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Download PDF - Desert Research Institute

MILITARY GEOSCIENCE

FOR THE 21 st CENTURY

U.S. Military Research Initiatives

at DRI

Contact:

Dr. Eric V. McDonald

Terrain Analysis Program Manager

Desert Research Institute

Division of Earth & Ecosystem

Sciences

2215 Raggio Parkway

Reno, NV 89512

(775) 673 - 7300 (main)

(775) 673 - 7302 (office)

Eric.McDonald@dri.edu

www.dri.edu


U.S. Military Research Initiatives at DRI:

DRI scientists provide the DoD with a wide range of science-based information in support of military objectives.

Efforts range from improving technology to detect and defeat IEDs (Improvised Explosive Devices) to

evaluating the suitability of DoD military testing and training installations as realistic analogs for deployment

areas in Iraq and Afghanistan. DRI conducts frequent briefings and site visits to DoD agencies and installations

to enhance technology transfer, as well as learn about current DoD issues and problems requiring scientific

solutions.

Comprehensive Terrain Issues

Challenging the U.S. DoD

• U.S. forces must be prepared to react

quickly to conflict or humanitarian

missions anywhere in the world, at any

time.

• Adequate terrain information commonly

limited or outdated

• Mission success depends on the equipment

issued to the U.S. military being

pre-tested under realistic conditions representative

of actual or potential areas of

deployment

• Significant links needed between military

technology and state-of-the art scientific

knowledge of global terrain and environmental

conditions


Targeted Solutions & Contributions to DoD by DRI

DRI has provided extensive support to better define actual areas of deployment

(Global Military Operating Environments)

DRI has provided critical information about terrain conditions in Iraq and Afghanistan,

including identification of potential environmental hazards to military equipment

and health dynamics of U.S. ground forces.

DRI has taken the initiative to develop Master Environmental Reference Sites (MERS) to serve as global

test beds in the counter-IED (improvised explosive devices) and Mine/ Countermine efforts worldwide

DRI is developing new technology to rapidly characterize terrain and environmental conditions in support

of testing and tactical operations

DRI is developing science-based, cost-effective approaches to improve stewardship of military testing and

training installations in the U.S.


Desert Research Institute

Division of Earth & Ecosystem Sciences (DEES)

Integrated Desert Terrain

Forecasting for Military

Operations (DTF)

Deserts are, and will continue to be, strategic sites for military operations.

Military success in desert conditions requires familiarity with these environments,

as well as appropriate training and testing in locations that are

characterized by rapidly changing surface conditions and climatic extremes,

ranging from dust storm and brownout generation, to terrain-induced

mobility and detection hazards.

Photo: Graham Dalldorf

predictive tool for forecasting desert terrain conditions (soils, vegetation

cover, landscape form, dust emission potential) to support military activities.

Project results have lead to the development of a geographic information

system (GIS) platform to predict essential surface and subsurface

terrain conditions through the integration of data on the spatial distribuexpert-based

prediction system, linking surface observables to subsurface

conditions over a wide range of scales in near real-time by incorporating

information from satellite and unmanned aerial vehicle remote-sensing

technology

Major Tasks:

geomorphic soil and landform models

Develop global database of critical soil and terrain features for

accurate soil property predictions in a wide variety of landscapes

Acquire soil-surface data and improve technology to measure and

model potential dust emission

Improve remote-sensing strategies for desert characterization

Continued advancement of integrated numerical models for

production of rapid terrain characterization and visualization

Photo: Todd G. Caldwell

Related Research Sponsored in part by the Department of Defense

Bacon, S.N., McDonald, E.V., Baker, S.E., Caldwell, T.G., and Stullenbarger, G. 2008. Desert terrain characterization of landforms

and surface materials within vehicle test courses at U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground, USA. Journal of Terramechanics 45, 5,

p. 167-183.

Berli, M., Caldwell, T.G., McDonald, E.V., and Gilewitch, D.A. In Press. Modeling desert pavement deterioration due to heavy

vehicle traffic. Journal of Terramechanics.

Caldwell, T.G., McDonald, E.V., Bacon, S.N., Stullenbarger, G.

for military testing. Journal of Terramechanics 45, 6, p. 213-221.

Caldwell, T.G., McDonald, E.V. and Young, M. 2008. Soil disturbance and unsaturated hydraulic response at the U.S. Army

National Training Center, Ft. Irwin, California. Journal of Arid Environments, 67, p. 456-472.

Dalldorf, G.K., McDonald, E.V., Bacon, S.N. and Nikolich, G. 2008. Testing and evaluation of a synthetic polymer for dust

suppression in military applications. Geological Society of America Meeting, Oct. 5-10, Houston, TX.


Desert Research Institute

Division of Earth & Ecosystem Sciences (DEES)

DTF: Current Accomplishments

• Continued effort toward global soil database population;

current database coverage includes greater than 4,000

individual georeferenced pedological horizon descriptions

• Successful testing of our GIS-based predictive mapping

approach to rapidly map landforms and soils. First test

effort mapped nearly 350 km 2 in


Desert Research Institute

Division of Earth & Ecosystem Sciences (DEES)

DTF Highlight:

Global Physiographic Maps to Support Army Regulation (AR) 70-38.

Maps developed in support of ongoing efforts to revise Army Regulation (AR) 70-38: Research, Development, Test

and Evaluation of materiél for extreme climatic conditions. Maps provide multiple views of key global environments

that enhance understanding of the types, global distribution, and potential hazards of conditions most likely

to impact military operations.

180°

130°W

80°W

30°W

20°E

70°E

120°E

170°E

70°N 70°N

50°N 50°N

30°N 30°N

10°N 10°N

10°S 10°S

Physiographic Feature

30°S 30°S

Coastal Plain

Sand Sea / Dunes

Arid River 50°S Plain

Humid River Plain

Low Interior Plain

High Interior Plain

Plateau

Basin and Range

Low Relief Mountains

High Relief Mountains

Continental Ice

70°S 70°S

180°

130°W

80°W

30°W

GLOBAL PHYSIOGRAPHIC AND CLIMATIC MAPS TO SUPPORT

ARMY REGULATION (AR) 70-38

Global Physiographic Map

20°E

70°E

0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000

0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000

Kilometers

Miles

120°E

170°E

Projection:

World Robinson, WGS 1984.

50°S

180°

130°W

80°W

30°W

20°E

70°E

120°E

170°E

70°N 70°N

50°N 50°N

30°N 30°N

10°N 10°N

10°S 10°S

30°S 30°S

50°S

50°S

Dust Potential

Rating Class

None

Very Low

Low

Moderate

High

Very High

Map developed from the integration of dust potential rating classes

assigned to physiographic feature and NRCS Global Soil Map units by:

Steven N. Bacon, Eric V. McDonald, Scott D. Bassett, and Jermey D. Burke,

Terrain Analysis Program, Desert Research Institute.

70°S 70°S

180°

130°W

80°W

30°W

GLOBAL PHYSIOGRAPHIC AND CLIMATIC MAPS TO SUPPORT

ARMY REGULATION (AR) 70-38

Global Dust Potential Map

20°E

70°E

0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000

0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000

Kilometers

Miles

120°E

170°E

Projection:

World Robinson, WGS 1984.


Desert Research Institute

Division of Earth & Ecosystem Sciences (DEES)

DTF Highlight:

Regional Dust and Salt Concentration i Maps

Air Force Research Laboratory Project

in support of prevention of sand induced

circuit card and electrical system corrosion

Products from this project are intended to advance understanding of the distribution and composition of airborne

dust and sand. This dust and sand appears to be a major source of environmental contamination and corrosion

of aircraft circuit boards. The primary initiative of this project - see map, below - is the production of strategicscale

maps of potential dust and associated salt emission in southwest Asia. Emission estimates are derived from

regional projections of soil type and content, based in part on work conducted at U.S. Army Yuma Proving

Ground, Arizona, USA.

35°0'0"E

40°0'0"E

45°0'0"E

50°0'0"E

55°0'0"E

60°0'0"E

65°0'0"E

70°0'0"E

75°0'0"E

80°0'0"E

Turkey

Georgia Georgia

Armenia

Azerbaijan

Kazakhstan

Kazakhstan

Uzbekistan

Kazakhstan

Kyrgyzstan

40°0'0"N

Turkmenistan

Tajikistan

China

35°0'0"N

Cyprus

Caspian Sea

Mediterranean

Sea

Lebanon

Syria

35°0'0"N

West Bank

Gaza Strip

Iraq

Afghanistan

30°0'0"N

Israel Jordan

Egypt

Iran

30°0'0"N

MAP UNIT

Dust & Salt Potential

Kuwait

Pakistan

12

Very High

25°0'0"N

11

10

9

8

High

Saudi Arabia

Qatar

Arabian - Persian Gulf

India

25°0'0"N

Egypt

7

6

Moderate

United Arab Emirates

Gulf of Oman

20°0'0"N

Sudan

5

4

3

0

Low

Water

Composite Dust &

Salt Potential Map

Oman

0 100

200 400 600 800 1,000

0 100 200 400 600 800 1,000

Kilometers

Miles

20°0'0"N

Eritrea

40°0'0"E

45°0'0"E

50°0'0"E

55°0'0"E

60°0'0"E

65°0'0"E

70°0'0"E

75°0'0"E

COMPOSITE DUST & SALT POTENTIAL MAP BASED ON LANDFORMS,

PRECIPITATION & GEOLOGY OF A PORTION OF SOUTHWEST ASIA

Abundant dust and sand decrease performance

and commonly damage military equipment


Desert Research Institute

Division of Earth & Ecosystem Sciences (DEES)

DTF Highlight:

Catalog of Analogs:

Terrain Similarities between the U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground

and Central Southwest Asia

Catalog of Analogs employs the predictive methodology developed for the DTF program to identify similarities

desert materiél development and testing by identifying the best U.S. landscape analogs for international conflict

areas. Initial comparisons were conducted at Yuma Proving Ground, Yuma, Arizona. Future work will expand

this initiative to other U.S. military training and testing areas.

114°30'0"W

114°20'0"W

114°10'0"W

114°0'0"W

113°50'0"W

113°40'0"W

33°30'0"N

Generalized Surface Soil [with USCS Symbol] - Typical Landform

not mapped

silty clay to clayey silt; silty sand [CL-ML; SM] - badlands

poorly graded sand [SP] - sand seas/dunes

poorly graded sand with silt and gravel [SP-SM (>15% gravel)] - alluvial plains

poorly graded gravel with silt and sand [GP-GM] - alluvial fans

silty gravel with sand [GM] - mountain highlands, pediments

32°50'0"N

32°50'0"N

33°0'0"N

33°0'0"N

33°10'0"N

33°10'0"N

33°20'0"N

33°20'0"N

33°30'0"N

32°40'0"N

0 5 10

Miles

0 5 10

Kilometers

32°40'0"N

114°30'0"W

114°20'0"W

114°10'0"W

114°0'0"W

113°50'0"W

113°40'0"W

GM

28.5%

CL-ML; SM

1.4%

SP

0.2%

SP-SM

8.4%

Generalized Surface Material Characteristics of YPG

Soil

[USCS Symbol]

Landform(s) Area Area Area

(mi 2 ) (km 2 ) (%)

CL-ML; SM

SP

SP-SM

GP-GM

GM

Badlands

Sand seas/dunes

Alluvial plains

Alluvial fans

Mountain highlands, pediments

18.3

2.5

110.2

805.1

373.1

47.4

6.4

285.5

2,085.2

966.3

1.4

0.2

8.4

61.5

28.5

GP-GM

61.5%

SURFACE SOILS IN YPG

(total area = ~1,300 sq mi (~3,400 sq km))


Desert Research Institute

Division of Earth & Ecosystem Sciences (DEES)

DRI Research: Evaluation of primary Army test areas as analogous to areas of strategic interest.

YUMA PROVING GROUND

AFGHANISTAN

Pediment

1.2%

Sand dunes

0.2%

Sand sea/dunes

9.0%

Sand sheets

Playa

1.2% Alluvial fan

0.5%

10.4%

Plateau

Alluvial plain

3.6%

7.1%

Mountain highlands

27.3%

Pediment

9.0%

Badlands

12.9%

Badlands

1.4%

Alluvial fans

61.5%

Mountain highlands

45.3%

Broad river valley

0.6%

Alluvial plain

8.4%

Major River

MAP UNIT

Landform

not mapped

sand sea/dunes

MAP UNIT

Landform

sand sheets

playa

not mapped

alluvial plain

sand dunes

broad river valley

alluvial plain

alluvial fans

0 5 10

Miles

0 5 10

Kilometers

alluvial fans

badlands

pediment

mountain highlands

0 50 100 200 300

Miles

0 50 100 200 300

Kilometers

pediment

badlands

plateau

mountain highlands

IRAQ

PAKISTAN

Sand sea/dunes

5.2%

Plateau

20.6%

Recent volcanic

features

0.1%

Pediment

37.3%

Sand sheets

4.5%

Alluvial fans

6.9%

Alluvial plain

1.3%

Broad river valley

19.0%

Mountain

highlands

4.5%

Coastal

0.7%

Sand sea/dunes

2.6%

Playa

0.5%

Plateau

3.7%

Pediment

0.1%

Mountain highlands

39.4%

Sand sheets

11.1%

Alluvial fans

10.7%

Alluvial plain

7.9%

Coastal

1.5%

Badlands

2.0%

Broad river

valley

20.6%

Baghdad

Major River

Major River

MAP UNIT

Landform

MAP UNIT

Landform

not mapped

not mapped

coastal

coastal

sand sea/dunes

sand sea/dunes

sand sheets

sand sheets

playa

alluvial fans

alluvial plain

alluvial plain

broad river valley

broad river valley

alluvial fans

pediment

recent volcanic features

plateau

mountain highlands

25 0 50 100

Miles

25 0 50 100

Kilometers

0 50 100 200

Miles

0 50 100 200

Kilometers

pediment

badlands

plateau

mountain highlands


Desert Research Institute

Division of Earth & Ecosystem Sciences

Global Military Operating

Environments (GMOE)

material and equipment should replicate the environmental conditions that

are anticipated for areas where the U.S. Army will be deployed. In particular,

extreme climatic and physical factors should be incorporated into live

testing protocols to ensure functionality and sustainability of vehicles and

weapons systems as well as enhancing battlefield technologies.

Initial studies to characterize the environments where U.S. forces are

currently operating or will potentially operate have been in progress interto

characterize the natural environment worldwide are often outdated

(most circa 1955–80), oversimplified, and lack integration of current scientific

knowledge of critical processes that operate in global environments.

Furthermore, current technology that can extensively characterize natural

environments is underutilized. Science-based analysis of major global

terrain environments is required to identify critical environmental variables

that are the most likely to adversely impact military testing and tactical

operations.

Instrumented soil profile for data collection at

Master Environmental Reference Sites (MERS)

terrain across all four major environmental systems (deserts, cold regions,

tropics, and temperate zones). Research activities will span comprehensive

analyses of soil, physical, and chemical processes, with emphasis on the flux

of mass and energy at the soil-atmosphere boundary. Results are especially

critical to development and testing of technologies for the identification and

defeat of IEDs through translation of surface to subsurface properties.

Specific Objectives

(1)

Establish multiple Master Environmental Reference Sites (MERS) for comprehensive characterization of soil

processes that represent common terrain conditions that are critical for military operations and testing

(2)

(3)

(4)

(5)

(6)

Initiate data analysis of the established MERS to evaluate temporal dynamics of energy fluxes under both natural

and disturbed conditions in varying climatic conditions

Explore techniques, methods, and results using near-surface processes that support development and testing of technologies

for detection and defeat of IEDs

Characterize terrain conditions at primary testing and training installations to determine terrain analogs with areas

of current and future strategic interest

Characterize general soil and terrain conditions for Afghanistan and other areas of strategic interest in CENTCOM

Establish a military environments reference database that will collate soil and terrain data and related literature to

increase availability of accurate global terrain data to the testing and training community


Desert Research Institute

Division of Earth & Ecosystem Sciences (DEES)

Global Military Operating Environments (GMOE)

DRI Research: Soil monitoring for evaluation of impacts of soluble salts on dielectrib and sensor performance

Air Temp. and Rel. Humidity

Energy Balance

Incoming

General design of soil monitoring

(disturbed and undisturbed)

at each MERS.

Surface

IRR

Disturbed

IRR

Reflected

Reflected

2 m

Soil Moisture Sensors

TPHP TDR HDS

Natural Soil

2 m 2 m

Energy Balance

Heat Flux Plate

Average TCs

Disturbed Soil

0.5 m

Sensor probes installed vertically in two different soil profiles.

Inset graphs show vertical distribution of salts and electrical

conductivity (EC) within soil profiles.


Desert Research Institute

Division of Earth & Ecosystem Sciences (DEES)

GMOE Highlight:

Soil Investigations in support of an Intelligent Munitions System (IMS)

Proper materiel testing and development must be conducted within the full range of potential field conditions that

could be encountered during deployment. DRI analyzed a range of geotechnical soil information to be used during

development of an Intelligent Munitions System for the U.S. Army’s Future Combat System (FCS) program. Analyses

indicate that the desert is a complex mosaic of soils and associated properties. Results imply materiel development and

testing must be conducted in a broad range of environmental and soil conditions for optimal product performance.

Alluvial fan soils

mountain valley soil

Tigris

brown soil

Euphrates

pebbly, sandy desert soil

Terrain analogs

analyzed for

geotechnical

properties.

gypsiferous gravel soil

gypsum desert soil with gravels

Baghdad

Modern floodplain soils

silty river basin soil

Iraq

Test Locations

Shatt al Arab

25

20

sand sheet /

compacted dunes

Iraq Soil Analogs Characterized at the

U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground

Soil Stiffness (MN/m)

15

10

floodplain,

tilled fields

alluvial plain

alluvial fan,

desert pavement

alluvial fan, [disturbed]

desert pavement

5

0

A wide range of soil properties

will impact the design and

performance of weapons

systems.


Desert Research Institute

Division of Earth & Ecosystem Sciences (DEES)

Landscape Dynamics

Support Program (LanDPro)

Meeting military readiness, mission capability, and battlefield preparation

calls for large training areas in landscapes representative of the in-theater

field environment. Access to safe and realistic training necessitates training

area sustainability through land and cultural resource management, as

well as the ability to predict and avoid areas sensitive to disturbance.

Cost-effective, system-wide methodologies based on integrated scientific

approaches for rapid site assessment can minimize disruptions to training,

while fulfilling management strategies.

LanDPro enhances and integrates recently completed soil, geomorphic,

and hydrogeologic projects for ITAM and other DoD projects, as well as

improves the robustness and universality of existing tools in support of

use these tools to selectively assess and target sites for restoration and

resource management. Additionally, expedited cultural resource inventories

for DoD expansion areas or infrastructure modifications will be

possible through enhancement of existing prototypes for predictive

archaeological models.

Photos: Sara E. Jenkins

Related Research Sponsored in part by the Department of Defense

Bullard, T., McDonald, E., and Baker, S. 2009. Integration of new methods in soils and geomorphology applied to cultural

resources management on military lands. Workshop Report, sponsored by: Army Research Office, NAVFAC SW, Desert

Research Institute, Oct. 20-22, San Diego, CA.

Caldwell, T.G., McDonald, E.V. and Young, M. 2006. Soil disturbance and hydrologic response at the National Training Center,

Ft. Irwin, California. Journal of Arid Environments, 67, p. 456-472.

McDonald, E.V., and Bullard, T.F. 2008. Geomorphic response to extreme change in a Mediterranean ecosystem: Holocene

alluvial history of Santa Catalina Island, California, USA. European Geosciences Union, Geophysical Research Abstracts 10,

EGU2008-A-10709.

McDonald, E., Bullard, T., Britt, T., and Ruiz, M. 2004. Development of an archaeological predictive model for management of

military lands: identification of geological variables in desert terrain. In: D.R. Caldwell, J. Ehlen, and R.S. Harmon, Eds.,

Studies in Military Geology. Kluwer Academic, Boston, p. 259-270.


Desert Research Institute

Division of Earth & Ecosystem Sciences (DEES)

Landscape Dynamics Support Program (LanDPro)

Predictive models for archaeological surveys incorporate a wide variety of data, including site descriptions and

classification, geological maps, geomorphic maps and hydrogeological data to produce favorability models for

both site location, and site preservation to expedite cultural resource inventories.


50 Years of DRI: Balancing the Needs

of Nature and Humankind

www.dri.edu

Established by the Nevada Legislature in 1959, DRI is a standalone

educational and research institution of the Nevada System

of Higher Education with approximately 500 scientists,

technologists, students, and other support staff. DRI scientists

have traveled from their desert home to the far reaches of the

globe to study the air, the land, the water and life forms in many

environments. Institutional revenues amount to greater than

$50 million annually.

New Technology

Research at DRI

Many environmental science questions can be answered

only through development of new technologies. As a

result, DRI scientists and engineers are generating

leading-edge methods and apparatus to measure windblown

dust emissions and ultrafine particles, quantify

light scattering from large particles in the atmosphere,

model wind flow over complex terrain and improve detec-

-

ment forms the basis for an emphasis on patenting and

licensing technologies conceiving at DRI.

Entrepreneurial Culture

DRI’s contributions to science and society stem from a

unique culture. Unlike traditional universities, DRI’s

DRI has state-of-the-art research campuses in Las Vegas

and Reno, as well as satellite research stations in Boulder

City, Nevada; at the Sierra Nevada College near Lake

Tahoe; and at 10,500 ft elevation near Steamboat Springs,

-

ciplinary science centers that serve Nevada and every

continent, focusing on: air (Division of Atmospheric

Sciences), land and life (Division of Earth and Ecosystem

Sciences), and water (Division of Hydrologic Sciences).

More than 530 DRI research faculty, technicians and

support staff — in disciplines ranging from microbiology

to atmospheric physics — are conducting about 300 basic

answer the critical questions regarding global climate

change, water quality and availability, air quality, sustainability,

life in extreme environments, our archaeological

heritage and much more.

is the blend of the best of both worlds—the intellectual

rigor of academia and the creative, pragmatic focus of the

private sector.


Desert Research Institute

Division of Atmospheric Sciences (DAS)

-

quality and atmospheric research. Research faculty specialize in

a broad variety of topics, ranging from meteorology, cloud seeding,

and fire weather studies, to urban air quality and visibility

assessment.

DAS laboratories and facilities provide faculty with the capability

to study aerosol chemistry and physics, model atmospheric

dispersion, measure particle-scale optical and acoustical properties

to quantify ambient air quality, develop new technology for

fire management programs, trace mercury contamination, and

simulate large-scale meteorological phenomena.

Photo: Sara E. Jenkins

funded primarily by federal government agencies — NSF, DOE,

DOD, DOI, NOAA, NASA and EPA — as well as state and

local governments, and private organizations.

DAS has completed projects for the Department of Defense

Strategic Environmental Research & Development Program,

U.S. Army Research Office, U.S. Army Health Promotion and

Preventive Medicine, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Office of

Naval Research, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, among

others.

For more information, visit http://www.das.dri.edu/

Photo: Todd G. Caldwell

Recent DAS Research Highlights Sponsored by the Department of Defense

Marine cloud structure, entrainment processes, and refractivity effects. Steven K. Chai

Sources of particulate matter emission from Iraqi FOB/FOS. John A. Gillies

High resolution imaging of intermingling spores and cloud particles. John Hallett

Rotorcraft ground-effect wake simulation over desert terrain. Darko Koracin and Douglas Boyle

Data analysis and modeling to support activities at Fallon Naval Air Center. Gregory D. McCurdy

Cirrus characterization for laser propogation and global modeling. German Vidaurre-Fallas

Emission from off-road diesel sources. John G. Watson


Recent DEES Research Highlights Sponsored by the Department of Defense

Landscape Dynamics Support Program: soil-geomorphic analysis for range management.

Using canines to survey desert tortoise: human and dog comparison. Mary E. Cablk

Assessment of possible causes of weapons malfunction in Iraq. Eric V. McDonald

Integrated desert terrain forecasting for military operations. Eric V. McDonald

Catalog of Analogs: terrain comparison between U.S. test sites and SW Asia. Eric V. McDonald

Alternative futures analyses of military installations in SW California. David A. Mouat

Cultural Resources Survey, U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground. David E. Rhode

Desert Research Institute

Division of Earth & Ecosystem

Sciences (DEES)

broad faculty base of geoscientists, biologists, and archaeologists

with an interest in the causes, mechanisms, and history of

landscape change. DEES research focuses on surface environments

and soils, and the geologic and biologic processes that

modify these environments.

Photo: Sara E. Jenkins

DEES maintains laboratories for archaeology and archaeobotany,

soil nutrients and Quaternary pedology, environmental

microbiology and molecular microbial ecology, paleoecology,

geochronology, and remote sensing.

With an annual research budget of $11M, DEES faculty are

funded primarily by federal government agencies — DOD,

DOE, DOI, NSF, NASA, and the EPA. Research is also

supported by state, local, and private agencies, as well as

through collaboration with other DRI divisions.

DEES has conducted research for the U.S. Army Research

Office, Yuma Proving Ground, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers,

U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Army Medical Research Activity,

among others.

Photo: Graham Dalldorf

For more information, visit http://www.dees.dri.edu/


Desert Research Institute

Division of Hydrologic Sciences (DHS)

on the natural and human factors that influence the quality and

availability of water resources. From Nevada to a global scale,

DHS researchers examine both the science behind hydrologic

systems and the public policy that results in effective water

resources management and conservation.

DHS faculty collaborate on a broad variety of water-related

Photo: Sara E. Jenkins

topics: hydrogeology, isotope hydrology, geophysics, geochemistry,

water resources engineering and environmental assesslaboratories,

including both analytical chemistry, and environmental

geochemistry facilities.

supported through grants and contracts from federal government

agencies — DOE, DOD, DOI, NSF, NOAA, NASA — as

well as state and local entities, and private organizations.

DHS faculty have recently completed projects for the U.S.

Army Research Office, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Army ERDC

Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory.

Photo: Sara E. Jenkins

For more information, visit http://www.dhs.dri.edu/

Recent DHS Research Highlights Sponsored by the Department of Defense

. Integrated natural resource management for the Nevada Test and Training Range. Gilbert F. Cochran

. Investigation and simulation of streambank erosion, Upper Jordan River, Utah. Richard H. French

. Reactive chemical transport in natural media. Xiaolong Hu

. Floodplain delineation for Saline Valley radar and repeater sites. Julianne J. Miller

. Numerical assessment of hydrogeomorphic wetland functions. Gregory M. Pohll

. Urban Flood Demonstration Program (UFDP). John J. Warwick

. Alternative covers at Edwards Air Force Base, California. Michael H. Young


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