Annual Report - City of Portland

portlandmaine.gov

Annual Report - City of Portland

Public Health Division

Health and Human Services Department

City of Portland

Annual Report

Fiscal Year 2007-2008

PortlandMaine

Strengthening a Remarkable City

Building a Community for Life


Our Organization

Figure 1. Health and Human Services Department Organizational Chart

Health and Human Services Department

Barron Center

(Long Term Care Facility)

•Environmental

Services

•Nursing Services

•Nutrition Services

•Recreation

Activities

•Social Services

Office of Elder

Affairs

•Community Elder

Services

•Operations

Public

Health

Division

Social Services

Division

•Adult Services

•Facilities

Management

•Family Shelter

•General

Assistance

•Oxford Street

Shelter

Clinical Services

Cumberland District

Public Health Initiatives

Family Health

•Children’s Oral Health

•Maternal and Child Health

•Student Health Centers

Street/Free Clinics

•Health Care for the Homeless

Portland Community Free Clinic

Infectious Disease

•HIV Positive Health Care

•HIV and STD Prevention

•Immunization and TB testing

•Laboratory

Environmental

Health & Safety

•Cities Readiness Initiative

•Cumberland District Epidemiology

•Enivronmental Health

•Emergency Preparedness

Operations

•Finance

•Human Resources

•Marketing

Research & Data

•Data Collection and Analysis

•Public Health Informatics

Reporting

•Surveillance

Health Promotion &

Chronic Disease

Prevention

•Cancer Prevention

•District Tobacco

•Healthy Casco Bay

•Healthy Portland

•Minority Health

•Smoke-Free Housing

•Substance Abuse Prevention

City of Portland Public Health Division 2007-2008 Annual Report


Welcome to the 2007-2008 Annual Report

We are pleased to share our Fiscal Year 2007-08 Annual Report with you. The Public Health

Division employs nearly one hundred professionals, including clinicians, administrators, health

educators, and outreach workers, representing the gamut of public health essential services.

Operating out of a dozen sites throughout Portland (Figure 2), we work to identify health

needs, design targeted interventions, provide health education, link people to services, prevent

and contain infectious diseases, and ensure a healthy environment for all. As the following

pages illustrate, this past year saw the Division continuing to promote and protect the health of

all communities through various programs in Portland and, in many cases, beyond.

Welcome

However, in a time of increasing economic challenges we are seeing real reductions in

the services we can provide. Therefore, this is the most critical time in recent memory for

innovative public-private partnerships to leverage existing resources and develop new ones.

We look forward to working closer with our many partners, and forging new relationships to

ensure that the public’s health flourishes.

Already in Fiscal Year 2008-09 the Division has undergone a formal strategic planning and

restructuring process, which resulted in the creation of a new Research and Data Program

that centralizes the myriad requests for quality health data and analysis, as well as a new

Environmental Health and Safety Program that will expand our involvement in food safety and

environmental health.

I hope you find this report useful; please send all questions, comments and corrections to

phweb@portlandmaine.gov. Further information about the Division can be found on our

website at publichealth.portlandmaine.gov.

Yours in good health,

Yours in good health,

Julie Alfred Sullivan, MPH, MBA

Director, Public Health

Portland Health and Human Services

City of Portland Public Health Division 2007-2008 Annual Report 110


Where we are

Figure 2. Map of Public Health Division Locations.

1

2

3

12

11

10

4 5

7

8 9

6

2

1. Riverton Community School

1600 Forest Avenue

2. Casco Bay High School

Student Health Center

196 Allen Avenue

3. Deering High School

Student Health Center

370 Stevens Avenue

4. West School

Student Health Center

57 Douglass Street

5. King Middle School

Student Health Center

92 Deering Avenue

6. Reiche Community School

Student Health Center

166 Brackett Street

7. Healthcare for the Homeless

20 Portland Street

8. Portland High School

Student Health Center

284 Cumberland Avenue

9. City Hall

389 Congress Street

10. India Street Clinic

103 India Street

11. Healthy Maine Partnerships

134 Congress Street

12. East End Community School

Student Health Center

195 North Street

City of Portland Public Health Division 2007-2008 Annual Report


Table 1: Demographic and Health Indicators

Indicator

Gender: 1

Female

Male

Age distribution: 1

Under 5 years old

5 to 19 years old

20 to 44 years old

45 to 64 years old

65 years and older

Racial and ethnic distribution: 1

Hispanic/Latino

Non-Hispanic/Latino:

Asian and Pacific Islander

African American/Black

Native American

White

Multiracial or Other

Socio-economic indicators: 1

Median household income

Percent of those 16 years and older who are unemployed

Percent living in poverty

Percent of children living in poverty

Percent who have graduated high school by age 25

Healthcare access indicators:

Percent with no healthcare coverage 2

Number of residents per primary care physician 3

Number of residents per dentist 4

Portland

52.1%

47.9%

5.1%

15.9%

44.5%

20.6%

13.9%

Cumberland

District

51.6%

48.4%

5.8%

20.2%

37.1%

23.6%

13.3%

Maine

51.3%

48.7%

5.5%

20.8%

34.5%

24.8%

14.4%

U.S.

50.9%

49.1%

6.8%

21.8%

37.0%

22.0%

12.4%

Indicators

1.5%

3.1%

2.5%

0.4%

90.6%

1.8%

1.0%

1.4%

1.0%

0.3%

95.2%

1.1%

0.7%

0.7%

0.5%

0.5%

96.5%

1.0%

12.5%

3.7%

12.1%

0.7%

69.1%

1.8%

$35,650

3.3%

14.1%

20.0%

88.3%

$44,048

2.5%

7.9%

9.1%

90.1%

$37,240

3.1%

10.9%

13.0%

85.4%

$41,994

3.7%

12.4%

16.1%

80.4%

No data

9.8%

759

1,478

11.9%

980

2,252

14.2%

No data

No data

Maternal and child health indicators:

Percent who are females age 15 to 44 years old 1

24.9%

Percent of all pregnancies carried by women under 20 years old 5

No data

Annual infant mortality rate per 1,000 live births 5

No data

Percent of 2 year olds immunized with 4:3:1:3:3:1 series 6 No data

22.1%

5.4%

No data

No data

21.0%

8.0%

4.8

74.6%

21.9%

10.2%

6.2

75.6%

Average annual age-adjusted cancer mortality rates per 100,000 population: 7

Lung cancer

Male prostate cancer

Female breast cancer

Colorectal cancer

Percent of women 40 and older having a mammogram in the past two years 8

No data

58.9

29.3

24.6

21.6

84.9%

61.4

28.1

23.5

19.5

81.8%

54.1

26.7

25.0

18.8

76.5%

Other health indicators: 2

Percent of adults who currently smoke

Percent obese, as defined by having a body mass index of 30 or more

Percent binge drinkers (5 drinks on one occasion for men, 4 for women)

Percent ever diagnosed with asthma

Percent ever diagnosed with non-gestational diabetes

No data

15.8%

19.6%

18.9%

14.7%

5.9%

20.2%

25.2%

15.9%

15.2%

7.8%

19.8%

26.3%

15.8%

13.1%

8.0%

1

U.S. Census Bureau; “Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data.”

2

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey Data. Atlanta, Georgia: U.S. Department of Health and Human

Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2007.

3

Maine Department of Health and Human Services; Office of Data, Research, and Vital Statistics; Maine Cooperative Health Manpower Resource Inventory, Physicians,

2004.

4

Maine Department of Health and Human Services; Office of Data, Research, and Vital Statistics; Maine Cooperative Health Manpower Resource Inventory, Dentists, 2006.

5

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; National Center for Health Statistics. National Vital Statistics System. Atlanta, Georgia: U.S. Department of Health and Human

Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2005.

6

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Immunization Program. National Immunization Survey Data. Atlanta, Georgia: U.S. Department of Health and Human

Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2007.

7

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Cancer Institute. State Cancer Profiles, 2001 – 2005. Atlanta, Georgia: U.S. Department of Health and Human

Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2006.

8

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey Data. Atlanta, Georgia: U.S. Department of Health and Human

Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2006.

City of Portland Public Health Division 2007-2008 Annual Report 310


Environmental Health & Safety

4

Environmental Health & Safety

The goal of the Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) Program is to minimize the

harmful health effects and premature deaths due to infectious diseases, public health

disasters, and environmental hazards.

Environmental Health

Data analysis tells us that the rate of

enteric disease is significantly higher for

Portland at 60.2 cases per 100,000 (95%

CI 51.6 - 68.7) than the State of Maine

rate of 42.8 cases per 100,000 (95%

CI 41.2-44.4). This past summer, the

EH&S Program conducted a food safety

assessment of the City of Portland. This

assessment gave an overview of current

food safety practices in Portland; a detailed

analysis of the current restaurant

58

licensure, inspection, and complaint

12

investigation process; research on peer

practices, best practice reviews,

13

and primary

research via survey on the attitudes

30

of Portland residents towards the issue of

food safety. The results of this assessment

and follow-up work have provided a

34

roadmap for a much needed Food Safety

initiative.

A comprehensive environmental health

gap analysis is needed for the Cumberland

District before setting priorities beyond

Food Safety (i.e. water, soil, air etc.)

and this is currently underway in partnership

with the Edmund S. Muskie School

of Public Service. The gap analysis results

and recommendations will further shape

our strategic direction for environmental

health over the next 3 years.

61

Figure 3: Notifiable Disease Cases

in the Cumberland District, 2007

13

30

12

34

58

61

Lyme Disease

Giardiasis

165

Salmonellosis

Campylobacteriosis

Pertussis

Rabies, animal

Other

165

Source: Maine Center for Disease Control

and Prevention

Cumberland District

Epidemiology

The Field Epidemiologists investigate

infectious diseases in the Cumberland

District in cooperation with laboratories

and medical providers. These partners report

infectious disease cases to the Maine

CDC, which then assigns cases for investigation

based on the zip code of residence.

In 2007, the distribution of the 373

notifiable disease cases (excluding HIV

and sexually transmitted diseases) for

the Cumberland District shows that

Lyme disease and food- and waterborne

illnesses (giardiasis, salmonellosis, and

campylobacteriosis) accounted for more

than three-quarters of all notifiable disease

cases (Figure 3). Chronic hepatitis B

cases also represent a significant portion

of disease investigations, but at this time

are not disclosed at the state or federal

levels due to data integrity.

Highlights of 2007-08 investigations

for Cumberland District Epidemiology

include influenza-like illness outbreaks at

long-term care facilities, a pertussis outbreak

in the Greater Portland area, and

foodborne illness outbreaks throughout

Southern Maine.

Emergency Preparedness

Public health emergency preparedness

planning and evaluation efforts cut

across the division’s programs

and most often the City’s departments

and our community

partners. Pandemic influenza

is a very good example. While

the media attention and issuespecific

funding has waned over

the past year, H5N1 and its

potential emergence as a novel

strain capable of triggering

the next pandemic influenza

remain a very real concern to

the domestic and international

communities. The fatality rate

of H5N1 cases in Indonesia is 82%. The

EH&S staff help public health, emergency

management, and other professionals

prepare for such a disaster through planning,

training and evaluation.

Lyme Disease

Giardiasis

165

Salmonellosis

Campylobacteriosis

Pertussis

Rabies, animal

Other

Cities Readiness Initiative

The Cities Readiness Initiative (CRI)

is an emergency preparedness initiative

with collaboration between the Portland

Public Health Division, the Maine

Center for Disease Control and Prevention

and the federal Centers for Disease

Control and Prevention (CDC). CRI is

a federally funded program designed to

dispense antibiotics to 100% of the peak

daytime population in the affected region

within 48 hours of a bioterrorism event or

large-scale public health emergency. The

CRI program covers the Portland-South

Portland-Biddeford Metropolitan Statistical

Area (MSA). This MSA consists of 3

counties and over 500,000 residents.

In an emergency situation, the Governor

would request Strategic National

Stockpile assets from the federal government

and supplies would be delivered to

local Points of Dispensing (PODs). The

public would then pick up medication

from the PODs.

Highlights of preparation efforts in Fiscal

Year 2007-08 included the development

of mass dispensing training workshops

for public health employees who

would staff PODs. Over one hundred

city and state public health employees received

training this year.

City of Portland Public Health Division 2007-2008 Annual Report


Family Health

The Family Health Program targets its services to Portland students, expectant parents, new parents,

and infants. It is composed of the Student Health Centers, Maternal and Child Health Services,

and Children’s Oral Health Program.

Children’s Oral Health Program

Among Portland kindergarteners, 33%

of those screened experience dental decay

and 39% do not have a dentist. Access to

dental care continues to be a challenge

for families without insurance and for

those covered by MaineCare. Children

from low-income families in particular,

are still experiencing high rates of dental

disease. Early intervention and disease

prevention are vital to maintaining good

overall health, as poor oral health appears

to be a contributing factor in conditions

such as heart disease, lung disease, diabetes,

and adverse outcomes in pregnancy.

The Children’s Oral Health Program

(COHP) delivered preventive dental

care to over 1,500 students through the

sealant program and the Student dental

clinics, a 20% increase over the 2006-07

school year. Over three-quarters of the

children without a dentist were offered

case management services to become established

in a dental home, which is up

from one-third for the previous school

year.

The COHP recently opened a citywide

clinic in the health center at Riverton

Elementary School for children

who are not of school age, or for those

who attend a school without a schoolbased

dental clinic. To date, seventy-six

Somali Women’s Project

The COHP recently received funding from the Maine Community Foundation

to promote oral health within the Somali community. Over fifty Somali

women participated in the program, which addresses navigating the dental

health care system, oral hygiene, oral health related to overall health, and

nutrition.

children have received preventive dental

services at the clinic.

Through the help of volunteer dentists

and dental assistants, the COHP offers

free dental care to uninsured children.

Dr. Demitroula Kouzounas and her assistant,

Sue Cote, and Dr. Kathryn Horutz

and her assistant Tasia Marshall volunteer

once a month to provide treatment

for children who have no access to dental

care. Approximately $24,000 in dental

work was donated this past year.

During the 2007-08 school year, 2,114

sealants were placed on children’s teeth

through the school sealant program.

This program also saw a 20% increase in

the number of children served over the

2006-07 school year.

Family Health

Maternal and Child Health Program Table 2. Services Provided by the Maternal and

The Maternal and Child Health Program realized an increase in

both home visits and group activities for new parents and their children

this past year. (Table 2). The professional nursing staff in this program

provide support and education for parents about health issues, parenting

concerns,

growth and development

and community

resources.

Overall demand

for CPR classes,

parenting lecture

series and lead poisoning

screenings

declined somewhat

during the same

time period.

Child Health Program

Program 2006-07 2007-08 change

Weekly Participants

in Creative Kids

Group

Weekly Participants

in Play Group

29 36 +24%

42 50 +19%

Home visits 757 869 +15%

“This is a fantastic service! I appreciate the

support and care I have received from (the

nurse) over the years. Keep up the great

work!”

---A new mother on the nurse home visits.

City of Portland Public Health Division 2007-2008 Annual Report 510


Family Health

Student Health Centers

The seven Student Health Centers

offer primary healthcare, as well

as oral and mental health services.

Health centers are located at Deering

High School, Portland High

School, King Middle School, East

End Elementary School, Reiche Elementary

School, West School, and

Casco Bay High School.

Enrollment in the student health

center is voluntary, and requires

parental consent. Children with

their own doctor, dentist or mental

health provider can still utilize Student

health center services. During

the 2007-2008 school year, nearly

half of all 3,777 eligible students

were enrolled in their respective

student health center. (Table 3).

Students access the health centers

for a variety of reasons. The most

common reasons for visits are immunizations,

reproductive health,

ear, nose and throat problems,

physical exams, skin conditions,

and upper respiratory infections.

(Table 4).

Left: Members of the

Student Health Center

Outreach Teams

from Portland and

Deering High Schools

met with State Senator

Ethan Strimling

during a legislative

visit last spring.

Table 3. Enrollment and Usage of Student Health Centers, by School.

2007-2008 School

Year

Total

Students

Total Enrollees in

SHC

(% of Total Students)

Total Users of

SHC

(% of Total

Enrollees)

Deering High School 1,237 465 (37%) 194 (42%)

Portland High School 1,061 483 (45%) 215 (45%)

King Middle School 507 331 (65%) 91 (27%)

East End

Elementary School

435 263 (60%) 88 (30%)

Reiche Elementary

School

310 228 (73%) 57 (25%)

Casco Bay High

School

167 114 (68%) 63 (55%)

West School 60 57 (95%) 36 (63%)

TOTAL 3,777 1,941 (51%) 744 (38%)

Source: Student Health Center Records and Maine Department of Education.

Table 4. Top 5 reasons for Student Health Center Visits, by School, 2007-2008 School Year.

Deering High

School

1 st Reproductive

Health

Portland High

School

Reproductive

Health

King Middle

School

Physical Exams

East End

Elementary

School

Skin Conditions

Reiche

Elementary

School

Ear, Nose and

Throat Problems

Casco Bay

High

School

Reproductive

Health

West

School

Upper

Respiratory

Infections

2 nd Mental Health

Issues

Immunizations

Immunizations

Ear, Nose and

Throat Problems

Immunizations

Mental Health

Issues

Skin

Conditions

3 rd Immunizations

Mental Health

Issues

Upper

Respiratory

Infections

Immunizations Skin Conditions Skin Conditions Immunizations

4 th Skin Conditions Skin Conditions

Mental Health

Issues

Upper

Respiratory

Infections

Upper

Respiratory

Infections

Substance Use

Counseling

Ear, Nose

and Throat

Problems

5 th Upper

Respiratory

Infections

Upper Respiratory

Infections

Ear, Nose and

Throat Problems

Gastrointestinal

Problems

Physical Exams

Immunizations

Reproductive

Health

Source: Student Health Center Records.

6

City of Portland Public Health Division 2007-2008 Annual Report


Health Promotion & Chronic Disease Prevention

The Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention Program delivers services that

promote an array of health issues, including nutrition, physical activity, minority health,

substance and tobacco-free living, cancer, and heart disease.

Substance Abuse Prevention

One Maine One Portland

One Maine One Portland (OMOP) focuses on substance

free living among youth in Greater Portland. The OMOPsponsored

Reconnecting Youth (RY) Program by Portland and

Deering High Schools continued to grow and thrive in the

2007-08 school year. The Deering RY program reported the

following results:

• 84% of participants reduced their absences by at least 1/3.

• 759 additional days of school were added to participants’

education during the semester they attended RY.

OMOP collaborated with the 21 Reasons Coalition to create

a handout for all liquor license holders in Portland to highlight

Maine statutes, underage drinking statistics, and statewide

substance abuse programs. Statewide and national partners are

looking to utilize the guide as a model in their prevention efforts.

Overdose Prevention Project

The Overdose Prevention Project (OPP) provides advocacy,

education, and outreach to the Portland community through

Cancer Prevention

The Cancer Prevention Program

coordinates the Maine Breast and

Cervical Health Program for Greater

Portland.

The program pays for mammograms,

breast exams, pap smears,

pelvic exams, and some diagnostic

and follow-up services. Women are

eligible if they are a Maine resident

40 or older with limited or no health

insurance. The program currently

has 570 women enrolled in the

Greater Portland area.

positive collaborations and partnerships. In 2006 and 2007,

Portland experienced an average of 9% of the state’s drug-related

fatalities, down from 27% in 2002.

During the past year, OPP staff implemented groups and

workshops at various agencies in Greater Portland, including

the Cumberland County Jail, Preble Street Resource Center,

and Longcreek Youth Developmental Center. The annual Recovery

and Wellness Resource Fair attracted over 20 providers

and 90 consumers.

Portland Women’s Task Force

At a Portland Prevention Partners meeting in 2007, the group

identified a need for services and recovery support for young

opiate-addicted mothers in Portland’s Parkside neighborhood.

To address this need, a collaboration of area providers and nursing

staff at Maine Medical Center led to the creation of the

Portland Women’s Task Force (PWTF). With over forty members

and the help of two Community Nursing students from

the University of Southern Maine, PWTF will soon launch

a weekly social and support group, with childcare, for young

mothers in recovery.

“I love the special screening day. I can get a mammogram,

clinical breast exam and a Pap test all on the

same day. The provider I see is wonderful, spends time

with me and makes me feel comfortable and special.

The people there are all wonderful!”

In partnership with the Maine

Cancer Consortium, the Cancer Prevention

program provided 24 educational

sessions and exhibits to various

audiences in order to increase

awareness about skin and colorectal

cancer. This year, the program

reached more than 10,000 newborn

parents with the No Sun for Baby

Program. They also provided information

about the availability of cancer

screenings in the community.

Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention

City of Portland Public Health Division 2007-2008 Annual Report 710


Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention

Minority Health Program

- 2008

The Minority Health Program

(MHP), with its goal of eliminating

healthcare disparities in minority communities

in Portland, serves as a bridge

between service providers and communities

to improve access to healthcare and

social services.

Essential to the success of MHP’s activities

is the team of Community Health

Outreach Workers (CHOWs). They are

often referred to as “cultural brokers,”

meaning that they work with their respective

communities as advocates for

needed health services and facilitators

during medical appointments. The

CHOWs use innovative and culturally

appropriate methods of delivering public

health education and services (Table 5).

Without their knowledge and insight,

the healthcare system would be significantly

more difficult for new Mainers to

navigate.

Right: Somali CHOW Deqa Dhalac

educates clients on the proper use of

an inhaler to manage asthma

Table 5. Accomplishments of the Minority Health Program in Fiscal Year 2007 - 2008

Activity

Improved physical activity, increased social capital, and celebrated community assets

via a 2-day soccer tournament for the Latino community and a soccer skills clinic for

children.

Provided diabetes health education, prevention outreach, screening, and counseling at

the Multicultural Exercise for Health and Love Fair and Diabetes Screening Event.

A network of 14 Community Health Outreach Workers (CHOWs) linked community

members to primary care physicians and needed services. Two CHOWs offered services

at five partner clinics and other service agencies.

Connected community members to asthma services by maintaining the Somali and

Latino Asthma Helplines

Established a Stakeholders’ Workgroup to develop an Emergency Preparedness

plan involving racial/ethnic minority communities. Translated magnets into eight

languages and conducted a community education outreach series with refugee/

immigrant communities on emergency preparedness.

Convened a quarterly Healthcare Collaborative for health service providers to learn

about ongoing needs in minority communities and improve communication and referral

coordination.

Joined forces with the March of Dimes to distribute vitamins and folic acid education to

minority women as part of their Prematurity Prevention Campaign.

Provided training using three video documentaries on youth tobacco use prevention

among Serbo-Croatian, Somali, and Sudanese communities. Distributed translated

Smoke-Free Housing information flyers.

Source: Minority Health Program

District Tobacco Coordinator

In collaboration with the four Healthy

Maine Partnerships of the Cumberland

District, the District Tobacco Coordinator

(DTC) provides content expertise

and technical assistance through the District

on tobacco-related prevention, treatment

resources, and policy development

and implementation. The DTC offers a

broad range of support and assistance to

community organizations, municipalities,

and businesses. This work effects environmental

changes around tobacco use

and awareness, identifying and prioritizing

programs with and for populations

most at risk for tobacco–related issues.

During the last fiscal year, an initiative

Number Served

1,450 adults and 45

children

721 participants

757 patients served

14 referrals and

250 Asthma Helpline

Cards distributed

105 participants, 1,800

magnets distributed,

and 650 listeners of a

biweekly radio program

34 organizations

25,650 bottles

distributed

90 youth educated and

425 flyers distributed

was launched to enhance tobacco intervention

skills among community providers.

The District Tobacco Coordinator

provided twenty scholarships to social

service, public health and school-based

providers to attend the Tobacco Intervention

Basic Skills Training offered by

the Center for Tobacco Independence.

8

City of Portland Public Health Division 2007-2008 Annual Report


Smoke-Free Housing Coalition of Maine

The Smoke-Free Housing Coalition

of Maine is composed of over 50 public

health advocates, tenants, landlords,

property managers, and environmental

health professionals. Through education,

advocacy, and policy change, the Coalition’s

mission is to protect residents in

multi-unit housing from involuntary exposure

to secondhand smoke.

In 2008, the Coalition successfully advocated

for the City of Portland’s adoption

of a policy that would provide a

5% incentive to developers seeking City

funding for newly constructed multi-unit

properties. In a similar capacity, the Coalition

continued to work with MaineHousing’s

Qualified Allocation Plan, which led

to hundreds of new smoke-free, affordable

housing units throughout the State. The

Coalition’s efforts have also helped sixteen

(61%) of Maine’s 25 public and tribal

housing authorities to adopt a smoke-free

policy in at least one of their buildings,

including the nation’s first tribal housing

authority with a smoke-free policy.

The Coalition expanded its outreach

and education this year thanks to funding

from the Environmental Protection

Agency’s Healthy Communities Grant

Program. This funding supported the

translation of the tenant fact sheet into

Somali, Spanish, and Arabic, as well as

Healthy Portland

Healthy Portland is a community

coalition with a mission to increase

physical activity, improve nutrition, encourage

tobacco-free living, and reduce

substance use. Healthy Portland works

with schools, businesses, and community

members to promote policy and environmental

change in these focus areas.

In 2007, Healthy Portland had many accomplishments,

including:

• Expansion of bike lane infrastructure

to include over 13.5 miles of

striped bike lanes in Portland.

• Installation of over 50 bike racks in

the city and schools.

• Creation of Power Vending, a worksite

wellness tool to help businesses

adopt policies to offer healthier options

in their vending machines.

the execution of the Smoke-Free Homes

Pledge program. The Smoke-Free Homes

Pledge program gave the Coalition an opportunity

to better educate families on

the health effects of secondhand smoke

in detached or multi-unit homes. Over

1,000 Maine homes took the pledge between

November 2007 and June 2008.

The Smoke-Free Housing Coalition of

Maine is recognized as a model program

throughout the nation. The Coalition

received the Maine Public Health Association’s

Program Recognition Award

and the Maine Coalition on Smoking

or Health’s Recognition Award. The Coalition

has presented at several national

conferences and consulted with programs

throughout the world regarding the successful

implementation of smoke-free

housing messaging and campaigns. The

Coalition’s efforts have been the center

Smoke-Free Housing Authorities:

•Auburn

•Bangor

•Bath

•Brunswick

•Bar Harbor

•Brewer

•Ellsworth

•Fort Fairfield

•Mount Desert Island

Healthy Casco Bay

Healthy Casco Bay maintains the

same focus as Healthy Portland, but covers

the ten towns of Chebeague Island,

Cumberland, Falmouth, Freeport, Gray,

Long Island, New Gloucester, North

Yarmouth, Pownal, and Yarmouth. The

coalition completed a very successful inaugural

year in 2007, including the following

accomplishments:

• Promotion of the Maine Harvest

Lunch Program, with participation

from 7 of 10 towns

• Technical assistance in the creation

of 1.5 miles of new trails in Falmouth.

• Coordination of bicycle education

events serving over 650 adults and

children.

• Development of Easy Adventures, a

of several media reports in state, regional,

and national outlets.

•Old Town

•Pleasant Point Passamaquoddy

Reservation

•Sanford

•Southwest Harbor

•Tremont

•Waterville

•Westbrook

Kids from Memorial Elementary

School in New Gloucester ride a bicycle

safety skills course at a Let’s

Go! event coordinated by Healthy

Casco Bay.

senior activity program in cooperation

with the Southern Maine Area

Agency on Aging and local recreation

departments.

Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention

City of Portland Public Health Division 2007-2008 Annual Report 910


Infectious Desease

Infectious Disease

Based at 103 India Street, the Infectious Disease Program focuses on the testing, treatment,

management, and immunization of several infectious diseases.

HIV/STD

Prevention Program

The HIV/STD Prevention Program delivers

a high volume of HIV counseling, testing,

and referral services. In an attempt to reach

as broad an audience as possible, outreach,

education, and testing are provided at 17 sites

throughout Greater Portland. Incidence rates

(new cases) of STDs and HIV in the Cumberland

District are generally higher than rates

in neighboring York County, and higher than

the state as a whole. (Figure 4). Program activities

include the sexually transmitted disease

(STD) clinic, hepatitis C testing, hepatitis A

and B immunizations, and partner notification

services. Compared to the prior year, the

program provided 25% fewer STD clinic visits

and 4% fewer HIV tests (Figure 5).

The Needle Exchange Program reduces

the spread of bloodborne pathogens by offering

clean syringes and supplies in exchange

for used equipment. Clients are linked to

services offered by the STD/HIV Prevention

Program, as well as to substance abuse

treatment programs. Currently, there are 536

clients enrolled in the Needle Exchange Program,

a 29% increase over the last year. The

total number of syringes exchanged more

than doubled over the past year. (Figure 5)

These dramatic increases are likely due to the

recent amendment of state law that now allows

for an unlimited number of needles to

be exchanged at one time. The prior limit was

ten per visit.

The LABORATORY serves all clinical

services in the Public Health Division.

During fiscal year 2008, the lab

processed 11,317 specimens, an

increase of 7% over the last fiscal

year. Conditions that can be tested for

on-site include pregnancy, gonorrhea,

syphilis, urinary tract infections,

pinworm and strep throat.

Figure 4: Incidence Rates for Chlamydia, Gonorrhea and HIV

2004-2007

Cumberland

Co. York Co. Maine

Cumberland

Co. York Co. Maine

2007

2006

2005

2004

2007

2006

2005

2004

2007

2006

2005

2004

2007

2006

2005

2004

2007

2006

2005

2004

2007

2006

2005

2004

Figure 5: Services Provided by the STD/HIV Prevention and

Needle Exchange Programs Years 2005-07

12,000

10,000

8,000

6,000

4,000

Chlamydia per 1000 residents

128.5

142.0

149.9

166.3

156.9

180.7

176.7

193.1

206.3

225.1

4,713

244.0

245.5

0.0 50.0 100.0 150.0 200.0 250.0 300.0

Gonorrhea and HIV incidence per 1000 residents

3.9

3.6

3.7

4.5

4.4

3.0

4.3

3.2

6.0

7.0

6.2

6.4

6.4

8.0

9

9.6

10.7

11.1

13.4

16.8

17.1

17.7

21.1

10,290

2005

2006

2007

28.2

0.0 5.0 10.0 15.0 20.0 25.0 30.0

Gonorrhea

HIV Incidence

2,000

2,223 1,922

1,445

1,294

1,095

1,056

2,628

10

0

STD Clinic Visits HIV Tests Syringes Exchanged

City of Portland Public Health Division 2007-2008 Annual Report


Immunization Program

The Immunization and Tuberculosis

Testing Program protects local residents

against transmission of tuberculosis (TB)

and 17 vaccine-preventable diseases.

The Program provides easily accessible,

low-cost immunization and TB testing

services for persons at highest risk of

communicable disease including seniors,

international travelers, health care personnel,

public school students born outside

the US, adult students, and persons

receiving STD/HIV prevention 350services.

In 2007, 1,002 individuals received 1,973

doses of non-flu vaccines. The Program

300

collaborates with community-based organizations

and health care providers to protect

these vulnerable populations 250through

innovative strategies and partnerships.

The Program runs numerous influenza

vaccine clinics throughout Portland 200 during

the late fall. There was a slight increase

in doses administered this year compared

150

to the previous year. Coordinating the

vaccination of more than 2,400 people is

a major undertaking requiring 100 numerous

volunteer health professionals.

hepatitis B include intravenous drug users;

men who have sex with men; health care

workers; travelers to developing countries;

and other high-risk clients referred from

community-based organizations.

The number of typhoid immunizations

given serves as a proxy for the number of

comprehensive pre-travel health consults

provided by the program. Travel consultations

include health risk assessment,

immunization, malaria prevention, and

health education. The program administered

typhoid vaccine to 295 clients in

Figure 6. Number of clients receiving

selected immunizations and

tuberculosis testing, fiscal years

2005-2008

2007. 312 This number is an 18% increase

100

over last year, and is almost double the 295

number of travel clients served in 2006

50

(Figure 6). 251

0

July 05-June 06 July 06-June 07 July 07-June08

Tuberculin skin tests are provided for

individuals at risk of exposure to active

Typhoid (for International

tuberculosis 196 including refugees and recent

Travel

immigrants, health care 181students, health

Hepatitis B Series

care workers, and HIV-positive patients.

149

154

If a TB skin test is positive, which usu-14ally

Tuberculin Skin Test

indicates latent (non-communicable) 120

infection with TB, clients are referred to Source: Immunization and Tuberculosis

the Maine Medical Center TB Clinic for

Testing Program

During the past fiscal year, 120 highrisk

follow-up.

clients completed the three shot 50 hepa-

In 2007, 140 clients received a TB skin

titis B vaccine series, a 33% decrease over test and 9.3% of these tests were positive. centage of positives rose from 5.2%. The

the prior year (Figure 6). Clients considered

to be at highest risk of contracting 154 during 2006 (Figure 6), but the per-

2008 were among recent immigrants to

The number of clients tested is down from majority of positive TB skin tests in 2007-

0

July 05-June 06 July 06-June 07 July 07-June08

Portland from TB-endemic countries.

350

300

250

200

150

312

196

149

251

181

154

295

140

120

Infectious Disease

Typhoid (for International

Travel

Hepatitis B Series

Tuberculin Skin Test

Positive Health Care

Table 6: Positive Health Care Statistics

The Positive Health Care Program

provides comprehensive health services

to individuals in Maine living with HIV/

AIDS, and is the largest of its kind in

the state. It offers HIV specialty care,

psychiatry, sexually transmitted disease

(STD) counseling and testing, nutrition

advice and referrals to dental treatment.

In 2007, 172 patients were served, an

8% increase over last year (Table 6).

Also noteworthy among this patient

population are the significant proportions

who are co-infected with other

chronic conditions, including hepatitis

C, diabetes, substance abuse, and mental

health issues (Table 7).

In 2007, traditional case management

services expanded through an appointment

of a State-funded Intensive

Outreach Case Manager (IOCM). This

position is designed to assess newly diagnosed

HIV-positive individuals and

those who are lost to care, work with

them for three to six months, link them

to medical and other essential services,

and then transition them to traditional

case management. The IOCM provides

education and outreach to local health

care providers, substance abuse centers,

and correctional facilities with the aim

of increasing the number of those testing

for HIV and getting the HIV positive

population into care at the earliest possible

opportunity.

2006 2007

Number of unduplicated clients served 160 172

Number of outpatient visits/per patient 7.4 7.6

Minorities in the patient panel 17% 22%

Earning less than 300% of Federal poverty level 83% 94%

On either Mainecare or Medicare 94% 95%

Table 7: Co-Infection Proportions

July 1, 2007 - June 30, 2008

Number in panel co-infected 21%

with hepatitis C

Number in panel with diabetes 8%

Number in panel with

66%

substance abuse

Number in panel with mental 74%

health issues

Number in panel with both 57%

substance abuse and mental

health issues

City of Portland Public Health Division 2007-2008 Annual Report 11 10


Research and Data

Research and Data

The recently established Research and Data Program collects, analyzes, and reports health

data; supports other programs in their health planning, assessment, and evaluation efforts;

and provides leadership on informatics to the Division.

Surveillance

The Program continued its weekly surveillance

report to help with the early detection

of public health incidents. Data

include local rates of mortality, over-thecounter

medication sales, and employee

absenteeism.

Future plans include the addition of

data sources to the report, and collaborating

with the Maine Center for Disease

Control and Prevention to develop this

model for other parts of the state. Aiding

this goal has been the work of the

Common Ground Program, which applies

business process analysis to the work

of public health. For example, creating a

task flow analysis helps to visualize a process

by idenitfying the key steps and roles

necessary (Figure 7). Portland’s Common

Ground project, now in its second year,

has focused on the development of innovative

data systems to enhance the early

detection of public health events.

Data Collection, Analysis,

and Reporting

In addition to the Annual Report, the

Research and Data Program served as the

lead in developing the document, “Cumberland

District Health Indicators by

Municipality,” which catalogued numerous

health indicators down to the municipal

level. Corresponding fact sheets

for each town were also produced and

distributed to local stakeholders. Key to

the success of these documents was forming

relationships with colleagues to access

pertinent data. Additionally, using data

not exclusively related to health issues

(e.g., demographics, education, economics)

added value to the overall picture of

community health status.

Public Health Informatics

Informatics is a relatively new field

within public health that employs the

latest technology in order to advance

public health practice. This past year, the

Program enhanced the Division website’s

communication functionality by posting

important public health news, including

outbreaks, food recalls, and event notices.

Additionally, Health Alert Network and

CityWatch software were adopted to aid

in communicating with key partners

during a public health event. Similar to

a reverse-911 system, the programs alert

relevant groups of people (e.g., Division

staff, medical providers, school nurses)

about public health events with timely

information. Geographic Information

Systems has also been an important tool

used to map health information.

Figure 7: Task Flow Analysis of Redesigned Early Detection Surveillance System for Portland

12

City of Portland Public Health Division 2007-2008 Annual Report


Street and Free Clinics

The Public Health Division’s Street and Free Clinics operate out of two sites —the Street

Clinic (Health Care for Portland’s Homeless) at 20 Portland Street, and the Portland

Community Free Clinic at 103 India Street.

Street Clinic

The Portland Street Clinic, operated by

Health Care for the Homeless, is a Federally

Qualified Health Center that offers adult

and adolescent primary care, mental health

and substance abuse treatment, medical respite

care, dental services, case management

and outreach to the City’s most vulnerable

populations. Over the past 19 years, the

clinic has become a well-known, respected

and integral part of Portland’s safety net

services. Continued funding comes from

the Federal Health Resources and Services

Administration, other state, federal and local

grants, and MaineCare reimbursement.

In 2007, the Clinic provided services

for over 1,900 patients, a large percentage

of whom suffer from substance abuse and

mental health issues. Thus, 2007 saw an expansion

of the Behavioral Health team to

address this patient and community need.

The Behavioral Health team is comprised

of licensed alcohol and drug counselors

and mental health clinicians and is overseen

by a dually-licensed Program Coordinator.

The team’s outreach activities have

been lauded throughout the Bayside neighborhood

and the continuum of care in the

Portland area.

The Dental program continued to enhance

its services this year. The program offers

preventative care, restorative procedures

and simple oral surgery services. To address

the needs of the community, the program

runs a hygiene clinic for low-income uninsured

adults, coordinates a volunteer dental

clinic serving adults and hosts a site for a

volunteer children’s dental clinic.

The dental clinic provides services in cooperation

with the Positive Health program

to provide care for HIV-positive clients and

provide hygiene services to seniors at the

Barron Center.

As the cornerstone of the Portland Street

Clinic, the Primary Care team continues

to offer comprehensive, culturally sensitive

medical care in both the clinic setting and

at outreach events in the homeless community.

A sizable portion of the clinic’s patients

Patient Eric Sorenson with his clinical team. Left to right: Gregory Sprague, DDS;

Sharon LaPlante; Beth McKeeman; Eric Sorenson; William Price, LADC; and Peggy

Akers, Nurse Practitioner.

“The clinic provided life for me. Why? I was thrust into an environment in

which I felt cared for genuinely. I had been experiencing physical, emotional,

psychological, social, and dental deterioration to the point of a fearful no

return.

The clinic gave me hope that a better life was within reach. A turning point,

that would be a stark contrast to my previous life. Small steps each day,

toward a life foreign to me. This can happen, if I am willing and for this I feel

a deep sense of gratitude.”

--Eric Sorenson

live with chronic medical conditions.

The Primary Care team is staffed with

a Physician, Nurse Practioners, Registered

Nurses and support personnel under direction

of the Medical Director and the

Primary Care Program Coordinator. Clinicians

including Psychiatrists and other specialists

provide care in consultation with

the team.

The Primary Care team continues to focus

on prevention activities. The team has

held breast health fairs at shelters, continues

to actively inoculate adults against preventable

communicable diseases, and provides

screening and lab work as part of routine

physicals to assure that our patients are informed

of their health risks and status. The

team actively collaborates with the Maine

Center for Disease Control and the City of

Portland Infectious Disease program to assure

that preventative care and health education

continue to be a priority.

Healthcare for the Homeless works collaboratively

with many community agencies,

organizations, and universities. The

clinic maintains relationships with Mercy

Hospital, Spring Harbor, and Maine Medical

Center as well as many private practices

through the partnership with the Portland

Community Free Clinic. The clinic continues

to work with numerous agencies

throughout the City of Portland, including

Mercy Recovery, Portland Help, DHHS’

Intensive Case Management program,

Preble Street, Amistad, Inc., Milestone and

the Social Services Division of the City’s

Health and Human Service Department.

Street and Free Clinics

City of Portland Public Health Division 2007-2008 Annual Report 13 10


Street and Free Clinics

Portland Community Free Clinic

The Portland Community Free Clinic

(PCFC) is a private-public partnership of

the Public Health Division and Mercy

Hospital to provide free, comprehensive

healthcare to low-income, uninsured

adults residing in the Cumberland District.

The clinic serves adults living below

250% of Federal Poverty Guidelines, who

have no health insurance, and lack a primary

healthcare provider.

In 2007, 115 volunteer physicians,

nurse practitioners, registered nurses,

counselors, and receptionists donated

their services to 472 clients, half of whom

were new to the clinic. These visits totaled

2,125 hours of primary care services,

including annual exams; screening for

breast, cervical, and colon cancer; acute

and chronic disease management; prevention

education; and counseling. Additionally,

278 hours of specialty care were

provided, including allergy, counseling,

dermatology, endocrinology, gastroenterology,

gynecology, nutrition, orthopedics,

podiatry, psychology, and smoking cessation.

In addition to the on-site services at

103 India Street, comprehensive care for

clients is made possible by the generosity

of specialty clinics, including Casco Bay

Eye Care, Maine Eye Center, and Portland

Gastroenterology Associates.

This comprehensive approach to healthcare

benefits the clients because seven of

the ten top reasons for client visits during

2007 were for chronic conditions (Table

8). Treating chronic conditions requires

a long-term, coordinated effort among

medical providers, laboratories, ancillary

care providers, and especially the patients.

In 2007, 14% of patient encounters

were medication-related. PCFC offers

three resources to help clients obtain their

medications: access to donated sample

medications, prescription vouchers which

are paid for out of the PCFC donation

fund, and pharmaceutical company-sponsored

Prescription Assistance Programs

(PAP). This year, several local pharmacies

reduced the cost of generic medications to

$4 per month. This change has decreased

the demand of medications that need to

be provided through the assistance program

(Table 9).

Table 8. Most Common Reasons

for Client Visits Among PCFC Clients,

2007

Hypertension

Physical Exams

Depression

Back Pain

Upper Respiratory Infections

Anxiety

Diabetes

Asthma

Shoulder Pain

Skin Rash

Source: Portland Community Free Clinic

Table 9: Estimated amount spent on medications for PCFC Clients

Prescription

Assistance

Program

Samples Vouchers Total

2006 $94,184 $57, 874 $3,185 $155,243

2007 $84,952 $29,210 $2,278 $116,440

What volunteers are saying about the Free Clinic

“Volunteering at the Free Clinic has been incredibly enriching for me. I have a greater appreciation for the public

health needs of our community because of my experiences here. The patients, staff, and other volunteers are

wonderfully insightful and generous people, and a joy to work with.”

Kathleen Fairfield, MD, Medical Director

“My life has been richly blessed and this is a small way to give back to the community. The patients are always so

gracious. It always leaves you feeling good.”

- Mark Earnshaw, MD, Volunteer

“The clinic is truly a reflection of the Portland community’s generosity, compassion, and commitment to providing all

residents with comprehensive, unbiased health care.”

-Katie Addicott, NP-C, Program Coordinator

“I like working at the Portland Community Free Clinic. I appreciate its committed, compassionate staff and equally

dedicated fellow volunteers, and the ability to use my clinical skills to treat deserving, appreciative patients who

need and might not otherwise receive health care.”

- Joan Leitzer, MD, Volunteer

14

City of Portland Public Health Division 2007-2008 Annual Report


Operations

The Public Health Division operates an annual

budget of more than $6.2 million. More than

80% of funding comes from public and private

grants (Figure 8, Table 10). Currently, 96 staff

are employed by the Division (Figure 10).

The Operations Program provides technical

and professional support to the entire Public

Health Division, including:

• Management of 58 grants and contracts

• Staff credentialing

• Insurance billing

• Budget development and management

• Payroll and city credit card administration

• Travel arrangements

• Grant writing support

• Staff training on computer applications

• Providing administrative support

• Acting as a liaison to the City’s Human Resources,

Facilities, and Management Information

Systems Departments

Figure 8: Budget By Source

$506,964

$729,090

$1,788,399

Figure 9: Budget By Program

$960,181

$1,017,448

$1,206,626 $ 5

$482,524

$482,524

$355,751

$1,370,053

$355,751

$1,370,053

$99,063

$99,063

$835,497 $835,497

$1,293,539

$1,293,539

$1,772,280 $1,772,281

$1,772,281

3

4

Figure 10: Employees By Program

9

3

27

4

$

Municipal Funds

Federal Direct Grants

Federal Pass Through Grants

State Grants

Mainecare, Medicare, Private

Insurance

Other Grants

Street and Free Clinics

Street and Free Clinics

Infectious Infectious Disease

Health Promotion

Family Health

Research and Data

Operations

EH&S

EH&S

Operations

12

12

9

27

Indigent Care

Infectious Disease

Indigent Care

Infectious Health Promotion

Disease

Health Family Promotion Health Services

Family Health Services

Operations Operations

EH&S

and Data

Research and Data

Table 10. Public Health Division Annual Budget by Source and Program, Fiscal Year 2007-2008

Health

Promotion

Street and

Free Clinics

Infectious

Disease

Family

Health

EH&S

Operations

Research

and Data

State Grants $1,190,770 $0 $0 $510,000 $0 $0 $87,629

Federal Pass

Through

Grants

20

$48,845 $150,489 $459,112 $95,650 $402,729 $49,800 $0

20

21

21

Total (%)

$1,788,399

(29%)

$1,206,625

(19%)

Federal

Direct Grants

$34,627 $607,523 $375,298 $0 $0 $0 $0

$1,017,448

(16%)

Municipal

Funds

MaineCare,

Medicare, &

Private Insur.

$291,426 $0 $222,280 $67,775 $79,795 $287,471 $11,434

$29,401 $434,041 $213,349 $52,299 $0 $0 $0

Other Grants $177,211 $178,000 $23,500 $109,773 $0 $18,480 $0

Total

$1,772,280

(29%)

Source: Operations Program

$1,370,053

(22%)

$1,293,539

(21%)

$835,497

(13%)

$482,524

(8%)

$355,751

(6%)

$99,063

(2%)

$960,181

(15%)

$729,090

(12%)

$506,964

(8%)

$6,208,707

City of Portland Public Health Division 2007-2008 Annual Report

15 10


Our Staff

Environmental Health

and Safety

Abdel Moneim Ali, MD, DPath, MPH

Lisa Bondeson, MS, RN

Michael Radke, RRT

Michael Russell, MS, MEP *

Family Health

Peggy Akers, ANP

Kim Anderson

Lisa Belanger, MSN, NP *

Sandy Boland, RDH, BS

Karen Caines, FNP

Connie Collins

Pamela Dietz, MD

Shirley Heatley, RN

Lynn Holaday, RN

Connie Hughes, RN

Abigail Leavitt, RN

Ann Lemire, MD

Mary Anne MacDormand, RN

Kathy Martin, RDH, MS

Ava Moskin, MD

Patricia Patterson, MD

Phyl Rubinstein, LCSW

Asha Suldan

Mesele Tafere

Vaneesa Woodward

Barbara Yeboah, RDH

Madolynne Zimmerman, PNP

Health Promotion and Chronic

Disease Prevention

Kolawole Bankole, MD, MS

Nelida Berke

Tracy Chalecki

Nancy DeYoung

Deqa Dhalac

Kristen Dow

Amanda Edgar

Joan Ingram, MPH

Health and Human Services Administration

Douglas Gardner, Health and Human Services Director

Julie Sullivan, MPH, MBA, Public Health Director

Carrie Frost, MD, MPH, Medical Director

Linda Momborquette

Health Promotion and Chronic

Disease Prevention (continued)

Ronni Katz

Amy Olfene

Bethany Sanborn, MPH, CHES *

Toby Simon

James Tassé, PhD

Infectious Disease

Megan Evans, FNP

Susan Gilmour

Marcia Goldenberg, RN, MSN, ACRN

Sandra Green

Robert Haines, MD

Judy Hayes

Andrew Jones

Kimberly Lausier

Cookie LeMieux

Ann Lemire, MD

Kim Meehan-Brown

Kate Murrane, RN

Katherine Pinkerton, ANP

Myles Rightmire, MAT, MSW

Martin Sabol *

Ruby Spicer, MPH, RN

Caroline Teschke, MD

Katie Thurman, MA

Erin Wessel, RN

Operations

Olida Arnoe

Scott Caparelli

Shane Gallagher

Melisa Huntley, MNM

Jesse Johnson

Judith Johnson *

Lisa Peterson

John Schreck

Research and Data

JoAnna Hillman, MPH

Toho Soma, MPH *

Marice Tran, JD

Street and Free Clinics

Deborah Adams

Katie Addicott, NP

Peggy Akers, NP

Martha Barnes, RDH

Janelle Bechard, LADC

Ivana Carillo

Keith Danner, LADC

Ann Deutsch, APRN

Beth Eilers, MSW *

Kathleen Fairfield, MD

Ellen Farnsworth, MSN, MEd, APRN-

BC, NP-C

Nancy Flaherty, NP

Gretchen Gagnon

Diane Geyer, LADC, LCPC

Laura Giroux

Holly Grant, RN

Sandra Green

Paula Hasson, DDS

Brendan Johnson

Patricia Julian, LADC

Sharon LaPlante

Lorrie Marx-Adams, LCSW

Renate Masse

Beth McKeeman

Elna Osso, MPH, RN

Katherine Pinkerton, ANP

William Price, LADC

Melinda Rabideau, RN

Mary Remington, RDH

Greg Sprague, DDS

Alex Thorn, MS

Margie Thumm, NP

Katie Whitehead

*

Program Manager

16

City of Portland Public Health Division 2007-2008 Annual Report


Public Health Division Directory of Services

Health and Human Services (City Hall, Suite 304).....................................................874-8633

Operations (City Hall, Suite 307)................................................................................874-8784

Environmental Health and Safety (City Hall, Suite 301).............................................756-8008

Cities Readiness Initiative................................................................................................. 756-8052

Cumberland District Epidemiology.................................................................................. 756-8008

Environmental Health ..................................................................................................... 756-8008

Emergency Preparedness .................................................................................................. 756-8008

Directory

Family Health (166 Brackett Street)............................................................................874-8475

Children’s Oral Health...................................................................................................... 541-6628

Maternal and Child Health............................................................................................... 874-8475

Student Health Centers.................................................................................................... 874-8475

Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention....................................................874-8634

134 Congress Street

District Tobacco................................................................................................................ 541-6956

Healthy Casco Bay............................................................................................................ 874-8634

Healthy Portland.............................................................................................................. 541-6954

Smoke-Free Housing Coalition of Maine.......................................................................... 874-8774

City Hall, Suite 302

Cancer Prevention............................................................................................................ 874-8942

Minority Health............................................................................................................... 874-8773

Substance Abuse Prevention.............................................................................................. 756-8116

Infectious Disease (103 India Street)...........................................................................756-8003

HIV and STD Prevention................................................................................................. 874-8446

HIV Positive Health Care................................................................................................. 874-8791

Immunization and Tuberculosis Testing............................................................................ 874-8446

Laboratory........................................................................................................................ 874-8788

Research and Data (City Hall, Suite 301)....................................................................874-8787

Common Ground............................................................................................................. 874-8798

Street and Free Clinics.................................................................................................756-8254

20 Portland Street

Health Care for Portland’s Homeless................................................................................. 874-8445

103 India Street

Portland Community Free Clinic...................................................................................... 874-8982

Note: City 2007-2008 Hall is located City at 389 of Congress Portland Street. Division of Public Health Annual Report

Editors: Toho Soma, JoAnna Hillman

Design and layout by Non Profit Design Group (www.nonprofitdesigngroup.com)

City of Portland Public Health Division 2007-2008 Annual Report 17 10


PortlandMaine

Strengthening a Remarkable City

Building a Community for Life

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines