Clean Water Summit Comprehensive Planning Track Planning and ...

projectcleanwater.org

Clean Water Summit Comprehensive Planning Track Planning and ...

Planning and Decision Support Systems for

Sustainable City-Region Development

Clean Water Summit

Comprehensive Planning Track

June 21, 2002

Keith Pezzoli, Ph.D.

Urban Studies and Planning Program

University of California, San Diego

OVERVIEW

Context: City-Regions and Sustainable Development

Frontiers of Regional Ecology

• Information and Communications Technology

• New Regionalism

• Sustainability Science

Clean Water Program: Comprehensive Planning TAC

The Regional Workbench Consortium

Planning and Decision Support Systems:

• Interactive Web site, including GIS, Regional Mapping, Visualization tools

• Quality of Life Indicators/Mapping

• Groupware and Collaboration tools

• KINDRED systems (Knowledge-based Integration of Distributed Regional Environmental Data)

Four Integrated Project Cores

1. Water quality and supply

2. Toxics and Industrial Ecology

3. Housing, Infrastructure and Community Development

4. Land use and Regional Planning

Forward-looking Agenda

RWBC Roll Out: May 29-30, 2003

The Challenge of Joining Knowledge and Action

1


The Regional Workbench Consortium

A collaborative research and learning network

Inc from ~4.2M people in 2002

to ~6.4M by 2020

Information and

Communications

Technology

+

New

Regionalism

+

Sustainability

Science

GRP 1999: San Diego ($104B)

Baja Coastal ($16B)

1999 the average number of

daily two-way crossings totaled

over 300,000 people.

Fram and Slater (2001)

Year 2000,

Per-capita water usage per day,

Baja Coastal = ~ 57 gallons

(total ~ 86,000 AF)

San Diego = ~ 200 gallons

(total ~ 695,000 AF)

SDCWA (2000)

This 3-D perspective view was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and an enhanced color Landsat 5 satellite image.

Topographic expression is exaggerated two times. http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/srtm/california.html#PIA03330

Global Urbanization and the Rise of City-Regions

*

Today, there are 19 city-regions with 10 million or more people; 22 city-regions with 5-10 million people; and 370

city-regions with 1-5 million people (Habitat 2001). “Some city-regions increasingly act like quasi city-states, even

to the point of engaging in diplomatic relations with other cities and states in ways that by-pass their own national

governments. Along with the expanding scale and increased autonomy of city-regions, have come many

experiments with new forms of regional governance” (Friedmann 2002).

2


New Regionalism:

Defining characteristics

1) Focus on the metropolitan region as the unit of analysis and action,

2) Renewed emphasis on physical planning, urban design, and place,

3) Broadened agenda including environmental, equity, and livability

issues as well as economic development,

4) Normative, action-oriented approach aimed at addressing regional

problems, and

5) Widened range of research methods including qualitative as well as

quantitative tools.

From: THE NEW' REGIONALISM: AN EMERGING MOVEMENT IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE

A Paper Presented at the Annual Conference of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning, Atlanta, Georgia

November 2000 by Stephen M. Wheeler, Ph.D. Department of City and Regional Planning University of California at Berkeley

Drivers of the New Regionalism

A survey by the National Association of Regional Councils has found that

the number of regional efforts is growing in the U.S. A recent report by the

National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) argues that the renewed

interest in "thinking regionally" has to do with five current challenges:

•Developing a workforce: preparing and linking people with jobs in rapidly

growing suburbs.

•Competing economically: building world class research facilities,

transportation systems, and supplier networks.

•Quality of life: protecting the environment, controlling traffic congestion

and injuries, and preserving safe, healthy communities.

•Paying for growth: making wise investments in public facilities in growing

suburbs.

•Redevelopment: revitalizing inner cities and first tier suburbs. (cited in

Livable Communities 2000: 20-21)

The September 11 th shock adds the quest for regional homeland security

to this list.

3


D.Scott Slocombe (2001) Integration of Physical, Biological, and Socioeconomic Information. In A Guidebook to

Integrated Ecological Assesments, edited by Jensen and Bourgeron

Sustainability Science:

Core Questions

• 1. How can the dynamic interactions between nature and society – including lags and inertia – be

better incorporated in emerging models and conceptualizations that integrate the Earth system,

human development, and sustainability?


2. How are long-term trends in environment and development, including consumption and

population, reshaping nature-society interactions in ways relevant to sustainability?


3. What determines the vulnerability or resilience of the nature-society system in particular kinds of

places and for particular types of ecosystems and human livelihoods?


4. Can scientifically meaningful “limits” or “boundaries” be defined that would provide effective

warning of conditions beyond which the nature-society systems incur a significantly increased

risk of serious degradation?

• 5. What systems of incentive structures – including markets, rules, norms and scientific information

– can most effectively improve social capacity to guide interactions between nature and society

toward more sustainable trajectories?

• 6. How can today’s operational systems for monitoring and reporting on environmental and social

conditions be integrated or extended to provide more useful guidance for efforts to navigate a

transition toward sustainability?

• 7. How can today’s relatively independent activities of research planning, monitoring, assessment,

and decision support be better integrated into systems for adaptive management and societal

learning?

Kates, et al. (2001) Sustainability Science. ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT. Vol. 292 (#5517): 641

4


Regional Science and Technology for

Sustainability Workshops

Africa

Nov. 13-15, 15, ‘01

Abuja, Nigeria

Asia

Feb. 4-6, 4

‘02

Chiang Mai, Thailand

Europe

Feb. 27-March 1-6, 1

‘02

Bonn, Germany

Bonn, Germany

Latin America

March 4-6, 4

‘02

Santiago, Chile

Santiago, Chile

N. America

March 24-25, 25, ‘02

Ottawa, Canada

Integration and

Synthesis

May 21-24, 24, ‘02

Mexico City, Mexico

5


Water resource management is a 10,000-piece puzzle.

“To effectively manage our water resources, we need to understand the inter-connectivity of such

factors as water storage, supply and reuse, air pollution, land use planning and development,

agricultural use, transportation, business and industrial processes, and habitat management.

Many of the pieces of the puzzle are already addressed by various agencies and

individuals. What's needed is a way to assemble these pieces into a coherent whole.

This is the intent of Project Clean Water.” (p.3)

Integration of General Planning Issues and Watershed Planning Concepts. Draft 5-28-02

6


Southern California Coastal Research Project, Technical report 358/

Edited by:Brock Bernstein and Kenneth Schiff, February 8, 2002

Problem statement

At present, scientists and managers have limited ability to examine data from across the

region to search for patterns or trends, compare impacts and BMP effectiveness across

locations, assess local conditions against regional background or reference conditions, or

ensure regionally consistent quality control of raw and processed data. In addition, the

inability to combine and integrate data from throughout the region leads to duplication of

effort and other inefficiencies in individual monitoring programs.

Project Clean Water Phase 1 Results Report 6-30-01

GIS, Modeling, and Visualization

A GIS is a computer system capable of assembling, storing, manipulating, and displaying

geographically referenced information. GIS technologies have broad utility in supporting scientific

investigations, resource management, and other planning functions. Modeling and visualization can

further provide scientists and managers more sophisticated means of evaluating data and in many

instances the ability to quantify the relationship of various factors to observed or theorized

environmental outcomes.

The Science and Technology TAC identified some of the agencies and groups that are currently

demonstrating leadership in the areas of GIS, Modeling and Visualization. These include:

• § San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC).

• § San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG).

• § San Diego GIS Coordinators Group.

• § Center for Earth Systems Analysis Research (CESAR).

• § SanGIS.

• § URISA, San Diego Section.

• § Southern California Coastal Water Research Project (SCCWRP)

The Comprehensive Planning TAC was established to

provide direction and oversight on strategic planning

issues throughout Project Clean Water. Activities of the

TAC include:

•Strategic Planning and Assessment. During the first

phase of the project, the Comprehensive Planning TAC

compiled a baseline inventory of planning efforts by

watershed.

Clean Water Strategic Plan. The TAC established a

Steering Committee to develop the Clean Water

Strategic Plan, which provides the direction for the

second phase of Project Clean Water (Development and

Implementation Planning).

•Technical Workgroup Review and Coordination.

During Phase II, the Comprehensive Planning TAC will

also coordinate, and assist as necessary, the more

detailed assessments of planning and implementation of

priority action items to be conducted by the Focused

Technical Workgroups.

§ Development and Implementation Planning. The

Comprehensive Planning TAC will also play an important

role during this phase of Project Clean Water. After

recommended program elements are proposed by

Technical Workgroups, the TAC will develop a

recommended strategy for implementation of the

proposed program

elements.

Project Clean Water Phase I Results Report (6/30/01)

7


Project Clean

Water

Phase 1 Results

Report

6-30-01

Need to add

Multinational

and Global

Perspectives

8


Figure 6: Watersheds of the United

States- Mexico Border Region

Source: United States Department of the Interior, US-Mexico Border Field Coordinating Committee

http://www.cerc.usgs.gov/FCC/resources.htm#Regional

9


Regional Workbench Consortium (RWBC)

The RWBC is a collaborative network of university and community-based

partners dedicated to enabling sustainable city-region development.

We promote multidisciplinary research and service learning aimed at

understanding how problems of environment and development

interrelate at a regional scale.

Taking a global and forward-looking perspective, the RWBC focuses on

the Southern California-Northern Baja California transborder region--

especially the San Diego-Tijuana city-region and coastal zone.

The RWBC is currently building a trusted Internet-based research guide

and toolkit (i.e., workbench) to facilitate problem-driven projects that

require region-wide data integration and information sharing.

Specifically, the RWBC is developing the collaborative architecture

necessary for linking science, technology, and art to policy and

planning in four targeted “Project Cores.”

RWBC Project Cores

Water quality and supply (e.g., watershed-based approaches to non-point source

pollution, urban water supply and sanitation, ecohydrological rehabilitation)

• Toxics and Industrial Ecology (e.g., hazardous materials and environmental

management systems in the U.S.-Mexico border)

• Housing, Infrastructure and Community Development (e.g., historical redlining,

housing affordability in San Diego, sustainable community-based planning in

Tijuana’s low-income human settlements)

• Land use and Regional Planning (e.g., planning and decision-support tools

including Interactive Web sites, Visualization tools, GIS, Groupware and

Collaboration tools, multimedia/story-driven presentations linked to scalable—local,

regional and global--environmental information networks)

New project domains (e.g., air quality, energy, transportation) will be targeted according to faculty and

partner interest. The partners come from academia, industry, government, and community

organizations. The RWBC also serves as a platform for innovative education, outreach and

workforce development.

Our partnership-driven approach explicitly integrates issues of equity, environmental stewardship, and

economic efficiency (the so-called 3 Es of sustainable development). In the process, we are

weaving together innovative advances in three domains: Information and Communications

Technology, New Regionalism, and Sustainability Science.

11


Economy

Adequately remunerated work

Environment

Minimizing use/waste of

non-renewable resources

(fossil fuels, minerals, biodiversity)

Access to affordable housing,

including a secure, healthy environment

with adequate basic services &

community facilities

Equity

Affordable health care, and

adequate social safety net

Sustainable

City-Region

Development

Sustainable use of renewable resources

(aquifers, freshwater, wetlands, soils,

biomass, human beings)

Keeping within the absorptive capacity of

local, regional and global sinks

(air, land and water)

Information and Communications Technology

Flourishing civil life

in association with others

Good governance (accountable, transparent,

participatory, socially just and equitable,

respectful of human rights and diversity

Quality of Life and Futurity (fulfilling the

needs of the present generation without

undermining the ability of future generations

to meet their own needs)

Building infrastructure for a “learning region”

(i.e., milieu of innovation fostered by high quality

education, workforce development, and

knowledge-networking across digital divides

Developing planning and decision-support tools

(Interactive web sites, Visualization tools, GIS,

Simulation, Scenarios, Groupware and Collaboration

tools, Global network of Regional Workbenches)

Integrate sustainability science, technology, art, and

new regionalism (e.g., by creating story-based views

and multimedia presentations linked to scalable (local,

regional and global) information networks

Matrix for the Project Database

Regional

Global

Local

Info Tech

Regionalism

Sus Science

Equity

Economic

efficiency

Environmental

stewardship

Governance

Water Quality

and Supply

Toxics and

Industrial

Ecology

Housing and

Urban

Development

Land Use &

Regional

Planning

12


Components

of Regional

Ecology

Targeted

Domains

and Projects

Natural

Capital

Air, land and

water, biological

diversity,

ecosystem

services

Human/

Social Capital

Labor, selforganizing

civil

societ (NGOs),

cultural heritage/

diversity, wisdom

traditions

Economic Capital

Manufactured

Built environment

and infrastructure,

machines, tools

and production

facilities

Financial.

Cash,

investments and

monetary

instruments

Political

Capital

Law, institutional

organization and

political

community

Knowledge

Capital

Libraries, knowledge

networks, universities

and research centers,

planning and decisionsupport

tools, artists

intellectuals, scientists

Water Quality

and Supply

Watershed-based

approaches to nonpoint

source

pollution

•Urban water supply

and sanitation

•Ecohydrological

rehabilitation

Toxics and

Industrial

Ecology

•EMS &

Hazardous

materials

Housing &

Urban Dev.

•Colonias (10 de

Mayo)

•Redlining

•Affordability

•QoL/ Livability

Land Use and

Regional

Planning

Planning and

Decision-support

tools

•MSCP

13


Credit: SIO Geological Data Center, Regional Workbench,

CICESE, CREATE

As a pilot project, led by the UCSD's Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO), Cal(IT)2 will define and deploy, over the

next four years, the Southern California Wireless Environmental Sensor Network and Information System [WESNIS],

extending from the Sierra Nevada mountain range on the east to the outer limits of the southern California continental shelf

on the west. The data streams from these widely distributed sensors will be integrated in real time with historical data

archives and sophisticated computational models of environmental processes in prototype distributed computing,

visualization, and information systems ("control rooms").

23


Panoram Theatre

High Resolution Data

Visualization, SIO

Regional Workbench Consortium

University

Mentors

Students

Community /

Government

Mentors

Students

Regional

Workbench

Program

Community

Outreach

Link Research

To Action

Industry

Benefits

Industry/University

Partnerships

Sustainability Science Science

and and Policy Policy Development

Education Innovation and and

Workforce Development

Provides a Mode

of Communication

Web Web Site Site

Quality

Research

Skills

Management

Skills

Technical

Skills

Presents Cutting

Edge Research

Links Diverse

Databases

24


Federated Knowledge Network

for Sustainable City-Regions

Sustainability

Science Network/

Johannesburg,

Earth Summit +10

Natural

Capital

Social

Capital

Regional

Workbench

Knowledge

Capital

Political

Capital

Built

Capital

Financial

Capital

World

Congress

of Planning

Schools

Seven fundamental precepts guiding the RWBC

Place-based,

scalable

•Facilitate multidisciplinary place-based research in a scalable context (i.e., a conceptual space

that interrelates local, regional and global dynamics).

Integrative,

multidisciplinary

Normative

Problem-driven,

action oriented

•Link the “new regionalism” with sustainability science and advances in information and

communications technologies.

•Create methods for integrating physical, biological and socioeconomic data (including the

ability to do cross-border integrated risk assessment).

•Promote the three E’s of sustainable development (equity, environmental stewardship, and

economic efficiency) in a whole systems approach.

•Pursue a core set of pressing problems (projects) that inspire the linkage of knowledge to

action at the regional scale.

Collaborative

and multicultural

•Foster relationships and networks driving the shift from “planning for the public” to “planning

with the public.”

•Serve as a culturally sensitive platform for education, outreach and training.

Historical and

Forward-looking

•Articulate historically-informed views of alternative futures (i.e., actionable “Vision” based on

critical understanding and current knowledge of relevant literature)

Accessible, userfriendly,

network

extensible

•Build capacity for data and information sharing (based on principles of distributed intelligence

and federation).

•Create story-based narratives and multi-media presentations that offer meaningful views of the

RWBC’s projects (tailored to distinct audiences including researchers, public agencies,

community groups, and students).

25


RWBC Partners (under construction)

University Partners

UCSD

– Superfund Basic Research Program

– Urban Studies and Planning Program

– Civic Collaborative

– San Diego Supercomputer Center (Knowledge-based Integration Lab, Spatial

Information Laboratory)

– Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies

– SIO (Geological Data Center, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics)

– Cal-(IT)2

SDSU

– Graduate Program in City Planning, School of Public Adminsistration and Urban Studies

– Department of Geological Sciences

– Southwest Center for Environmental Research and Policy (SCERP)

Mexico

– COLEF (El Colegio de la Frontera Norte)

– CICESE (Centro de Investigación Científica y de Educación Superior de Ensenada/)

Non-profit organizations

– TELESIS

– Planeficacion, A.C.

Government Agencies

– IMPLAN (Instituto Municipal de Planeacion); Informatica

– SANDAG

– San Diego Regional Water Quality Control Board

Industry

– MONDECA, software developer of Topic Maps

– Industrial Environmental Association

RWB Working Papers and Reports

Transborder City-Regions and the Quest for Integrated Regional Planning: Challenges posed by

disarticulated infrastructures, fragmented ecologies of knowing, and uneven development.

Paper presented at the WPSC in Shanghai China, July 2001Keith Pezzoli, Ilya Zaslavsky

and Richard Marciano). http://www.regionalworkbench.org/sequence/prof/15004_final.htm

The KINDRED Project (Knowledge-based Integration and Navigation of Distributed Regional

Environmental Data). Ilya Zaslavsky, Keith Pezzoli, and Rchard Marciano

http://www.regionalworkbench.org/USP2/Kindred/Kindred.htm

Promoting Sustainability Science Through Education and Regional Ecology.

http://superfund.ucsd.edu/news/outreach_brochure.pdf

A full length (22-page report) provides details on all the items mentioned in the brochure.

http://superfund.ucsd.edu/news/outreach_news_dec01.pdf

On-line Guide to the Conceptualization, Design, Conduct and Write-up of Multidisciplinary

Research http://www.regionalworkbench.org/sequence/student/hb_main.htm

Sustainable Development: A Multidisciplinary Review of the Literature. Keith Pezzoli

http://www.regionalworkbench.org/sequence/prof/EPM-WEB.htm

Superfund Basic Research Program Web Site Development Plan

http://www.regionalworkbench.org/BenTolo/SBRP_Website/SBRP_WebSite_DevPlan.doc

Planning Pedagogy and Globalization Keith Pezzoli and Deborah Howe

http://www.regionalworkbench.org/USP2/links.html#pedagogy

RWBC Mission and Objectives document. Version 1.0

26

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines