Local Workforce Services Plan PY 2012-2016 - Polk County

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Local Workforce Services Plan PY 2012-2016 - Polk County

Local Workforce

Services Plan PY

2012-2016

Region 17 ~Polk County

Workforce Development

Board, Inc.

Submitted: October 1, 2012

Plan Contact: Luz Heredia

Email: luz_heredia@polkworks.org

Phone: (863)508-1600 x. 1111

Status of Signatures: Included

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 1


Region 17

Polk County Workforce Development Board, Inc.

Local Workforce Services Plan

PY 20122016

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 2


T A B L E O F C O N T E N T S

LOCAL WORKFORCE STRATEGIC PLAN SECTION I ............................................................................. 5

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ............................................................................................................................................... 6

ANALYSIS OF LOCAL ECONOMIC AND LABOR MARKET ..................................................................... 8

PLAN DEVELOPMENT ................................................................................................................................................ 16

ADMINISTRATIVE SECTION ................................................................................................................................... 18

LOCAL VISION, GOALS AND PRIORITIES ..................................................................................................... 27

ONE-STOP DELIVERY SYSTEM/SERVICES ................................................................................................. 30

LOCAL OPERATIONAL PLAN SECTION II .................................................................................................... 62

WAGNER PEYSER ....................................................................................................................................................... 63

MIGRANT AND SEASONAL FARMWORKERS (MSFW).......................................................................... 81

TRADE ADJUSTMENT ASSISTANCE (TAA) .................................................................................................. 86

WELFARE TRANSITION PROGRAM/TANF .................................................................................................... 89

SUPPLEMENTAL NUTRITION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM ................................................................... 109

WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT PROGRAMS (WIA)......................................................................... 116

VETERANS PROGRAM ........................................................................................................................................... 137

ASSURANCES SECTION III ................................................................................................................................. 140

ATTACHMENTS (ADMINISTRATIVE)............................................................................................................. 149

Attachment #1: Summary of Plan Comments .............................................................................................. 149

Attachment #2: Inter-local Agreement .............................................................................................................. 149

Attachment #3: Board & Youth Council Members List ............................................................................. 149

Attachment #4: Board Bylaws .............................................................................................................................. 149

Attachment #5: Fiscal Agent Design/Administrative Entity/One-Stop Operator .......................... 149

Attachment #6: Official Signatures ..................................................................................................................... 149

ATTACHMENTS (LOCAL OPERATING PROCEDURES) .................................................................... 150

Local Operating Procedure: Card Issuance .................................................................................................. 150

Local Operating Procedure: On-the-Job Training....................................................................................... 150

Local Operating Procedure: Customized Training ..................................................................................... 150

Local Operating Procedure: Community Service Work Experience.................................................. 150

Local Operating Procedure: Providing Re-employment Services to UC Customers ................ 150

Local Operating Procedure: REACT ................................................................................................................. 150

Local Operating Procedure: Work Registration ........................................................................................... 150

Local Operating Procedure: Developing IRPs and ARPs ...................................................................... 150

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 3


Local Operating Procedure: Assignment of Hours ..................................................................................... 150

Local Operating Procedure: Job Search ......................................................................................................... 150

Local Operating Procedure: Good Cause ...................................................................................................... 150

Local Operating Procedure: Medical Deferral .............................................................................................. 150

Local Operating Procedure: One-on-One Orientation and Assessment ......................................... 150

Local Operating Procedure: Job Search Activity ........................................................................................ 150

Local Operating Procedure: WIA Dual Enrollment ..................................................................................... 150

Local Operating Procedure: Veterans and Eligible Persons ................................................................. 150

ATTACHMENTS (ONE-STOP MOUS) ............................................................................................................. 152

MOU: AARP Foundation ......................................................................................................................................... 152

MOU: Agricultural and Labor Program, Inc. .................................................................................................. 152

MOU: Auburndale Bridge ........................................................................................................................................ 152

MOU: Lakeland Housing Authority ..................................................................................................................... 152

MOU: PSCB Farm Workers ................................................................................................................................... 152

MOU: Polk County Drug Court ............................................................................................................................. 152

MOU: Vocational Rehabilitation ........................................................................................................................... 152

MOU: West Bartow Front Porch .......................................................................................................................... 152

ATTACHMENTS (PROGRAM POLICIES) ..................................................................................................... 153

Program Policy: One-Stop Seamless Service Delivery ........................................................................... 153

Program Policy: Selection and Approval Process of ITA Providers .................................................. 153

Program Policy: Individual Training Account System ............................................................................... 153

Program Policy: Customized Training and CETA Awards ..................................................................... 153

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 4


LOCAL

WORKFORCE

STRATEGIC PLAN

SECTION I

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 5


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The Polk County Workforce Development Board‘s service area is Polk County. Polk

County is larger than the state of Rhode Island and equal in size to Delaware. The total

area of the county is approximately 2,010 square miles which makes it the fourth largest

county in Florida, exceeded only by Dade, Palm Beach, and Collier counties. The total

land area of Polk County is approximately 1,875 square miles.

The 2011 estimated population for Polk County is 604,792 persons. The US Census

Bureau Polk County QuickFacts indicate the county population is 80.4% white, 15.3%

Black, 0.6% Native persons, 1.8% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 1.8% reporting 2 or

more races, Hispanic or Latino 18.1%. Foreign born persons comprise 10.7% of the

region‘s population.

Notable strengths for the region include the fact that logistically, Polk County is the only

Southeast location which offers two international airports within an hour‘s drive –

Orlando and Tampa. It is intersected by Interstate 4, the Polk County Parkway, State

Road 60 and Highway 27, and has easy access to Interstate 75 on the west and 95 on

the east. Metropolitan Orlando-Kissimmee and Tampa-St. Petersburg, Clearwater

located in adjacent counties, each have a cost of living index of 96, while metropolitan

Lakeland has a cost of living index of 91.

In 2012, a Florida College System report compared the 28 state and community

colleges in terms of the grade-point averages students earn in their first year after

transferring to a State University System institution (SUS). In 2011 Polk State ranked

first for preparing students who do not need academic remediation, with 88 percent of

its SUS transfer students earning a first-year GPA of 2.5 or higher.

Opportunities for improvement include the fact that among adults aged 25 or older,

18.1% do not have a high school diploma or equivalent. Polk County has the third

highest single-year dropout rate in Florida, 4.2% in 2010-2011. While single-year dropout

rates have been declining in Florida since 2007, dropping down to 1.9% in 2010-

2011, they‘ve increased in Polk County during the same time period. Those holding a

Bachelor‘s degree or higher comprise only 18.0% of the region‘s population versus the

state average of 25.9%.

Since the enactment of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, the local workforce

investment system for Polk has seen many changes. While some mandatory One-Stop

partners co-located to serve customers under one roof, in an effort to offer convenience

and minimize duplication of effort, many of the workforce partners have increased their

reliance on technology, thus, closing offices. As a result of technological advances,

partnerships have been strengthened and efficiencies have been recognized. The

unification of established partnerships have proven to enhance communication, refine

processes, collectively anticipate problems and increased opportunities for customers to

receive services at single locations.

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In addition to increased reliance on technology, brick and mortar locations for One-Stop

centers have decreased in Polk. As a result of the decrease in these locations, Polk

Works has expanded partnerships that have proven very successful. These

partnerships include increased collaboration with library cooperatives, educational

institutions, housing authorities, etc.

As we continue to recognize efficiencies, additional critical partnerships are anticipated.

Through contracted services with our One-Stop operator, Polk Works was structured

such that Career Specialist staff was segregated by funding source. Over the next few

years, the service model will be enhanced and integrated to ensure a true seamless

service model that allows for staff to serve any customer who walks through the door in

a more effective, comprehensive and efficient manner.

As the entire workforce system undergoes necessary changes to keep pace with the

changing economy, Polk Works will keep a close watch on the pulse of Polk to ensure

that our residents‘ needs are met through employment, transportation and education.

Increased unemployment rates among our youth, veterans, long-term unemployed,

individuals with disabilities and ex-offenders continue to be a challenge for the region.

Polk Works will continue to form partnerships that will ensure service to these

underserved populations so that we may enable members of these special populations

to gain and retain full and sustainable employment.

Over the 2012 year, Polk Works will continue our primary focus of putting our citizens

back to work. Expanded partnerships with employers and increased employer market

penetration to ensure more businesses become aware of and use the workforce system

is our #1 goal.

Specific performance goals for our region:

Measure

Goal

Adult

Entered Employment Rate 78%

Employment Retention Rate 85%

Employment Average Earn (6 months) $13,750

Dislocated Worker

Entered Employment Rate 78%

Employment Retention Rate 85%

Employment Average Earn (6 months) $13,750

Youth

Placement in Employment or Education 58%

Attainment of Degree/Certification 43%

Youth Diploma or Equivalent Rate 44.5%

Wagner-Peyser

Entered Employment Rate 62%

Employment Retention Rate 74.5%

Employment Average Earnings $11,150

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 7


ANALYSIS OF LOCAL ECONOMIC AND LABOR MARKET

Polk Works is committed to ensuring that the services we provide properly and

appropriately align with the needs of the business community. It is clearly understood

that the best way to recognize and fulfill the needs of business is to know the

characteristics of the local area and listen to the business community regarding what

they are looking for in their workforce. Described below is the make-up of the Polk

County community:

1. Characteristics of the local area's population:

The US Census Bureau Polk County QuickFacts indicate the county population

is 80.4% white, 15.3% Black, 0.6% Native persons, 1.8% Asian, 0.1% Pacific

Islander, 1.8% reporting 2 or more races, Hispanic or Latino 18.1%. Foreign

born persons comprise 10.7% of the region‘s population and 18.2% speak a

language other than English in the home. There are approximately 55,400

residents who are veterans.

Median household income is $43,946, with 15.2% below poverty level. Mean

travel time to work is 25.4 minutes. The home ownership rate is 72.1% with 2.58

persons per household.

2. Specific needs of diverse sub-populations including those from racial

ethnic, linguistic groups, older persons, and individuals with disabilities:

Racial ethnic, linguistic groups

As 10% of the population has been identified as foreign-born, and 18% of the

population speaks a language other than English in the home, a significant

percentage of the population benefits from multi-lingual services. Obtaining

information regarding available opportunities for employment and training, as well

as other community services presents challenges.

Older persons

Residents 65 and older comprise 18.3% of the county population, compared to

17.6% statewide and 13.3% nationwide. While the unemployment rate for older

persons throughout the last 5 years hasn't reached that of younger persons, the

high unemployment rate coupled with long-term unemployment, a decrease in

the value of stock and significant decreases in home value has resulted in untold

numbers of older Americans working longer than they had anticipated, returning

to work if already retired and or leaving them unable to sell a home which may

have been used to pay for living expenses. Older persons frequently lack the

technological skills, or they are perceived to lack these skills.

Individuals with disabilities

The July 2012 federal unemployment rate for individuals without disabilities is

8.4%. For those with disabilities, the rate is significantly higher, 13.6%. For Polk

County residents with disabilities, record high unemployment over the last five

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years has resulted in unprecedented challenges in obtaining employment. Many

SSI or SSDI recipients have little or no work experience, and need extensive job

readiness skills training. For some, unrealistic expectations of what to expect

from an employer regarding flexibility in a work schedule or anticipated wages

are also barriers.

3. Analysis of the challenges associated with the local area's population

attaining the education, skills, and training needed to obtain employment:

Overall, the county faces a skills mismatch. High skill/high wage positions go

unfilled, while the county faces record high unemployment rates. With 18.1% of

the population without a high school diploma, employment opportunities are

limited, and meeting pre-requisites for educational/training programs can seem

unattainable.

Individuals with criminal backgrounds have found it harder than most other subgroups

in finding employment, even when they‘re qualifications meet the

employers‘ needs. Because a prison record or felony greatly reduces prospects

in the job market, even individuals with in demand skills seem to have fewer

opportunities to interview with a prospective employer whether or not the charges

legally or illegally make them ineligible for a job opening.

4. Specific strategies designed to address skill needs of local employers and

to close any existing skill gaps:

The Business Services team takes the lead in contacting and working with

employers in identifying and addressing skill needs. This is done through

monthly newsletters, e-mail blasts, consultations and on-site visits, job fairs,

recruiting events and training grants.

The team works with Youth staff, Local Veteran Employment Representatives,

Displaced Homemaker staff and Disability Program/Ticket to Work staff in

coordinating employer outreach. In addition to monthly business development,

including the previously mentioned staff, they frequently partner to meet with

employers to find out what it takes to best meet their staffing needs. Strategies

designed to address the employers‘ skill needs range from addressing basic

skills to providing training grants for high skill high wage training.

Job readiness skills are provided through the One-Stop Career Center and topics

addressed include but aren‘t limited to resume writing, interviewing techniques,

financial skills, networking, and job search strategies. In addition, software

tutorials and assessment are available through the learning and assessment

center using Prove-It which provides over 1,300 validated assessments.

Employed Worker Training and On-the-Job Training Grants are coordinated by

the Business Services team. A grant partnership with the Polk State College

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Engineering Technology and Advanced Manufacturing Program addresses the

needs local manufacturers have for a curriculum developed to meet their needs,

and provide training opportunities and industry certification. The curriculum was

developed to provide industry certification and award credit towards an

associate‘s degree in engineering technology.

Offenders – A partnership with the Polk County Drug Court has recently led to

the integration of Polk Works, and a new job readiness program, into the drug

court process. Participation by offenders is the last chance for someone with a

drug conviction to get assistance and avoid a prison sentence. Participants will

be case managed by both Polk Works and County staff, similar to individuals on

a work release program. The Polk Works Mobile One-Stop will be parked at the

courthouse for all participants for part of the day and available only for drug

participants the remainder of the day. The program is already seeing immediate

results and leading to the development of additional partnerships with the

Salvation Army and other Fresh Start Programs. Polk Works will continue to

adjust the curriculum for this program.

5. Process used to identify the workforce needs of the businesses, job

seekers and workers in the local area:

Workforce needs of the businesses are identified through staff and Board

involvement on various committees and taskforces throughout the county.

Through this engagement, board members are encouraged to utilize workforce

services and provide constructive feedback regarding any opportunities for

improvement needed in our system delivery. The Vice President of Human

Resources & Workforce Programs and our Business Services Division is

engaged with the local Human Resources chapter known as Mid-Florida Society

for Human Resource Management (MFSHRM).

Through the Business Services Division, monthly roundtables are hosted to

address the needs of businesses. Our CEO serves on the Lakeland Chamber

Board where she is an active member of the Talent Development and Education

subcommittee. The Committee works diligently to solicit input from the small

business community regarding their needs and then crafts a plan to address

those needs. The Business Services Division has a database of over 2000

business partners who are solicited for input on workforce programs, employer

needs, etc. Other committee involvement includes Polk Businesses for World

Class Education, Polk Vision, the various Economic Development Organizations

and various committees within the local Chambers of Commerce.

One of the goals identified by the Executive Committee is for the Polk Works

President & CEO to host Forums focused on identifying the needs of the long

term unemployed. Following each forum, the CEO will draft a report of the

outcomes and make recommendations for system redesign to ensure that our

system is poised to serve these individuals in a way that is beneficial. Our One-

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Stop Operator is responsible for ensuring that job seekers are successful in

navigating through the workforce system and thus, obtaining employment.

Our Board ensures accountability of these activities through the Career Council.

At each Career Council meeting, the One-Stop Operator reports on performance,

and strategies implemented by the One-Stop Operator to address job seeker

needs. The One-Stop Operator is very flexible in its delivery of services to

ensure job seeker needs are being met through the establishment of new

programs or services that have been identified and will eliminate those services

that no longer seem to be useful or effective.

6. Current and projected trends of the local area’s economy, industries and

occupations:

Polk County's economy has been historically based on three primary industries:

phosphate mining, agriculture and tourism.

The discovery of phosphate rock in Polk County in 1881, initiated the mining of

the world's largest deposit of phosphate rock. This deposit, which encompasses

approximately 500,000 acres in Polk, Hillsborough, Hardee, and Manatee

Counties, provides approximately 75 percent of the nation's phosphate supply

and about 25 percent of the world supply. Approximately 200,000 acres or 15.3

percent of Polk County have been mined for phosphate rock. The industry's

impact on the Polk County economy will continue to decline in the 21st Century

as phosphate mining moves south into Hardee and Desoto Counties. Chemical

manufacturing plants located in Polk County are used to convert the insoluble

phosphate rock into soluble products, which are used in fertilizers and other

products. There are numerous, other industries located in Polk County which

support and rely on the phosphate mining industry.

Polk County has the 2nd largest amount of farmland in the state with an

estimated 626,634 acres in 2002. Polk remains the sixth most productive

agricultural county in Florida. The $878 million citrus industry employs

approximately 8,000 people in Polk County.

Tourism is a strong economic force in Polk County. Millions of people visit Polk

County each year to enjoy attractions and spring training for two major-league

baseball teams, and the county has gained notoriety as a preferred venue for

recreational and competitive sports on all levels.

Today, phosphate mining, agriculture and tourism still play vital roles in the local

economy. However, the county has successfully expanded and diversified its

economic base in recent years. Polk County's central location within the large

Florida marketplace has attracted numerous manufacturers and distribution

centers in recent years. There are more than 440 manufacturers in the county,

manufacturing a broad line of products – including food products, chemicals,

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 11


paper and building materials and benefit from Polk County‘s logistics and

distribution advantages.

7. Current and projected employment opportunities in the local area.

Per the Labor Market Statistics released August 17, 2012, Polk County had a

total employment of 192,400 in July 2012, up from 190,700 in July 2011. Trade,

Transportation and Utilities ranked first with 46,000 (up from 45,400) employed,

followed by Education and Health Services with 29,500 (up from 29,000);

Government with 26,300 (down from 26,400); and Professional and Business

Services with 24,200 (up from 23,900).

According to Post-Secondary Reports published by the Florida Education and

Training Placement Information Program, occupations that have 100%

placement rates include Accounting, Truck and Bus Technicians, Computer

related occupations, industrial machine maintenance and those transitioning from

Correctional to Law Enforcement occupations.

The current and projected workforce demand for Polk County is highlighted

below. Analyzing trends in industry employment assists workforce planners in

predicting where new jobs are being created now and in to the future. At the

same time, we can anticipate the need for retraining workers who are employed

in declining industries to ensure they have the skills to become quickly reattached

to the labor force. Industry categories used to analyze this data are from

the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).

Industry 2011 2019

Natural Resources and Mining 4,965 5,435

Construction 9,364 11,612

Manufacturing 14,028 13,867

Trade, Transportation, and Utilities 44,488 50,285

Information 1,685 1,808

Financial Activities 11,414 13,024

Professional and Business Services 30,530 36,723

Education and Health Services 29,214 34,980

Leisure and Hospitality 16,542 18,734

Other Services 8,231 9,233

Government 29,688 31,952

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OCCUPATIONS GAINING THE MOST NEW JOBS AND FASTEST GROWING

Knowing which occupations within industries are the gaining the most new jobs

and those that are the fastest growing helps workforce officials stay focused on

training residents for jobs that will not only be available, but will assist economic

developers in supporting growing businesses. If area employers cannot find the

trained people needed to fuel their growth, there could be an adverse effect on

the area economy. At the same time, occupational analysis assists Polk Works

and its educational partners in planning for the types of programs needed.

OCCUPATIONS GAINING THE MOST NEW JOBS IN POLK COUNTY

Occupation

Annual Growth

Rate from

2011 - 2019

Total

Change

from

2011-

2019

2011

Average

Hourly

Pay

Rank

Truck Drivers, Heavy and Tractor-Trailer 2.59 220 18.27 1

Retail Salespersons 2.07 301 12.62 2

Food Preparation & Serving Workers, Including

Fast Food 1.80 241 8.27 3

Registered Nurses 2.87 175 28.21 4

Customer Service Representatives 2.51 221 13.89 5

Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks 2.27 134 15.87 6

Nursing Aides, Orderlies, and Attendants 2.50 115 11.06 7

Amusement and Recreation Attendants 15.57 112 9.16 8

Stock Clerks and Order Fillers 1.48 191 11.79 9

Office Clerks, General 1.82 129 12.69 10

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FASTEST GROWING OCCUPATIONS IN POLK COUNTY

Occupation

Annual

Growth

Rate from

2011 -2019

# of Annual

Openings

Average

Hourly

Pay

Education

Code

Amusement and Recreation Attendants 15.57 112 9.16 1

Veterinary Technologists and Technicians 6.52 21 12.25 4

Home Health Aides 5.87 53 9.70 3

Personal Financial Advisors 4.84 10 26.05 5

Medical Records and Health Information Technicians 4.40 25 19.14 4

Refuse and Recyclable Material Collectors 4.31 9 13.63 1

Network Systems and Data Communications Analysts 4.07 17 30.69 3

Physical Therapists 4.02 17 35.25 6

Computer Software Engineers, Applications 3.94 8 37.90 4

Medical Assistants 3.84 41 13.21 3

Mental Health and Substance Abuse Social Workers 3.68 8 19.06 6

Heating, A.C., and Refrigeration Mechanics and Installers 3.58 49 15.40 3

Dental Assistants 3.58 21 15.58 3

Cost Estimators 3.42 13 30.54 4

Surgical Technologists 3.42 7 17.84 3

Sheet Metal Workers 3.38 7 13.77 3

Pharmacy Technicians 3.25 26 12.56 3

Opticians, Dispensing 3.18 8 18.45 4

Accountants and Auditors 3.18 100 33.25 5

Advertising Sales Agents 3.12 7 18.05 3

Job skills necessary for participants to obtain employment based on current and

projected job opportunities in the region:

Of the fastest growing occupations and the occupations gaining the most new

jobs, more than 50% of the occupations require education beyond a high school

diploma. Polk Works uses a variety of methods to identify needed job skills. We

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work with employers and industry related organizations to identify worker

shortages in specific occupations as well as identifying challenges facing

businesses in filling jobs. Work readiness skills are the number one concern for

area businesses. To address those concerns, Polk Works has been a partner in

the State‘s Work Readiness Credential program, fully implementing not only the

credentialing process but training to identify deficiencies. This information is

communicated to our education and training partners in order to aid them in

crafting curriculum and developing programs that meet the current and future

business needs.

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PLAN DEVELOPMENT

The steps for developing the local plan:

1. Timeline

Date Due

August 20

Aug. 20 – Sept. 20

August 23

September 18

October 1

October 30

October 31

November 7

November 16

November 17

Task

Post Plan on Polk Works Website

Notice to Stakeholders/ Partners/Board/LEOs

Board Reviews Plan

Public Comment Period

Full Board Approves Plan

Board of County Commissioners Approves Plan

Submit Plan to Workforce Florida

DEO Webinar with Polk Works

Revision of Plan

Final Plan due for CEO Review

Final Plan Submitted to Workforce Florida

Final Plan Placed on Common Drive with attachments

2. Consultation process:





Local elected officials

The Plan is on the agenda for the Board of County Commissioners meeting

on September 18, 2012 for approval.

Workforce Investment Board

The Polk Works Board of Directors was notified that the plan is online August

20, 2012 – September 20, 2012 and that the plan is on the agenda for

approval by the Full Board of Directors at their meeting on August 23, 2012.

Members of the Public

The public was able to view the Plan online at www.polkworks.org. The Plan

will be posted from August 20, 2012 to September 20, 2012.

Partners

Partners were notified via e-mail on August 20, 2012 of the availability and

location of the plan for review and comment.

3. Actions taken to acquire other input into the plan development process:

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Announcements regarding the plan were posted at the reception desks of the

One-Stops and satellite offices, posted on FaceBook and Twitter and announced

via press release.

4. Dates plan was posted electronically to local website;

August 20, 2012 – September 20, 2012.

5. Summary of Plan comments:

Attached:

Attachment #1 - Summary of Plan Comments

6. Strategies for RWBs that are designated as significant migrant and

seasonal farmworker (MSFW) to ensure individuals/organizations serving

the MSFWs are informed of the plan and are provided the opportunity to

comment on the local Workforce Services Plan.

On August 20, 2012, notification was sent to partners including Heart to Heart

which provides services to the Haitian community, the Agricultural and Labor

Program which administers services to migrant seasonal farm workers and the

Polk County School Board, Florida (Farmworkers).

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 17


ADMINISTRATIVE SECTION

The administrative section of the local plan shall include responses to federal

requirements, as well as the following:

Florida Statutes

RWB Accountability Act

­ Final Guidance Implementing Changes

State Workforce Policies and Procedures

Organization

A. Chief Elected Official

1. Chief elected official by name, address, phone number, and email.

Sam Johnson

Commissioner and Chairman

Polk County Board of Commissioners

330 West Church Street, Bartow, FL 22830

Mailing address: Drawer BC01, P.O. Box 9005, Bartow, FL 33891-9005

Email: samjohnson@polk-county.net

Phone: (863) 534-6049

2. Process utilized to secure the chief elected official agreement. Current inter-local

agreement for the time period of the plan submission must be submitted with the

plan.

The inter-local agreement is developed by the Board of County Commissioners

(BoCC) staff in cooperation with the RWB staff to document the partnership

between the two in an effort to meet the requirements of the Workforce

Investment Act of 1998, the Workforce Innovation Act of 2000, Laws of Florida

and any future state and federal workforce initiatives and laws. The agreement is

then signed by the Board Chair and the Chairman of the Polk County Board of

Commissioners.

Attached:

Attachment #2 - Inter-local Agreement

B. Workforce Investment Board

1. Structure, including the nomination process of the Workforce Investment Board.

A current agreement between the chief elected official and the Workforce

Investment Board, a Workforce Investment Board member list, and current

Workforce Investment Board By-Laws are required. Below is the structure of the

Board.

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The Board‘s membership is made up of those members and member

organizations mandated by the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 and the

Workforce Accountability Act. All Board Members are required to serve on a

functional committee appointed by the Board Chair. Functional Committees

include:

Business Competitiveness Council

Career Council

Youth Development Council

Finance/Audit Committee

Executive Committee

All members are nominated by the appropriate bodies as outlined in the

Workforce Investment Act. Members are then approved by the Polk Works Full

Board. After approval by the Full Board, members are then submitted to the

Board of County Commissioners for approval.

Number of Members

a. The initial number of members, as determined by the BOCC, shall be thirty

six (36), but in no event shall be fewer than twenty-one (21). The actual

number of members at any given time shall not exceed the minimum

membership required in Pub. L. 105-220, Title I, S. 117 (b) (2) (A) unless

approved by the Governor.

b. No less than fifty-one percent (51%) of the Board‘s membership shall be from

the private sector category of membership. However, it is the Board‘s intent

that the objective for private sector membership representatives be two thirds

of total membership.

Appointment to Board

The membership of the Board of Directors shall be elected by those present each

year at the spring meeting of the members of the organization and so that

approximately one-third shall be elected each year to a three year term. A new

board member can be nominated and elected with approval of two-thirds of the

board members present. Final appointment must be by the BOCC.

Section 6 – Vacancies

a. All appointments to fill vacancies must follow the same process as that used

to initially fill the appointment. All vacancies shall be filled by the BOCC

through the same process followed for all appointments.

b. New members must be appointed to fill the same category of membership as

that in which the vacancy occurred. However, new members do not have to

be from the same organization or company as the members being replaced.

c. All appointments for vacancies shall be for the unexpired term of the member

being replaced.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 20


Nominations: At least forty five (45) days prior to the date of the end of the fiscal

year, all Committees shall propose names of persons as candidates for election

to the Board of Directors.

Attached:

Attachment #2 - Inter-local Agreement

Attachment #3 - Board & Youth Council Members List

Attachment #4 - Workforce Investment Board Bylaws

2. Describe how the business members of the Workforce Investment Board

play a leading role in ensuring the workforce system is demand-driven.

Business members must hold a majority of the positions on the Board and the

Board Chair along with the Chair of each Council must be selected from the

business community.

In addition to the role of the Business Community on the Board, Members of the

Board serve on various councils. The Business Competitiveness Council is

charged with the following responsibilities:

a. Addresses the workforce needs of business and industry.

b. Provides oversight of the Business Services; recommends policies and

strategies to improve the quality of services offered to employers.

c. Recommends policies and strategies to improve both the skill levels of the

workforce and the availability of higher skill jobs.

d. Reviews labor market information and other pertinent information in the

process of devising strategies to address training related to high skills/high

wage issues.

e. Performs strategic planning functions for the Board, including periodic reviews

of performance against objectives; reviews other plans as required by funding

entities; and monitors performance of all business competitiveness strategies.

f. It is responsible for preparation and revision at least annually of the 25 top

businesses and 25 emerging companies, and of the Targeted Occupations

list.

3. In accordance with State policy, identify the circumstance which

constitutes a conflict of interest for any local Workforce Investment Board

member.

Section 2 – Conflict of Interest

a. No member of the Board shall discuss any matter before the Board or its

committees/councils which would financially benefit the member or his or her

organization or company. Board members who have a conflict of interest as

defined by the relevant statutes must complete the conflict of interest form as

prescribed by Florida Law. It is the intention that all Board members comply

with all conflict of interest statutes, regulations and guidelines as prescribed

by law.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 21


. No member of the Board shall make or second a motion or cast a vote on any

matter under deliberation by the Board or its committees/councils which has a

direct bearing on services to be provided by the member or any business or

organization with which the member is affiliated.

c. No member of the Board shall make or second a motion or cast a vote on any

matter before the Board or its committees/councils which would financially

benefit the member or his or her business or organization.

d. Polk Works shall not enter into a contract with one of its own board members,

with an organization represented by its own board member or with any entity

where a board member has any relationship with the contracting vendor.

However, at the board‘s discretion, the following may be exempted from the

above paragraph:

i. A contract with an agency (as defined in s. 112.312(2), including, but not

limited to, those statutorily required to be board members) when said

agency is represented by a board member and said member does not

personally benefit financially from such contracts;

ii. A contract with a board member or a vendor (when a board member has

any relationship with the contacting vendor) when the contract relates to

the member‘s appointment to the board under Pub. L. No. 105-220,

(―Workforce Investment Act) Title I, s. 117 (b)(2)(A)(vi) [―representatives of

the one-stop partners].

iii. A contract with a member receiving a grant for workforce services under

federal, state or other governmental workforce programs.

iv. A contract between a board and a board member which is not exempted

under paragraphs II(a), II(b) or II(c) where the board documents

exceptional circumstances and/or need and the board member does not

personally benefit financially from the contract. Based upon criteria

developed by WFI, DEO shall review the board‘s documentation and

assure compliance.

v. Such contracts, as listed above, may not be executed before or without

prior submission to the Department of Economic Opportunity for review

and recommendation to Workforce Florida, Inc.

vi. A contract under $25,000 between the Board and a member of the board

is not required to have prior approval of Workforce Florida, Inc., but must

be approved by two-thirds vote of the board, a quorum having been

established, and must be reported to the Department of Economic

Opportunity.

e. Board contracts equal to or greater than $50,000 shall not be executed prior

to the written approval of Polk Works‘ Board.

Section 3 – Abstentions

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 22


a. Any member of the Board with a conflict of interest, or appearance thereof,

shall abstain from voting on such matters.

b. All abstentions due to conflict of interest, or the appearance thereof, shall be

publicly acknowledged and recorded in the minutes.

4. Describe how the RWB shall coordinate and interact with the local elected

official(s).

The local elected official appoints a liaison to attend all Polk Works Board

meetings. The Executive Committee of the Polk Works Board and the local

elected official will meet periodically to provide updates relative to the workforce

system. The CEO of Polk Works maintains contact with the County manager as

well as the County attorney to ensure that all required documents are submitted

and approved in a timely fashion. Monthly Employer newsletters regarding Polk

Works‘ programs and business opportunities are distributed to the business

community, including the elected officials. In Program Year 2012, Polk Works

will begin making quarterly presentations to the Polk County Board of County

Commissioners.

5. Explain how the RWB shall ensure nondiscrimination and equal

opportunity.

Per the Polk Works Anti-Discrimination and Anti-Harassment, including Sexual

Harassment Policy:

The Board is committed to a work environment in which all individuals are treated

with respect and dignity. The Board is a zero tolerance workplace and does not

tolerate any type of harassment to our employees, applicants, customers or

vendors. Offenses or alleged offenses are to be immediately brought to the

attention of supervisor/management, Human Resources Director or President &

CEO, which are to be handled quickly, discreetly and as confidentially as

possible.

The One-Stop Career Centers and satellite offices post all required department

of labor documentation relating to non-discrimination and equal opportunity.

6. Explain what strategies the CEO and local Board shall create to utilize the

leadership of faith-based and neighborhood partnerships.

To utilize the leadership of faith-based and neighborhood partnerships, Polk

Works has built strategic partnerships with more than 20 non-profit organizations

and faith based institutions. Information on partnering with Polk Works is posted

on the website, along with an invitation to contact the President & CEO for

information on the partnership process. In addition, as staff interacts in various

community activities, they invite organizations to participate in the partnership

program.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 23


Polk Works meets with its partners quarterly. During the meeting, ‗round the

room introductions provide the opportunity for partners to share their mission. At

least one partner is on the agenda to provide a more in depth presentation about

their organization and services.

C. Administrative Entity

1. Identify the administrative and their staff; describe their responsibilities in

carrying out the work of the local board.

The Board Administrative Staff is as follows:

President & CEO – Provides administrative leadership and carries out the

directives of the Polk County Workforce Development Board. S/He is

responsible for administering all procedures, programs and activities of the Board

of Directors. Reports directly to the Board of Directors.

VP of Operations – Functions as Assistant to the President & CEO and is

responsible for program planning, compliance with State and internal policies and

overall contract management, inclusive of programmatic contracts and

procurement of program services/activities. Has overall accountability for grant

funded programs and a variety of tasks related to the Board‘s operational

functions. Supervises all operational staff and reports to the President & CEO.

Contract Manager – One-Stop Operator – Responsible for the administration and

management of all aspects of the Board‘s customer services contract including

contracting, negotiating, procurement and performance, and ongoing liaison to

the service provider. Develops and/or manages special customer service

projects for the Board and supports Board Committees. Reports to the Vice

President of Operations.

Testing Services Advisor – LEAD – Schedules and administers appropriate

testing services (TABE, CareerScope, CPT, and clerical) for the Assessment

Center at Polk Works. Provides supervision and oversight to other Testing

Services Advisors. Reports to the Contract Manager.

Testing Services Advisor – Schedules and administers appropriate testing

services (TABE, CareerScope, CPT, and clerical) for the Assessment Center

at Polk Works. Reports to the Testing Services Advisor - LEAD.

Contract Manager Youth Programs – Responsible for administration and

management of all aspects of the Board‘s customer services youth contracts

including contracting, negotiating, procurement and ongoing liaison with the

service provider, also support for Board Committee. Reports to the Vice

President of Operations.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 24


Contract Manager Special Projects – Responsible for administration and

management of all aspects of the Board‘s day-to-day operational functions

related to special contracts including contracting, negotiating, procurement and

ongoing liaison with service provider. Reports to the Vice President of

Operations.

Facilities Center Manager – Responsible for managing the planning and

maintenance of equipment and buildings to provide a safe and professional work

environment for the delivery of services to job seekers and employers in Region

17. This includes all facilities buildings, grounds, etc. Provide tactical

management for Polk Works/administrative support units to ensure quality and

consistency in the services provided to various and/or multiple locations.

Responsible for and supervises the care, maintenance and efficient operation of

facilities including but not limited to maintenance, reporting and purchasing.

Reports to the Contract Manager – Special Projects.

Ticket to Work/Disability Coordinator – Responsible for providing services to

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance

(SSDI) beneficiaries as defined by the Social Security Administration (SSA) to

obtain employment and return to work through the Ticket to Work program. This

is a responsible position with overall accountability to develop and maintain

linkages with employers to facilitate job placement for individuals with disabilities.

Serves as a resource to the workforce investment community within the service

are to ensure the availability of comprehensive knowledge on federal, state, local

and private programs that impact the ability of individuals with disabilities to enter

and remain in the workforce. Reports to the Contract Manager – Special

Projects.

VP of Finance – Responsible for the administrative and technical work involving

overall responsibility for the day-to-day administration and management of the

Board‘s financial affairs. Reports to the President & CEO.

Senior Accountant – Responsible for technical work involving all aspects of the

Board‘s financial system under the direction of the Administration and Vice

President of Finance performs tasks related to the day to day financial

operations. Reports to the Vice President of Finance.

Accountant – Responsible for technical work involving all aspects of the Board‘s

financial system. Performs tasks related to the day-to-day financial operations.

Reports to the Vice President of Finance.

VP of Human Resources – Responsible for administrative & workforce services

including but not limited to human resources management and issues,

professional office functions, policy development, administrative staff activities,

board membership and customer services provider liaison for Paychex Business

Solutions, Inc. Reports to the President & CEO.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 25


Administrative Assistant – Responsible for serving as the primary administrative

support to the President & CEO and administrative overall support to the Senior

Management Team by performing a wide variety of highly complex, responsible,

and confidential office, technical, clerical and para-professional administrative

duties. Reports to the Vice President of Human Resources.

Community Outreach Coordinator – Overall responsibility to Polk Works‘

Workforce System for community outreach and education functions including

developing, designing, coordinating, and implementing all community outreach

and education activities and media relations. Reports to the Vice President of

Human Resources.

MIS Director – Responsible for overall coordination and leadership inclusive of all

aspects of the Board automated system activities, services and contracts.

Reports to the Vice President of Operations.

Network Systems Officer – Responsible for overall coordination of all aspects of

the Boards automated system activities, services and contracts. Primary

responsibilities include all administrative functions on the network, including all

software and hardware installation, upgrades and normal server and workstation

maintenance tasks. Reports to the MIS Director.

Displaced Homemaker Program Career Specialist – Responsible for the overall

coordination and management of a caseload of Displaced Homemaker Program

participants. Provides a full spectrum of services including recruiting, evaluating,

counseling and job placement of job seekers entering the grant program.

Attached:

Attachment #5 - Fiscal Agent Design/Administrative Entity/One-

Stop Operator

Attached:

Attachment #6 – Official Signatures

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 26


LOCAL VISION, GOALS AND PRIORITIES

The local vision, goals and priorities must be consistent with the State Plan and

demonstrates a broader strategic planning approach as called by the U.S.

Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration’s (ETA) in TEGL

21-11.

A. CEO and RWB Collaboration

1. Outline the vision, goals, and priorities for all local workforce programs

including WT/TANF, TAA and SNAP that reflect the strategic direction

articulated in Sections I and II of the State Workforce Investment Plan.

Just as the 2010-2015 Strategic Plan for Workforce Development‘s findings

centered on a shared vision for establishing Florida as a leader in the global

innovation economy, Polk Works along with the Central Florida Development

Council, endeavors to implement a shared vision for economic development for

the Region and ensuring that we provide and sustain a qualified workforce.

Consistent with the Governor Scott‘s focus on job creation and economic

development, Polk Works has a strong partnership with our economic

development partners across the region. In particular, the Central Florida

Development Council has strategically focused its efforts on targeting

industries that complement the Region‘s current and future job base.

In order to ensure that Polk Works is preparing a qualified workforce, our

employment and training objectives are developed to align with the outreach

efforts of our economic development partners. In a study commissioned by the

CFDC, the following sectors were identified as the strongest market segments

for the Region:







Life Sciences & Medical Services

Research, Engineering & High-tech

Logistics and Supply Chain Management

Agri-technology and Agribusiness

Business and Financial Services

Renewable and Alternative Energy

These market segments will continue to be one of the focal points for limited

training resources. Polk Works will strategically and innovatively work with the

CFDC and all other economic development organizations within the county and

across the Central Florida area, as well as our training and education partners

in the Region to ensure that our WIA eligible customers, including WT/TANF

and SNAP customers are educated about the employment prospects in these

targeted industry clusters. This partnership with our workforce development

partners aligns with the Governor‘s commitments and principles outlined in his

7-7-7 plan for job creation which challenges Polk Works and our economic

development partners ―to work together toward a shared goal of making Florida

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 27


the best state in the nation to….succeed in the workplace.‖

In addition, Polk Works has begun the use of the DEO/LMS Supply/Demand

Reports. These reports when fully developed will compliment and inform the

outreach efforts of our economic development partners. The data reported will

better customize Polk Works‘ training programs to anticipate employer needs in

the sectors identified as the strongest market segments for the Region. This

approach, aligning training resources with the outreach efforts of our economic

development partners, is not only practical and strategic, but offers the best

chance and job growth for our Region.

This new approach, based on the understanding that analyzing occupations

and critical skill sets within Florida‘s targeted industry clusters, can help identify

which occupations provide the best opportunities for investment to build

different types of skills, identify gaps and build career ladders in high growth

areas.

This supply/demand modeling focused on occupational skills can help guide

and elevate both new and incumbent workers into the workforce by comparing

workforce needs to the numbers and types of training, certificates and degrees

awarded. Polk Works currently utilizes the Supply/Demand data to analyze

occupations in demand and to determine the variances, consistencies or

inconsistencies over time. The most recent advertised occupations are

compared with the Preliminary Targeted Occupations List (TOL). Those

occupations that are listed in decline and that have an oversupply of trained

workers are first to be considered for recommending not to offer training for

these occupations.

The Polk Works‘ Career Council regularly reviews the Supply/Demand Report,

the TOL and Training provider performance information to make decisions

concerning local targeted occupations for providing occupational skills training.

The Career Council makes recommendations to the Polk Works Board

regarding the continuation or suspension of funding for training in those

occupations for which there is an oversupply of trained workers. In making its

recommendations the Council also considers the Annual Percent Growth data

as included with the annual Regional Targeted Occupations List.

Polk Works‘ Career Specialists provide this information to WIA eligible customers

so that they may make informed choices toward those occupations that are in

demand and which are considered high growth potential. Polk Works‘ delivery of

services is carried out through its comprehensive One-Stop delivery system,

which integrates the provision of services for unemployed, underemployed and

employed workers including WT/TANF and SNAP customers. For WT/TANF

customers and others who may require additional education and training,

including job readiness, and adult basic education skills training, etc., referrals

are made to other partners including, school districts, community-based

programs, and faith-based organizations.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 28


2. Identify "action steps" the RWB and delivery system will take to contribute

to reaching the local vision, goals, and priorities.

The Board staff, in collaboration with the Board of Directors and its Councils,

service providers and partners, will work together to analyze and interpret Labor

Market Information in developing programs and opportunities that will align the

best interests of job seekers and employers with the economic future of the

county.

The Career Council will continue to recommend policies and strategies to

improve the quality of jobs filled by the under employed, including researching,

addressing and improving the types of training and delivery systems available to

incumbent workers.

Business Competitiveness Council will continue to review the Labor Market

Information and other pertinent information in the process of designing strategies

to address training related to high skill/high wage issues.

The Youth Development Council will continue to design and recommend the

delivery of service strategies that address the need to prepare young people and

others new to the workforce for employment or transition to addition education

beyond high school.

3. Describe RWB process to prepare their proposed performance for the nine

Common Measures to be negotiated with the State.

The RWB will follow the lead of the State in negotiating performance for the

Common measures for Region 17 based on previous performance, local

economic indicators and labor market data for the area.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 29


ONE-STOP DELIVERY SYSTEM/SERVICES

The establishment of a One-Stop delivery system is a cornerstone of the reforms

contained in Title I of WIA. The One-Stop system is designed to enhance access

to services and improve long-term employment outcomes for individuals seeking

assistance. The regulations define the system as consisting of one or more

comprehensive, physical One-Stop center(s) in a local area that provide the core

services specified in WIA.

A. Design

1. Describe the process for the selection of One-Stop operator(s),

including the competitive process or the agreement process between

the local board and a consortium of partners

The selection of the One-Stop Operator is procured in accordance with

Polk Works‘ adopted Procurement Policies and Procedures, which

incorporates the methods of procurement provided for under 2 CFR 215.

The One-Stop Operator facilitates services for workforce program,

including; WIA, TAA, WT, SNAP, Veterans, Wagner-Peyser, REA, UI,

RES-EUC, PREP.

The policy states:

Competitive Proposals – the determination to seek competitive proposals

may be made by the President & CEO or by the Board. The President &

CEO or the Board will direct Board staff to prepare a Request for

Proposals (RFP) to detail the goods or services being sought, the amount

the Board intends to spend, the proposal content instructions and the

proposal review and award criteria. In determining the amount anticipated

to spend, the staff person responsible for preparing the RFP will prepare a

cost estimate. This cost estimate will take into consideration such things

as:




What other workforce regions are paying for similar services

What the Polk Workforce Board is paying for similar services

Historical data as to what has been paid in the past for similar

services, adjusted for inflation and local conditions

Each RFP shall make clear to potential offerors that the issuance of the

RFP does not commit the Board to award a contract, pay any costs

associated with the preparation of a proposal, or to actually procure the

requested service. Each RFP shall also reserve the right of the Board to

accept and/or reject all proposals received and to negotiate with all

qualified sources.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 30


Once the RFP is fully developed, a legal notice detailing the scope of the

RFP, how and when to propose, a contact person at the Board, and other

pertinent information will be prepared and published, using the Purchase

Order process described above. RFP‘s will also be advertised in Florida

Administrative Weekly and posted at the Board‘s website,

www.polkworks.org.

Prior to the release of each RFP, the President & CEO will appoint a team

of at least three (3) Board members and/or staff to review the proposals

received. Staff and Board members will be selected based on their

expertise in the services being sought and/or the procurement process.

These staff will be provided with copies of the RFP and any related

documents.

The Board also maintains a current listing of all agencies and

organizations that may be potential providers of goods or services

solicited. Agencies and organizations on that list will be direct mailed a

memorandum announcing the availability of the RFP and a general

description of goods or services being sought. The announcement will

direct them to call the Board or visit the Board‘s website to access the full

RFP.

A proposer‘s conference will be held in conjunction with each RFP issued.

The conduct of that conference is the responsibility of the staff person who

developed the RFP. This responsibility includes a requirement for the

production and distribution of conference minutes. Conference minutes

made available to all attendees and any other interested parties through

the Board‘s website and copied to the three (3) staff proposal reviewers.

Once an RFP is issued, designated Board staff will be available to answer

technical questions only. All potential bidders are required to attend the

proposer‘s conference as the primary venue to have questions addressed.

As proposals are received, they will be date and time stamped on the

outside of the envelope/box in which they are received to ensure timely

submission. On the specified date at the specified time and location, the

Board will open the proposals received. Each proposal‘s receipt will be

recorded on a log that provides the name of the RFP at the top and the

name, address and contact person for each proposal opened. Originals

will be filed with the Vice President of Operation‘s office. Copies will be

distributed to each member of the review committee.

All proposals meeting the following criteria will be reviewed:



Submittal on or before the deadline specified

Submittal in the format specified

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 31


Proposal is responsive to the RFP

Staff reviewers will read and rate each proposal independent of one

another, using the objective rating criteria contained in the RFP. Rating

criteria may include, but will not necessarily be limited to:








Past performance of the proposer in the services solicited

Fiscal accountability of the proposer

Ability of the proposer to meet performance objectives

Reasonableness of the proposed costs

Quality of the services proposed

Qualifications of staff to deliver the proposed services

Proposer‘s demonstrated ability to serve targeted populations, if

any

Once reviewers complete their independent scoring of the proposals, they

will meet and finalize the proposal rating process. Based on their

independent rating of each proposal, the team will formulate written

recommendations to the President& CEO for presentation to the Board.

The President& CEO will schedule the recommendations for consideration

to the appropriate committee of the Board in a timely manner.

The Board Committee may elect to accept, accept with modifications or

reject the staff recommendations. Where a recommendation to fund is

made, the Committee Chair will request that the Executive Committee

place the recommendation on the agenda of the next Board meeting. The

Full Workforce Development Board then either accepts, or accepts with

modifications, or rejects the committee recommendation. Board approval

constitutes staff authorization to proceed with contract negotiations.

Actual funding of any proposal is contingent upon:




Successful negotiation with the service provider

Acceptance by the service provider of the Board‘s contract terms

and conditions

Reference checks, as required

In addition, prior to the execution of each contract, Board staff must

determine that each service provider meets the following requirements:

Has adequate financial resources or the ability to obtain such

Has the ability to meet the performance goals, program

specifications and conditions and to do so at a reasonable cost

Has a satisfactory record of past performance

Has a satisfactory record of business ethics and fiscal

accountability

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 32


Has the necessary organization, experience, accounting and

operational controls, as well as the technical skills to perform the

contracted work

The Board‘s Vice President of Operations or other designated staff person

will proceed with contract negotiations as directed by the Board.

Negotiations will include the establishment of performance standards and

the conduct of a full price analysis. Where profit is allowable, it will be

negotiated separately from the line-item budget. The amount of profit

allowed will be associated with contractor risk and reasonableness

considering the work being performed.

The final agreed-upon contract document will be presented to the

President & CEO for review and approval. The President & CEO has

signatory authority for all contracts.

Once fully executed (signed and dated by both parties), the Vice President

of Operations will issue an Authorization to Proceed memorandum to the

contractor.

Competitive procurements will be fully documented. Procurement files will

be established and maintained by the Planning and Contracting Office and

will include, at a minimum:






Solicitation (cost/price estimates, the RFP, legal advertisements

and other announcements, bidder‘s list and proposer‘s conference

minutes)

Proposals submitted (full submission of each proposal, whether

selected for funding or not, along with transmittal attachments, staff

summaries of proposals, if any)

Evaluation of Proposals (completed rating sheets – in ink and

signed by each rater – summaries and tabulations of ratings and

staff recommendations)

Board actions (record of committee and/or full board actions, copies

of letters sent to each proposer announcing Board actions; and

Contract negotiations (documentation of the significant history of

the negotiations, documentation of the cost/price analysis

conducted)

The Board will maintain, for three (3) years, those written records specified

above. This extension period will be extended until such time as all audits,

claims and litigation, if any, have been fully resolved.

2. Describe the appeals process to be used by entities not selected as

the One-Stop operator

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 33


Any bidder that submits a proposal in response to this RFP will receive fair

and unbiased consideration. Should such a firm not be funded for these

services and contends that the procurement process was flawed, then that

firm may protest the funding decision in writing to the Board‘s President &

CEO within ten (10) days of the Board‘s decision. The President & CEO

will attempt to resolve the protest in a reasonable manner and time frame.

If the dispute cannot be resolved with the President & CEO, then the

protesting bidder can seek and may be granted an opportunity to appeal

to the Executive Committee of the Polk Works Board. The Executive

Committee decision on all such matters is final.

3. Provide overview of the One-Stop Delivery system, including

physical site location, operator, personnel, and participating

partners. Include organizational chart for the comprehensive One

Stop site.

Polk Works operates two full service One-Stop Career Centers and a

Satellite office. Both centers provide WIA, TAA, WT, SNAP, Veterans,

Wagner-Peyser, REA, UI, RES-EUC, PREP, Ticket to Work, and

Displaced Homemaker services. Polk Works contracts with a Service

Provider as the One-Stop Operator. Experience Works, Vocational

Rehabilitation, PCSB GED Program and Job Corps provide services at the

One-Stop Career Centers. All other partners are located at their own

facilities. Polk Works also provides the rural community with services on

the Mobile One-Stop Unit three or more times per month.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 34


POLK WORKS COMPREHENSIVE ONE-STOP ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 35


4. Identify and describe any affiliate site or agents or specialized

centers to be established in the local area. Include any remote sites

accessed through the use of technology.

Site

One-Stop Career Center

500 East Lake Howard Drive

Winter Haven, FL 33880

One-Stop Career Center

309 N. Ingraham Avenue

Lakeland, FL 33803

Business Services

600 N. Broadway Ave., Suite A

Bartow, FL 33830

940 E Parker Street

Lakeland, FL 33801

315 Dr. Martin Luther King Blvd.,

North

Lake Wales, FL 33853

705 Ingraham Ave., Suite 15

Haines City, FL 33844

997 E. Memorial Blvd., Ste 103

Lakeland, FL 33801

Lake Wales Public Library

290 Cypress Garden Lane

Lake Wales, FL 33853

Association of Poinciana-

Community Ctr.

395 Marigold Ave.,

Poinciana, FL 34759

Bartow Public Library

2150 S. Broadway Ave

Bartow, FL 33830

Haines City

705 Ingraham Ave Suite 15

Haines City, FL 33844

Polk County Courthouse

225 North Broadway

Bartow, FL 33830

Services Provided

Full Service One-Stop Career Center providing

WIA, TAA, WT, SNAP, Veterans, Wagner-

Peyser, REA, UI, RES-EUC, PREP, Ticket to

Work, and Displaced Homemaker services.

Youth Services are also provided in the Winter

Haven One-Stop.

Under the MOU with the BoCC of County

Commissioners, provides services to the

business community.

Welfare Transition Services – provides job

readiness and support services.

Young Leaders Program - provides academic

support and career coaching to youth ages 16-21

that live in Polk County.

Young Leaders Program –Same as above.

Young Leaders Program –Same as above.

Mobile One-Stop - The Mobile One-Stop (MOS)

Unit delivers workforce development services

throughout Polk County. The MOS allows

individuals to search for jobs online, prepare

resumes, submit applications and access the

Polk Works‘ individualized workforce

development programs.

Mobile One-Stop – Same as above.

Mobile One-Stop – Same as above

Mobile One-Stop – Same as above

Mobile One-Stop – Same as above

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 36


5. Describe how the Workforce Investment Board shall engage

employers and organized labor in the One-Stop delivery system.

Employers and organized labor are engaged in the One-Stop delivery

system through their participation on the Board of Director‘s and its

councils, through their engagement with workforce activities of Business

Services, our One-Stop Career Centers, and through the Employ Florida

System. Polk Works distributes a monthly newsletter to the business

community regarding workforce issues, labor market information and

workforce training. Business members must hold a majority of the

positions on the Board and the Board Chair must be selected from the

business community. One of our union representatives serves on the

Career Council which oversees and provides input to One-Stop Operator

regarding workforce programs and initiatives. The other representative

serves on the Finance Committee which oversees and provides input on

the allocation of workforce funds.

Our employers participate in our monthly roundtables and community

forums as well as our annual Workforce Summit and Polk Works‘ Annual

meeting. They also readily participate in hosting many of our summer

youth participants and provide work and mentoring opportunities to ensure

proper guidance is being provided to their future workforce.

Our Business Services Consultants, in partnership with our LVERs

conduct daily visits to businesses within their territory in an effort to inform

them of workforce programs such as job postings, recruitment events and

job fairs, workforce training grants and other workforce services.

6. Describe services offered to businesses. Include a description of

how the RWB ensures physical and programmatic accessibility for

individuals with disabilities at One-Stop centers.

Programs and services for businesses include:

Employee recruitment assistance (screening and applicant

referrals)

Financial incentives for businesses

Labor market information

Assistance during transitions, such as layoffs or mass hiring

Pre-employment testing and employee skills assessment

Employee bonding

Information on labor law to include ADA, EEO, and related

legislation

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 37


Assistance with law compliance, such as I-9 completion and

employment authorization

On site recruiting at Career Centers

Specialized Round Tables and Employer Seminars

Business Consultations

Employed Worker and On-the Job Training Grants

Job postings on Employ Florida Marketplace

All of Polk Works‘ facilities are ADA compliant allowing individuals to

participate in the full range of programs. In addition, a full time Disability

Program/Ticket to Work Coordinator is available to complement the

services already offered by the One-Stop Career Center, and assist SSI

and SSDI recipients with enrollment and participation in the Ticket to Work

program.

The Disabled Veteran Outreach Program (DVOP) is located at both One-

Stops, and travel to locations throughout the community. Veterans are

offered the full range of One-Stop Career Center services as well as the

opportunity to participate in programs designed specifically for veterans.

7. Describe any innovative initiatives or service delivery strategies

Polk Works Annual Meeting and Best Places to Work Awards – Polk

Works recognizes employers in Polk County that have taken the lead in

developing quality workplaces by sponsoring the Best Places to Work

Awards. This prestigious recognition not only helps advertise and

promote the company‘s unique forward-looking philosophy, it also serves

to recognize the exceptional workplaces that improve the quality of life for

workers and their families. Each year, over 500 community leaders attend

this event to hear about the programs and services of Polk Works over the

past year and learn about innovative initiatives other companies are

offering that make them a Best Place to Work. Board members‘ awards

and recognition are announced and a community Workforce Champion is

named.

In-house Recruiting Events – Almost weekly, Polk Works hosts

recruiting events in our One-Stop Career Centers. Different employers

designate a day that they will come to our One-Stop centers to recruit job

applicants onsite. Applications are completed, interviews are conducted

and some may even make contingent job offers on the spot. These

events are announced to all staff in our workforce system so that file

searches may be conducted and job seekers with matching qualifications

are contacted and informed of the event. Notifications are sent to our

Board members and workforce partners to share with job seekers they

know.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 38


Heart to Heart Partnership - Polk Works has established a partnership

with Heart to Heart, an organization that provides support services for

members of the Haitian Community. During the process it was

determined that the best time of day to provide services to this population

was late in the afternoon. As a result, Polk Works will have extended

hours two days a week specifically for referrals from Heart to Heart,

allowing them to attend computer and job readiness training at a time and

place that meets their needs.

What If? Symposium – Established in 2010, the What If? Symposium

focuses on youth between the ages of 14 and 21. The premise of the

event is based on the concept of ―What if your dreams of becoming a

professional athlete or superstar do not come true?‖ Polk Works provides

a youth focused career and education fair to help guide students on the

right career path. A variety of employers with job openings, non-profit

organizations and corporations support this event each year through

sponsorships, exhibits and job recruitment.

ACES Golf Tournament - Each year, Polk Works has hosted the ACES

Golf Tournament for Workforce Development and Literacy. This event is

solely hosted and funded by the Business Community. Over 130 business

leaders participate in this event each year, playing golf, networking with

other businesses and learning about Polk Works‘ initiatives and supporting

Polk Works‘ efforts. Since inception, Polk Works has raised over

$600,000 through this event.

Annual Workforce Summit – Each year, Polk Works‘ Business Services

Division hosts a Workforce Summit, bring together business leaders,

managers and HR professionals to learn about workforce trends,

employment law issues and HR best practices. Guest speakers engage

our audiences through various workshops and keynote messages. This

event is hosted in partnership with our local Mid-Florida SHRM

organization and several community sponsors.

Annual Employment & Education Fair – Each year, Polk Works hosts a

community-wide Employment & Education Fair in partnership with our

local Congressman‘s office. All costs associated with the event are

covered by the Congressman‘s office and all planning, organizing and

execution is provided by Polk Works‘ Business Services and One-Stop

staff. Employers and educators from all over the county participate in

what is one of our largest recruiting events of the year. At this event,

VETS are allowed early admission.

Annual Veteran’s Job Fair – Each year, Polk Works hosts job fairs for

Veteran‘s on the campuses of Polk State College. Employers and

educators from all over the county participate in what is one of our largest

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 39


ecruiting events dedicated to veterans. While many job seekers attend

this event, VETs are allowed entrance one-hour earlier than others.

Much more…

8. Describe examples of strategic partnering with required and optional

One-Stop partners and other organizations to provide services.

Service to Veterans - Through a strategic partnership with Polk State

College, new opportunities to provide services to veterans have been

established. As many returning veterans have attended college, their

attendance has not necessarily resulted in a college diploma or

marketable credential. Through this forged partnership Polk State

College, staff developed standard processes to provide services to

veterans regardless of the campus or program, established campus office

hours for Polk Works‘ veteran‘s staff and scheduled welcome back to

school sessions specifically for veterans and their families.

Service to Offenders – In a new partnership established between the

Polk County Drug Court and Polk Works, the Mobile One-Stop will be

available for use by job seekers at the County Court House, with part of

the day reserved for Drug Court participants only. As a mandatory part of

their program, drug court participants will attend job readiness activities on

the Mobile One-stop. While the program is less than 6 months old,

feedback from all parties has been positive and is leading to conversations

regarding similar opportunities.

9. Describe universal access and what services shall be provided.

Include the strategy for outreach and recruitment. Explain how

customer groups are identified and describe services that are

necessary to meet their needs:

dislocated workers

displaced homemakers

individuals training for non-traditional employment

migrants seasonal farmworkers

older individuals

public assistance recipients

people with disabilities

people with limited English-speaking proficiency

Veterans

Women General Policy

Universal Access to employment-related services is delivered in a

seamless and integrated manner for all customers through the One-Stop

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 40


Career Centers, satellite offices, partner sites and virtual venues. As each

individual engages with One-Stop Career Centers, they are directed to

staff to determine the program that best meets their needs.

Strategies for outreach and recruitment include participation at various

community events and job fairs with partner and non-partner

organizations, use of the Polk Works website, Twitter, FaceBook and a job

seeker newsletter.

Policies and local operating procedures are established for each program

that guides staff in determining who is eligible for which services and how

those services must be documented in the appropriate system.

RWBs are required to develop similar policy for several different programs. The policy

generally guides who is eligible to receive program service, determines the

administrative procedures for training services, and directs which program benefits and

funding staff can issue to a participant enrolled in training or other allowable activities.

1. Self-sufficiency may be based on the Lower Living Standard Income Level

(LLSIL) or wages. If the self-sufficiency level for employed workers is over

250% of the LLSIL and above the average wage in the region, the board

must provide acceptable justification that the level is required for an

individual to provide for him/herself and family. Provide the local

definition(s) of ―self-sufficiency‖ for:

Adult employed workers

Dislocated workers who are working in an income maintenance job

LLSIL:

The self-sufficiency standard defines the minimum amount of cash resources

needed in order for a family to meet its basic needs and to be self-sufficient.

Region 17‘s self-sufficiency definition is based on whether the individual at

the time of application is employed. The Region provides a separate selfsufficiency

definition for dislocated workers. The Region also uses the selfsufficient

wage to measure performance outcomes.



The definition of self-sufficiency for adult-employed workers is the local

LLSIL as annually published by the Department of Economic

Opportunity for eligible adults.

The self-sufficient wage for dislocated workers is the LLSIL as annually

published by the Department of Economic Opportunity or 80% of the

layoff wage, whichever is greater.


If self-sufficiency is defined differently for the following populations in the

region, please describe:


Recipients of public assistance, and people with disabilities and other barriers

to employment

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 41


If this definition of self-sufficiency does not apply to WT/TANF and SNAP

programs, please provide a definition that applies to these programs.

Self Sufficiency for WT/TANF programs is defined as follows:

For WT/TANF – 69% of the LLSIL

For SNAP – 67% of the LLSIL.

2. Describe the process for providing support services including the type,

dollar amount, conditions, and duration under which these services will be

made available to participants enrolled in workforce service programs. The

description of the supportive services may include a general description of

the supportive services to be provided for all programs or a description of

the services to be provided to participants of each of the programs. Attach

a copy of the local operating procedure:

Supportive Services may be provided for Welfare Transition, WIA Adults, and

WIA Dislocated customers who are participating in programs with activities

authorized under Assisted Core Services, Intensive Services and Training

Services; who are in post placement services and who are unable to obtain such

supportive services through other programs providing such services.

Within each twelve month period, a Welfare Transition mandatory customer may

receive, based on need, support services in an amount up to $1,250 for clothing

and transportation needs, inclusive of gas referrals, fuel cards, bus passes and

limited vehicle repairs. On a case-by-case basis, transitional services may also

be provided for up to 3 months following employment ending the TANF grant. If

approved by the local supervisor, however, the amount allowed must be within

the $1,250 support services limit.

It is the policy of the Board that customer owned vehicle repair requests will not

be approved for vehicles over 10 years of age. Vehicles under 10 years of age

needing minor repairs may be approved up to $500; repairs over $500 must be

approved by the Immediate Supervisor.

Attached:

Local Operating Procedures ~ Issuance of Cards


Describe the process for providing support services to target

populations such as the homeless, ex-offenders, migrant and seasonal

farm-workers, individuals with disabilities, older workers, limited

English Proficiency, and other target groups.

Individuals within the categories listed above are referred to the appropriate

agency or program in order to determine the eligibility for support services.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 42


Support services may be prioritized due to limited funding. Please

describe how services are to be limited by type and by amount.

Polk Works provides funded support services to those who are eligible under

governing rules and regulations for the type of funding deemed appropriate

and allowable. Limitations on funds will not affect the amount that we provide

as the limit is already relatively low. Therefore, Polk Works funded support

services will be provided to those who are eligible until funds are exhausted.


Support services for a particular program that are not listed above,

please describe the services, prioritization for such services, and attach

a corresponding policy for each.

Not applicable

3. Describe the local procedure for handling any WIA grievance from a

customer/participant. (20 CFR 667.600 - 667.650)

Any participant or other interested party adversely affected by a decision or

action by the local workforce system, including decisions by career center

partners and service partners has the right to file a grievance/complaint with the

Polk County Workforce Development Board, Inc.

The Board shall receive, review, and attempt to informally resolve the initial WIA,

TAA, TANF/WT, and SNAP grievance/complaint. If the grievance/complaint

cannot be resolved informally, then a hearing shall be held and a decision issued

within the required sixty (60) calendar days from receipt.

Employment, and health and safety complaints/alleged violations for reasons

other than unlawful discrimination may be forwarded to the Department of

Economic Opportunity (DEO), Office of General Counsel, Caldwell Building–

Suite 150, 107 East Madison Street, Tallahassee, Florida, 32399-4128, or may

be mailed directly to the appropriate federal agency as allowed by federal

regulation. A copy of the complaint/alleged violation report shall also be mailed to

DEO at the above address.

4. Describe how individuals seeking occupational skills training are assisted

if training funds are not available at the time of their request.

In the event training funds are not available, Polk Works‘ staff will maintain a

waiting list and assist individuals in applying for PELL grants, and researching

other funding opportunities.

5. Describe how Customized Training, On the Job Training (OJT), and work

experience activities are used locally. Provide a description of the process

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 43


for developing work sites and training agreements with employers. Attach

local operating procedures.

Describe the strategies used to provide priority of service under the WIA

Adult program.

How are Welfare Transition and other training funds taken into account

when establishing these strategies?

How are the needs of special client groups addressed?

How do employed workers fit in the priority of service strategies?

Customized and On-the-Job Training are used to meet the needs of both the

employer and employee.

Work sites for Customized Training and On-the-Job Training grants are primarily

developed through the outreach efforts of the Business Services. The Business

Services promotes the availability of Customized Training and On-the-Job

Training grants to employers throughout the county at various networking events.

Employed worker training grants provide funding for up to 50% of an employer‘s

direct training costs. The employer selects the training program and provider that

best meets the needs of its employees and business.

On-the-Job training grants provide employers financial reimbursement for up to

50% of the OJT‘s employee‘s wages during the contract period. Jobs must be

permanent in nature, require from 160 – 520 hours of training and have an ONET

Online Standard Vocational Preparation component of three or greater.

Community Service Work Experience (CSWE) – Before a customer may be

assigned to a CSWE site there must be a properly executed agreement signed

by a designated representative of the CSWE site and the Regional Workforce

Board provider. Customers assigned to CSWE will sign the Confidentiality

Agreement and be given copies of the CSWE timesheet. The forms will be

taken by the participant to the work site supervisor, and copies placed in the

participant‘s case file. There is no minimum number of hours for which CSWE

may be assigned, but customer‘s will be counseled by their Career Specialist

that, by law, a participant may not be scheduled for more hours per week than

the maximum number allowed by their calculation as reported in the Benefit

Information Screen.

Hours of participation in CSWE will be verified by the CSWE site supervisor.

Verification of hours of participation will be turned in timely as determined by the

Career Specialist. All activity will be case noted.

Attached:

Attached:

Attached:

Local Operating Procedures ~ On-the-Job Training

Local Operating Procedures ~ Customized Training

Local Operating Procedures ~Community Service Work Experience

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 44


6. Explain the process used by the board for determining whether adult

formula funds are not limited, and therefore, priority of services is not

required to apply. Are adult formula funds currently limited so that priority

of services does not apply in the region?

Describe the criteria to be used for providing priority of services in employment

and training to veterans across all workforce programs.

Describe the strategies used to provide priority of service under the WIA Adult

program.

How will priority of service be provided to low-income individuals and public

assistance recipients?

How are Welfare Transition and other training funds taken into account when

establishing these strategies?

How are the needs of special client groups addressed?

How do employed workers fit in the priority of service strategies?

In the event WIA funds allocated are limited, priority within the eligible population

for training services will be determined in the following manner:

The highest priority of service will be for an adult who is at least one of the

following:

a. An individual who receives, or is a member of a family that receives cash

welfare payments

b. A veteran

c. An individual who is receiving or, at any time in the prior six months, was

eligible to receive Food Stamps.

d. An individual who has received or is a member of a family which has

received, a total family income for the previous six months, less than

125% of the Poverty Level as established by the Department of Health

and Human Services.

e. An individual who was a Job Corps participant at any time in the six month

period prior to application.

f. An individual who is eligible to receive welfare transitional benefits.

The next highest priority of service is for an adult with one or more of the

following barriers to employment:

a. Homeless Individual

b. Offender

c. Older Worker

d. Physically or Mentally Disabled

e. Single Parent with one or more children under the age of 18 living in the

applicants‘ household

f. Substantial language or cultural barriers

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 45


The lowest priority of service is for an adult who does not have any of the

above characteristics.

Note: When the Priority System is imposed, the Board‘s President & CEO will

officially notify the Service Provider who in turn alerts the One-Stop program

staff.

Adult formula funds are not currently declared limited in the Region.


Describe the criteria to be used for providing priority of services in

employment and training to veterans across all workforce programs.

Veterans covered under the Jobs for Veterans Act of 2009 shall be given

priority over non-veterans for the receipt of employment, training and

placement services. Eligible WIA Veterans shall receive priority over nonveterans.

Veterans are to be served within the context of giving priority to

public assistance and low-income persons first for intensive and training

services. For example, if there was only sufficient money to provide services

to one low-income individual, and a veteran is in the pool, the veteran must

receive priority. Polk Works ensures the priority of services is provided to all

Veterans by:

o Reserving 5 spots for Veterans in each WIA Orientation

o Allowing Veterans are welcome to come to an in person WIA

Orientation the day of the Orientation without being previously signed

up

o Being provided the first available WIA case management appointment

prior to non-veterans


How will priority of service be provided to low-income individuals and

public assistance recipients?

Low-income individuals and public assistance recipients shall be given

priority for the receipt of employment, training and placement services.

Eligible low-income and public assistance recipients shall receive priority

to intensive and training services. For example, if there was only sufficient

funding to provide services to one low-income individual or public

assistance recipient and an eligible customer who was not low-income,

the low-income or public assistance recipient must receive the funding

assistance.

7. Describe the need for employment, training and supportive services

to individuals with limited English proficiency in your area. Describe

current and planned strategies for increasing access to ESL training;

providing services and materials in multiple languages; increasing

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 46


cultural awareness among staff serving customers; and current and

planned partnerships to improve the local area’s ability to serve

individuals with limited English proficiency.

Nearly one-fifth of Polk County‘s population speaks a language other than

English in the home. To assist individuals with limited English proficiency,

bi-lingual staff is available, partnerships are developed with organizations

which provide multi-lingual services and staff receives training in cultural

awareness. DEO materials printed in multiple languages are also available

for distribution.

B. Memorandum of Understanding (MOU)

Please describe customer service improvements or operational efficiency

gained from recent updates to the MOUs described in Section 121(c) of WIA

between the RWB and each of the mandatory and/or optional one-stop

partners. Each MOU must contain the following:

A description of methods for referral of individuals between the One-Stop

operator and the one-stop partners, for the appropriate services and activities.

A description of the services and how these services will be provided through the

One-Stop delivery system.

A description of the funding arrangements for services and operating costs of the

One-Stop delivery system.

The duration of the memorandum and the procedures for amending the

memorandum during the term of the memorandum.

The regions MOUs prior to Program Year 2012 included the above listed points.

There were no recommendations for additional changes.

C. Fiscal Controls and Reporting (WFI Contracting Policy)

1. Describe the competitive and noncompetitive processes that will be used

by the local area to award grants and contracts for activities under Title I of

WIA including how potential bidders are being made aware of grants and

contracts.

Polk Works competitively procures a One-Stop Operator and a provider of Youth

Services to deliver services under Title 1 of WIA every three years. The

procurement processes are described below:

PROCEDURE:

Polk Works shall adhere to procurement standards to ensure Finance accountability,

efficiency, prevent waste, fraud and abuse.

A. THE PROCUREMENT of GOODS and SERVICES

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 47


1. All purchases of goods and services other than those described herein shall

be initiated with a purchase order form following an acceptable method of

procurement as described in paragraph A. 3 below. The person initiating the

purchase must provide an estimate of the total number of units of a good or a

service that will be needed over the course of a program year. Breaking down

an aggregate purchase into smaller units which fall below the threshold for a

bid is prohibited. Purchase orders must be authorized by the appropriate

approving authority.

a) Purchase orders for office supplies, and furniture shall be submitted to the

requesting individual‘s Departmental Vice President for approval, then

shall be forwarded to the President & CEO for approval and upon the

President & CEO approval may be purchased in accordance with an

acceptable method of procurement as described in paragraph A. 3.

b) Purchase orders for Copy Machines, Hardware, Software, Toner, Fax

Machines and other technology based items shall originate with the MIS

Director who shall submit it to the Departmental Vice President for review

then to the President & CEO for approval and upon the President & CEO

approval may be purchased in accordance with an acceptable method of

procurement as described in paragraph A. 3.

c) Purchase orders for all other goods or services which do not exceed

$4,999.99 shall be submitted to the Departmental Vice President for

review and to the President & CEO for approval and upon the President &

CEO approval may be purchased in accordance with an acceptable

method of procurement as described in paragraph A. 3.

d) Credit-Card purchases made by the President & CEO or Department Vice

Presidents up to the limit of their Credit Card require a purchase order and

must be made and documented in accordance with an acceptable method

of procurement as described in paragraph A. 3.

e) Exception - Credit Card purchases made by the President & CEO or staff

with company credit cards up to the limit for travel or while on travel status

do not require a Purchase Order. However, upon return, the need for the

purchase should be documented with a purchase order and made part of

the file.

f) Exception - Purchases for seminars and airfare and other related travels

costs are approved through a Travel Request Form.

g) Purchase orders for all other goods or services which exceed $4,999.99

shall be submitted to the Departmental Vice President for approval and

forwarded to the President & CEO or Vice President of Finance for

approval. Upon Executive Department approval the goods or services may

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 48


e purchased in accordance with an acceptable method of procurement

as described in paragraph A.3.

h) All Purchase Orders need to include the funding stream(s) to be charged

for the good or service and the fund/account number and if applicable the

state contract number, which may be found at www.myflorida .com.

This also applies to purchases which will be cost allocated within or

among funding streams. (This may be obtained from Finance

Department).

i) The approving authority for items in excess of a credit card limit requested

by Department Vice Presidents shall be the Vice President of the Finance

Department.

2. Ordering and Receipt of Purchased Goods and Services

a) An employee other than the employee who requested the good or service

must receive the goods and services to verify the proper count as well as

sign and date the packing slip.

b) Discrepancies in ordered merchandise (short delivery/returned items)

must be recorded on the packing slip and forwarded to the requestor for

follow up with the vendor.

c) The Requestor shall compare the goods and services received

(description, unit price, quantity) to the Purchase Order using the packing

slip.

d) Copies of the purchase orders and packing slips must be compared by the

Finance Department to ensure that duplicate invoices are not paid.

e) Vendor statements shall be analyzed monthly to ensure that all credits

have been recorded by Polk Works and the vendor.

3. Goods and/or services necessary for the conduct of the agency‘s business

and to implement and operate programs shall be procured using one of the

following acceptable methods of procurement provided for under 2 CFR 215

a) NONCOMPETITIVE PROPOSAL/SOLE SOURCE—May be used when

the award of the contract under competitive negotiation or small purchase

procedures is not feasible.

i. In general purchases shall be awarded under noncompetitive

negotiations only when it is appropriate, necessary, and in the best

interests of Polk Works.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 49


ii.

iii.

iv.

Circumstances under which a contract may be awarded by

noncompetitive negotiations are limited to the following: (1) The

goods and services to be procured are available from a single

source only. (2) Public exigency or emergency when the urgency

for the requirements will not permit a delay incident to competitive

solicitation (3) After the solicitation of a number of sources,

competition is determined to be inadequate (4) the awardee is a

local educational agency, which is defined as public elementary,

secondary, or vocational schools, the Community College and the

State University System (5) For the purchases of utilities (6)

Purchases made from another governmental unit in accordance

with the Florida Statutes, which provides for the purchases of such

purchases without the necessity of procurement. (7)For On the Job

Training contracts, (8) For the placement of advertisements in the

two newspapers of general circulation in Polk County, Florida.

A failure to properly plan for procurement is not an emergency

under these rules.

In the event of an emergency or exigency a competitive

procurement must be initiated within two years of the purchase or

procurement. In other instances where a sole source procurement

was the method of decision making for a purchase an attempt to

solicit the goods or services through a competitive procurement

must be initiated within three years.

v. Sole source procurements require a cost or price analysis.

b) SMALL BUSINESS PURCHASES – ―Small Purchases‖ relate to the

procurement of goods and services, for which the aggregate cost is less

than $50,000.00. Purchases between $0 - $49,999.99 do not require a

formal request for proposals or bids.

i. Purchases of $0 - $24,999.99 shall require a minimum of two price

comparisons (verbal or written) of the cost of the item both of which

shall be documented and attached to the purchase order or the

procurement file for that item as appropriate. Vendor selection must

be based on vendor qualifications, product quality and availability,

and competitive price as stated in the written vendor quote as

solicited by Polk Works. This can be done by obtaining online

pricing, telephone quotes, etc. If the lowest priced item is not

purchased, there shall be a written justification included in the

procurement file.

ii.

Purchases of $25,000.00 - $49,999.99 shall require at least three

written quotes of the item, all of which shall be documented and

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 50


attached to the purchase order or the procurement file for that item

as appropriate. Vendor selection must be based on vendor

qualifications, product quality and availability, and competitive price

as stated in the written vendor quote as solicited by Polk Works. If

the lowest priced item is not purchased, there shall be a written

justification included in the procurement file.

c) BIDS AND FORMAL REQUESTS FOR PROPOSALS—Purchases

of $50,000.00 and above shall be publicly advertised and a formal request

for bids, proposals, or quotations shall be issued. Where the goods or

services are for the purpose of implementing grant activities, and not for

the day to day operations of the agency except as provided herein for Onthe

Job Training, GED Training and Employed/Incumbent Worker

Training, the decision to let an RFP or a bid shall be made by the

governing board, which is, the Polk County Workforce Development

Board, Inc., for their approval.

i. Previous proposers as well as entities, which have asked to be

included on the Polk Works proposer/bid list for various types of

goods and services, shall be notified that Polk Works is seeking

service providers. The requestor shall be responsible for

maintaining the proposer/bid lists.

ii.

iii.

iv.

Legal notices will be posted on the Polk Works website and shall

appear in at least one newspaper, of general circulation (the

Ledger, Polk County Democrat, Newschief, etc.) for three (3)

consecutive days whenever a formal bid/proposal is let. Potential

bidders will be given at least ten (10) working days to respond to

the advertisement if time permits.

Polk Works will accept proposals based upon the terms and

conditions of the RFP.

Proposals / bids submitted are received by Polk Works staff and

stamped with date and time of receipt.

v. Proposal/bid evaluation criteria are published with the RFP or bid.

The rating criteria include but are not limited to the following

elements:

aa.

bb.

cc.

Proposer‘s financial capability. Proposer‘s books and

records are kept in accordance with generally accepted

accounting principles.

Reasonableness of the cost

Proposer‘s ability to meet performance goals.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 51


dd.

ee.

Proposer‘s record of past performance in the delivery of

goods or services.

Proposer‘s experience.

vi.

vii.

viii.

ix.

Polk Works may conduct pre-award surveys where indicated.

RFPs and bids shall be reviewed by staff for responsiveness. Non

responsive proposers are notified in accordance with the RFP or

bid.

The President & CEO shall assemble review committees to rate

and rank proposals and bids. Generally review committees consist

of board members and or staff members who volunteer to serve in

that capacity. They may on occasion consist of members of the

community with a special applicable expertise.

Proposals to serve Youth must be presented to the Youth Council

which shall make recommendations as to funding in some cases to

the Polk Works Board of Directors.

x. Other proposals/bids for program services must generally be

presented to the appropriate Committee/Council who provides

oversight for that good or service. The committee then makes

recommendations for funding and in some cases selection to the

Polk Works Executive Committee for selection and approval.

xi.

Recommendations from the PWDB committees are submitted for

consideration to the Polk Works Board of Directors which makes

the final selection and approval determinations.

d) Purchases made based upon prices established by a State contract

administered by the State of Florida, Department of Management Services

still require further procurement actions, including cost analysis. When

making a purchase based upon a price established by a State contract,

the contract number, year and title shall be noted on the documents

maintained for the Polk Works procurement file.

e) Purchases made based upon a procurement made by another unit of local

government or a State Agency in the state of Florida still require further

procurement actions, including cost analysis. When making a purchase

based upon such procurement, a copy of the procurement should be

attached to the purchase order or the procurement file for that item as

appropriate. If the item was sole source procurement by the unit of

government or the state agency Polk Works may not rely on the

procurement unless it meets the NON COMPETITIVE SOLE SOURCE

requirements described above.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 52


f) Regardless of the amount of the purchase or the type of procurement a

―no-bid‖ shall be considered a bid for the purpose of receiving bids,

proposals and quotes. ―No bids‖ must be in writing on company letterhead

or submitted electronically by email.

g) Polk Works‘ staff initiating purchases shall seek out any available

discounts and credits.

B. ITEMS REQUIRING PRIOR STATE APPROVAL PRIOR TO PURCHASE

Annually the Finance Department shall submit a request to the state to

purchase items requiring prior grantor approval in accordance with Office of

Management and Budget Circular A-122 on the form provided by the state

pursuant to 05046 AWI Final Guidance on Prior Approval Procedures for

Selected Costs and Administrative Requirements, dated 03/08/05. This

request for approval must be followed by an appropriate procurement.

C. APPEAL PROCESS

Polk Works maintains an appeal process for anyone wishing to appeal or

protest an award which can be obtained from the Executive Office.

D. VENDOR LISTS

Where many entities can provide the same or similar goods or services, or

where no one entity can provide sufficient amounts of a good or service Polk

Works may follow publication requirements for procurements in excess of the

amount for small business purchases describing the goods or services sought

and based upon the responses received may establish a vendor list of all

interested providers. Polk Works may select from the vendor list on a rotating

basis, a ranked basis or based upon the entity which can best meet Polk

Works‘ needs as determined in the sole discretion of the Polk Works

President /CEO.

E. COST OR PRICE ANALYSIS

1. A cost or price analysis shall be performed in connection with every

procurement. Cost comparisons and cost or price analysis are for the

purpose of ensuring that:

a) Public funds are spent economically and the cost is reasonable.

b) The funds expended are appropriate in relation to the need for the

service.

c) Providers funded present the best services at the most favorable

prices.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 53


2. Cost comparisons and cost and price analysis including pre-bid estimates

utilized for RFPs shall be documented in writing. Pre bid estimates may be

obtained by examining previous Polk Works‘ purchases of the same or

similar items as well as advertised costs of goods and services.

3. An annual price analysis to document reasonableness may be conducted

for goods and services ordered on an ongoing basis. In lieu of a price

comparison for each purchase an annual price analysis shall be

conducted for those goods and services purchased with regularity to

operate the organization. An annual estimate shall be made of the value

of the items to be ordered and the proper procurement in accordance with

section A.3 above shall be completed based upon the aggregate amount

estimated to be necessary

4. Preference, to the extent practicable and economically feasible, for

products and services that conserve natural resources and protect the

environment and are energy efficient

5. Positive efforts shall be made by recipients to utilize small businesses,

minority-owned firms, and women‘s business enterprises, whenever

possible. Recipients of Federal awards shall take all of the following steps

to further this goal

6. Contracts shall be made only with responsible contractors who possess

the potential ability to perform successfully under the terms and conditions

of the proposed procurement. Consideration shall be given to such

matters as contractor integrity, record of past performance, financial and

technical resources or accessibility to other necessary resources. In

certain circumstances, contracts with certain parties are restricted by

agencies‘ implementation of E.O.s 12549 and 12689, ―Debarment and

Suspension.‖

F. ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS IN PROCUREMENT

1. In general, care shall be taken to avoid restrictions to competition in

the letting of bids and RFP‘s. Such actions include but are not limited

to the following:

a) Unreasonable requirements in order to qualify to do business.

b) Unnecessary experience and excessive bonding.

c) Noncompetitive pricing practices between organizations or between

affiliated companies.

d) Noncompetitive consultant retainer contracts.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 54


e) Organizational conflicts of interest.

f) The specification of a brand name or the description of a good or

service in a manner, which unreasonably restricts possible offerers.

g) Overly restrictive specifications.

h) Arbitrary actions in the procurement process

2. Polk Works has adopted a code of conduct related to the conduct of

procurements which is contained in Polk Works Policy 108. Polk Works

Board of Directors and staff must comply with State and Federal rules

and regulations governing the conflict of interest and appearance of

conflict of interest in the procurement process.

a) Employees, and proposer‘s / bidders must disclose the name of

any officer, director or agency who is also an employee of Polk

Works or the name of any Polk Works employee who owns, directly

or indirectly, any interest in the proposer‘s/bidder‘s business or any

of its branches. Such disclosure must be submitted in writing

addressed to the Polk Works President & CEO, no later than the

proposal/bid deadline. Where such disclosure is made the Polk

Works President & CEO shall present the matter to the Polk Works

Board of Directors for a final determination regarding the

procurement.

b) Governing board members, current service providers and

prospective proposers shall not take part in the development of

specifications or the evaluation criteria which will be used to review

proposals and/or bids.

c) Governing board members, current service providers, and

prospective offerers who submit or intend to submit a bid or

proposal for goods or services may not sit on any review committee

considering or evaluating or voting on the award.

d) Regardless of the type of procurement if Polk Works desires to

enter into a contract with an organization or individual represented

on the PWDB, the contract must be approved by a two-thirds vote

of the entire board, and the board member who could benefit

financially from the transaction must declare their conflict and

abstain from voting on the contract. Board members must disclose

any such conflicts in accordance with the requirements of the

Florida Statutes and complete appropriate Conflict of Interest

forms.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 55


e) During the proposal process proposers/bidders including entities

representing the proposers/bidders are prohibited from contacting

Polk Works Board of Directors or employees involved in the

procurement. Where such inappropriate contact occurs it shall be

referred to the Polk Works Board of Directors, the individual

contacted may not participate in the review or ranking process and

must disclose the contact to the full Board of Directors prior to the

vote on that procurement.

f) Polk Works‘ governing board members shall complete financial

disclosure forms required by the State of public officers on an

annual basis.

g) The acceptance or payment of gratuities, kickbacks, the provision

of confidential procurement information not made available to the

general public and improper communications in connection with the

procurement of goods and services is prohibited.

G. AUTHORIZATION TO APPROVE PROCUREMENT ACTIONS, TERMINATE

CONTRACTS AND TO SIGN CONTRACTS

The Polk Works President & CEO or the Vice President of Operations or

Finance when the CEO is out of the county is authorized to terminate

contracts, sign contracts, approve sole source procurements and take such

other actions as are necessary to assure the uninterrupted flow of business

for the organization.

H. EMERGENCY PROCUREMENT ACTION

The President & CEO may act for the Board of Directors in an emergency,

and has the authority to make purchases over $10,000.00 with a report to

the Polk Works Board of Directors after authorization of the procurement.

I. SPECIAL REPORTS

The President & CEO shall report to the Polk Works Board of Directors at

the next most convenient meeting following purchases $10,000.00 or more,

other than for On the Job Training, employed/incumbent worker training,

GED training, customized training employers and individual work experience

sites.

J. RECORD KEEPING

The Operations and/or Finance Department shall maintain a history of all

procurements. Records shall include mailing lists, the rationale for the

method of procurement, the selection process, responses, Requests for

Proposals, contract type, communications including rejection notices, the

basis for the agreement price and the selection or rejection of the award and

any other pertinent information. Documents may be attached to the

purchase order or the procurement file as appropriate. All records shall be

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 56


EXCEPTIONS:

maintained for a period of five years following final payment and closure of

all pending matters.

Exceptions to this policy except as provided in this policy or any part thereof

must be approved by the President & CEO or his/her designee.

2. Describe the procurement process for purchasing goods and services in

the local area.

See procurement process outlined immediately above.

3. Identify (if applicable) the process to be used to procure training services

that are made as exceptions to the Individual Training Account (ITA)

process.

Not applicable.

4. Identify what system will be used to collect data, track and report local

performance measures and program activity.

Employ Florida Marketplace

5. Describe system/mechanism that will be included for consumer reporting.

Employ Florida Marketplace

D. Oversight Plan

―The local board, in partnership with the Chief Elected Official, shall conduct

oversight with respect to local programs of youth activities authorized under

Section 129, local employment and training activities authorized under section

134, and the one-stop delivery system in the local area.‖ [Sec. 117(d)(4)]

1. Identify the plan for conducting monitoring of sub-recipients (if

applicable)

Polk Works contracts with a third party qualified firm that provides

programmatic and fiscal monitoring of workforce programs. The contracted

monitors conduct monitoring visits at least 3 times during the fiscal year.

Monitoring reports, along with the Corrective Action Plans are provided to the

Board, through the appropriate Council for full review and comment. The

Councils review the reports and address concerns to the Board staff and

Service Provider staff on a quarterly basis.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 57


2. Address how the Local Workforce Investment Board shall be engaged in

oversight activities

The structure of Polk Works‘ Administrative staff is such that each service

provider under contract is assigned a Contract Manager who is responsible

for providing direct oversight and technical support to the Service Provider for

the execution of workforce programs. The Contract Managers monitor

performance through the appropriate system (i.e. EFM, OSST) as well as

through monthly meetings with the Service Providers management. In

addition to monthly ―one-on-ones‖ with the Contract Manager and the Service

Provider manager, a quarterly performance meeting is conducted with the

Contract Manager and the Service Providers‘ top local manager and their

area manager to discuss successes, concerns and questions that have

surfaced during the quarter.

The Polk Works Board is also structured to provide oversight of program

activities. The top management of each Service Provider (One-Stop Operator,

Youth Services, and Business Services) is required to attend the appropriate

Board Council/Committee and report on performance over the quarter. The

Youth Development Council receives and reviews the quarterly performance

report of the Youth Leaders program. The Career Council receives and

reviews the quarterly performance report of the One-Stop Operator. The

Business Competitiveness Council receives and reviews the quarterly

performance report of the Business Services.

Polk Works contracts with a third party firm that provides programmatic and

fiscal monitoring of workforce programs. Monitoring reports, along with the

Corrective Action Plans are provided to the Board, through the appropriate

Council for full review and comment. The Councils review the reports and

address concerns to the Board staff and Service Provider staff on a quarterly

basis.

3. Describe evaluation tools used to assess effectiveness of services to

customers and ensure continuous improvement of the One-Stop

delivery system, including local satisfaction surveys (if applicable).

Job Seekers - Paper surveys are available for job seeker customers. The

customer places the surveys in a locked box and they‘re then removed by the

site manager. Survey results are compiled by a Customer Service Task

Force and shared at One-Stop staff meetings. Job seekers who have

submitted forms are invited to attend One-Stop Operator staff meetings for

further conversation.

The Polk Works Career Council reviews, on quarterly basis, all customer

concerns and addresses those concerns with the One-Stop operator. The

goal of this process is ensure that customer concerns are being addressed

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 58


timely and effectively and to determine if any workforce policy or procedure is

impeding staff‘s ability to deliver quality customer service to our customers.

E. Partner Involvement Pursuant to Florida law and policy, the funding of one-stop

core services and intensive services is to be determined by a local MOU between

the one-stop partners, and no one partner is presumed to be the sole source of

funding for any of the core services. Additionally, using youth formula funds at the

local level is to fulfill the mandate of providing universal services through the

network of One-Stop Career Centers. Providing services to youth ages 14–21

goes beyond the doors of the One-Stop Career Centers through partnerships with

schools, adult education centers, post-secondary education providers, juvenile

justice providers, community youth centers, health departments, and referrals from

a host of other organizations that provide workforce development related services.

1. Describe the relationship of the One-Stop Career Center with Job Corps

and the manner in which referrals are made.

Job Corps currently has a staff member co-located at the Winter Haven One-

Stop Career Center. Job Corps staff conducts regularly scheduled orientation

sessions at both the Lakeland and Winter Haven One-Stop Career Centers.

Potentially eligible individuals are referred to Job Corps by Polk Works

program staff.

2. Describe partners’ involvement and role in the one-stop system.

Polk Works enjoys strong partnerships with both mandated and nonmandated

One-Stop partners. Through these partnerships, attempts are

made to minimize duplication of services and leverage resources to ensure

efficient use of funds in our region. All partners are allowed, encouraged and

applauded for participation in our quarterly Partner Management Team

meetings which allow full disclosure of each agencies services, successes

and concerns. Discussions at meetings include full engagement of partners

with various agency plans, participation on task forces and/or committees and

collaboration on grant opportunities that will benefit the region.

All partners are allowed and encouraged to become Tier 1 certified, providing

access to EFM and allowing partner agencies to make job referrals.

Several of our strategic partners serve on the Polk Works Board and/or the

Polk Works Youth Council.

Polk Works maintains an electronic distribution list of partners and uses it

regularly to inform partners of workforce activities, including job fairs, grant

opportunities, recruitment events, equipment availability through our disposal

process, etc.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 59


3. Describe the partnership/involvement that the RWB will have or has with

the Florida Farmworker Jobs and Education Program (WIA Section 167

grantee) and how the local provider for this program will be integrated

into the one-stop system.

As a Significant Bilingual One-Stop Career Center, the Region works to meet

the Wagner-Peyser requirements for services to Migrant and Seasonal Farm

Workers and their dependents by partnering with the Polk County School

Board (PCSB), Florida Farmworkers.

The Farmworker Jobs and Education Program operated through PCSB will

recruit and assist eligible migrant and seasonal farmworkers and dependents

in achieving self-sufficiency through education and skills training. Forms are

to be completed by the PCSB staff for referral to One-Stop Career Center

services.

Services provided include, but aren‘t limited to, job referral and placement,

WIA core, intensive and training services, assistance in translation services,

TABE testing and assistance in completing job applications.

In addition, staff operating this program with the PSCB, have the opportunity

to access Employ Florida to make job referrals. Should they desire this

access, the staff is required to take the Tier 1 certification and maintain the

15-hour certification credits required.

4. Describe the partnership/involvement that the RWB will have or has with

faith-based and community-based initiatives and how these entities will

be integrated into the one-stop system.

The Board has partnerships with both faith-based and community-based

organizations, cultivated through community outreach at various events and

through board members, staff and program participants.

Upon meeting with One-Stop Career Center staff, individuals referred from

partner organizations are referred to programs for eligibility determination.

Partner organization staff is familiar with the services offered by Polk Works.

In turn, partner organizations will be available to conduct training to Polk

Works‘ staff on the issues faced by the individuals served by the partner.

In addition to this communication, our partner agencies also have the

opportunity to have access to Employ Florida to make job referrals. Should

they desire this access, partners are required to take the Tier 1 certification

and maintain the 15-hour certification credits required for all Polk Works staff.

5. Describe local use of the Partners Meeting in aiding with the oversight

and function of the local one-stop system.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 60


Partner meetings are held quarterly. An agenda is developed, with input from

the partners. As an ongoing agenda item, at each meeting, each partner is

given the opportunity to highlight any program success or special needs. At

least one partner is showcased during each partner meeting.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 61


LOCAL

OPERATIONAL

PLAN SECTION II

Section II – Local Operational Plan, requires RWBs to describe how each individual

program, using the funds allocated under each specific title, will align with and

implement the strategies and vision outlined in the Strategic Plan section. Where the

Strategic Plan section must discuss local plans and resources for an aligned and

integrated workforce system, the Local Operational Plan section must discuss how

various participant groups will be served by the programs included in Strategic Plan

section.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 62


WAGNER PEYSER

Wagner-Peyser is a labor exchange program that brings together individuals who are

seeking employment and employers who are seeking employees. The State shall

administer a labor exchange that has the capacity to assist job seekers to find

employment; to assist employers in filling jobs; to facilitate the match between job

seekers and employers; to participate in a system for clearing labor between the States,

including the use of standardized classification systems issued by the Secretary of

Labor under Section 15 of the Act; and to meet the work test requirement of the State

Unemployment Compensation system.

Self-services are available to all job seekers and employers. Services may be

accessed from computer workstations at One-Stop Career Centers and personal

desktop computers through the Internet. In addition to accessing information

electronically, customers can choose to receive information in more traditional forms

such as printed material which will be available at One-Stop Career Centers. Attach a

copy of the local operating procedure for the following processes.

1. Describe how Section 7(a) of the WIA will be implemented in the local One-

Stop Career Centers. The description must include job search and placement

services to job seekers, including counseling, testing, occupational and labor

market information, and referral to employers; recruitment services and

special technical services for employers, including on-site employer visits;

and One-Stop Career Center plans for meeting the requirement of the basic

labor exchange system, including a narrative of how the local center will

match job seekers and employers. (V.G.1.a)

At the One-Stop Center, Core and Intensive services will be provided by the One-

Stop Operator, Polk Work‘s customer service staff, and DEO staff hereafter referred

to as One-Stop Center staff. One-Stop Center staff will present the delivery of

services as a seamless system. In striving to provide the best services to individuals,

the following guidelines will be followed in carrying out this policy.

CORE SERVICES: Core services are to be provided to all individuals who are

primarily seeking employment assistance, both self-service and assisted. Individuals

are registered in Employ Florida Marketplace (EFM). Core services may include but

not be limited to the following:





Orientation to the services available through the One-Stop Center for all

service seekers

Outreach, recruitment and intake

Initial assessment of skill levels, aptitudes and abilities in order to determine

job readiness

Matching of employer job requirements and screening for supportive service

needs

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 63


Job search and placement assistance, including job workshops, job referrals

and job development

Provision of employment statistics information which includes job vacancy

listings in the local, regional and national labor market areas

Information on job skills necessary to obtain the jobs described in the

statistics and information relating to local occupations in demand and the

earnings and skill requirements for such occupations

Provision of information regarding the performance of the Board in regards to

the performance measures and any additional performance information with

respect to the Board‘s One-Stop delivery system

Provision of accurate information relating to the availability of supportive

services, including childcare and transportation available in Polk County, and

referral to such services, as appropriate

Provision of information regarding filing claims for unemployment

compensation

Assistance in establishing eligibility and determination for all programs and

provide follow up services for individuals as applicable.

INTENSIVE SERVICES: Intensive services will be provided to individuals who meet

the eligibility requirements of the selected program and are determined suitable for

the designated program; are unemployed, unable to obtain employment through

core services provided; or are employed, but who are determined to be in need of

intensive services in order to obtain or retain employment that allows for selfsufficiency.

Intensive services may include but are not limited to the following:









Development of an Individual Employment Plan via EFM System to identify

the employment goals, appropriate achievement objectives, and appropriate

combination of services.

Short-term pre-vocational services, including development of learning skills,

communication skills, interviewing skills, punctuality and professional conduct

to prepare individuals for unsubsidized employment or training;

Assistance in filing for training financial aid

Work assignment where appropriate

Case management for those seeking training and for all TANF and Welfareto-Work

participants

Individual, group and career counseling

Referrals to One-Stop partner agencies for needed services as determined by

assessment

Comprehensive and specialized assessment of the skill levels and service

needs which may include but is not limited to diagnostic testing, use of

appropriate assessment tools and in-depth interviewing.

TRAINING SERVICES: Training services are designed to equip eligible individuals

to enter the workforce and retain employment. These services will be provided by

Board approved providers or other special grant programs. Performance information

and program cost information on eligible training providers will be provided (for

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 64


individuals deemed appropriate for training services.) *Training services may be

provided only for individuals who:






Are eligible for intensive services, but were unable to obtain or retain a

suitable job after receiving such services (at a wage equal to or greater than

the current ‗self-sufficient‘ wage); after an interview, evaluation and

assessment by the Career Specialist, he/she have been determined to be in

need of training services; and have the qualifications to successfully

participate (appropriate TABE scores, interest and aptitude) in the selected

program of training services

Select programs for training services that are directly linked to Polk County

high skill/high wage employment opportunities or similar opportunities in other

geographic areas for which the individual is willing to relocate

Applied for financial aid from the Pell Grant and other available financial

sources

Agree to apply Pell grant as the priority funding source for training expenses

and understand that if ITA eligible, the ITA will be used as the secondary

funding source;

Are determined to be eligible in accordance with the priority system or are

determined to be a candidate directed to other special programs.

The Polk Works Business Services Division provides employer services based on

the needs of the employer.

Employers may directly post an order online at www.employflorida.com or contact

the Polk Works Business Services Division, providing information for the staff to post

the order. In either case, the Business Services Division ensures that the posting

complies with federal and state laws and guidelines, as well as local operating

procedures.

When the job posting is entered, the employer can indicate how the candidates

should be recruited, via telephone, fax, e-mail, self-referral or referral by Wagner-

Peyser staff, etc. While the job posting is online, the staff of Polk Works and its

providers may refer to the job order, job seekers with experience matching the job

requirements, skills and attributes. The referral can be a result of a job seeker

request, or as the result of candidate search completed by Polk Work‘s staff or its

providers. In completing a job match, the staff will review the requirements stated by

the employer, and search the job seeker database by ONET code, key words,

education level or other data fields that meet the employer‘s needs.

Business Services Staff will remain in contact with the employer while the job order

is online. The job posting will remain online until the employer notifies otherwise.

When the employer indicates the position is filled or no longer needed, information

provided by the employer regarding the status of the order, and the referral hired,

will be entered into the database.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 65


Special recruitment services are available, and dependent upon the needs of the

employer. If an employer has special recruitment needs, such as recruiting for a new

facility, recruiting candidates for hard-to-fill job orders or recruiting for a new product

or service added to their organization, Business Services Staff may provide

customized recruiting assistance such as hosting a recruiting event at the One-Stop,

or assisting the employer with a recruiting event at their specified location. The

services may also include the distribution and collection of employment applications

at the One-Stop and candidate testing.

The Business Services Division hosts at least two brick and mortar job fairs and

three virtual job fairs annually. Employers for both types of job fairs represent a wide

range of industries.

In the event an employer anticipates or has a reduction in workforce, the Reemployment

Emergency Assistance Coordination Team (REACT) is available to

provide guidance to the employer. REACT services for the employees include, but

aren‘t limited to counseling to provide them with critical information on filing for

unemployment, using the One-Stop services and obtaining training funds.

Attached:

Program Policies ~ One-Stop Seamless Service Delivery Policy

2. Notice of the strike or lockout is required for applicants who are referred to

positions that are not affected by the strike. Describe the One-Stop Career

Centers’ procedures to ensure that applicants will not be referred to a job at a

company that is on strike or lockout status for a particular position. (V.G.1.b)

When working with a company that is in strike or lockout status and the company

has current job openings listed in the EFM system, job orders will be placed on hold

for those positions covered by the strike or lockout. In addition, notice is provided to

those applicants who may be referred on openings not affected by the strike or

lockout status of this company.

3. The One-Stop Career Centers will not be prohibited from referring an applicant

to the private employment agency as long as the applicant is not charged a fee

by the private agency in accordance with the Wagner-Peyser Act, Section

13(b)(1). Describe the procedures to ensure that applicants referred to private

employment agencies will not be charged a fee. (V.G.1.c)

When reviewing job openings from private employment agencies in EFM, the

Business Services staff question the employer to ensure that applicants referred to

these positions by the One-Stop (self-service or assisted) are not charged a fee, and

a statement to the effect of ―This is a no fee staffing agency‖ will be included in the

job order.

4. The One-Stop Career Centers may, from time-to-time, advertise in the

newspaper for hard-to-fill job openings which pay up to $50,000 per year as

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 66


part of the overall economic development effort of the State of Florida. For

jobs above this level, the One-Stop Career Center will seek prior approval in

accordance with the Wagner-Peyser Act, Section 13(b)(2). Describe the

procedures to ensure that the One-Stop Career Center will seek prior approval

from the DEO to advertise hard-to-fill job openings which pay over $50,000 per

year. (V.G.1.d)

If the One-Stop Center wishes to advertise for hard-to-fill job openings with a salary

of over $50,000 annually, the first step would be for a recommendation from the

Business Services to be brought to the attention of the RWB Administrative staff and

President & CEO who would then follow the procedure of seeking prior approval

from the Department of Economic Opportunity, in accordance with the Wagner-

Peyser Act, Section 13(b)(2). However, given the wide exposure to job listings

provided by the Employ Florida Marketplace system, it is unlikely that such approval

would be sought other than in extraordinary situations.

5. Describe how counseling services (under Section 7(a)(1) and Section 8(b) in

the WIA of 1998) will be delivered to Wagner-Peyser program job seekers

(V.G.1.i)

Wagner-Peyser program job seekers needing basic employability skills counseling

are provided those service by One-Stop Career Center staff on a one-on-one or

group basis. These services are provided during the interview/referral process,

through employability skills workshops, or through the referral to internal or external

One-Stop partners, or to appropriate community based agencies.

6. Identify the screening process for referrals to job openings on suppressed job

orders, include a narrative of how the local centers manage the Referrals

Pending Review list (V.G.1.j)

Job seekers who select suppressed job orders from Employment Florida

Marketplace are screened by One-Stop Career Center staff against the employer

requirements listed in the job order. Job seekers who do not meet the stated

requirements may be directed to other jobs for which they have the required

qualifications or to other appropriate services. For the Referrals Pending Review

(RPR) list, the Employment Service Representative (ESR) will review requirements

of the job order then will attempt to contact job seeker either by email or EFM

contact to advise them of how to apply for the job and then delete the job seeker

from the RPR list. After the contact with the job seeker is made and is deleted, a

case note is made in the job seekers‘ file explaining that contact was made

concerning the job he/she is seeking and how to apply for the stated position.

A. Reemployment Services

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 67


1. Describe the reemployment services that will be provided to

unemployment insurance claimants. Include a narrative about how the

region will serve the reemployment and training needs of (V.G.1.f):

Priority Re-Employment Planning claimants

Reemployment and Eligibility Assessment (if applicable) claimants

The One Stop Centers provide access to resource room computers for the

purpose of filing claims via the Internet (www.FLUID.com). It also provides

Reemployment services to UI claimants. The PREP services being provided

are coordinated with the REA services including: initial assessment, LMI, and

a written IEP and may include, as appropriate, resume assistance, job

search, employment counseling and referral to other services. The EUC-RES

program focuses on those individuals on extended UI benefits focusing on

orientation, assessment, LMI, and Work Search verification.

Attached:

Local Operating Procedures ~ Providing Re-Employment

Services to UC Customers

2. Describe how the RWB will use the scores obtained from the initial

skills review (ISR) to provide employment and training services to

Reemployment Assistance claimants. (V.G.1.g)

Staff will utilize the career matching tool within the ISR to determine

occupations that match the identified scores. Once the list of occupations has

been generated, staff will cross-reference with EFM the available jobs in

selected industries that are of interest to the customer. If the customer meets

the requirements of the job order, then a referral will be made. If there is a

gap and customer expresses an interest in the occupation, they will be

referred to WIA for training determinations.

3. Describe how the RWB will administer the unemployment insurance

work test and how feedback requirements (under Sec. 7(a) (3)(F) of the

Wagner-Peyser Act) for all Unemployment Compensation claimants are

met. (V.G.1.h)

Claimants who are screened through the One-Stop Career Center and are

matched to job openings which meet the UI work test and who refuse to

accept those referrals are reported in accordance with the UC Communiqué.

In order to manage UC customers at the One-Stop Career Center, an EFM

and Unemployment Work Search Quick Start guide is provided to customers.

This guide has instructions on registering, resume building, job search and

automatic work searches. The purpose of this guide is two-fold. First, it adds

value to the services provided in the resource room and by the Career

Specialist. Then, it instructs clients on how to create automatic work

searches (alerts) that will run daily. This function will allow users to set up

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 68


more than one alert based on different occupational titles and other

requirements. It also provides the Career Specialist with an opportunity to

provide a service in lieu of 5 work searches, while training the job seeker on

creating alerts.

4. Describe how the RWB plans to serve claimants seeking to fulfill the

weekly work search requirement by meeting with One-Stop Career

Center staff. (V.G.1.h)

Claimants who are screened through the One-Stop Center and are matched

to job openings which meet the UI work test and then refuse to accept those

referrals are reported by UC Communiqué. In order to manage the UC

customer at the One Stop an EFM and Unemployment Work Search Quick

Start guide provides customers with instructions on registering, resume

building, job search and automatic work searches. The purpose of this guide

is two-fold. First, it adds value to the service provided in the resource room

and with the Career Specialist, by instructing clients to create automatic work

searches (alerts) that will run daily. This function will allow users to set up

more than one alert based on different occupational titles and other

requirements. It also provides the Career Specialist with an opportunity to

provide a service in lieu of 5 work searches, while training the job seeker on

creating alerts.

B. Rapid Response

The rapid response unit is the State’s central point for identifying layoffs

and plant closings. This includes receiving the Worker Adjustment

Retraining Notification notices from employers as required by federal law.

Key strategies in Florida’s system are to provide occupational information

and skills training to include incumbent workers who are at risk of losing

their jobs and to provide immediate reemployment assistance for

dislocated workers. These efforts are intended to enable workers to make

the transition to new employment as quickly as possible and to lessen the

period of unemployment, thereby decreasing the need for unemployment

compensation and other supportive service benefits for workers.

1. Describe the procedures for the following rapid response activities and

attach a copy of the local operating procedures for the rapid response

activities below.

The Polk Works Rapid Response Coordinator serves as the initial point of

contact for receipt of Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act

(WARN) notices, as well as notification of lay-off activities not subject to

WARN that may be obtained through the media, workforce partners,

employers or staff. The Coordinator receives the information and

disseminates it to appropriate partners, particularly the DEO and WIA One-

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 69


Stop Career Center Staff who will assist in the delivery of services. The

Coordinator makes the initial contact with the employer to advise them of the

services available and coordinates the activities of the REACT staff in the

delivery of those services that include but aren't limited to labor market

information, eligibility determination, assessment, career counseling and

training. In the event they are unable to reach the employer by telephone, a

letter will be e-mailed.

Polk Works routinely provides rapid response services to employers laying off

20 or more workers. When a layoff is smaller than 20 workers, REACT

packets are delivered to the employer and the affected workers can be

directed to the nearest One-Stop Career Center, or a member of the REACT

staff will make a presentation to the affected workers.

Rapid Response services are also made available to affected workers when a

Trade Act petition is filed

Attached: Local Operating Procedures ~ REACT

2. Describe the process for meeting the minimum service level and Equity

Ratio Indicators (see the Employ Florida Marketplace System at

https://www.employflorida.com/). (V.G.4.a)


Arranging on-site employer/employee visits and informational

sessions;

As soon as a WARN notice is received, the Rapid Response Coordinator

will call the contact person for the employer to briefly discuss services

available and schedule a meeting. If the Coordinator is unsuccessful in

reaching the employer by telephone, they will e-mail the contact person a

letter. During the meeting the Coordinator will provide detailed information

on the REACT process and offer Rapid Response services at a time and

location that meets the employer's needs; the employer's place of

business, One-Stop Career Center or other location.


Developing rapid response visit reports;

At the meeting with the employer and other interested parties, the Rapid

Response Coordinator will gather information to complete the On-site

Rapid Response Visit Report. The Coordinator will then complete and file

the Rapid Response Visit Report.


Administering employee surveys;

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 70


Upon arrival at the Rapid Response, employees will sign the sign-in sheet

and will be given a Rapid Response packet which includes the Employee

Survey. They will be instructed to complete the survey and return it at the

end of the session. Information from the surveys will be used by Polk

Works' staff to schedule appointments that will address the employee's

needs for education, job training, or re-employment services.


Developing event response plans;

Rapid Response is scheduled in cooperation with the employer. The

number of workers to be impacted, the skills of the employees, labor

market information and the services requested will determine the

response plan. Response plans may include, but aren't limited to the

following:

o Presentations to effected workers explaining workforce services

o Assistance to the workers in filing Unemployment Compensation

claims

o Direct job referral and placement services

o Arranging job Fairs and other special employment events

o Referral to community agencies for supportive services

o Information on training opportunities

o Use of a Mobile One-Stop


Coordinating reemployment services with One-Stop Career Centers;

As soon as the date, time and location have been confirmed with the

employer, an e-mail is sent to Rapid Response Team members and other

partner agencies to notify them of the event. The Rapid Response Team

meets with employees prior to the layoff. The employees are provided with

information on the full range of One-Stop Career Center services, the

orientation process and how to schedule individual appointments for the

various services offered through the One-Stop Career Center. Affected

workers residing outside of Region 17 can be directed to their nearest

One-Stop Career Center.


Reporting the employment situation of State employees;

If an agency experiences a layoff and the employee cannot be placed

internally, the agency will report the layoff to the DEO who will notify the

Region of the impending layoff. The Rapid Response Coordinator will call

the agency contact person to set up a meeting to discuss available

services.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 71


Services available to state employees are as stated above for the region‘s

employers.


Rapid response-related performance measures and goals;

Rapid Response activities are carried out in accordance with Workforce

Investment Act Regulations. Polk Works ensures that rapid response

activities are appropriately and timely provided to all workers, including

trade-affected individuals, employers and communities throughout Region

17.

It is the goal of Polk Works for the affected worker to re-enter the

workplace in the shortest period of time possible, at wages comparable to

or higher than their previous job.


Rapid response dislocated worker unit staffing;

Service delivery to the Dislocated Worker is provided by WIA Career

Counselors. All WIA Career Counselors are fully trained to assist

Dislocated Workers.


Public awareness.

The Region‘s Community Outreach Coordinator responds to media

inquiries and disseminates public information for the Workforce Board.

Employers are also made aware of Rapid Response services through the

outreach efforts of Business Services.

3. Describe the process used to ensure that rapid response assistance

and appropriate core and intensive services as described in Section 134

of the WIA are made available to all dislocated workers, including for

those whom a petition for TAA has been filed.

To ensure that appropriate services are available to all dislocated workers

and TAA eligible participants. At the REACT Event the following services are

explained to the affected workers:

One-Stop Career Center Resource Room services

Employability skills training

Job seeking assistance

Job referrals

Resume assistance

Retraining services

Veteran services

Testing

Labor market information

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 72


Employ Florida Marketplace

Unemployment claims filing

Services through United Way

Assessment of the affected workers through he Dislocated Worker

Transitional Reemployment Services Survey

Follow-up with affected workers to ensure they are receiving services

needed to become re-employed.

C. Business Services

Business partnerships are essential to training Florida’s workforce to meet

the current and future needs of diverse business sectors. The workforce

system has successfully partnered with business and industry. Current

employer penetration data indicate a tremendous opportunity exists to

develop additional business partnerships. Both business and workforce

have a vested interest in partnering. Ease of access to Florida’s workforce

services via the Employ Florida Marketplace is just a start. Provide a

description of the processes for implementing the following business

services strategies in the region. Attach a copy of the local operating

procedures for the following processes:

1. How the region will aggressively market/communicate, internally and

externally, the workforce business value proposition to significantly

increase awareness and stimulate workforce system usage (including

the Employ Florida Marketplace) (V.G.16a)

Our Business Services Team is made up of three Business Service

Consultants and three Local Veteran Employment Representatives

(LVERs) each covering a specific geographic area based on population

density. The assigned areas include the Northeast quadrant of Polk

County, the Lakeland area in the western quadrant and the entire southern

area of the county. Our Business Service Consultants along with their

veteran counterparts schedule visits to new and existing employers in order

to educate them on the full range of services available to them including

Employ Florida Marketplace (EFM). For employers who are unfamiliar with

EFM, staff provides hands on instruction on registering and posting job

orders. This instruction includes searching EFM for viable candidates for

job openings. Each employer is given a Business Services Portfolio, and

follow-up visits are scheduled. Employers are encouraged to use our Polk

Works One-Stop Career Centers for in-house recruiting events which are

promoted through candidate file searches, event flyers, the Polk Works

website, Facebook and Twitter. In addition, the recruiting events are sent to

our Polk Works partners. Every opportunity is taken to communicate our

services and increase awareness through speaking engagements at civic

and community organizations, chambers, and Mid-Florida SHRM.

Community Forums are also conducted throughout the county.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 73


2. Describe how employer services will be delivered/conducted to

employers (including agricultural employers), such as employer visits to

obtain job orders for veterans, MSFWs, and other job seekers (V.G.16.b)

Business services are conducted by staff members across various funding

streams. The Local Veterans‘ Employment Representative takes the lead in

developing relationships with government contractors and in developing

employment opportunities for veterans. As the Winter Haven One-Stop

Career Center is a significant MSFW One-Stop Career Center, the MSFW

outreach specialist takes the lead in developing job opportunities with

agricultural employers. A Ticket to Work/Disability Coordinator and Displaced

Homemaker Career Specialist focus their efforts on opportunities for

individuals with disabilities and displaced homemakers respectively. To

facilitate the sharing of information, these staff, along with staff from the Youth

Program, WIA, and Business Services, meets regularly to collectively develop

an outreach plan that includes joint employer visitations. New and expanding

businesses, businesses in targeted industry clusters, and those that hire a

significant number of job seekers through EFM are frequently visited by the

various outreach staff.

3. Describe the process the One-Stop Career Center uses in conducting

recruiting agreements and job fairs. (V.G.1.k)

Recruiting agreements are formal written agreements which are developed

with employers and define how job referrals, testing, or other employment

related requirements are to be handled for each agreement. The

Businesses Services staff is responsible for establishing these agreements

and ensuring that the services outlined and agreed upon are provided by

the appropriate workforce system staff. Periodic follow-up is done to

update and review these agreements.

Job Fairs are organized and coordinated by Business Services staff, in

conjunction with Wagner-Peyser and VET staff as well was One-Stop Career

Center staff and partners when the job fair is initiated through the One-Stop.

The One-Stop Career Center staff may also participate as a partner in job

fairs initiated by other entities. In either case, notices are distributed to the

partners in the One-Stop Career Centers, on Polk Works‘ website, through

public service announcements, and are then provided to One-Stop customers

– these notices can be flyers or electronic notices.

4. Describe how the region will identify and evaluate the most effective

local Business Services team. (V.G.16.c)

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 74


Business services are evaluated based upon feedback received from their

involvement with area businesses, in local programs and services. In addition,

services are compared to other regions to determine whether or not additional

steps can be taken to reduce paperwork, streamline processes, and make the

delivery of services more easily accessible to the customer. Customer

satisfaction surveys are provided to employers to obtain feedback following all

events. Our best means to determine effectiveness and usefulness is to

interact with the business community, discuss services received, and to

determine whether or not services are meeting their needs.

5. Describe how the region will institutionalize and replicate proven

outreach tactics, core processes and performance matrices (V.G.16.d/e)

Polk Works Business Services has developed key objectives for the Region‘s

outreach efforts, which include education and awareness of Polk Works‘

services and programs, networking, speaking engagements.

Each Business Services Representative is responsible for attaining specific,

measurable goals toward the attainment of the stated objectives according to

the following: Education and awareness of Polk Works‘ services and

programs; Developing a 30 second elevator speech; Networking with

employers to generate employer and candidate leads; Speaking

engagements, through local Chamber of Commerce groups, Rotary, Kiwanis,

etc.

The following have been adopted as best practices for meeting the stated

objectives:

Annual Exploratory Meeting To be conducted with employers that have 100

or more employees to determine whether or not

we are meeting their needs, and identify areas

in need of improvement. This group of

employers is targeted because it has the

greatest chance of posting jobs above the

region‘s LLSIL.

Elevator Speech

Each staff member is a 30 second elevator

speech in preparation for the question, ―What

do you do?‖ when in the community.

Stock Presentations

Polk Works Board Recruitment

Begin building and maintaining a PowerPoint

presentation database with a customizable

presentation for each Business Services

relevant topic

Target leadership that represents both social

and business markets

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 75


500 Employer Visits 40% = 200 employer visits to be new employers

EFM reporting

40% = 200 will place job listings with Polk

Works

information for each contact entered into EFM

within 1 week of contact

Polk Works eNewletter The Business Services responsible for (1)

educational or community information piece per

issue

Job Fairs

Collateral Materials

Annual Breakfast/Best Places

To Work

Polk Works Annual Report

State of the Work Force Summit

Employer Roundtable Events

Social/Networking

Job Development

Recruiting Agreements

One-Stop Support

Host and coordinate 2 job fairs annually (1 of

these to be veteran focused)

All materials, flyers, fax cover sheets, business

cards and business media distributed will be

subject to the review and approval of the

Community Outreach Coordinator

Plan, manage and host in August annually

Track, manage and produce data relative to

and required in the Polk Works Annual Report

Plan, manage and host in January annually

Requisition, coordinate and host 8 employer

roundtable events – topics relative to current

workforce issues

Each staff member is responsible for the image

of Polk Works Business Services. Every

opportunity to join a reputable networking

and/or professional organization; i.e. Chamber

of Commerce, Rotary, Kiwanis, Mid-Florida

SHRM and Florida Public Relations Association

should be taken. Whenever possible, staff

should obtain a leadership position within these

organizations.

Will develop 50 job opportunities for training

participants to be placed by Polk Works

contracted service providers.

Determine and negotiate quality agreements

which best fit potential employers

Communicate with, and involve One-Stop staff

in Business Service Unit initiatives, agreements

and events as they arise - Support One-Stop

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 76


initiatives

Employer Recruiting Events Will partner with employers and organize 36

recruiting events annually

6. How the region will expand outreach and availability of the following

value-added, business-focused training programs:

Incumbent Worker Training;

Quick Response Training;

Employed Worker Training

Trade Adjustment Assistance

Through its outreach efforts, Business Services informs employers of the

Incumbent Worker Training (IWT), Quick Response Training (QRT),

Employed Worker Training (EWT), On-the-Job Training and Trade

Adjustment Assistance (TAA) programs.

Outreach efforts include employer visits, distribution of a monthly

electronic employer newsletter, use of Twitter, FaceBook and e-mail

blasts, publication of training awards in the Region‘s annual report, and

promotional efforts through local Chambers of Commerce, business

organizations, Partners, and community events.

The IWT and QRT application process and contract administration are

administered through WFI. The Region is notified by WFI when they

award a training grant to an employer in the region. Business Services will

then contact the employer offering its services.

The Business Services staff will assist the employer in identifying the

appropriate grant for which to apply and assist the employer in the

application process. Availability of training grants will be expanded in as

much as the budget allows.


In partnership with economic development organizations, how will

the region build on existing or establish local, industry-specific

workforce business consortiums (V.G.16.f)

Polk Works Business Services works closely with all of the economic

development organizations in the region including, the Central Florida

Development Council, Lakeland Economic Development Council, Bartow

Committee of 100, Winter Haven Economic Development Council and the

various Chambers in order to share information and collaborate with the

council to serve the employer community. In addition, Business Services

partners with Polk State College – Corporate College to discuss and

evaluate the needs of industry.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 77


7. How the region will prioritize target industry clusters by One-Stop

Career Center; (V.G.16.g);

The Business Outreach Team and all key outreach program staff meet

regularly so that they are knowledgeable about all industry clusters. Staff has

been trained in each cluster. In addition, all outreach program staff receive a

copy of the SRA Cluster Study conducted by Central Florida Development

Council for Polk County, becoming the knowledge experts. As jobs are

posted, team members identify qualified job seekers to fill those job postings.

In addition, customers interested in training are encouraged to explore

training within those industry clusters in addition to other areas identified on

the regions‘ Targeted Occupations List.

8. Describe how the region will provide a platform for creation or technical

input of industry specific training programs—leverage expertise of

strategic partners (Education, Training Providers) (V.G.16.h)

Polk Works President & CEO and staff serve on several local Boards charged

with policy development for workforce and education programs. As a member

of the Employ Florida Banner Center for Advanced Manufacturing, Polk

Works‘ CEO helps to strategically direct employment and training initiatives

that are aligned with current supply and demand trends of the workforce.

Ensuring that the skills of Florida manufacturing workers keep pace with new

technology is the chief goal of the Employ Florida Banner Center for

Advanced Manufacturing. The Banner Center – located at Polk State College

– is a consortium of academic, workforce, economic development and

industry partners.

Polk Works is also represented on the Polk State College Corporate College

Advisory Board as well as the Lakeland Economic Development Council‘s

High Skill/High Wage Committee. These boards focus on strategically

promoting critical industry sectors and high skill/high wage jobs through

collaboration with employment, education and economic development.

Membership on these boards include business partners in various industry

sectors who come together for the purpose of enhance, expanding and

growing their workforce through training.

The President & CEO also serves on the Board of Directors of Central Florida

Development Council as well as the Lakeland Area Chamber of Commerce,

enabling Polk Works to strategically assist with business development and

retention efforts.

9. Describe how the region will institutionalize local, regional and

statewide ―voice of the customer‖ business forums to keep abreast of

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 78


current and emerging workforce needs (e.g., through Employ Florida

Banner Centers and other similar business-led initiatives) (V.G.16.i)

Information acquired through Florida‘s Banner Centers will be distributed to

local educational institutions, business leaders, the Region‘s Board of

Directors and economic development entities. The information will be

reviewed and, if possible, adapted into local programs and initiatives if

approved by the entity responsible for those revisions.

Business forums are designed to listen to our customer, local businesses, to

determine future endeavors. Information received from local entities will be

provided to the Region‘s Board of Directors through standing committees for

their review and final action in regard to local programs for which they have

oversight authority.

Business Service Unit staff are members of local, regional or statewide

business forums or attend meetings to stay abreast of current and emerging

workforce needs. These include Chamber of Commerce, Mid-Florida Society

for Human Resources Management, Economic Development Organizations,

the Polk Manufacturer‘s Association, Career Academies, etc.

10. Describe how the region will increase workforce awareness via visibility

at target industry specific events (V.G.16.j)

Increased workforce awareness will be accomplished by Business Services

participation and sponsorship of industry events and meetings for input on the

needs of the workforce. Business Services participates in the Polk

Manufacturing Association to address the needs of the manufacturing

employers. Local job fairs and recruiting events are organized as needs are

identified by job seekers and/or employers. In addition, Business Services

promotes workforce awareness at our Community Forums, chamber of

commerce and economic development events.

11. Showcase successful workforce/business partnerships at local

economic development business events. (V.G.16.k)

Polk Works Business Services sponsors an annual State of the Workforce

Summit. This summit offers company executives, education partners,

community leaders, human resource professionals and the general public

cutting edge information about topics in business and their impact in today‘s

economy.

In addition, we will continue to showcase our workforce/business partnerships

at local economic development events by:

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 79


Hosting round tables facilitated by experts from the business and

economic development arenas, to share the latest information on

employer issues and challenges.

Sponsoring events

Showcasing our work at various community events

Disseminating press releases that showcase our workforce/business

partnerships to media outlets

Using social media to put a spotlight on our work with local employers and

community stakeholders

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 80


MIGRANT AND SEASONAL FARMWORKERS (MSFW)

Outreach and Services

Review required for significant MSFW One-Stop Career Centers

The Wagner-Peyser Act contains specific requirements for services to MSFWs as

outlined in 20 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 651, 653 and 658 Services for

MSFWs. These regulations require each significant MSFW One-Stop Career Center to

develop an Outreach Plan designed to contact MSFWs not reached by usual One-Stop

Career Center intake. The Outreach Plan should reflect the policies contained in 20

CFR, Part 653,

Subpart 3, Section 653.107 and its specific guidelines for completing the Outreach Plan.

Significant bilingual One-Stop Career Centers:

Belle Glade One-Stop Career Center—RWB 21

Bradenton One-Stop Career Center—RWB 18

Port Saint Lucie One-Stop Career Center—RWB 20

Homestead One-Stop Career Center—RWB 23

Immokalee One-Stop Career Center—RWB 24

Plant City One-Stop Career Center—RWB 15

Quincy One-Stop Career Center—RWB 5

Sebring/Wauchula One-Stop Career Centers—RWB 19

Winter Haven One-Stop Career Center—RWB 17

MSFW Outreach

If the region has local operating procedures for serving MSFWs, please provide a copy

to the attachment section of the plan. Each MSFW outreach specialist is required to

have a minimum of five "quality" contacts of MSFWs per staff day. A quality contact is

defined as a contact with an MSFW where a reportable supportive service is provided

and documented with the MSFW's name and social security number. The requirement

of five MSFW contacts per staff day applies only to the MSFW outreach specialists and

not to other staff resources utilized.

1. Describe the process for providing the required services and activities, such

as outreach to the MSFWs, Agricultural Employers, and employer job orders.

We maintain a partnership with community groups, public agencies and advocacy

groups interested in the welfare of the agricultural workers and employers. We are in

close contact with the Department of Licensing, who is in contact with the crew leaders.

The Region‘s MSFW program includes access to all services available at the One-Stop,

job development, OJT, pre-screening and referral to non-ag job orders, job search

workshops, referral to support services, referral to ESOL and GED, career guidance

and WIA training programs. Partner agencies in the region that consider interagency

referral and provide service to the MSFW population concurrently include: Farmworker

Jobs & Education program, Children & Families Services, and the Polk County School

Board Head Start Centers.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 81


During the season (October thru June), the outreach worker is out of the office

approximately 80% of the time conducting outreach services. The MSFW outreach

worker explains the complaint system, provides brochures and information on

partner programs, interagency referrals, referrals to other organizations serving

MSFWs and a basic summary of farmworker rights with respect to the terms and

conditions of employment.

Also provide the following:

Assessment of Needs must include a review of the agricultural and MSFW

activity in the area and an assessment of the challenges/barriers faced by

the MSFWs. (V.G.3.b.1.)

Assessments are conducted during outreach by the MSFW Representative and

through One-Stop Career Center staff. These assessments identify needs such

as GED Training, ESOL classes, job readiness, career counseling, job search

assistance for traditional employment, etc.


Assessment of Available One-Stop and Partner Resources (V.G.3.b.2.)

MSFW Outreach Specialist, in conjunction with the One-Stop Career Center

staff, has developed an extensive network of organizations, i.e. faith-based

organizations, social service agencies, and migrant advocate groups that assist

with housing, groceries, medical services, etc. Contacts are established with

crew leaders and employers to determine labor needs that will assist in making

increased job referral assistance available to the MSFW customers.

There are many resources available at the One-Stop Career Centers, including

bilingual staff, computers, assessment services, job readiness workshops, etc.,

along with workforce programs, such as SNAP, WTP, and WIA.


Proposed Outreach Activities (V.G.3.b.3.); shall be designed to meet the

needs determined in subpart a. of this section and shall include the tools to

be used to conduct outreach activities.

The MSFW Outreach Specialist travels extensively within the region and uses a

network of community contacts and knowledge of the local agricultural employer

seasonal cycles of activity to reach the goal of 5 quality contacts per day. These

contacts and reportable services are appropriately documented in the MIS

system. Quality contacts are made with MSFWs through employers, in the fields,

and at stores and community service facilities where the migrant and seasonal

farm workers are known to congregate. These contacts are recorded daily on

the Log of Daily Outreach Activities (DEO 1303) by the Outreach Specialist and

reported monthly to the State Monitor Advocate.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 82


The assessment of need begins with a review of the previous year‘s agricultural

activity and MSFW activity. MSFW Outreach Specialist will visit Migrant Seasonal

Farm Workers (MSFWs) and their families at their living and gathering areas,

hand out 511-N forms (English/Spanish/Creole) to inform the farm workers of the

services and resources available at no cost from the local One-Stop Centers -

including: referrals to AG and non-AG employment, information about the

complaint system, farm worker rights, etc. After this presentation is made in the

field and the MSFW cannot or does not visit the local One-Stop Center, the

Outreach Specialist offers assistance on completing applications, make referrals

to specific job(s) or to supportive services for which the individual or a family

member may be eligible; and/or assists in making an appointment to an

appropriate agencies, documenting complaints, etc. The Outreach Specialist

must make follow-up contacts as necessary.


Complete the MSFW Outreach Plan (V.G.3.b.4.)

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 83


MSFW Outreach Plan

ACTIVITY July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May June

FOCUS ON FARMWORKERS

Visits to MSFWs at labor camps, work sites,

gathering areas, etc. 23 116 94 100 100 110 108 100 102 100 108 0

Presentations to groups of MSFWs (migrant

education/Head Start parent meetings, ESL

classes, churches, etc.) 0 0 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 0

Visits to staff/staff meetings at organizations which

serve MSFWs 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 5

Attending MSFW interagency ―councils‖

2 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0

Regular outstation visiting/intake

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

Other MSFW outreach activities*

0 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0

FOCUS ON EMPLOYERS TO PROMOTE

HIRING MSFWs

Visits to agricultural businesses

2 2 8 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 0 0

Visits to non-agricultural businesses

1 1 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0

Presentations to meetings/groups of employers

0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

Other employer focused activities to promote hiring

MSFWs 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0

Estimated outreach hours in month

23 40 120 96 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 0

Estimated number of MSFW outreach contacts^

by month 15 70 200 200 200 105 105 105 200 200 105 0

Job fairs, festivals and other unscheduled special events

Outreach Contact estimates are the # of potential MSFWs spoken to through/during outreach; not estimated number of registered MSFWs.

Estimated total outreach time for the 12 months: 5

Estimated total outreach contacts for the 12 months: 137

Number of individual staff estimated to participate in outreach for the 12 months: 1

Estimated number of: Ag Job Orders: __6__ Ag Positions: _500___ Ag Positions Filled: _500___

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 84


2. Describe the process for meeting the Equity Ratio Indicators and Minimum

Service Level Indicators. (V.G.3.d.)

Equity Ratio Indicators:

Referred to employment

Referred to supportive services

Received staff assisted services

Job development contacts

Career Guidance

Minimum Service Level Indicators

Placed in a job

Placed $0.50 above minimum wage

Place in long-term non-agricultural job

The minimum service level process is met through mass recruitment, job

development, referrals through H-2A job order, and outreach at gathering sites.

Through job development, job orders may reflect at least .50 above the minimum

wage. During outreach the Equity Ratio Indicators are accounted for on the Daily

Outreach Log. The information is then entered into Employ Florida with the

appropriate activity codes. If the MSFW uses the services at the One Stop the

minimum level of service is provided using the MSFW Desktop Aide. Complaints are

maintained in the One Stop log and forwarded monthly to the MSFW State Monitor.

Status checks are made periodically.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 85


TRADE ADJUSTMENT ASSISTANCE (TAA)

The State Workforce Agency is required to ensure that effective strategies are utilized to

help trade-affected workers obtain new employment. It is essential that the RWBs

move trade-affected workers into new jobs as quickly and effectively as possible so that

they continue to be productive members of the workforce. To this end, the intervention

strategies used for program benefits and services will be aimed toward rapid, suitable,

and long-term reemployment for adversely affected workers. Under the Trade Act, the

RWBs must:




Increase the focus on early intervention, upfront assessment and reemployment

services for adversely affected workers;

Use One-Stop Career Centers as the main point of participant intake and delivery

of benefits and services; and

Maintain fiscal integrity and promote performance accountability.

1. Describe local procedures to ensure timely response to trade-affected

dislocations, including coordination with Rapid Response, provision of

technical assistance for the filing of Petitions, and conducting TAA

Information sessions to affected workers. (V.G.5.b)

Polk Works distributes information about TAA services and the certification process

in the One Stop Career Centers and through the Business Services division. A local

designated merit staff serves as the initial point of contact for receipt of a TAA

Certification. The designated staff makes initial contact with the employer to

request an impacted worker list and advise them of the TAA Services. If the

employer is not willing to provide a list of the impacted workers, the designated staff

member works with the TAA State Coordinator to obtain a list of employees who are

listed on the tax rolls during TAA Certification period. Upon obtaining the list of

impacted workers the designated staff sends a TAA Certification Notification to all

the impacted workers. The notification includes information about the services, next

steps and deadlines related to the TAA benefits. TAA customers are invited to

attend a group or one on one orientation sessions including information about:








determination of eligibility for TAA services;

unemployment compensation claims filing assistance;

Information sessions for affected workers about the One-Stop‘s full array of

services, employability skills, job seeking assistance, and resume preparation;

Assessment of the needs of the affected workers through surveying and

interviewing;

Training, Job Search Allowances, Relocation Assistance, TRA payments;

Documentation and benefit deadlines;

Follow-up and follow-along with affected workers to ensure they are receiving

services needed to become re-employed.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 86


One-Stop partners are afforded the opportunity to participate in TAA Orientation

sessions.

2. Describe local procedures to ensure that trade-affected workers receive a

timely comprehensive assessment for all TAA services and benefits for which

they qualify. (V.G.5.C)

DEO Merit Staff maintain familiarity with TAA requirements, screening and

determination applicability. The requirement for Trade Act services, should they

arise, can be augmented by TAA staff from adjoining regions and from DEO staff in

Tallahassee. The Region‘s Business Services Unit, WIA staff, and WP staff

comprise the local REACT team. When the region receives a WARN notice on an

area employer, the Business Services Unit contacts the employer for a site visit.

Information on all programs, including Rapid Response and TAA are taken to the

site visit. An orientation is arranged with all the affected workers to provide

information on all services available through the workforce. Any affected workers

requesting TAA assistance are referred to the TAA staff at the region.

3. Describe coordination with the Wagner Peyser and/or WIA programs to

provide joint case management services to trade-affected workers who are coenrolled.

Note: Core and Intensive services including training should be

properly reflected by the respective program(s) in the state management

information system (EFM) for which the worker is enrolled. Also, TAA funds

will be used first for eligible trade-affected workers, when available.

Upon determination of TAA eligibility, Wagner Peyser and WIA staff will coordinate

the co-enrollment of TAA customers to ensure core and intensive services, including

training, are being provided while maintaining separate files. Registration and case

management activities will be entered and tracked through the Wagner Peyser and

WIA programs in EFM. If TAA funds are not available, WIA training funding will be

utilized.

4. Describe the process for ensuring that eligible trade-affected workers receive

approval for training based on the (6) program criteria. Approval of training

should be based on the allowable training types: Occupation Skills,

Customized, On-the-Job, Remedial, and Prerequisite.

Every potential Trade- affected worker is carefully screened in a joint interview

process by both DEO and WIA staff with emphasis on:

The existence of a current petition (and effect of policies under that petition

series), as well as the applicant's status as primary or secondary impacted

worker.

The applicant's knowledge, skills, and abilities in relation to local demand

occupations.

The applicant's desire for retraining, local available training, and need for

prerequisite or remediation services.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 87


Performance Measures and Goals

Based on petitions certified within a regional workforce board area, the region must

provide information regarding the number of petitions certified and the percentage of the

trade-affected workers enrolled in the TAA program. This information will be calculated

based on the total number of workers identified by the company versus the number of

individuals who actually received a TAA reportable service. Specifically, those

reportable services include (1) training, (2) waiver of training requirements (3) job

search and (4) relocation allowances where training funds are utilized. These services

not only allow the program to meet certain performance measure goals but give a basis

for ensuring that we are concentrating on expending the training funds for which the

United States Department of Labor has allocated to the State of Florida.

1. What plan of action will be implemented within your RWB to capture the

number of petitions certified, total number of potential workers covered and

percentage of those workers enrolled in the TAA program?

The designated Wagner-Peyser staff will track the petitions posted in

EFM/State/Federal lists along with the lists of potential workers. Monthly/Quarterly

reports will be pulled from EFM to identify all workers actively enrolled in the TAA

program.

2. How will you report those training funds expended by participant?

Polk Works RWB will issue monthly reports to the state utilizing the One-Stop

Management Information System (OSMIS) for expenditures paid out for TAA

customers for all benefits related to training, job search allowances and relocation

allowances.

3. What percentage of TAA training funds will your RWB expend on eligible

trade-affected workers covered under a certified petition who qualify for

training, job search and/or relocation allowances?

Polk Works RWB and the Wagner Peyser merit staff will be responsible for ensuring

100% of TAA training funds are awarded to those individuals enrolled in the TAA

program. TAA funding will not be utilized for any other function.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 88


WELFARE TRANSITION PROGRAM/TANF

For the WT/TANF section, please provide short narratives responding to the following

informational requests. Where requested, please provide assurances and/or short

explanations of local processes. If the RWB has a local operating procedure that

meets all required elements of the section, the RWB may attach the document and

simply refer to the local operating procedure.

Customer Notifications (V.G.8.b.1) (b, c, d, and e)

1. Please describe the regional process for notifying customers of their rights:

I. The right to be treated equitably under the anti-discrimination laws

II. The right and the process to have their case reviewed by a supervisor

III. The right to file a grievance

IV. The right to report good cause for failing to participate in a required

activity

During work registration/orientation a Customer Service Specialist informs

customers on the programs anti-discrimination laws, grievance process, and the

program rights and responsibilities. The customers are given a copy of the One Stop

grievance policy; they are also given information on their rights for a case review and

equitable treatment. All customers that complete the program orientation sign

documentation specifying that they have been informed of all the subjects listed

above. This documentation is retained in the participant‘s file and entered as a case

note in OSST. This information is also made available on the regions website at

www.polkworks.org

2. Describe how customers are provided information about the One-Stop Career

Center

The One-Stop Career Center global orientation has been integrated into the Welfare

Transition and Workforce Investment Act orientations, which give information about

One-Stop Services offered. A link to the global One-Stop Career Center orientation

is saved in each resource room desktop for job seekers to review. Fact Sheets for all

One-Stop Career Center programs and services are displayed and made available

to all customers explaining in detail what is offered and how to obtain it. Customers

are also reminded throughout their experience within the One-Stop Career Center of

additional services available.

3. Describe the RWB’s process for notifying customers of their opportunity to

receive support service

Support services are explained during programmatic and global One-Stop

orientations. This is also reiterated during the initial appointment and any other

appointments thereafter. This information is provided verbally and in writing.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 89


4. Describe the RWB’s process for informing customers of their Opportunities

and Obligations

Grievances and Hearings

During work registration/orientation the customer is explained what their

opportunities and obligations entail. The customer is also given an ―opportunities

and obligations‖ informational form that is signed and retained in a file during work

registration/orientation. Customers are consistently reminded of their opportunities

and obligations regardless of their programmatic status.

1. Describe the steps a customer must take to file a local grievance

Any time a customer feels an action taken by a One Stop staff has severely

affected the customer in any way they have a right to file a grievance. There are

several ways a customer is encouraged to do this. Customer concern forms are

located at each reception area within the One Stops. The customer will explain

their concern and a member of the management team will be contacted

immediately in an attempt to resolve the issue. There are also customer survey

forms available at each staff desk which can be filled anonymously or containing

contact information. Regardless of how the customer chooses to make the region

aware of the intention to file a grievance it is encouraged that they make aware

any staff they can as soon as the issue occurs.

2. Describe the steps a customer must take to request supervisory review of

actions taken on their case.

A customer is able to request a file review by informing the Career Specialist

verbally or in writing. The Program Manager will review the file and meet with the

customer within 48 hours of the file review request.

3. Describe the RWB’s process for preparing for local Fair Hearings

The Career Specialist and Program Manager represent Polk Works at the Fair

Hearing as the ―custodian‖ of the case record. The Career Specialist and

Program Manager explain the policy and program directives. The Career

Specialist must present the information as it pertains to the requested sanction.

The Career Specialist and Program Manager will prepare a packet that includes

the entire case record from work registration until the sanction request and case

closure.

4. Describe the type of documentation the RWB presents at Local Fair

Hearings

Documentation includes all relevant timesheets, appointment letters, case notes,

detailed written explanation and timeline.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 90


5. What program staff is required to attend Local and DCF Administrative

Hearings

The Career Specialist and Program Manager represent Polk Works at the Fair

Hearing as the ―custodian‖ of the case record.

Applicant Services

1. Describe the types of services that the region provides to applicants

Customers who are in applicant status can be provided a myriad of services

including vocational training and support services which address barriers to

employment or employment retention. Additionally ―applicants‖ have access and

are provided general services such as resume preparedness, job

readiness/retention workshops, interview skills workshops, etc.

2. Describe the process customers must follow to access applicant services

(V.G.8.a.1.1)(b – e)

If the customer expresses interest or the need to receive services while in

―applicant‖ status they will be assessed to make a determination of TANF

eligibility based on 200% of the LLSIL. TABE, Career Scope, Ready to Work or a

combination thereof will be completed to determine if customer is ready for

training. If customer is placed in training, support services can be provided based

on availability. The customer will be required to follow-up with an assigned

Career Specialist during and after training takes place.

3. Describe the region’s Work Registration Process

The customer is referred to the One-Stop Career Center by the DCF for Work

registration/orientation. During work registration/orientation the customer learns

of the WTP requirements. The customer completes the Initial Assessment

Application and required paperwork. This allows the Customer Service Specialist

to screen for possible diversion services. The Customer is scheduled for and

completes assessments such as TABE and Career Scope testing. Once this is all

completed and entered in the appropriate MIS the One Stop notifies the DCF that

the customer has complied with the work registration/orientation process. After a

determination of eligibility has been made by the DCF and the applicant becomes

a mandatory participant, a One-Stop Center Career Specialist is electronically

notified through OSST.

4. Describe the types of activities in which applicants are engaged to satisfy

the work registration requirements

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 91


In order to satisfy the region‘s local work registration requirements, the following

must be completed: An in-person or online orientation, Initial Assessment

Application packet, TABE and Career Scope or Ready to Work assessments.

5. Describe the steps that applicants with limitations must take to be

excepted from the work registration activities

Acceptable documentation explaining why the applicant cannot complete a

specific portion of the work registration process may be accepted in some

situations. In any instance, the region will attempt in any way possible to assist

the customer in completing the entire process. For example, if a customer is not

able to physically come into the One-Stop Career Center due to a medical

condition. A medical verification form may be submitted, signed by a licensed

physician, in lieu of completing a certain portion of the work registration process.

In some instances a phone orientation and assessment may be provided in order

to assist the customer.

6. Describe how applicants are assessed for cash assistance diversions

during the work registration process.(V.G.8.a.1.2)

During the work registration process, customers complete an Initial Assessment

Application. This in addition to verbal screening is used to determine eligibility for

all diversion services. If the individual appears to be eligible, based on the above

assessments, the DEO Up-front Diversion Pre-Screening Form WTP-2073A is

used.

7. Describe how applicants are informed of Up-Front Diversion (UFD)

Applicants are informed of Up-Front Diversion during the work

registration/orientation process.

8. What steps must an applicant take to receive Up-Front Diversion or UFD

services

All customers are screened during the work registration process to determine

eligibility for UFD. If determine eligible, applicant must provide required

documentation confirming their eligibility. This documentation includes a

verifiable job offer and proof of past due bills. The Customer Service Specialist

must ensure that the customer is not currently sanctioned and that they have not

been given UFD in the past. Once this is completed DCF will be informed that the

customer meets the requirements for UFD and DCF will issue the appropriate

funds.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 92


9. Describe the process for entering work registration information into the

data entry system

Once orientation is completed, the Customer Service Specialist will document the

customer‘s information in OSST and will schedule them for TABE and Career

Scope tests.

10. Describe the process for entering work registration completion into the

data entry system (V.G.8.a.1.3.a)

The TABE and Career Scope results are submitted to the Customer Service

Specialist and entered into OSST. Case notes are entered into the OSST and

(DCF) FLORIDA system to report customer‘s compliance.

11. Describe any work registration promising practices. A promising practice

can be defined as processes that increase and encourage program

efficiency, eliminates duplication, and/or streamlines processes and

services.

To facilitate the orientation and registration processes, the Customer Service

Specialist has been cross trained to provide the One-Stop and Welfare Transition

orientations and complete the work registration process.

12. Describe how applicants are informed of relocation assistance

Applicants are informed of relocation assistance during work

registration/orientation. The information is provided individually, in a group

setting, and also after the assessment is completed and reviewed with the

customer.

13. What steps must an applicant take to receive relocation assistance

Relocation assistance is only offered to applicants and mandatory customers

who are in compliance and:

a. have a job offer and provide verification

b. are relocating due to domestic violence

In either instance, all paperwork must be completed which includes

Upfront/Relocation Screening form (2073a), Diversion service worksheet

(2073b), Relocation Budget Worksheet (0002), Relocation Assistance Program

Checklist (2279), estimates of housing, moving, utilities expenses and deposits

thereof.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 93


14. What is the region’s maximum allowable payment for Relocation

Assistance

As a general practice, the maximum amount allowable for Relocation Assistance

is $3,000. However, if a higher amount is required the service provider will

forward a request to the Contract Manager for approval.

Attached: Local Operating Procedure ~ Work Registration

Mandatory Services (V.G.11.a.1.c i and ii) (V.G.11.a.2 a and b)

1. Describe how a participant’s prior work history, skills, and employability

are assessed

A participant‘s work history, skills and employability are assessed during the work

registration process when the customer completes the Initial Assessment

application, TABE and CareerScope. The Initial Assessment application

provides work history, the TABE indicates academic ability and the CareerScope

indicates aptitude and interest.

2. What tool does the RWB use to conduct the initial assessment

The RWB uses an Initial Assessment Application, TABE, and Career Scope.

3. When is the initial assessment initiated and conducted?

The initial assessment is initiated and conducted during the Orientation/Work

Registration process. The TABE and CareerScope are scheduled after the

completion of orientation.

4. If the initial assessment is conducted during the work registration process,

describe how the information is reviewed, updated, and used once the

participant becomes mandatory?

Once the customer‘s case becomes mandatory, the initial assessments are

reviewed to determine the appropriate activity. Customers are required to

complete a TABE and Career Scope assessment every year. Depending on the

customer‘s circumstance, if an additional assessment is needed, RTW and other

job readiness employer testing is used. In addition, new initial assessments are

completed every 6 months or every time a customer‘s case opens, whichever is

first.

5. Describe the process of developing an IRP in conjunction with the

mandatory participant.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 94


The region requires participants to complete the Initial Assessment Application to

develop the IRP. The IRP is created to fit the customer‘s greatest needs and to

assist the customer in attaining self-sufficiency as quickly as possible. For

example, if the customer is determined job ready but lacks work experience, they

would most likely be assigned to community service/work experience.

Attached: Local Operating Procedure ~ Developing IRPs and ARPs

6. Describe how often the steps to self-sufficiency are updated and signed by

the program participant and program staff.

The IRP is initiated within thirty days of the customer becoming mandatory. Steps

for self-sufficiency are updated as completed. The IRP is updated on a case by

case basis, depending on the specific activity and when the steps are completed.

Each new IRP must be signed by program participant and program staff monthly

or more often if the activities change during the month.

7. Describe the types of services provided to mandatory participants.

Mandatory participants are offered services which include job search, resume

writing, employment workshops, vocational training, transportation assistance,

childcare, uniforms, etc.

8. Describe how the region provides support services to mandatory

participants.

Career Specialist will document identified barriers in the participant‘s IRP and

provide appropriate support service to address barriers.

The following support services may be provided to enable participant‘s to comply

with WT Program activities: Transportation Assistance (car repair, gas cards, bus

passes), Ancillary expenses (i.e., books, tools, uniforms, glasses, shots, physical

exam), Education and/or training related fees, Clothing, and/or Child Care.

9. Describe how mandatory participants are informed of relocation

assistance.

Career Specialist reiterates relocation assistance during planning sessions, in the

event the participant secures employment outside of the local area, or due to

domestic violence.

10. Describe the steps that must be taken by mandatory participants to receive

relocation assistance.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 95


The participant will inform the Career Specialist he/she is interested in Relocation

Assistance. The Career Specialist will initiate the screening process by using the

DEO WTP-2279, Relocation Assistance Program Checklist to determine if the

participant has a situation that can be resolved by Relocation Assistance instead

of ongoing temporary cash assistance (TCA). The determination must reflect

whether the Relocation Assistance will enable the participant to obtain or retain

employment. The participant will complete the budgeting process and the

Relocation Budget Worksheet, DEO WTP-0002. The participant will provide

appropriate documentation to validate moving to a new location such as a lease

agreement, utilities, moving expenses, etc.

If the relocation is due to domestic violence, permanent housing may not be an

option and temporary housing, in a protective shelter or with a family member will

be accepted. The participant will locate support service agencies (transportation

assistance, childcare assistance) in the area (s) he is requesting relocation to.

The participant is required to provide contact information to the Career Specialist

for follow up within thirty days.

11. Describe the process for assigning mandatory participants to work

activities. How does the region determine the activity in which a participant

will be assigned?(V.G.8.b.6), (V.G.8.b.7)

Activities are assigned based on goals, assessments and barriers that the

participant may have in collaboration with Career Specialist‘s input. For example:

If the customer has a goal to work as a Secretary but, doesn‘t have the

experience or training to meet that goal then customer could be assigned to

Work Experience in an office environment to achieve necessary skills.

12. Describe how the RWB will document actual participation hours.

The Career Specialist will collect time sheets weekly and data enter the

appropriate hours in the OSST system in the JPR screen.

Attached: Local Operating Procedure ~ Assignment of Hours

13. Describe how the RWB will ensure that documentation to support hours in

unpaid work activities is collected at a minimum of every two weeks.

The service provider will conduct ongoing system reviews, desk reviews and onsite

quality assurance reviews. Weekly documentation of unpaid work activities

and entry thereof are vital to keeping participants in compliance with the TANF

program. Career Specialist maintains an active list of program participants that

are printed the first day of every week and are marked to document hours

received and input into the data system for the previous week. Any participant

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 96


that has not turned in the allotted documented hours may be issued a pre-penalty

letter. Polk Works, DEO, and TLH&W will conduct ongoing system reviews, desk

reviews and on-site quality assurance reviews, and provides continuous written

feedback to the Provider‘s management with recommendations for improvement

to ensure that documentation is collected on a weekly basis.

14. How does the RWB ensure that documentation is collected prior to

entering Job Participation Rate (JPR) hours in the data entry system

(V.G.8.b.4)(a and d).

The provider will conduct ongoing system reviews, desk reviews and on-site

quality assurance reviews that assure the documentation of JPR hours are

present and retained in participant‘s file at the time JPR‘s are entered in the data

entry system. Polk Works, DEO, and TLH&W will conduct ongoing system

reviews, desk reviews and on-site quality assurance reviews, and provides

continuous written feedback to the Provider‘s management with

recommendations for improvement to ensure JPR‘s are only entered in the event

the necessary documentation has been collected.

15. How does the RWB ensure that program participants are not assigned to

more than 40 hours per week in work activities.

The region has an assigned hour calculator that is sent to all Career Specialist

towards the end of each month for the following month that assists in assigning

the proper combination of core and core plus hours. This calculator does not

allow you to assign more than 40 weekly hours. The provider will also conduct

ongoing system reviews, desk reviews and on-site quality assurance reviews.

Polk Works, DEO, and TLH&W will conduct ongoing system reviews, desk

reviews and on-site quality assurance reviews, and provides continuous written

feedback to the Provider‘s management with recommendations for improvement

to ensure participants are not assigned more than 40 hours on a weekly basis.

16. Describe how the RWB will ensure that unpaid work activities are

supervised no less than daily by a designated responsible party

(V.G.8.b.3.c).

The regions timesheets include sections for daily signatures and documentation

of hours to ensure unpaid work activities are supervised no less than daily by a

designated responsible party. Career Specialist also maintains regular contact

with work site supervisors. The provider will also conduct ongoing system

reviews, desk reviews and on-site quality assurance reviews. Polk Works, DEO,

and TLH&W will conduct ongoing system reviews, desk reviews and on-site

quality assurance reviews, and provides continuous written feedback to the

Provider‘s management with recommendations for improvement to ensure

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 97


unpaid work activities are supervised no less than daily by a designated

responsible party.

Attached: Local Operating Procedure ~ Community Service Work Experience

17. Describe how daily supervision is documented for ―on-site‖ job searches.

Career Specialist may utilize customer tracker to verify attendance for onsite job

searches timeframes required/allowed in resource room. Each participant

regardless of onsite or off site job searches must complete the required job

search log along with the verification printouts/emails of each application

submitted. Each job search/application listed may be documented up to 2 hours

credit per search/application submitted. Due to state compliance 10 % of each

completed and documented job searches must be verified by Career Specialist

prior to entering in OSST.

Attached: Local Operating Procedure ~ Job Search

18. Describe how daily supervision is documented for ―off-site‖ job searches

(V.G.8.b.2).

Each participant regardless of on-site or off-site job searches must complete the

required job search log along with the verification printouts/emails of each

application submitted online. Each job search/application listed may be

documented up to 2 hours credit per search/application submitted online or in

person. If a customer walks in to a place of business, documentation including

phone number, name of business, and contact signature must be provided on job

search sheet. Due to state compliance 10 % of each completed and

documented job searches must be verified by Career Specialist prior to entering

into OSST.

19. Describe how the RWB informs participants of their responsibilities.

(V.G.8.b.1)(e and f) Including the responsibility to:

Work in conjunction with program and career center staff

Participate in assigned activities

Document and submit participation hours

Report employment

Accept suitable employment

Remain employed

Report good cause reasons for failure to participate immediately

The Customer Service Specialist informs participants of the above

responsibilities at the work registration/orientation. The above items are reviewed

again by the Career Specialist during the participant‘s mandatory appointment. If

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 98


the participant receives a Pre-Penalty for non-compliance, these requirements

are reviewed again to ensure awareness and understanding.

20. Provide the local definition for Good Cause for failure to participate or

comply with program requirements.

Good Cause- A specific circumstance beyond the participant‘s control that

prohibits he/she from participating in the assigned activity. Examples of good

cause includes: sickness, court dates, family death, approved holiday, etc.

Attached: Local Operating Procedure ~ Good Cause

21. Describe the steps that a participant with Good Cause must take to be

excused from or rescheduled for an activity.

Participant must notify the Career Specialist within 24 hours and must provide

the required supporting documentation. Examples of supporting documentation

includes: physician‘s note, subpoena, obituary, state holiday schedule, etc.

22. When must a participant submit documentation to support Good

Cause?(V.G.8.b.2).

The participant must submit documentation supporting good cause each and

every occasion that good cause is identified.

23. What documentation does the region require to support missed activities

due to good cause (V.G.8.b.3).

Required supporting documentation includes: physician‘s note, subpoena,

obituary, state holiday schedule, etc.

24. Define and describe each of the following activities as they exist in your

region:

Unsubsidized Employment:

Employment, for which an employer does not receive a subsidy from TANF or

other public funds to offset some or all of the wages and costs of employing a

participant, may include, but is not limited to, domestic work, self-employment,

and childcare and it may also include individuals that receive benefits for services

rendered (i.e. rent).

Subsidized Employment Public: Employment for which a not for profit

employer receives a subsidy from TANF or other public funds to offset some or

all of the wages and costs of employing a participant.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 99


Subsidized Employment Private:

Employment for which a for-profit employer receives a subsidy from TANF or

other public funds to offset some or all of the wages and costs of employing a

participant.

Job Search:

The participant is actively seeking or obtaining employment, preparation to seek

or obtain employment, including life skills training and substance abuse

treatment, mental health treatment or rehabilitation activities for those who are

otherwise employable, an In House - Job Readiness (Employment Preparation)

Vocational and Secondary Education:

May be used as a stand-alone activity for participation not to exceed 1 year credit

toward participation. Either education avenues need to be utilized to provide

necessary education and skills necessary for the participants to gain employment

and achieve self-sufficiency. Whether Vocational or Secondary education the

documentation of syllabus or course description along with hours of training will

occur along with study hours needed per hour spent in training are needed.

Applicants may be dually enrolled in WIA for these activities if participant meets

WIA guidelines.

Community Service/Work Experience:

May be selected as an activity for participants who need to increase

employability skills by improving their interpersonal skills, job-retention skills,

stress management, and job problem solving and by learning to attain a balance

between job and personal responsibilities‘. The region ensure that community

service is provided at a not for profit site by requiring a printout of the company‘s

articles of incorporation provided on the website Sunbiz.org. This information is

available for any legally operating company in the State of Florida.

Job Skills Training directly Related to Employment:

Training or education for job skills required by an employer to provide an

individual with the ability to obtain employment or to advance or adapt to the

changing demands of the workplace. May include literacy training or language

instruction when it is focused on skills needed for employment or combined in a

unified whole with job training.

Education Directly Related to Employment:

If a participant has not received a high school diploma or GED, (s) he may

receive credit for hours by participating in education related to specific

occupation, job or job offer. This includes courses designed to provide the

knowledge and skills for specific occupations or work settings, but may also

include adult basic education and ESOL. Where required as pre-requisite for

employment by employers or occupation, this activity may also include education

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 100


leading to a General Education Development (GED) or high school equivalency

diploma.

Providing Childcare:

When and where applicable, providing Childcare (Core) Required

Documentation, The Community Service/Worksite agreement, Signed Weekly

Community Service Time Sheet. Weekly case notes indicating that the

participant actually provided the community service

25. How does the RWB ensure that local work activities comply with federal

and state definitions?

The RWB‘s local work activities are structured based on definitions as stated in

the Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and

Families, 45 CFR parts 261,262,263 and 265 as well as the Florida‘s Work

Verification Plan. In addition, the RWB‘s internal monitors review local activities

quarterly to ensure we comply with federal and state definitions. All local LOP‘s

formulated to reflect federal and state definitions per work activities.

Attached: Local Operating Procedure ~ Assignment of Hours

26. Describe how participants are referred to work sites to begin engagement

(V.G.8.b.4)

When applicable, in collaboration with the participant, the Career Specialist will

assign a worksite that will directly benefit the participant‘s goals and address

identified barriers to employment. For example, if a participant has great interest

in the Veterinary field as identified on the CareerScope assessment, the ideal

worksite would be a Veterinary clinic. Worksite agreements are completed by the

business, and the site supervisor is identified. Periodically the Career Specialist

will communicate with the site supervisor on the progress and possible

employment opportunity for the customer.

27. How does the RWB ensure that participants assigned to community service

or work experience do not exceed the maximum number of hours allowed

based on the work site calculation (cash assistance plus food stamps

divided by the higher of the state or federal minimum wage)?

This region has formulated and adopted a calculator worksheet that accurately

produces the hours needed for community service/work experience based on

Florida Screens IQFS (food stamps) and IQCH (TANF) divided by minimum

wage. This calculation is performed monthly, addressed in IRP, and are verified

by weekly signed timesheets returned to Career Specialist and enter into data

system. The provider will conduct ongoing system reviews, desk reviews and

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on-site quality assurance reviews. Polk Works, DEO, and TLH&W will conduct

ongoing system reviews, desk reviews and on-site quality assurance reviews,

and provides continuous written feedback to the Provider‘s management with

recommendations for improvement to ensure participants are assigned to the

proper amount of hours in community service/work experience. The provider will

also conduct ongoing system reviews, desk reviews and on-site quality

assurance reviews.

Attached: Local Operating Procedure ~ Assignment of Hours

28. How does the region ensure that current worksite employees are not

displaced by program participants, including paid vacancies for which the

employer will hire?(V.G.8.b.9)(a – e)

As part of the signed and executed worksite agreement, the worksite agency

acknowledges and agrees not to displace current employees. If the region

becomes aware of a situation in which this occurs the agreement will be

immediately terminated.

29. If a participant reports limited abilities, what is the process for deferring the

participant from traditional work activities?

A medical verification form is required for a participant who indicates he/she has

a medical condition that prohibits him/her from participating in a work activity.

The form must be completed by a license physician, and must verify the specific

illness and duration of the condition. The participant maybe placed in deferral

status up to ninety days before a new form is required.

Attached: Local Operating Procedure ~ Medical Deferral

Describe the types of activities that may be included in a participant’s

Alternative Plan.

The following are examples of alternative plan activities: medical appointments

and completed application process for SSI or SSDI.

Participant is required to maintain appropriate contact with the Career Specialist

at all times.

30. Does the region require deferred participants to complete any vocational or

other assessments?

All deferred participants are required to complete the Initial Assessment

application during the work registration/orientation.

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31. Describe how the region identifies hidden disabilities, including learning

disabilities.

If a participant shows very little progress in assigned activities or low scores in

assessments, they are referred to Vocational Rehabilitation, other partner

agencies, or a medical professional.

32. What other services are provided to participants who have learning or

other hidden disabilities?

The Disability Program Navigator will assist individuals with disabilities in

obtaining universal services as well as facilitating participation in the Ticket to

Work program.

Special Populations (V.G.17) (V.G.20.e)

1. Describe the region’s process for providing workforce services to the

following hard-to-serve populations:

Homeless-

Ex-Offenders

Older Workers

Migrant Seasonal Farm Workers

Individuals with Disabilities

Limited English Proficiency/English as a Second Language (ESL)

Refugees

Domestic Violence

The region does a detailed assessment, regardless of entry point into the One-

Stop system, which allows the staff to best gauge the level and types of

assistance the participants will need. This assessment allows the Career

Specialist to customize and personalize a plan of action to remove as many

barriers the participant may have. The region firmly believes that each customer

and situation is unique and when possible individualized attention and services

are best delivered. Aside from the basic assistance available to our ―global‘

participants such as, resume preparation assistance, job search and referrals,

job readiness workshops, access to internet, fax and copiers; there are specific

options available to hard to serve populations. Below are examples of specific

assistance or services that are available to those populations:

Homeless - Participants that are homeless may be referred to many of our

community service partners such as Talbot House, Salvation Army, etc.

Ex-Offenders – Are referred to the Fresh Start workshop and briefed on the

Federal Bonding program.

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Older Workers - May be referred to agencies such as Experience Works and

AARP.

Migrant Seasonal Farm Workers- May be referred to the local Farm Worker

Program.

Individuals with Disabilities - May be referred to the local Ticket to Work

Coordinator or to agencies such as Agency for Disabled People or Vocational

Rehabilitation.

Limited English Proficiency/English for speakers of other Languages (ESL) - May

be referred to ESOL courses and ResCare Academy.

Refugees – May be referred to ESOL classes and/or agencies such as Catholic

Charities or Lutheran Services.

Domestic Violence - May be referred to licensed local agencies such as Peace

River Center who specialize in domestic violence prevention.

Describe how the RWB ensures that domestic violence providers/partners are

trained and competent to provide such services.

The region‘s management team is responsible for ensuring that only licensed legally

operating agencies are utilized as a referral source for domestic violence services.

Other than work registration, describe when customers are notified of the

opportunity to receive domestic violence services and counseling.

In the event that a Career Specialist suspects domestic violence, or if the participant

inquires about services, the available assistance is reiterated and offered.

2. How does the RWB ensure the confidentiality of customers who have

reported domestic violence?

In addition to a customer‘s standard file, a secondary file may be created with the

intent to contain the sensitive information. These files are kept in a specific

locked file cabinet at each location. The Program Manager maintains the keys

for the designated file cabinets.

3. How does the RWB ensure that the customer has a safety plan in place?

Part of the domestic violence relocation process is to assist the customer in

locating assistance in the area the customer is locating to. This assistance can

include domestic violence counseling, shelters, and local law enforcement. All

customers approved for domestic violence relocation are referred to community

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agencies such as Peace River for professional guidance on creating a ―Safety

Plan‖. These plans include: directions on how to use the safety plan; tips to

increase safety while still at home; how to prepare an escape bag; additional tips

for safety; preparing at work; tips for those who live in rural areas; as well as

preparing for feelings and emotions that accompany abusive relationships.

4. How does the region ensure that the safety plan for customers requesting

relocation assistance due to domestic violence include a recommendation

of relocation from a domestic violence professional?

The region does not require a recommendation for relocation from a domestic

violence professional.

Transitional Services (V.G.20.g)

1. Describe when and how customers are informed about transitional

services.

During the work registration/orientation customers are given an overview of

services provided. When the customer notifies the Career Specialist of their

employment, a transitional service letter containing information on the applicable

services and how to access them is mailed.

2. Describe the type of services offered to participants whose cash

assistance closes with earned income

A transitional customer is offered the following services: Childcare assistance,

transportation assistance, car repairs, gas cards, merchandise cards, training

assistance, job retention skills workshops and other basic services offered

through the One Stop Career Center.

3. Describe how those eligible for transitional services can access them.

The Career Specialist will contact the customer in order to arrange a schedule to

turn in paystubs and receive support services as needed and available. If there is

an urgent need for the support services the customer has the option of contacting

the assigned Career Specialist in order to receive the necessary support.

4. How long can an eligible transitional customers access transitional support

services?

The eligible transitional customer can access transitional support services for up

to 90 days after the case closes. Childcare can be provided up to 2 years.

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5. How long does the RWB authorize a childcare referral for transitional

customers?

The RWB does not authorize transitional childcare, this is a service issued by

Department of Children and Families.

6. How often does the RWB require a participant receiving transitional

childcare to document employment?

Transitional child care is provided by DCF.

7. How often are transitional participants receiving support services reviewed

for eligibility (family size, income, household composition, etc.)?

On each occurrence that a transitional customer receives support services they

are asked to explain any changes in family size, income, household composition

etc. The customer is instructed to report the changes to DCF.

8. Describe the educational and training opportunities available to transitional

participants.

The Region follows Federal guidelines which specify eligibility for education and

training. They can receive educational training for one year. This is primarily for

GED‘s or for an educational institution.

9. How does the RWB encourage employment retention and advancement for

transitional participants?

Transitional customers are assigned to a Transitional Career Specialist that

specializes in placement and retention. Support Services are available on an as

needed basis.

Special Projects

1. Describe how the RWB uses TANF funds for any locally developed special

projects?

Polk Works provides applicants who are 200% of poverty assistance with GED

assistance, short term training, support services as well as youth ages 16-21

with paid work experience.

2. What TANF purpose does the project serve?

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Polk Works serves customers under purpose 2, and 3. Under TANF purpose 2

(ending dependency on government assistance) Polk Works provides GED

assistance, short term training , and supportive services to customers who are

200% or less of federal poverty guidelines. Under TANF purpose 3 (prevent and

reduce out-of-wedlock pregnancies) Polk Works provides approximately 10

weeks of paid work experience to youth ages (16-21).

Oversight and Safeguards

1. Describe safeguards the region has in place to recognize and identify

fraud, attempted fraud or suspected fraud by program participants?

Career Specialists check signatures on timesheets and worksite agreements.

Follow up calls are placed to worksites and employers. The Region works with

DCF on any suspected fraud cases. Program Managers are on the local fraud

committee with DCF. Staff are informed annually of their obligation to report

fraud and to be ethical in their business dealings.

2. Describe safeguards the region has in place to discourage fraud or

attempted fraud by program participants?

During programmatic orientations customers are made aware that fraud is

reported and the consequences therein. Customers are made aware that cases

are continuously monitored and audited to ensure compliance with rules and

regulations.

3. What’s the process for reporting program participants (applicants,

mandatory, and transitional) for fraud or suspected fraud?

When fraud is suspected or found to be occurring involving a customer,

regardless of applicant, mandatory, or transitional status, management and the

appropriate authority are notified immediately (DCF, DEO, etc.).

4. Describe safeguards the region has in place to recognize and identify

fraud, attempted fraud, or suspected fraud among program staff?

Audits are conducted by Career Specialists, Team Leads, Program Managers,

TLH&W, and DEO. The region utilizes a card tracking system which requires a

signature from the issuer and recipient of a support service such as a

merchandise card. All support services are documented in the appropriate MIS.

Card reconciliations are done by the RWB to ensure proper tracking.

5. Describe safeguards the region has in place to discourage fraud or

attempted fraud among program staff?

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The region‘s service provider requires completion of annual Compliance training.

This includes the requirement to report suspected, attempted, or actual fraud to

management or the Compliance Action Hotline. Included in the trainings are

explanations of disciplinary and criminal actions taken when fraud is proven.

6. What’s the process for reporting program staff for fraud, attempted fraud or

suspected fraud?

The RWB service provider has contracted with an independent company to offer

a Compliance Action Hotline. This hotline offers the opportunity to staff to report

suspected, attempted, or actual compliance violations which include fraud. Staff

are instructed of their responsibility and duty to report such concerns.

Individual Developmental Accounts (V.G.8.c.6)(a and b)

1. Describe the region’s Individual Development Account (IDA) program;

specifically identify the population served under the IDA project.

Polk Works does not operate an IDA program.

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SUPPLEMENTAL NUTRITION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

Employment and Training (SNAP E&T)

For the SNAP E&T section, please provide short narratives responding to the

following informational requests. If the RWB has a local operating procedure that

meets all required elements of the section, the RWB may attach the document and

simply refer to the local operating procedure. If the RWB does not implement a SNAP

E&T program, indicate ―does not operate a SNAP E&T program.‖ Please refer to the

recently approved SNAP E&T Program State Plan as a reference to assist in the

preparation of the local plan. If a local policy exists which addresses any of the items

below, refer to that local policy. Include it as an attachment to the local plan.

1. Describe the local staffing (case management) model used to serve SNAP

E&T participants.

Polk Works has one full-time Career Specialist who serves SNAP customers in

the One-Stop Career Centers. This is based on the 50:1 ratio.

2. Describe the local procedures for contacting participants after the referral

has been received from DCF through the overnight interface (FLORIDA to

OSST Interface). Include the timeframe involved and how this process is

documented.

The Snap E&T Career Specialist mails a letter to customers within 10 days after

the DCF referral and the completion of the SNAP E&T on-line orientation. A case

note is entered into the OSST system to document the date the letter was

mailed.

3. Describe procedures for notifying the participants of their rights and

opportunities while participating in the SNAP E&T Program. Include

procedures for providing information on the Grievance process.

Participants will receive and sign the Rights and Opportunities Acknowledgement

and Grievance forms during their initial One-Stop Career Center visit. These

forms are reviewed with the Career Specialist to ensure awareness and

understanding. Signed copies will be placed in the customer‘s SNAP E&T case

file.

4. What is the local approach for providing orientation and assessment in the

SNAP E&T program? Include a description of assessment tools that are

used and when assessment is conducted.

Customers may complete orientation and assessment on-line or at the One-Stop.

For those customers who do not complete the on-line Assessment, they

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complete the SNAP interest skills questionnaire at the One-Stop. A new

assessment is completed each time a customer is assigned an activity. These

assessments may include the Standard on-line State Assessment, TABE, Career

Scope, and Skill Gap Analysis in (EFM).

Attached: Local Operating Procedure ~ One-on-One Orientation & Assessment

5. Describe the local approach to integrate services for SNAP E&T clients

with WIA, Wagner-Peyser, and other workforce programs available through

the One-Stop Career Center.

SNAP customers are given a One Stop overview to include all services available

at the One Stop. In addition, WIA and WTP orientations include an informative

slide in each of their orientations, presenting information on the SNAP program.

FACT sheets outlining services are available in each One-Stop location. SNAP

participants are encouraged to enroll in other programs WIA and Wagner-Peyser.

6. Provide a definition for Job Search and describe the local approach for

determining when to assign a program volunteer to Job Search.

Job Search is defined as the search for an employment opportunity or better

employment opportunity through various methods. These include completing

applications, submitting resumes, job referrals, and job readiness workshops.

Job search is assigned based on an analysis of the participant‘s assessment.

Attached: Local Operating Procedure ~ Job Search Activity

7. Provide a definition for Job Search Training and describe the local

approach for determining when to assign a program volunteer to Job

Search Training.

Job search training is define as participation in workshops that may include

topics such as: resume writing, interview skills, appropriate dress, financial

literacy, communication and team work, career explorations, and computer

basics. Job search training is assigned based on an analysis of the participant‘s

assessment.

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8. Describe the local approach for developing Work Experience sites,

including the procedure for securing signed worksite agreements and job

descriptions.

Staff contact worksites and generate a worksite agreement. A list of sites is

available for customers who need assistance in choosing a site. The instruction

in the automated direction will provide the customer with guidance in printing a

work site agreement and returning the agreement in 10 working days. Hard

copies of work site agreements, which include specific job descriptions, are on

file at the One Stops.

9. Describe the procedures for verifying and documenting participant

engagement in Work Experience.

Work Experience Time Sheets documenting days and hours worked must be

signed by the worksite supervisor. Volunteer Customers are required to turn in

original signed time sheets monthly which are verified for accuracy and validity

by the Career Specialist. Customers are counseled on permissible hours and

notations are made in the case file. Hours of participation not to exceed the

permissible amount are entered on the JPR screen. Detailed case notes

document the information regarding participation and verification.

10. How will the region ensure that hours recorded for engagement in Work

Experience do not exceed the permissible hours based on the worksite

calculation.

The formula (FS/higher of state/federal minimum wage), is utilized by all SNAP

staff to assign, schedule, and update the new month‘s JPR‘s in OSST. Periodic

monitoring is completed by the Program Manager, internal/external auditor,

and/or designated staff to ensure local processes is followed, with staff counseling,

correction and/or disciplinary action as needed. RWB SNAP staff attends

periodic training held by the Department of Economic Opportunities or by the

Program Manager. All JPR and participation requirements are reviewed to

ensure staff‘s understanding and retention.

11. Describe the local approach for providing the Self-Initiated Work

Experience (SIWE) component. Include a description of the process and

criteria given to participants for developing their own worksites and

procedures for obtaining signed contracts with the worksites and job

descriptions.

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Program participants who are receiving food stamps can connect directly with an

employer to gain employability skills or job related skills through actual work

experience or training at a worksite. This is not a paid work opportunity. Many

individuals have previously established relationships with employers or

community-based agencies and can begin volunteering with the entity on their

own. Often, self-initiated outreach to employers and volunteer experiences lead

to employment because the employer sees the individual as motivated and hardworking.

If a participant indicates that he/she is already volunteering with a notfor-profit

entity, the individual will be informed that such volunteering may be

considered a part of this program. The instruction in the automated direction will

provide the customer with guidance in printing the work site agreement and

returning the agreement in 10 working days. Hard copies of work site

agreements which include detailed job descriptions are on hand at both One

Stops.

12. Describe the procedures for verifying and documenting participant

engagement in SIWE, including how the region will ensure that hours

recorded for engagement in this component do not exceed the permissible

hours each month based on the worksite calculation.

Participants are engaged in a Self-Initiated Work Experience component based

on their benefit calculation. An individual cannot be mandated to do more hours

at a worksite during the month than their food stamp benefits for the month of

participation divided by the higher of the Federal/State minimum wage divided by

the number of individuals in the food stamp assistance group. Work Experience

Time Sheets documenting days and hours worked must be signed by the

worksite representative. Volunteer Customers are required to turn in original

signed time sheets monthly. Customers are counseled on the permissible hours

and notations are made in the case file. Hours of participation not to exceed the

permissible amount are entered on the JPR screen. Detailed Case notes

document the information regarding participation and verification. Polk Works,

DEO, and TLH&W will conduct ongoing system reviews, desk reviews and onsite

quality assurance reviews, and provides continuous written feedback to the

Provider‘s management with recommendations for improvement to ensure hours

recorded for engagement in SIWE do not exceed permissible hours. The provider

will also conduct ongoing system reviews, desk reviews and on-site quality

assurance reviews.

13. What is the local approach for providing the Vocational Training

component?

Vocational training is offered in the career centers, through community partners

and through training providers. Training providers are approved by the RWBs

and/or WFI and posted on an Eligible Training Provider List (ETPL). This option

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 112


is available to participants that have proven through assessments that additional

training is needed in order to secure meaningful employment. When possible, the

customer is dually enrolled in WIA.

14. Describe the process for developing customized training sites and

agreements for participants enrolled in SNAP E&T.

Customers are allowed to select their own site based on their experience and

skills. Staff may also contact sites and develop those based on customer skills,

experience and background. Customers and/or staff may take the Worksite

agreement and Job Description to the site for completion. Completed

agreements are kept on file at the One Stop.

15. What is the local approach for providing the Education component (when it

is assigned, documentation, etc)?

Based on the on-line process, customers are allowed to select Education as an

activity. Customers who are assessed by Career Specialist may be referred to

Education activities which provides SNAP E&T participants with the opportunity

to improve basic skills through Adult Basic Education (ABE), basic skills through

General Equivalency Diploma (GED) activities, basic literacy, the ability to speak

and read English via English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL)

programs, the ability to use computers etc. Education activity will be assigned if it

is proven through the above mentioned assessments that it is needed in order to

secure meaningful employment.

16. Describe the local criteria for using 100 percent funds.

Polk Works will use 100 percent funds when a customer has been enrolled in the

SNAP E&T volunteer program and expresses a desire to attend training. The

customer will have to demonstrate they are not eligible for any funds under other

program such as WIA, or Pell grant. The customer will be required to take the

TABE, Career Scope, and complete Career Exploration to determine the type of

training the customer will attend.

17. Describe the local approach for assigning program volunteers to the WIA

and/or TAA component, including documenting enrollment into WIA/TAA

program(s) and when to assign to this component.

An initial assessment will be conducted for the SNAP E&T volunteer to determine

whether additional services are needed. All RWB staff is trained and able to

provide information to any ―in need‖ customer or formally refer suitable

candidates to the SNAP E&T Volunteer program. Likewise the SNAP E&T staff

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will refer their customers to any and all alternate program or services within the

One-Stop such as WIA and TAA. Additionally, a One-Stop Orientation is

available online which explains in detail the availability of all programs offered

within the One Stop. Enrollment in by a SNAP volunteer in WIA, TAA, or any

other program within the One Stop will be documented in EFM and/or OSST.

Attached: Local Operating Procedure ~ WIA Dual Enrollment

18. Describe local procedures for referring employed participants to SNAP E&T

activities.

A SNAP E&T program participant will be referred to employment and/or retention

services if they have secured employment, provided the necessary employment

verification documentation, and are still receiving food stamps. Program

participants may receive up to 90 days of reimbursement assistance with

transportation. The participant also must have participated in program activities

before getting the job. Depending on funding availability, services may also

include clothing, tools, or equipment needed for a job, test fees for work, etc.

Reimbursements for these services will be made through the same Food Stamp

reimbursement system from which transportation reimbursements are made.

Staff will include notes related to any of the above reimbursements in the case

notes in the OSST system.

19. What are the local procedures for informing food stamp recipients who are

not referred by DCF via the FLORIDA/OSST system interface of their ability

to volunteer for the SNAP E&T program?

On average, 100 letters are mailed weekly to customers. These Outreach letters

are mailed to customers who have the 593 or authorization to use the system,

but no automatic letter was mailed. Phone calls are also made to these

customers, explaining the SNAP E & T program. SNAP is presented as an

available option during all One Stop orientations. Information on the SNAP E&T

program is provided at community partner meetings, correctional institutes,

housing authorities and Head Start programs.

The Employ Florida Marketplace website is also used for EFM blasts to

registered job seekers receiving food stamps.

20. Describe the local process for monitoring the SNAP E&T Program. Include

information about reports or tools that are used to monitor the program.

The FSR report from OSST is used as a tool to select cases for monitoring.

SNAP E&T cases that are on this report are checked to ensure correct

assignment to activity, hours of participation, documentation of transportation and

correctness of FSR‘s. The caseload report in OSST is another tool used to

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monitor the number of participants for any given month as well as the activity

assigned. The SNAP E&T Checklist mirrors the state monitoring tool and is used

for internal monitoring purposes.

21. Describe the local procedures for requesting Food Stamp Reimbursements

(FSRs) for eligible participants. Include procedures for ensuring that

volunteers who request transportation reimbursements are engaged in

SNAP E&T components.

FSR‘s are requested for travel reimbursement for eligible participants by the

SNAP Career Specialist. The FLORIDA screens, IQEL and IQFS, are checked to

ensure the participants is eligible to receive the FSR payment. FSR‘s for up to

$20 are requested once a receipt or attestation is received and participation has

been verified and documented for that month. FSR‘s for $10 are requested for

participants who come to the office for the in person Orientation and

Assessment. FSR‘s are not issued unless proof of participation in a SNAP E&T

component is provided.

22. Describe local procedures for linking participants to other services and

funding streams as appropriate.

During the initial appointment and at each activity thereafter, the Career

Specialist will advise the participant of other One-Stop services.

23. Describe local procedures for ensuring that SNAP E&T Program staff is

represented and proper documentation is provided at the DCF

Administrative Fair Hearings.

The SNAP E&T Program is a volunteer program therefore no fair hearing is

necessary.

24. Describe local efforts relative to developing jobs for SNAP Program

participants, assisting them with securing unsubsidized employment, and

helping them become self-sufficient.

The Program Manager in coordination with Business Services will work to

develop opportunities for SNAP participants. The Career Specialist refers SNAP

Program participants to recruiting events; and provides job referral and

placement assistance.

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WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT PROGRAMS (WIA)

Provide a comprehensive overview of Adult, Dislocated Worker and Youth program

activities. Indicate how these activities will be structured to support the Governor‘s

strategic objectives as well as other imperatives outlined in the State Plan. Discuss how

the RWB will provide training services to the following groups in response to the

established needs of local employers:











dislocated workers

displaced homemakers

migrants seasonal farmworkers

women

older individuals

people with limited English-speaking proficiency

individuals training for non-traditional employment

veterans

public assistance recipients

people with disabilities

A. Definitions

Please define the terms listed below. They should be descriptive and verifiable.

Terms such as ―working poor,‖ ―at-risk,‖ ―dysfunctional,‖ etc. should be defined by

the board. Operating procedures should further identify criteria that apply to each

definition as well as appropriate verification sources

1. Provide the local definition for youth requiring additional assistance to

complete an educational program or to secure and hold employment.

An eligible youth facing serious barriers to employment is an individual

between the ages 14-21 (including a youth with a disability) who requires

additional assistance to complete an educational program, or to secure and

hold employment.

At least one of the following must apply when documenting the need for

additional assistance:








Individual has below average grades or test scores;

One or more grade levels below their age appropriate grade level;

Exceptional Special Education status;

Substance abuse;

Youth involved in the Juvenile Justice system;

Individual has poor work history (to include no work history);

Individual has been terminated from a job in the last six calendar months

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 116


In order to document the need for additional assistance, the following can be

used to document the need for addition assistance:






An active job search form reflecting a minimum of at least 10 documented

job searches which clearly shows the customer has been actively job

searching.

Documentation from UTC records for wage history.

Proof of termination of employment.

A letter from the school guidance counselor indicating that the student

would need additional assistance in order to successfully graduate from

high school.

Self-attestation (will only be accepted if the service provider has

exhausted all other efforts to document the case).

2. Provide the definition for locally identified ―additional barriers to

employment‖ for youth who are not low income as referenced in 20 CFR

664.220.

Up to five percent (5%) of the WIA youth applicants may be served without

meeting the low income guidelines as referenced in 20 CFR 664.220.

Additional barriers to employment will be required such as:













youth with a disability;

attending an alternative school,

who‘s education level is below grade level,

who has never held a job,

who has been fired from a job within the six month prior to application,

who has worked less than three consecutive months in the same job

during the last six months,

who currently has a job below an adequate level for self-sufficiency (i.e.

underemployed, unemployment),

who requires additional assistance to complete an educational program,

who is enrolled in a special education,

students maintaining less than a "C' average,

persons with Limited English Proficiency

who has demonstrated a minimum of 10 job searches which resulted in no

hire

3. Provide the local definition of a substantial layoff for determining

dislocated worker status, as referenced in WIA section 101(9)(B)(i).

A substantial lay-off shall be defined as the lay-off of at least 50 or more

workers with a company at the local level.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 117


4. Provide the local definition for ―underemployed‖ for determining

displaced homemaker status, as referenced in WIA section 101(10).

A displaced homemaker and others who fall under the definition of

underemployed are defined in the Region as: A person who is not selfsufficient

and may be a first-time jobseeker or is employed, but not in the

capacity of expertise and preferment, whether in terms of compensation,

hours or level of skill and experience. While not technically unemployed, the

underemployed may be working in employment not commensurate with the

individual‘s demonstrated level of educational attainment. This will be verified

and documented by Career Specialists by reviewing education history, career

assessments, through interviews with the customer, paystubs, UC records,

and self-attestation financial records for the self-employed. Case notes will

be entered in the State‘s MIS and copies of all documentation it will be placed

in the file.

5. Provide the local definition for ―income maintenance‖ for dislocated

workers who take an income maintenance job (wages may not exceed

self-sufficiency standard for dislocated workers).

Income maintenance for dislocated workers is defined as a dislocated worker

who has taken on employment that is less than 80% of the wage from the job

of dislocation or less than the LLSIL self-sufficient wage, whichever is greater.

Example: A Dislocated Worker was earning $30,000 annually and is laid-off

and accepts employment with another employer earning $18,000 annually.

Because the individual‘s income is less than $24,000 annually the individual

is eligible to receive WIA Dislocated Worker Training services.

B. Eligible Training Providers

The State has compiled a list of all eligible providers based on the lists

submitted by the RWBs. This list and the performance and cost information that

accompanies the eligible provider identification will be disseminated to the onestop

systems throughout the State. At a minimum, the data and information

specified in Section 122(d)(1) and (2)(A)(i)(iii) for each program on the eligible

list must be made available to customers in a customer friendly format at every

One-Stop Career Center throughout the one-stop delivery system.

1. Please describe the process for maintaining/updating an eligible

training provider list. Attach a copy of the local eligible training provider

list and applicable operation procedures.

Providers desiring to do business with the Region are requested to submit an

application to be added to the Local Approved Vendor‘s List. The Career

Council reviews and approves the vendor‘s application. The full board, in

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 118


turn, votes on the Career Council‘s recommendation to either add or deny

vendor inclusion on the vendor list.

The state Workforce Board‗s policy allows the Region to add providers that

have been previously approved in our region to the list of eligible providers.

The Region will use their local experience with these providers to evaluate

performance.

Attached: Program Policies: Selection & Approval Process for ITA

Providers.

Region 17 – 2012-2013 Eligible Training Provider List

Career Tech, LLC

Central Florida Institute - Orlando Campus

Central Insurance School, Inc.

Certification Associates, Inc. d/b/a Center for Technology Training

Concorde Career Institute

Erwin Technical Center

Everest University

Florida Technical College

Fortis Institute

Fortis College - Tampa

J&J Healthcare Institute, Inc.

Keiser University (Lakeland Campus)

LaSalle Computer Learning Center

National Business Institute of Florida, Inc. dba NBI Truck Driver Training

New Horizons Computer Learning Center of Gulf Coast

Orlando Academy School of Health Professions

Polk County School Board-Adult Education

Polk State College

Ridge Career Center

Roadmaster Driver School - Tampa

Rose Training Institute

South Florida Community College

Southern Technical College

Tampa Area Electrical Joint Apprenticeship Committee

The Center for Allied Health & Nursing Education

Traviss Technical Center

Truck Driver Institute, Inc. - Orlando & Tampa

Ultimate Medical Academy

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 119


2. Describe continuous education and training of eligible service providers

through the local system that ensures the providers meet the

employment needs of local employers and participants.

The Service Providers are required to provide an individual training plan for

staff. The training plans identify the areas in which each staff need training to

improve their skills and knowledge. New staff is required to have the Tier 1

certification completed within 6 months of their hire date. Polk Works provides

semi-annual and annual training for frontline staff in addition to any statewide

or program specific training they receive.

3. Assessment of the strengths and opportunities of service providers

available in the local one-stop service system

Service providers are required to demonstrate continuous improvement in all

programs. Continuous improvement will be measured through evaluations

regarding the level of services provided to the customer. This will include an

evaluation initiated by the Region and will be taken at various times

throughout the year. Continuous improvement will center around the

usefulness of monthly reports provided to Contract Managers. Additionally,

surveying employers and job seekers will determine levels of customer

satisfaction relative to services rendered. This feedback provides the Region

with critical information toward continuous improvement. Satisfaction surveys

are available in the facilities. In addition employers are surveyed after their

participation in job fairs and other events, and feedback is used in planning

future events.

4. Describe the process used to identify local targeted occupations for

providing occupational skills training; ensure the local process is

consistent with State Targeted Occupation List Process as described

here: http://www.labormarketinfo.com/wec/0910/wec_tolprocess.pdf.

(III.D.)

Once the Preliminary Regional Targeted Occupations Web Application is

published with the latest statewide and regional occupational employment

projections, Polk Works' staff conducts an analysis of the ―Supply/Demand

Report‖ for WIA Training Analysis published by DEO/LMI, and the Help

Wanted Online Reports (HWOL) published by DEO/LMI. The analysis

considers the occupations in demand (HWOL) to determine the variances,

consistencies or inconsistencies over time. Major occupational groups with

the most online ads, total job openings, as well as the top advertised

occupations in the Region are also considered.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 120


The highest advertised occupations are compared with the Preliminary

Targeted Occupations List (TOL). Those occupations that are listed in decline

and that have an oversupply of trained workers are first to be considered for

recommending not to offer training for these occupations. The Polk Works‘

Career Council regularly reviews the ―Supply/Demand Report‖ for WIA

Training Analysis and the TOL as well as Training provider performance

information to make decisions concerning local targeted occupations for

providing occupational skills training. The Career Council makes

recommendations to the Polk Works Board to suspend training for those

occupations for which there is an oversupply of trained workers. In making its

recommendations the Council also considers the Annual Percent Growth data

as included with the annual Regional Targeted Occupations List.

C. Individual Training Accounts

The Governor‘s vision in Florida for increasing training access and

opportunities for individuals consists of a state policy requiring that fifty percent

(50%) of the funds for adults and dislocated workers be allocated to ITA unless

the local board obtains a waiver from WFI – click ITA Policy for more

information. Attach a copy of the local operating procedures for the following

processes:

1. Provide a description of the locally developed ITA system including any

limitation (e.g., the dollar amount and/or duration of the ITA) to be

placed on the ITA in accordance with 20 CFR 663.440, 663.420, 663.430

An ITA may be utilized if an occupation is clearly linked to a priority industry

that is in local demand and appears in the Region‘s Targeted Occupations

List (TOL).

Polk Works has established a maximum educational scholarship cost that will

be paid for each occupational/program training area. This cost structure takes

into account the institutional costs (including tuition, lab fees, registration fees,

etc.), books, materials, other costs, such as uniforms, physicals, certification

fees, licensing fees, etc. There is a cap on the Educational Scholarship per

occupation. The maximum program cost cap is $7,500 based on type of

training. Anything above that cap is the responsibility of the client.

Attached: Program Policies: Individual Training Account System

2. Provide a description of local policy and/or procedures established to

ensure that any exceptions to the use of ITAs are consistent with the

exceptions contained in WIA. (V.G.11.b.2)

All occupational skills training must be conducted with an approved training

vendor and must utilize ITAs. Exceptions are only allowed for training

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 121


conducted by employers to include On-the-Job Training, Customized

Training, and Employed-Worker Training.

3. Provide a description of the local policy and procedures to

competitively award grants and contracts for activities and services not

funded with ITAs.( V.G.11.b.3)

Customized Training, On-the-Job Training (OJT), and Employed Worker

Training (EWT) are provided on a case–by-case basis as requested by

employers. The Business Competitiveness Council must approve all training

grants valued over $50,000.

Attached: Program Policies: Customized Training, CETA Awards

D. Training Employed Workers

1. Provide a description of the process for upgrading the skills of existing

workers in the region. The description should include the following:



those industries in the region whose workers will be targeted

specifically for skills upgrade training and how those industries were

identified;

processes to address the needs of individuals working part-time and

full-time, the working poor, and across all earning levels (V.G.15.A.3).

The Central Florida Development Council conducted an industry cluster

assessment. As a result, Region 17 has targeted Life Sciences & Medical

Services, Business & Financial Services, Manufacturing, Logistics & Supply

Chain Management, Research, Engineering and High Tech and Agritechnology

and Agri-business as potential high skill/high wage growth

industries in need of training. In addition, the Current and Projected

Workforce Demand Industry data provided by NAICS indicates that significant

growth is expected in the Construction; Manufacturing; Trade, Transportation

and Utilities; Professional and Business Services; and Education and Health

Services. Employed Worker Training opportunities will be offered to eligible

WIA participants and promoted to employers through the Business Services.

Individuals selected for training opportunities may be full-time or part-time

workers, or underemployed participants. All participants complete skill

assessments to properly determine the training needs. Individual career plans

are developed to guide the participant toward employment and career goals.

Polk Works routinely seeks other funding sources to assist employers in

meeting the needs of the workforce including assisting them with WFI grant

applications.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 122


2. Please explain the local process to determine an employed worker

eligibility to receive WIA training service, take into account the minimum

eligibility criteria outlined in 20 CFR 663.220 and 230.

The Business Service Representative will provide the contact information of

the candidate(s) to the Career Specialist. The employed worker must be at or

below the wage of 200% of poverty for a family of three as shown by USDOL

LLSIL and must be in need of training to avoid lay-off to upgrade his/her skill

level to increase their wage within the company. The Career Specialist will

contact the potential employee and/or employer to arrange an eligibility intake

and inform him/her of the necessary documentation he/she will need to

provide which includes:

Driver‘s license with current address, if address is not valid on driver‘s

license, other documentation must be provided which includes current

address.

Signed social security card – proof of citizenship/legal work documentation

DD214 if they have served in the military

Birth Certificate or proof of birth date

Current pay stub or income record from employer

After the intake process is completed the Career Specialist will notify the

Business Services Unit that the customer has been determined eligible and

data entered into the MIS system.

E. Local Level Layoff Aversion Incumbent Worker Training (LAIWT)

Workforce Florida has received a Waiver Modification from the USDOL that

would allow RWBs to use up to 20% of their dislocated worker formula funds to

provide incumbent worker training. The USDOL has provided definitions and

guidance on the appropriate use of this waiver in TEGLs 26-09 and 30-09.

1. Describe the process to be used by the RWB to provide LAIWT through

the use of the waiver. If the RWB does not intend to use the LAIWT

program, please indicate: ―Does not operate a LAIWT program.‖

Polk Works does not operate a LAIWT program.

2. Describe the RWBs layoff aversion strategy, including a description of

how the potential for layoff aversion will be determined, such as:




The likelihood of future layoffs without training

The business circumstances surrounding the probable layoff and

how the training will prevent or reduce the magnitude of the layoff

The specific skills to be provided to the workers that will help avert

the layoff

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 123


How employers will be identified, and how local partners will

contribute to this process

Targeted industries and economic sectors

Polk Works does not operate a LAIWT program

3. Describe how the RWB will operationalize ―Layoff Aversion‖ as defined

in TEGL 30-09.

Polk Works does not operate a LAIWT program

4. Describe how the RWB will determine the eligibility of workers to

participate in LAIWT. (See TEGL 26-09, 7.A.ii.)

Polk Works does not operate a LAIWT program

5. Describe how the skills training will contribute either to the maintenance

of employment or increased employment security. (See TEGL 26-09,

7.A.iii.)

Polk Works does not operate a LAIWT program

Youth Programs

The Strengthening Youth Partnerships will continue to provide all RWBs with the

framework necessary to carry out the strategic imperatives articulated in the federal

Shared Youth Vision. Florida has recognized the following youth program goals as

being critical to implementing the federal vision throughout the state workforce

investment system:

To build consensus for a policy on the preparation of youth for employment in

targeted demand occupations

To develop regional alliances among workforce, education, state agencies

serving the most at-risk youth, economic development, housing, faith and

community-based organizations, and transportation stakeholders to better

meet the needs of businesses within a region by creating a pipeline of youth

who have the hard and soft skills to enter targeted demand occupations

To create a blueprint for state-level stakeholders to facilitate the creation and

growth of state/regional/local alliances

To provide a forum for local, regional, and state level stakeholders to

exchange information and ideas on new initiatives, cross-agency planning,

promising practices and data-based decision making

1. Based on the evaluation of Local Labor Market Need outlined in Section

1., describe and assess the type and availability of employment and

training related youth activities in the region, including an identification

of successful providers of such activities. [Regulations Section

661.350(a) (7); WIA Section 118(b)(6)].

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 124


The majority of the employment opportunities for youth pay less than the selfsufficiency

wage, such as retail, hospitality, agricultural, and manufacturing

fields. Therefore our region has devised a strategy to work with the Economic

Development, and PCSB to strategize and implement strategic plans, to draw

new businesses to the area, that will provide opportunities for youth to follow

a career pathway through employment opportunities and education. Postsecondary

educational opportunities are limited to Traviss Career Center,

Ridge Career Center, and Polk State College, along with some private

educational organizations. Other educational opportunities for training or

training assistance are with the Department of Education, Career Academies,

and possibly in house work experience. These options are in financial reach

of most of the youth due to being provided at no direct cost to the youth, or

being an option with financial aid and assistance through the WIA program.

2. Describe the current and planned recruitment strategies to expand and

market services to out-of-school youth. Describe current and planned

retention strategies to ensure seamless, year-round services to out-ofschool

youth despite possible gaps caused by expiration of provider

contracts.

Recruitment strategies to engage out-of-school youth are conducted on a

year-round basis. Partnerships with the high schools, alternative schools and

youth service groups, and the One-Stop service provider yield many referrals

of eligible youth to the youth program for services. Strong word-of-mouth

among former participants also assists with recruitment. Polk Works

continues its commitment of serving out-of-school youth setting its youth

contract to serve 70% out of school and 30% in school youth.

The Board ensures a seamless delivery system by branding its youth

program as the Young Leaders program and promoting the program as a

year-round option for youth. Regardless of the operator, that is procured

every three years, the program name and the community recognition remains

3. Describe the current and planned strategies to expand and market

services to Younger Youth. and In-school Youth in order to foster a

relationship that allows them access to one-stop services throughout

their academic and professional careers.

The Young Leaders program provides program information to all high school

guidance counselors and staff via the district office, all youth programs

serving teens, and other One Stop partner programs, to market services for

younger youth and in-school youth. Workshops on career interest

inventories, job searching, basic EFM use, and dress for success are also

provided to partner youth programs as a method to introduce One Stop

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 125


services, including the youth program, which may assist in their academic and

professional careers. All youth program sites are located in accessible areas

to in-school youth, with one location being at a high school that allows Polk

Works to provide services to in-school youth who cannot easily access

services.

4. Describe service strategies (current and planned) for assuring that

youth found deficient in basic reading/writing and math, remediate

before post-testing.

Polk Works requires that basic skill remediation is provided to all enrolled

youth and outlines the requirement and the strategies for remediation in the

provider‘s contract; specifically in the statement of work.

Youth are provided remediation through various methods such as tutoring

and study skills training. Staff takes into account the various ways people

learn – visual, auditory, and hands-on – to ensure each participant can

become engaged in the learning process. This is accomplished by using

textbooks (Steck Vaughn‘s GED book or Contemporary‘s Complete GED),

interactive, internet-based software (Skills Tutor), FCAT/SAT/ACT preparation

materials, and group discussions to engage youth. Skills Tutor, which aligns

with the Florida Sunshine Standards, is a comprehensive resource for

diagnosing and remediating students‘ basis skills and offers five types of

activities: pretests, posttests, quizzes, basic skills lessons and thinking

lessons. Skills Tutor is youth-friendly, animated, and provides verbal and

visual explanation of how problems are solved. Staff also uses current youth

culture (music, movies, magazines) as a tool to engage youth in reading,

language arts and writing.

All youth who are basic skills deficient will be required to take a post-test to

track progression and demonstrate gains in reading and/or math.

5. Describe the assessment strategy and the procedure for ensuring posttesting

occurs within one year of the first youth service or prior to exit.

As part of the Young Leaders‘ Orientation process, every youth is made

aware of the full array of available services and resources in their

communities, including, but not limited to all workforce funded programming.

With the cooperation of each youth, an individual service strategy that

documents the youth‘s strengths, barriers, services needed to support their

individual progress, goals (basic, occupational, work readiness goal) for the

individual youth, and what activities will be undertaken to support the youth‘s

progress. During this process youth will also take a TABE test to assess

academic levels in reading and math. This will also help to inform the ISS and

what steps must be taken in respect to basic skills remediation or enrichment.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 126


Once enrolled in the program, youth will be assessed in various intervals to

gauge progress and achievement. By monitoring progression, staff is able to

track progress and have the progress and post-testing scores within the first

year of when a service was provided or prior to exit. The ISS will continue to

be updated to document progress as it is ―a living document.‖ Orientation and

Assessment is the key to outlining a plan to help participants improve basic

skills, make satisfactory progress in school, and ultimately graduate.

6. Describe service strategies (current and planned) for increasing the

number of participants who earn their high school diploma or GED after

enrolling in the Youth program.

The Polk Works Young Leaders program works with high school students to

ensure they have completed all the graduation requirements required to

graduate. This is accomplished by establishing regular, scheduled activities

with a dedicated career coach whose goal is to keep youth engaged and

working on skills.

Polk Works Young Leaders will increase its partnership with Polk County

School Board‘s (PCSB) Fresh Start program that will allow out-of-school

youth to re-engage in academic skills and in-school youth who are behind in

credits earn their high school diploma via online and instructor led PennFoster

curriculum. This proved to be a successful model during the 11-12 program

year, and Polk Works will look to expand efforts in this area.

Polk Works Young Leaders staff are also assigned to the technical career

education centers to support youth in the PCSB Teen Parent Programs

achieve their diplomas by providing mentoring, coaching, and tutoring

services.

In order to assist more youth obtain their high school diploma, Polk Works will

explore options with the PCSB Adult Education programs to enroll and

support more youth in GED preparation courses. Increased partnership with

PCSB will allow Polk Works to assist more youth obtain their high school

diplomas.

7. Describe assessment and service strategies (current and planned) for

placing youth into employment or enrolling youth in post-secondary

education and/or advanced training/occupational skills (including

apprenticeship, apprenticeship preparation, OJT, work readiness skills

training, etc.

Youth meet with a career coach to assess their skills, weaknesses, program

needs, and appropriateness/eligibility for the program. All youth are assessed

for basic skills, but further assessment is determined based on their individual

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 127


Youth Council

service strategy (ISS) and career interest. Staff will utilize two, free resources

to assist youth:

My Skills My Future: The website (http://myskillsmyfuture.org ) enables job

seekers to match their occupational skills and experience with the skills

needed in other occupations, and;

My Next Move, (http://mynextmove.dol.gov ) an online tool intended to assist

all job seekers, but may be especially useful for students, young adults and

other first-time workers as they explore potential careers. It allows users to

search by occupation, by industry and using the O*NET Interest Profiler,

which matches an individual‘s interests with suitable occupations by asking

60 questions.

These assessments of career interests and skills will assist program staff to

outline strategies with youth that target placement options – employment,

post-secondary, advanced training/occupational skills activities. If youth are

enrolled in partner programs and additional assessments are available, staff

will work with those agencies to obtain documentation and consider the

information when planning activities and/or strategies.

The youth career coach and the youth will complete an ISS that outlines what

strategies, goals, activities will be put in place to move the youth to the

agreed upon outcomes once assessments are completed. Activities for

youth fall into one of four areas – basic skills, work readiness, occupational

skills, and positive lifestyle choices which include leadership and decisionmaking.

All the activities are focused on youth performance outcomes.

Additionally, youth can earn incentives for completing activities that represent

foundation skills to moving toward placement. Program completion

incentives are also aligned to outcomes (entering employment, postsecondary

education, advanced training, military) required for the youth

program.

Provide information about the composition and membership of the Youth Council and its

function within the local board. Please provide a list of the Youth Council members and

indicate whether the members are voting or nonvoting members of the local board.

1. Describe the membership of the local Youth Council and the process

used to determine the appointments. Identify the responsibilities of this

council. Specify if this includes recommending eligible youth service

providers and conducting oversight with respect to eligible providers of

youth activities. A current Youth Council membership list is a required

attachment of the final Local Plan.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 128


The Youth Development Council is a subgroup of the Board. Nominations are

solicited from partner organizations. The Youth Development Council includes

a. Education personnel, employers, and representatives of human service

agencies with special interest or expertise in youth policy

b. Juvenile justice agency

c. Local law enforcement agency

d. Local public housing authority

e. Parents of eligible youth seeking assistance

f. Individuals including former participants and representatives of

organizations that have experience relating to youth activities

The Youth Development Council is responsible for:










Developing and recommending the delivery of service strategies that

address the need to prepare young people and others new to the

workforce for employment or transition to additional education beyond

high school.

Developing the portion of the local plan relating to eligible youth.

Recommending eligible providers of youth activities to be awarded

grants or contracts on a competitive basis.

Conducting oversight of the eligible providers of youth activities.

Overseeing the Board‘s teenage pregnancy prevention and teen

parent initiatives; and it monitors performance of all youth development

strategies.

Assisting with new board member recruitment.

Identifying Board capacity for resource development and uses such

capacity to build revenue.

Working with other community partners to solicit grant opportunities as

a means of increasing overall workforce development services in Polk

County.

Seeking out and pursuing entrepreneurial opportunities for the Board.

Attached: Attachment #3 - Board & Youth Council Members List

2. Provide information on the process used by the Youth Council to

assess the type and availability of youth activities in the local workforce

region and how the information gathered as part of this process is made

available to the One-Stop and Youth Service Providers to ensure that

youth clients have access to a wide array of services in the area.

Through Council Education the partners provide the expertise and present

information on their various programs to the Youth Council. The Council also

utilizes networking and research of local resources. Through this process, the

Youth Council seeks to expand current services, and collaborate with faith

based organizations, parents, educational institutions, and other groups to

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 129


strategically leverage resources to better serve community youth. Part of this

process includes a focus on expanding and tailoring academic and

employment opportunities to youth with barriers to employment and

education. Information gained is shared with One- Stop youth staffs via

Contract Manager or youth staff present for the meeting.

3. Describe the process for the competitive selection of eligible providers

of youth activities. Specifically, discuss the role of the Youth Council in

making recommendations to the board regarding the final decision to

award grants or contracts and/or provide direct youth services by the

board.

Goods and/or services necessary for the conduct of Polk Works‘ business

and to implement and operate programs, including the process for selecting

service providers for all workforce programs, are procured in accordance with

Polk Works‘ adopted Procurement Policies and Procedures, which

incorporates the methods of procurement provided for under 2 CFR 215.

Service providers for all workforce programs, including WIA Youth are

procured through formal requests for proposals. The following is excerpted

from Polk Works‘ procurement policies and procedures:

BIDS AND FORMAL REQUESTS FOR PROPOSALS—Purchases of

$50,000.00 and above shall be publicly advertised and a formal request for

bids, proposals, or quotations shall be issued. Where the goods or services

are for the purpose of implementing grant activities, and not for the day to day

operations of the agency except as provided herein for On-the Job Training,

GED Training and Employed/Incumbent Worker Training, the decision to let

an RFP or a bid shall be made by the governing board, which is, the Polk

County Workforce Development Board, Inc., (PWDB) for their approval.

a. Previous proposers as well as entities, which have asked to be included

on the Polk Works proposer/bid list for various types of goods and

services, shall be notified that Polk Works is seeking service providers.

The requestor shall be responsible for maintaining the proposer/bid lists.

b. Legal notices will be posted on the Polk Works website and shall appear

in at least one newspaper, of general circulation (the Ledger, Polk County

Democrat, Newschief, etc.) for three (3) consecutive days whenever a

formal bid/proposal is let. Potential bidders will be given at least ten (10)

working days to respond to the advertisement if time permits.

c. Polk Works will accept proposals based upon the terms and conditions of

the RFP.

d. Proposals / bids submitted are received by Polk Works' staff and stamped

with date and time of receipt.

e. Proposal/bid evaluation criteria are published with the RFP or bid. The

rating criteria include but are not limited to the following elements:

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 130


aa.

ab.

ac.

ad.

ae.

Proposer‘s financial capability. Proposer‘s books and records are

kept in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.

Reasonableness of the cost

Proposer‘s ability to meet performance goals.

Proposer‘s record of past performance in the delivery of goods or

services.

Proposer‘s experience.

f. Polk Works may conduct pre-award surveys where indicated.

g. RFPs and bids shall be reviewed by staff for responsiveness. Non

responsive proposers are notified in accordance with the RFP or bid.

h. The President & CEO shall assemble a review committee to rate and

comprised of Youth Council members to rank proposals and bids. They

may on occasion consist of members of the community with a special

applicable expertise.

i. Proposals to serve Youth must be presented to the Youth Council which

shall make recommendations as to funding in some cases to the Polk

Works Board of Directors.

j. Other proposals/bids for program services must generally be presented to

the appropriate Committee/Council who provides oversight for that good

or service. The committee then makes recommendations for funding and

in some cases selection to the Polk Works Executive Committee for

selection and approval.

k. Recommendations from the PWDB committees are submitted for

consideration to the Polk Works Board of Directors which makes the final

selection and approval determinations.

4. Provide a list of youth services providers thus selected.

Henkels & McCoy Inc. is the primary youth service provider.

5. Describe how the Youth Council will share ―best practices‖ with

Workforce Florida and the Department of Economic Opportunity so that

the State may disseminate that information throughout the workforce

system.

The Youth Council will prepare, with staff assistance, white papers describing

best practices to share with WFI and DEO staff. Best practices will also be

shared with DEO staff during compliance and training visits.

6. Describe how the four strategic goals outlined in the Youth Program

section above will be implemented for youth in the region.


To build consensus for a policy on the preparation of youth for

employment in targeted demand occupations

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 131


The region will build consensus for a policy on the preparation of youth for

employment in targeted demand occupations through identifying the

needs of employers in the region, and assessing the training opportunities

available to fill those employment needs. Upon reviewing the data, Board

staff will work with the Polk County School Board Workforce Education

Director, private schools, and local colleges to identify and address the

gaps in training programs that will prepare youth to enter key occupational

fields. Board staff will serve as the intermediary between business and

education/training partners to identify and implement action steps to

achieve this goal.

To develop regional alliances among workforce, education, state

agencies serving the most at-risk youth, economic development,

housing, faith and community-based organizations, and

transportation stakeholders to better meet the needs of businesses

within a region by creating a pipeline of youth who have the hard and

soft skills to enter targeted demand occupations

Recognizing the benefit and need for regional alliances to better meet the

needs of business while serving as a pipeline for trained youth to enter the

targeted demand occupations, the Board will work to leverage resources

by developing and maintaining key partnership with the Polk County

School Board, youth serving agencies, health department offices,

Department of Juvenile Justice, representatives of targeted industries,

key chambers of commerce, trade associations; and economic

development entities, public and private educational institutions,

community-based organizations; organized labor; the area‘s local elected

officials; and state agencies, including Department of Children and

Families. Board staff will also reach out to post-secondary institutions to

identify training programs that are tied to in-demand occupations identified

by industry.

Board staff will work with key stakeholders to develop recommendations

for youth policy on the preparation of youth for employment in targeted

demand occupations and present them to the Board‘s Youth Council for

discussion and consideration. These recommendations may include

policy changes, programmatic areas of focus (such as STEM-related

programming, services for at-risk minority males), recommendations on

implementing strategies that increase the engagement of the private

sector in WIA youth programming.

Board staff will also look to provide a forum for the exchange of

information and ideas to increase the number of high school graduates

within the county and include community leaders, school officials, youth,

parents, and other stakeholders. Dialogue will also include discussion on

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 132


strategies to increase the number of youth who obtain a living wage job,

and encourage more interaction between service agencies and

educational institutions to help first-time workers enter and advance in the

workplace.



To create a blueprint for state-level stakeholders to facilitate the

creation and growth of state/regional/local alliances

In conjunction with the Local Youth Council, Workforce Boards, youth

providers the Region will work with state-level stakeholders to facilitate the

creation and growth of state/regional/local alliances. This will be

accomplished through meetings for networking, brainstorming, and

developing a blueprint for the region. The Region will utilize this blueprint

to enhance, improve, and advocate for local youth services.

To provide a forum for local, regional, and state level stakeholders to

exchange information and ideas on new initiatives, cross-agency

planning, promising practices and data-based decision making:

The Region will provide a forum that will consist of local, regional, and

state level stakeholders to exchange information and ideas on new

initiatives, cross-agency planning, promising practices and data-based

decision making:

Some of the areas of discussion may include:

• Coordination of youth activities in the Region

• Implementing areas of the local plan related to eligible youth

• Providing training that expands basic workplace skills and the

experience of young people and first-time working young adults.

• Promoting successful entry into the workforce through education

and workplace experience that leads to self-sufficiency and career

advancement. The components of the strategy may include efforts

that enlist business, education and community support for students

to achieve long-term career goals, ensuring that young people and

young adults entering the workforce for the first time have the

academic and occupational skills required to succeed in the

workplace.

• Networking with educators, employers, and representatives of

human services agencies such as juvenile justice, youth with

disabilities and local law enforcement agencies, department of

children and families; member who represent local public housing

authorities; parents of eligible youth seeking assistance under

subtitle B of title I of WIA; individuals, including former participants,

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 133


and members who represent organizations that have experience

relating to youth activities; and members who represent Job Corps.

• Exposing youth to post-secondary education options

• Addressing barriers to education and employment

7. Describe the procedures that will be implemented to target and provide

workforce services to youth with the following barriers: aged out of

foster care; youthful offenders; out-of-school youth; basic skills

deficient, etc.

Aged Out of Foster Care: The primary goals of aged out of foster care

services are to:

• Customize tutoring and academic support

• Provide counseling and assistance with social service referrals

• Provide child care referrals as needed

• Provide transportation assistance as needed

• Provide employability skills training/life skills training to prepare youth

for job referrals

• Provide access to leadership skills training and mentoring activities as

appropriate

• Act as liaison/advocate for those youth who are involved in the justice /

child welfare system as appropriate

• Provide substance abuse treatment referral as appropriate

• Provide referrals to resources in the community (e.g., mentoring,

mental health services, and parenting classes)

In order to serve this population adequately, Polk Works provides procedures

for referring youth in the foster care system to the in school and out-of-school

youth service partners to ensure that these youth are offered services through

the above WIA sponsored programs. Strengthening the communication

between Polk Works, youth partners and the foster care system to ensure

that foster care youth obtain the appropriate services that they require to

become self-sufficient is the key component for successful entry into the

workforce. That is further emphasized by working to strengthen existing

transition initiatives of the youth program‘s delivery system through maximum

cooperation between the youth partners and to share information and

services that are necessary to best serve the aged out of foster care youth

target group and help them achieve their goal of self-sufficiency through

employment and career advancement.

Youth Offenders: The primary goals of youth offender services are to:

• Provide assistance to youth offenders to attain long term employment

at wage levels that will prevent future dependency and to break the

cycle of crime and juvenile delinquency that contributes to recidivism

and non-productive activities

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 134


• Develop and implement a service delivery system that links with youth

offenders, to education and employment.

• Collaboration of local agencies to encourage the delivery of

comprehensive and non-duplicative services to youthful offenders and

to develop better community strategies to reduce delinquent behavior

among youth

• Encourage strong partnerships to fill the gaps in the community‘s

existing interventions dealing with youth offenders

• To reconnect these young people with caring adults and positive

activities in the community.

• Youthful offenders will be provided quality youth services through

training customized to their special needs

Out-of-School Youth: This target group is defined as youth who are eligible for

the out-of-school youth program‘s full array of services, have either dropped

out-of-school, or have graduated from high school and are in need of further

guidance with job assistance, higher educational goals or other similar

opportunities that requires assistance through such benefits as educational

scholarships or youth training vouchers.

The primary services provided to of out-of-school youth services are:

• Receive objective and comprehensive assessment services,

• Receive counseling about options to enter postsecondary educational

institutions, GED preparation and testing, vocational training, military

information,

• Provided job referrals and employment counseling, tutoring, mentoring,

leadership development, internships/work experience, support

services, work readiness skills training,

• Provide Job Corps information/referrals as appropriate and set-up

contact with the local Job Corps Admission Counselor

The out-of-school youth program also provides directions in the decision

making process of options that are available to the youth, offering guidance to

other options that may benefit the youth, such as referrals to community

organizations specializing in youth programs/services, presentations by youth

development specialists/job developers whose priority is to ensure a good

employment match for each participating youth, tutoring and other academic

support that may be needed to assist the youth participant in making

appropriate choices.

Basic Skills Deficient:

Polk Works defines an individual who has English reading, writing computing

skills or solve problems at or below the ninth grade level on a generally

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 135


accepted standardized test or a comparable score on a criterion referenced

test as basic skills deficient.

• Standardized tests are utilized when determining basic skill levels, Test

of Adult Basic Education (TABE) Test, and the test must be the same

for the pre-testing and post-testing.

• Pre and post-testing of the participant will determine the youth‘s level

of improvement in basic skills.

Polk Works requires that all youth participants are administered the

TABE Test in order to better tailor the service delivery to each specific

youth enrolled in the program.

• For youth who are basic skills deficient, a youth development activity

that includes individual or group academic support services,

specialized instructions or schooling are provided as part of the service

delivery for youth to improve in advancing to the next grade level and

moving toward an educational program and/or employment.

Other At-Risk Youth Populations:

Other at-risk youth populations such as pregnant or parenting, homeless,

runaways, migrant and seasonal farm workers, youth who require additional

assistance to complete an educational program or secure/hold employment

all receive the same services that are outlined above, as well as specialized

services, where applicable.

To serve at-risk youth populations, Polk Works in and out-of-school programs

provide youth with comprehensive assessment and guidance through the

decision-making processes of weighing all the available options; unbiased

presentation of information on alternative options; the guidance of youth

development career advisors and counselors whose only priority is ensuring

an appropriate career strategy for each participating youth; and the tutoring

and other academic support they may need to gain access to gainful

employment.

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VETERANS PROGRAM

1. How will the State Veterans Program Plan of SERVICE will be implemented in

the One-Stop Career Center(s)?

At the time of sign-in with the receptionist, customers are requested to identify their

military status. Veterans and their families have priority of service in the Resource

Room and for all programs operated by the Region and are immediately seen by

VETS staff. Should no VETS staff be available, then the first available staff person is

required to provide services. All personnel, not just VETS, are required to see

Veterans as their first priority. The VETS are fully trained and attend all annual and

on-going training offered by the State and Federal programs. Veterans are offered

the full range of One-Stop services to include job counseling, job search/referral,

resume services, as well as specialized assistance on Veterans rights and benefits

as well as assistance and interface with the Veteran‘s Administration (VA) programs.

The veterans program falls under the supervision of the One-Stop Service Provider

and the DEO OMC II. The LVER staff promotes the veterans program with One-Stop

Career Center partners and to the employer community, and may provide training,

reports, and analysis to management as requested.

2. How outreach and organizational visits for veterans are conducted?

The LVER communicates with employers in the Region including those who have

federal contracts. LVER staff provides employers with an understanding of Federal

regulations regarding Veteran‘s service Preference. The Region‘s LVER activities

and services include, but are not limited to the following services for Veterans:

conducts marketing to employers on behalf of veteran job seekers and the Career

Center, conducts job search workshops, provides job development and job referrals,

provides career and vocational guidance, provides Labor Market Information, refers

Veterans to supportive or remedial services, refers veterans to job focused and

outcome driven training, certification, etc., conducts Veterans' Program training for

all One-Stop Associates, maintains an updated Federal Contractor List, advocates

for veterans by contacting employers, unions, apprenticeship programs,

Veterans/Community Based Organizations, etc., provides assistance to the National

Guard Unit with Military Occupational Skills (MOS) translation to ONET codes, and

informs Veterans of all other services and training programs at the One-Stop. The

LVER notifies veterans and members of the National Guard of their Priority of

Service and availability of services/training, including WIA training programs. The

Veterans Staff has an ongoing relationship with the local VFW Posts who provide

leads for disabled and other Veterans in need.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 137


3. How the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program specialists and Local Veterans

Employment Representatives staff are fulfilling their required roles and

responsibilities as indicated in the State Veterans plan at:

http://www.floridajobs.org/pdg/vets/Fy07StVetsSrvPlan080706.pdf; how

technical assistance and best practices can be provided to improve services

to veterans.

Upon their initial entry into the One-Stop Career Center, veterans and eligible

persons with barriers to employment will be identified using the needs-based

approach and then directed to the DVOP staff for assessment and intensive case

management services. One-Stop partners and service providers will be trained to

identify veterans and covered persons with barriers to employment and, in most

instances, immediately refer these veterans to the DVOP staff for services.

DVOP staff will provide a wide range of workforce services to veterans and eligible

persons with their primary focus being on identifying veterans requiring intensive

services. DVOP staff will facilitate services through the case management approach

to veterans and eligible persons with barriers to employment and with special

workforce needs. These services include but are not limited to the following:

• Assessment, including a documented plan of service (Individual Employment

Plan) ;

• Counseling and career/vocational guidance;

• Referral of veterans to supportive or remedial services;

• Referral of veterans to job focused and outcome-driven training, certification,

etc.

• Job development services;

• Development of VA funded Special Employer Incentive and On-the-Job

training slots for VR&E participants;

• Refer veterans to employment opportunities found in EFM;

• Maintenance of an up-to-date Network Guide for veteran customers and One-

Stop associates;

• Conduct outreach to locate veterans for intensive services and market

services for veterans in VR&E, HVRP, VWIP, WIA, etc.; and

• Participate in TAP activities for transitioning service members and their

spouses.

Staff are considered key players and team participants in One-Stop business

development activities and employer marketing efforts, developing jobs for the One-

Stop Career Center, marketing One-Stop services to employers, planning,

conducting and participating in employer job fairs for veterans, facilitating and

maintaining employer recruitments, and assisting with employer recruiting

agreements. Staff will contact Military Base Family Service/Support Centers;

Facilitate and participate in employer mass recruitments for the new and expanding

firms. All of these activities translate into positive benefits and productivity for the

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 138


One-Stop Career Centers and subsequently result in the development of

employment opportunities for veterans.

In addition, the LVER provides oversight and guidance to the Veterans Program

outcomes and to the DVOP staff in the delivery of veteran services. The LVER also

provides the data and drafts the quarterly management report, trains One-Stop staff

and partners on the veterans program, and helps (as noted above) with the

marketing of the veterans program for the One-Stop Career Centers.

Attached:

Local Operating Procedures ~ Veterans and Eligible Persons

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 139


ASSURANCES

SECTION III

Assurances require RWBs to affirm that key obligations in the law have been met. A

number of plan elements that were previously a part of the narrative are now among the

assurances and are vitally important as a commitment to upholding the requirements in

the law and regulations. The assurances may form a basis for local Board-monitoring of

these requirements and for DEO’s monitoring of the regions. Many of the assurances

affect the required process for developing local Workforce Services Plans, such as the

requirements for stakeholder consultation, public comment and various policies which

RWBs must have in place.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 140


Assurances

The following section delineates the formal assurances related to statutory

compliance, program integration, universal access, customer choice, reporting,

veterans‘ priority of service, performance, quality assurance and other program and

administrative elements to which each Regional Workforce Investment Board

agrees, ensuring the systemic foundation of the Florida workforce investment

system. By signing the Local Workforce Services Plan the Board and CEO certify

that the operators and partners of the local One-Stop Career Center delivery system

will adhere to these assurances and comply with all Federal, State, County and local

statutes, regulations and policies relevant to the delivery of services within the

context and meaning of the local plan.

1. GOVERNANCE The Board agrees to perform in accordance with governing federal

and state law; any and all requirements set forth in the Grantee-Subgrantee

Agreement (and relevant attachments); Florida, Inc., policies, and other agreements

in which the Board has received a Notice of Fund Availability.

2. DISABILITY ACT

The certifies compliance with the section 504 of Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the

American Disabilities Act of 1990

3. CUSTOMER CHOICE

The Board assures that local One-Stop Career Center System Operators and

partners will adhere to the principles of customer choice as outlined in provisions of

the WIA.

4. SUNSHINE PROVISIONS

The Board certifies, that it will adhere to provisions of the Sunshine Act as described

in the WIA and Florida Statute.

5. FINANCIAL RECORDKEEPING, COST PRINCIPLES AND COST ALLOCATION

The Board agrees to maintain all financial records, and to develop and follow cost

allocation procedures that are in compliance with GAAP, Federal Cost Principles, all

applicable OMB Circulars, and policies issued by the State of Florida. These

include, but are not limited to, the following OMB Circulars:

A-21, Cost Principles for Educational Institutions (5/10/2004); relocated to

2 CFR, Part 220

A-87, Cost Principles for State and Local Governments (5/10/2004);

relocated to 2 CFR, Part 225

A-122, Cost Principles for Non-Profit Organizations (5/10/2004); relocated

to 2 CFR, Part 230

A-102, Grants and Cooperative Agreements with State and Local

Governments (10/7/94, amended 8/29/97)

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 141


A-110, Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Agreements

with Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other Non-Profit

Organizations (11/19/93, amended 9/30/99); relocated to 2 CFR, Part 215

A-133, Audits of States, Local Governments, and Non-Profit Organizations

(6/24/97, Revised 6/27/2003 and 6/27/2007)

USDOL Compliance Supplement (complement to A-133)

6. FOREIGN LABOR CERTIFICATION - AGRICULTURAL & NON-AGRICULTURAL

The Board assures that the local One-Stop Career Center (OSCC) Operators (in

accordance with all relevant state policies and procedures, and the requirements set

forth at 20 CFR Parts 655 and 656) will assist the DEO to determine the availability

of U.S. workers and the potential adverse effect on wages and working conditions

that the admission of foreign workers might have on similarly employed U.S.

workers. With regards to H-2B Program activities under the Foreign Labor

Certification Program, the Board assures that OSCCs will facilitate the referral of

qualified and eligible (meaning that the individual is not an unauthorized alien with

respect to that employment) job seekers and to assist employers throughout the

recruitment process. For both visa programs, the Board also agrees that OSCCs

may be required to generate, process and conduct follow-up activities on H-2A / B

related job orders in accordance with the requirements set forth at 20 CFR 655 &

656 of federal regulations.

7. FUNCTIONAL GUIDANCE OF DEO STAFF

The Board assures that One-Stop Career Center Operators and their management

and supervisory employees will provide a level of functional guidance to DEO staff

assigned to the local area‘s One-Stop Career Center(s) sufficient to assure an

integrated and seamless delivery of services. Non-state agency managers and

supervisors may provide functional guidance to DEO staff assigned to provide

services in the local career center with the exercise of supervisory authority for all

personnel matters, including compensation, personnel actions, terms and conditions

of employment, performance appraisals, and accountability, retained by DEO

supervision and guidance of DEO staff assigned to the One-Stop Career Center(s)

will be carried out by the respective parties with an expectation of mutual

cooperation by the Operator, DEO and all partner organizations, and a focus on

achieving the performance goals established for the One-Stop Career Center

System.

8. FUNDS OF LAST RESORT

The Board assures that One-Stop Career Center System Operators shall take

sufficient actions to assure that WIA programs will not be charged when other

assistance is available. Local operators shall be responsible for ensuring the filing of

applications for Pell Grant or Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant (SEOG)

assistance or any other assistance available for each participant enrolled in a Pell

Grant or SEOG approved course and upon receipt of such grant the portion received

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 142


y a training participant for the cost of tuition, fees and books shall be applied to

replace the WIA funds used to cover such costs.

If the Pell Grant is received after the termination of training paid with WIA funds, the

portion to be applied for the cost of tuition, fees and books shall be remitted to the

Polk Works Administrative Office.

No compensation shall be earned or deemed payable for services provided to a WIA

program participant to the extent that any such services are paid for, directly or

indirectly, through a Pell Grant (or Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant

(SEOG)) by Trade, or by any other source.

9. GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE POLICY

The Board assures that the local One-Stop Career Center Operators will implement

and maintain a formal complaint system consistent with State policy and Federal

regulations promulgated at 20CFR §658.400-418 and 658.500-504 and §667.600-

667.640 relevant to the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 and the Wagner-Peyser

Act, as amended.

10. HEALTH AND SAFETY

The Board agrees all services provided to participants under the programs covered

under this plan will take place in an environment where appropriate standards for

health, safety and comfort are maintained. Participants in on-the-job training

operated with WIA funds as defined in 20 CFR Part 663.700, are subject to the

same health and safety standards established under State and Federal law which

are applicable to similarly employed employees, of the same employer, who are not

participants in programs under WIA. Facilities will be adequately heated and

ventilated; with adequate toilet, rest and lunch areas; easy access to potable water;

and separate and clearly delineated smoking areas.

11. MIGRANT AND SEASONAL FARMWORKERS - MSFWs

The Board assures that the local One-Stop Career Center (OSCC) Operators will

ensure (in accordance with all relevant state policies and procedures and as

required under 20 CFR Parts 651, 653 and 658) that Migrant and Seasonal Farm

Workers (MSFWs) receive the full array of workforce development services, benefits

and protections in a non-discriminatory manner and the services provided to MSFWs

are ―qualitatively equivalent and quantitatively proportionate‖ to the services

provided to other jobseekers. OSCC will identify Migrant and Seasonal

Farmworkers (MSFWs); refer such identified customers to appropriate job openings,

training opportunities, career guidance and any other workforce investment services

as needed; conduct appropriate follow-up with employers and other applicable

service providers; and report all relevant activities through OSCC will continue to

provide service to agricultural employers and implement systems and strategies to

enhance and integrate service delivery to both MSFWs and agricultural employers.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 143


12. NEPOTISM

The Board assures that no recipient of funds covered under this plan will hire a

person in an On-The-Job Training position, administrative capacity or consultant

position funded under WIA if the individual or a member of his/her immediate family

is employed in an administrative capacity of the USDOL, DEO, the State of Florida

or the recipient. The Board agrees to inform Workforce Florida Inc. (WFI) of

potential violation of the nepotism restriction. Additionally, no individual may be

placed in a WIA employment activity if a member of that person‘s immediate family

is directly supervised by or directly supervises that individual.

13. NONDISCRIMINATION EMPLOYMENT & EQUAL OPPORTUNITY

The Board assures that the local One-Stop Career Center Operator will comply fully

with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of the following laws:

Section 188 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA), which prohibits

discrimination against all individuals in the United States on the basis of race, color,

religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, political affiliation or belief, and against

beneficiaries on the basis of either citizenship/status as a lawfully admitted

immigrant authorized to work in the United States or participation in any WIA Title I

financially assisted program or activity; Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as

amended, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color and national

origin; Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, which prohibits

discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities; The Age Discrimination

Act of 1975, as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of age; and

Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, as amended, which prohibits

discrimination on the basis of sex in educational programs. The Board also assures

that it will comply with 29 CFR Part 37 and all other regulations implementing the

laws listed above. This assurance applies to the operation of the WIA Title I

financially assisted program or activity, and to all agreements made to carry out the

WIA Title I financially assisted program or activity. The Board understands that the

United States, the State of Florida and the DEO have the right to seek judicial

enforcement of this assurance. The Board also assures that the local One-Stop

Career Center Operator will appoint an Equal Opportunity Officer to ensure

compliance with the regulatory requirements cited above.

14. NONPARTICIPATION IN SECTARIAN ACTIVITIES

The Board assures that WIA Title I funds will not be expended on the employment or

training of participants in sectarian activities. Participants must not be employed

under Title I of WIA to carry out the construction, or maintenance of any part of any

facility that is used or to be used for sectarian instruction or as a place of religious

worship. However, WIA funds may be used for the maintenance of a facility that is

not primarily or inherently devoted to sectarian instruction or religious worship if the

organization operating the facility is part of a program or activity providing services to

WIA participants.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 144


15. PERFORMANCE

The Board agrees that for purposes of this plan, performance will be measured in a

manner that is consistent with all appropriate federal and/or state statutes,

regulations, and policies.

16. POLITICAL ACTIVITIES, LOBBYING PROHIBITION

The Board assures that WIA Title I funds and none of the services provided with said

funds may be used for any partisan or non-partisan political activity or to further the

election or defeat of any candidate for public office. The Board also agrees to

comply, where applicable, with the provisions of the Hatch Act, which limits the

political activity of certain State and Local government employees, along with

contractors, subcontractors and participants funded through the use of WIA funds.

The Board shall comply with 29 CFR 93 regarding the restrictions on lobbying and

the Certification and Disclosure requirements pursuant to Section 319 of Public Law

101-12.

17. PROGRAM INTEGRATION

The Board assures that the One-Stop Career Center delivery system will fully

integrate all programs covered under this local plan into the full range of available

workforce development services.

The Board agrees that DVOP and LVER staff will be responsible for case

management of veterans' service delivery, and where feasible, provide direct

services or assist one-stop delivery system staff in the provision of priority services

for veteran customers.

The Board assures that One-Stop Career Center System Operators will coordinate

with local Rapid Response staff related to outreach, intake and registration of

workers covered by a certification under the Trade Adjustment Assistance Act.

18. QUALITY ASSURANCE (GENERAL)

The Board assures the local One-Stop Career Center Operator will carry out all

activities relevant to the provision of each program covered under this plan in

accordance with all Federal/State policies and procedures. The Board further

assures that a schedule for the monitoring of local One-Stop Career Center activities

will be developed and agreed upon in concert with the Department of Economic

Opportunity. Additionally, the Board assures that DEO shall have full access to all

One-Stop Career Center staff, records, systems, data, books, accounts,

correspondence and other documentation necessary to carry out its program

evaluation responsibilities as authorized by statute and/or regulation. The Board

also agrees that DEO, in order to effectively carry out its responsibilities, may

conduct on-site evaluation activity that is either with, or without, advance notice. The

Board also assures that local staff training relevant to the delivery of services

covered under this plan will be developed and agreed upon in concert with DEO.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 145


19. RAPID RESPONSE SERVICES

The Board assures that local One-Stop Career Center Operators and other

workforce development staff will coordinate/support Rapid Response service

delivery in accordance with all established Federal and State policies and

procedures.

20. REPORTING

The Board assures that the local One-Stop Career Center delivery system (in

accordance with all relevant Federal and State policies and procedures) will collect

data on customer characteristics, service/activity participation, and outcomes

consistent with the requirements of the State‘s management information system so

as to ensure the integrity of all federal and state reporting requirements.

21. TAA PROGRAM COORDINATION

The Board assures the local TAA Coordinator at the regional level is a merit

employee and that local One-Stop Career Center Operators will provide timely and

appropriate services for any customer wishing to apply for benefits under TAA. The

Board also assures that local One-Stop Career Center Operators will conform to all

policies and regulations of the program. The Board also assures that local One-Stop

Career Center Operators will cooperate with any hearings requirements related to

TAA services. 20 CFR Part 618

22. STATUTORY COMPLIANCE

The Board agrees to comply with the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, the

Wagner-Peyser Act, as amended, the Trade Act of 1974, as amended, the Trade

Reform Act of 2002, the Trade and Globalization Adjustment Assistance Act of 2009,

the Jobs for Veterans Act and all related statutory requirements and implementing

regulations. The Board also agrees to comply with policies issued by DEO related to

the administration, delivery, and performance of all programs covered by this local

plan.

23. UI INFORMATION (ACCESS TO)

The Board assures that local One-Stop Career Center Operators will use any

information received from the UI system related to claimants solely for the purpose

of providing reemployment services to UI claimants. The Board further assures that

all information on UI claimants received by the One-Stop Career Center Operators

will be used in a manner that is consistent with state and federal confidentiality

statutes and policies.

24. UNIONIZATION AND ANTI-UNIONIZATION

The Board assures that no funds covered by this plan shall in any way be used to

either promote or oppose unionization.

25. UNIVERSAL ACCESS

The Board assures that the local One-Stop Career Center delivery system [as

described in 20 CFR 662.100(b) of the Workforce Investment Act and in accordance

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 146


with all relevant state policies and procedures] will provide services to all customers

consistent with the principles of universal access. The Board also assures that core

and applicable intensive services, including staff-assisted services, will be provided

in at least one physical career center in the workforce investment area.

The Board assures that LVER and/or DVOP staff assigned to the local One-Stop

Career Centers, consistent with the principle of universal access, will also provide

outreach services to veterans at Service Delivery Points (SDPs) such as Veterans

Administration Hospitals, veterans‘ shelters and military installations for which no

LVER or DVOP is assigned. The Board also assures that DVOP and LVER staff will

also conduct outreach to employers, community agencies, veterans‘ organizations,

etc. and that they will share information gained from these contacts with staff of the

One-Stop Career Centers and SDPs.

26. VETERANS PRIORITY OF SERVICE

The Board agrees that One-Stop Career Center Operators will assure priority of

services for veterans and other eligible persons (under the Federal umbrella

designation of ―covered persons‖ 20 CFR Part 1010.110 RIN 1293-AA15) for all

employment and training services funded with Federal resources. The Board also

assures that it will encourage and promote the provision of maximum employment

and training opportunities to veterans by all service program providers participating

in the local workforce investment system. To promote informed choice for veteran

customers, the Board agrees that One-Stop Career Center System Operators will

provide information at the point of program access that advises covered persons of

the priority of service and the advantages of registration to access special programs

and services for veterans and the availability of DVOP or LVER staff to assist with

these veteran services and with employment issues. .

Federal Contractors and Federal Agencies will be provided with recruitment

assistance in accordance with their obligation for Affirmative Action and veterans‘

preference requirements pursuant to 38 U.S.C., Chapter 42.

The Board agrees that LVER and DVOP staff will provide training and technical

assistance to One-Stop Career Center staff relative to Federal employment

opportunities for veterans, the Federal Contractor Job Listing Program and the

customer complaint process as it relates to veterans.

The Board agrees that under this plan LVER and DVOP staff can receive functional

guidance from the One-Stop Operator. However, compensation, personnel actions

and terms and conditions of employment, including performance appraisals and

accountability of merit-staff employees will remain under the authority of DEO.

The Board will demonstrate through policy, procedure and action that veterans

receive priority of service for all programs funded by DOL sources; and that no local

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 147


policy shall restrict services to veterans regardless of residency or other local

constraints.

27. WORK OPPORTUNITY TAX CREDIT

The Board assures that the local One-Stop Career Center Operators will assist in

determining the eligibility of interested customers as members of targeted groups;

and assist interested customers and employers to complete related documentation

including IRS Form 8850 Work Opportunity Credit Pre-screening Notice and

Certification Request, and DOL Form ETA-9061 (Individual Characteristics Form) or

DOL Form ETA-9062 (Conditional Certification). Issuance of final certifications will

remain a central administrative responsibility of DEO. There are no reporting

requirements applicable to this section.

28. WORKER PROFILING PROGRAM and REEMPLOYMENT SERVICES

The Board assures that local One-Stop Career Center Operators will continue to

provide reemployment services to a sub-set of individuals who are enrolled in

reemployment services (RES) to assist in accelerating their return to work. Board

further assures that the local One-Stop Career Center operator(s) will collect data on

claimant service/activity participation, outcomes and results, including conformance

with the work search plan activities.

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 148


ATTACHMENTS

(ADMINISTRATIVE)

The following attachments are included:

Attachment #1: Summary of Plan Comments

Attachment #2: Inter-local Agreement

Attachment #3: Board & Youth Council Members List

Attachment #4: Board Bylaws

Attachment #5: Fiscal Agent Design/Administrative Entity/One -Stop Operator

Attachment #6: Official Signatures

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 149


ATTACHMENTS

(LOCAL OPERATING

PROCEDURES)

The following LOPs are included:

Local Operating Procedure: Card Issuance

Local Operating Procedure: On-the-Job Training

Local Operating Procedure: Customized Training

Local Operating Procedure: Community Service Work Experience

Local Operating Procedure: Providing Re-employment Services to UC

Customers

Local Operating Procedure: REACT

Local Operating Procedure: Work Registration

Local Operating Procedure: Developing IRPs and ARPs

Local Operating Procedure: Assignment of Hours

Local Operating Procedure: Job Search

Local Operating Procedure: Good Cause

Local Operating Procedure: Medical Deferral

Local Operating Procedure: One-on-One Orientation and Assessment

Local Operating Procedure: Job Search Activity

Local Operating Procedure: WIA Dual Enrollment

Local Operating Procedure: Veterans and Eligible Persons

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 150


Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 151


ATTACHMENTS

(ONE-STOP MOUS)

The following MOUs are included:

MOU: AARP Foundation

MOU: Agricultural and Labor Program, Inc.

MOU: Auburndale Bridge

MOU: Lakeland Housing Authority

MOU: PSCB Farm Workers

MOU: Polk County Drug Court

MOU: Vocational Rehabilitation

MOU: West Bartow Front Porch

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 152


ATTACHMENTS

(PROGRAM POLICIES)

The following Program Policies are included:

Program Policy: One-Stop Seamless Service Delivery

Program Policy: Selection and Approval Process of ITA Providers

Program Policy: Individual Training Account System

Program Policy: Customized Training and CETA Awards

Polk Works – Region 17 Submitted on October 1, 2012 Page | 153

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