growth in online video learning and teaching across

the University’s 10 campuses during 2012.

These upgrades enable access to major new features including

collaboration between staff and students using high-quality video, new

mobility features for mobile devices, enhanced grade book, improved

online assessment functionality, and improved integration with

electronic portfolios, and coupled with a high level of scalability. These

exciting upgrades have, for example, been used to host the University’s

first Open Online Courses (OOCs), and will be used to provide

professional short course offerings. The University has launched its

Online Live Classroom capability to support its distance education

cohort of students using Blackboard Collaborate. This has improved

student engagement by enabling interaction with peers and lecturers,

leading to improved student satisfaction and retention.


28

REVIEW OF OUR ACTIVITIES

ENGAGED RESEARCH AND INNOVATION

OUR AIM: CQUniversity will conduct both fundamental and applied research in selected priority areas. We will aim to help improve the

economies of regions and nations by collaborating in research projects, developing knowledge, promoting innovation and being entrepreneurial.

ACHIEVING RESEARCH EXCELLENCE

CQUniversity will develop new knowledge and innovation through

fundamental and applied research in priority areas that contribute

to the resource industries, community health, social viability and

education, and meet the needs of the communities we serve.

Throughout 2012, CQUniversity implemented and expanded its

Engagement Strategy and long-term vision to become the most engaged

university in Australia in research and innovation. CQUniversity has

increased involvement with industry, funding agencies, government,

regional communities and other higher education institutions. With the

growing importance of the mining industry and associated export industries

in the region, CQUniversity has developed important strategic relationships

with coal seam gas (CSG), coal extraction and export companies that

are developing major export facilities. These relationships build upon

existing long-term collaborative engagement with other major industries

such as the aluminium industry, shale oil and power generation, and port

development. A number of projects in this area are evolving to include

interdisciplinary research in the areas of environmental management and

the effects associated with long-distance commuters sometimes defined as

‘fly in – fly out’ (FIFO) and ‘drive in – drive out’ (DIDO) workers.

Throughout 2012, the Engaged Research Chairs have continued to

demonstrate their strategic leadership roles to mentor and encourage

researchers and promote research activity aligned to the University’s

research priorities, while continuing high levels of research

performance. The success of the new focus on research is evident

through CQUniversity researchers attaining several distinguished

research grants.

In 2012, CQUniversity was successful in receiving several National

Competitive Grants (Category 1):

• A prestigious National Health and Medical Research Council

(NHMRC) Project Grant to the value of $697 086 over three years

was awarded to Dr Corneel Vandelanotte and Dr Mitch Duncan.

The project will investigate the effectiveness of tailored videos in

promoting physical activity via the internet to commence in 2013.

• An Australian Research Council (ARC) Discovery Early Career

Researcher Award (DECRA) to the value of $371 622 awarded to Dr

Kirrilly Thompson of the Appleton Institute for her work on natural

disaster preparedness and survival through animal attachment.

• An ARC Discovery Project Grant to Associate Professor Greg Roach,

Dr Xuan Zhou and Professor Drew Dawson of the Appleton Institute.

The three-year project valued at $302 000 will look at the impact of

split work–rest schedules on sleep and cognitive performance.

• Professor Bronwyn Fredericks is a co-investigator on another

prestigious grant from the ARC. The grant is a special research

initiative for an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Researchers’

Network which aims to establish a signifi cant cohort of skilled,

qualified Indigenous researchers. The project worth $3 198 392

will run over four years.

CQUniversity was also a partner investigator in a successful

ARC Linkage Infrastructure, Equipment and Facilities (LIEF) Grant

valued at $150 000. This project will develop an integrated facility

to support a collaborative research centre of government and

university partners for research to better address priority issues

in the fi elds of health, education, policing, and community services.

• Dr Claire Sellen of the Centre for Environmental Management

(CEM) received an Australian Coal Association Research Program

(ACARP) Grant of $325 945. The two and a half year project aims

to improve the management of the mine site environment by

developing a biological monitoring tool that can be used to detect

the effect of mining on aquatic ecosystems specific to Central

Queensland.

The Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) exercise conducted

across the Australian higher education sector by the ARC in 2012

collated data regarding the volume and academic quality of research

activity at all eligible higher education institutions. ERA assesses

research quality within Australia’s higher education institutions

using a combination of indicators and expert review by committees

comprising internationally recognised experts. In line with the

Vice-Chancellor and President’s strategy for research resurgence.

CQUniversity is now ranked in the highest tier ‘well above world

standard’ in Applied Mathematics; Agriculture, Land and Farm

Management and Other Medical and Health Sciences. CQUniversity

is also ranked ‘at world standard’ for Nursing and Medical and

Health Sciences. Other areas that improved in ranking from the 2010

evaluation were Environmental Science, Economics and Language

Communication and Culture. The ERA submission included information

on over 2400 research publications, 400 academic staff, external

research income (grants) and innovation (patent) information.

The strategic approach to building research capacity has resulted

in an outstanding outcome for CQUniversity. The results from the

ERA evaluation highlight the exceptional, world class research

undertaken by a regional university and will benefi t both the

University and the community.

CQUniversity has a commitment to increasing its research intensity

across the campuses through the development of programs to

encourage and support Early Career Researchers. An Early Career

Researcher Mentoring Program was established through the Offi ce

of Research in 2012. This program provided an intensive and

focused opportunity for researchers to hone their career planning

and writing, and provided a peer group for further collaboration.

In addition, the Higher Education Division established the new

Researcher Career Development Program designed to provide Early

Career Researchers with mentoring and support to develop their

skills in grant applications, writing publications and developing

collaboration opportunities.


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

The Industry, Vocational Training and Access Education Division has

actively promoted the University’s research agenda in 2012 and proudly

launched the Inaugural Dual Sector Research Symposium in November.

This two-day event was attended by over seventy delegates from

CQUniversity and CQ TAFE staff and external stakeholders from local

businesses and industry who engaged with and informed the development

of a Dual Sector Research Framework for the University.

In addition, the Academic Learning Services Unit (ALSU) has provided

15 places for their staff on a purpose-built research program – the

Scholarship of Teaching Research Program: Introduction to researching

your own teaching. The program aims to encourage and support the

research activity of the ALSU academic teaching staff. The scholarship

was launched in October and will support participants to develop their

research in 2013.

The Health Collaborative Research Network (CRN) was established

in 2011 with Commonwealth and University funding to develop

collaborative research partnerships between CQUniversity, the

University of Queensland, the Queensland University of Technology

and Curtin University. The Health CRN aims to develop synergistic

research relationships with larger metropolitan universities to provide

CQUniversity researchers access to larger facilities while providing

metropolitan researchers better access to health networks on the

ground in rural and regional communities. Under the auspices of the

Health CRN, CQUniversity has now hired four new Research Professors

in targeted areas of Health and increased the leadership development

capabilities across a range of disciplines. The Health CRN has also

established a CRN Mentor Program to support the Early Career

Researchers and provide professional development opportunities.

The Office of Indigenous Engagement has worked with the Health

CRN and other CQUniversity directorates to ensure that research

opportunities are inclusive of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

people. This has resulted in the Health CRN engaging an Early Career

Researcher who identifi es as Aboriginal, and collaborative work

being developed and implemented between the Offi ce of Indigenous

Engagement and the Allied Health Clinic.

Additionally, the Office of Indigenous Engagement has hosted a series

of research seminars in 2012 that showcase the work of researchers

who identify as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people. These are

open to the public and have been well attended by a broad cross section

of university staff, external stakeholders and members of the public.

RESEARCH INSTITUTES AND FLAGSHIPS

CQUniversity’s diverse research areas are embedded within a

framework of research institutes and centres.

The Appleton Institute is a multidisciplinary research hub based

in Adelaide, combining excellence in research, teaching and

community engagement across a range of scientifi c areas

including sleep and biological rhythms, applied psychology,

occupational health and safety, human factors, risk

management and cultural anthropology.

In 2012, the Education Flagship, encompassing both the IERC

and LTERC, was strategically positioned within the fi eld of

education research at CQUniversity. The Flagship provides

multidisciplinary research capabilities and expertise in ethically

responsible, socially and culturally inclusive investigations

into learning and teaching. LTERC is now at the cutting-edge

of innovation using state-of-the-art visual tracking systems to

undertake new research, leading to Australia’s initial eye tracking

research methodology conference Eye Track Australia 2012.

The Institute for Resource Industries and Sustainability (IRIS)

provides multidisciplinary capabilities and expertise specifi cally

structured to meet the needs of the Australian business sector.

Research undertaken within the IRIS group of centres is very

diverse: non-invasive assessment in agriculture, marine biosecurity,

precision livestock management, ecological security laboratory and

applied economics are some examples of the relevant and valuable

research currently underway.

The Institute for Health and Social Science Research provides a focus

for multidisciplinary research that addresses the real needs of the

communities in which it operates, and informs the undergraduate and

postgraduate curriculum of CQUniversity. The primary focus of this

research is on informing, monitoring and evaluating programs, and

interventions and behavioural changes that promote healthy, safe and

viable communities.

The Central Queensland Innovation and Research Precinct (CQIRP),

purchased in 2011, has continued to grow as researchers occupy

the laboratories and offi ce space. The research hub is expected to

become a major regional research facility for research innovation in

Central Queensland.

29

REVIEW OF OUR ACTIVITIES


30

REVIEW OF OUR ACTIVITIES

RESEARCH INCOME AND PERFORMANCE

TABLE 2: RESEARCH INCOME AGAINST BENCHMARK GROUP AND INSTITUTIONAL

SHARE FOR 2011

Category Research Grants

Reported

in 2012

Institutional

Benchmark

Share

Sector

1 Australian Competitive $1 324 925 9.87% 0.09% 34

2 Other Public Sector $2 843 555 18.36% 0.34% 31

3 Industry and Other $1 917 479 11.81% 0.23% 35

4 Cooperative Research Centre $1 003 517 12.08% 0.93% 24

Total Research Funding $7 089 476 34

National

Ranking

Source: Australian Government 2012 Institutional Performance Portfolio, CQUniversity

CQUniversity has continued on the journey to becoming a truly great university throughout

2012, following implementation of the ‘research resurgence’ strategy. The initiatives that had

commenced in previous years were continued and strengthened. These included a commitment

to performance-based management for research delivery, and a commitment to the continued

provision of a strong research training platform, the growth of research higher degree (RHD)

enrolments and continued on-time completions. The creation of a dedicated School of Graduate

Research for research higher degree administration and training at CQUniversity was coupled

with the appointment of a new Dean of the School of Graduate Research, Associate Professor

Owen Nevin, to provide academic leadership for RHD students and supervisors.

Our research revenue increased by 17% in total income reported in 2012. The University’s efforts

to improve its research standing include increasing success in securing nationally competitive

income as refl ected in an increased number of competitive grant applications submitted; a 37%

increase in Category 2 income; and a 58% increase in Category 4 income.

TABLE 3: RESEARCH PERFORMANCE AGAINST BENCHMARK GROUP AND

INSTITUTIONAL SHARE FOR 2011

Research Performance Indicators

Number Institutional

Benchmark

Share

Sector

Weighted Research Publications 316.9 15.67% 0.57% 33

Total HDR Student Load (EFTSL) 220.4 15.72% 0.54% 34

Total HDR Award Completions 45 16.25% 0.57% 31

Source: Australian Government 2012 Institutional Performance Portfolio, CQUniversity

National

Ranking

TABLE 4 COMMONWEALTH RESEARCH BLOCK GRANT FUNDING AGAINST

BENCHMARK GROUP AND INSTITUTIONAL SHARE FOR 2011

Research Block Grant Categories

Amount Institutional

Benchmark

Share

Sector

Research Training Scheme $2 239 885 12.62%A 0.36%

Research Infrastructure Block Grant $209 810 10.18% 0.10%

Australian Postgraduate Awards $682 548 11.17% 0.34%

International Postgraduate Research $61 633 10.00% 0.31%

Scholarship Scheme

Sustainable Research Excellence $237 071 11.66% 0.19%

Joint Research Engagement $1 291 254 15.23% 0.40%

Total $4 722 201 12.73% 0.31% 34

Source: Australian Government 2012 Institutional Performance Portfolio, CQUniversity

National

Ranking


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

31

FACILITIES AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Research at the University has gone from strength to strength in 2012,

particularly on the back of signifi cant investment in the purchase of

facilities, development of systems and implementation of infrastructure

across the campus portfolio. Besides the continued support for

research activities within existing operations, the University has

invested heavily in new, dedicated research facilities in support of the

excellent work undertaken by our world-class research teams.

ACCESS GRID

Our leading-edge video collaboration facilities (i.e. access grids)

at Rockhampton, Bundaberg and Mackay were upgraded during

2012 to provide high-defi nition video and audio capability.

Access grids provide visualisation of multiple data sets in real

time, enabling researchers to collaborate with researchers

around the world.

REVIEW OF OUR ACTIVITIES

TABLE 5: BUILDINGS INFRASTRUCTURE HIGHLIGHTS FOR

RESEARCH IN 2012 HAVE INCLUDED:

Campus Description Cost/

Budget

Rockhampton Central Queensland Innovation and

Research Precinct (Stage 1 – occupation

and fi tout post facility purchase)

$1.1m

Adelaide

Appleton Institute – Sleep Research

Centre fi tout

$2.0m

Biodiesel researchers Associate Professor Nanjappa Ashwath and

Subhash Hathurusingha inspect a beauty leaf tree as a likely new

fuel source.

During 2012, the University successfully submitted ERA and Higher

Education Research Data Collection (HERDC) reporting. Much of this

work was due to the consultation between Offi ce of Research, Library

Directorate and Information Technology Directorate. The ability to work

together to ensure the required information was provided in a timely

manner whilst giving the Offi ce of Research the opportunity to correct

and qualify data to guarantee reporting was correctly recorded and

giving positive outcomes in terms of research output for the University.

Key systems supporting the signifi cant research portfolio include:

eRESEARCH

eResearch support for existing and new researchers has been

bolstered through the University’s alliance with the Australian Access

Federation and Queensland Cyber Infrastructure Foundation (QCIF)

which has improved access for researchers to national facilities such

as QCloud research services including data storage, specialist webbased

video collaboration tools, and access grid visualisation services.

HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING (HPC)

In 2012, CQUniversity was successful in gaining funding from the

Queensland Cyber Infrastructure Foundation (QCIF) to upgrade the High

Performance Computing (HPC) facility. The new HPC facility which was

commissioned in November 2012 provides a signifi cant increase (14 x

previous capacity) to allow researchers to undertake more advanced

analysis and visualisation of data. The HPC facility has enabled

CQUniversity researchers to signifi cantly improve research results in

areas such as analysing genomic data, hydrological statistical analysis,

time delay control system problems, and medical image reconstruction.

Dr Vicky Vicente-Beckett displays the trophy

on offer for schools competing in the regional

titration competition.


32

REVIEW OF OUR ACTIVITIES

ENGAGEMENT

OUR AIM: We will engage in all areas of endeavour. Our interactions with our communities will drive our Learning and Teaching, Research

and Innovation, and Enterprise. Through these interactions, we will identify and address the needs of our communities, industry and the

University which deepens our students’ civic and academic learning, and enhances community wellbeing. We will also enrich our scholarship

and research in a way that benefi ts both the University and its stakeholders.

STRENGTHENING AND BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS

Throughout 2012, CQUniversity continued to embrace its ‘power of

place’ and enhance relationships with staff, students, organisations

and community members across its diverse multi-city campus footprint.

The University has a strong focus on empowering communities through

collaboration and supported this again in 2012 through Community

Connection Forums and interactive Regional Engagement Committees

(RECs). Facilitated across five regional centres, this ongoing stakeholder

engagement resulted in the review of regional priorities including research

needs, human services and Indigenous issues; student accommodation

options; and programs required by local industry and business.

CQUniversity aspires to be recognised as an inclusive university at the

forefront of providing access to higher education for all individuals.

The University has ongoing initiatives such as Engage Education,

Start Uni Now, and Tertiary Education Preparation, which target the

preparation of students, including those from low socio-economic

status (SES) backgrounds, for university life and beyond. Additional

widening participation activities, such as the Artists in Residence

program, and the launch of a Mobile Education Trailer (MET), focussed

on educational participation through engaged learning at more than

100 primary schools throughout Central Queensland.

Aspiring to be Australia’s most engaged university, CQUniversity places a

strong focus on enhancing relations and promoting engagement between

the University and a wide range of external partners at the local,

national and international level. During 2012, more than 20 Memoranda

of Understanding (MOUs) were implemented with organisations in

Australia, China, South Korea, Finland, Sweden and Kuwait, among

others, introducing a wide range of opportunities including pathway

articulations, staff and student exchanges and study tours. Also playing

a key role in facilitating industry engagement, the University’s QCPD

worked closely with industry and business to provide career services

and tailored professional development programs to meet the needs of

resources industries and other employers. Partnerships with businesses

such as Fitlink Australia, Joncris Sentinel Services and Group Engineering

created valuable opportunities for CQUniversity and its students.

With the establishment of the Offi ce of Indigenous Engagement

and the appointment of the Pro Vice-Chancellor and BMA Chair

(Indigenous Engagement) in 2012, CQUniversity has ensured that there

is renewed effort and increased focus on engaging with Aboriginal

and Torres Strait Islander students, service providers, business and

communities. The Pro Vice-Chancellor has been proactive in listening

to community members, developing partnerships and speaking at a

range of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community events. This

work has been vital in laying the foundations for the intensive work

that will be required to progress the fi nalisation of CQUniversity’s

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Strategy, the development of

CQUniversity’s Reconciliation Action Plan and the implementation of

associated activities.

The University’s engagement with its alumni grew steadily in 2012

building on a comprehensive communication program including regular

electronic and printed materials, nation-wide and international events

and a suite of benefits, the most popular being access to library

journals. The Distinguished Alumni program continued to identify

high achieving alumni and inspired the introduction of Alumni Awards

and the production of promotional material. Alumni were surveyed to

ascertain preferences for communication and engagement with the

University which provided credible data to inform future activity.

The Industry, Vocational Training and Access Education Division has

championed engagement through all its business activities in 2012.

Students have graduated this year through the Skills for Tertiary

Education Preparatory Studies (STEPS) program and can now continue

their journey onto higher education. The STEPS program has been

expanded to metropolitan campuses and will continue to grow in 2013.

The Academic Learning Centres have continued to engage with

undergraduate students of the University and have provided individual

learning support to students. The Academic Learning Services Unit

(ALSU) is establishing two new learning centres in Science and

Computing for 2013.

CONTRIBUTING TO GROWTH

With engagement fully entrenched in CQUniversity’s vision, mission,

values and strategy, the realisation of aspirations is largely impacted by

the provision of ongoing capacity-building in the practice of engagement.

In 2012, CQUniversity launched an online staff platform dedicated

to engagement news, professional development and rewards and

recognition, as well as access to internal and external engagement

resources. The Engagement Channel has assisted staff in making the

most of interactions with internal and external communities and provided

access to a database to record their contribution to the University’s

engagement journey. Development in specialised engagement strategy

components was also a key focus, with Service-Learning targeted in

2012. In March, CQUniversity hosted a visiting scholar from Texas State

University to share their Service-Learning expertise and knowledge with

all staff. The University later appointed two Adjunct Professors in Service-

Learning, one national and one international, to provide staff with ongoing

development in this emerging learning and teaching initiative.

For the third consecutive year, CQUniversity’s Opal Awards for Excellence

in Engagement recognised and rewarded staff for outstanding

engagement in collaboration with external communities. Award

categories, which focused on Learning and Teaching, Research and

Innovation, and Service, again encouraged quality engagement aligned to

the University’s strategic priorities and community needs. From 2012, the

Opal Awards feature a new category, Engaged Service-Learning, which

recognises CQUniversity students engaged with the community. Details

of all 2012 Award finalists are available later in this report.


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

A number of CQUniversity’s achievements in the engagement arena were

highlighted at the 2012 annual Engagement Australia Conference held in

Brisbane. Two Conservatorium of Music students were selected to attend

the conference to showcase the successful applied theatre program

‘Choices’. In addition, the Pro Vice-Chancellor (Community and Engagement)

presented a paper on ‘Engaging with communities: an empowerment

approach to university–community engagement’ and facilitated a workshop

on ‘Leading a University's Engagement Strategy’. The University’s

representation within this organisation will be strengthened following the

2012 appointment of the Pro Vice-Chancellor (Community and Engagement)

as Chair of the Engagement Australia Board. At the forefront of promoting

and facilitating discussion and development of university–community

engagement across Australia and Asia Pacific, strong representation on this

Board will enhance CQUniversity’s ability to interact with other engagementminded

universities, organisations and individuals worldwide.

Fundraising activity at the University entered a new phase in 2012 with BHP

Billiton Mitsubishi Alliance (BMA) establishing a significant partnership

with the University to name the BMA Chair in Indigenous Engagement and

a suite of scholarships in support of Central Queensland students wishing

to pursue non-mining related careers. The B. Macfie Family Foundation

renewed its significant support for research into environment related issues

and the John Villiers Trust ambulance was purchased as a teaching and

learning resource primarily aimed at Paramedic Science students. The

University continued to receive support for undergraduate scholarships

and academic prizes from a range of continuing and new industry partners

and generous individuals. The funding support of corporations, trusts and

individuals is deeply appreciated by the University and is a very significant

source of encouragement and practical support for students.

Throughout 2012, the Industry, Vocational Training and Access Education

Division has also been working with the University’s Deans, vocational

education providers and industry partners to develop new pathways

between vocational and academic learning. We have established 871

articulations and 23 dual offers with over 80 Australian and international

organisations. Twenty-five additional dual offers have been submitted to

QTAC and are currently being progressed.

In response to a need in Central Queensland’s resources industry,

QCPD initiated the launch of a postgraduate qualifi cation in Project

Management. QCPD is proud to report that 27 industry employees from

the inaugural cohort will graduate from the program in 2012. QCPD’s

newly established tendering service in collaboration with IRIS won

business with Horticulture Australia Ltd for the delivery of training to

horticulture retailers.

QCPD is currently working with CQUniversity’s own registered training

organisation (RTO) Health Train to facilitate an articulated pathway into

the CQUniversity graduate programs via the Certifi cate IV and Diploma

in Project Management. Throughout 2012, QCPD has been working

with industry and across the University to develop commercial online

short courses for professional development, which will be available

from 2013.

CULTURAL LINKAGES

With engagement as a core premise of the University, cultural

linkages are a key attribute of its operations. This is displayed in

learning and teaching activities, as earlier described, but also in

sporting and community events. CQUniversity hosts a range of

such activities each year, some of the more ‘renowned’ being

the Mini Olympics and Chancellor’s Cup, as well as regular

formal and informal on-campus activities, which are favourites

with international students and provide opportunities for

linkages to occur.

Within the community, a great example of cross-cultural

engagement is the work undertaken by CQUniversity’s Sydney

campus students and staff with The Exodus Foundation, a

charitable organisation that assists homeless and abandoned

youth, and other people in need. This is part of an ongoing

commitment, whereby the campus sends a team of volunteers

once a month to the ‘Loaves and Fishes Free Restaurant’ in

Ashfi eld, which serves food to the homeless. This also has the

benefi t of allowing international students to experience a way of

life they have not been exposed to while in Australia.

Within Central Queensland, the English Language Centre (based on

the CQUniversity Rockhampton campus) provides a great vehicle for

connections to partner institutions in other countries. It provides a

strong platform for CQUniversity to link various communities within

the local region, through a common desire to improve their English

skills and play a greater role in our wonderfully diverse community.

During 2012, around 170 students and about 20 accompanying staff have

visited Rockhampton to participate in tailored English Language Centre

study tours, from institutions in Korea, China, Japan and Thailand. In

addition, the Rockhampton, Yeppoon and Gladstone schools who teach

Japanese and Korean welcome these students into their classrooms to

enrich the learning experiences of the Australian students.

The engagement goes to the heart of our Central Queensland

community, with all the students being accommodated in Homestay,

with families who have committed to this service for many years. The

students undertake English language classes, but also participate

in a range of cultural and tourist activities such as visits to islands,

farms, cultural centres and wildlife parks. Many lasting friendships are

developed, and many students return to Rockhampton for further study,

or as tourists.

33

REVIEW OF OUR ACTIVITIES


34

REVIEW OF OUR ACTIVITIES

OPEN CAMPUSES

CQUniversity hosted on-campus open days and career information

events throughout 2012 in conjunction with various community

partners. These events introduced prospective students and the

broader community to the University’s program offerings, facilities,

staff and student support services, as well as partnerships with local

business and industry.

The University prides itself on its open campus philosophy, and

continued to encourage business, industry, community and sporting

groups to use campus facilities for various activities throughout the

year. During 2012, CQUniversity was privileged to support many

external organisations, groups and individuals in hosting events such

as the Northern Queensland Engineering Conference 2012, CQ Fair

Day, and 2012 Cultural Diversity Forum.

FACILITIES AND

INFRASTRUCTURE

Various community activities continue to be held across the

campus portfolio, and land and/or buildings have been provided for

community facilities. These have included a multi-faith centre and

links with Queensland Health (as part of the Allied Health Clinic)

in Rockhampton, as well as an autism research centre operated

by the AEIOU Foundation on the Bundaberg campus. Community

engagement has strong links to the Engaged Learning and Teaching

and Engaged Research strategies of the University, with synergies

across these areas leading to improved outcomes for students, staff

and communities.

ENGAGED SERVICE

With a focus on giving back to the community, CQUniversity staff

partnered with individuals, industry and business on a daily basis

to create and exchange knowledge and deliver services. E-DNA, the

University’s engagement database launched late 2011, recorded

in excess of 600 engagement-related activities as entered by staff

to the end of 2012. The ability to track engagement data in this

manner has resulted in benefi ts to individual staff from a career and

professional development perspective, and the University through

the mapping of relationships, identifi cation of opportunities, and

measurement of performance. The data collected within E-DNA

refl ects a trend towards higher staff participation in service-related

engagement activity (particularly external) compared with the

other engagement categories captured. To assist staff in further

enhancing community service activity, the provision of Engaged

Service Leave was negotiated, granting staff members up to

7.25 hours per year (non-cumulative) to volunteer their time to a

registered charity.

A member of the Regional Universities Network (RUN), CQUniversity

contributed to the development of a proposal entitled ‘Regional

Universities Network contribution to regions and the nation – A

report on the social, cultural and environmental impact of the

Universities’. Subsequently sanctioned by Vice-Chancellors of the

RUN group, anticipated outcomes of the enacted proposal include a

robust framework for classifying and measuring the social, cultural

and environmental impact of regional universities in the Australian

context; detailed case studies that describe the nature and extent

of contribution across the range of university activities and outcome

areas; and a report of RUN’s performance against the framework. It is

envisaged that the outcomes of this investigation would also provide a

basis for further associated research into the future.

CQUniversity is supporting organisations like the Salaam Baalak Trust, which

is dedicated to the care and protection of street children in India.


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

ENGAGED ENTERPRISE

OUR AIM: CQUniversity will have a positive culture which supports people and capability, manages performance, and values the University’s s

staff, students, communities and industry partners. We are committed to high standards of governance and a continuing quest for quality. Our

financial, physical, management and information technology systems and infrastructure supports the University’s core business.

STUDENT OUTCOMES

ACCESS AND INCLUSION

COUNSELLING AND DISABILITY SERVICE

In 2012, the Disability Service received 192 registrations from

students who accessed the service 544 times for consultation.

Assistive services were provided to 128 students in examination

conditions and a further 18 students required participation assistance.

The Counselling Service provided support and assistance to

885 students. In addition to one-on-one support to students, the

Counselling team also provided a number of psycho-educational

programs to a total of 1011 students and 57 CQUniversity staff

members in 2012.

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

There were 61 student loans provided in 2012 totalling

$36 399.

35

REVIEW OF OUR ACTIVITIES

TABLE 6: SCHOLARSHIPS, FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND GRANTS

Scholarships, Awards

and Grants

Equity Technology Award (ETA)

Laptops

Brief Description

Number awarded

in 2012

Expenditure

$1250 per unit 50 $50 000

Equity Merit Scholarship (EMS) $2000 max per calendar year 362 $724 000

Indigenous Commonwealth Scholarship payments from $2377 (ICECS) and $2754 (ICAS) 49 $106 965

Scholarship

Indigenous Access Scholarship $4485 one-off payments 20 $89 700

(IAS)

Commonwealth Scholarships for Scholarship payments from $2377 (CECS) and $2754 (CAS) 226 $218 684

Continuing Recipients

Equity Compulsory Placement $100–$1500 170 $67 666

Initiative

CQUniversity Accommodation

Scholarship

Approx $9700 full board at CQUniversity student residences 32 new

19 continuing

$417 969

CQUni Cares Grants $500 towards compulsory residential school costs 9 $4430

CQUni Connect $250 CQUniversity bookshop vouchers 142 $35 500

START UNI NOW (SUN) PROGRAM

In 2012, 36 schools participated in the SUN program with 94 student

enrolments for the year. There are currently 120 SUN courses

available to students, including those from new programs added this

year: Law, Allied Health, Paramedic Science, Chiropractic Science and

Tourism.

WIDENING PARTICIPATION – PARTNERSHIPS

In 2012, Higher Education Participation and Partnerships Program

(HEPPP) funding enabled the widening participation initiative to

increase from eight programs in 2011 to 10 programs in 2012. A

majority of the programs were delivered through 54 sessions located

at school sites and across CQUniversity campuses.

The introduction of the Mobile Education Trailer in 2012 saw

the program reach 112 primary schools as far west as Birdsville,

Queensland. Overall, 6260 school students with low socio-economic

status across Central Queensland participated in widening

participation programs in 2012, compared to 1206 students in 2011.

MONITORING ACADEMIC PROGRESS (MAP)

In 2012, 709 MAP 1 interviews were conducted with students who

were making unsatisfactory academic progress and 166 action plans

and learning agreements were put in place.


36

REVIEW OF OUR ACTIVITIES

ALLY PROGRAM

In 2012, the student-led Ally Program was rolled out to CQUniversity

Bundaberg, Mackay, Noosa and Rockhampton. The program aimed to

create a supportive University culture for LGBTI students by raising

awareness and countering discriminatory attitudes and behaviours. A

total of 36 students attended a one-day training program.

EQUITY PROJECTS

In 2012, HEPPP funding was directed towards essential services and

projects to support low socio-economic status (LSES) students. HEPPP

funding also supported the implementation of learning and teaching

projects which aimed to embed inclusive practices and/or modify

teaching delivery and learning methods to better meet the needs of

students from LSES backgrounds. In 2012, a number of projects were

facilitated by HEPPP funding:

• The provision of Careers and Program Advisors on regional

campuses.

• The establishment of First-Year Experience Offi cers to enhance

orientation and transition practices at CQUniversity.

• A First-Year Distance Learning Facilitator was placed in the School

of Education with the dual role of supporting both students and

academic staff in the design and delivery of fi rst-year distance

education courses.

• The development and implementation of a multimedia engineering

resource in the School of Engineering and Built Environment to

support non-traditional learners who enter University with variable

skills and knowledge levels.

• The creation of Coordinator positions on regional campuses to

support and/or transition new students in the Bachelor of Nursing.

• The implementation of a computing assistance service (including

resources, workshops and individual assistance) to assist targeted

students who experience diffi culties with computing related

coursework and general computer skills.

• Improved integration of library and research skills support for

distance education students, with a focus on LSES, mature-aged

students based in the south-east corner of Queensland.

FIRST-YEAR EXPERIENCE

In 2012, there were 194 active student mentors across CQUniversity

campuses and distance education. For on-campus orientation sessions

in Term 1 and Term 2 there were 1336 and 183 students in attendance

respectively. In Term 2 2012, 215 students completed the core

materials in Orientation Online.

CAREERS

The 2012 Careers Fair hosted 43 local, national and international

employers who targeted students across a diverse range of disciplines.

Approximately 550 students attended the fair. Work-integrated

learning (WIL) placements were organised for nine students throughout

2012 and 782 students from 19 schools participated in the Career

Match Program.

STUDENT CENTRES INITIATIVES

CONVERSION PROJECT

During 2012, the Student Centres continued the conversion project.

Conversion occurs at different touch points from the point of contact

with a potential student through until completion of the academic Term.

The conversion approach is based on the principles of relationship

management coordinated through a customer relationship management

(CRM) system. The conversion project is supported by a Communications

Plan which involves targeted communications for students from the time

of offer through to enrolment (and beyond) for the Term. All commencing

undergraduate and postgraduate students were issued with a USB stick

that contained helpful information for commencement.

TERTIARY ADMISSION CENTRES

In 2012, CQUniversity Australia commenced working with the Victorian

Tertiary Admissions Centre (VTAC). The fi rst cohort of domestic

students will be admitted to CQUniversity Melbourne or via distance

education. CQUniversity Australia now admits domestic students

via three Tertiary Admission Centres: QTAC, the New South Wales

University Admission Centre (UAC) and VTAC.

STUDENT COMMUNICATION

Student Communications co-ordinated with other CQUniversity

departments over the course of 2012 to develop and implement

such initiatives as the commencing student welcome emails, fi rstyear

student communication, Student Services and Amenities Fee

feedback, and the Rockhampton campus reception drop-in sessions.

The CQUniversity website upgrade was a signifi cant project for 2012

and further development will continue over 2013. The functionality

of the Student Portal was utilised throughout 2012 with signifi cant

improvements made to document accessibility and version control.

During 2012, students continued to receive the Student Broadcast

email fortnightly as well as regular communication via the Student

Portal and student email accounts.

CQUNIVERSITY STUDENT RESIDENCES

In 2012, the Student Residences hosted the Fifth Annual Chancellor’s

Cup Sports Tournament. The success of this tournament in recent years

will see the event expand to include the regional campuses in 2013.

A strategic ‘Academic Excellence’ focus was established at the

Student Residences in 2012. The Join-In program, a major element of

this focus, is a new and innovative peer-led academic tutorial program

which had over 60 regular participants throughout the year.

The success of the 2011 Professorial Lecture in Rockhampton resulted

in both the Mackay and Rockhampton Student Residences hosting their

own Professorial Lecture in 2012. ‘What are the odds? Dealing with

uncertainty and risk,’ presented by Professor Kevin Tickle in Rockhampton;

and ‘Why my child cannot hear the dragonfly,’ presented by Professor

Jennelle Kyd in Mackay, were extremely well received by students, staff

and the community. During Term 2, the Mackay and Rockhampton Student

Residences celebrated the academic achievements of their students with

an Academic Awards presentation at each campus.

Overall student numbers increased in 2012 compared with 2011. Group

and individual guest accommodation slightly increased compared with

2011 fi gures.


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

STUDENT BUSINESS CENTRE

In 2012, the Examinations and Timetabling section of the Student

Business Centre (SBC) administered over 50 000 offi cial end-of-term

examinations across more than 190 exam centres worldwide. Some

of the exams administered in 2012 include those held for Australian

troops in Afghanistan and East Timor, and students in places from

Mongolia to Papua New Guinea to Niue.

The Student Fees and Records section of the SBC produced 4350

official transcripts and 2140 Australian Higher Education Graduation

Statements (AHEGS) on paper-stock bearing some new in-built security

controls. The team has also assessed and processed 550 requests for

removal of financial liability and withdrawal without academic penalty,

and followed up on a large number of outstanding Commonwealth

Assistance Forms (CAFs), thereby enabling the retention of students

who would otherwise need to have enrolments cancelled under the

terms of the Higher Education Support Act (2003).

COURSE INFORMATION CENTRE

Staff in the Course Information Centre dealt with over 15 000 requests

for assistance from enrolled students. Each request generated an

email conversation that was recorded and tracked for future reference,

building a picture of each student’s interaction with Program Advisors.

A total of 8675 credit transfers were processed, and over 4200

students were assessed as eligible to graduate.

CAMPUS RECEPTION

Campus Reception was opened in February 2012 and is now the point

of contact for all students on Rockhampton campus. Campus Reception

operates as a central point for visitors and enables both current and

prospective students to seek directions, guidance and advice from

friendly staff members.

CQUNIVERSITY ACCESS SCHEMES

In 2012, CQUniversity Access Schemes were implemented across

various Tertiary Admissions Centres. Receiving additional OP points or

tertiary selection ranks assists access and participation in higher

education from eligible applicants, especially those from underrepresented

backgrounds. The Regional Bonus Scheme, the

Educational Access Scheme and the School Bonus Scheme were

made available to domestic students applying for undergraduate

admission through QTAC, UAC and VTAC.

COMPLAINTS MANAGEMENT

In 2012, CQUniversity revised its Student Complaints Policy

and Procedures as a result of the Queensland Ombudsman

Review. CQUniversity is committed to a complaint-handling

process based on the principles of good decision-making,

visibility and access, responsiveness, assessment and action,

feedback and monitoring effectiveness.

Complaints are managed impartially, effectively, fairly and

economically. The Academic Registrar ensures that staff are

trained and informed of the complaint handling process and

that senior University offi cers are clearly directed to investigate,

resolve and record complaints in their Divisions and Directorates.

The Academic Registrar’s offi ce fi nalised 172 complaints

throughout 2012. These complaints were submitted through the

CRM system. Turnaround times are monitored and reported to the

Vice-Chancellor’s Advisory Committee (VCAC).

GRADUATION

The University conducted 16 graduation ceremonies throughout the year

at Brisbane, Bundaberg, Gladstone, Gold Coast, Mackay, Melbourne,

Noosa, Rockhampton, Singapore and Sydney. A total of 4830 graduates

were conferred with awards, including 11 Doctoral awards.

Thirteen graduates from the University’s wholly-owned registered

training organisation, HealthTrain, attended the 13 December 2012

Melbourne Graduation Ceremony. This was the University’s first

ceremony to include HealthTrain graduates.

37

REVIEW OF OUR ACTIVITIES

TABLE 7: HONORARY AWARDS CONFERRED IN 2012

Companion of the University

Honorary Doctor of the University

Honorary Master of Engineering

Honorary Doctor of Social Work

Honorary Doctor of Engineering

Emeritus Professor of the

University

Dr Denise Powell MBBS(Hons) Qld, GradCertHlthProfEd Monash, GradCertAppSc(BrstUltrasound) QUT,

GradDipHumNutr Deakin, GradDipFamMed Monash, FRACGP, FASBP

Ms Julie Boyd RN, GAICD, FAIM

Ms Judith Tatow BArts CQU

Mr Allan Ruming MAICD

Reverend Bill Crews AM, BElectEng UNSW

Mr Maxwell Davis PSM BEng(Mech) CIAE, MEng(Mech) VIC, RPEQ

Mr Glen Schumacher BEng(Mech) UTS, GradCertHRMgt USQ, MEng(PowerGen) Qld, MBusAdmin Deakin

Professor Mark Burton BSc(Hons), PhD UNE

Professor Ken Hawkins DipPE Melbourne, BArts Monash, MEd Minnesota, PhD Deakin, FAIM, FAICD

Professor Kevin Tickle CertEngGroundHydro UNSW, BSc, MScSt Qld, PhD Griffi th


38

REVIEW OF OUR ACTIVITIES

TABLE 8: GRADUATION CEREMONY GUEST SPEAKERS

Location

Guest Speaker

Rockhampton, 23 February Mr Graham Carpenter, GDM CIAE, MBA CQU, FCA, FAICD

Board Chairman, Stanwell Corporation Limited

Singapore, 10 March Professor Graham Pegg, BSc(Hons), PhD JCU

Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Higher Education Division, CQUniversity Australia

Bundaberg, 19 April Dr Denise Powell, MBBSHons Qld, GradCertAppSc QUT, GradCertHlthProfEd, GradDipFM, MFM Monash,

GradDipHumNutrition Deakin, CFP, FASBP, FRACGP

Principal, Millbank Medical Practice

Mackay, 27 April

Superintendent Graham Coleman, GradCertMgt, GradDipMgt CQU, APM

District Offi cer and Disaster District Coordinator, Mackay Police District

Brisbane, 8 May

Ms Jessica van Vonderen, BArts(Jour) USQ

Host of 7.30 Qld and State political reporter, ABC TV Queensland

Sydney, 9 May

Reverend Bill Crews, AM BElecEng UNSW, BTh UCUTC, JP

Minister, Exodus Foundation

Melbourne, 11 May Emeritus Professor Kwong Lee Dow AO, BEd, BSc(Hons), HonLLD Melbourne, HonDUniv Ballarat, HonDEd HKIEd

Emeritus Professor, University of Melbourne

Gladstone, 30 May Mr Paul Walmsley, AssDipStk&MeatInspect, CertAnimalHusb,GradCertRuralSysMgt Qld

Executive Regional Director, Gladstone with the Queensland Government

Noosa, 26 June

Mr David Turner, DipT JCU, BEd QUT, MBA SCU, MLMEd Newcastle, EdD CQU, FACLM

Principal, Bald Hills State School

Brisbane, 11 September Mr Max Davis, PSM BEng(Mech) CIAE, MEng(Mech) VIC, RPEQ

Director, Adhesion Associates

Sydney, 12 September Mr Phill Nosworthy

Head, Partnerships and Business Development, ChangeLabs

Melbourne, 14 September Associate Professor Jane Munro AM, BA(Hons) Sydney, MA, PhD Harvard

Head of College – International House, University of Melbourne

Rockhampton, 20 September Ms Patrice Brown, CertSugarChem Mackay TAFE, BApSc(Chem) UCQ, MEng(Civil) UNSW, GradDipBus,

CertEnvMaritimeMgt Lloyds, CEnvP, MAICD, MEIANZ

Director, CQG Consulting

Gold Coast, 10 December Ms Laura Daniels, BICT JCU/SCU

Manager Industry Engagement, Business Strategy and Engagement, CITEC

Sydney, 12 December Mr Alex Malley, DipEd Sydney, BCom, MCom NSW, FCPA

Chief Executive Offi cer, CPA Australia

Melbourne, 13 December Dr Noel Edge, BCom, MIS Qld, PhD Bond, FACS, MAICD, AIMM, FINSIA

Executive Director and Chief Executive Offi cer, Graduate Careers Australia


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

39

CQUNIVERSITY MEDALS

The University may award CQUniversity medals to students who have

achieved an exceptionally high level of performance in their studies in

certain programs. The recipient for 2012 was:

Mr Mitchell Lees

Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) (Coop) First Class

GPA of 6.971

FACULTY OF SCIENCES, ENGINEERING AND HEALTH

Ms Tanya Elstob

Bachelor of Biomedical Science

GPA 6.87

Mr Mitchell Lees

Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) (Coop) First Class

GPA 6.971

REVIEW OF OUR ACTIVITIES

FACULTY MEDALS

Faculty medals are awarded to the graduating students with the

highest academic achievement in a bachelor degree program in each

faculty. The recipients for 2012 were:

FACULTY OF ARTS, BUSINESS, INFORMATICS AND

EDUCATION

Mr Ross Crear

Bachelor of Music

GPA 6.875

Ms Samantha Fox

Bachelor of Accounting

GPA 6.916

Mr Paul Moore

Bachelor of Aviation Technology

GPA 6.958

Mr Peter Pledger

Bachelor of Engineering

GPA 6.846

STATISTICS

GROWTH INDICATION

CQUniversity has moved toward achieving the goal of greatness

by attracting new students to a broad selection of new and

previously available programs in 2012. The following charts

demonstrate some of the high growth areas within CQUniversity

and show the necessity for the decision to introduce programs in

the fi eld of Allied Health.

TABLE 9: NEW

PROGRAMS

OFFERED IN

2012

CB96 GD Rail Safety Management

CB95 M Rail Safety Management

CB87 B Speech Pathology (Hons)

CB86 B Podiatry (Hons)

CB81 B Public Health (Hons)

CB79 M Health Professional Education

CB77 B Science (Chiropractic)

CB71 M Accident Investigation

CB67 B Accident Forensics

CB66 B Health Science (Allied Health)

CB29 B Oral Health

0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80

Number of students

TABLE 10:

TOP 5

EXISTING

PROGRAMS –

INCREASE IN

STUDENTS

IN 2012

CQ23 B Nursing

CG98 B Laws

CG95 B Paramedic Science

CG91 B Medical Sonography and

GD Medical Sonography

CA01 B Business

0 50 100 150 200 250 300

Number of additional students in 2012


40

REVIEW OF OUR ACTIVITIES

TABLE 11: 2012 FULL-YEAR PRELIMINARY DATA

TOTAL STUDENT LOAD (EFTSL) BY FUNDING TYPE

Funding Type 2010 2011 2012

DEEWR Funded 5926.23 6291.90 6882.23

Australian Fee Paying 479.49 435.96 474.38

Overseas Fee Paying 6214.06 5348.17 4199.66

RTS 148.17 160.25 170.25

Grand Total 12 767.95 12 236.28 11 726.52

Note: Totals do not always match precisely the sum of values in the rows and

columns due to rounding.

(Source: Data is extracted from official files submitted to DEEWR, with the exception of

Term 3 2012 data, which was taken from the CQUniversity Data Warehouse after Census

date: 31 December 2012.)

TABLE 12: 2012 FULL-YEAR PRELIMINARY DATA

TOTAL STUDENT NUMBERS BY LEVEL OF PROGRAM

Level of Program 2010 2011 2012

Research

Doctorate by Research 263 282 311

Masters by Research 60 69 86

Total 323 351 397

Postgraduate

Doctorate by Coursework 3 1 1

Masters by Coursework 3708 2815 2391

Graduate Diploma/Postgraduate Diploma 1648 1462 1387

(pass or honours) – New

Graduate Diploma/Postgraduate Diploma 206 145 94

(pass or honours) – Extended

Graduate Certifi cate 422 464 537

Other Postgraduate 0 0 0

Total 5987 4887 4410

Undergraduate

Bachelors Honours 266 247 326

Bachelors Graduate Entry 0 0 0

Bachelors Pass 10 097 10 929 11 323

Advanced Diploma (AQF)/Diploma (pre AQF) 794 787 655

Associate Degree 71 76 111

Other Award Course 0 0 0

Total 11 228 12 039 12 415

Non-award

Cross Institutional – Postgraduate 131 135 89

Cross Institutional – Undergraduate 157 156 158

Enabling 1693 1697 1565

Non Award 284 168 216

Total 2265 2156 2028

Grand Total 19 803 19 433 19 250

(Source: Data is extracted from official fi les submitted to DEEWR, with the exception of

Term 3 2012 data, which was taken from the CQUniversity Data Warehouse after Census

date: 31 December 2012.)

Guests attending the annual CQUniversity

2012 Christmas Ball (L-R) Rebecca Cross (staff

member), Annie Gowdy (community guest) and

Samantha Fox (CQUniversity graduate).


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

41

TABLE 13: 2012 FULL-YEAR PRELIMINARY DATA

TOTAL DOMESTIC STUDENT LOAD (EFTSL) BY GENDER BY

LEVEL OF PROGRAM

Level of Program Female Male Total

Research

Doctorate by Research 88.00 107.08 195.08

Masters by Research 19.00 22.25 44.25

Total 107.00 129.33 239.33

Postgraduate

Doctorate by Coursework 0.00 0.50 0.50

Masters by Coursework 761.51 833.39 1594.91

Graduate Diploma/Postgraduate 351.15 344.51 695.66

Diploma (pass or honours) – New

Graduate Diploma/Postgraduate

Diploma (pass or honours) –

Extended

17.83 25.29 43.13

Graduate Certifi cate 48.25 117.17 165.42

Other Postgraduate 0.00 0.00 0.00

Total 1178.74 1320.86 2499.62

Undergraduate

Bachelors Honours 165.00 16.67 181.67

Bachelors Graduate Entry 0.00 0.00 0.00

Bachelors Pass 4727.25 2910.50 7637.75

Advanced Diploma (AQF)/Diploma 99.00 204.00 303.00

(pre-AQF)

Associate Degree 15.13 24.25 39.38

Other Award Course 0.00 0.00 0.00

Total 5006.38 3155.42 8161.80

Non Award

Cross Institutional: Postgraduate 5.79 8.63 14.42

Cross Institutional: Undergraduate 13.00 11.50 24.50

Non Award 21.21 22.67 43.88

Enabling 460.12 282.87 742.99

Total 500.12 293.33 825.80

Grand Total 6792.24 4898.94 11 726.25

Note: Totals do not always match precisely the sum of values in the rows and

columns due to rounding.

(Source: Data is extracted from official files submitted to DEEWR, with the exception of

Term 3 2012 data, which was taken from the CQUniversity Data Warehouse after Census

date: 31 December 2012.)

TABLE 14: 2012 FULL-YEAR PRELIMINARY DATA

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT NUMBERS BY CAMPUS

Campus 2010 2011 2012

Bundaberg 1 3 8

Emerald 0 0 0

Gladstone 0 1 3

Mackay 6 4 7

Rockhampton 178 192 174

Noosa Hub Delivery Site 0 0 0

Distance Education 195 164 302

Brisbane 1294 1165 987

Gold Coast 566 473 352

Melbourne 2341 1917 1424

Sydney 3405 3149 2431

Melior Education Group 68 126 91

Grand Total 8054 7194 5779

(Source: Program Campus Data is extracted from CQUniversity Data Warehouse as

this data is not available in DIISRTE files).

REVIEW OF OUR ACTIVITIES

Ancient sea creature

English PhD student Rachel Williams has travelled all the way to CQUniversity

Rockhampton to research one of the most ancient and iconic sea creatures,

the Pearly Nautilus. Rachel wants to help produce data to inform decisions on

whether the nautilus needs formal protection against harvesting.


42

REVIEW OF OUR ACTIVITIES

TABLE 15: 2012 FULL-YEAR PRELIMINARY DATA

TOTAL STUDENT LOAD (EFTSL) BY MODE AND TYPE OF ATTENDANCE

Domestic International Total Student Load (EFTSL)

2010 2011 2012 2010 2011 2012 2010 2011 2012

Internal

Full-time 1093.04 1094.17 1057.63 5614.01 4707.71 3626.99 6707.05 5801.87 4684.61

Part-time 142.46 135.71 141.50 398.55 467.76 283.13 541.01 603.46 424.63

Total 1235.50 1229.88 1199.13 6012.56 5175.47 3910.12 7248.06 6405.33 5109.25

External

Full-time 1731.48 1858.71 2249.77 18.33 13.63 9.88 1749.81 1872.34 2259.65

Part-time 1996.23 2093.36 2181.01 41.25 26.71 29.67 2037.48 2120.07 2210.67

Total 3727.71 3952.07 4430.78 59.58 40.34 39.54 3787.29 3992.41 4470.32

Multi Modal

Full-time 1425.46 1556.75 1773.29 131.46 117.63 238.63 1556.92 1674.38 2011.92

Part-time 165.21 149.42 123.67 10.46 14.75 11.38 175.67 164.17 135.04

Total 1590.67 1706.17 1896.96 141.92 132.38 250.00 1732.59 1838.55 2146.96

Grand Total 6553.88 6888.11 7526.86 6214.06 5348.17 4199.66 12 767.94 12 236.28 11 726.52

(Source: Data is extracted from official files submitted to DEEWR, with the exception of Term 3 2012 data, which was taken from the CQUniversity Data Warehouse after Census date: 31 December 2012.)

PEOPLE AND CULTURE

CQUniversity must attract, develop, reward and retain staff of the highest

quality and provide a working environment that enables them to maximise

their capacity to contribute to the achievement of the University’s mission.

The People and Culture Directorate has implemented actions and plans

to move the University forward in the areas of workplace health and

safety, employee and industrial relations, Indigenous employment,

equity, environmental sustainability, salaries, superannuation and

systems and professional development.

Increasing the capacity and ability of the Directorate to meet the

current and future needs of the organisation is the primary focus.

STAFF SATISFACTION SURVEY (VOICE)

In February 2010, the University conducted a staff satisfaction survey

called VOICE. This survey enabled CQUniversity to benchmark its

results across other participating universities in Australia. In 2011,

CQUniversity continued to improve by implementing actions resulting

from the original survey recommendations. A temperature check of

key areas of the survey during 2011 indicated that the University was

continuing to improve in the areas of leadership, organisational direction,

communication, engagement and processes. A further VOICE Survey was

conducted during 2012. The results showed improvements in the areas

of organisational commitment, job satisfaction, mission and values, and

role clarity. Focus groups were arranged for the areas in the survey which

were identified as critical to the success of the University. Changes to

processes and delivery of services resulted from these sessions and the

University continues to expend efforts on improvements in these areas.

STAFF DEVELOPMENT

CQUniversity continues its emphasis on the professional development

of staff with a large number of conferences and development activities

conducted during 2012. Leading on from the success of 2011, the

University held its second annual Professional Staff Conference. This

year’s conference was expanded to staff from Levels 2–9 from all

areas of the University to discuss their experiences and learn from

others. The Senior Leadership Conference brought together more than

80 senior managers to discuss leadership development, strategic

initiatives and the future direction of CQUniversity with the theme

‘From Strong to Great’. Additionally, the Research and Learning and

Teaching Showcases provided insight and inspiration to academic and

professional staff alike.

The Leading to Greatness Program was carried on from 2012, providing

further leadership development opportunities for all levels of the

organisation. Focusing on fi ve elements – Core, Emerging, Success,

Performance and Executive Leadership – the program saw more than

186 staff participate in specifi c development activities. All sessions

were well attended.

The Professional Development Calendar provided many opportunities

for staff to continue to develop their expertise in all manner of areas

and will continue to do so in 2013.


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

INDIGENOUS EMPLOYMENT

CQUniversity continues to highlight the importance of Indigenous

employment issues both within and external to the University.

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Employment and Career

Development Strategy continues to be a high priority. The Offi ce of

Indigenous Engagement provided valuable mentoring to the People and

Culture Directorate in its efforts to increase the number of Aboriginal

and Torres Strait Islander employees at CQUniversity and both areas

are working towards the future.

WORKFORCE PLANNING, ATTRACTION AND

RETENTION

The Workforce Planning Framework was incorporated into the

operational planning cycle during 2012 to ensure the capability and

capacity of CQUniversity’s workforce continued to be enhanced

and available to meet the upcoming needs of the organisation. The

Workforce Planning Strategy was reviewed and updated including

action items to ensure the right people, in the right place, with the

right skills at the right time. More action items were commenced with

a focus on improving retention and career progression opportunities,

enhancing development activities to strengthen management and

leadership capability, and to increase the capacity of the organisation

through an appropriately engaged workforce.

Emphasis on the Performance Management Framework – Performance

Review and Professional Development (PRPD) – continued in 2012 with

the introduction of a 360 degree feedback process for senior managers.

The University has a very effective staff consultation mechanism

through the Joint Consultative Committee which has membership from

management, unions and staff. It meets bi-monthly and discusses all

areas of industrial and employee relations matters.

SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENT

Following on from the implementation of the Safety Health Environment

Workcover Sustainability (SHEWS) system in 2011, the Safety and

Environment team implemented a number of improved processes to

reduce high risk operations. Improvements implemented included

upgrades to contractor management, asbestos management, driver

safety, hazardous substance management, dive and boating safety,

working from home and event management procedures and processes.

Over 200 staff attended awareness sessions regarding the new

harmonised Work Health and Safety Act.

The Engineering/Safety and Environment Collaborative Project

involving a revamp of safety operations in the laboratories continues.

This work includes a new Safety Management System and over 80

new risk assessments completed on lab operations bringing them into

line with the new legislation.

Earth Hour was a success in March with all campuses participating in

this great initiative to raise awareness for environmental sustainability.

ENTERPRISE AGREEMENT NEGOTIATIONS

Enterprise Bargaining commenced in June 2012, with all parties

working together to ensure working conditions and staff benefi ts

were both attractive and met the needs of the University. It is

expected that the agreement will be approved by Fair Work

Australia in early 2013.

OTHER MAJOR ACHIEVEMENTS FOR 2012

The University Rehabilitation Program continues to be

proactive in managing both work and non-work-related injuries

and illness. The fi nancial year ending 2012 resulted in a further

reduction in our WorkCover Premium against the previous year.

INITIATIVES FOR WOMEN

Provisions in the Enterprise Agreement provide fl exibility to

ensure opportunities for women at CQUniversity including 26

weeks’ paid maternity leave, the option of an additional 5.4

weeks annual leave per year (fl exible work year scheme 48/52),

annualised hours, fl exi-time, job share, and part-time work.

Professional development opportunities are open to all employees

and women are encouraged to participate.

The Senior Women’s Breakfast continued this year with a group

of senior female staff meeting on a monthly basis to listen to

prominent female guest speakers and network over breakfast. All

proceeds from each breakfast are donated to a local charity.

OUTSIDE STUDIES PROGRAM (OSPRO)

There were six applications for OSPRO in 2012 for the 2013 university

year. Five applications were supported and approved and one

application is pending a decision.

VOLUNTARY EARLY RETIREMENT,

REDUNDANCY AND SEPARATION

No offers for voluntary early retirement were made in 2012.

In 2012, four occupied positions were made redundant and 28

employees accepted voluntary separations, with the total money

value of severance benefi ts available within the University’s Financial

Statements (2012 Annual Report Volume 2).

CARER’S RECOGNITION STATEMENT

CQUniversity supports the Queensland Carers Charter as detailed in

the Carers (Recognition) Act 2008, through the fl exible work practices

and remote access facilities available to our staff. The University

ensures staff are provided with relevant information and support

as required. Our policies are regularly reviewed and if changes are

initiated they are disseminated to all staff for their information.

CQUniversity also provides access to an Employee Assistance Program

for all staff and their immediate families. This service includes access

to free counselling sessions via face-to-face meetings, or by email

and telephone. All staff with both work and non-work-related injuries

or conditions are provided with support and assistance via the People

and Culture Directorate.

43

REVIEW OF OUR ACTIVITIES


44

REVIEW OF OUR ACTIVITIES

TABLE 16: STAFF PROFILE SHOWING EMPLOYMENT

CLASSIFICATION AND STATUS FEMALE MALE TOTAL FTE

FTE Percentage FTE Percentage

ACADEMIC Contract Academic Level A 3.65 78.49% 1 21.51% 4.65

Academic Level B 9.78 66.17% 5 33.83% 14.78

Academic Level C 2 28.17% 5.1 71.83% 7.1

Academic Level D 2 40.00% 3 60.00% 5

Academic Level E 3 31.09% 6.65 68.91% 9.65

Academic Salary Package 4 27.59% 10.5 72.41% 14.5

Classification Total 24.43 31.25 55.68

Continuing Academic Level A 16.8 75.68% 5.4 24.32% 22.2

Academic Level B 69.29 61.16% 44 38.84% 113.29

Academic Level C 41.9 42.11% 57.6 57.89% 99.5

Academic Level D 16 42.11% 22 57.89% 38

Academic Level E 4 22.47% 13.8 77.53% 17.8

Academic Salary Package 1 0.00% 0.5 0.00% 1.5

Classification Total 148.99 143.30 292.29

Contract Status Total 173.42 174.55 347.97

PROFESSIONAL Contract HEW Level 2 2 83.33% 0.4 16.67% 2.4

HEW Level 3 4 100.00% 0 0.00% 4

HEW Level 4 18.1 73.28% 6.6 26.72% 24.7

HEW Level 5 12.09 87.04% 1.8 12.96% 13.89

HEW Level 6 13.41 74.46% 4.6 25.54% 18.01

HEW Level 7 11.52 76.70% 3.5 23.30% 15.02

HEW Level 8 4.2 41.18% 6 58.82% 10.2

HEW Level 9 3.1 43.66% 4 56.34% 7.1

Classification Total 68.42 26.90 95.32

Continuing HEW Level 2 3.83 74.22% 1.33 25.78% 5.16

HEW Level 3 8.31 29.42% 19.94 70.58% 28.25

HEW Level 4 75.57 88.31% 10 11.69% 85.57

HEW Level 5 93.69 83.14% 19 16.86% 112.69

HEW Level 6 61.12 63.72% 34.8 36.28% 95.92

HEW Level 7 56.9 71.13% 23.1 28.88% 80

HEW Level 8 33.35 55.33% 26.92 44.67% 60.27

HEW Level 9 13.98 54.87% 11.5 45.13% 25.48

Classification Total 346.75 146.59 493.34

Contract Status Total 415.17 173.49 588.66

OTHER Contract Management 25.86 49.22% 26.68 50.78% 52.54

Classification Total 25.86 26.68 52.54

Continuing Management 2 66.67% 1 33.33% 3

Classification Total 2 1 3

Contract Status Total 27.86 27.68 55.54

RESEARCH Contract Principal Research Fellow 0.6 18.75% 2.6 81.25% 3.2

Research Fellow 2.9 34.52% 5.5 65.48% 8.4

Research Officer 8.1 47.93% 8.8 52.07% 16.9

Research Worker Level 4 0.69 100.00% 0 0.00% 0.69

Research Worker Level 5 2.16 35.06% 4 64.94% 6.16

Research Worker Level 6 2 100.00% 0 0.00% 2

Research Worker Level 7 1 50.00% 1 50.00% 2

Senior Research Fellow 4 44.44% 5 55.56% 9

Senior Research Officer Grade 1 4 40.82% 5.8 59.18% 9.8

Classification Total 25.45 32.70 58.15

Continuing Research Officer 0.8 44.44% 1 55.56% 1.8

Research Worker Level 5 0.6 100.00% 0 0.00% 0.6

Research Worker Level 6 1 100.00% 0 0.00% 1

Senior Research Fellow 0 0.00% 2 100.00% 2

Senior Research Officer Grade 1 1 33.33% 2 66.67% 3

Classification Total 3.40 5.00 8.40

Contract Status Total 28.85 37.7 66.55

REPORT TOTAL 645.30 413.42 1 058.72

Date provided represents the CQUniversity staff profile as at 31 December 2012.

It does not reflect staff of any joint ventures or controlled entities.


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

45

STAFF AWARDS

VICE-CHANCELLOR’S AWARD FOR GOOD

PRACTICE IN LEARNING AND TEACHING

Recognise staff who have demonstrated a positive impact on student

outcomes within their School, as a result of their learning and

teaching practice.

VICE-CHANCELLOR’S STUDENT VOICE AWARD

FOR ON-CAMPUS EDUCATOR OF THE YEAR 2012

Mr Darrin Cournoyea, School of Medical and Applied

Sciences representing the team delivering MEDS12004

Sonographic Skills Development 1. OSS = 4.8.

REVIEW OF OUR ACTIVITIES

$1000 per winner along with a certifi cate.

Professor Kerry Reid-Searl, School of Nursing and Midwifery.

Kerry received this award for her commitment to good learning and

teaching practice.

Dr William Guo, School of Engineering and Technology.

William received this award for his commitment to the student

learning journey.

VICE-CHANCELLOR’S AWARD FOR

EXCELLENCE IN LEARNING AND TEACHING

Recognise staff who demonstrate that they have made an excellent

contribution to student learning outcomes through their learning and

teaching practice across the University.

$2500 per winner, certifi cate and memento.

Dr Santoso Wibowo, CQUniversity Melbourne.

Santoso received this award in the category ‘Approaches to the

support of learning and teaching that infl uence, motivate and inspire

students to learn’ for developing effective and innovative approaches

to cater to students’ needs in achieving a successful learning outcome.

Dr Leo Duivenvoorden, School of Medical and Applied Sciences.

Leo received this award in the category ‘Approaches to the support

of learning and teaching that infl uence, motivate and inspire students

to learn’ for the development of an engaging and supportive learning

environment that facilitates and inspires student learning in the

science and nursing areas.

VICE-CHANCELLOR’S STUDENT VOICE

AWARDS (ON-CAMPUS/DISTANCE

EDUCATOR OF THE YEAR)

Recognise the course coordinator whose course meets the following

eligibility criteria along with achieving the highest Overall Satisfaction

Score (OSS) within the course evaluation data for the relevant

timeframe (courses delivered over Term 3 of the previous year or

Term 1 or Term 2 of the current year):

• 10+ responses from the relevant student cohort (on-campus or

distance)

• 50%+ response rate

• 4.5+ OSS in the course evaluation data.

$2500 per winner, along with a certificate and memento which are

presented to the course coordinator as representative of the teaching team.

VICE-CHANCELLOR’S STUDENT VOICE AWARD

FOR DISTANCE EDUCATOR OF THE YEAR 2012

Dr Kumari Fernando, School of Human, Health and

Social Sciences representing the team delivering course

PSYC20034 Professional Practice of Cognitive Therapies. OSS

= 4.8.

AWARDS FOR EXCELLENCE IN

ENGAGEMENT (OPAL) AWARDS

These awards recognise and encourage outstanding engagement

by CQUniversity staff, students and communities. The specifi c

categories for these awards are Engaged Service, Engaged

Learning and Teaching, and Engaged Research and Innovation.

$2500 per winner/team, certifi cate, an opal pin and citation on the

CQUniversity UniNews website.

ENGAGED RESEARCH AND INNOVATION

‘10,000’ Steps – Dr Mitch Duncan, Dr Corneel Vandelotte,

Ms Anetta Van Itallie, Mrs Kelly Corry, Ms Cindy Hooker,

Ms Stephanie Hall and Mr Luke Fallon.

The 10,000 Steps project is a freely accessible physical activity

promotion project that aims to increase the physical activity levels

of Australians. The program, now in its 11th year, has reached over

200 000 members and has recorded more than 100 billion steps.

Continued engagement with the community is achieved by conducting

research to inform project practice, as well as being involved with

many community groups. The project receives ongoing funding from

Queensland Health to expand its reach at a state and national level.

ENGAGED SERVICE

‘Earth Day’ – Cr Gai Sypher and Miss Jessie Phelan.

Earth Day was celebrated in Emerald between 17–19 May. The purpose

of the event was to raise environmental awareness and educate

the community about ways it can contribute to a more sustainable

environment. Special guests included ABC Radio’s Gardening Talkback

host Tom Wyatt and gardener/environmentalist Don Burke from Burke’s

Backyard. The success of Earth Day has also been recognised by the

Central Highlands Development Corporation where CQUniversity

Emerald was announced as Business of the Month.


46

REVIEW OF OUR ACTIVITIES

ENGAGED SERVICE-LEARNING (STUDENT)

‘Clinical Handover at the Bedside – Rehab Unit’ – Ms Patricia Callow.

This project identifi ed gaps in the current clinical handover process

and carried out a quality activity to improve processes. The intent of

this program was to minimise preventable harm to patients that can be

caused by communication breakdown between health care providers

throughout the health care setting.

CQUniversity’s Nepal Nursing and Midwifery Experience 2011’ –

Ms Sherrie Lee and 17 Nursing/Midwifery students.

In November 2011, second- and third-year Nursing and Midwifery

students and lecturers travelled to Nepal, fundraising to provide its

communities with money, health/nursing equipment, clothing and toys.

The aim of the overseas project was to enhance cultural competence,

communication skills and make a difference to the lives of the less

fortunate. Students also had the opportunity to work with Nepali doctors

and nurses, assessing and helping to treat diseases and infections.

VICE-CHANCELLOR’S AWARD FOR

OUTSTANDING RESEARCHERS

These awards recognise outstanding researchers who have made a

significant contribution to enhancing and supporting research activities

at CQUniversity, and is intended to reward the achievement of research

outcomes by researchers and to recognise the important role research

leadership plays in the research culture at CQUniversity.

EXCELLENCE IN RESEARCH

$5000 per winner, certifi cate and trophy.

Professor Brenda Happell – Institute for Health and Social

Science Research.

Brenda has a strong record of accomplishment in research in the

area of mental health nursing and is recognised nationally and

internationally for her contribution to the fi eld. Her areas of specifi c

interest include the physical health of people experiencing mental

illness; consumer participation in mental health services; and mental

health nursing education.

MID-CAREER RESEARCH

$5000 per winner, certifi cate and trophy.

Dr Surya Bhattarai – Institute for Resource Industries and

Sustainability/Centre for Plant and Water Science.

Research and development of irrigated agriculture is becoming more

relevant under the scenario of global climate change in Australia and

overseas. Surya, with his multidisciplinary team, is working actively

in this highly challenging and rewarding research field, which is

extremely relevant to Australian agriculture in general and Central

Queensland agriculture in particular, as this region plays a significant

role in agriculture production, marketing and generation of employment

opportunities.

EARLY-CAREER RESEARCH

$5000 per winner, certifi cate and trophy.

Dr Alison Jones – Institute for Resource Industries and

Sustainability/Centre for Environmental Management.

Alison’s research contributes to assisting reef management including

predictions of reef resilience, identifying the conservation value of

reefs and predicting the adaptive capacity of reef-building corals.

Her research is focused on the southern Great Barrier Reef. Alison’s

mission is to grow marine research capacity in the Central Queensland

region and to have CQUniversity recognised as a leading research

institution in reef regeneration by strengthening links with national

and international research partners and industry to provide real-life

solutions to the threats facing the reef.

VICE-CHANCELLOR’S AWARDS FOR

EXCELLENCE TO PROFESSIONAL STAFF

(EXCEL) AWARDS

The following professional staff received the Vice-Chancellor’s Excel

Award in recognition of outstanding contributions to the University.

$2500 development grant, citation and certifi cate.

Mr Reg Budarick, Groundsperson, Facilities Management

Directorate.

Reg is a professional staff member who embodies the values of

CQUniversity. As a groundsman responsible for the buildings and

gardens surrounding Building 65 at the Rockhampton campus, Reg

maintains a professional attitude and continually strives to deliver to

the best of his abilities. He is friendly, works well either on his own or

within the team and is well known and liked by all who work with him.

Reg takes great pride in maintaining this area to a very high standard.

Mr Ray Kearney, Technical Services Manager, School of

Engineering and Technology.

For 18 months, Ray put his heart and soul into the engineering

refurbishment project for Buildings 28 and 29 at CQUniversity’s

Rockhampton campus to ensure that the best outcomes would be

achieved for the University, its students and staff.

Ray was integral to the success of the refurbishing project and was

involved in almost every facet of the project, giving his attention to

even the minutest detail. The project required an awareness of the

needs of students, academic staff, technical staff and the professional

community. Ray’s exceptional ability to work co-operatively with all

of these groups made him essential to the success of the project.

Ray consistently demonstrates excellence both at the strategic and

operational level through hard work and dedication, coupled with a

depth of knowledge and initiative to take the School of Engineering

and Technology forward.


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

EXCEL COMMENDATION AWARDS

Certificate and memento.

Ms Robyn Bailey, Coordinator International Student Support,

Academic Registrar Directorate

Mr Graeme Boyle, Manager Projects, Infrastructure and

Logistics, Higher Education Division

Miss Christine Hanley, Manager Population Research Lab,

Research Office/Institute for Health and Social Science

Research

Ms Yvonne Holbeck, Research/Administration Officer, Institute

for Health and Social Science Research

Miss Keri Wilson, Facilities Support Supervisor, Facilities

Management Directorate

Ms Therese O’Donnell, Executive Assistant, Academic Learning

Services Unit

Ms Michele Palu, Student Counsellor and Disability Officer

(Bundaberg), Academic Registrar Directorate

Ms Mary McLeod, Academic Registrar Directorate

THE NOOSA ADMINISTRATION TEAM:

Mrs Denise Beckinsale, Administration Officer, School of

Education and the Arts

Mrs Tanya Burgess, Administration Officer, School of Nursing

and Midwifery

Ms Jacqui Duggan, Administration Officer (Placements and

School Support), School of Education and the Arts

Mrs Jan Tarling, Administration Officer (Placements and School

Support), School of Education and the Arts

Ms Robyn Tobin, School of Human, Health and Social Sciences

STAFF SERVICE AWARDS

The Vice-Chancellor and President presented service certifi cates

and badges to the following staff who completed 35, 25, 15 and

10 years of service:

35 YEARS SERVICE

Ms Kathy Ramm

Mr Ron Wallis

25 YEARS SERVICE

Mr Peter Cherry

Ms Jane Cleal

Mr Raymond Kearney

Dr Jo-Anne Luck

Ms Leslie Molloy

Mr David Murray

15 YEARS SERVICE

Dr William John Aspden

Mrs Jennifer Barnes

Ms Reegan Bickey

Ms Libbie Blanchard

Mr James Callan

Ms Jillianne Campbell

Mr Stephen Chadwick

Mr Ian Crane

Associate Professor Yehoah

Gyasi-Agyei

Ms Maureen Hill

Mrs Faith Jones

Ms Tracey Kennedy

Ms Dianne Lancaster

Mrs Dalyce McKay

Dr Teresa Moore

Ms Lois Pinkney

Associate Professor Peter

Reaburn

Mrs Bridgette Saplos

Mr Dennis Simon

Ms Leesa Tarlington

Dr Judith Wake

Dr Monir Zaman

10 YEARS SERVICE

Mrs Nadine Adams

Dr Angelina Ambrosetti

Ms Jennifer Banks

Mr Geoff Black

Mrs Tracy Buchanan

Ms Karen Chapman

Ms Kelly Corry

Mrs Priscilla Crighton

Mrs Denise Davidson

Miss Kendell Davies

Miss Melissa Dobbs

Dr Mitch Duncan

Mrs Louise Edwards

Ms Lyn Ellerton

Mrs Susan Ferguson

Ms Lynette Forbes-Smith

Ms Deanna Gardner

Mr Nathan Green

Dr Ashley Holmes

Mr Kenneth Howah

Mrs Carol Keong

Mr Mark Kerley

Mr Pete Lawrence

Ms Jan lewis

Dr Dujuan Li

Dr Michael Minmei Li

Mrs Leesa Lynch

Ms Jo Miller

Ms Bridgette Muller

Mr Viv Murphy

Ms Heather Nancarrow

Mrs Sam Paterson

Mr Steve Price

Associate Professor

Mohammad Rasul

Mrs Jennifer Sharp

Mr Aaron Slater

Mr Jay Somasundaram

Ms Jennifer Taylor

Mr Daniel Teghe

Ms Julianne Weekers

Ms Jenny Weise

Dr Kevin Wormington

47

REVIEW OF OUR ACTIVITIES


48

Our Corporate

Governance

‘CQUNIVERSITY

COUNCIL

MEMBERS HAVE

A DUTY TO

ACT HONESTLY

AND WITH

INTEGRITY’.


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

CENTRAL QUEENSLAND UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

PROFILE

The Council is the governing body of the University, as set out in the

Central Queensland University Act 1998. The University Council is

responsible for managing and controlling the University’s affairs, property

and finances. The Council must act in the manner that is most likely to

promote the University’s interests and has the full power and authority

to appoint and dismiss officers and employees of the University. It acts

in all matters to advance the interests and aspirations of the University.

Membership of the Council is set out in ss.12–16 of the Act. The current

Council was constituted on 27 May 2010.

ELECTED MEMBERS

Dr John Fitzsimmons, BArts(Hons), GradCertOnlineLearning ECU,

PhD Adel

Ms Jan Davis, BBus(Acct) CQU, CIA, CCSA, MIIA (Aust)

Ms Caryl Turpin, BLearnMgt(EC) CQU

SECRETARY TO COUNCIL

University Secretary

49

OUR CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

Council members have a duty to act honestly and with integrity;

to exercise due care, skill and diligence in their duties; to make

appropriately informed decisions; and to act at all times in the interests

of the University.

COUNCIL MEMBERS

CHANCELLOR (CHAIR)

Mr Rennie Fritschy, BEng(Chem) Sydney, BEc WAust, FIEAust, FAICD

VICE-CHANCELLOR AND PRESIDENT

Professor Scott Bowman, TDCR, DCR, HDCR CollRadiog, FAETC

City&Guilds, MArts GuildHall, MBusAdmin USC, PhD OpenUK, FAIM

PRESIDENT OF ACADEMIC BOARD

Professor Bronwyn Fredericks, DipTeach(Sec) BCAE, BEd, MEd QUT,

MEdStudies UTas, PhD CQU

MEMBERS APPOINTED BY THE

GOVERNOR-IN-COUNCIL

Mr John Anderson, AssocDipCivEng DDIAE, BArts USQ, GradCertSocSc

Qld, MAICD

Ms Sandra Collins, BEng(Mining) Qld, MBusAdmin Pennsylvania

Dr Robyn Minchinton, BAppSc(MLS) RMIT, GradDipScComm CQU, PhD

London

Mr Charles Ware, BA, LLB(Hons) Qld, MBus(PubMgt), LLM, QUT, FAICD

Vacant

Ms Jenny Roberts, BBusAdmin CQU, GAICD

MINUTES SECRETARY

Ms Chris Galinovic

TABLE 17: COUNCIL MEETING ATTENDANCE

Member

Number of

meetings

attended

Total possible

meetings

Mr John Anderson 5 7

Professor Scott Bowman 7 7

Mr Graham Carpenter 5 5

Ms Sandra Collins 7 7

Mr Peter Corones AM 6 7

Ms Jan Davis 7 7

Dr John Fitzsimmons 7 7

Mr Rennie Fritschy 7 7

Professor Bronwyn Fredericks 3 4

Mr Tim Griffi n OAM 7 7

Dr Robyn Minchinton 7 7

Ms Narelle Pearse 5 7

Ms Caryl Turpin 6 7

Mr Charles Ware 7 7

Professor Jennelle Kyd 2 3

Ms Marni McGrath 1 2

Council meetings in 2012 were held on 5 March, 1 May, 25 June, 20

August, 15 October, 19 November and 3 December.

ADDITIONAL MEMBERS APPOINTED BY COUNCIL

Ms Narelle Pearse, BComm JCU, GradDipPsych CQU, MBusAdmin,

MComm QUT, CA, ICAA

Mr Peter Corones AM

Mr Tim Griffi n OAM, BEng(Civil), MBusAdmin CQU, FAICD, FCILT (UK)

Mr Graham Carpenter, GradDipMgt CIAE, MBusAdmin CQU, FICAA, FAICD


50

OUR CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

COUNCIL MEMBERS’ PROFESSIONAL

DEVELOPMENT

Professional development for Council members is a key strategy

of Council’s continuous improvement processes. Professional

development is provided to Council members in the form of regular ‘in

house’ briefings on key issues prior to each Council meeting and focus

item discussions during Council meetings, as well as the opportunity to

attend sector-wide conferences and other events.

At its meeting on 28 November 2011, Council endorsed a proposal

to increase the budget allocation to $2000 per year for each Council

member to expend on professional development activities (as approved

by the Chancellor) and for the development of an annual Professional

Development Plan.

During 2012, Council members received briefi ngs on faculty plans,

strategic directions and key activities; Tertiary Education Quality

Standards Agency (TEQSA) requirements and the new higher

education regulatory environment; alumni relations developments,

including fundraising activities and donor sponsorships; the

University’s fi nancial performance; the future direction for

CQUniversity Noosa, Rockhampton and Melbourne, and a tour of

the facilities of the Noosa and Melbourne campuses; the Distance

Education Enhancement Project; the University’s Indigenous

Engagement Strategy; our student profi le, enrolment trends, and

attrition and retention issues; key issues regarding IT provision, future

plans and IT governance processes; a tailored governance update

by the Australian Institute of Company Directors on the latest key

governance issues; and an overview of the corporate and operational

plans for the University’s key activities in 2013.

In addition a Planning and Strategy session was held mid-year which

sought Council members’ input on the key issues for the University

for 2012 and beyond. The outcomes of this session were fed into

the development of the University’s 2013 Strategic Plan. Four

Council members attended the University’s annual Senior Leadership

Conference to gain a broader understanding of the key issues

facing University management. Six Council members attended the

National Conference on University Governance, a biennial conference

organised by the University Chancellors’ Council which focuses on the

characteristics of high performing Councils, best practice, strategy and

Council functions. One member of Council attended the National Higher

Education Summit, with topics relevant to the University’s aspirations,

renewal program and strategic objectives.

COUNCIL MEMBERS’ REMUNERATION

CQUniversity committee members, including CQUniversity Council

members, are not remunerated; however the University pays for all

costs relating to member attendance at Council meetings. The total

sum expended on travel, accommodation and meals for Council

members in 2012 was $77 369.

Thirteen graduates from HealthTrain's Diploma of Enrolled Nursing program were among the first cohort of students to be presented with their graduation

certificates since the registered training organisation became part of CQUniversity.


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

51

CENTRAL QUEENSLAND UNIVERSITY COUNCIL MEMBERS’ DETAILS

AS AT 31 DECEMBER 2012

MR RENNIE FRITSCHY

Rennie’s background is in mineral processing, petrochemicals and textiles. He has been a member of Council since 1996 and

Chancellor since 2004. During this time he has used his expertise in strategy development and implementation; accounting

and financial matters, risk management stratagems, and high-level governance expertise to ensure the Council performs in

accordance with its responsibilities.

OUR CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

PROFESSOR SCOTT BOWMAN

In his role as Vice-Chancellor and President Scott drives the strategic planning, fi nancial and external affairs of the

University across its network of campus and teaching locations in Australia. He is the force behind CQUniversity’s

Renewal Plan and is committed to building a strong regional university. Scott’s background is in the fi elds of radiography

and imaging.

PROFESSOR BRONWYN FREDERICKS

Bronwyn is the President of Academic Board, and leads the work undertaken by the University’s Office of Indigenous

Engagement through her roles as Pro Vice-Chancellor (Indigenous Engagement) and BMA Chair in Indigenous Engagement. She

holds numerous qualifications in education and health and is a recipient of several highly competitive awards. She has worked

at universities in Australia and New Zealand, and in the health care and human service sector for State and Commonwealth

governments, non-government organisations and community-based health and human service organisations.

MR JOHN ANDERSON

John’s broad experience in developing innovative and creative partnerships across the corporate, small business and community

sectors, as well as with all levels of government enables him to provide high-level strategic policy and operational advice over a

range of issues. He has a special interest in issues around native title, land interests, cultural heritage and natural resource policy

and programs.

MS SANDRA COLLINS

Sandra is a qualified mining engineer and the recipient of a Harkness Fellowship (USA). In 2009 Sandra was recognised as ‘Mine

Manager of the Year’ and also received an award for the ‘Most Outstanding Contribution to Mining’. She has experience in corporate

finance and as an organisational development consultant.

DR ROBYN MINCHINTON

Robyn is a medical scientist specialising in haematology; her career has spanned 40 years in the public health sector in diagnostics

and research in hospitals, the Red Cross Blood Service and higher education. She is experienced in executive and laboratory

management and accreditation. Robyn is passionate about lifelong learning, innovation and science communication.

MR CHARLES WARE

With 30 years of experience as a lawyer in private practice, Charles brings a broad range of directorship experience to the Council in

his role as Deputy Chancellor. He has extensive experience in the leadership, oversight and operation of large, complex public sector

agencies and government-owned corporations.


52

OUR CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

MS NARELLE PEARSE

Narelle is the Chief Executive Offi cer of the Mackay Whitsunday Regional Economic Development Corporation. She is a wellcredentialed

negotiator with a commitment to working collaboratively to manage the impact of economic development on key

industries in the region. In 2008 she participated in Australia’s 2020 summit as part of the Future Direction of the Australian

Economy stream.

MR PETER CORONES AM

Peter is an experienced businessman who has spent many years in local government roles, including serving as Mayor of

Gladstone City for 14 years. He has a wealth of experience and knowledge in industrial development, tourism, education and

training and environmental responsibility. Peter was the Director of the Committee that formed Gladstone Area Promotion and

Development Limited.

MR TIM GRIFFIN OAM

Tim is a qualifi ed engineer with a background that includes utility infrastructure management, performance

assessment and capital sustainability. In 2007 Tim was awarded the Order of Australia (OAM) for his services to

engineering and to the Association that represents the interests of over 42 000 professional engineers, scientists and

managers in Australia (APESMA).

MR GRAHAM CARPENTER

Graham is a chartered accountant and former partner of BDO, a firm for which he continues to provide consulting services. He is

a board member and also chairs a number of audit / compliance / risk committees within Queensland government departments

and for local government entities. Graham’s other past experience includes senior positions with Queensland and Victorian

Treasuries and as Northern Territory Auditor-General. He brings financial management, audit and risk expertise as well as

experience with corporate governance.

DR JOHN FITZSIMMONS

John is the elected Academic Staff representative on Council. He is a senior lecturer at CQUniversity and teaches in literary

and cultural studies in the School of Education and the Arts. John’s academic expertise is in online learning, postmodern fiction

and narrative theory. He is the CQUniversity Branch President of the National Tertiary Education Union.

MS JAN DAVIS

Jan is the elected Professional Staff representative on Council. She is a senior internal auditor and holds a Bachelor of

Business (Accounting) from CQUniversity. Jan’s position requires her to review the fi nancial controls of the University. Jan

also is a certifi ed internal auditor with the Institute of Internal Auditors (Australia).

MS CARYL TURPIN

Caryl is the Student Representative on Council. She completed her Bachelor of Learning Management (Early Childhood)

with Distinction with CQUniversity in 2005. Caryl is currently completing the third year of a Bachelor of Nursing degree.

She will continue to work in both fi elds when she graduates.


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

53

VOLUNTARY CODE OF

BEST PRACTICE FOR THE

GOVERNANCE OF AUSTRALIAN

UNIVERSITIES

The University Council adopted the Voluntary Code of Best Practice

for the Governance of Australian Universities at its September 2011

meeting. The purpose of the Code, and its 14 principles, is to ensure

members of the Council have a good understanding of their roles and

duties, and to foster transparency and accountability in the governance

arrangements of the University by strengthening performance

evaluation practices. The University undertakes an annual review

of its compliance with the Code to ensure ongoing compliance and

further strengthening of governance practices. At 31 December 2012,

the University continued to be compliant with the requirements of the

Code, and had identifi ed two areas where further improvements could

be made to enact the full spirit of the Code.

FUNCTIONS AND

CONSTITUTIONS

The University is established and derives its functions and powers by

virtue of the Central Queensland University Act 1998 (the Act). The Act

establishes the University as a body corporate, with a seal. It may sue

and be sued in its corporate name.

FUNCTIONS OF THE UNIVERSITY

Section 5 of the Central Queensland University Act 1998 outlines the

University’s functions, which are:

a. to provide education at university standard

b. to provide facilities for, and encourage, study and research

c. to encourage the advancement and development of knowledge,

and its application to government, industry, commerce and the

community

d. to provide courses of study or instruction (at the levels of

achievement the council considers appropriate) to meet the needs

of the community

e. to confer higher education awards

f. to disseminate knowledge and promote scholarship

g. to provide facilities and resources for the wellbeing of the

university’s staff, students and other persons undertaking courses

at the university

h. to exploit commercially, for the university’s benefi t, a facility or

resource of the university, including, for example, study, research

or knowledge, or the practical application of study, research or

knowledge, belonging to the university, whether alone or with

someone else, and

i. to perform other functions given to the university under this or

another Act.

CENTRAL QUEENSLAND UNIVERSITY ACT

1998

No changes were made to the Central Queensland University

Act 1998 in 2012.

STATUTORY OBLIGATIONS

The higher education sector is a dynamic environment, and

continues to undergo significant legislative change that impacts

on the University. The University, through the University Secretary,

continues to progress its compliance accountability framework to

ensure it meets its key obligations under those laws, regulations,

codes and organisational standards that are applicable to

CQUniversity. Reporting of compliance practices and the key

risks associated with non-compliance are presented to the Audit,

Compliance and Risk Committee. The key statutory obligations are

shown below.

COMMISSION FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG

PEOPLE AND CHILD GUARDIAN ACT 2000

The Commission for Children and Young People and Child

Guardian Act 2000 establishes a regime requiring all employees

and volunteers working with children and young people to obtain

a Positive Suitability Notice (known as a Blue Card). CQUniversity

requires all staff in certain categories (such as Student Counseling)

to hold Blue Cards as a condition of their employment.

EDUCATION SERVICES FOR OVERSEAS STUDENTS

(ESOS) ACT 2000 (CWLTH)

Under the authority of the Commonwealth’s ESOS Act 2000, the

reviewed and updated National Code of Practice for Registration

Authorities and Providers of Education and Training to Overseas

Students (The National Code) was implemented on 1 July 2007. The

University made significant policy reviews at that time to ensure

compliance. The Code provides nationally consistent standards for

the conduct of registered higher education providers in relation to the

provision of education to international students and the registration of

their courses.

FINANCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY ACT 2009

The University continues to monitor compliance with the Financial

Accountability Act 2009 and the related Financial and Performance

Management Standard 2009. Internal Audit performs a review of

financial policies and procedures on a quadrennial basis to assure the

Audit, Compliance and Risk Committee of Council that the University is

compliant with the legislation.

PUBLIC INTEREST DISCLOSURE ACT 2010

This Act came into effect on 1 January 2011, replacing the

Whistleblowers Protection Act 1994. The Public Interest Disclosure Act

requires disclosures to be reported to the Public Service Commission,

rather than in our Annual Report.

PUBLIC SECTOR ETHICS ACT 1994

The CQUniversity Code of Conduct reaffirms the University’s commitment

to the ethical principles set out in the Queensland Public Sector Ethics

Act 1994. The Code goes beyond the Act’s emphasis on good public

administration to demonstrate how ethical principles are fundamental

OUR CORPORATE GOVERNANCE


54

OUR CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

to the operations of the University; and these are also reflected in the

University’s Value of Openness. The University’s Leading Towards Zero

Tolerance program rolled out in 2012 covered the requirements of our Code

of Conduct and staff obligations under the Act.

DELEGATIONS OF AUTHORITY

The University’s Schedule of Authorities and Financial Delegations

Policy and attached schedules document the authorities within the

University to exercise powers and carry out certain actions for which

staff and officers of the University are accountable. Delegation of

authority and powers is accompanied by appropriate internal control

structures and systems to enable effi cient but controlled operation of

the business. The Schedule and Policy are updated as required and

reviewed in accordance with the University’s policy review schedule.

AUDIT AND RISK MANAGEMENT

AUDIT COMMITTEE

The University Council has an established Audit, Compliance and

Risk Committee to assist the Council to discharge its responsibilities

prescribed in the Financial Accountability Act 2009, the Financial

and Performance Management Standard 2009 and other relevant

legislation and prescribed requirements.

The purpose of the Audit, Compliance and Risk Committee is to assist

the Council to fulfil its oversight responsibilities regarding:

• the University’s frameworks for performance management, risk

management and internal control

• the performance of the internal audit and external audit functions

• the integrity of the University’s fi nancial reporting processes

• ensuring a healthy and safe workplace

• the application of good corporate governance principles

• ensuring strong compliance with legislative requirements.

The Committee is responsible for reviewing, discussing and promptly

reporting, as appropriate, to the Council in relation to the above areas.

Meeting attendance in 2012 was as follows:

TABLE 18: AUDIT, COMPLIANCE AND RISK COMMITTEE 2012

Member

Number of

meetings attended

Total possible

meetings

Ms Sandra Collins (Chair) 6 6

Mr Charles Ware 5 6

Ms Narelle Pearse 4 6

Mr Graham Carpenter 2 2

Ms Marni McGrath 4 6

Representatives of the University’s senior management regularly attend

Committee meetings to provide members with necessary reports and

briefings. Representatives include the Vice-Chancellor and President;

the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic and Research); the Deputy

Vice-Chancellor (International and Services) and Chief Executive Officer,

C Management Services Pty Ltd; the University Secretary; the Chief

Financial Officer and CFO, C Management Services Pty Ltd; the Director

Corporate Strategy and Planning Directorate; and the Associate Director

Audit and Advisory Directorate. A standing invitation has been extended

to the University’s external auditors to discuss any matters with the

Committee regarding its auditing of the University’s financial statements.

During 2012 the Committee operated within the framework established

by its Terms of Reference with due regard to the Audit Committee

Guidelines issued by Queensland Treasury.

The Committee undertook annual self-evaluation and reporting to the

Council. To ensure a comprehensive evaluation was undertaken, the

Committee survey instrument was aligned with the Committee’s Terms

of Reference and was informed by better practice guidance published by

the Queensland Audit Office.

In addition, the Committee concentrated on further embedding strong

committee practice, which had been identified and implemented in recent

years. The Committee continued to focus on high priority areas with

considerable success; received presentations on key strategic risks at

each meeting; continued to focus on the resolution of outstanding audit

recommendations; and undertook private sessions with the external audit

and internal audit functions.

INTERNAL AUDIT FUNCTION

Organisationally, the Audit and Advisory Directorate forms part of the

Corporate Governance Division, reporting to the University Secretary

for administrative purposes, and to the Audit, Compliance and Risk

Committee for functional purposes.

Audit and Advisory operates within a Charter approved by the Audit,

Compliance and Risk Committee, which is consistent with the Definition of

Internal Auditing, the Code of Ethics, and the International Standards for

the Professional Practice of Internal Auditing as issued by the Institute of

Internal Auditors. The Directorate operates independently of the structures

and systems within the University to provide meaningful assurance. The

purpose of the Audit and Advisory Directorate is to assist the Council; the

Audit, Compliance and Risk Committee; and University management and

staff in the effective discharge of their responsibilities. This is achieved

through the provision of independent advice and assurance underpinned

by a process of systematic, professional and independent audits, which

measure and evaluate the efficiency, effectiveness, economy and

compliance of controls and systems in place.

Planning, monitoring, reporting, and review processes exist to ensure

the effective, efficient and economic operation of the Audit and Advisory

Directorate. The University Secretary receives regular reports as

does the Audit, Compliance and Risk Committee. In addition, ongoing

monitoring and regular reviews of audit operations are undertaken.

The work of the Audit and Advisory Directorate is guided by its

multi-year strategy (which outlines objectives and strategies for the

Directorate for a fi ve-year period) and its annual work plan (which

operationalizes the multi-year strategy for a one-year period). In


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

55

developing the respective plans a risk assessment is undertaken to

provide a means for rational deployment of limited resources to assure

audit coverage of the areas identifi ed as representing the greatest

current risk, while at the same time assuring broad coverage of the

business operations of the University over time. Audit and Advisory

staff use their combined experience and judgment, along with input

from the University’s executive management, senior management

and external auditors to assess the overall level of risk for an area. A

number of risk factors are considered as part of the risk assessment

process. Each plan is reviewed by the Audit, Compliance and Risk

Committee at its fi nal meeting of the year and recommended to the

Council for approval.

Audit and Advisory staff issued 14 audit reports on fi nancial,

compliance, operational and information technology matters during

2012. Significant review reports issued during 2012 related to strategic

asset management, mobile phone usage, timesheet management,

compliance with the Education Services for Overseas Students (ESOS)

Act, and contract management.

Audit and Advisory also has responsibility for supporting the Audit,

Compliance and Risk Committee and for liaising with the University’s

external auditors to ensure a properly coordinated overall audit effort.

An annual report is provided to the Committee on the performance

of Audit and Advisory. In supporting the operations of the Audit,

Compliance and Risk Committee, the Directorate has had due regard to

Queensland Treasury’s Audit Committee Guidelines.

RISK MANAGEMENT FUNCTION

The function of risk management at CQUniversity is to manage risk in

accordance with the process set out in the Australian/New Zealand

Joint Standard on Risk Management (AS/NZS ISO 31000:2009)

to benefit the University and manage the cost of risk by focusing

on strategies to minimise risks to University goals and objectives.

The University has an integrated Risk Management and Planning

Framework where strategic, corporate and operational risks are linked

to the relevant plans. The Audit, Compliance and Risk Committee of

Council has oversight of all enterprise risks which are reviewed against

their mitigation strategies within the relevant plan. Any signifi cant

operational or fi nancial risks are dealt with at the senior executive

level of the University as well as the Committee. Risks are monitored

through systematic reviews and within plans in the University.

Strategic risks are reported to each Council meeting.

ENTITIES CONTROLLED BY

THE UNIVERSITY

The University has formed a number of entities that serve to

further the functions of the University in accordance with the

Central Queensland University Act 1998. The University Council

monitors the performance of these entities through its Planning

and Resources Committee. The Committee receives quarterly

financial statements, an annual report on progress and an annual

business plan. Each of the following controlled entities prepares

a set of financial statements for audit by the Queensland Audit

Office. Once certified, the financial information is combined with

that of the University to produce a consolidated financial position

(refer to annual financial statements in Volume 2).

AUSTRALIAN INTERNATIONAL CAMPUSES

TRUST AND AUSTRALIAN INTERNATIONAL

CAMPUSES PTY LTD

The Australian International Campuses Trust is a unit trust and was

established to hold the shares of C Management Services Pty Ltd on

behalf of CQUniversity. The Australian International Campuses Pty

Ltd is the trustee for the trust and CQUniversity is the sole beneficiary

of the trust and holds all units on issue. The Australian International

Campuses Pty Ltd Board comprises the following members:

CHAIR

Ms Sandra Collins, BEng(Mining) Qld, MBusAdmin Pennsylvania

BOARD MEMBERS

Mr Graham Carpenter, GradDipMgt CIAE, MBusAdmin CQU, FICAA, FAICD

COMPANY SECRETARY

Ms Jenny Roberts, BBusAdmin CQU, GAICD

CQU INSTITUTE OF HIGHER LEARNING PTE LTD

On 9 March 2012, CQUniversity incorporated a new company in

Singapore for the purpose of ensuring that the University has control

over its transnational education strategy, intellectual property and

brand. The CQU Institute of Higher Education Pte Ltd Board comprises

the following members:

CHAIR

Professor Scott Bowman TDCR, DCR, HDCR CollRadiog, FAETC

City&Guilds, MA GuildHall, MBA USC, PhD OpenUK

OUR CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

BOARD MEMBERS

Professor Graham Pegg, BSc (Hons), PhD, C.Chem JCU

Mr David Turner CA, BComm Qld

Mr Patrick Loke

Mr Cheng Sim Kok

COMPANY SECRETARY

Mrs Jeannete Aruldoss


56

OUR CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

CQU TRAVEL CENTRE PTY LTD

This company provides travel agency services and educational travel

programs for University staff and students as well as the general

public. The entity is 100% owned by the University and has a Board of

Directors comprising the following members:

CHAIR

Mr David Turner, CA, BComm Qld

BOARD MEMBER AND COMPANY SECRETARY

Ms Jenny Roberts, BBusAdmin CQU, GAICD

HEALTH TRAIN EDUCATION SERVICES PTY LTD

On 13 June 2012, CQUniversity took ownership of Health Train

Education Services Pty Ltd which is a registered training organisation

(RTO). Health Train Education Services Pty Ltd is a respected training

provider of vocational education and training (VET) programs in enrolled

nursing and aged care, based in Victoria. Health Train Education

Services Pty Ltd Board comprises the following members:

CHAIR

Mr Nik Babovic BEd QUT, MBA GradDipBusMgt GCIT

BOARD MEMBERS

Mr David Turner, CA, BComm Qld

COMPANY SECRETARY

Ms Jenny Roberts, BBusAdmin CQU, GAICD

MASK-ED INTERNATIONAL PTY LTD

Mask-Ed International Pty Ltd was established to commercialise

intellectual property developed through the University’s undergraduate

Nursing program. The intellectual property is a novel experiential

learning process that provides a realistic and humanistic simulation

experience. The company is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the

University and has a Board comprising the following members:

CHAIR

Mr David Turner, CA, BComm Qld

COMPANY SECRETARY

Ms Jenny Roberts, BBusAdmin CQU, GAICD

C MANAGEMENT SERVICES PTY

LTD

C Management Services Pty Ltd (CMS) is a wholly-owned subsidiary

of CQUniversity operating as a corporate arm of the University with

responsibility for the management of its international operations in all

education sectors.

The principal activity of CMS is to manage the metropolitan campuses

of CQUniversity in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and the Gold Coast

including the delivery of the University’s programs (Diploma, Bachelors,

Masters Degrees and Professional Doctorates) in a range of disciplines

as well as English Language, Foundation and Professional-Year

programs through these campuses.

OBJECTIVES OF CMS

The objectives of CMS as defi ned in the Company’s Constitution are as

follows:

a. conducting the business of managing and operating the Australian

International Campuses of Central Queensland University for

the provision of courses of education to eligible domestic and

international students

b. maximising the value of the business for the benefi t of the

Shareholders

c. maintaining the reputation, quality and values of Central

Queensland University in undertaking the business, and

d. performing the functions necessary for or incidental to achieving

objects (a) to (c).

STRATEGIC DIRECTION

The CMS Strategic Direction is endorsed by the CMS Board of

Directors and approved by the University Council. The plan includes,

among other things, the CMS Vision which follows the CQUniversity

Vision and the CMS Mission.

The CMS Vision is to support CQUniversity to become one of

Australia’s truly great universities through extensive engagement with

domestic and international communities and stakeholders, ensuring

a high standard of learning and teaching, scholarly productivity,

governance and enterprise.

The CMS Mission is to operate as a corporate arm of CQUniversity

delivering commercially and academically superior quality management

of CQUniversity’s international operations in all education sectors

and managing all metropolitan campuses of the University. CMS is

committed to delivering its core business of campus management;

teaching excellence; international marketing and recruitment; distance

support and marketing; delivering on the CQUniversity franchise and

leading overseas distance education. The Mission will be achieved

by embracing the CQUniversity and CMS values of openness,

inclusiveness, a ‘can-do’ approach, engagement and leadership and

the additional CMS value of ‘we care’.


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

57

GOVERNANCE

The CMS governance structure is modeled on the corporate

governance guidelines for a government-owned corporation (GOC).

The CMS Constitution sets out the fundamental and entrenched

rules governing the conduct of the Company including those matters

requiring the prior approval of the Shareholder.

CMS is governed by a Board of Directors who approve the strategic

direction and operations of the Company in accordance with sound

corporate governance protocols. The CMS Board Charter sets out the

overarching function, purpose, duties and responsibilities of the CMS

Board of Directors to facilitate Board and management accountability

for CMS’s performance and strategic direction. The CMS Board Charter

defines the primary responsibility of the CMS Board of Directors to be

to govern and manage the business of CMS and ensure the profi table

operation of CMS on a sustainable basis.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

The size and composition of the Board is determined by the

Shareholder having regard to the skills and expertise required to

advance the interests of the Company.

Currently, the CMS Board consists of five Directors, two of whom

are independent. All Directors serve a three-year term and the three

Directors who are CQUniversity Council members only remain a member

of the CMS Board whilst still a Council Member. All Directors have

extensive experience within the Australian higher education sector.

The CMS Board of Directors comprises:

CHAIR

Professor Scott Bowman, TDCR, DCR, HDCR CollRadiog, FAETC

City&Guilds, MArts GuildHall, MBusAdmin USC, PhD OpenUK, FAIM

BOARD MEMBERS

Emeritus Professor Anthony Blake AM, MSc, BEd Melbourne, PhD

Purdue, Hon DUniv UTS

Mr Rennie Fritschy, BEng(Chem) Sydney, BEc WAust, FIEAust, FAICD

Ms Lindy Hyam, DipTeach Sydney, BEd Sydney, MBA UTS, FAICD

Mr Charles Ware, BA, LLB(Hons) Qld, MBus(PubMgt), LLM, QUT, FAICD

ALTERNATE DIRECTOR

Mr Alastair Dawson, BA DDIAE, MBA CQU, MAICD, FAIM

COMMITTEES OF THE CMS BOARD

The CMS Board has established two Committees which

each have Charters outlining their objectives, roles and

responsibilities. Committee Members comprise the full Board

of Directors.

AUDIT RISK AND LEGAL COMPLIANCE

COMMITTEE

CHAIR

Ms Lindy Hyam, DipTeach Sydney, BEd Sydney, MBA UTS,

FAICD

Its role is to monitor, investigate and make recommendations

to the CMS Board of Directors with respect to fi nancial and

external reporting, related party transactions, external and

internal audit, risk management and quality assurance, ethics

and compliance.

HUMAN RESOURCES COMMITTEE

CHAIR

Mr Rennie Fritschy, BEng(Chem) Sydney, BEc WAust, FIEAust, FAICD

Its role is to monitor, investigate and make recommendations to the

CMS Board of Directors with respect to employee and industrial

relations matters, remuneration and incentive policies and practices,

workforce planning and human resources policies and practices

including occupational health and safety, equal opportunity and

discrimination.

The CMS Board and each of its Committees conduct annual

performance evaluations as well as assessment of the CMS Chairman,

individual Directors (self-assessment and peer-assessment), the

Chief Executive Offi cer, the Chief Financial Offi cer and the Company

Secretary. The CMS Board and Committee Charters are also reviewed

annually to ensure best practice and are updated throughout the year

as required.

MEETINGS

The CMS Board of Directors meet a minimum of six times per annum.

In 2012, the CMS Board met nine times. The Committees of the CMS

Board are required to meet a minimum of four times per year. In 2012,

the Audit, Risk and Legal Compliance Committee and the Human

Resources Committee each met fi ve times.

OUR CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

COMPANY SECRETARY

Ms Debra Witalik, LLB QUT, CSA (Cert)

All Directors, excluding the Chairman, are Non-Executive Directors and

are paid an annual director’s fee.

SENIOR MANAGEMENT

Early 2012 saw a change to the senior management of CMS with the

replacement of the existing Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial

Officer with Mr Alastair Dawson undertaking the dual role of CMS

Chief Executive Officer and CQUniversity Deputy Vice-Chancellor

(International and Services) and Mr David Turner performing the dual

role of CMS Chief Financial Officer and CQUniversity Chief Financial

Officer.


58

OUR CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

REPORTING TO THE SHAREHOLDER

CMS provides a written report to each University Council meeting in

accordance with the requirements of the Shareholder. In addition, the

Chief Executive Offi cer and the Chief Financial Offi cer attend at least

one Council meeting per annum to present the CMS Five-Year Strategic

Direction and associated plans.

OTHER BODIES (NOT

CONTROLLED ENTITIES)

HORTICAL PTY LTD

This venture was initiated as a joint venture between CQUniversity and

Colour Vision Systems (CVS) to commercialise their respective interests in

non-invasive fruit sorting technology. To this end, CQUniversity and CVS

granted HortiCal a licence on the intellectual property relating to the use

of near infrared spectroscopy. HortiCal’s business is to support research

and development and to commercialise the intellectual property it holds.

RAIL INNOVATION AUSTRALIA PTY LTD

This company was established to hold the intellectual property

generated by the previous co-operative research centre, the CRC for

Railway Engineering and Technologies, which closed in 2007.

OUR COMMITTEE STRUCTURE

AS AT 31 DECEMBER 2012

Council

Vice-Chancellor and

President

Chancellor’s Committee

Vice-Chancellor’s

Advisory Committee

Academic Board

Audit, Compliance and

Risk Committee

Appeals Committee

Ceremonial and Honorary

Awards Committee

Education Committee e

of Academic Board

Planning and Resources

Committee

Executive Committee e

of Academic Board

Research Committee e

of Academic Board

Research Higher

Degrees Committee


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

59

OUR CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

The new mobile education trailer is a key component of the widening participation project.


60

Our Financial

Performance

‘THE

UNIVERSITY

OPERATES TO

ACHIEVE VALUE

FOR MONEY

AND HAS

APPROPRIATE

POLICIES AND

PROCEDURES

TO SUPPORT

THIS OUTCOME’


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

OUR FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

RESULT FOR 2012

The University recorded a signifi cant loss for the year of $24.668m,

which is deterioration on the loss of the previous year of $3.763m. A

downturn in international student revenue contributed to this loss,

resulting in revenue of $17.671m less than in 2011. The University

responded to this by undertaking restructuring to offset the decline in

student numbers and incurred redundancies in excess of $4m.

In addition, the University continued to invest in the development of

new programs and facilities. This contributed around $8m to the loss

position as the University renovated space for new laboratories and

purchased significant equipment to support these programs.

CQUniversity’s research area also contributed to this loss due to

spending funds that had been received in a prior period, resulting in

expenditure exceeding grants and other revenue for the year.

REVENUE PERFORMANCE DOMESTIC LOAD

There was a 19.8% increase in Australian Government funding

received in 2012 compared to 2011.

The Commonwealth Grant Scheme income increased by 15.65% to

$77.616m reflecting an increase in domestic student load of 13.4%,

with indexation of Commonwealth funding and continued growth in our

health programs.

The University set aggressive domestic student enrolment targets in

the 2012 budget and the actual result was better than expected. The

revenue targets for domestic funded load was exceeded by $9.552m

giving a total of $106.176m (refer to Table 19).

TABLE 19: BUDGET 2012 COMPARED TO ACTUAL

AUSTRALIAN FUNDED LOAD EFTSL AND DOLLARS

(EXCLUDING RESEARCH STUDENTS)

2012

Budget

2012

Actual

Variance

to Budget

Percentage

Variance

Australian 6574 6880 306 4.65%

funded load

EFTSL

Australian $96.624m $106.176m $9.552m 9.88%

funded load

REVENUE

Source: CQU Budget document 2012 / Actual EFTSL per the University dashboard, Actual Revenue

for CGS and HECS per CQUniversity Financials

REVENUE PERFORMANCE FEE-PAYING

STUDENTS AUSTRALIAN AND

INTERNATIONAL

Revenue from fees and charges continued in decline, due to a

continued drop in international students studying at the metropolitan

campuses. This was further compounded by the related drop in

Management Fee of $7.75m received from C Management Services.

The University budgeted for a decline in international students

however the size of the decline exceeded expectations. The

University delivered 32 413 courses compared to a budget

of 38 581 courses and actual delivery of 40 731 courses the

previous year. This resulted in a loss of revenue from 2011 to

2012 of $17.671m (refer to Table 20).

TABLE 20: BUDGET 2011 COMPARED TO ACTUAL FEE-

PAYING LOAN COURSES AND DOLLARS (EXCLUDING

RESEARCH STUDENTS)

Fee-paying

student

COURSES

Fee-paying

student

REVENUE

2012

Budget

2012

Actual

Variance

to Budget

Percentage

Variance

38 581 32 413 6168 16.0%

$84.873m $73.789m $11.084m 13.0%

Source: CQU Budget document 2012 / Actual courses and revenue per the University

dashboard

Other signifi cant revenue movements include a decline in Fee

Revenue due to non-payment of $7.75m in Management Fee

from C Management Services Pty Ltd and a decline in investment

income due to much lower than expected interest rates,

non-payment of distributions from the investment in the Queensland

Investment Corporation Growth Fund and no dividend payment from

C Management Services Pty Ltd.

EXPENDITURE PERFORMANCE

Total expenditure increased from $262.823m in 2011 to $275.534m in

2012, an increase of $12.7m or 4.8%.

General operations was overspent by $6.428m which relates to

$4m for accounting adjustments for leases and additional leases

commenced during the year that were not budgeted, and salaries

of $2.79m. Restructuring carried out during 2012 to reduce staffi ng

numbers cost the University in excess of $4m.

Research and restricted funds contributed $12.434m to the loss.

The bulk of this expenditure is attributed to the University-funded

investment into new buildings, new programs, building renovation

and purchase of equipment for new program delivery. As these are

internally funded projects there is no revenue to offset against the

expenditure. Without this investment into new programs the University

would not be refl ecting the growth in domestic student numbers that

was occurring by the end of 2012. The University has in the past few

years invested a signifi cant amount from its reserves into programs

and buildings to re-invigorate the domestic business. In 2012 the

University saw an increase in load of 13.4% and applications by the

end of 2012 suggest in excess of 10% growth in 2013.

61

OUR FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE


62

OUR FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

Other areas of expenditure that have seen a signifi cant increase are

leases, where the University made strategic investments in expansion

of leased space at Noosa, Adelaide and Cairns. Leases increased by

$3.788m from 2011 to 2012.

Depreciation increased by $1.3m or 10% refl ecting the capitalisation

of completed projects. Other expenses to show signifi cant increases

included marketing where additional funds were invested to support

growth in domestic student numbers ($720k), scholarships and prizes

($774k), legal costs incurred in pursuit of the merger ($407k), student

waivers ($781k) and increased utilities costs ($893k).

Management fees paid to partners have decreased by 13.1% refl ecting

the decline in international student numbers.

OTHER MATTERS

The University maintains a comprehensive insurance program that

annually assesses its risks and provides appropriate levels of cover

for each of these risks. It also has a range of programs for staff

and students to ensure their safety and wellbeing, and provides

appropriate channels to enable decisions of the University to be

reviewed. Through these mechanisms the University minimises the

cost and risk in relation to liabilities and contingent liabilities.

The University operates to achieve value for money and has appropriate

procurement policies and procedures to support this outcome.

The University has exercised appropriate control over budgets and has

operated within the budgets it allocated to Divisions for the year. As a

result of revenue losses in the international student business not being

fully offset by increases in domestic student revenue, the University

recorded a defi cit of revenue.

It was too late in the year to make adjustments to expenditure budgets

by the time this information was to hand. Further the University

made decisions to incur additional costs in restructuring to make the

University more sustainable into the future. Spending of research funds

were not in excess of the budget but were against funds earned in a

prior year, and the spending of University funds against development

projects was approved by Council within the budgets established for

those projects.


64

Our Contact

Details


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

65

CQUNIVERSITY APPLETON INSTITUTE (ADELAIDE)

44 Greenhill Road

Wayville SA 5034

Tel: +61 8 8378 4523

Fax: +61 8 8378 4532

CQUNIVERSITY NOOSA

90 Goodchap Street

Noosaville Qld 4566

Tel: +61 7 5440 7000

Fax: +61 7 5440 7025

OUR CONTACT DETAILS

CQUNIVERSITY BUNDABERG

University Drive

Bundaberg Qld 4670

Tel: +61 7 4150 7177

Fax: +61 7 4150 7090

CQUNIVERSITY CAIRNS DISTANCE EDUCATION

STUDY CENTRE

36 Florence Street

Cairns Qld 4870

Tel: +61 7 4031 1572

Fax: +61 7 4923 2767

CQUNIVERSITY EMERALD

Capricorn Highway

Emerald Qld 4720

Tel: +61 7 4982 0205

Fax: +61 7 4982 1246

CQUNIVERSITY GLADSTONE

Bryan Jordan Drive

Gladstone Qld 4680

Tel: +61 7 4970 7277

Fax: +61 7 4970 7252

CQUNIVERSITY GOLD COAST

60 Marine Parade

Southport Qld 4215

Tel: +61 7 5552 4988

Fax: +61 7 5531 2288

CQUNIVERSITY MACKAY

Boundary Road

Mackay Qld 4741

Tel: +61 7 4940 7577

Fax: +61 7 4940 7407

CQUNIVERSITY MELBOURNE

108 Lonsdale Street

Melbourne Vic 3000

Tel: +61 7 8662 0555

Fax: +61 7 9639 4800

CQUNIVERSITY ROCKHAMPTON

Bruce Highway

Rockhampton Qld 4702

Tel: +61 7 4930 9777

Fax: +61 7 4923 2100

CQUNIVERSITY SYDNEY

400 Kent Street

Sydney NSW 2000

Tel: +61 7 9324 5000

Fax: +61 7 8295 5766


66

Glossary


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

ACARP

Australian Coal Association Research Program

ICECS

Indigenous Commonwealth Education Scholarships

67

AEIOU

AGS

AHEEF

AHEGS

Autism Early Intervention Outcomes Unit

Australian Graduate Survey

Australasian Higher Education Evaluation Forum

Australian Higher Education Graduation Statements

IERC

IRIS

LGBTI

LIEF

International Education Research Centre

Institute for Resource Industries and Sustainability

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transsexual and Intersexual

Linkage Infrastructure, Equipment and Facilities

GLOSSARY

ALSU

Academic Learning Services Unit

LSES

Low socio-economic status

AM

Member of the Order of Australia

LTERC

Learning and Teaching Education Research Centre

AQF

Australian Qualifications Framework

MAP

Monitoring Academic Progress

ARC

Australian Research Council

MATSITI

More Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Teachers Initiative

BMA

BHP Billiton Mitsubishi Alliance

MET

Mobile Education Trailer

CAFs

Commonwealth Assistance Forms

MOU

Memoranda of Understanding

CAS

Commonwealth Accommodation Scholarships

NHMRC

National Health and Medical Research Council

CBD

Central Business District

OAM

Medal of the Order of Australia

CECS

Commonwealth Education Scholarships

OOCs

Open online courses

CEM

Centre for Environmental Management

OP

Overall Position

CMS

C Management Services Pty Ltd

OPAL

Awards for Excellence in Engagement Awards

COP

Communities of Practice

OSPRO

Outside Studies Program

CQHHS

Central Queensland Hospital and Health Services

OSS

Overall Satisfaction Score

CQIRP

Central Queensland Innovation and Research Precinct

PhD

Doctor of Philosophy

CQ TAFE

Central Queensland Technical and Further Education

PRPD

Performance Review and Professional Development

CR

Councillor

QCIF

Queensland Cyber Infrastructure Foundation

CRM

Customer Relationship Management

QCPD

Queensland Centre for Professional Development

CRN

Collaborative Research Network

QTAC

Queensland Tertiary Admissions Centre

CSG

Coal seam gas

REC

Regional Engagement Committee

CVS

Colour Vision Systems

RHD

Research higher degree

DECRA

Discovery Early Career Researcher Award

RTO

Registered training organisation

DEEWR Commonwealth Department of Education, Employment and

Workplace Relations

DIDO Drive in – drive out

DIISRTE Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and

Tertiary Education

E-DNA Electronic database on engagement activity

EFTSL Equivalent Full-time Student Load

ELICOS English Language Intensive Courses for Overseas Students

EMS Equity Merit Scholarship

ERA Excellence in Research for Australia

ESOS Education Services for Overseas Students Act 2000

ETA Equity Technology Award

FIFO Fly in – fly out

GCA Graduate Careers Australia

GOC Government-owned corporation

HERDC Higher Education Research Data Collection

RTS

RUN

SBC

SES

SHEWS

STEPS

SUN

TAFE

TEQSA

UAC

VCAC

VET

VOICE

VTAC

WIL

Research Training Scheme

Regional Universities Network

Student Business Centre

Socio-economic status

Safety Health Environment Workcover Sustainability

Skills for Tertiary Education Preparatory Studies

Start Uni Now

Technical and Further Education

Tertiary Education Quality Standards Agency

University Admissions Centre

Vice-Chancellor’s Advisory Committee

Vocational education and training

Staff Satisfaction Survey

Victorian Tertiary Admissions Centre

Work-integrated learning

HEPPP

Higher Education Participation and Partnerships Program

HDR

Higher degree research

HPC

High Performance Computing

IAS

Indigenous Access Scholarship

ICAS

Indigenous Commonwealth Accommodation Scholarships


CQUniversity

A N N U A L

R E P O R T

2012 | vol.2


jn12-0873

20

Distribution

This report is available for download from the

CQUniversity website, or by contacting CQUniversity

by email, telephone or fax to request a hard copy.

Contact officer

Ms Jenny Roberts

University Secretary

CQUniversity Australia

Bruce Highway

Rockhampton Qld 4702

Australia

Telephone: +61 7 4930 6903

Fax: +61 7 4930 9438

Email: j.roberts@cqu.edu.au

Website: www.cqu.edu.au

Annual Report website:

www.cqu.edu.au/about-us/governance/annual-report

Feedback in writing to the above address is invited.

Interpreter

CQUniversity is committed to

providing accessible services

to people from culturally and

linguistically diverse backgrounds. If you have

difficulty in understanding the Annual Report, you

can contact CQUniversity on +61 7 4930 9777

and we will arrange an interpreter to effectively

communicate the report to you.

CQUniversity Annual Report 2012

ISSN 1839-2636

Produced: Corporate Governance Division.

Additional published information

Additional published information on CQUniversity’s

information systems and recordkeeping, consultancies

and overseas travel (staff and student) can be accessed

from the Annual Report website: www.cqu.edu.au/

about-us/governance/annual-report.

Acknowledgement

CQUniversity recognises that its campuses are

situated on Country for which Aboriginal people have

been custodians for many centuries. The University

therefore pays its respects to the Elders, past, present

and future for they hold the memories, the traditions,

the culture and hopes of Indigenous Australia.

Copyright

© Central Queensland University 2013


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

CQUniversity

A N N U A L

1

R E P O R T

2012 | vol.2

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


2

Annual

financial

statements


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

COUNCIL MEMBERS REPORT

The members of the Council of Central Queensland University present their report on the consolidated entity

consisting of Central Queensland University and the entities it controlled at the end of, or during, the year ended 31

December 2012.

Governing Body Members

The following persons were members of the Central Queensland University Council during 2012 and up to the date

of this report:

Mr Rennie Fritschy, BE(Chem) Sydney, BEc WAust, FIEAust, GAICD

Professor Scott Bowman, TDCR, DCR, HDCR CollRadiog, FAETC City&Guilds, MA GuildHall, MBA USC, PhD

OpenUK

Mr Tim Griffin OAM, BEng(Civil), MBA CQU, FAICD, FCILT(UK)

Mr Charles Ware, BA, LLB(Hons) Qld, MBus(PubMgt), LLM QUT, FAICD

Ms Sandra Collins, BEng(Mining) Qld, MBA Pennsylvania

Mr John Anderson, AssocDipCivEng DDIAE, BA USQ, GradCertSocSc Qld, CertIV WorkplaceTrain&Assess

Dr Robyn Minchinton, BAppSc(MLS) RMIT, GradDipScComm CQU, Phd London

Ms Narelle Pearse, BComm JCU, GradDipPsych CQU, MBA, MComm QUT, CA, ICAA

Ms Caryl Turpin, BLM(EC) CQU

Mr Peter Corones AM

Dr John Fitzsimmons, BA(Hons), PhD Adelaide, GradCertOnlineLearning ECU (Elected by the academic staff)

Ms Janette Davis, BBus(Acct) CQU, CIA, CCSA, MIIA (Aust) (Professional staff representative) (Appointed 30

January 2012)

Mr Graham Carpenter, GradDipMgt CIAE, MBA CQU, FICAA, FAICD (Appointed 25 May 2012)

Professor Bronwyn Fredericks, DipTeach(Sec) BCAE, BEd, MEd QUT, MEdStudies UTas, PhD CQU (Appointed 1

August 2012)

Mr Jancsi (John) Mark, MCP (Elected by the professional staff) (Resigned 27 January 2012)

Ms Marni McGrath, BBus(Acct) UCCQ, CA (Term of office concluded 25 May 2012)

Professor Jennelle Kyd, BSc(Hons) UNSW, DipEd Sydney, PhD Newcastle (Resigned 31 August 2012)

3

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Meetings of Members

The numbers of meetings of the members of the Central Queensland University Council and each Council

Committee held during the year ended 31 December 2012, and the number of meetings attended by each member

were as follows:

A = number of meetings attended

B = number of meetings held (including Special Meetings) during the time the member held office or was a member

of the Committee during the year

Committee

Council

PR

ACR

AB

C&HA

C

Council (Governing Body)

Planning & Resources

Audit, Compliance & Risk

Academic Board

Ceremonial & Honorary Award

Chancellor’s

Comment


4




Committee Council PR ACR AB C&HA C

Member A B A B A B A B A B A B





















Review of Operations


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

number of factors including increased Scholarships and Fee Waivers, increased Marketing spend and increased

Utilities costs.

The University also incurred significant expenses relating to the proposed merger with CQIT. The University

engaged professional services firms to provide due diligence and development of a merger agreement in addition to

employing a full time project officer. These costs were always anticipated to be recovered from the promised funding,

but at year end the merger had not proceeded.

Significant Changes in the State of Affairs

For the second year the University experienced significant decreases in international student numbers. During 2012

the University was very strict on offers made to International students to ensure that the University could stay within

the new streamlined visa processing system. This caused a significant issue in 2012 and as mentioned previously

saw a decline in net revenue to the University of $12.2 M in 2012 from international student activity. Having

implemented very strict screening in 2012 the University is aiming to stabilize international student intakes during

2013.

5

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Matters Subsequent to the End of the Financial Year

There are no matters which have arisen subsequent to year end that significantly impact upon the operations of the

University as disclosed at December 2012.

Likely Developments and Expected Results of Operations

The university was invited at the end of 2012 to re-submit its Structural Adjustment Fund bid. This will progress

through the SAF Committee processes and the University expects a successful outcome and announcement of the

$74M allocation to be made in the middle of the 2013 financial year. This application includes around $50M in capital

funding for various projects and $24M for student retention and curriculum development projects to position

CQUniversity into the future as a strong regional University.

Insurance of officers

Central Queensland University indemnifies to the extent permitted by law, each Councillor, secretary, executive

officer or individuals who formerly held one of those positions, against liability incurred in, or arising out of, the

conduct of the business of the University or the discharge of the duties of the Councillor, secretary or executive

officer. The University as a general rule will support and hold harmless an employee who, while acting in good faith,

incurs personal liability to others as a result of working for the University

Central Queensland University has paid premiums totalling $ 22,817 for a “Directors and Officers Liability Insurance

& Employment Practices Liability Insurance Policy” with Zurich Australian Insurance Limited covering the insured

person which by definition under the policy shall mean any chancellor, provost, dean, risk manager, counsellor,

faculty member, volunteer, committee or council member, coach, consultant, contractor, assistant, trainer, teacher or

academic, researcher, supervisor or student and any other person for whose acts the institution is legally

responsible.

This report is made in accordance with a resolution of the members of the Council of Central Queensland University.

RC Ware

Acting Chancellor

Rockhampton

Date : / / 2013


6

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Income Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Consolidated

Parent

Notes 2012 2011 2012 2011

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Income from continuing operations

Australian Government financial assistance

Australian Government grants 3 91,538 82,740 91,538 82,740

HELP - Australian Government payments 3 40,931 31,451 40,931 31,451

HECS-HELP - Student payments 5,819 4,892 5,819 4,892

Fees and charges 4 89,936 98,870 90,274 107,610

Investment and rental income 5 3,741 8,402 3,177 8,682

Royalties, trademarks and licences 4 14 4 14

Consultancy and contracts 6 7,756 7,367 7,756 7,367

Revaluation increment - - - -

Sale of books and related student material 7 4,072 4,120 4,175 4,208

Non-government grants 3,231 2,163 3,231 2,163

Other revenue 8 4,264 2,695 3,976 2,322

Total revenue from continuing operations 251,292 242,714 250,881 251,449

Fair value adjustment to investment property - 350 - 350

Gain on assets acquired at less than fair value 9 - 8,081 - 8,081

Other income 16 - 16 -

Total income from continuing operations 251,308 251,145 250,897 259,880

Expenses from continuing operations

Employee related expenses 10 161,632 145,797 130,540 116,108

Depreciation and amortisation 11 14,327 13,038 13,583 12,239

Repairs and maintenance 12 9,576 10,278 8,161 8,856

Bad and doubtful debts 114 206 113 206

Finance costs 208 25 208 25

Management and other fees 13 16,252 14,817 53,143 61,098

Minor acquisitions and consumables 7,496 9,114 7,054 8,643

Minimum lease payments on operating leases 23,074 19,069 22,834 19,046

Telecommunications 3,428 2,943 3,249 2,780

Staff development, training and related travel 7,295 7,772 6,560 6,686

Inventory purchases 3,110 2,656 3,110 2,656

Books and subscriptions 1,939 2,133 1,531 1,764

Recovery of Grants 14 3,561 2,708 3,561 2,708

Loss on disposal of assets 42 653 29 629

Other expenses 15 25,655 22,942 21,857 19,378

Total expenses from continuing operations 277,709 254,152 275,533 262,823

Share of profit/(loss) on equity accounted investments (net of tax) 23 (59) 41 - -

Operating result from continuing operations before income tax (26,460) (2,966) (24,636) (2,943)

Income tax expense 16 376 (312) - -

Operating result from continuing operations after income tax for

the period (26,084) (3,278) (24,636) (2,943)

Operating result attributable to non-controlling interest (188) - - -

Operating result attributable to members of Central Queensland

University (25,896) (3,278) (24,636) (2,943)

The above Income Statements should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Statements of Comprehensive Income

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Consolidated

Parent

Notes 2012 2011 2012 2011

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Operating result from continuing operations after income tax for the

year (26,084) (3,278) (24,636) (2,943)

Other comprehensive income

Gain (loss) on revaluation of land and buildings, net of tax 31(a) 2,119 2,179 2,119 2,179

Gain (loss) on revaluation of infrastructure, net of tax 31(a) 71 61 71 61

Gain (loss) on revaluation of artwork collection, net of tax 31(a) (77) 347 (77) 347

Gain (loss) on revaluation of library collection, net of tax 31(a) 1,167 - 1,167 -

Gain (loss) on foreign exchange reserve 31(a) 34 - - -

Gain (loss) on value of available for sale financial assets, net of tax 31(a) 3,589 (3,594) 3,219 (3,571)

7

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Total comprehensive income (19,181) (4,285) (18,137) (3,927)

Total comprehensive income attributable to:

Non-controlling interest (171) - - -

Total comprehensive income attributable to members of Central

Queensland University (19,010) (4,285) (18,137) (3,927)

The above Statement of Comprehensive Income should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.


8

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Statements of Financial Position

as at 31 December 2012

Consolidated

Parent

Notes 2012

Restated

31/12/11 2012

Restated

31/12/11

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

ASSETS

Current assets

Cash and cash equivalents 17 18,250 44,286 8,170 29,512

Receivables 18 10,987 11,265 14,487 18,340

Inventories 19 2,208 1,890 2,208 1,890

Income tax assets 20 473 106 - -

Available for sale financial assets 21 30,886 35,500 30,886 35,500

Other non-financial assets 22 241 199 241 199

Total current assets 63,045 93,246 55,992 85,441

Non-current assets

Available for sale financial assets 21 1,813 1,553 2,750 1,955

Investments acounted for using the equity method 23 177 236 - -

Investment properties 24 1,650 1,650 1,650 1,650

Property, plant & equipment 25 267,563 253,986 266,535 252,628

Intangible assets 26 5,557 6,145 5,523 6,046

Deferred tax assets 27 1,912 1,526 - -

Total non-current assets 278,672 265,096 276,458 262,279

Total assets 341,717 358,342 332,450 347,720

LIABILITIES

Current liabilities

Trade and other payables 28 9,948 9,475 8,422 8,197

Provisions 29 26,704 24,195 24,257 21,378

Other liabilities 30 14,080 19,708 14,054 19,196

Total current liabilities 50,732 53,378 46,733 48,771

Non-current liabilities

Provisions 29 8,429 7,636 6,711 5,988

Other liabilities 30 16,741 12,559 16,741 12,559

Total non-current liabilities 25,170 20,195 23,452 18,547

Total liabilities 75,902 73,573 70,185 67,318

Net assets 265,817 284,769 262,265 280,402

EQUITY

Parent entity interest

Reserves 31(a) 84,459 77,573 84,374 77,875

Retained surplus 31(b) 181,134 207,196 177,891 202,527

Parent entity interest 265,593 284,769 262,265 280,402

Non-controlling interest 223 - - -

Total equity 265,817 284,769 262,265 280,402

The above Statements of Financial Position should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

9

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Statements of Changes in Equity

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Retained

surplus

Consolidated Parent

Total:

Owners of

the parent

Noncontrolling

interest Total Reserves

Retained

surplus Total

Notes Reserves

$'000 $'000 $'000 $000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Balance at 1 January 2011 78,580 210,474 289,054 - 289,054 78,859 205,469 284,328

Operating result from continuing operations after tax - (3,278) (3,278) - (3,278) - (2,942) (2,942)

Other comprehensive income

Revaluation of land and buildings 31(a) 2,179 - 2,179 - 2,179 2,179 - 2,179

Revaluation of infrastructure 31(a) 61 - 61 - 61 61 - 61

Revaluation of artwork 31(a) 347 - 347 - 347 347 - 347

Revaluation of library collection 31(a) - - - - - - - -

Gain on available-for-sale financial assets 31(a) (3,594) - (3,594) - (3,594) (3,571) - (3,571)

Balance at 31 December 2011 77,573 207,196 284,769 - 284,769 77,875 202,527 280,402

Balance at 1 January 2012 77,573 207,196 284,769 - 284,769 77,875 202,527 280,402

Operating result from continuing operations after tax - (25,896) (25,896) (188) (26,084) - (24,636) (24,636)

Retained surplus on acquisition of subsidiary - (166) (166) - (166)

Other comprehensive income -

Revaluation of land and buildings 31(a) 2,119 - 2,119 - 2,119 2,119 - 2,119

Revaluation of infrastructure 31(a) 71 - 71 - 71 71 - 71

Revaluation of artwork 31(a) (77) - (77) - (77) (77) - (77)

Revaluation of library collection 31(a) 1,167 - 1,167 - 1,167 1,167 - 1,167

Gain on available-for-sale financial assets 31(a) 3,589 - 3,589 - 3,589 3,219 - 3,219

Foreign currency translation 31(a) 17 - 17 17 34 - - -

Non-controlling interest in issued capital - - - 394 394

Movement for the perid 6,886 (26,062) (19,176) 223 (18,953) 6,499 (24,636) (18,137)

Balance at 31 December 2012 84,459 181,134 265,593 223 265,816 84,374 177,891 262,265

The above Statements of Changes in Equity should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


10

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Statements of Cash Flows

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Consolidated

Parent

Notes 2012 2011 2012 2011

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Cash flows from operating activities

Australian Government Grants received 131,072 109,362 131,072 109,362

HECS-HELP - Student payments 5,880 4,924 5,880 4,924

OS-HELP (63) (5) (63) (5)

Receipts from student fees and other customers 135,664 138,552 120,251 128,870

Trust Distribution 9 705 9 1,506

Dividends received - - - 219

Interest received 1,738 3,673 1,169 2,932

Payments to suppliers and employees (inclusive of goods

and services tax) (287,132) (266,204) (265,991) (257,453)

Interest and other costs of finance paid (25) (25) (25) (25)

Income taxes paid (378) (430) - -

Net cash provided by/(used in) operating activities 40 (13,235) (9,447) (7,698) (9,670)

Cash flows from investing activities

Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment 304 471 292 457

Proceeds from sale of investment property - 7,623 - 7,623

Proceeds from sale of financial assets 1,728 - 1,728 -

Proceeds from drawdown of financial assets 7,800 - 7,800 -

Proceeds from non-controlling interest 394 - - -

Payments for financial assets - - (905) -

Payments for property, plant and equipment (20,369) (31,485) (19,923) (32,381)

Payments for Intangibles (2,661) (2,101) (2,638) (2,097)

Net cash provided by/(used in) investing activities (12,804) (25,491) (13,646) (26,398)

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents (26,039) (34,939) (21,344) (36,068)

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the financial

year 44,286 79,225 29,511 65,579

Effects of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents 3 - 3 -

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the financial year 17 18,250 44,286 8,170 29,511

The above Statements of Cash Flows should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

Objectives and principal activities

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

The principal activities of the consolidated entity are listed in the Council Members Report.

Note 1: Summary of significant accounting policies

The principal accounting policies adopted in the preparation of the financial report are set out below. These policies have been

consistently applied to all the years presented, unless otherwise stated.

The Chancellor by signature has approved the release of the financial statements as at the date of signature.

(a)

Basis of preparation

Central Queensland University is a statutory body established under the Central Queensland University Act 1998, and

domiciled in Australia. The financial report includes separate financial statements for Central Queensland University as an

individual entity and the consolidated entity consisting of Central Queensland University and the entities it controls.

11

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

The annual financial statements represent the audited general purpose financial statements of Central Queensland

University. They have been prepared on an accrual basis and comply with the Australian Accounting Standards.

Additionally the statements have been prepared in accordance with the following statutory requirements:

Higher Education Support Act 2003 (Financial Statement Guidelines)

Central Queensland University Act 1998

Financial and Performance Management Standard 2009 made under the Financial Accountability Act 2009

With respect to compliance with Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations, Central Queensland University has

applied those requirements applicable to not-for-profit entities, as the University is a not-for-profit entity.

Basis of measurement

These financial statements have been prepared under the historical cost convention, except for available-for-sale financial

assets, land, buildings and infrastructure, artworks, heritage collection and investment property.

Critical accounting estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with Australian Accounting Standards requires the use of certain

critical accounting estimates. It also requires management to exercise its judgment in the process of applying the Group’s

accounting policies. Estimates and judgments are continually evaluated and are based on historical experience and other

factors, including expectations of future events that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances.

Estimates and assumptions that have a potential significant effect are outlined in the following financial statement notes:

Available for sale financial assets – Note 21

Property, plant and equipment – Note 25

Deferred tax assets and liabilities – Note 27

Provisions – Note 29

Contingencies – Note 34

Retrospective restatement

The group has made a retrospective restatement to the prior period to recognise internally generated software. As this

change effected the 2011 financial year only no column for the 2010 financial year has been provided. The effect of this

restatement is set out in the table below:

Note 2011 Unadjusted Adjustment 2011 Adjusted

$’000 $’000 $’000

Income Statements

Employee related expenses 10 146,448 (651) 145,797

Depreciation 11 12,990 138 13,038

Management and other fees 13 15,122 (305) 14,817

Travel 7,775 (3) 7,772

Statements of Financial

Position

Intangible assets 26 5,325 820 6,145

Equity

Retained surplus 31(b) 206,376 820 207,196


12

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

(b)

Principles of Consolidation

(i) Subsidiaries

The consolidated financial statements incorporate the assets and liabilities of all subsidiaries of Central Queensland

University (“parent entity”) as at 31 December 2012 and the results of all subsidiaries for the year then ended. Central

Queensland University and its subsidiaries together are referred to in these financial statements as the Group or the

consolidated entity.

Subsidiaries are all those entities over which the Group has the power to govern the financial and operating policies,

generally accompanying a shareholding of more than one-half of the voting rights. The existence and effect of potential

voting rights that are currently exercisable or convertible are considered when assessing whether the Group controls

another entity.

Subsidiaries are fully consolidated from the date on which control is transferred to the Group. They are de-consolidated

from the date that control ceases.

The acquisition method of accounting is used to account for the acquisition of subsidiaries by the Group.

Intercompany transactions, balances and unrealised gains on transactions between group companies are eliminated.

Unrealised losses are also eliminated unless the transaction provides evidence of the impairment of the asset transferred.

Accounting policies of subsidiaries have been changed where necessary to ensure consistency with the policies adopted

by the Group.

(ii) Associates

Associates are all entities over which the Group has significant influence but not control, generally accompanying a

shareholding of between 20% and 50% of the voting rights. Investments in associates are accounted for in the parent

entity financial statements using the cost method and in the consolidated financial statements using the equity method of

accounting, after initially being recognised at cost.

The Group’s share of its associates’ post-acquisition profits or losses is recognised in the income statement, and its share

of post-acquisition movements in reserves is recognised in reserves. The cumulative post-acquisition movements are

adjusted against the carrying amount of the investment. Dividends receivable from associates are recognised in the parent

entity’s income statement, while in the consolidated financial statements they reduce the carrying amount of the

investment.

When the Group’s share of losses in an associate equals or exceeds its interest in the associate, including any other

unsecured receivables, the Group does not recognise further losses, unless it has incurred obligations or made payments

on behalf of the associate.

(iii) Business combinations

The acquisition method shall be applied to account for each business combination, this does not include a combination of

entities or businesses under common control, the formation of a joint venture, or the acquisition of an asset or a group of

assets. The acquisition method requires identification of the acquirer, determining the acquisition date and recognising and

measuring the identifiable assets acquired, liabilities assumed, goodwill gained, a gain from a bargain purchase and any

non-controlling interest in the acquiree that are present ownership interests and entitle their holders to a proportionate

share of the entity’s net assets in the event of liquidation. Identifiable assets acquired, liabilities assumed and any noncontrolling

interest in the acquiree shall be recognised separately from goodwill as of the acquisition date. Intangible

assets acquired in a business combination are recognised separately from goodwill if they are separable, but only together

with a related contract, identifiable asset or liability. Acquisition related costs are expensed in the periods in which they are

incurred with the exception of costs to issue debt or equity securities, which are recognised in accordance with AASB132

and AASB139.

Identifiable assets acquired and liabilities and contingent liabilities assumed in a business combination are measured

initially at their fair values at the acquisition date. Measurement of any non-controlling interest in the acquiree is at fair

value or the present ownership instruments’ proportionate share in the recognised amounts of the acquiree’s identifiable

net assets. All other components of non-controlling interests shall be measured at their acquisition date fair values, unless

another measurement basis is required by Australian Accounting Standards. Contingent liabilities assumed are recognised

as part of the acquisition if there is a present obligation arising from past events and the fair value can be reliably

measured. The excess at the acquisition date of the aggregate of the consideration transferred, the amount of any noncontrolling

interest and any previously held equity interest in the acquiree, over the net amounts of identifiable assets

acquired and liabilities assumed is recognised as goodwill (refer to note 1(o)). If the cost of acquisition is less than the fair

value of the identifiable net assets of the subsidiary acquired, the difference is recognised directly in the income statement

of the acquirer, but only after a reassessment of the identification and measurement of the net assets acquired.


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

(c)

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Consideration transferred in a business combination shall be measured at fair value. Where the business combination is

achieved in stages, the acquirer shall re-measure previously held equity interest in the acquiree at its acquisition date fair

value and recognise the resulting gain or loss in profit or loss.

Where a business combination is achieved in stages, previously held equity interests in the acquiree are re-measured to

fair value at the acquisition date and any resulting gain or loss is recognised in profit or loss.

Foreign currency translation

(i) Functional and presentation currency

Items included in the financial statements of each of the Group’s entities are measured using the currency of the primary

economic environment in which the entity operates (“the functional currency”). The consolidated financial statements are

presented in Australian dollars, which is Central Queensland University’s functional currency.

(ii) Transactions and balances

Foreign currency transactions are translated into the functional currency using the exchange rates prevailing at the dates of

the transactions. Foreign exchange gains and losses resulting from the settlement of such transactions and from the

translation at year-end exchange rates of monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies are recognised

in the income statement.

Translation differences on non-monetary financial assets and liabilities are reported as part of the fair value gain or loss.

Translation differences on non-monetary financial assets and liabilities, such as equities held at fair value through profit

and loss, are recognised in profit or loss as part of the fair values gain or loss. Translation differences on non-monetary

financial assets are included in the foreign currency revaluation reserve in equity.

(iii) Group companies

The results and financial position of all the Group entities (none of which has the currency of a hyperinflationary economy)

that have a functional currency different from the presentation currency are translated into the presentation currency as

follows:

13

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS




assets and liabilities for each statement of financial position presented are translated at the closing rate at the

date of that statement of financial position;

income and expenses for each income statement are translated at average exchange rates (unless this is not a

reasonable approximation of the cumulative effect of the rates prevailing on the transaction dates, in which case

income and expenses are translated at the dates of the transactions); and

all resulting exchange differences are recognised as a separate component of equity.

(d)

Revenue recognition

Revenue is measured at the fair value of the consideration received or receivable. Amounts disclosed as revenue are net

of refunds, trade allowances and duties and taxes paid. Revenue is recognised for the major business activities as follows:

(i) Government grants

Central Queensland University treats operating grants received from Australian government entities as income in the year

of receipt. A provision is recognised where there is an obligation that the University will be required to return the funds to

the government in a future period.

(ii) Investment income

Investment Income is recognised as it accrues based on the interest rate applicable to the asset and distributions received.

(iii) Fees and charges

Fees and charges are recognised as income in the year of receipt, except to the extent that fees and charges relate to

courses to be held in future periods. Such receipts (or portion thereof) are treated as income in advance in liabilities.

Conversely, fees and charges relating to debtors are recognised as revenue in the year to which the prescribed course

relates.

(iv) Sale of goods

Sale of goods is recognised upon delivery of goods to the customer.


14

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

(v) Consultancy and contract revenue

Consultancy and contract revenue is recognised upon the delivery of the service to the customer.

(vi) Revenue received prior to delivery

Revenue received prior to the delivery of goods to the customer or delivery of the service to the customer is recognised as

a liability.

(vii) Lease income

Lease income from operating leases is recognised in income on a straight-line basis over the lease term.

(e)

Income tax

Central Queensland University is exempt from income tax by virtue of Section 50-5 of the Income Tax Assessment Act of

1997.

The University’s controlled entities, CQU Travel Centre Pty Ltd, Australian International Campuses Pty Ltd, C Management

Services Pty Ltd, and Health Train Education Services Pty Ltd are subject to income tax and these companies adopt the

“balance sheet” approach under AASB 112 Income Taxes.

CQU Institute of Higher Learning Pte Ltd is subject to income tax and complies with Singapore Financial Reporting

Standards FRS 12 Income Taxes.

The income tax expense or revenue for the period is the tax payable on the current period’s taxable income based on the

national income tax rate adjusted by changes in deferred tax assets and liabilities attributable to temporary differences

between the tax bases of assets and liabilities and their carrying amounts in the financial statements, and to unused tax

losses.

Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognised for temporary differences at the tax rates expected to apply when the

assets are recovered or liabilities are settled. The relevant tax rates are applied to the cumulative amounts of deductible

and taxable temporary differences to measure the deferred tax asset or liability.

Deferred tax assets are recognised for deductible temporary differences and unused tax losses only if it is probable that

future taxable amounts will be available to utilise those temporary differences and losses.

(f)

Leases

Leases of property, plant and equipment where the Group, as lessee, has substantially all the risks and rewards of

ownership are classified as finance leases. Finance leases are capitalised at the lease’s inception at the lower of the fair

value of the leased property and the present value of the minimum lease payments. The corresponding rental obligations,

net of finance charges, are included in other long term payables. Each lease payment is allocated between the liability and

finance charges so as to achieve a constant rate on the finance balance outstanding. The interest element of the finance

cost is charged to the income statement over the lease period so as to produce a constant periodic rate of interest on the

remaining balance of the liability for each period. There are no financial leases as at 31 December 2012.

Leases in which a significant portion of the risks and rewards of ownership are retained by the lessor are classified as

operating leases (Note 35). Payments made under operating leases (net of any incentives received from the lessor) are

charged to the income statement on a straight-line basis over the period of the lease.

Operating lease payments are representative of the pattern of benefits derived from the leased assets and are expensed in

the periods in which they are incurred.

Incentives received on entering into operating leases are recognised as liabilities. Lease payments are allocated between

rental expense and reduction of the liability.

(g)

Acquisition of assets

The acquisition method of accounting is used for all acquisitions of assets regardless of whether equity instruments or

other assets are acquired. Cost is measured as the fair value of the assets given or liabilities incurred or assumed at the

date of exchange plus incidental costs directly attributable to the acquisition.

Costs incurred on assets subsequent to initial acquisition are capitalised when it is probable that future economic benefits

in excess of the originally assessed performance of the asset will flow to the consolidated entity in future years, otherwise,

the costs are expensed as incurred.


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Acquisition of assets with a cost or other value equal to or in excess of the following thresholds are recognised for financial

reporting purposes in the year of acquisition:

Buildings $10,000

Infrastructure $10,000

Land $1

Plant and equipment $5,000

Shares $1

Computer software $100,000

Goodwill $1

Other (including artworks and heritage) $1

Where settlement of any part of cash consideration is deferred, the amounts payable in the future are discounted to their

present value as at the date of exchange. The discount rate used is the entity’s incremental borrowing rate, being the rate

at which a similar borrowing could be obtained from an independent financier under comparable terms and conditions.

15

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(h)

Impairment of assets

The carrying amounts of the consolidated entity’s assets, other than inventories and deferred tax assets are assessed on

an annual basis to determine whether there is any indication of impairment. If any such indication exists, the asset’s

recoverable amount is estimated.

Goodwill and intangible assets that have an indefinite useful life are not subject to amortisation and are tested annually for

impairment or more frequently if events or changes in circumstances indicate that they might be impaired. Other assets are

reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount may not be

recoverable. An impairment loss is recognised for the amount by which the asset’s carrying amount exceeds its

recoverable amount. The recoverable amount is the higher of an asset’s fair value less costs to sell and value in use. For

the purposes of assessing impairment, assets are grouped at the lowest levels for which there are separately identifiable

cash flows which are largely independent of the cash inflows from other assets or groups of assets (cash generating units).

Non-financial assets other than goodwill that suffered impairment are reviewed for possible reversal of the impairment at

each reporting date.

(i)

Cash and cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents include cash on hand, deposits held at call with financial institutions, other short-term, highly

liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and

which are subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value.

(j)

Receivables

Commercial and general debtors are recognised at cost less impairment losses and are generally due for settlement

within 14 days.

Student debtors are recognised at cost and are due within 14 days of invoice.

Collectability of trade receivables are reviewed on an on-going basis. An allowance for impaired receivables is established

when there is objective evidence that the Group may not be able to collect certain debts. Debts which are known to be

uncollectible, when formally approved for write off, are written off against the allowance for impaired receivables to the

extent that the expense has previously been provided for. Receivables expected to be received in the next 12 months are

classified as current.

(k)

Inventories

Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or net realisable value which is the estimated selling price in the ordinary course

of business less the estimated costs of completion and the estimated costs necessary to make the sale.

The cost of inventories comprises all costs of purchases and other costs of bringing the inventories to their present location

and condition. Bookshop inventory cost is determined using the weighted average cost method.

Obsolete, redundant and slow moving inventories are identified and written down to their estimated current replacement

cost.


16

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

(l)

Investments and other financial assets

The Group classifies its investments in the following categories: financial assets at fair value through profit or loss, loans

and receivables, held-to-maturity investments, and available-for-sale financial assets. The classification depends on the

purpose for which the investments were acquired. Management determines the classification of its investments at initial

recognition and, in the case of assets classifed as held-to-maturity, re-evaluates this designation at each reporting date.

(i) Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss

Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss include financial assets held for trading. A financial asset is classified in

this category if it is acquired principally for the purpose of selling in the short term. Assets in this category are classified as

current assets. There are no financial assets categorised as ‘financial assets at fair value through profit or loss’ as at 31

December 2012.

(ii) Loans and receivables

Loans and receivables are non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an

active market. They are included in current assets, except for those with maturities greater than 12 months after reporting

date which are classified as non-current assets. Loans and receivables are included in receivables in the statement of

financial position.

(iii) Held-to-maturity investments

Held-to-maturity investments are non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments and fixed maturities

that the Group’s management has the positive intention and ability to hold to maturity.

(iv) Available-for-sale financial assets

Available-for-sale financial assets, comprising principally marketable equity securities, are non-derivatives that are either

designated in this category or not classified in any of the other categories. They are included in non-current assets apart

from those which are available to be sold at short notice in an active market.

Purchases and sales of financial assets are recognised on trade-date – the date on which the Group commits to purchase

or sell the asset. Investments are initially recognised at fair value plus transaction costs for all financial assets not carried at

fair value through profit or loss. Financial assets carried at fair value through profit or loss, are initially recognised at fair

value and transaction costs are expensed in other comprehensive income. Subsequent to initial recognition, they are

measured at fair value and changes therein, other than impairment losses are recognised in other comprehensive income

and presented in reserves in equity. Financial assets are de-recognised when the rights to receive cash flows from the

financial assets have expired or have been transferred and the Group has transferred substantially all the risks and

rewards of ownership.

When securities classified as available-for-sale are sold, the accumulated fair value adjustments recognised in other

comprehensive income are included in the income statement as gains and losses from investment securities.

Subsequent measurement

Available-for-sale financial assets and financial assets at fair value through profit or loss are subsequently carried at fair

value. Loans and receivables and held-to-maturity investments are carried at amortised cost using the effective interest

method.

Impairment

The Group assesses annually whether there is objective evidence that a financial asset or a group of financial assets are

impaired. If any such evidence exists an impairment loss is recognised in the income statement.

(m)

Investment properties

Investment properties exclude properties held to meet service delivery objectives of Central Queensland University and are

held to earn rental income and/or for capital appreciation.

Investment properties are initially recognised at cost. Costs incurred subsequent to initial acquisition are capitalised when it

is probable that future economic benefits in excess of the originally assessed performance of the asset will flow to Central

Queensland University. Where an investment property is acquired at no cost or for nominal consideration, its estimated

value shall be deemed to be its fair value, as at the date of acquisition.

Subsequent to initial recognition at cost, investment property is carried at fair value, which is based on active market prices,

adjusted, if necessary, for any difference in the nature, location or condition of the specific asset. If this information is not

available, the Group uses alternative valuation methods such as recent prices in less active markets or discounted cash

flow projections. These valuations are reviewed annually by a Registered Valuer. Changes in fair values are recorded in

the income statement.


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

(n)

(o)

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Rental revenue from the leasing of investment properties is recognised in the income statement in the periods in which it is

receivable, as this represents the pattern of service rendered through the provision of the properties.

Property, plant and equipment

Land and buildings (except for investment properties – refer to note 1(m) above), infrastructure, library heritage and art

collections are shown at fair value, based on periodic, but at least triennial, valuations by external independent valuers less

subsequent depreciation for buildings and infrastructure. During intervening years a management assessment of fair value

using indices supplied by external valuers which are specifically tailored assessments of market trends occurring at the

time. Buildings, infrastructure and land indices and assessment were supplied by G Pyman (FAPI, MRICS) Registered

Valuer No. 1856; B MacAulay (AVAA No. 336) provided a specific assessment for Artworks. The University Heritage

Collection was independently revalued during 2012 by J Harbeck, an Australian Government Cultural Gifts Program

Valuer.

Any accumulated depreciation at the date of revaluation is restated proportionately with the change in the gross carrying

amount of the asset so that the carrying amount of the asset after valuation equals its revalued amount. All other property,

plant and equipment are stated at historical cost less depreciation. Historical cost includes expenditure that is directly

attributable to the acquisition of the items.

Subsequent costs are included in the asset’s carrying amount or recognised as a separate asset, as appropriate, only

when it is probable that future economic benefits associated with the item will flow to the Group and the cost of the item

can be measured reliably. All other repairs and maintenance expenses are charged to the income statement during the

financial period in which they are incurred.

Increases in the carrying amounts arising on revaluation of land, buildings, infrastructure, library heritage and art collections

are credited to reserves in equity. To the extent that the increase reverses a decrease for that class previously recognised

in profit or loss, the increase is first recognised in profit and loss. Decreases that reverse previous increases of the same

asset class are first charged against revaluation reserves directly in equity of the remaining reserve attributable to the asset

class; all other decreases are charged to the income statement.

Asset classes land, library heritage and art collections are not depreciated. Depreciation on other assets is calculated

using the straight-line method to allocate their cost or revalued amounts, net of their residual values, over their remaining

useful lives as follows:

freehold buildings 2 to 59 years

infrastructure 2 to 39 years

leasehold improvements 1 to 16 years

plant and equipment 4 to 25 years

The assets’ residual values and useful lives are reviewed annually, and adjusted if appropriate.

An asset’s carrying amount is written down immediately to its recoverable amount if the asset’s carrying amount is greater

than its estimated recoverable amount. Gains and losses on disposal are determined by comparing proceeds with carrying

amount. These are included in the income statement. Where revalued assets are sold, it is Group policy to transfer the

amounts included in other reserves in respect of those assets to retained earnings.

Intangible assets

Intangible assets with a cost or other value equal to or greater than $100,000 are recognised in the financial statements,

items with a lesser value being expensed. Each intangible asset is amortised over its estimated useful life to the Group,

less any anticipated residual value. The residual value is zero for all the Group’s intangible assets.

It has been determined that there is no active market for any of the Group’s intangible assets. As such, the assets are

recognised and carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses.

No intangible assets have been classified as held for sale or form part of the disposal group held for sale.

Purchased software

Software development costs in excess of $100,000 are recognised as an asset on acquisition only when the consolidated

entity controls future economic benefits as a result of the costs incurred that are probable and can be measured reliably.

Costs attributable to feasibility assessments are expensed as incurred. The costs capitalised include the cost of materials,

direct labour, directly attributable overheads and other incidental costs incurred. The purchase cost of this software is being

amortised on a straight-line basis over the period of the expected benefit to the university, namely 3 to 5 years.

17

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


18

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Internally generated software

Expenditure on research activities relating to internally generated intangible assets is recognised as an expense in the

period in which it is incurred. Costs associated with the development of computer software have been capitalised and are

amortised on a straight-line basis over the period of expected benefit to the university, namely 3 to 5 years.

Goodwill

Goodwill is initially recorded at the amount by which the purchase price for a business combination exceeds the fair value

attributed to the interest in the net fair value of identifiable assets, liabilities and contingent liabilities at date of acquisition.

Goodwill on acquisitions of subsidiaries is included in intangible assets. Changes in the ownership interests in a subsidiary

are accounted for as equity transactions and do not affect the carrying amount of goodwill. Goodwill is tested annually for

impairment and carried at cost less accumulated impairment losses. Gains and losses on disposal of an entity include the

carrying amount of goodwill relating to the entity sold.

(p)

Trade and other payables

These amounts represent liabilities for goods and services provided to the Group prior to the end of the financial year

which are unpaid. The amounts are unsecured and are usually paid within 30 days of recognition.

(q)

Employee benefits

(i) Wages, salaries and annual leave

Wages, salaries and annual leave due but unpaid at reporting date are recognised in the Statement of Financial Position at

the remuneration rates expected to apply at the time of settlement and include related on-costs.

For unpaid benefits expected to be paid within twelve (12) months, the liabilities are recognised at their undiscounted

values. For those benefits not expected to be paid within twelve (12) months, the liabilities are recognised at their present

value, calculated using market yields at the reporting date on national government bonds with maturities matching the term

to settlement. Regardless of the expected timing of settlements, provisions made in respect of employee benefits are

classified as a current liability, unless there is an unconditional right to defer the settlement of the liability for at least 12

months after the reporting date, in which case it would be classified as a non-current liability.

(ii) Sick leave

No provision has been made for sick leave as all sick leave is non-vesting and the average sick leave taken in future years

by employees is estimated to be less than the annual entitlement of sick leave.

(iii) Long service leave

The liability for long service leave is recognised in the provision for employee benefits and measured as the present value

of expected future payments to be made in respect of services provided by employees up to the reporting date.

Consideration is given to expected future wage and salary levels, experience of employee departures and periods of

service. Expected future payments are discounted using market yields at the reporting date on national government bonds

with terms to maturity that match, as closely as possible, the estimated future cash outflows.

(iv) Time off in lieu

Time off in lieu accrued is not recorded as a liability as it is considered immaterial and any payment of time in lieu is

recognised as an expense.

(v) Superannuation plans

Central Queensland University contributes to UniSuper and QSuper under arrangements where employees are entitled to

defined benefits and accumulated plan benefits on resignation, retirement, disability or death. Continuing employees may

contribute to the relevant plan an amount of between 0% and 7% of their wages and salaries. The University contributes to

the plan at the applicable rate for each fund – ranging from 3% to a maximum of 17%. A minimum of 9% is paid on behalf

of each eligible employee in accordance with the Superannuation Guarantee Administration Act 1992.

The University’s share of the superannuation plans assets and accrued vested benefits are not recognised in the financial

statements.

The UniSuper Defined Benefit Division (DBD) which is the predominant plan within the University, is a defined benefit plan

under superannuation law, however, as a result of amendments to Clause 34 of the UniSuper Trust Deed, it is deemed a

defined contribution plan under Accounting Statdard AASB 119 Employee Benefits. The DBD receives fixed contributions

from the consolidated entity and the consolidated entity’s legal or constructive obligation is limited to these contributions.

Additionally any acturarial risk and investment risk falls on the consolidated entity’s employees.

The University also contributes to QSuper (the Trustee for State Public Sector Superannualtion Scheme) in respect of

certain employees, however the University’s obligation is considered immaterial.


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

(r)

(s)

(t)

(u)

(v)

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

(vi) Executive remuneration

Key executive management personnel and remuneration disclosures are made in accordance with Section 5 to the

Financial Reporting Requirements for Queensland Government Agencies, issued by Queensland Treasury in conjunction

with the requirements of the Financial Statement Guidelines for Australian Education Providers, issued by the Department

of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education. Refer to Note 32 for the disclosures on key executive

management personnel and remuneration.

Provisions

Provisions for grant recovery and lease make good are recognised when: the Group has a present obligation as a result of

past events; it is probable that an outflow of resources will be required to settle the obligation; and the amount can be

reliably estimated. Provisions are not recognised for future operating losses.

Provisions are measured at the present value of management’s best estimate of the expenditure required to settle the

present obligation at the balance sheet date. The discount rate used to determine the present value reflects current market

assessments of the time value of money and the risks specific to the liability. The increase in the provision due to the

passage of time is recognised as a finance cost.

Financial instruments

Recognition

Financial assets and financial liabilities are recognised in the statement of financial position when the Group becomes party

to the contractual provisions of the financial instrument.

Classification

Financial instruments are classified and measured as follows:

cash and cash equivalents - held at fair value through profit or loss

receivables – held at amortised cost

available for sale financial assets – fair value and cost (Note 21)

payables – held at amortised cost

provisions – held at amortised cost

The Group does not enter into transactions for speculative purposes, nor for hedging. Apart from cash and cash

equivalents, the Group holds no financial assets classified at fair value through profit or loss.

Council member benefits

Central Queensland University Council members do not receive any remuneration for attendance at council meetings or

activities. Council members who are also employees of the University receive their normal remuneration while attending to

council business. Council members who are also public service employees of other entities are remunerated by their

employing entity in accordance with arrangements with that entity. The University accepts financial responsibility for travel

costs related to university meetings and activities.

Rounding and comparatives

Amounts shown in these financial statements have been rounded to the nearest thousand dollars, or in certain cases, the

nearest dollar. Comparative information has been restated where necessary to be consistent with disclosures in the current

reporting period.

Goods and services tax (GST)

Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of associated GST, unless the amount of GST incurred

is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office (ATO). In this case it is recognised as part of the cost of acquisition

of an asset or as part of an item of expense.

Receivables and payables are stated inclusive of the amount of GST receivable or payable. The net amount of GST

recoverable from, or payable to, the ATO is included with receivables or payables in the statement of financial position.

Cash flows are presented on a gross basis. The GST component of the cash flows arising from investing or financing

activities, which are recoverable from or payable to the ATO, are presented as operating cash flows.

19

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


20

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

(w)

New standards and interpretations

In the current year , the Group adopted all of the new and revised Standards and Interpretations issued by the Australian

Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that are relevant to its operations and effective for the current reporting period. The

adoption of the new and revised Standards and Interpretations has not resulted in any material changes to the Group’s

accounting policies and has had a minimal impact on the Group’s financial statements as outlined below.

As the Group held no collateral or other credit enhancements in respect of its financial instruments, and did not renegotiate

the terms of any financial assets, during the reporting periods presented in these financial statements, there were no other

changes required to the Group’s financial instruments note arising from the amendments to AASB 7 Financial Instruments:

Disclosures.

AASB 1054 Australian Additional Disclosures became effective from reporting periods beginning on or after 1 July 2011.

Given the Group's previous disclosure practices, AASB 1054 had minimal impact on the Group. Note 33 regarding audit

fees has been slightly amended to clarify the nature of the work performed by the auditor.

AASB 2011-1 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from the Trans-Tasman Convergence Project also

became effective from reporting periods beginning on or after 1 July 2011. The only implication for the Group from this

amending standard was the deletion from AASB 101 Presentation of Financial Statements of the requirement for disclosure

of contractual expenditure commitments. Group has elected to continue to disclose this information in aggregate in Note

35.

The following standards, amendments to standards and interpretations have been identified as those which may impact the

entity in the period of initial application. They are available for early adoption at 31 December 2012, but have not been

applied in preparing this financial report.

This accounting standard is effective for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2013 and is to be applied

prospectively from that date. AASB 13 establishes a single source of guidance for fair value measurements. The standard

does not include requirements on when fair value measurement is required but rather prescribes how fair value is to be

measured and disclosed when it is required by another accounting standard. Many of these disclosures relate to the threelevel

fair value hierarchy and are already required for financial instruments under AASB 7. However, AASB 13 extends

these disclosures to cover all assets and liabilities within its scope. Potential impacts of AASB 13 relate to the fair value

measurement methodologies used, and financial statement disclosure made in respect of such assets and liabilities.

The University has commenced reviewing its fair value methodologies (including instructions to valuers, data used and

assumptions made) for all items of property, plant and equipment measured at fair value to determine whether those

methodologies comply with AASB 13. No significant changes are anticipated based on the fair value methodologies

presently used. Therefore, at this stage, no consequential material impacts are expected for the university’s property, plant

and equipment for year ended 31 December 2013.

AASB 13 will require an increased amount of information to be disclosed in relation to fair value measurements for both

assets and liabilities. To the extent that any fair value measurement for an asset or liability uses data that is not

‘observable’ outside the Group, the amount of information to be disclosed will be relatively greater.

AASB 9 Financial Instruments (December 2010) and AASB 2010-7 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards

arising from AASB 9 (December 2010) [AASB 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 101, 102, 108, 112, 118, 120, 121, 127, 128, 131, 132, 136,

137, 139, 1023 & 1038 and Interpretations 2, 5, 10, 12, 19 & 127] become effective from reporting periods beginning on or

after 1 January 2015. The main impact of AASB 9 is to change the requirements for the classification, measurement and

disclosures associated with financial assets. Under the new requirements, financial assets will be more simply classified

according to whether they are measured at amortised cost or fair value. Pursuant to AASB 9, financial assets can only be

measured at amortised cost if two conditions are met. One of these conditions is that the asset must be held within a

business model whose objective is to hold assets in order to collect contractual cash flows. The other condition is that the

contractual terms of the asset give rise on specified dates to cash flows that are solely payments of principal and interest

on the principal amount outstanding.

The University has commenced reviewing the measurement of its financial assets against the new AASB 9 classification

and measurement requirements. However, as the classification of financial assets at the date of initial application of AASB

9 will depend on the facts and circumstances existing at that date, the University’s conclusions will not be confirmed until

closer to that time.

The following new and revised standards apply as from reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2013:



AASB 10 Consolidated Financial Statements

AASB 11 Joint Arrangements


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012





Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

AASB 12 Disclosure of Interests in Other Entities

AASB 127 (revised) Separate Financial Statements

AASB 128 (revised) Investments in Associates and Joint Ventures

AASB 2011-7 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from the Consolidation and Joint

Arrangements Standards [AASB 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 9, 2009-11, 101, 107, 112, 118, 121, 124, 132, 133, 136, 138, 139,

1023 & 1038 and Interpretations 5, 9, 16 & 17].

These standards cannot be applied by not-for-profit entities prior to their effective date, as the AASB is presently

considering modifying them for application by not-for-profit entities in an Australian context. Any such modifications are

likely to clarify how the IASB’s principles should be applied by not-for-profit entities. Hence, the University is not yet in a

position to reliably determine the future implications of these new and revised standards for the Group’s financial

statements.

21

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

AASB 10 redefines and clarifies the concept of control of another entity, which is the basis for determining which entities

should be consolidated into the University’s financial statements. Therefore subject to any not-for-profit modifications yet to

be made to AASB 10, the University will need to re-assess the nature of its relationships with other entities, including

entities that are not currently consolidated.

AASB 11 deals with the concept of joint control, and sets out new principles for determining the type of joint arrangement

that exists – which, in turn, dictates the accounting treatment. The new categories of joint arrangements under AASB 11

are more aligned to the actual rights and obligations of the parties to the arrangement. Subject to any not-for-profit

modifications yet to be made to AASB 11, the University will need to assess the nature of any arrangements with other

entities to determine whether a joint arrangement exists in terms of AASB 11.

AASB 12 contains a wide range of new disclosure requirements in respect of interests in other entities, whether those

entities are controlled entities, associates, joint arrangements, or structured entities that are not consolidated. The volume

and nature of disclosures that the University will be required to make for the 31 December 2013 financial statements will

depend on the eventual assessment of the implications of the new and revised standards listed above, particularly AASB

10, AASB 11 and AASB 128.

A revised version of AASB 119 Employee Benefits applies from reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2013.

The revised AASB 119 is generally to be applied retrospectively. Given the University’s circumstances, the only

implications for the group are that the revised standard clarifies the concept of “termination benefits”, and the recognition

criteria for liabilities for termination benefits will be different. If termination benefits meet the timeframe criterion for “shortterm

employee benefits”, they will be measured according to the AASB 119 requirements for “short-term employee

benefits”. Otherwise, termination benefits will need to be measured according to the AASB 119 requirements for “other

long-term employee benefits”. Under the revised standard, the recognition and measurement of employer obligations for

“other long-term employee benefits” will need to be accounted for according to most of the requirements of the defined

benefits plans.

The revised AASB 119 includes changed requirements for the measurement of employer liabilities/assets arising from

defined benefit plans, and the measurement and presentation of changes in such liabilities/assets. The University

contributions to QSuper defined benefit plan (which the obligations are considered immaterial), and the corresponding

QSuper employer benefit obligation is held by the State. Therefore, those changes to AASB 119 will have no impact on the

University.

AASB 1053 Application of Tiers of Australian Accounting Standards applies as from reporting periods beginning on or after

1 July 2013. AASB 1053 establishes a differential financial reporting framework for those entities that prepare general

purpose financial statements, consisting of two tiers of reporting requirements – Australian Accounting Standards

(commonly referred to as “tier 1”), and Australian Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements (commonly

referred to as “tier 2”). Tier 1 requirements comprise the full range of AASB recognition, measurement, presentation and

disclosure requirements that are currently applicable to reporting entities in Australia. The only difference between tier 1

and tier 2 requirements is that tier 2 requires fewer disclosures than tier 1.

Pursuant to AASB 1053, public sector entities like Central Queensland University may adopt tier 2 requirements for their

general purpose financial statements. However, AASB 1053 acknowledges the power of a regulator to require application

of the tier 1 requirements. In the case of the Central Queensland University, the Department of Industry, Innovation,

Science, Research and Tertiary Education has advised that tier 2 reporting requirements are not to be adopted for the

reporting period ending 31 December 2012.

All other Accounting Standards and Interpretations with future commencement dates have been assessed and are not

considered to impact the Group.


22

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 2.

Disaggregated information

Geographical [Consolidated Entity]

University courses are delivered in Singapore through a partnering

arrangement.

Revenue

Results before tax

Notes 2012 2011 2012 2011

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Australia 250,506 250,370 (25,207) (3,502)

Overseas 803 775 (877) 224

251,309 251,145 (26,084) (3,278)

Assets

Australia 341,267 358,342

Overseas 451 -

341,718 358,342

Note 3. Australian Government financial assistance including HECS-HELP and FEE-HELP

Consolidated

Parent Entity

2012 2011 2012 2011

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

(a) Commonwealth Grants Scheme and Other Grants 42.1

Commonwealth Grants Scheme 77,616 67,114 77,616 67,114

Indigenous Support Program 814 814 814 814

Partnership & Participation Program 1,899 2,762 1,899 2,762

Disability Support Program 24 37 24 37

Learning and Teaching Performance Fund 265 - 265 -

Diversity and Structural Adjustment Fund - 686 - 686

Transitional Cost Program 161 203 161 203

Total Commonwealth Grants Scheme and Other Grants 80,779 71,616 80,779 71,616

(b) Higher Education Loan Programs 42.2

HECS - HELP 36,927 29,443 36,927 29,443

FEE - HELP 2,686 2,008 2,686 2,008

SA-HELP 1,318 - 1,318 -

Total Higher Education Loan Programs 40,931 31,451 40,931 31,451

(c) Scholarships 42.3

Australian Postgraduate Awards 799 683 799 683

International Postgraduate Research Scholarship 64 62 64 62

Commonwealth Education Cost Scholarships 908 982 908 982

Commonwealth Accommodation Scholarships 48 335 48 335

Indigenous Access Scholarships 90 (54) 90 (54)

Total Scholarships 1,909 2,008 1,909 2,008


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Consolidated

Parent Entity

Notes 2012 2011 2012 2011

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

(d) DIISRTE - Research 42.4

Joint Research Engagement Program 1,284 1,291 1,284 1,291

Research Training Scheme 2,209 2,240 2,209 2,240

Research Infrastructure Block Grants 212 210 212 210

Sustainable Research Excellence in Universities 323 237 323 237

Total DIISRTE - Research Grants 4,028 3,978 4,028 3,978

(e) Australian Research Council 42.7

(i) Discovery

Project 244 83 244 83

Total Discovery 244 83 244 83

23

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(ii) Linkages

Projects 266 - 266 -

Total Linkages 266 - 266 -

Total ARC 510 83 510 83

(f) Other Australian Government financial assistance

Non-capital

Health Workforce Australia 474 736 474 736

Indigenous Tutorial Assistance Scheme 168 189 168 189

Student services amenities fee 20 - 20 -

Total 662 925 662 925

Capital

Health Workforce Australia 3,650 4,130 3,650 4,130

Total 3,650 4,130 3,650 4,130

Total Other Australian Government financial assistance 4,312 5,055 4,312 5,055

Total Australian Government financial assistance 132,469 114,191 132,469 114,191

Reconciliation

Australian Government grants 91,538 82,740 91,538 82,740

HECS-HELP payments 36,927 29,443 36,927 29,443

FEE-HELP payments 2,686 2,008 2,686 2,008

SA-HELP payments 1,318 - 1,318 -

Total Australian Government financial assistance 132,469 114,191 132,469 114,191


24

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Consolidated

Parent Entity

Notes 2012 2011 2012 2011

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

(g) Australian Government Grants received - cash basis

CGS and Other DIISRTE Grants 42.1 79,414 69,789 79,414 69,789

Higher Education Loan Programs 42.2 40,898 30,031 40,898 30,031

Scholarships 42.3 1,909 426 1,909 426

DIISRTE Research 42.4 4,028 3,978 4,028 3,978

ARC grants - Discovery 42.7(i) 244 83 244 83

ARC grants - Linkages 42.7(ii) 266 - 266 -

Other Australian Government Grants 4,313 5,055 4,313 5,055

Total Australian Government Grants received - cash basis 131,072 109,362 131,072 109,362

OS - Help (Net) 42.8 (63) (5) (63) (5)

Total Australian Government funding received - cash basis 131,009 109,357 131,009 109,357

Note 4. Fees and charges

Course fees and charges

Fee-paying overseas students 73,368 86,127 73,368 86,127

Continuing education 798 213 399 213

Fee-paying domestic postgraduate students 3,094 2,910 3,094 2,910

Fee-paying domestic undergraduate students 11 88 11 88

Fee-paying domestic non-award students 447 358 447 358

Total course fees and charges 77,718 89,696 77,319 89,696

Other non-course fees and charges

Student services fees from students 1,006 - 1,006 -

Amenities and service fees 1,324 1,619 1,233 1,552

Examination fees 3 2 2 2

Library fines 23 26 23 26

Lease fees & rental charges 5,160 3,348 5,160 3,348

Student accommodation 2,575 2,284 2,575 2,284

Membership fees 198 185 198 185

Management fee income 245 - 1,291 9,050

Accounting fees & charges 457 603 457 603

Conference fees 138 131 138 131

Unclaimed student payments 470 517 470 517

Other fees and charges 619 459 402 216

Total other fees and charges 12,218 9,174 12,955 17,914

Total fees and charges 89,938 98,870 90,274 107,610


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

Note 5. Investment revenue and income

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Consolidated

Parent Entity

Notes 2012 2011 2012 2011

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Interest 1,735 3,667 1,171 2,927

Rental 209 791 209 791

Dividends - 197 - 217

Trust distribution 1,797 3,747 1,797 4,747

Total investment revenue 3,741 8,402 3,177 8,682

Net investment income 3,741 8,402 3,177 8,682

25

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Note 6. Consultancy and contracts

Research

Contracts 6,936 6,801 6,936 6,801

6,936 6,801 6,936 6,801

Other

Consultancy 820 566 820 566

820 566 820 566

Total consultancy and contracts 7,756 7,367 7,756 7,367

Note 7. Sale of books and related student material

(a) Gross sales

Bookshop 4,072 4,041 4,175 4,129

CQU Press - 78 - 78

Sports Centre - 1 - 1

4,072 4,120 4,175 4,208

(b) Cost of sales

Bookshop 2,764 2,793 2,764 2,793

CQU Press - 76 - 76

Sports Centre - 1 - 1

2,764 2,870 2,764 2,870

Gross profit on sale of goods 1,308 1,250 1,411 1,338

Note 8. Other revenue

Other revenue

Donations and bequests 866 146 866 146

Scholarships and prizes 1,422 609 1,422 609

Commission 291 390 28 10

Sales 179 123 147 124

Subsidies 960 464 960 464

Materials Development 2 - 2 -

Recouped Expenditure 414 869 422 875

Other 130 94 129 94

4,264 2,695 3,976 2,322


26

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Consolidated

Parent Entity

Notes 2012 2011 2012 2011

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Note 9. Gain on assets acquired at less than fair value

Gain on assets acquired at less than fair value - 8,081 - 8,081

During 2011 the Group acquired property at 5 Ibis Avenue, Rockhampton. This acquisition resulted from an ‘arms-length’ transaction. A

subsequent valuation as at 31 October 2011 was performed by MD Sheehan (AAPI), Registered valuer No. 1011 which resulted in a gain

on assets acquired at less than fair value.

Note 10. Employee related expenses

Academic

Salaries 60,742 54,292 49,150 42,554

Contribution to funded superannuation and pension schemes 8,199 7,412 7,548 6,752

Payroll tax 3,330 2,913 2,901 2,499

Worker's compensation 161 167 118 117

Long service leave expense 1,286 1,398 1,174 1,224

Annual leave 4,199 3,729 4,212 3,710

Other 136 120 89 78

Total academic 78,053 70,033 65,192 56,936

Non-academic

Salaries 64,395 57,680 49,080 44,254

Contribution to funded superannuation and pension schemes 9,088 8,467 7,578 6,920

Payroll tax 3,760 3,472 2,758 2,500

Worker's compensation 211 244 124 129

Long service leave expense 1,505 1,719 1,231 1,305

Annual leave 4,454 3,983 4,468 3,933

Other 166 201 109 132

Total non-academic 83,579 75,764 65,348 59,172

Total employee related expenses 161,632 145,797 130,540 116,108

Included in salaries are redundancy payments in the amount of $4,773,045 (Parent entity); $2,185,494 (C Management Services Pty Ltd).

The number of employees including full-time, part-time and casual,

measured on a full-time equivalent basis is:

Number of employees 1370 1379 1178 1151

Note 11. Depreciation and amortisation

Depreciation

Buildings 5,693 4,624 5,693 4,625

Infrastructure 605 607 605 607

Leasehold improvements 1,398 1,653 1,392 1,653

Motor vehicles 661 601 660 601

Computing equipment 1,059 1,200 616 696

Plant and equipment 1,662 1,268 1,456 1,084

Total depreciation 11,078 9,953 10,422 9,266

Amortisation

Computer software 3,249 3,085 3,161 2,973

Total amortisation 3,249 3,085 3,161 2,973

Total depreciation and amortisation 14,327 13,038 13,583 12,239


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

Note 12. Repairs and maintenance

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Consolidated

Parent Entity

Notes 2012 2011 2012 2011

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Buildings 1,492 1,609 1,391 1,508

Cleaning 2,178 1,904 1,740 1,479

Repairs and maintenance general 866 821 863 818

IT maintenance 2,590 2,260 2,590 2,260

Service contracts 350 157 350 145

Other operating expenses 2,100 3,527 1,227 2,646

Total repairs and maintenance 9,576 10,278 8,161 8,856

Note 13. Management and other fees

27

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Management fees 804 580 41,987 50,271

Consultants fees 1,083 1,417 978 1,361

Commission 4,056 4,873 167 169

Copyright, royalties and patents 660 632 704 632

Membership fees and subscriptions 1,208 1,078 1,196 1,074

Student related fees 1,063 1,210 1,063 1,218

Labour services fees 5,226 3,336 4,993 4,701

Other fees 2,152 1,691 2,055 1,672

Total management and other fees 16,252 14,817 53,143 61,098

Note 14. Recovery of grants

Australian government grants

Commonwealth Grants Scheme 1,469 1,573 1,469 1,573

HECS - HELP - Australian Government payments 1,954 271 1,954 271

Scholarships - 596 - 596

DIISRTE - Research - 22 - 22

Health Workforce Australia 69 166 69 166

Other 69 80 69 80

Total recovery of grants 3,561 2,708 3,561 2,708

Note 15. Other expenses

Scholarships, grants and prizes 3,086 2,492 3,243 2,469

Advertising, marketing and promotional expenses 7,740 6,527 5,524 4,804

Audit fees, bank charges, legal costs, insurance and taxes 2,492 2,041 2,189 1,782

Donations 53 59 53 59

Changes in inventories of finished goods (327) 228 (327) 228

Printing, stationery, postages and freight 1,665 1,794 1,360 1,385

Rental, hire and other leasing fees 619 767 369 611

Foreign exchange losses - 2 - 2

Services and utility costs 4,374 3,476 3,997 3,104

Waivers - student fees 3,961 3,180 3,961 3,180

Publications expenses 707 957 696 957

Special payments (ex gratia) 141 - 141 -

Other expenses 1,144 1,419 651 797

Total other expenses 25,655 22,942 21,857 19,378


28

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Consolidated

Parent Entity

Notes 2012 2011 2012 2011

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Note 16. Income tax expense

Current tax 10 562 - -

Deferred tax (386) (250) - -

Under/(over) provided in prior years - - - -

(376) 312 - -

Income tax expense is attributable to:

Operating result from continuing operations (376) 312 - -

Operating result from discontinued operations - - - -

Aggregate income tax expense (376) 312 - -

Deferred income tax (revenue)/expense included in income

tax expense comprises:

Decrease/(increase) in deferred tax assets (304) (212) - -

(Decrease)/increase in deferred tax liabilities (82) (38) - -

(386) (250) - -

(b) Numerical reconciliation of income tax expense to prima facie tax payable

Operating result from continuing operations

before income tax expense (1,384) 956 - -

Tax at the Australian tax rate of 30% (2011: 30%) (415) 287 - -

Tax effect of amounts which are not deductible/(taxable) in

calculating taxable income:

Sundry items 22 25 - -

Income tax expense (393) 312 - -

Under/(over) provided in prior years 17 - - -

Income tax expense (376) 312 - -

Note 17. Cash and cash equivalents

Cash at bank and on hand 2,800 2,897 1,504 1,484

Deposits at call 15,318 41,270 6,666 28,028

Other - trust fund 132 119 - -

Total cash and cash equivalents 18,250 44,286 8,170 29,512

(a) Cash at bank and on hand

Cash on hand - These are non-interest bearing.

Cash at bank - These deposits are bearing weighted average interest rate 2.70% (2011: 3.6%).

(b) Deposits at call

The deposits are bearing floating interest rates between 3% and 4.73% (2011: 3.25% and 5.22%). These deposits are held in "on-call'

accounts and available daily.


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

Note 18. Receivables

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Consolidated

Parent Entity

Notes 2012 2011 2012 2011

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Current

Trade receivables

Commercial and general debtors 4,462 5,504 3,830 5,821

Student debtors 725 657 725 656

Student loans 21 7 21 7

Student board 20 10 20 10

5,228 6,178 4,596 6,494

Less: Impaired receivables - Student debtors (149) (112) (149) (112)

Less: Impaired receivables - Commercial and general debtors (187) (193) (187) (193)

4,892 5873000 4,260 6,189

Other receivables

Accrued revenue 12 15 7 7

Prepayments 5,074 4,208 9,206 11,112

(Net) GST 1,009 1,169 1,014 1,032

Total current receivables 10,987 11,265 14,487 18,339

29

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Total receivables 10,987 11,265 14,487 18,339

Impaired receivables

As at 31 December 2012 current receivables of the Group with a nominal value of $335,597 (2011: $305,200) were considered

impaired and form the value of the allowance.

Trade receivables with a value of $1,760,216 (2011: $1,987,505) for the Group and $1,714,462 (2011: $1,977,042) for the Parent

Entity were past due but not impaired. These relate to a number of independent customers for whom there is no recent history of

default. The ageing analysis of these receivables is as follows:

Up to 3 months

3 to 6 months

Over 6 months

Movements in the allowance for impaired receivables are as follows:

At 1 January

Allowance for impairment recognised during the year

Receivables written off during the year as uncollectible

Unused amount reversed

1,167 1,820 1,162 1,809

451 135 410 135

142 33 142 33

1,760 1,988 1,714 1,977

305 180 305 180

236 (17) 236 (17)

(79) (64) (79) (64)

(126) 206 (126) 206

336 305 336 305

The creation and release of the allowance for impaired receivables has been included in 'bad and doubtful debts' in the income

statement. Amounts charged to the allowance account are generally written off when there is no expectation of recovering additional

cash.

The other amounts within receivables do not contain impaired assets and are not past due. Based on credit history, it is expected

that these amounts will be received when due.


30

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Consolidated

Parent Entity

Notes 2012 2011 2012 2011

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Note 19. Inventories

Current

Merchandise

Bookshop inventory held for distribution - at cost 2,208 1,890 2,208 1,890

Total current inventories 2,208 1,890 2,208 1,890

Total inventories 2,208 1,890 2,208 1,890

Note 20. Income tax assets

The income tax refundable of $472,803 (2011: $105,914) for the Group, $Nil (2011: $Nil) for the Parent Entity represents the amount

of income tax refundable in respect of current periods net of payments of tax made to the relevant tax authority and accrual at end of

year.

Note 21. Available for sale financial assets

Current

QIC - Unit trust 30,886 35,500 30,886 35,500

30,886 35,500 30,886 35,500

Non-current

Shares in Subsidiaries

C Management Services Pty Ltd - - - -

CQU Travel Centre Pty Ltd - - 411 402

Australian International Campuses Pty Ltd - - - -

Health Train Education Services Pty Ltd - - 304 -

CQU Institute of Higher Learning Pte Ltd - - 222 -

Mask-Ed International Pty Ltd - - - -

Shares in Unlisted Companies

Education Australia Ltd 1,565 1,337 1,565 1,337

WaterEd Australia Pty Ltd 165 137 165 137

Rail Innovation Australia Pty Ltd 82 78 82 78

AARNet Pty Ltd 1 1 1 1

Unisuper Management Pty Ltd - - -

Total non-current other financial assets 1,813 1,553 2,750 1,955

Total available for sale financial assets 32,699 37,053 33,636 37,455

Changes in fair values of other financial assets are recorded in other comprehensive income.

Investment Funds

The investment funds in the unit trust with Queensland Investment Corporation (QIC) were established to provide the University with shortterm

funding capabilities.

Subsidiaries

Details of subsidiaries are set out in Note 38. The Australian International Campuses Trust owns 100% of the shares in C Management

Services Pty Ltd. The trust was established for the benefit of the University, being the sole unit holder. These shares are valued using

the net asset method. This is a management valuation and there is no active market for these shares.

CQU Travel Centre Pty Ltd is a licenced travel agency. The company is 100% owned by the University. These shares are valued using

the net asset method. This is a management valuation and there is no active market for these shares.

Health Train Education Services Pty Ltd was acquired by Central Queensland University on 1 June 2012 and is a fully owned subsidiary of

the University. The university acquired the company in an active market. These shares are valued using the net asset value on a going

concern method.

CQU Institute of Higher Learning Pte Ltd was registered in Singapore on 9 March 2012 with 1,000,000 ordinary shares issued. Central

Queensland University has a 51% shareholding. The company has traded during the 2012 year however operations are now on hold.


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

Note 21. Available for sale financial assets cont..

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Mask-Ed International Pty Ltd was established on 28 June 2011 and is a fully owned subsidiary of the Univesity with 100 ordinary shares

issued to Central Queensland University. The company has not traded to date.

Unlisted Securities

Education Australia Ltd is a company offering student placement and English language testing services. The University holds less than

3% of the shareholding in Education Australia Ltd. The shares are valued using the net asset method. This is a management valuation

and there is no active market for these shares.

WaterEd Australia Pty Ltd is a company providing leadership and innovation in collaborative water resources management education and

training. The University holds a 20% shareholding in WaterEd Australia Pty Ltd. The shares are valued using the net asset value on a

going concern method. This is a management valuation and there is no active market for these shares.

Rail Innovation Australia Pty Ltd is a company responsible for the establishment of the Cooperative Research Centre for Railway

Engineering and Technologies. The University holds a 24% shareholding in Rail Innovation Australia Pty Ltd. The shares are valued

using the net asset method. This is a management valuation and there is no active market for these shares.

31

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

AARNet Pty Ltd provides network connectivity for Australian Universities and the CSIRO. The University holds less than 3% of the

shareholding in AARNet Pty Ltd. The shares are valued at cost and there is no active market for these shares.

The University also has holdings with immaterial value. These holdings, valued at cost, carry minimal value due to there not being an

active market to trade, or the shares are held as part of a membership. These holdings are with the unlisted entities, Australian

International Campuses Pty Ltd and Unisuper Management Pty Ltd.

Note 22. Other non-financial assets

Consolidated

Parent Entity

Notes 2012 2011 2012 2011

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Current

Imputation credits 61 8 61 8

Other 180 191 180 191

Total other non-financial assets 241 199 241 199

Note 23. Investments accounted for using the equity method

Investments in associates 177 236 - -

Reconciliation

Balance at 1 January 2012 236 195 - -

Share of profit for the year (59) 41 - -

Balance at 31 December 2012 177 236 - -

Name of Entity Description

Ownership interest

Hortical Pty Ltd Company established to hold the licence to the

50% 50%

intellectual property rights in Non-invasive

Sorting Technology and to develop and

commercialise these activities.

Summarised financial information in respect of associates is set out below.

Financial Position

Total assets 561 686 - -

Total liabilities 208 214 - -

Net assets 353 472 - -

Share of associates' net assets 177 236 - -

Financial Performance

Total revenue 28 176 - -

Profit/(loss) (119) 82 - -

Share of associates' profit/(loss) (59) 41 - -


32

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Consolidated

Parent Entity

Notes 2012 2011 2012 2011

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Note 24. Investment properties

At fair value

Opening balance at 1 January 1,650 9,500 1,650 9,500

Change in fair value - 350 - 350

Disposals - (8,200) - (8,200)

Closing balance at 31 December 1,650 1,650 1,650 1,650

(a) Amounts recognised in profit and loss for investment properties

Rental Income 141 712 141 712

Direct operating expenses (rent generating properties) (3) (251) (3) (251)

Total recognised in profit and loss 138 461 138 461

(b) Valuation basis

Investment property was last comprehensively revalued at fair value as at 31 October 2012 by M.D. Sheehan, Registered

Valuer (No. 1011). The valuation was based on publicly available data on recent rentals and sales of similar buildings in

nearby localities. Such valuations were also influenced by details supplied by the University in respect of the age, internal

features/design and physical condition of each building.

(c) Leasing arrangements

Investment properties consist of one property that is leased to third parties under individually negotiated lease terms.


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

33

Note 25. Property, plant and equipment

Construction

in progress Freehold land

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Freehold

buildings

Plant and

equipment

Leasehold

improvements

Other work in

progress

Library &

collections Infrastructure Total

Consolidated $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

At 1 January 2011

- Cost 7,994 - - 32,426 10,345 3,407 - - 54,172

- Valuation - 39,115 179,562 - - - 1,536 14,717 234,930

Accumulated depreciation - - (28,291) (25,252) (7,554) - - (6,715) (67,811)

Net book amount 7,994 39,115 151,271 7,174 2,792 3,407 1,536 8,002 221,291

Year ended 31 December 2011

Opening net book amount 7,994 39,115 151,271 7,174 2,792 3,407 1,536 8,002 221,291

Adjustment relating to prior period - - (402) 39 - - (8) 401 30

Revaluation surplus/(deficit) - 596 1,583 - - - 339 61 2,579

Additions 15,069 4,300 9,550 3,652 207 7,288 18 363 40,447

Disposals - - - (401) - - (7) - (408)

Depreciation charge - - (4,624) (3,069) (1,653) - - (607) (9,953)

Capitalisation (19,317) - 19,101 2,240 6,093 (8,333) - 216 -

Closing net book amount 3,746 44,011 176,479 9,635 7,439 2,362 1,878 8,436 253,986

At 31 December 2011

- Cost 3,746 - - 35,752 16,645 2,362 - - 58,505

- Valuation ¹

- 44,011 209,553 - - - 1,878 15,955 271,397

Accumulated depreciation - - (33,074) (26,117) (9,206) - - (7,519) (75,916)

Net book amount 3,746 44,011 176,479 9,635 7,439 2,362 1,878 8,436 253,986

Year ended 31 December 2012

Opening net book amount 3,746 44,011 176,479 9,635 7,439 2,362 1,878 8,436 253,986

Adjustment relating to prior period - - - - - - - - -

Revaluation surplus/(deficit) - 401 1,719 - - - 1,090 71 3,281

Additions 11,520 - - 4,605 1,243 4,254 96 - 21,718

Disposals - - - (335) - - (10) - (345)

Depreciation charge - - (5,693) (3,382) (1,397) - - (605) (11,077)

Capitalisation (12,067) - 11,376 1,316 4,389 (5,178) - 164 -

Closing net book amount 3,199 44,412 183,881 11,839 11,674 1,438 3,054 8,066 267,563

At 31 December 2012

- Cost

3,199 - - 38,934 22,261 1,438 - - 65,832

- Valuation ¹

- 44,412 223,013 - - - 3,054 16,281 286,760

Accumulated depreciation - - (39,132) (27,095) (10,587) - - (8,215) (85,029)

Net book amount 3,199 44,412 183,881 11,839 11,674 1,438 3,054 8,066 267,563

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


34

Note 25. Property, plant and equipment (continued)

Construction

in progress

Freehold land

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Freehold

buildings

Plant and

equipment

Leasehold

improvements

Other work in

progress

Library &

collections

Infrastructure Total

Parent entity $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

At 1 January 2011

- Cost 7,994 - - 27,727 10,346 3,407 - - 49,474

- Valuation - 39,115 179,562 - - - 1,536 14,713 234,926

Accumulated depreciation - - (28,291) (21,891) (7,554) - - (6,711) (64,447)

Net book amount 7,994 39,115 151,271 5,836 2,792 3,407 1,536 8,002 219,953

Year ended 31 December 2011

Opening net book amount 7,994 39,115 151,271 5,836 2,792 3,407 1,536 8,002 219,953

Adjustment relating to prior period - - (402) 39 - - (8) 401 30

Revaluation surplus/(deficit) - 596 1,583 - - - 339 61 2,579

Additions 15,069 4,300 9,550 2,908 207 7,288 18 363 39,703

Disposals - - - (364) - - (7) - (371)

Depreciation charge

- - (4,624) (2,382) (1,653) - - (607) (9,266)

Capitalisation (19,317) - 19,101 2,240 6,093 (8,333) - 216 -

Closing net book amount 3,746 44,011 176,479 8,277 7,439 2,362 1,878 8,436 252,628

At 31 December 2011

- Cost 3,746 - - 31,122 16,645 2,362 - - 53,875

- Valuation ¹

- 44,011 209,553 - - - 1,878 15,951 271,393

Accumulated depreciation - - (33,074) (22,845) (9,206) - - (7,515) (72,640)

Net book amount 3,746 44,011 176,479 8,277 7,439 2,362 1,878 8,436 252,628

Year ended 31 December 2012

Opening net book amount 3,746 44,011 176,479 8,277 7,439 2,362 1,878 8,436 252,628

Adjustment relating to prior period - - - - - - - - -

Revaluation surplus/(deficit) - 401 1,719 - - - 1,090 71 3,281

Additions 11,520 - - 4,354 1,146 4,254 96 - 21,370

Disposals - - - (311) - (10) - (321)

Depreciation charge - - (5,693) (2,733) (1,392) - - (605) (10,423)

Capitalisation (12,067) - 11,376 1,316 4,389 (5,178) - 164 -

Closing net book amount 3,199 44,412 183,881 10,903 11,582 1,438 3,054 8,066 266,535

At 31 December 2012

- Cost

3,199 - - 34,671 22,127 1,438 - - 61,435

- Valuation ¹

- 44,412 223,013 - - - 3,054 16,278 286,757

Accumulated depreciation - - (39,132) (23,768) (10,545) - - (8,212) (81,657)

Net book amount 3,199 44,412 183,881 10,903 11,582 1,438 3,054 8,066 266,535

The fair value model is applied to all Buildings, Infrastructure, Land, Library Heritage collection and Artworks, all other property, plant and equipment is valued at cost.

(1) Buildings, Infrastructure and Land were last independently valued to Fair Value as at 31 December 2010 by G Pyman (FAPI, MRICS), Registered Valuer (No. 1856), with interim valuation using indexes as at 31 October

2012 and management assessment. Purchase of property at 5 Ibis Avenue, Rockhampton on 5 October 2011 at cost with comprehensive revalue as at 31 October 2011 by MD Sheehan (AAPI) Registered Valuer (No.

1011). Library Heritage Collection was last independently valued to Fair Value as at 30 September 2012 by J Harbeck, Australian Government Cultural Gifts Program Valuer. Artworks was last independently valued to

Fair Value as at 31 December 2011 by B MacAulay (AVAA - No. 336) with a desk top valuation as at 31 October 2012 and management assessment. Assets acquired in years between comprehensive revaluation by

external valuer are not revalued and are carried at cost. Thus fair value of these are based on management assessment.


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

Note 26. Intangible assets

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Computer

Computer

Software

Software Work

in Progress Goodwill Total

Consolidated $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

At 1 January 2011

- Cost 17,836 94 - 17,930

Accumulated amortisation (10,662) - - (10,662)

Net book amount 7,174 94 - 7,268

35

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Year ended 31 December 2011

Opening net book amount 7,174 94 - 7,268

Additions 3 2,096 - 2,099

Disposals (137) - (137)

Amortisation charge (3,085) - - (3,085)

Capitalisation 2,137 (2,137) - -

Closing net book amount 6,092 53 - 6,145

At 31 December 2011

- Cost 19,419 53 - 19,472

Accumulated amortisation (13,327) - - (13,327)

-

Net book amount 6,092 53 - 6,145

Year ended 31 December 2012

Opening net book amount 6,092 53 - 6,145

Adjustment relating to prior period - - -

Additions 149 2,138 373 2,660

Disposals - - -

Amortisation charge (3,248) - - (3,248)

Capitalisation 991 (991) - -

Closing net book amount 3,984 1,200 373 5,557

At 31 December 2012

- Cost 20,560 1,200 373 22,133

Accumulated amortisation (16,576) - - (16,576)

Net book amount 3,984 1,200 373 5,557


36

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 26. Intangible assets (continued)

Parent

Computer

Computer

Software

Software Work

in Progress Goodwill Total

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

At 1 January 2011

- Cost 16,929 94 - 17,023

Accumulated amortisation (9,962) - - (9,962)

Net book amount 6,967 94 - 7,061

Year ended 31 December 2011

Opening net book amount 6,967 94 - 7,061

Adjustment relating to prior period - - - -

Additions 2,096 - 2,096

Disposals (137) - - (137)

Amortisation charge (2,974) - - (2,974)

Capitalisation 2,137 (2,137) - -

Closing net book amount 5,993 53 - 6,046

At 31 December 2011

- Cost 18,548 53 - 18,601

Accumulated amortisation (12,555) - - (12,555)

Net book amount 5,993 53 - 6,046

Year ended 31 December 2012

Opening net book amount 5,993 53 - 6,046

Additions 127 2,138 373 2,638

Disposals - - -

Amortisation charge (3,161) - - (3,161)

Capitalisation 991 (991) - -

Closing net book amount 3,950 1,200 373 5,523

At 31 December 2012

- Cost 19,666 1,200 373 21,239

Accumulated amortisation (15,716) - - (15,716)

Net book amount 3,950 1,200 373 5,523


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

Note 27. Deferred tax assets and liabilities

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Consolidated

The balance comprises temporary differences

attributable to:

Assets Liabilities Net

2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Prepayments - - (59) (95) (59) (95)

Property, plant and equipment 162 212 - - 162 212

Accrued interest - - (2) (3) (2) (3)

Payables 145 125 - - 145 125

Employee provisions 1,249 1,340 - - 1,249 1,340

FBT liability - 4 (12) - (12) 4

Other legal and consultancy fees - - - - - -

Vehicle leases - - - (57) - (57)

Tax loss carried forward 429 - - - 429 -

1,985 1,681 (73) (155) 1,912 1,526

37

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Movement in temporary differences during the year: Balance Recognised Balance

01-Jan-11 in income 31-Dec-11

$'000 $'000 $'000

Prepayments (138) 43 (95)

Property, plant and equipment 193 19 212

Accrued interest (3) - (3)

Payables 123 2 125

Employee provisions 1,142 198 1,340

FBT Liability (3) 7 4

Other legal and consultancy fees 13 (13) -

Vehicle leases (51) (6) (57)

Tax loss carried forward - - -

1,276 250 1,526

Movement in temporary differences during the year: Balance Recognised Balance

01-Jan-12 in income 31-Dec-12

$'000 $'000 $'000

Prepayments (95) 36 (59)

Property, plant and equipment 212 (50) 162

Accrued interest (3) 1 (2)

Payables 125 20 145

Employee provisions 1,340 (91) 1,249

FBT Liability 4 (16) (12)

Other legal and consultancy fees - - -

Vehicle leases (57) 57 -

Tax loss carried forward - 429 429

1,526 386 1,912


38

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 28. Trade and other payables

Consolidated

Parent Entity

2012 2011 2012 2011

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Current

OS-HELP liability to Australian Government 1 64 1 64

Trade creditors 6,629 7,606 5,507 6,356

Liability to Australian Government for grant recovery 292 165 292 165

Other creditors 3,026 1,640 2,622 1,612

Total current trade and other payables 9,948 9,475 8,422 8,197

Total trade and other payables 9,948 9,475 8,422 8,197

Note 29. Provisions

Current provisions expected to be settled within 12 months

Grant recovery 3,480 1,454 3,480 1,454

Employee benefits

Annual leave 9,653 8,981 8,100 7,429

Long service leave 3,304 3,580 2,410 2,315

Staff redundancies - 580 - 580

Current provisions expected to be settled after 12 months

Employee benefits

Annual leave 1,075 1,103 1,075 1,103

Long service leave 9,192 8,497 9,192 8,497

Total current provisions 26,704 24,195 24,257 21,378

Non-current

Make good 4,151 2,822 4,151 2,822

Employee benefits

Long service leave 4,278 4,814 2,560 3,166

Total non-current provisions 8,429 7,636 6,711 5,988

Total provisions 35,133 31,831 30,968 27,366


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

(a) Movements in provisions

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Movements in each class of provision during the financial year, other than employee benefits, are set out below:

Grant

Recovery

2012

Consolidated

$'000

Current

Carrying amount at start of year 1,454

Additional provisions recognised 3,424

Amounts used (1,398)

Unused amounts reversed -

Carrying amount at end of year 3,480

39

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Grant recovery

Provision is made for estimated recovery of Australian Government financial assistance in particular Commonwealth Grants Scheme,

HECS-HELP and Commonwealth Scholarships due to lower than expected student enrolments.

Make Good

2012

$'000

Non-current

Carrying amount at start of year 2,822

Additional provisions recognised 999

Unused amounts reversed -

Change in estimated cashflows 147

Increase/(decrease) in discounted amount 183

Carrying amount at end of year 4,151

Leasehold improvements - make good

Provision is made for estimated make good expenses in accordance with the terms of the lease agreements for premises at 400 Kent

Street Sydney, 90 Goodchap Street Noosaville, 160 Ann Street Brisbane, 44 Greenhill Road Wayville and 134 -140 Little Lonsdale Street

Melbourne. The leases have termination dates of 2022, 2021, 2020 and 2016 respectively when it is expected that these obligations will

be realised.

Consolidated

Parent Entity

2012 2011 2012 2011

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Note 30. Other liabilities

Current

Revenue received in advance 10,577 15,326 10,566 15,329

Building lease liability* 491 693 491 693

Other 3,012 3,689 2,997 3,174

Total current other liabilities 14,080 19,708 14,054 19,196

Non-current

Building lease liability* 16,741 12,559 16,741 12,559

Total non-current other liabilities 16,741 12,559 16,741 12,559

Total other liabilities 30,821 32,267 30,795 31,755

*This accumulated liability relates to the University's operating leases for the Australian International Campuses' premises which are

expensed on a straight-line basis over the terms of the individual lease in accordance with AASB 117. This liability is over the

remaining life of the leases.


40

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Consolidated

Parent Entity

Notes 2012 2011 2012 2011

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Note 31. Reserves and retained surpluses

(a) Reserves

Property, plant and equipment revaluation reserve 78,452 75,171 78,451 75,171

Available for sale financial assets 5,990 2,402 5,923 2,704

Foreign currency translation reserve 34 - - -

Total reserves 84,476 77,573 84,374 77,875

Non-controlling interest (17) - - -

Total reserves attributable to parent entity 84,459 77,573 84,374 77,875

Movements:

Property, plant and equipment revaluation reserve

Balance 1 January 75,171 72,584 75,171 72,584

Revaluation increment/(decrement)

Buildings 1,718 1,583 1,718 1,583

Land 401 596 401 596

Infrastructure 71 61 71 61

Library heritage collection 1,167 - 1,167 -

Artwork (77) 347 (77) 347

Balance 31 December 78,451 75,171 78,451 75,171

Available for sale financial assets reserve

Balance 1 January 2,402 5,996 2,704 6,275

Fair value increment/(decrement) 3,588 (3,594) 3,219 (3,571)

Balance 31 December 5,990 2,402 5,923 2,704

Foreign currency translation reserve

Balance 1 January - - - -

Fair value increment/(decrement) 34 - - -

Balance 31 December 34 - - -

(b) Retained surplus

Movements in retained surplus were as follows:

Retained surplus at 1 January 207,196 210,474 202,527 205,469

Net operating result for the year (25,896) (3,278) (24,636) (2,942)

Retained surplus on acquisition of subsidiary (166) - - -

Retained surplus at 31 December 181,134 207,196 177,891 202,527

(c) Nature and purpose of reserves

The property, plant and equipment revaluation reserve includes the net revaluation increments and decrements arising from the

revaluation.

Available for sale financial assets reserve represents fair value movements in financial assets.

The share revaluation reserve includes the net revaluation increments and decrements arising from the revaluation.

The foreign currency translation reserve relates to the translation of the results and position of CQU Institute of Higher Learning Pte

Ltd whose functional and presentation currency is Singapore dollars into the group accounts which are presented in Australian

dollars.


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

Note 32. Key Management personnel and remuneration

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

(a) Names of responsible persons and key executive management personnel

The following persons were responsible persons and key management executive personnel of the consolidated entity during the

financial year:

Members of the Council and Board Members of the consolidated entity

R. Fritschy C. Turpin

S. Bowman R. Minchinton

J. Kyd (Resigned 31 August 2012) B. Fredericks (Appointed 1 August 2012)

T. Griffin T. Grigg (Resigned 17 July 2012)

C. Ware A. Blake

S. Collins L. Hyam

J. Anderson D.Turner

J. Fitzsimmons J. Roberts

J. Mark (Resigned 27 January 2012) P. Procter (Resigned 1 July 2012)

J. Davis (Appointed 30 January 2012) V. Hindell (Resigned 1 July 2012)

P. Corones N. Babovic (Appointed 5 June 2012)

M. McGrath (Term of Office concluded 25 May 2012) G. Pegg (Appointed 9 March 2012)

G. Carpenter (Appointed 25 May 2012) S. K. Cheng (Appointed 9 March 2012)

N. Pearse P. Loke (Appointed 9 March - Resigned 18 December 2012)

41

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Key Executive Management Personnel

S. Bowman J. Roberts

J. Kyd (Resigned 31 August 2012) H. Winchester (Appointed 1 August 2012)

M. Burton (Contract expired 31 January 2012) P. Carter (Resigned 31 July 2012)

K. Hawkins (Contract expired 1 August 2012) G. Wessling

A. Dawson D. Horvath

N. Babovic J. Brown

K. Tickle (Contract expired 6 July 2012) P. Deacon (Appointed 23 October 2012)

G. Pegg G. McMillan (Appointed 5 June 2012)

D. Turner K. Bruce (Appointed 9 April - Resigned 4 July 2012)

No other person had authority or responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of the consolidated entity during the

financial year.


42

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

(b) Council and Board Members

University Council Members

The University Council is the governing body of the University, as set out in the Central Queensland University Act 1998 and is

responsible for managing and controlling the University's affairs, property and finances. The council must act in the manner that is

most likely to promote the University's interests and acts in all matters to advance the interests and aspirations of the University.

Membership of the Council is set out in ss 12-16 of the Act.

Council members have a duty to act honestly and with integrity; to exercise due care, skill and diligence in their duties; to make

appropriately informed decisions; and to act at all times in the interests of the University.

CQU Travel Centre Pty Ltd Board Members

Board members of CQU Travel Centre Pty Ltd are responsible for applying governance and oversight of the management of the

business and for ensuring the profitable operation on a sustainable basis. They approve the strategic direction and operations of

the Company in accordance with sound corporate governance protocols.

The two board members are also key executive management personnel of Central Queensland University and were appointed by

authority of the Company's Shareholder on 17 January 2006 and 23 June 2010 respectively.

Australian International Campuses Pty Ltd Board Members

Board members of Australian International Campuses Pty Ltd are responsible for applying governance and oversight of the

management of the business and for ensuring the profitable operation on a sustainable basis. They approve the strategic direction

and operations of the Company in accordance with sound corporate governance protocols.

The two current board members are also Members of the University Council and were appointed by authority of the Company's

Shareholder on 5 November 2008 and 22 February 2011 respectively.

C Management Services Pty Ltd Board Members

Board members of C Management Services Pty Ltd are responsible for ensuring that the Company complies with the objects as set

out in its constitution, governance and oversight of the management of the business and for ensuring the profitable operation on a

sustainable basis. The Company's Board of Directors approve the strategic direction and operations of the Company in

accordance with sound corporate governance protocols.

Three of the current board members are also Members of the University Council and were appointed by authority of the Company's

Shareholder on 26 August 2003, 20 November 2003 and 2 September 2009 respectively.

Health Train Education Services Pty Ltd Board Members

Board members of Health Train Education Services Pty Ltd are responsible for applying governance and oversight of the

management of the business and for ensuring the profitable operation on a sustainable basis. They approve the strategic direction

and operations of the Company in accordance with sound corporate governance protocols.

The two board members are also key executive management personnel of Central Queensland University and were appointed by

authority of the Company's Shareholder on 5 June 2012.

CQU Institute of Higher Learning Pte Ltd Board Members

Board members of CQU Institute of Higher Learning Pte Ltd are responsible for applying governance and oversight of the

management of the business and for ensuring the profitable operation on a sustainable basis. They approve the strategic direction

and operations of the Company in accordance with sound corporate governance protocols.

Three board members are also key executive management personnel of Central Queensland University and were appointed by

authority of the Company's Shareholders on 9 March 2012.


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

Note 32. Key Management personnel and remuneration (continued)

C Management Services Pty Ltd Board Members

Position

Chairman of the Board

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Responsibilities

Contract classification

and appointment

authority

The Chairman of the Board is

responsible for leading and managing

the Board in the discharge of its duties.

Appointed by authority and

Professor Bowman is the CQUniversity

on contract terms of the

Vice Chancellor & President and brings

Company’s Shareholder.

extensive academic and management

experience from within the Australian

higher education sector.

Current Incumbents

Date appointed to position

(Date resigned from position)

Appointed 27 July 2011

(Board Member –

2 September 2009 to 27 July

2011)

43

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Board Member (1)

Board Member (2)

Emeritus Professor Blake, AM held the

position of Vice Chancellor &

President, University of Technology,

Sydney from 1996 to 2002. He has

also held Directorships and

Memberships on Boards and Councils

(both public and private) within the

Australian higher education sector.

Emeritus Professor Blake, AM brings

to the Board a wide range of

educational, strategic and

management experience as well as

strategic skills.

Mr Fritschy is the CQUniversity

Chancellor. Mr Fritschy has held

senior managerial positions and

directorships within the mining sector

and brings to the Board extensive

commercial knowledge and experience

from within the Australian higher

education sector.

Appointed by authority of

the Company’s

Shareholder. Contract

duration is approved by

the Company’s

Shareholder.

Appointed by authority of

the Company’s

Shareholder. Contract

duration is approved by

the Company’s

Shareholder.

Appointed 1 August 2008

(Chairman – 1 August 2008 to 27

July 2011)

Appointed 26 August 2003

Board Member (3)

Ms Hyam has held executive

management positions and

Directorships within the international

and Australian higher education sector

as well as in local government. Ms

Hyam brings extensive industry,

strategic development, market

development and government relations

experience to the Board.

Appointed by authority of

the Company’s

Shareholder. Contract

duration is approved by

the Company’s

Shareholder.

Appointed 1 August 2008

Board Member (4)

Mr Ware is the CQUniversity Deputy

Chancellor. He is currently a

Consultant in a private legal practice

and is a widely experienced solicitor.

Mr Ware has held Directorships on

local industry Boards and brings

extensive legal and government

knowledge to the Board.

Appointed by authority of

the Company’s

Shareholder. Contract

duration is approved by

the Company’s

Shareholder.

Appointed 20 November 2003


44

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 32. Key Management personnel and remuneration (continued)

(c) Remuneration of Council and Board Members

Central Queensland University Council members do not receive any remuneration for attendance at Council meetings or

activities. The University does accept financial responsibility for travel costs related to University meetings and activities.

Board members of Australian International Campuses Pty Ltd, CQU Travel Centre Pty Ltd, Health Train Education Services

Pty Ltd and CQU Institute of Higher Learning Pte Ltd receive no remuneration from the company or the Group in return for

their efforts in the discharge of their responsibilities in those positions.

C Management Services Pty Ltd's Shareholder determines the aggregate amount of Directors Fees or remuneration.

Directors Fees are allocated among the Non-Executive Directors as the Board determines and do not, in any financial year,

exceed in aggregate the amount last determined by the Company's Shareholder. Remuneration of Directors was last

reviewed by the Board on 28 November 2012.

Remuneration packages for Board personnel comprise the following components:-



C Management Services Pty Ltd

Short-term employee benefits

Post-employment benefits

Other long-term benefits

Termination benefits

2012 2011

$ $

208,607 213,586

17,865 19,222

- -

- -

226,472 232,808

2012 C Management Services Pty Ltd

Position

Chairman of the Board *

Board Member (1)

Board Member (2)

Board Member (3)

Board Member (4)

Short term Employee

Benefits

Base

$'000

Non-

Monetary

Benefits

$'000

Long Term

Employee

Benefits

Post

Employment

Benefits

Termination

Benefits

Total

Remuneration

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

- - - - - -

53 - - 4 - 57

52 - - 5 - 57

52 - - 5 - 57

52 - - 5 - 57

209 - - 18 - 227

* The Chairman of the Board is an employee of Central Queensland University (the Company's ultimate shareholder) and is

not paid Director's fees.


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 32. Key Management personnel and remuneration (continued)

(c) Remuneration of Council and Board Members (continued)

2011 C Management Services Pty Ltd

Board Member (1)

Board Member (2)

Board Member (3)

Board Member (4)

Position

Chairman of the Board *

Short term Employee

Benefits

Base

$'000

Non-

Monetary

Benefits

$'000

Long Term

Employee

Benefits

Post

Employment

Benefits

Termination

Benefits

Total

Remuneration

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

- - - - - -

69 - - 6 - 76

48 - - 4 - 52

48 - - 4 - 52

48 - - 4 - 52

213 - - 19 - 232

45

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

* The Chairman of the Board is an employee of Central Queensland University (the Company's ultimate shareholder) and is

not paid Director's fees.

No loans have been made to any council member, board personnel or their related parties.

Total remuneration of Council Members and Board

Members (excluding Key Executive Management

Personnel)

Nil - $14,999

$45,000 - $59,999

$75,000 - $89,999

Consolidated

Parent Entity

2012 2011 2012 2011

No. No. No. No.

18 13 15 14

4 3 - -

- 1 - -


46

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 32. Key Management personnel and remuneration (continued)

(d) Key Executive Management Personnel

Key executive management personnel include those positions that had authority and responsibility for planning, directing and

controlling the activities of the Group during 2012.

Central Queensland University

Current Incumbents

Position

Responsibilities

Contract classification

and appointment

authority

Date appointed to position

(Date resigned from position)

Vice-Chancellor and

President

The Vice-Chancellor and President is

Appointed by authority of

responsible for the provision of

the University Council

leadership and driving the strategic

according to the Central

planning, finance and external affairs of

Queensland University Act

the University is a Member of the

Appointed 1 August 2009

1998, Part 3, Section 32.

University Council and Chair of the

Contract terms are based

Board of C Management Services Pty

on market forces and

Ltd and CQU Institute of Higher

research.

Learning Pte Ltd.

Deputy Vice-

Chancellor (Academic

& Research)

The Deputy Vice-Chancellor

(Academic & Research) is responsible

for driving the University's academic,

research and engagement strategic

and operational agendas. The

previous appointee was a Member of

the University Council.

Appointed by authority of

the University Council

according to the Central

Queensland University Act

1998, Part 2, Division 2,

S9 (2)(a). Contract terms

are based on market

forces and research.

Previous incumbent resigned 31

August 2012

Current incumbent appointed 19

November 2012 (Acting from 1

August 2012)

Deputy Vice-

Chancellor

(International)

The Deputy Vice-Chancellor

(International) is a dual role with that of

Chief Executive Officer of C

Management Services Pty Ltd - a

wholly owned subsidiary of the

University, which has responsibility for

the management of the company and

its relationship with the University.

Appointed by authority of

the University Council

according to the Central

Queensland University Act

1998, Part 2, Division 2,

S9 (2)(a). Contract terms

are based on market

forces and research.

Previous incumbent contract

expired 1 August 2012

Interim acting appointment from

11 January 2012 (Resigned 31

August 2012)

Responsibilities incorporated into

Deputy Vice-Chancellor

(International and Services)

position 4 July 2012

Deputy Vice-

Chancellor

(International and

Services)

The Deputy Vice-Chancellor

(International and Services) is

responsible for oversight and strategic

management of the facilities which

support the provision of academic and

research activity across the University.

During the year the incumbent was

appointed to the role of Chief Executive

Officer of C Management Services Pty

Ltd and is responsible for the oversight

and strategic management of that

Company.

Appointed by authority of

the University Council

according to the Central

Queensland University Act

1998, Part 2, Division 2,

S9 (2)(a). Contract terms

are based on market

forces and research.

Appointed 4 July 2012

Previously Deputy Vice-

Chancellor (University Services)

appointed 1 May 2010


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 32. Key Management personnel and remuneration (continued)

(d) Key Executive Management Personnel (continued)

Central Queensland University (continued)

Deputy Vice-

Chancellor

(Development)

The Deputy Vice-Chancellor

(Development) is responsible for

facilitating the University's renewal

agenda.

Appointed by authority of

the University Council

according to the Central

Queensland University Act

1998, Part 2, Division 2,

S9 (2)(a). Contract terms

are based on market

forces and research.

Appointed 16 November 2009

(Contract expired 31 January

2012)

Position disestablished

47

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Deputy Vice-

Chancellor (Industry

and Vocational

Education and

Training)

The Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Industry

and Vocational Education and

Training) main focus is the

responsibility for developing the first

Dual Sector University in Queensland

and is a Director of Health Train

Education Services Pty Ltd.

Appointed by authority of

the University Council

according to the Central

Queensland University Act

1998, Part 2, Division 2,

S9 (2)(a). Contract terms

are based on market

forces and research.

Appointed 2 May 2011

Deputy Vice-

Chancellor (Higher

Education Division)

The Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Higher

Education Division) is responsible for

building a higher education portfolio.

The position will also identify potential

to raise the profile of the University,

and develop innovative strategies and

plans to increase student numbers,

community engagement opportunities,

research potential and the overall

quality of the University. The

incumbent is a Director of CQU

Institute of Higher Learning Pte Ltd.

Appointed by authority of

the University Council

according to the Central

Queensland University Act

1998, Part 2, Division 2,

S9 (2)(a). Contract terms

are based on market

forces and research.

Appointed 27 June 2012

Appointed 27 May 2010

Pro Vice-Chancellor &

Executive Dean

(Faculty of Sciences,

Engineering & Health)

The Pro Vice-Chancellor & Executive

Dean is responsible for strategic

planning and developing goals,

objectives and budgets, for high

standards of curriculum, pedagogy and

assessment in relation to programs

and courses.

Appointed by authority of

the University Council

according to the Central

Queensland University Act

1998, Part 2, Division 2,

S9 (2)(a). Contract terms

are based on market

forces and research.

Appointed to concurrent role of

Acting Executive Dean (Faculty

of Arts, Business, Informatics

and Education) 8 May 2012)

Roles disestablished 26 June

2012 and incorporated into

position of Deputy Vice-

Chancellor (Higher Education

Division)

Pro Vice-Chancellor &

Executive Dean

(Faculty of Arts,

Business, Informatics

and Education & Head

of Campus, Noosa)

The Pro Vice-Chancellor & Executive

Dean is responsible for strategic

planning and developing goals,

objectives and budgets, for high

standards of curriculum, pedagogy and

assessment in relation to programs

and courses.

Appointed by authority of

the University Council

according to the Central

Queensland University Act

1998, Part 2, Division 2,

S9 (2)(a). Contract terms

are based on market

forces and research.

Appointed 9 February 2011

(Contract expired 6 July 2012)

Position responsibilities

redistributed 8 May 2012

Pro Vice-Chancellor & Executive

Dean position disestablished 6

July 2012


48

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 32. Key Management personnel and remuneration (continued)

(d) Key Executive Management Personnel (continued)

Central Queensland University (continued)

Chief Financial Officer

The Chief Financial Officer is

responsible for the University's

Planning and Financial Management

including Risk Management; is a

Director of CQU Travel Centre Pty Ltd,

Health Train Education Services Pty

Ltd, Mask-Ed International Pty Ltd and

CQU Institute of Higher Learning Pte

Ltd.

During the year the incumbent was

appointed to the role of Chief Financial

Officer of C Management Services Pty

Ltd and is responsible for the

Company's strategic planning and

financial management including risk

management.

Appointed by authority of

the University Council

according to the Central

Queensland University Act

1998, Part 2, Division 2,

S9 (2)(a). Contract terms

are based on market

forces and research.

Appointed 1 May 2010

University Secretary

The University Secretary is the

Secretary to the University Council and

is responsible for the processes of

governance within the University

through the Council and its subcommittees,

the management of the

Vice-Chancellor and President's Office,

and is a Director of CQU Travel Centre

Pty Ltd.

Appointed by authority of

the University Council

according to the Central

Queensland University Act

1998, Part 2, Division 2,

S9 (2)(a). Contract terms

are based on market

forces and research.

Appointed 1 May 2010

Concurrent role of Director,

Office of the Vice-Chancellor and

President removed as from 10

February 2012

C Management Services Pty Ltd

Current Incumbents

Position

Responsibilities

Contract classification

and appointment

authority

Date appointed to position

(Date resigned from position)

Chief Executive Officer

Chief Executive Officer

The Chief Executive Officer is

responsible for oversight and strategic

management of the Company.

The Chief Executive Officer is

responsible for oversight and strategic

management of the Company.

Appointed by authority of

The Company’s

Shareholder. Contract

terms are based on

market forces and

research.

Appointed by authority of

The Company's

Shareholder.

Appointed 1 February 2008

(Resigned 31 July 2012)

Appointed as Acting Chief

Executive Officer 1 February

2012

Appointed 1 August 2012

Chief Financial Officer

/ Company Secretary

The Chief Financial Officer / Company

Secretary is responsible for the

Company's strategic planning and

financial management including risk

management. The Company

Secretary is appointed by the Board

and is responsible on all corporate

governance matters.

Appointed by authority of

the C Management

Services Pty Ltd Board.

Contract terms are based

on market forces and

research.

Appointed Chief Financial Officer

1 June 2006

(Resigned 31 July 2012)

Appointed Company Secretary

6 March 2003

(Resigned 20 February 2012)


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 32. Key Management personnel and remuneration (continued)

(d) Key Executive Management Personnel (continued)

C Management Services Pty Ltd (continued)

Chief Financial Officer

Chief Operating Officer

The Chief Financial Officer / Company

Secretary is responsible for the

Company's strategic planning and

financial management including risk

management.

The Chief Operating Officer is

responsible for strategic planning and

development of business opportunities

in relation to the Academic programs

and courses delivered by the

Company.

Appointed by authority of

The Company's

Shareholder.

Appointed by authority of

the Chief Executive

Officer. Contract terms

are based on market

forces and research.

Appointed as Acting Chief

Executive Officer 1 March 2012

Appointed 1 August 2012

Appointed 1 October 2009

49

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

General Manager

Marketing and

Recruitment

The General Manager Marketing and

Recruitment is responsible for

developing the Company's marketing

and recruitment strategies and plans

that drive growth across these

markets.

Appointed by authority of

the Chief Executive

Officer. Contract terms

are based on market

forces and research.

Appointed 10 June 2010

Role restructured 23 October

2012 as a non-executive

leadership position

General Manager

Human Resources

The General Manager Human

Resources is responsible for the

Company's strategic planning in

relation to all staff related matters.

Appointed by authority of

the Chief Executive

Officer. Contract terms

are based on market

forces and research.

Appointed 14 September 2009

Group Manager

Accounting

The Group Manager Accounting is

responsible for influencing and

Appointed to the Executive

implementing the financial objectives of

Leadership Group by the

the Company, statutory reporting and

Chief Executive Officer.

Corporate financial and administrative

policies and procedures.

Appointed to Executive

Leadership Group 23 October

2012

Health Train Services Pty Ltd

Current Incumbents

Position

Responsibilities

Contract classification

and appointment

authority

Date appointed to position

Executive Director

The Executive Director is responsible

for oversight and strategic

management of the Company.

Appointed by authority of

The Company’s

Shareholder. Contract

terms are based on

market forces and

research.

Appointed 5 June 2012


50

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 32. Key Management personnel and remuneration (continued)

(d) Key Executive Management Personnel (continued)

CQU Institute of Higher Learning Pte Ltd

Current Incumbents

Position

Responsibilities

Contract classification

and appointment

authority

Date appointed to position

Chief Executive Officer

The Chief Executive Officer is

responsible for oversight and strategic

management of the Company.

Appointed by authority of

The Company’s

Shareholder. Contract

terms are based on

market forces and

research.

Appointed 9 April 2012

(Resigned 4 July 2012)

Australian International Campuses Pty Ltd and CQU Travel Centre Pty Ltd have no Key Executive Management Personnel.

(e) Remuneration of Key Executive Management Personnel

Remuneration policies for the Group's key executive management personnel is set by the University Council or the Board of C

Management Services Pty Ltd as applicable. The remuneration and other terms of employment for the key executive

management personnel are specified in individual employment contracts. The contracts provide for the provision of other

benefits where applicable.

For the 2012 year, remuneration of Central Queensland University key executive management personnel increased by 6% in

line with the applicable Enterprise Agreement as approved by the University Council with C Management Services key

executive management personnel increasing by 3% (as from 1 December 2012) in line with the Company's Enterprise

Agreement as approved by the Board.

Remuneration packages for key executive management personnel comprise the following components:-

• Short term employee benefits include:


provided for the entire year or for that part of the year during which the employee occupied the specified position. Amounts

disclosed equal the amount expensed in the Statement of Comprehensive Income.


• Long term employee benefits include long service leave accrued during the period.

• Post employment benefits include superannuation contributions.

• Redundancy payments are in line with individual employment contracts and /or the Enterprise Agreements.

• Performance bonuses may be paid or payable annually to the Vice-Chancellor and President only depending upon

satisfaction of key criteria. The quantum of the performance bonus is determined against pre-defined key performance

indicators as set during annual performance review discussions with the Chancellor.

No loans have been made to any key management personnel of the Group or their related parties.

Consolidated

Parent Entity

2012 2011 2012 2011

$ $ $ $

Short-term employee benefits 3,343,281 3,717,154 2,379,642 2,473,110

Long term employee benefits 209,823 122,252 174,072 72,039

Post employment benefits 457,833 475,624 354,727 370,979

Termination benefits 1,469,983 - 470,440 -

5,480,920 4,315,030 3,378,881 2,916,128


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 32. Key Management personnel and remuneration (continued)

(e) Remuneration of Key Executive Management Personnel (continued)

2012 Central Queensland University

Position

Vice-Chancellor and President

1 January to 31 December 2012

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic and

Research)

1 January to 10 January 2012

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic and

Research) and Acting Deputy Vice-

Chancellor (International)

11 January to 31 August 2012

Short Term

Employee Benefits

Base

$'000

Non-

Monetary

Benefits

$'000

Long Term

Employee

Benefits

Post

Employment

Benefits

Termination

Benefits

Total

Remuneration

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

450 25 11 74 - 560

10 1 2 7 - 19

170 14 5 26 - 215

51

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Acting Deputy Vice-Chancellor

(Academic and Research)

1 August to 18 November 2012

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic and

Research)

19 November to 31 December 2012

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (International)

1 January to 1 August 2012 *

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (University

Services)

1 January to 3 July 2012

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (International

and Services)

4 July to 31 December 2012

101 1 2 8 - 113

38 1 1 3 - 43

- - - - - -

153 11 4 24 - 193

149 11 4 25 - 188

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Development)

1 January to 31 January 2012

48 3 19 4 - 74

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Industry &

Vocational Education and Training)

1 January to 31 December 2012

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Higher

Education)

27 June to 31 December 2012

252 19 7 49 - 327

160 1 4 26 - 191

Pro Vice-Chancellor and Executive

Dean (Faculty of Sciences,

Engineering and Health) and Pro Vice-

Chancellor and Executive Dean

(Faculty of Arts, Business, Informatics

and Education

8 May to 26 June 2012

38 - 4 4 - 46


52

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 32. Key Management personnel and remuneration (continued)

(e) Remuneration of Key Executive Management Personnel (continued)

Pro Vice-Chancellor and Executive

Dean (Faculty of Sciences,

Engineering and Health)

1 January to 7 May 2012

Pro Vice-Chancellor and Executive

Dean (Faculty of Arts, Business,

Informatics and Education & Head of

Campus, Noosa)

1 January to 6 July 2012

Chief Financial Officer

1 January to 31 December 2012

University Secretary

10 February to 31 December 2012

University Secretary & Director, Office

of the Vice-Chancellor and President

1 January to 9 February 2012

82 - 2 13 - 98

166 11 106 16 470 771

223 23 9 38 - 292

193 17 (8) 34 - 236

7 2 2 3 - 13

2,240 139 174 355 470 3,379

* The Deputy Vice-Chancellor (International) was the Chief Executive Officer of C Management Services Pty Ltd and was

paid by that company.

2012 C Management Services Pty Ltd

Position

Chief Executive Officer

1 January to 31 July 2012

Chief Financial Officer

1 January to 31 July 2012

Chief Executive Officer *

1 August to 31 December 2012

Chief Financial Officer *

1 August to 31 December 2012

General Manager Academic Programs

and Development

1 January to 31 December 2012

General Manager Marketing and

Recruitment

1 January to 22 October 2012

General Manager Human Resources

1 January to 31 December 2012

Short Term

Employee Benefits

Base

$'000

Non-

Monetary

Benefits

$'000

Long Term

Employee

Benefits

Post

Employment

Benefits

Termination

Benefits

Total

Remuneration

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

90 39 9 25 542 704

75 40 5 18 458 596

- - - - - -

- - - - - -

215 - 7 20 - 241

121 - 6 11 - 138

159 - 6 15 - 180

Group Manager Accounting

23 October to 31 December 2012

33 - 3 - 36

692 79 33 92 1,000 1,896

* The Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer are employees of Central Queensland University (the

Company's ultimate shareholder) and are not paid by the Company.


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 32. Key Management personnel and remuneration (continued)

(e) Remuneration of Key Executive Management Personnel (continued)

2012 Health Train Education Services Pty Ltd

Position

Executive Director

5 June to 31 December 2012

Short Term

Employee Benefits

Base

$'000

Non-

Monetary

Benefits

$'000

Long Term

Employee

Benefits

Post

Employment

Benefits

Termination

Benefits

Total

Remuneration

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

113 - 3 9 - 125

53

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

The Executive Director is an employee of and paid by Central Queensland University for this period.

2012 CQU Institute of Higher Learning Pte Ltd

Position

Chief Executive Officer

1 February to 4 July 2012

Short Term

Employee Benefits

Base

$'000

Non-

Monetary

Benefits

$'000

Long Term

Employee

Benefits

Post

Employment

Benefits

Termination

Benefits

Total

Remuneration

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

64 15 2 - 81

The Chief Executive Officer was an employee of C Management Services Pty Ltd from 1 February to 9 April 2012 and

funded by Central Queensland Univerity during this period.

2011 Central Queensland University

Position

Vice-Chancellor and President

1 January to 31 December 2011

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic and

Research)

1 January to 31 December 2011

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Development)

1 January to 31 December 2011

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (International)

1 January to 31 December 2011 *

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (University

Services)

1 January to 31 December 2011

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Industry &

VET)

2 May to 31 December 2011

Short Term

Employee Benefits

Base

$'000

Non-

Monetary

Benefits

$'000

Long Term

Employee

Benefits

Post

Employment

Benefits

Termination

Benefits

Total

Remuneration

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

427 38 10 67 - 541

270 24 8 47 - 349

273 25 7 45 - 350

279 21 7 47 - 354

198 11 4 31 - 244

-


54

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 32. Key Management personnel and remuneration (continued)

(e) Remuneration of Key Executive Management Personnel (continued)

Pro Vice-Chancellor and Executive

Dean (Faculty of Arts, Business,

Informatics and Education & Head of

Campus, Noosa)

1 January to 31 December 2011

Pro Vice-Chancellor and Executive

Dean (Faculty of Sciences,

Engineering and Health)

1 January to 31 December 2011

232 18 9 30 - 289

225 - 6 36 - 267

Chief Financial Officer

1 January to 31 December 2011

217 21 13 36 - 287

University Secretary & Director, Office

of the Vice-Chancellor and President

1 January to 31 December 2011

178 17 8 32 - 235

2,299 174 72 371 - 2,917

* The Deputy Vice-Chancellor (International) is the Chief Executive Officer of C Management Services Pty Ltd and is paid

by that company.

2011 C Management Services Pty Ltd

Position

Chief Executive Officer

1 January to 31 December 2011

Chief Financial Officer / Company

Secretary

1 January to 31 December 2011

General Manager Academic Programs

and Development

1 January to 31 December 2011

General Manager Marketing and

Recruitment

1 January to 31 December 2011

Short Term

Employee Benefits

Base

$'000

Non-

Monetary

Benefits

$'000

Long Term

Employee

Benefits

Post

Employment

Benefits

Termination

Benefits

Total

Remuneration

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

377 36 16 33 - 462

317 22 18 28 - 385

201 - 13 18 - 232

144 - 1 12 - 157

General Manager Human Resources

1 January to 31 December 2011

148 - 2 13 - 163

1,187 58 50 106 - 1,399


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 32. Key Management personnel and remuneration (continued)

(e) Remuneration of Key Executive Management Personnel (continued)

Performance payments

Central Queensland University

Position

Vice-Chancellor and President

Date Paid

01-Jun-12

25-Feb-11

Amount and basis for payment

$35,150 - The cash performance bonus was calculated by reference to

the outcome of the Vice-Chancellor and President's performance

appraisal. The bonus paid equated to 100% of the maximum bonus

payable and attracted a 9% employer superannuation contribution.

$37,000 - The cash performance bonus was calculated by reference to

the outcome of the Vice-Chancellor and President's performance

appraisal. The bonus paid equated to 100% of the maximum bonus

payable and attracted a 9% employer superannuation contribution.

55

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


56

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 32. Key Management personnel and remuneration (continued)

(e) Remuneration of Key Executive Management Personnel (continued)

Consolidated

Parent Entity

2012 2011 2012 2011

No. No. No. No.

Nil - $14,999 - - 1 1

$30,000 - $44,999 1 - - 0

$60,000 - $74,999 1 - 1 0

$75,000 - $89,999 1 - - -

$120,000 - $134,999 1 - - -

$135,000 - $149,000 1 - - -

$150,000 - $164,999 1 2 1 -

$180,000 - $194,999 1 - - -

$225,000 - $239,999 1 2 1 1

$240,000 - $254,999 2 1 1 1

$255,000 - $269,999 - 1 - 1

$285,000 - $299,999 1 2 1 2

$315,000 - $329,999 1 - 1 -

$330,000 - $344,999 1 - 1 -

$345,000 - $359,999 - 3 - 3

$375,000 - $389,999 1 1 1 -

$450,000 - $464,999 - 1 - -

$540,000 - $554,999 - 1 - 1

$555,000 - $569,999 1 - 1 -

$585,000 - $599,999 1 - - -

$690,000 - $704,999 1 - - -

$765,000 - $779,999 1 - 1 -

These figures represent all payments, including superannuation contributions and package expenses paid by the

University.


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

Note 33. Remuneration of auditors

Assurance Services

1. Audit Services

Fees paid to the Auditor General of Queensland:

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Consolidated

Parent Entity

2012 2011 2012 2011

$ $ $ $

During the year the following fees were paid for services provided by the auditor of the parent entity and its controlled entities.

Audit and review of financial reports under the Financial

Accountability Act 2009

359,868 367,300 209,500 243,600

Total remuneration for audit services 359,868 367,300 209,500 243,600

57

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Note 34. Contingencies

Contingent Liabilities

(a) Consultation with the University's staff and insurers has indicated one (1) pending issue which may result in a claim

against the University. This relates to a possible employment claim. It is difficult to quantify the financial impact of this

potential claim, as the amount payable for this claim, if any, would be reduced by any payout received from the

University's insurers. No material amount is expected to be paid in relation to this matter as at 31 December 2012.

(b) The University has provided a bank guarantee from the Commonwealth Bank of Australia for $2,000,000 in 2012 in

relation to a building lease for 333 Kent Street, Sydney and a further $30,701 for other entities.

(c) The University has provided a bank guarantee from the Commonwealth Bank of Australia for $22,500 in 2012 in

relation to an overseas based research project.


58

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 35. Commitments

(a) Capital commitments

Capital expenditure contracted for at the reporting date but not recognised as liabilities is as follows:

Consolidated

Parent Entity

Notes 2012 2011 2012 2011

Property, Plant and Equipment $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Payable:

Within one year 6,386 9,662 6,386 9,662

Total capital commitments 6,386 9,662 6,386 9,662

(b) Lease commitments

Operating leases

Commitments in relation to non-property leases contracted for at the reporting date but not recognised as liabilities:

Payable

Within one year 633 197 534 148

Later than one year but not later than five years 1,585 249 1,395 209

2,218 446 1,929 357

The consolidated entity leases plant and equipment under non-cancellable operating leases expiring from 1 to 5 years.

There are no provisions for contingent rentals within the existing operating leases.

There are no provisions within the agreements for additional debt.

Commitments for operating leases for Australian International Campus buildings in existence at the reporting date but not

recognised as liabilities:

Payable

Within one year 18,766 20,018 18,766 20,018

Later than one year but not later than five years 83,085 97,085 83,085 97,085

Later than five years 37,285 18,803 37,285 18,803

139,136 135,906 139,136 135,906

Receivable

Within one year 4,204 1,044 4,204 1,044

Later than one year but not later than five years 15,968 310 15,968 310

20,172 1,354 20,172 1,354

Total operating lease commitments 118,964 134,552 118,964 134,552

(c) Other expenditure commitments

Payable

Within one year 311 446 311 446

Total other expenditure commitments 311 446 311 446


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

Note 36. Related Parties

(a)

(b)

(c)

Parent entity

The parent entity is Central Queensland University which at 31 December 2012 owns 100% (2011: 100%) of C Management

Services Pty Ltd, CQU Travel Centre Pty Ltd and Australian International Campuses Pty Ltd. During 2012 Central Queensland

University purchased Health Train Education Services Pty Ltd and owns 100% of the issued share capital. Central Queensland

University also has a 51% share holding in CQU Institute of Higher Learning Pte Ltd located in Singapore.

Subsidiaries

Interests in subsidiaries are set out in Note 38.

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Key management personnel

Disclosures relating to directors and specified executives are set out in Note 32.

59

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(d)

Transactions with related parties

The following transactions occurred with related parties:

Consolidated

Parent

2012 2011 2012 2011

$ $ $ $

Revenue received from controlled entities

Management fee - - 1,290,909 9,049,986

Trust distribution - - - 1,000,000

Dividends - - - 20,000

General - - 856,738 1,169,350

Expenses paid to controlled entities

Management fee - - 40,969,331 49,541,522

Commission - - 86,996 58,426

Booking fee - - 228,000 228,000

General - - 1,302,569 2,896,886

Subsidy - - 180,000 -

(e)

Outstanding balances

The following balances are outstanding at the reporting date in

relation to transactions with related parties:

Current Receivables

Controlled entities (Trade receivable) - - 209,863 586,055

Controlled entities ( Prepaid management fees) - - 4,552,814 7,452,534

Non-current receivables

Associates 84,799 84,799 - -

Current payables

Controlled entities - - 1,117,464 2,255,905

(f)

(g)

Guarantees

No guarantees have been granted in relation to any related party.

Terms and conditions

All transactions were made on normal commercial terms and conditions and at market rates.


60

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 37. Business combinations

(a) Summary of acquisition

Central Queensland University acquired Health Train Education Services Pty Ltd on 1 June 2012 and is a wholly owned

subsidiary of the university. Health Train Education Services Pty Ltd is a registered training organisation registered under the

national regulator Australian Skills Quality Authority (ASQA).

Health Train Education Services Pty Ltd applied to the Australian Taxation Office for a substituted accounting period which

was approved on 13 December 2012. Consequently the comparative figures for the business combination are for the

financial year 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2012, with the current reporting period being 1 July to 31 December 2012.

Details of the fair value of the assets and liabilities acquired and goodwill are as follows:

$'000

Purchase consideration (refer to (b) below): 778

Contingent consideration -

Total purchase consideration 778

Fair value of net identifiable assets acquired (refer to (d) below) 405

Goodwill (refer to (d) below and Note 26) 373

(b) Purchase consideration

Consolidated

Parent Entity

2012 2011

Jul to

Dec 12 2012

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Outflow of cash to acquire subsidiary, net of cash acquired

Cash consideration - - 783 -

Less: Balance acquired cash - - (5)

Outflow of cash - - 778 -

(c)

Operating result

Net operating result for the period 70 123

Net operating result since acquisition date (1 Jun to 31 Dec 2012) (24)

(d) Assets acquired and liabilities assumed

The assets and liabilities arising from the acquisition are as follows:

Acquiree's

carrying Fair value

amount

$'000 $'000

Current assets

Receivables 264 264

264 264

Non-current assets

Leasehold improvements 255 255

Property, Plant and Equipment 35 35

290 290

554 554

Current liabilities

Provisions 149 149

149 149

Net assets 405 405

Net identifiable assets acquired 405 405

Goodwill arising on acquisition 373 373

55

778 778


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

Note 38. Subsidiaries

Name of entity and principal activities

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

The consolidated financial statements incorporate the assets, liabilities and results of the following subsidiaries in accordance with the

accounting policy described in note 1(b):

CQU Travel Centre Pty Ltd

The principal activity of the Company during the financial year was a

licenced international travel agency and provider of educational travel in

Australia.

Country of

incorporation

Class of

shares

Equity holding

2012 2011

% %

Australia Ord 100 100

61

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Australian International Campuses Pty Ltd

The principal activity of the Company is to act as "Trustee" for the

Australian International Campuses Trust.

Australia Ord 100 100

Australian International Campuses Trust

The trust was established for the benefit of the Unitholder being, Central

Queensland University, to hold in trust the shareholdings in the

companies that run the Central Queensland University Australian

International Campuses.

Australia N/A 100 100

C Management Services Pty Ltd

The principal activity of the Company during the financial year was

delivering Central Queensland University academic product to

international students at the Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and Gold

Coast international campuses.

Australia Ord 100 100

Mask-Ed International Pty Ltd

Mask-Ed was established for the purpose of commercialising Intellectual

Property developed by a member of staff. The company was

incorporated during 2011. It has not yet commenced commercial

operations but it is intended that this will occur during 2013.

Australia Ord 100 100

Health Train Education Services Pty Ltd

The principal activity of the Company during the financial year was

delivering health services related training to students throughout Victoria.

Australia Ord 100 -

CQU Institute of Higher Learning Pte Ltd

The principal activity of the Company during the financial year was

delivering Central Queensland University academic product to

international students at the Singapore international campus.

Singapore Ord 51 -

Note 39. Events occurring after the balance sheet date

There are no matters which have arisen subsequent to year end that significantly impact upon the operations of the University.


62

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the financial statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Consolidated

Parent

Notes 2012 2011 2012 2011

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Note 40. Reconciliation of operating result after income

tax to net cash inflow from operating activities

Operating result for the year (26,084) (3,277) (24,636) (2,942)

Depreciation and amortisation 11 14,327 13,038 13,583 12,239

Investment fees/expenditure 143 151 143 151

Investment distributions reinvested (1,613) (3,240) (1,613) (3,240)

Inputation credits (175) - (175) -

Revaluation decrement/(increment) - (350) - (350)

Fair value (gain)/loss on valuation of assets - (8,081) - (8,081)

Net (gain)/loss on sale of investment property - 576 - 576

Net (gain)/loss on sale of non-current assets 42 77 29 53

Net exchange differences (4) - (4) -

Share of profits of associates and joint venture partnership not

received as dividends or distributions 59 (41) - -

Change in operating assets and liabilities, net of effects from

purchase of controlled entity

Decrease/(Increase) in trade debtors 1,110 (3,107) 1,917 (3,061)

Decrease/(Increase) in inventories (318) (33) (318) (33)

Decrease/(Increase) in income tax receivable (367) 132 - -

Decrease/(Increase) in deferred tax asset (386) (250) - -

Decrease/(Increase) in other operating assets (845) (270) 1,926 (515)

Increase/(decrease) in trade creditors 234 (7,664) (14) (6,729)

Increase/(decrease) in other operating liabilities (1,510) 2,227 (1,023) 2,256

Increase/(decrease) in other provisions 2,152 665 2,487 6

Net cash inflow (outflow) from operating activities (13,235) (9,447) (7,698) (9,670)

Credit standby arrangements

Total facilities

Queensland Treasury Corporation 42,650 43,800 42,650 43,800

Used at balance date - - - -

Unused at balance date 42,650 43,800 42,650 43,800


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

Note 41. Financial risk management

The consolidated entity's activities expose it to a variety of financial risks, as follows:

(a)

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Market risk

(i) Foreign exchange risk

Foreign currency risk arises when commercial transactions and recognised assets and liabilities are denominated in a

currency that is not the entity's functional currency. The consolidated entity operates internationally and is exposed to

foreign exchange risk arising from currency exposure to the Fijian and Singapore dollar.

Fees charged to overseas students are generally denominated in Australian dollars.

The consolidated entity manages foreign currency risk by maintaining sufficient cash balances in these currencies to

meet offshore purchases.

63

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(ii) Equity market risk

Equity market risk arises when the value of an investment decreases due to moves in market factors. In accordance

with the accounting policy discussed in note 1(l), these investments are measured at fair value at each balance date and

changes in fair value are recognised in equity.

The consolidated entity negates equity risk as it holds no investments in an active market.

(iii) Interest rate risk

Interest rate risk is the risk (variability in value) borne by an interest-bearing asset due to the variability of interest rates.

The consolidated entity minimises its exposure to fluctuating market interest rates by diversifying its investments in both

cash and short term funding with Queensland Treasury Corporation (QTC). It regularly reviews its investments and

markets to obtain best interest rates. The entity does not have any borrowings which are subject to interest rate risk.

Summarised sensitivity analysis

Consolidated

An increase in interest rates of 100 basis points (1%) would have increased the Group profit before tax and Equity by

$182,000 (2011: $442,000). A decrease of 100 basis points (1%) would have decreased the Group profit before tax and

Equity by an equivalent amount.

An increase in the foreign exchange rate of 10% would have decreased the Group profit before tax and Equity by $Nil

(2011:$Nil). A decrease of 10% would have increased the Group profit before tax and Equity by an equivalent amount.

Parent

An increase in interest rates of 100 basis points (1%) would have increased the Parent profit before tax and Equity by

$81,000 (2011: $294,000). A decrease of 100 basis points (1%) would have decreased the Parent profit before tax and

Equity by an equivalent amount.

An increase in the foreign exchange rate of 10% would have decreased the Parent profit before tax and Equity by $Nil

(2011:$Nil). A decrease of 10% would have increased the Parent profit before tax and Equity by an equivalent amount.

(b) Credit risk

Credit risk arises from the potential failure of students, other customers and other contractual counterparties to meet

their obligations under the respective contracts. The consolidated entity has a Collections Policy in place to manage the

collection of accounts receivable. A provision for impaired receivables has been established.

Detailed information on the consolidated groups' impaired receivables is contained in Note 18.


64

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 41. Financial risk management (continued)

(c) Liquidity risk

The following tables summarise the maturity of the Group's financial assets and liabilities along with the effective weighted average

interest rate by maturity periods.

2012

Consolidated

Financial assets

Cash and cash

equivalents

Receivables

Available for sale

financial assets

Unlisted shares

Floating

interest

rate

Fixed interest maturing in:

1 year or

less

Over 1 to

2 years

Over 2 to

3 years

Over 3 to

4 years

Over 4 to

5 years

Over 5

years

Noninterest

bearing

Total

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Weighted

average

interest

rate

18,205 - - - - - - 45 18,250 2.70%

- - - - - - - 10,987 10,987 0.00%

- - - - - - - 30,886 30,886 0.00%

- - - - - - - 1,813 1,813 0.00%

18,205 - - - - - - 43,731 61,936

Financial liabilities

Payables

Provisions

Net financial assets

(liabilities)

2011

Financial assets

Cash and cash

equivalents

Receivables

Available for sale

financial assets

Unlisted shares

Financial liabilities

Payables

Provisions

Net financial assets

(liabilities)

- - - - - - - 9,948 9,948 0.00%

- - - - - - - 35,133 35,133 0.00%

- - - - - - - 45,081 45,081

18,205 - - - - - - (1,350) 16,855

Floating

interest

rate

Fixed interest maturing in:

1 year or

less

Over 1 to

2 years

Over 2 to

3 years

Over 3 to

4 years

Over 4 to

5 years

Over 5

years

Noninterest

bearing

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

44,244 - - - - - - 42 44,286 3.60%

- - - - - - - 11,265 11,265 0.00%

- - - - - - - 35,500 35,500 0.00%

- - - - - - - 1,553 1,553 0.00%

44,244 - - - - - - 48,360 92,604

- - - - - - - 9,475 9,475 0.00%

- - - - - - - 31,831 31,831 0.00%

- - - - - - - 41,306 41,306

44,244 - - - - - - 7,054 51,298

Total

Weighted

average

interest

rate


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

Note 41. Financial risk management (continued)

(c) Liquidity risk (continued)

2012

Parent

Financial assets

Cash and cash

equivalents

Receivables

Available for sale

financial assets

Unlisted shares

Floating

interest

rate

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Fixed interest maturing in:

1 year or

less

Over 1 to

2 years

Over 2 to

3 years

Over 3 to

4 years

Over 4 to

5 years

Over 5

years

Noninterest

bearing

Total

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Weighted

average

interest

rate

8,137 - - - - - - 33 8,170 1.60%

- - - - - - - 14,487 14,487 0.00%

- - - - - - - 30,886 30,886 0.00%

- - - - - - - 2,750 2,750 0.00%

8,137 - - - - - - 48,156 56,293

65

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Financial liabilities

Payables

Provisions

Net financial assets

(liabilities)

2011

Financial assets

Cash and cash

equivalents

Receivables

Available for sale

financial assets

Unlisted shares

Financial liabilities

Payables

Provisions

Net financial assets

(liabilities)

- - - - - - - 8,422 8,422 0.00%

- - - - - - - 30,968 30,968 0.00%

- - - - - - - 39,390 39,390

8,137 - - - - - - 8,766 16,903

Floating

interest

rate

Fixed interest maturing in:

1 year or

less

Over 1 to

2 years

Over 2 to

3 years

Over 3 to

4 years

Over 4 to

5 years

Over 5

years

Noninterest

bearing

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

29,476 - - - - - - 36 29,512 1.90%

- - - - - - - 18,340 18,340 0.00%

- - - - - - - 35,500 35,500 0.00%

- - - - - - - 1,955 1,955 0.00%

29,476 - - - - - - 55,831 85,307

- - - - - - - 8,197 8,197 0.00%

- - - - - - - 27,366 27,366 0.00%

- - - - - - - 35,563 35,563

29,476 - - - - - - 20,268 49,744

Total

Weighted

average

interest

rate


66

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 41. Financial risk management (continued)

(d) Fair value of financial assets and liabilities

The fair value of financial assets and financial liabilities must be estimated for recognition and measurement or for disclosure

purposes.

The fair value of financial instruments traded in active markets (such as publicly traded derivatives, and trading and available-forsale

securities) is based on quoted market prices at the balance sheet date. The quoted market price used for financial assets

held by the Group is the current bid price.

For those financial instruments not traded in active markets other valuaiton techniques are applied as disclosed in Note 21.

The carrying value less impairment provision of trade receivables and payables is a resonable approximation of their fair values

due to the short-term nature of trade receivables. The fair value of financial liabilities for disclosure purposes is estimated by

discounting the future contractual cash flows at the current market interest rate that is available to the Group for similar financial

instruments.

Due to the short-term nature of the current receivables, their carrying value is assumed to approximate their fair value and based

on credit history it is expected that the receivables that are neither past due nor impaired will be received when due.

The carrying amounts and net fair values of financial assets and liabilities at balance date are:

Consolidated

On-balance sheet financial

instruments

Notes

2012 2011

Carrying amount Fair value Carrying amount Fair value

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Financial assets

Non-Traded financial assets

Cash assets 17

18,250 18,250 44,286 44,286

Receivables

Available for sale

18

10,987 10,987 11,265 11,265

financial assets 21

30,886 30,886 35,500 35,500

Unlisted shares 21

1,813 1,813 1,553 1,553

61,936 61,936 92,604 92,604

Financial liabilities

Non-Traded financial liabilities

Payables 28

Provisions 29

9,948 9,948 9,475 9,475

35,133 35,133 31,831 31,831

45,081 45,081 41,306 41,306

Parent

On-balance sheet financial

instruments

Notes

2012 2011

Carrying amount Fair value Carrying amount Fair value

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Financial assets

Non-Traded financial assets

Cash assets 17

Receivables 18

Available for sale

21

Unlisted shares 21

8,170 8,170 29,512 29,512

14,487 14,487 18,340 18,340

financial assets 30,886 30,886 35,500 35,500

2,750 2,750 1,955 1,955

56,293 56,293 85,307 85,307

Financial liabilities

Non-Traded financial liabilities

Payables 28

8,422 8,422 8,197 8,197

Provisions 29 30,968 30,968 27,366 27,366

39,390 39,390 35,563 35,563


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

Note 41. Financial risk management (continued)

(d) Fair value of financial assets and liabilities (continued)

Consolidated

Notes

Financial assets

Non-traded financial assets

Available for sale financial assets 21

Unlisted shares 21

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Fair value measurements recognised in the balance sheet are categorised into the following fair value

hierarchy that reflects the significance of the inputs used in making these measurements:

Level 1 - fair values that reflect unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets/liabilities;

Level 2 - fair values that are based on inputs that are directly or indirectly observable for the asset/liability (other than unadjusted

quoted prices); and

Level 3 - fair values that are derived from data not observable in a market.

31 Dec 2012 Level 1 Level 2 Level 3

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

30,886 30,886 - -

1,813 - - 1,813

32,699 30,886 - 1,813

67

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Notes

Financial assets

Non-traded financial assets

Available for sale financial assets 21

Unlisted shares 21

31 Dec 2011 Level 1 Level 2 Level 3

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

35,500 35,500 - -

1,553 - - 1,553

37,053 35,500 - 1,553

Parent

Notes

Financial assets

Non-traded financial assets

Available for sale financial assets 21

Unlisted shares 21

31 Dec 2012 Level 1 Level 2 Level 3

$000 $000 $000 $000

30,886 30,886 - -

2,750 - - 2,750

33,636 30,886 - 2,750

Notes

Financial assets

Non-traded financial assets

Available for sale financial assets 21

Unlisted shares 21

31 Dec 2011 Level 1 Level 2 Level 3

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

35,500 35,500 - -

1,553 - - 1,553

37,053 35,500 - 1,553

Reconciliation of movements of financial assets categorised as level 3 has been disclosed in Note 21 - Available for sale financial

assets.


68

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 41. Financial risk management (continued)

(e) Reconciliation of Financial Assets categorised as level 3:

Consolidated

Level 3 Financial Assets 2012

Investments using

the equity method Unlisted shares Total

$'000 $'000 $'000

Opening balance

Total gains/(losses)

In profit or loss

-

-

1,553

-

1,553

-

In other comprehensive income - 260 260

Purchases

Sales

Transfers out of Level 3

Closing balance

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1,813

-

-

-

1,813

Parent

Level 3 Financial Assets 2012

Investments using

the equity method Unlisted shares Total

$'000 $'000 $'000

Opening balance

- 1,955 1,955

Total gains/(losses)

In profit or loss - - -

In other comprehensive income - (110) (110)

Purchases

- 905 905

Sales

- - -

Transfers out of Level 3

- - -

Closing balance

- 2,750 2,750


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

Note 41. Financial risk management (continued)

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

(e) Reconciliation of Financial Assets categorised as level 3 (continued):

Consolidated

Level 3 Financial Assets 2011

Investments using

the equity method Unlisted shares Total

$'000 $'000 $'000

Opening balance

Total gains/(losses)

In profit or loss

-

-

1,559

-

1,559

-

In other comprehensive income - (6) (6)

Purchases

Sales

Transfers out of Level 3

Closing balance

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1,553

-

-

-

1,553

69

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Parent

Level 3 Financial Assets 2011

Investments using

the equity method Unlisted shares Total

$'000 $'000 $'000

Opening balance

- 1,938 1,938

Total gains/(losses)

In profit or loss - - -

In other comprehensive income - 17 17

Purchases

- - -

Sales

- - -

Transfers out of Level 3

- - -

Closing balance

- 1,955 1,955


70

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 42. Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance

42.1 DIISRTE - CGS and Other DIISRTE Grants

Parent entity

Commonwealth

Grants Scheme

Indigenous

Support Program

Partnership &

Participation

Program

Disability Support

Program

Workplace

Productivity

Program

Learning &

Teaching

Performance Fund

Notes 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Financial assistance received in cash during the reporting period

(total cash received from the Australian Government for the

Programs) 76,251 65,286 814 814 1,899 2,762 24 37 - - 265 -

Net accrual adjustments 1,365 1,828 - - - - - - - - - -

Revenue for the period 3(a) 77,616 67,114 814 814 1,899 2,762 24 37 - - 265 -

Surplus/(Deficit) from the previous year - - - - 1,484 1,310 - - - 55 80 608

Total revenue including accrued revenue 77,616 67,114 814 814 3,383 4,072 24 37 - 55 345 608

Less expenses including accrued expenses (77,616) (67,114) (814) (814) (3,383) (2,588) - (37) - (55) (64) (528)

Surplus/(Deficit) for reporting period - - - - - 1,484 24 - - - 281 80


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

71

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 42. Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance (continued)

42.1 DIISRTE - CGS and Other DIISRTE Grants

Diversity and

Structural

Adjustment Fund

Transitional Cost

Program

Total

Notes 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Financial assistance received in cash during the reporting period

(total cash received from the Australian Government for the

Programs) - 686 161 203 79,414 69,788

Net accrual adjustments - - - - 1,365 1,828

Revenue for the period 3(a) - 686 161 203 80,779 71,616

Surplus/(Deficit) from the previous year 521 521 - - 2,085 2,494

Total revenue including accrued revenue 521 1,207 161 203 82,864 74,110

Less expenses including accrued expenses (521) (686) (161) (203) (82,559) (72,025)

Surplus/(Deficit) for reporting period - 521 - - 305 2,085

Parent entity

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


72

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 42. Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance (continued)

42.2 Higher Education Loan Programs (excl OS-HELP)

HECS-HELP

(Australian

Government

payments only)

FEE-HELP SA-HELP Total

Notes 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Financial assistance received in cash during the reporting period

(total cash received from the Australian Government for the

Programs) 36,894 28,023 2,686 2,008 1,318 - 40,898 30,031

Net accrual adjustments 33 1,420 - - - - 33 1,420

Revenue for the period 3(b) 36,927 29,443 2,686 2,008 1,318 - 40,931 31,451

Surplus/(Deficit) from the previous year - - (229) 169 - - (229) 169

Total revenue including accrued revenue 36,927 29,443 2,457 2,177 1,318 - 40,702 31,620

Less expenses including accrued expenses (36,927) (29,443) (3,019) (2,406) (1,318) - (41,264) (31,849)

Surplus/(Deficit) for reporting period - - (562) (229) - - (562) (229)

Parent entity


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

73

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 42. Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance (continued)

42.3 Scholarships

Parent entity

Australian

Postgraduate

Awards

International

Postgraduate

Research

Scholarships

Commonwealth

Education Costs

Scholarships

Commonwealth

Accommodation

Scholarships

Indigenous Access

Scholarhips

Total

Notes 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Financial assistance received in cash during the reporting period

(total cash received from the Australian Government for the

Programs) 799 682 64 62 908 (461) 48 197 90 (54) 1,909 426

Net accrual adjustment - - - - - 1,443 - 139 - - - 1,582

Revenue for the period 3(c) 799 682 64 62 908 982 48 336 90 (54) 1,909 2,008

Surplus/(Deficit) from the previous year 7 8 9 1 245 109 86 2 - 119 347 239

Total revenue including accrued revenue 806 690 73 63 1,153 1,091 134 338 90 65 2,256 2,247

Less expenses including accrued expenses (799) (683) (70) (54) (261) (846) (64) (252) (90) (65) (1,285) (1,900)

Surplus/(Deficit) for reporting period 7 7 3 9 892 245 69 86 - - 971 347

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


74

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 42. Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance (continued)

42.4 DIISRTE Research

Joint Research

Engagement

Research Training

Scheme

Research

Infrastructure

Block Grants

Commercialisation

Training Scheme

Notes 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Financial assistance received in cash during the reporting period

(total cash received from the Australian Government for the

Programs) 1,284 1,291 2,209 2,240 212 210 - -

Net accrual adjustments - - - - - - - -

Revenue for the period 3(d) 1,284 1,291 2,209 2,240 212 210 - -

Surplus/(Deficit) from the previous year - - - - 50 78 - 22

Total revenue including accrued revenue 1,284 1,291 2,209 2,240 262 288 - 22

Less expenses including accrued expenses (1,284) (1,291) (2,209) (2,240) (228) (238) - (22)

Surplus/(Deficit) for reporting period - - - - 34 50 - -

Parent entity


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

Parent entity

75

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 42. Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance (continued)

42.4 DIISRTE Research (continued)

Sustainable

Research

Excellence in

Universities

Total

Notes 2012 2011 2012 2011

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Financial assistance received in cash during the reporting period

(total cash received from the Australian Government for the

Programs) 323 237 4,028 3,978

Net accrual adjustments - - - -

Revenue for the period 3(d) 323 237 4,028 3,978

Surplus/(Deficit) from the previous year 92 157 142 257

Total revenue including accrued revenue 415 394 4,170 4,235

Less expenses including accrued expenses (382) (302) (4,103) (4,093)

Surplus/(Deficit) for reporting period 33 92 67 142

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


76

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 42. Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance (continued)

42.5 Voluntary Student Unionism

VSU Transition

Fund

Total

Notes 2012 2011 2012 2011

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Financial assistance received in cash during the reporting period

(total cash received from the Australian Government for the

Programs) - - - -

Net accrual adjustments - - - -

Revenue for the period - - - -

Surplus/(Deficit) from the previous year 3 865 3 865

Total revenue including accrued revenue 3 865 3 865

Less expenses including accrued expenses - (862) - (862)

Surplus/(Deficit) for reporting period 3 3 3 3

Parent entity


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

77

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 42. Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance (continued)

42.6 Other Capital Funding

Better Universities

Renewal Fund

Teaching and

Learning Capital

Fund

Total

Notes 2012 2011 2012 2011 2012 2011

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Financial assistance received in cash during the reporting period

(total cash received from the Australian Government for the

Programs) - - - - - -

Net accrual adjustments - - - - - -

Revenue for the period - - - - - -

Surplus/(Deficit) from the previous year - 1,613 - 6,057 - 7,670

Total revenue including accrued revenue - 1,613 - 6,057 - 7,670

Less expenses including accrued expenses - (1,613) - (6,057) - (7,670)

Surplus/(Deficit) for reporting period - - - - - -

Parent entity

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


78

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 42. Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance (continued)

42.7 Australian Research Council Grants

(i) Discovery

Projects Total

Notes 2012 2011 2012 2011

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Financial assistance received in cash during the reporting period

(total cash received from the Australian Government for the

Programs) 244 83 244 83

Net accrual adjustment - - - -

Revenue for the period 3(e)(i) 244 83 244 83

Surplus/(Deficit) from the previous year 16 92 16 92

Total revenue including accrued revenue 260 175 260 175

Less expenses including accrued expenses (221) (159) (221) (159)

Surplus/(Deficit) for reporting period 39 16 39 16

Parent entity


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

79

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 42. Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance (continued)

42.7 Australian Research Council Grants (continued)

(ii) Linkages

Projects Total

Notes 2012 2011 2012 2011

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Financial assistance received in cash during the reporting period

(total cash received from the Australian Government for the

Programs) 266 - 266 -

Net accrual adjustment - - - -

Revenue for the period 3(e)(ii) 266 - 266 -

- -

Surplus/(Deficit) from the previous year - 6 - 6

Total revenue including accrued revenue 266 6 266 6

Less expenses including accrued expenses (152) (6) (152) (6)

Surplus/(Deficit) for reporting period 114 - 114 -

Parent entity

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


80

Central Queensland University

and Controlled Entities

Notes to the Financial Statements

for the year ended 31 December 2012

Note 42. Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance (continued)

42.8 OS-HELP

Notes 2012 2011

$'000 $'000

Cash Received during the reporting period 3 (g) 87 43

Cash Spent during the reporting period 150 48

Net Cash received (63) (5)

Cash Surplus / (deficit) from the previous period 64 69

Cash Surplus / (deficit) for the reporting period 1 64

42.9 Student Services and amenities fee

Unspent/(overspent) revenue from previous period

SA-HELP revenue earned 3 (b) 1,318 -

Students services fees direct from students 4 1,006 -

Total revenue expendable in period 2,324 -

Student services expenses during period (1,405) -

Unspent/(overspent) student services revenue 919 -

Parent entity


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

81

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


CQUniversity ANNUAL REPORT 2012

83

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

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