Student Handbook - Faculty of Social Sciences

socialsciences.uottawa.ca

Student Handbook - Faculty of Social Sciences

University of Ottawa

Faculty of Social Sciences

Student

Handbook

Fall 2012

Conflict Studies and

Human Rights

It

starts

here.

Faculty of Social Sciences

www.socialsciences.uOttawa.ca


Graduate School of Public

and International Affairs

Social Sciences Building

120 University Street

Room 6005

Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5

Canada

613-562-5800, ext. 5905

Fax: 613-562-5106

interfss@uOttawa.ca

Monday to Friday

September to May:

8:45 a.m. to 12 p.m.

1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

June to August:

8:45 a.m. to 12 p.m.

1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m


Table of contents

Welcome to the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs ....................................... 4

Conflict Studies and Human Rights ...................................................................... 5

What is Conflict Studies and Human Rights ................................................................. 5

Career opportunities in Conflict Studies and Human Rights ................................................. 5

1. About the Faculty of Social Sciences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

1.1 Professors and research at the Faculty of Social Sciences ................................................. 6

2. Understanding how your program is structured . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

2.1 Types of bachelor’s and program structures ............................................................. 7

2.2 Initial program structure ............................................................................... 7

3. Selecting your courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

3.1 How to choose your courses ...........................................................................11

3.2 If you are admited into second year with advanced standing or exemptions ............................12

3.3 Use the following resources ...........................................................................13

4. Registering for courses online: Step by step . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

4.1 Registration ...........................................................................................14

5. Once your studies begin... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

6. Other ways to learn! .................................................................................22

6.1 Studying abroad... have you thought about it? .........................................................22

6.2 Research projects and thesis for fourth-year students ..................................................25

7. Transitioning to post-secondary studies with ease: Help with your University studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

7.1 FSS+ ..................................................................................................26

7.2 First-year seminars: Introduction to Social Science studies ..............................................27

7.3 Customized workshops! ...............................................................................28

7.4 Mentoring Centre .....................................................................................28

7.5 Student Academic Success Service (SASS) ..............................................................28

8. Dates to remember ..................................................................................31

8.1 Important dates .......................................................................................31

8.2 u101 Week ............................................................................................33

9. Financial aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

9.1 My Financial Portfolio .......................................................... 34

9.2 Learn to make your own education budget ..................................... 34

9.3 Jobs on campus: The Work-Study program ...................................... 34

9.4 Scholarships and bursaries ..................................................... 35

10. Know your campus... ..........................................................36

11. About InfoService .............................................................37

Academic Secretariat .............................................................38

Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39

Campus Map .....................................................................43

2012 fall session

begins on September 4

Updated: May 13, 2012. The contents of this handbook are subject to change without notice.


Welcome

Welcome to the Conflict Studies and Human

Rights program. We will be with you over

the next few years, as you discover a field of

study that will shed light on the realities of the

contemporary world, its issues, challenges and

dilemmas. The time is right to take part in a field

of study that is increasing in popularity, prestige

and importance both in Canada and abroad. Our

professors welcome you with enthusiasm to this

exclusive program.

The Conflict Studies and Human Rights program

will initiate you to the theories and debates about

social and political conflict, as well as to the

most central issues in the field of human rights.

The program will allow you to study all forms of

conflict, in various historical and geographical

contexts and from a variety of theoretical

approaches. Furthermore, the program will

provide you with an excellent understanding of

human rights and of how their promotion can

help resolve conflict. The program’s link between

conflict resolution and human rights makes it

unique in Canada. In short, you will receive

a comprehensive and in-depth education in a

comfortable and welcoming environment.

Your education in conflict studies and human rights

will be ideal for a career in government as well as with

international and non governmental organizations.

The program can also lead to graduate studies in a

variety of fields, such as conflict studies, war studies,

conflict resolution, peace and governance studies,

women’s studies and to the Masters in Public and

International Affairs, offered by the University’s

Graduate School of Public and International Affairs.

Christoph Zuercher

Program Coordinator,

Faculty of Social Sciences

- 4 -


Conflict Studies and

Human Rights

What is Conflict Studies and

Human Rights

In this program, you study national and

international conflicts, fundamental human

rights, as well as peace-making efforts and

processes. Among the themes addressed are

the sources of conflict and violence, justice and

democracy, diplomacy and peacekeeping, war

and the foundations of universal human rights.

Career opportunities in Conflict Studies and

Human Rights

Departmental assistant in international relations

Development officer in peace building initiatives

International development officer

Program or project officer

International policy analyst

Conflict resolution worker

Foreign-service officer

Consultant

Link

- 5 -


1

About

the Faculty of Social Sciences

The Graduate School of Public and International

Affairs is one of the academic units that make up

the Faculty of Social Sciences. The Faculty

offers bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees

in both English and French, in nine departments,

schools and institutes. With some 10,000 students,

260 full-time professors, a huge choice of

programs, as well as major research centres where

our master’s and doctoral students conduct

leading-edge research under the direction of

experienced researchers, the Faculty stands

as a cornerstone of the University of Ottawa.

1.1 Professors and research at

the Faculty of Social Sciences

The Faculty of Social Sciences has witnessed

significant growth in terms of research in recent

years. Our professors are active in large national

and international studies in a wide array of

disciplines across all continents. They are leaders

in Canada’s research community and recognized

around the world. They contribute to public

policy and to our well-being by their review of

public, parapublic and community organizations.

They can be found actively participating in

public debates.

The Faculty is further bolstered by researchers

and other in-house professionals who have

considerable experience in government

ministries and in national and international

research centres and NGOs.

Research is at the heart of the Faculty’s

programs. Research and teaching go hand in

hand, providing not only better teaching, but

also more stimulating learning.

- 6 -


2

UNDERSTANDING

HOW

YOUR PROGRAM IS STRUCTURED

2.1 Types of bachelor’s and

program structures

An honours bachelor’s degree requires the

equivalent of four years of study and 120 credits

with a minimum cumulative grade point average

of 4.5 and a minimum diploma grade average

of 5. The degree is required for admission

to graduate studies and is recognized in all

Canadian provinces and abroad.

The three-year general bachelor’s degree

requires the equivalent of three years of study

and 90 credits with a grade point average of 3.5.

The three-year general bachelor’s provides a basic

university education. The program does not lead

to graduate studies and is not always recognized

in other provinces or abroad.

2.2 Initial program structure

If you have been admitted from high-school into

a major at the University of Ottawa, you will

choose the complete structure of your bachelor’s

degree at the end of your first year.

If you have studied at college, been granted

advanced standing and been admitted to

the second year of a major, you must choose

the structure of your bachelor’s during your

first session.

- 7 -


You are admitted to:

International Development and Global Studies (multidisciplinary)

Economics and Public Policy (multidisciplinary)

International Economics and Development (multidisciplinary)

Conflict Studies and Human Rights (multidisciplinary)

International Studies and Modern Languages (multidisciplinary)

Psychology (BSc)

Social Work (offered in French only)

Therefore:

You are admitted to an honours bachelor’s degree

program

You can add a minor, provided that your course of

studies allows for it. The minor replaces 30 credits

worth of elective courses.

Political Science and Juris Doctor (JD) (offered in French only)

Droit civil et développement international et mondialisation

(offered in French only)

You are admitted to an integrated program;

you cannot add a minor

Joint honours bachelor’s degrees

You are admitted to an honours bachelor’s;

you cannot add a minor

Public Administration

Anthropology

Criminology

Women’s Studies

Psychology (BA)

Economics

Political Science

Sociology

You are admitted to an honours bachelor’s

with a major

You must add a second program

(either a major or a minor)

OR

You must transfer to the honours bachelor’s

with specialization

General bachelor’s

You must choose your 3 course blocks

OR

You must register for a minor

- 8 -


The table below shows program combinations, depending

on the type of bachelor’s and on credit distribution.

Type of

bachelor’s

degree

Bachelor of

Social Sciences

(BSocSc)

Honours

BSocSc with

specialization

Duration (years)

Basic skill courses

Disciplinary courses

- First program

Disciplinary courses

- Second program

Elective courses

Total credits

4 6 credits 60 credits 54 credits 120

6

60 54

LEGEND

Basic skill

courses

Disciplinary courses

- First program

Disciplinary courses

- Second program

Elective

courses

Multidisciplinary

honours BSocSc

Honours

BSocSc with

specialization

+ minor

4 6 credits

Between

72 et 78

credits

4 6 credits 60 credits

Minor

30 credits

Between

36 et 42

credits

120

24 credits 120

72

60

6

42

6

24

30

* 18 credits in

three (3)

disciplines,

including two (2)

disciplines

offered by the

Faculty of

Social Sciences.

Honours

BSocSc with

major + major

4 6 credits

Major

42 credits

Major

42 credits

30 credits 120

42

6

30

42

Honours

BSocSc with

major + minor

4 6 credits

Major

42 credits

Minor

30 credits

42 credits 120

42

30

6

42

Joint honours

BSocSc

4 6 credits

Between

36 and 48

credits

Between

36 and 48

credits

Between

18 and 33

credits

120

48

6

18

48

General

BSocSc

3 6 credits

9 credits

SCS

3 x 18

credits*

21 credits 90

9 6

21

54

- 9 -


During your four years as an undergraduate

student, especially in your first year, you will

inevitably touch on material from a variety of

fields. As a result, many combinations of a major

and a minor are possible. We recommend that

you decide according to:

your interest in your second field;

your postgraduate or employment plans.

For more information on your program

structure, speak to one of our academic

advisors. You can schedule an appointment

at the Academic Secretariat.

- 10 -


3

Selecting

your courses

3.1 How to choose your courses

As a student, selecting your courses is your first

responsibility. When making your selection,

consider among other things the following:

your projected academic path, your prerequisite

courses, and your second field of studies. Note

that you will be asked to provide your course

selections for both the fall and winter sessions

when you register online using Rabaska.

Most courses are worth three credits. If you study

full time (normally five courses per session) you

should receive 15 credits per session. Therefore,

you would complete 10 courses from September

to April, for a total of 30 credits after one year and

120 credits after four years of study.

A typical first-year course selection for both the

fall and winter sessions includes:

compulsory courses ENG1100 and either

ENG1120 or ENG1121;

compulsory introductory courses (1000 level) in

your program;

introductory course(s) (1000 level) in another

field of interest (for those who have to add a

major or a minor at the end of their first year);

one or more Faculty-recommended introductory

courses (1000 level), and courses in other fields

you wish to explore.

- 11 -


3.2 If you are admitted into

second year with advanced

standing or exemptions

If you are admitted into the second year of a

program with a major, you must add a second

program. You can also choose to transfer from an

honours bachelor’s with a major to an honours

bachelor’s with specialization (if your admission

average allows), or to a joint honours bachelor’s

in the same field of study. Academic advisors and

assistants at the Academic Secretariat are ready

to answer your questions.

Students admitted into second year with advanced

standing or exemptions from a college in Quebec

(CÉGEP) or from an Ontario College of Applied

Arts and Technology (OCAAT) must consult

their offer of admission while selecting courses.

The letter contains details about advanced

standing and exemptions. Advanced standing

and exemptions are granted most often for firstyear

(1000 level) courses, but also on occasion

for second-year (2000 level) courses. As such,

students can register (respectively) for second or

third-year courses (2000 and 3000 level) in that

same field. Please note that to meet your degree

requirements, replace courses for which you have

been granted advanced standing with courses

having the same number of credits.

If you have not received advanced standing or

exemptions for the courses below, you must

register for them:

both compulsory courses: ENG1100 and either

ENG1120 or ENG1121;

compulsory introductory (1000 level) courses

in your program. However, if you have been

granted advanced standing for one or more

of these courses, you may replace them with

2000-level courses in the same field;

introductory (1000 level) course(s) from your

second field of study. If you have been granted

advanced standing for one or more courses, you

may replace them with 2000-level courses in the

same field.

Please do not register for 3000 and 4000-level

courses when you are in second year. Selecting

2000-level courses in second year gives you a

better opportunity to learn the fundamentals in

your field.

- 12 -


3.3 Use the following resources

Before selecting your courses, you should consult

the following resources:

the online list of recommended electives and

the suggested sequence of compulsory courses;

the Faculty’s team of academic assistants and

advisors who are ready to help you; they provide

guidance on the various decisions you have

to make throughout your studies; they also

offer details about procedures, forms, online

registration tools, as well as answers to all your

general questions.

The Faculty highly recommends that you

register for SCS1150 Introduction to Studying the

Social Sciences, a course based on work methods

in the social sciences.

A four-year program is a big

commitment. That’s why it’s

important to choose a field that

you are passionate about.

- 13 -


4

REGISTERING

FOR COURSES ONLINE:

Step By Step

Rabaska is the University of Ottawa’s online

registration tool. You use it not only to register

for your courses, but also to keep track of your

academic record and course of studies. It is

important to familiarize yourself with your

course of studies while using Rabaska.

4.1 Registration

Course registration is a critical step because it

validates your admission to a program.

4.1.1 Register early

It is recommended that you register for your

fall and winter courses as early as possible, as

soon as you have access to Rabaska. If you delay

your registration, your courses may fill up or be

cancelled for lack of registrations.

You can also register in person at the Faculty of

Social Sciences’ Academic Secretariat, which is

located at 120 University Street (Social Sciences

Building), room 3010. If you choose to register

in person, be sure to bring the list of courses,

course codes and sections for which you would

like to register (ex: SOC1105, section A).

- 14 -


4.1.3 Prepare your

personalized timetable

4.1.2 Plan your course

selection and schedule

Each degree program has its own course

requirements. Use your program’s requirements

to determine the course(s) you must or

would like to take. A suggested sequence for

compulsory courses is available for some

programs. Given that some courses are

prerequisite to others, you should follow the

suggested sequence of compulsory courses

posted on the Faculty website. See undergraduate

studies calendars online for more detailed

information on programs and courses.

By clicking on Audit in Rabaska, you can generate

five different reports based on your program

requirements:

Full report—shows program conditions,

the credits obtained and your completed

requirements.

Short report—shows a summary of your

academic progress, without the program

conditions

Program of studies report—similar to the full

report, but without the legend

Incomplete requirements report—shows only

the requirements in your program that are left

to complete

Exemptions report—shows only the exemptions

you have been granted for your program

- 15 -


4.1.4 Select your courses

and register

Step 1

The Registration section in Rabaska allows you to

register for your courses in three steps:

Find a course: If you know the codes of the courses for

which you wish to register, enter them in the first field,

one at a time. You can also search for a course from a list

or select a course from one of your Audit reports. Enter the

session and course section desired in the textbox next to

each course selected.

Step 2

Select a course: The courses you selected will appear in your

Cart. Please note that you are not officially registered and

that the cart does not reserve a place for you in the course.

However, the cart does allow you to view your timetable

using the link on the left of the webpage. To register for the

selected courses, add a checkmark in the box next to each

course, and then select Registration from the drop-down

menu at the bottom of the section. Be sure to confirm

your registration.

Step 3

Confirm your registration: Once your registration is

confirmed, the courses appear in your Registered courses

list. You can modify your registration for a course or

section by selecting from the drop-down menu at the

bottom of the page.

4.1.5 Confirm your course

selection and print your timetable

Once your online registration is complete,

remember to keep your registration confirmation

number for future reference. You can now print

your personalized timetable from Rabaska.

Consult your timetable on Rabaska shortly

before the start of each session, in case course

schedules or locations have changed.

4.1.6 Pay your fees

To finalize your registration, you must pay your

tuition fees before the deadline. View your

account balance on uoZone under Statement

of Account.

E-billing is now the University’s official billing

method. No invoices are sent to you by mail.

Your e-bill indicates the amount due at a specific

moment in time and is issued at the beginning

of each session. You can view your regularly

updated Statement of Account on uoZone.

- 16 -


5

ONCE

YOUR

STUDIES BEGIN...

Be mindful of your time management. Considering a

part-time job? Not more than 10 to 15 hours per week.

Your job is to study. Read the following carefully:

One university course = 180 hours per session

AND

(Number of courses X Number of hours) = Number of study hours per week

Number of weeks

THEREFORE

A student with a full course load (five) should spend 45 hours per week attending classes and

discussion groups, reading, completing assignments and studying.

Being a student is a full-time job!

- 17 -


The three best ways

to pass a course

Use University resources

You are responsible for your academic success and we

are here to help you. If you’re struggling with a course

or an assignment, talk to your professor or teaching

assistant. The Student Academic Success Service (SASS)

and the Academic Writing Help Centre are also key

resources you should consider using.

Be ready (eat, sleep, study)

A healthy mind in a healthy body, wrote the poet

Juvenal. By paying special attention to your physical

and psychological well-being, you’ll be more alert,

you’ll be better able to concentrate, and you will

learn more.

Be there

While some professors do post their class notes on

Virtual Campus, this does not exempt you from

attending class. The best path to success is to be present

and attentive in class. That way, you can ask questions,

learn information that is not found in the manual

or in the course notes and discuss the material with

your classmates.

- 18 -

The three best ways

to fail a course

Underestimate the time it takes to complete

assignments, and hand them in late

University assignments require time and effort.

They also require research and help you develop the

ability for critical thinking. Waiting until the last

minute to write a 15-page report is a fool-proof way

to fail a course.

Don’t read the syllabus

The course syllabus outlines all course-related

information: assignment deadlines, learning objectives,

the professor’s instructions and expectations, etc.

Not reading it will prevent you from asking pertinent

questions and from planning your assignments

effectively.

Give in to distractions during class

Facebook, chatting, text messaging, email and so on are

not required for class...Avoid them! Don’t be distracted.

Part-time job? Not more

than 10 to 15 hours

per week.


Your 4 years of studies at a glance!

1 st year 2 nd year 3 rd year 4 th year

Courses

Gain the fundamental

knowledge you’ll need to

succeed in your study of

social sciences. Attend

introductory courses in a

number of disciplines.

First-year seminars in the

Introduction to Studying

the Social Sciences course

(SCS1150-1550)

For more information,

see your course sequence.*

Learn about the main

issues in your field.

Develop your capacity

for analysis and critical

thinking, and your

research skills.

Take the Directed

Research in Social

Sciences course

(SCS4150-4550)

Do your first internship

in social work (SVS3620)

If you are studying

psychology, have an

information session

about your thesis.

Develop your ability to

synthesize information

and concepts. Reinforce

your analytical and

research skills, as well as

your creativity and ethical

judgement.

Take the Directed

Research in Social

Sciences course

(SCS4150-4550)

Do your second internship

in social work (SVS3620)

Do your internship in

criminology (CRM4660)

Enrolled in the honours

bachelor’s in Psychology?

Take the psychology

thesis course.

Workshops

*

Tools for success!

Attend a library

workshop*

Learn to use these tools:

i. Refworks

ii. Assignment calculator*

Sign-up to a variety

of workshops: time

management, exam

preparation, etc*

Visit the Mentoring Centre*

Sign-up to a variety

of workshops: time

management, exam

preparation, etc

Attend workshops at

the Counselling Service,

Career Services and in the

Academic Writing Help

Centre to gain a better

grasp of the essential skills

needed for personal and

academic success.

Attend workshops offered

by the Counselling

Service, Career Services

and the Academic writing

Help Centre to gain a

better grasp of the skills

needed for personal and

academic success.

Second year students admitted from an Ontario College (OCAAT) or from a CEGEP must pay particular attention

to these points from the moment they arrive at the University.

Attend workshops offered

by the Counselling

Service, Career Services

and the Academic writing

Help Centre to gain a

better grasp of the skills

needed for personal and

academic success.

- 19 -


Your 4 years of studies at a glance!

1 st year 2 nd year 3 rd year 4 th year

Second Language

A market advantage!

Attend the secondlanguage

conversation

workshops.

Take FLS3500 and

the Second Language

Certification Test.

French-speaking

international students

have access to the RAAFI

program.

Attend the secondlanguage

conversation

workshops.

Take FLS3500 and

the Second Language

Certification Test.

French-speaking

international students

have access to the RAAFI

program.

Attend the secondlanguage

conversation

workshops.

Take FLS3500 and

the Second Language

Certification Test.

Attend the secondlanguage

conversation

workshops.

Last chance to take

FLS3500 and to write

the Second Language

Certification Test.

CO-OP

Work experience

while you study

There is still time to

register for the CO-OP

program.*

Last chance to register

(September 30). First

summer internship.

Prepare to submit your

internship report in the

fall of your third year.

*You will receive your

placement and attend

various workshops.

Submit your summer

CO-OP report.

Complete your winter

session internship.

Return to class in the

summer.

Complete your fall

session internship.

International exchange

*

A memorable learning experience

Would you like to

participate in an

international exchange in

a country where neither

English nor French is

spoken? Register for a

language course: fall

session (code 1911 or

1991); winter session

(code 1912 or 1992)*

Would you like to

participate in an

international exchange in

a country where neither

English nor French is

spoken? Register for a

language course: fall

session (code 2911 or

2991); winter session

(code 2912 or 2992)

Submit your student

exchange program

application form and

attend pre-departure

workshops in the winter

session.

Go on an international

exchange this year.

Submit your student

exchange program

application form and

attend pre-departure

workshops in the winter

session.

Second year students admitted from an Ontario College (OCAAT) or from a CEGEP must pay particular attention

to these points from the moment they arrive at the University.

Go on an international

exchange this year.

- 20 -


Your 4 years of studies at a glance!

1 st year 2 nd year 3 rd year 4 th year

Field research

course

A unique way to

learn

Would you like to take

a field research course

next May? You can, if you

complete 54 university

credits by next April.

Attend the information

session in October for

more details.

Apply for your field

research course and

submit the required

documents in the fall.

Departure in the first

week of May, for three

weeks.

Apply for your field

research course and

submit the required

documents in the fall.

Departure in the first

week of May, for three

weeks.

International internships

Your turn to make a difference

Internships take place

during the third and

fourth years of the

program. Schedule

all your remaining

compulsory courses so

that you can complete an

internship in the semester

of your choice: fall, winter

or summer.

Internships take place

during the third and

fourth years of the

program.

At the beginning of

the session, attend the

information session on

available internships and

submit your application

so that next session you

can do an internship

abroad. Internships take

place in the fall, winter

and summer.

Internships take place

during the third and

fourth years of the

program.

At the beginning of

the session, attend the

information session on

available internships and

submit your application

so that next session you

can do an internship

abroad. Internships take

place in the fall, winter

and summer.

Course of studies

*

For help establishing

your course of studies,

meet with the first-year

academic advisor.*

For help selecting your

courses, your second

program, etc., meet with

an academic assistant or

advisor at the Academic

Secretariat.

For help selecting your

courses, your second

program, etc., meet with

an academic assistant or

advisor at the Academic

Secretariat.

Second year students admitted from an Ontario College (OCAAT) or from a CEGEP must pay particular attention

to these points from the moment they arrive at the University.

Get started, whether

that means landing a job

or preparing graduate

studies. Have your

curriculum up to date

and ready for potential

employers.

Graduation is

approaching. Consult

with an academic

advisor at the Academic

Secretariat to ensure

that you have met all

the requirements.

- 21 -


6

Other

ways to learn!

The University of Ottawa’s Faculty of Social

Sciences offers programs that are both diversified

and adapted to the realities of today. In addition

to its single-discipline programs, the Faculty

has a full range of multidisciplinary programs

that focus on today’s most pressing social issues.

The skills you acquire in the social sciences

will enable you to reach your personal and

professional goals.

6.1 Studying abroad...

have you thought about it?

6.1.1 Exchange programs

International exchange: where to?

Germany,Argentina,Austria,South Korea,Spain,

United States,France,Italy,Japan,Norway,

United Kingdom,Switzerland,Sweden,etc.

As a University of Ottawa student, you have

the option of studying abroad. Find out more

about the exchange programs offered by the

University of Ottawa’s International Office. If

you’re interested in a national or international

exchange, you have to attend an information

session before submitting an application.

The University of Ottawa has signed over

250 agreements with universities in more than

40 countries. More than 150 Faculty students

take advantage of the experience each year.

You can also receive one of our student mobility

bursaries in the process.

- 22 -


In order to be eligible for the Student Exchange

Program, you must:

be a Canadian citizen, a permanent resident or

an international student admitted to a regular

undergraduate, graduate or postgraduate degree

program at the University of Ottawa;

be registered as a full-time undergraduate,

graduate or postgraduate student at the time

of the exchange;

have completed at least 24 university credits by

the application deadline; you normally submit

your application during the second year of your

undergraduate studies. If you’re from CEGEP,

you can apply during your first year of

university studies.

The University of Ottawa offers mobility

scolarships to all students admitted to an

exchange program. Students on an international

exchange receive $1,000 for one session and

$2,000 for two sessions abroad. Students on a

national exchange receive $500 for one session

and $1,000 for two sessions.

6.1.2 Field research courses

Every May, the Faculty of Social Sciences offers

field-research courses in several countries. The

courses can be worth six credits towards your

program. Once there, in the company of your

professor, you attend lectures by professionals

and professors from the host country. You

also visit local organizations, meet with local

stakeholders and partake in many stimulating

educational activities.

6.1.3 International internships

Intern abroad, experience life in the developing

world and refine your knowledge in the field

of international development. Internships are

12 weeks and can count for six credits in your

program. International internships are offered to

individuals registered in a Faculty

of Social Sciences program.

- 23 -


The internship helped me realize that I am on the right track,both

in terms of my studies and my career. I learned a lot and was able

to apply the methods, strategies and interventions that I had learned

in class. My international exchange allowed me to find myself–in a

different context. As a future social worker, I know that the ability to

adapts is an important quality to develop; the experience force me out of

my comfort zone and into a different, challenging environment. It also

confirmed that social work is the right career for me.

Céline Brisson,

World University Service of Canada,

4 th year, Honours BSocSc with specialization in Social Work

- 24 -


6.2 Research projects and

thesis for fourth-year students

6.1.4 Model United

Nations course

The Faculty offers fourth-year students

(81 credits completed) with a minimum

8.0 cumulative grade point average a variety

of opportunities to work closely with professors

on actual research projects. Participation is

credited as an elective course (three credits)

and helps students decide if they want to pursue

graduate studies or enter the workplace.

Through in-class activities, you gain

understanding and experience in international

diplomacy and current issues, as well as

confidence in your communication skills.

To cap off the course, you participate in the

prestigious National Model United Nations

conference in New York City.

- 25 -


7

TRANSITIONING

TO POST-SECONDARY

STUDIES WITH EASE: HELP WITH YOUR

UNIVERSITY STUDIES

7.1 FSS+

In recent years, the Faculty of Social Sciences

has provided students with a variety of new

tools to ease their integration into university

life and foster their academic success. Your

university experience not only fills you with new

knowledge, but can also lead you, both at home

and abroad, to experiences that broaden your

horizons and expand your know-how.

Join FSS+ for the 2012-2013 academic year.

The FSS+ program, available exclusively to

first-year students of the Faculty of Social

Sciences, offers you a unique learning experience

that promotes your academic success at the

University of Ottawa, while allowing you to

forge links with your classmates.

With FSS+, you have access to a variety of prime

resources that make it easier for you to get

accustomed to university and to help you excel

in your courses: exclusive study sessions, courses

with few students, student mentorship, a host

of workshops, information sessions, cultural

activities, etc.

- 26 -


7.2 First-year seminars:

Introduction to Social

Science studies

7.1.1 Successful integration

Special activities allow FSS+ members to tap into

all of the services at the University, including:

the Library

the Academic Writing Help Centre

Career Services

the Mentoring Centre

Introduction to Studying the Social Sciences

(SCS1150) is a course offered to all first-year

students of the Faculty of Social Sciences. In

addition to making your transition to university

smoother, the course acquaints you with Faculty

practices and requirements. It is specifically

designed to introduce you to social science

research and subject matter, as well as to provide

an introduction to the courses and resource

materials you can expect in your program.

The professors selected to teach this course bring

their unique experience and expertise to the

sessions, recommended readings, discussions

and assignments on a wide array of topics: the

environment, globalization, social exclusion,

politics, etc. Space is reserved in this course for

interested FSS+ students.

Only 30 spots are available though, so register early!

- 27 -


7.3 Customized workshops!

In collaboration with the Student Academic

Success Service and the Mentoring Centre, we

offer a broad range of specialized workshops on

writing techniques, career development, and

other topics related to your student experience.

You also meet fascinating people and make

exciting discoveries through these sessions.

Sign up online.

7.4 Mentoring

Centre

The objective of the Faculty of Social Sciences

Mentoring Centre is to lend a helping hand, be

it for academic or personal issues, and regardless

of your program or year level. The Centre offers

a place to talk about study strategies and about

university life in general. Mentors are advanced

students who have received special training and

can answer your questions quickly and clearly.

All Faculty of Social Sciences students can use

the Centre’s services.

7.4.1 How to find a mentor

To make an appointment or to speak with a

mentor, go to the Mentoring Centre. You can

also ask to speak with a student in the same

program as you.

Consult our many guides and online tools

intended to provide some advice on how to best

manage your academic and private life: exam

preparation, time management, note taking,

memorization, etc. For more information,

consult the Mentoring Centre’s FAQ.

7.5 Student Academic Success

Service (SASS)

Student Academic Success Service is a free

network of tools and resources designed

to stimulate your learning by, for example,

supporting you in your efforts to achieve your

academic and professional objectives. To find out

more about how SASS can make your students

experience all the more fulfilling, stop by to

meet with the experts and student assistants on

staff, who’ve received comprehensive training to

answer your questions and needs effectively.

- 28 -


SASS at a glance

Student

Mentoring

Acquire strategies and skills to help

you in first year, to plan for your

career or to guide you through to

graduate studies.

Study groups, workshops;

Study skills;

Private sessions with a mentor

UCU 333

613-562-5800

ext. 2707

sass@uOttawa.ca

Academic

Writing

Help Centre

(AWHC)

Learn to properly structure your

assignments, to understand and

correct your errors and to avoid

plagiarism.

Private sessions with writing

advisors;

Online resource on writing,

referencing, essay structure and

grammar

110 University

613-562-5601

cartu@uOttawa.ca

Career

Services

Call on a range of services and

resources to transition successfully

into the labour market.

Online resources to plan your

career in Canada or abroad;

Workshops and individual consults

with professional advisors;

UCU 312

613-562-5806

scs@uOttawa.ca

Résumé and cover letter revision,

mock interviews

Access

Service

If you have a learning disability

or any other functional limitation

(cognitive, psychological,

psychiatric, medical, physical or

sensory), book an appointment

with one of Access Services’

specialists in order to develop and

implement a learning strategy

designed to unleash your full

potential as a student.

Needs assessment and personalized

academic support;

Coping with exams;

Transcription service into Braille

and other alternative formats

UCU 339

613-562-5976

adapt@uOttawa.ca

- 29 -


SASS at a glance

Counselling

and

Coaching

Service

Counsellors and coaches are ready

to help resolve personal difficulties

and to support you in defining

your objectives—all in an effort to

help you achieve optimal academic

success.

Career counselling and personal

counselling;

Career coaching and personal

coaching;

Psychoeducational groups

100 Marie-Curie,

4 th floor

613-562-5200

couns@uOttawa.ca

Aboriginal

Ressource

Centre

(ARC)

The Aboriginal Resource Centre

provides First Nations, Inuit and

Métis students with a culturally

sensitive and welcoming space.

Help with transition to

university life;

Information on employment

opportunities

UCU 215D

613-562-5800

ext. 4529 or 4566

arc-cra@uOttawa.ca

Office for the

Prevention of

Discrimination

and

Harassment

You can safely discuss, report and

resolve situations where you feel

discrimination or harassment has

taken place.

Confidential consults;

Individual support and resolution

of student complaints

100 Marie-Curie,

4 th floor

613-562-5222

respect@uOttawa.ca

- 30 -


8 DATES

TO REMEMBER

8.1 Important Dates - From the University calendar

Fall 2012 - Winter 2013

Fall 2012 Winter 2013

Beginning of registration (newly admitted first year students –

undergraduate)

June

June

Last day to register without late registration fees

(regular undergraduate students)

September 7 January 7

Last day to pay tuition fees without late payment fees August 29 December 12

Session begins: faculties, schools and departments hold

welcome activities for the new student cohort.

Student attendance is mandatory

September 4

Courses begin September 5 January 7

Last day to modify a course selection or a program of study September 19 January 18

Reading week October 21 to 27 February 11 to 23

Last day to withdraw from a course November 16 March 15

Courses end December 5 April 9

Examinations December 7 to 20 April 11 to 24

Final grades are posted on the Web and considered official January 18 May 13

- 31 -


Check the University calendar

regularly for important dates

and deadlines.

Holidays 2012 - 2013

Spring 2012

May-July

Summer 2012

July-August

Fall 2013

Sept.-Dec.

Winter 2013

January-April

Victoria Day May 21

Canada Day July 1

Civic holiday August 6

Labour Day September 3

Thanksgiving October 8

Christmas and New Year’s

holidays (inclusive)

December 21 to January 6

Family Day February 18

Easter Break

March 29

to April 1

- 32 -


8.2 u101 Week

September means back to school for

the University of Ottawa’s more than

40,000 students, and orientation week is an

exciting time for newcomers and returnees alike.

The Student Academic Support Service (SASS),

in collaboration with Community Life Service

and the student associations, organizes academic

and social activities that take place from the end

of August to mid-September.

Students already familiar with the University

are there to greet you. They help you find your

way around campus, become familiar with the

various University programs and services, and

settle in to your residence room. Orientation

week is also the chance for returning students

to give you Gee-Gees fever!

- 33 -


9 financial

aid

Several options are available to you, including

bursaries, government financial aid, and the

Work-Study program.

9.1 My Financial Portfolio

My Financial Portfolio is a new online tool that

centralizes all your Financial Aid and Awards

Services: scholarship applications, government

financial aid, the Work-Study program,

statement of account and much more.

My Financial Portfolio is available

through uoZone.

9.2 Learn to make your own

education budget

The Financial Aid and Awards webpage has

tools to help you estimate your yearly income

and expenses, and plan a budget; it also offers an

example of the average cost of an academic year.

- 34 -

9.3 Jobs on campus:

The Work-Study program

Through the Work-Study program at the

University of Ottawa, you can find a part-time

job on campus that allows you to earn money

and gain experience without disrupting your

all-important course schedule. You qualify for

the program if your file demonstrates a need for

financial support.

Thanks to the new Work-Study Navigator (WSN)

accessible through uoZone, it is now easier

than ever to apply to some 1,000 jobs available

on campus. These part-time positions are open

to students who need financial support. They

offer flexible hours that will help you keep your

studies at the top of your list of priorities.

Complete the Work-Study application form

available through uoZone, using the Work-Study

Navigator.

You can obtain information on other on

and off-campus jobs at Career Services.

Come see us in room 312 of the University Centre.


9.4 Scholarships and bursaries

To help you on the road to success, the

University of Ottawa offers many generous

scholarships and bursaries. The University

is proud to have one of the most generous

scholarship and bursary programs in Canada.

Over 30 million dollars in scholarships and

bursaries were awarded last year.

To apply for scholarships and bursaries, please

see Online scholarships and bursaries, which

you can access through uoZone; it provides

a complete directory—including eligibility

requirements—of the scholarships and bursaries

offered by the Faculty of Social Sciences.

For more information, consult the FAQ—

Scholarships and Bursaries section on the

University of Ottawa’s scholarships and bursaries

Web page. Also, see the list of scholarships and

bursaries offered by the Faculty, according to

your academic unit or program.

- 35 -


10 KNOW YOUR CAMPUS…

The University of Ottawa campus will be

your home for the next four years. Before the

fall session begins, take the time to find your

favourite spots to study, relax and socialize. Find

out where your classrooms are and the best way

to get to the library, to the sports facilities or

from one end of campus to the other.

- 36 -


11 About

in f o ser vice

InfoService offers chat sessions to answer

your questions, Monday through Friday.

InfoService is a one-stop-shop providing the

student population with a wide array of services

and information, in particular for admission,

registration, and financial transactions. Services

are offered in person, by telephone, fax or email.

Start a chat session with InfoService through

uoZone.

InfoService

Tabaret Hall

75 Laurier Avenue East

Ottawa (Ontario) K1N 6N5

613-562-5700

Fax: 613-562-5323

infoservice@uOttawa.ca

Toll Free: 1-877-868-8292

*

When locating a room (classroom, lab, service,

etc.), keep in mind that the first three letters

indicate the name of the building. If you are

looking for FSS3010, for example, the first

three letters tell you that the room is in the

Social Sciences building (FSS). The first one or

two numbers indicate the floor (3 rd ), and the

following numbers indicate the room number.

- 37 -


Academic Secretariat

Social Sciences Building

120 University Street, Room 3010

Ottawa (Ontario) K1N 6N5

Canada

613-562-5709

Fax: 613-562-5311

socialsciences@uOttawa.ca

Office hours

Monday to Friday

September to May:

9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

June to August:

9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

- 38 -


Glossary

The following definitions will help you become

familiar with common university terminology.

They are not, however, considered official

definitions when interpreting university or

faculty regulations.

ACADEMIC YEAR – An expression normally

used to describe the period between the start of

the fall session (September) and the end of the

winter session (April).

ADMISSION – Approval to register in a program

of study at the University. Admission is valid

only for the session indicated on the offer and is

cancelled if it is not followed by registration.

ADVANCED STANDING – Recognizing a course

previously completed at another academic

institution as part of the student’s program of

study at the University of Ottawa.

ANNUAL GRADE POINT AVERAGE (AGPA) –

Measure of the student’s performance over all

courses taken during an academic year (May

through April).

BACHELOR; BACHELOR’S DEGREE;

BACCALAUREATE – An undergraduate degree

conferred upon completion of a three- or fouryear

program of studies.

CALENDAR – Document containing the

official descriptions of programs of study,

degree requirements and courses, as well as

faculty and university regulations.

CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION; CO-OP – An

academic stream offered in certain honours

bachelor’s programs where academic sessions

alternate with paid work terms (placements).

COMPLEMENTARY PROGRAM – A program

for which there is no direct admission (ex:

complementary minor), but is instead taken in

addition to a student’s main program.

COMPULSORY COURSE – Any obligatory

course taken to fulfill core-education and

program-specific requirements.

COURSE – A set of teaching and learning

activities for which the calendar definition has

been approved by Senate.

CREDIT – The numerical value assigned to

an academic activity. With the exception of

internships in the Co-operative Education

program, intensive internships which take place

over long periods, and for research projects,

a credit generally represents 45 hours of work

including attendance in class and online (lectures,

labs, practical training), personal work, practical

and other assignments and exam preparation.

- 39 -


CUMULATIVE GRADE POINT AVERAGE

(CGPA) – Measure of the student’s performance

over all courses that make up his or her program

of studies.

DIPLOMA GRADE POINT AVERAGE (DGPA) –

Special measure of the student’s academic record

required to obtain a bachelor’s degree.

DISCUSSION GROUP (DGD) - A class during

which guided group discussions provide further

exploration of various aspects of the subject

matter covered during lectures.

ELECTIVE – A course chosen from all courses

offered by the University of Ottawa. Electives

are a part of the degree requirements but are

not part of the core-education or the disciplinary

program of studies (including compulsory and

optional courses)

FACULTY – Administrative entity consisting in

several departments or academic units (Faculty

of Arts, Faculty of Social Sciences, Faculty of

Engineering, etc.).

FULL-TIME – Status of a student registered for

12 credits or more during a session.

GENERAL BACHELOR; GENERAL BACHELOR’S

DEGREE; GENERAL BACCALAUREATE –

Undergraduate degree requiring the equivalent

of three or four years of studies and, respectively,

90 or 120 credits with the required cumulative

grade point average (CGPA). Offered in Arts,

Science and Social Sciences, the general bachelor’s

provides a basic university education in either of

two streams: three-year (with or without a minor)

or four-year (with a major or a double minor).

GRADE POINT AVERAGE (GPA) – A measure

of academic performance corresponding to the

sum of the final grade values times the number

of credits for each course, divided by the total

number of credits attempted.

GRADE POINT AVERAGE of CREDITED

COURSES (GPACC) – Measure of the student’s

performance considered during a faculty transfer,

a change of program or a re-admission.

GRADE REPORT – Document that presents the

academic results obtained by a student during

an academic session.

HONOURS BACHELOR; HONOURS

BACHELOR’S DEGREE; HONOURS

BACCALAUREATE – An undergraduate degree

requiring the equivalent of four years of study

and at least 120 credits with the required

cumulative grade point average (CGPA)

and diploma grade point average (DGPA).

HONOURS BACHELOR’S with

SPECIALIZATION – Degree conferred upon

completion of a program requiring in-depth

training in a single discipline or in an

interdisciplinary area of studies with a

minimum of 54 credits in the discipline

or interdisciplinary area.

INFOWEB – The University’s secure online

services system, where students have remote

access by computer to a variety of services and

can make many transactions related to their

academic life. Both a student number and

password are required to access InfoWeb.

- 40 -


INTEGRATED PROGRAM – A four-year

undergraduate program requiring 36 credits in

two disciplines, allowing for a dual specialization

(ex: philosophy and political science; psychology

and linguistics).

INTERNATIONAL or NATIONAL EXCHANGE

PROGRAM – Program available to students

at the University of Ottawa who are interested

in studying at another Canadian university or

abroad for one session or an entire academic year.

LECTURE – A course in which the subject matter

is communicated orally to a class requiring

limited student participation.

MAJOR – Intensive training in a main discipline

or field of study, consisting of 42 credits in

the discipline or field of study, of which 18 for

courses at the 3000 level or above and at least

6 credits at the 4000 level.

MINOR – Introductory-level training in a branch

or sub-branch of a particular discipline, requiring

30 credits—at least 6 of which at the 3000 level

or above.

MULTIDISCIPLINARY PROGRAM – A program

requiring students to take courses in at least

three disciplines (International Development

and Global Studies, Conflict Studies and

Human Rights, Economics and Public Policy,

International Economics and Development,

International Studies and Modern Languages)

OPTIONAL COURSE – A course included in the

program requirements, which must be chosen

within a given disciplinary field or a specific list

of courses.

PART-TIME – Status of a student registered for

fewer than 12 credits during a session.

PROGRAM OF STUDIES – A set of courses or

other work that must be successfully completed

before qualifying for a degree, certificate or grade

from the University.

RABASKA – Web application enabling students

to explore program and degree requirements,

to perform various course related activities

(registration, replacement, etc.), to view courses

completed, remaining and those to be re-taken in

order to earn a degree.

REGISTRAR (Office of the) – The unit

responsible for registrations and admissions, for

filing academic records, and for the publication

of course descriptions, timetables, and calendars.

REGISTRATION – A formal notice in which

students show the courses they are taking in

a session.

REGULAR STUDENT – A person who has been

admitted to a program of study leading to an

undergraduate degree, diploma or certificate at

the University of Ottawa, and who is registered

for one or more courses in that program.

RETAINED CREDITS – Credits for courses

completed in one program of studies at the

University that are recognized as part of the

requirements of a new program to which a

student has transferred and are counted in the

determination of the grade point average in the

new program.

SCHOLARSHIP – A scholarship is non-repayable

financial assistance that is awarded on the basis

of academic or other merit, or to assist a student

continue his or her studies (studies scholarship).

- 41 -


SECTION – Most Faculty of Sciences courses

are offered more than once per session. A letter

following the course code identifies the course

section. For example, SOC2511A (SOC2511,

section A) is offered on Mondays at 8:30 a.m.,

whereas SOC2511B (SOC2511, section B) is

offered on Tuesdays at 1 p.m.

SESSION – Period during which the University’s

academic activities take place (Fall session:

September to December; Winter session: January

to April; Spring-summer session: May to August).

In general, the fall and winter sessions run

15 weeks each, including the exam period. The

spring-summer session breaks down into subsessions

with a varying numbers of weeks.

SESSIONAL DATES – A list of the dates

corresponding to important deadlines or events

during the academic year for different sessions

(i.e., fall, winter, summer sessions).

SESSIONAL GRAD POINT AVERAGE (SGPA) –

Measure of the student’s overall performance for

all courses in a given session.

SPECIAL STUDENT – A person who is allowed

by the University to register for undergraduate

courses in order to obtain university credits, but

who is not seeking an undergraduate degree,

certificate or diploma from the University.

TRANSCRIPT – An official and confidential

document issued by the University of Ottawa at

the student’s request which indicates all courses

and corresponding results for which a student is

officially registered at the University.

TRANSFER CREDITS – Credits for courses

completed at another university, which

are recognized and counted as part of the

requirements of a program of studies at the

University of Ottawa (see also Advanced

Standing).

UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES / STUDENT –

University studies leading to a bachelor’s degree

or an undergraduate certificate; a person

pursuing such studies.

UOZONE – The University’s secured online

information system. Students are able to complete

a variety of study-related transactions online.

Requires a student number and a password.

WORK TERM – A study-related work experience

(paid or unpaid)

- 42 -


Campus Map























InfoService

75






Laurier
















































































































































































































































































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