FREEDOM - The Spectrum Magazine - Redwood City's Monthly ...

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FREEDOM - The Spectrum Magazine - Redwood City's Monthly ...

Sea Scouts Celebrates

Are you ready to

“Paint the Town?”

FREEDOM

OF SPEECH ISSUES

in “As I Was Saying... ”


The Spectrum.AUG.2012

Table of Contents

Inside The Spectrum – 4

RCSD Corner – 5

“As I Was Saying...” – 6

Cultural Events – 11

Obituaries – 12

Shop Redwood City – 14

Ahoy, Mate! Sea Scouts

Celebrates 100th Year – 16

Artists to “Paint the Town”

and Then Give Back – 20

Community Interest – 27

Senior Activities – 28

Insurance Tips:

Learner’s Permits and

Parental Responsibilities – 29

Welcome to the August 2012 issue of The Spectrum Magazine. The summer is still heating up our

community, and we know the stories and features we have for you this month will warm you up as well.

Our cover story is on a local group that has been sailing for years and continues to do so. The

Sea Scouts organization is celebrating its 100th anniversary this year. In contributing writer

Julie McCoy’s story, you will learn that camaraderie is a huge aspect of the program and has

provided many in our community with the opportunity to create lifelong relationships.

A great community event is planned for Saturday, Sept. 9, at Courthouse Square, and The

Spectrum is informing you about all of the “Paint the Town” activities for the day. The event will

concentrate on fine art, and our story will tell you all about the Redwood City Art Center and

the role they play in our community.

In publisher Steve Penna’s column, “As I Was Saying…,” he discusses the issues of freedom

of speech, censorship and the county wanting more sales tax dollars from us all.

We also bring you our regular features on senior activities, items of community interest,

cultural and entertainment events, insurance tips from Hector Flamenco, information from the

Redwood City School District and the popular feature “A Minute With.”

In all communities, businesses are an important component because they create sales tax

revenues that contribute to the overall city budget while providing much-needed services to

the community. In that spirit, we encourage you to support our valuable Spectrum advertisers

by using their services when you are out shopping, dining or enjoying yourself in our

community with friends and family. Many of them have special offers for you to cut out and

present, including discounts on services, food and beverages, so please take the time to look

over their ads this month and use their coupons and discounts.

We also want to remind you that when you are looking for up-to-the-minute information about

our community, you can visit us online at www.spectrummagazine.net.

Now get out and enjoy Redwood City!

Steve Penna

Owner and Publisher

penna@spectrummagazine.net

Anne Callery

Copy Editor

writers@spectrummagazine.net

James Massey

Graphic Designer

007massey@gmail.com

James R. Kaspar

Cover/Cover Story Photography

staff@spectrummagazine.net

A Minute With

Julie Mooney – 30

Dale McKee

Julie McCoy

Contributing Writers

writers@spectrummagazine.net

Contact Information:

Phone 650-368-2434

www.spectrummagazine.net

The Spectrum 3


Inside The Spectrum: Cover Story Photo Shoot

This month’s cover photo shoot was arranged by Spectrum publisher

Steve Penna through email correspondence with Mike Marzano. The

shoot was scheduled for Saturday, July 28, at 9 a.m. at the Sea Scout

Ship Gryphon at the Port Corrin of Redwood Rankin

City, 675 Seaport Blvd.

Penna was volunteering all day at the PAL Blues Festival, so he

could not attend the shoot. That meant cover photographer James

Kaspar had to go solo. He arrived at Wharf No. 5, the home port of

the Redwood 6

368-2660

City Sea Scouts, a few minutes after 9 a.m. It was not

an easy spot for him to find, but thankfully the driver of another car,

whom 5he flagged down, was also going there and he followed him.

Just another example of how our community responds to each other.

Kaspar was immediately met by Commodore Marzano, whom

he had 0known previously when both worked for the County of San

Mateo and worked together on some court safety issues. He then

talked with various members of the chapter, including Don Blum, a

retired commodore

234

who

Marshall

is also retired

Street

from San Mateo

#100

County, and

Jason Lawrence, who is the engineering officer of the SSS Gryphon.

Lawrence was Redwood very helpful in providing City, information CA 94063 about the Sea

Scouts and how the program works. He holds the Sea Scouts’

highest rank of Quartermaster and is also an Eagle Scout with the

Boy Scouts of America.

It was a wonderful learning experience for Kaspar, since he was

Se Habla Español CA Insurance Lic. #1842835

totally unfamiliar with the Sea Scouts. He sought input from the

leaders as to what photographic images would best portray the work

and character building they seek to instill. After the shoot he was

given a tour of the boat and its various compartments.

After about an hour the shoot was complete, and Kaspar left as

the cover subjects changed into work clothes to begin doing various

cleaning chores surrounding the boat.

The Spectrum Magazine is honored to help celebrate with this

community group that does so many character building activities with

the youth in our community. Here’s to another 100 years!

www.SpectrumMagazine.net

6

5

0

368-2660

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RCSD Corner: News From the Redwood City School District

Summer Math Institute at Kennedy Boosts Student Success

Yancy, an eighth-grade student at Selby Lane

School, got thunderous applause from a roomful

of Redwood City Education Foundation

supporters when she told her math success story

at the annual Benefit for a Brighter Future last

spring. Yancy explained that she began “zoning

out” in math during sixth grade, and by seventh

grade she was getting F’s in math. Her math

teacher recognized that she had potential to do

much better in math, and suggested that Yancy’s

parents sign her up for the Summer Math Institute

during the summer of 2011, a program funded and

implemented through a partnership between the

RCEF, the Redwood City School District and the

Silicon Valley Community Foundation (SVCF).

When Yancy found out about the Summer

Math Institute, her reaction was, “There goes

my summer,” but soon she was enjoying a new

confidence in math, feeling more comfortable

asking questions, and was even making new

friends in the program. By the end of the summer,

her math skills had improved tremendously, and

as an eighth-grader she received B’s in math. You

can watch a video of Yancy telling her story at

rcef.org/SMI.html#Video.

The mission of the Summer Math Institute is

to prepare selected incoming sixth-, seventh- and

eighth-grade students for Algebra I. Studies show

that students who take Algebra I by eighth or

ninth grade are far more likely to take calculus

in high school and pursue higher education than

those who do not.

At the institute, students develop mastery in

fundamental concepts, improved study skills and

increased confidence in the area of mathematics.

“This program is designed for students who

need a little boost for success,” explained 2012

Summer Math Institute Principal Carolyn

Williams. “It is not a remedial program but

an intervention program for students who are

performing under their potential.”

Williams explained that the program is very

fast-paced and covers 19 weeks of math in 19

days. Students work four hours a day and have a

heavy homework load, but the hard work pays off.

Teachers see students make tremendous progress

because of the intensity of the math instruction,

and most students, like Yancy, leave with a strong

foundation for success at the next grade level.

Since 2009, 145 students who were performing

below the level necessary to achieve success in

Algebra I have attended the institute. The institute

has more than proven its worth: 72 percent of

eighth-grade students who participated in the

institute are currently enrolled in Algebra I, and

97 percent of the parents of 2010 students rated

the Institute as “very positive.”

Additionally, the Summer Math Institute

provides teachers the opportunity to learn from

experienced mentors. Teachers who work in the

program also gain new skills and, in turn, they

take these new skills back to their schools and

share them with colleagues.

“We are thankful that partners like RCEF

and the Silicon Valley make it possible for us to

offer summer school during these times when we

no longer have state funding to cover summer

school,” said Deputy Superintendent John Baker,

who oversees curriculum and instruction for the

Redwood City School District.

The Spectrum 5


As I Was

Saying… Publisher

| Steve Penna

During a recent City Council meeting, when

the issue of the proposed Cargill Salt property

development was pulled from consideration, I

was struck and, to be quite honest, disappointed

by an incident that happened during the oral

communications section of the meeting.

Let me set this up for you. In a press release,

the Occupy Saltworks group (which has some

members in common with the Occupy Redwood

City (ORWC) group) stated that they “attended

last night’s City Council meeting in Redwood

City to speak about the Cargill–DMB Saltworks

project.” The group said they were very

“disappointed to see the City Council once again

trying to misrepresent our views by framing our

arguments as ‘personal attacks.’ We were also

disappointed that Mayor Alicia Aguirre and

Councilmember Jeff Ira attempted to cut off one

of our speakers from Occupy San Jose (OSJ).”

They actually did not attempt to cut her off

— they did cut her off and censor her and even

had her escorted from the podium by two police

officers. The comments she made were about an

item that was not on the agenda, and she did not

disrespect the council in her tone or manner. She

should have been allowed to continue her statement.

“When our OSJ representative attempted to

speak during general public comment, member

Ira cut her off, alleging that she was attempting

to speak prematurely to the Saltworks agenda

item. Despite our representative’s attempts to

explain that she was simply attempting to speak

to the issue of transparency in city government,

Mayor Aguirre stepped in as well and threatened

our Occupier with ejection from the Council

chambers by a police escort to stop her from

speaking. Even though this OSJ representative

had carefully respected Mayor Aguirre’s

preliminary warning at the start of the meeting

that there be no clapping, booing, or personal

attacks, Mayor Aguirre reprimanded her for

allegedly disrespecting the Council and in a loud

tone warned the entire audience against even

laughter and facial expressions that might be

perceived as negative,” the group went on to state.

Not that I like to have my column, views and

opinions written for me at any time, but this

statement is accurate as to what happened and

really did not go far enough in expressing the

disdain felt by those of us who believe in freedom

of speech as we watched this unfold. I did not

agree with what the speaker was saying. In fact, I

found her so misinformed and laughable, I “laughed

off” what she had to say. Next speaker, please.

The group also stated, “We are seriously

disappointed at the overreaction of the two

members of the Council and their attempt to

stifle with a police escort what was a legitimate

www.SpectrumMagazine.net

grievance being aired during public comment.

We object to any and all attempts to stifle free

speech in the Council chambers, particularly in a

situation where all rules of conduct were followed

despite the Council’s allegations to the contrary.

Occupy Saltworks demands that our City Council

stop their repeated attempts to play the victims of

an attack that never took place.”

I think you all get the drift about what

happened and the tone of the meeting. With

the subject being discussed and the sometimes

confrontational approaches by members of the

audience, the meeting definitely had emotional

overtones. The point I want to make is that no

matter what personal opinions I, we or elected

officials have, it is an outright privilege to be

able to have the freedom to express our views

and opinions when and where we want. Most

importantly, in this case, in our council chambers.

We must be able to distinguish between real

personal attacks and valid criticisms regarding

controversial matters that could have a huge impact on

the future of our community and realize that dissent,

views and opinions expressed in a professional

and courteous manner will keep our city healthy

and functional. I think that we all have to

constantly question ourselves and also realize

that there is a cause greater than one’s self when

confronted with those we disagree with. It’s called

freedom of speech and the right to express it.

Sometimes leaders even have to be reminded of it.

There is a great quote from Cesar Chavez that

states: “We cannot seek achievement for ourselves

and forget about progress and prosperity for our

community. … Our ambitions must be broad

enough to include the aspirations and needs of

others, for their sakes and for our own.”

This reminds me of Article 19 of the Universal

Declaration of Human Rights, adopted in 1948,

which states: “Everyone has the right to freedom

of opinion and expression; this right includes

freedom to hold opinions without interference and

to seek, receive and impart information and ideas

through any media and regardless of frontiers.”

For those of you reading who may need a

refresher course, freedom of speech is the

political right to communicate one’s opinions and

ideas via speech. The term freedom of expression

is sometimes used synonymously but includes

any act of seeking, receiving and imparting

information or ideas, regardless of the medium

used. To protect “us,” in practice, the right to

freedom of speech is not absolute in any country,

and the right is commonly subject to limitations,

as with libel, slander, obscenity and incitement to

commit a crime.

The right to freedom of expression is

recognized as a human right under Article 19

of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

and recognized in international human rights

law in the International Covenant on Civil and

Political Rights (ICCPR). Article 19 of the ICCPR

states that “everyone shall have the right to hold

opinions without interference” and “everyone

shall have the right to freedom of expression;

this right shall include freedom to seek, receive

and impart information and ideas of all kinds,

regardless of frontiers, either orally, in writing or

in print, in the form of art, or through any other

media of his choice”.

Article 19 goes on to say that the exercise

of these rights carries “special duties and

responsibilities” and may “therefore be subject to

certain restrictions” when necessary for “respect

of the rights or reputation of others” or “the

protection of national security or of public order

(order public), or of public health or morals.”

That is when bodies like a city council can step

in and censor. That is our protection from harmful

statements, views and opinions.

To the council’s credit, they did allow the

speaker the opportunity to speak later on in the

meeting on the subject at hand. She respected

them and they respected her. Just as it should be.

.…

As predictable as tax-and-spend tactics are, the

San Mateo County Board of Supervisors, led

by Don Horsley and Adrienne Tissier, voted

4 to 1 to ask voters in November to support a

countywide sales tax increase. They are asking

voters to approve the increase after voters rejected

two other measures in last June’s election. Talk

about being out of touch with mainstream voters.

Here is the situation. We currently pay 8.25

percent in sales tax in San Mateo County (the city

of San Mateo pays a little more). The supervisors

are asking for another 0.5 percent because,

according to Supervisor Carole Groom, the

county is facing public safety and health cuts and

“we cannot sit here and allow that to continue.”

She did not, however, point to any particular cuts

that have been made. The county is currently

facing a $25 million budget shortfall.

The only supervisor to publicly take into

consideration the effects the increase would have

on the poor in our community was Dave Pine.

In casting the only vote against the increase, he

also showed concern that if this potential tax

increase and the governor’s tax (Prop. 30 would

add another 0.25 percent) both passed, San Mateo

County would be tied for the highest sales tax rate

in the state at 9 percent.

(continues on page 29)


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Cultural Events

The Main Gallery

1018 Main St., Redwood City

650-701-1018

www.themaingallery.org

The Main Gallery, an artists’ cooperative with

23 members, showcases the work of some of the

best local talent in the Bay Area. The gallery is

located in the historic yellow Victorian cottage at

the corner of Main and Middlefield. The gallery is

open Wednesday to Friday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

and weekends from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Elizabeth Noerdlinger, “Pilgrim’s Beach,” oil on canvas,

12” x 12”, 2011

Doris Fischer-Colbrie , “Beach Born,” clay, 6”x6”x6”, 2012

Katinka Hartmetz , “Day Out,” mixed media, 24” x 24”, 2012

On view Aug. 8 through Sept. 9 at The Main

Gallery is “Nude Beach,” the 12th annual allgallery

show. The gallery will host a reception

with the artists, serving drinks and hors

d’oeuvres, on Saturday, Aug. 11, from 6 p.m. to 8

p.m.. Please join us and celebrate summer!

“Nude Beach” means different things to

different people, and The Main Gallery’s artists

have translated their views of the theme into their

own unique visual formats. Here is a sampling of

what to expect.

Susan Wolf, Nina Koepcke and Doris Fischer-

Colbrie, three of the gallery’s ceramic artists,

focused on different aspects of the theme. Wolf

states, “I have made a footed platter with a nude

beach on it. It is nude because of the naked little

people lying on it and because it is unglazed, for

the most part.” Koepcke decided to focus on the

beach part of the title and made two shore birds

that frequent Ocean Beach in San Francisco:

Brandt’s cormorant and the California gull. “I

also made a small wall piece of dog tracks in the

sand by printing my Lab retriever’s paws in the

wet clay,” states Koepcke. Fischer-Colbrie takes

an interesting twist to the theme by making pieces

that have no glaze and are fired in a pit on the

beach; she considers the pieces to be “nude” and

reach their final state on the beach — in effect,

they are born on the beach! Fischer-Colbrie has

also made vase forms with a pattern suggesting

the rippled sand just beneath the water at an ocean

beach, the idea being that the beach itself is nude.

“My reaction to the ‘Nude Beach’ theme

was to view the show title within the context of

environmental degradation. ‘Nude Beach’ became

land that has been denuded of living things,”

painter Terrie Moore states. Moore’s piece

contrasts the lushness of the natural world with a

gray, industrial landscape with the beaches being

river beaches that flow into the ocean.

Elizabeth Noerdlinger has been interested

in beach scenes for a number of years and

has focused on the sky, water and sand in her

paintings. She states, “For this show I decided

to stay with the purity of the basic elements that

comprise a beach. There are no people in my

paintings. I think of them as ‘denuded’ of the

impurity people tend to bring to a beach!”

The beach scenes that Katinka Hartmetz

painted are mounted in vintage window frames.

“No naked bathers!” she states. “But don’t be

surprised if you find a polka-dot bikini hanging

on a peg somewhere in the gallery!”

Don’t miss this unique and thought-provoking

show at The Main Gallery in Redwood City!

Fox Theatre and Club Fox

2209 Broadway, downtown Redwood City

Tickets available at www.clubfoxrwc.

com, 650-369-7770 or tickets.foxrwc.com

Fox Theatre

• Blood Sweat & Tears featuring Chuck Negron.

8 p.m. Aug. 22. $45–$63.

Club Fox

• Ruckatan and Manzo Rally. 8 p.m. Saturday,

Aug. 4.

• Albert Lee. 8 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 5.

• Bring It Karaoke with Anthony. 8 p.m. Monday,

Aug. 6.

• Steve Freund (Club Fox Blues Jam). 7 p.m.

Wednesday, Aug. 8.

• ’80s Dance Party with RebelYell. 9 p.m.

Saturday, Aug. 11.

• Bring It Karaoke with Anthony. 8 p.m. Monday,

Aug. 13.

• Cold Feat (Club Fox Blues Jam). 7 p.m.

Wednesday, Aug. 15

• KFOG Local Scene Happy Hour with Corner

Laughers, Stone Foxes and Alma Desnuda to

benefit Music in Schools Today. Thursday,

Aug. 16.

• Salsa, Bachata, Merengue and Cha Cha Cha. 9

p.m. Friday, Aug. 17.

• Allman Step Brothers, Pretending SF and Blue

Diamond Fillups. 9 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 18.

• Andre Thierry & Zydeco Magic. 4 p.m. Sunday,

Aug. 19.

• Bring It Karaoke with Anthony. 8 p.m. Monday,

Aug. 20.

• Mark Hummel (Club Fox Blues Jam). 7 p.m.

Wednesday, Aug. 22.

• Kapala. 8 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 23.

• Skynnyn Lynnyrd and ZAP Band. 8 p.m.

Saturday, Aug. 25.

• HAPA – Hawaii’s Super Group. 7 p.m. Sunday,

Aug. 26.

• Bring It Karaoke with Anthony. 8 p.m. Monday,

Aug. 27.

• Sinister Blue (Club Fox Blues Jam). 7 p.m.

Wednesday, Aug. 29.

San Mateo County

History Museum

2200 Broadway St., Redwood City

650-299-0141

www.historysmc.org

Tuesday–Sunday, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.

$5 for adults, $3 for seniors and students,

free for children 5 and under

The History Museum is housed inside the historic

1910 County Courthouse. Over 50,000 people

visit the museum each year, and the number of

local residents who hold memberships is growing.

The History Museum teaches approximately

14,000 children each year through the on- and

off-site programs. The museum houses the

research library and archives that currently hold

over 100,000 photographs, prints, books and

documents collected by the San Mateo County

Historical Association.

Free First Fridays Program

The San Mateo County History Museum

continues its “Free First Fridays” program on

Sept. 7. Not only is admission free the entire

day (10 a.m. to 4 p.m.), but two programs are

(continues on page 19)

The Spectrum 11


Obituaries

Corinne Centeno

Resident of Redwood City

Dec. 3, 1954 – June 13, 2012

Corinne Centeno passed away peacefully at her home on June 13 following

a brave battle with cancer. Corinne was born in San Francisco to Charles

and Margery Becker. She is survived by her son Diego Centeno (Mikaela),

brothers Craig Becker and Marc Becker (Sharon) and nephews Brad and

Matthew.

Corinne called Redwood City home for 45 years. She established deep

roots in the community through her many friendships and her career in

public service. While deeply committed to the local community, she was

adventurous and enjoyed her frequent travels.

She began her public service career in 1976 and advanced through the

ranks as assistant to the city manager and superintendent of the Parks,

Recreation and Community Services Department and then served as that

department’s director for 10 years. She retired in 2009.

Corinne’s devotion to the community transcended her work with Redwood City.

As an active volunteer she served on the boards of Shelter Network, the Peninsula

Conflict Resolution Center and the American Cancer Society/Relay for Life.

It is, however, the woman behind all of these great accomplishments that

her family and many dear friends remember with such deep affection. We

will miss her leadership, her smile, her laughter, her energy, her compassion,

her sense of adventure and her positive attitude that so often buoyed our spirits.

A Celebration of Life memorial was held on Saturday, July 14, at the

Veterans Memorial Senior Center, 1455 Madison Ave., Redwood City. In

lieu of flowers, donations may still be made in her memory to Redwood City

Parks and Arts Foundation, 1400 Roosevelt Ave., Redwood City, CA 94061.

Debra Jean Evans

God opened his arms and welcomed Debra Jean Evans into heaven

Feb. 28, 1953 – June 17, 2012

Debra, known as “Debbie” or “Deb Deb” to her family and friends, fought

a courageous 17-month battle with cancer. Debbie’s spiritual beliefs and

faith comforted her during her illness. Debbie was born in Redwood City

to Robert and Dorthy Evans. Debbie was a 1971 graduate of Sequoia High

School. She attended San Mateo Junior College, where she became a licensed

cosmetologist. Her passion for her career won her first place at the West

Coast National Supply hairstyling competition. Debbie loved spending time

with her family and friends, vacationing in Hawaii, tending to her vegetable

garden and cooking. Debbie loved wearing hats, from her baseball caps to her

leopard print hats, her beautiful smile and laugh radiating from underneath.

She loved cheering on her favorite sports teams, the 49ers and the Giants.

Debbie is survived by her loving, supportive husband Tim Anderson,

stepsons Tim Jr. and Jelani, brother Jerry Evans and nephew Christopher.

She is remembered with love by her aunt Evelyn Shannon, cousins Colleen

Shannon Milani and James Shannon and her many other cousins, nieces and

nephews. Debbie held a special place in her heart for Michael Hartmann, her

goddaughter Jenna Hartmann Grant (Danny) and their children Gracie and

Emmie Lu. Jenna and Michael were Debbie’s pride and joy. She also leaves

behind her lifelong friends Lori and Jim Hartmann, dear friends Regina Turner

and Diane Fochetti, Fred Baldwin, Jim and Mary Bailey and many other

friends. Debbie was “Auntie” to Michelle Pedone, Lauren and Kenny Turner.

Debbie will be remembered as a bright, shining light that brought joy, love

and devotion to all who were blessed to have known her. With the biggest

heart, she taught all of those around her how to love unconditionally, to enjoy

the simplest things in life and to laugh. She will be greatly missed but never

forgotten by all those who loved her. Debbie passed surrounded with “love

and God’s blessings” — her favorite quote. We love you, Debra Jean.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in Debra Jean Evans’

memory to the American Cancer Society, 1308 Bay Shore Highway, Suite

101, Burlingame, CA 94010.

A celebration of Debbie’s life with be held Sunday, Aug. 5, at the American

Legion Hall, 1159 Bush St., San Carlos, at 1 p.m.

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www.SpectrumMagazine.net


The Spectrum 13


Auto Care:

Redwood General Tire – 1630 Broadway –

Redwood General Tire was founded on the

principles of good customer service and quality

products at fair prices. Many satisfied customers

have been with them since their founding.

Whether you are looking for a new set of tires or

need repair work on your vehicle, this Redwood

City institution has been providing quality vehicle

services since 1957. They even have free Wi-Fi

Internet hookups so you can work while you wait

for your vehicle to be serviced.

Eating and Catering:

Arya Global Cuisine — 885 Middlefield Road

Redwood City’s new “it” restaurant lives up to

its name, serving Italian, American and Persian

food. “We loved the whole concept of Italian and

Persian food. We tried the chicken kabob and Pollo

Firenze. And wow — the food was great. Our server

gave us a good suggestion in white wine to go

with our dinner. Can’t wait to bring my friends in

for lunch!”

Canyon Inn – 587 Canyon Road – Tim Harrison

and the staff at Canyon Inn serve everything from

their famous hamburgers to pizzas, all kinds of

sandwiches and pastas, and South-of-the-Border

specialties while various sports play on the big,

flat-screen TVs. Don’t forget to reserve their

closed patio for your next party — it has heaters,

fans and a big-screen TV (no extra charges). Why

cook when you don’t have to? They do catering

too for all occasions!

D. Tequila

Lounge and

Restaurant – 851

Main St. – “We

went there and it

was fabulous! We

were impressed

by their food

menu, and the

burger I had was tasty. They have 21 big-screen

TVs for watching your favorite sports team, having

a drink with friends or dancing the night away.”

Little India – 917 Main St. – “There are good

restaurants. There are bad restaurants. There

are OK restaurants. Then there are those places,

the magic ones. You come back again and again

because the food doesn’t just taste good and

satisfy hunger, but helps heal the heart and soul.”

Senior citizens receive $1 off and children under

12 dine at half price. www.littleindiacuisine.com

The Sandwich Spot – 2420 Broadway – With

a motto promising to change your life “one

sandwich at a time” and a menu and atmosphere

that has already made it a popular spot in

downtown Redwood City, the Sandwich Spot will

have you wondering where this place has been all

your life, and whether or not you can get some of

their signature Bomb Sauce to go.

www.SpectrumMagazine.net

Financial Institutions:

San Mateo Credit Union – Three Redwood City

locations – As a member-driven organization,

SMCU does everything possible to ensure that

all of your financial priorities are anticipated and

fulfilled. Offerings include free auto-shopping

assistance, members-only car sales, low-rate

home loans and lines of credit. Call 650-363-1725

or 888-363-1725, or visit a branch to learn the

advantages of membership banking.

Home Improvements:

Lewis Carpet Cleaners – 1-800-23-LEWIS – Founded

in 1985, Lewis Carpet Cleaners has grown from

one small, portable machine to a company of six

employees and five working vans. The Lewis

family works and lives in Redwood City and is

committed to our community. Ask about their

Spectrum special: Get 100 square feet of carpet

cleaned for absolutely nothing. Call today! Get

your home ready for entertaining during the year.

Legal Services:

Hannig Law Firm – 2991 El Camino Real –

Hannig Law Firm LLP provides transactional and

litigation expertise in a variety of areas. The

professionals at HLF are committed to knowing

and meeting their clients’ needs through long-term

relationships and value-added services, and to

supporting and participating in the communities

where they live and work.

Real Estate:

Michelle Glaubert at

Coldwell Banker – 650-722-

1193 – Michelle has been a

full-time, top-producing real

estate agent since 1978. With a

proven track record, she has

helped buyers achieve their

dreams of home ownership and sellers make

successful moves to their next properties. The

majority of her business is garnered through referrals

from her many satisfied clients. Living in Emerald

Hills, she knows the area well and is involved

in the community. Count on Michelle’s years of

experience to guide you through your next real estate

transaction. Visit her online at www.glaubert.com.

John Nelson at Coldwell Banker – 650-566-5315

– John has been a resident of Redwood City for

21 years and has been a real estate agent for 18

years. He is known for doing his clients’ legwork,

keeping them up to date with new listings and

conditions as they impact the market. He will make

the process as pleasurable and stress-free an experience

for you as he can. Let John guide you through the

complexities of buying or selling your home,

eliminating hassles and stress. Visit him online at

www.johnnelsonhomes.com.

Specialty Businesses:

Davies Appliance – 1580 El Camino Real –

“Davies helped me with my appliance purchases

and they know what they are doing. All they

carry is appliances; you don’t have to worry about

anything else. Leave it to them to assist you with

your kitchen remodel and you will be very happy.

I recommend Davies to anyone who is interested

in great pricing and even better service. The focus

is appliances and service.”

Every Woman Health Club – 611 Jefferson Ave. –

A women-only, body-positive fitness center in downtown

Redwood City. Services include classes, weight and

cardio equipment, personal training, therapeutic

massage and skin care. Flexible pricing, with

several options available for members and

nonmembers. Visit www.everywomanhealthclub.

com or call 650-364-9194 to get started.

Hector Flamenco Insurance (State Farm) – 956

Main St. – Hector has been in the insurance

business and with State Farm for 20 years. He

specializes in auto and business insurance. A local

resident, he also provides servicio en español!

Visit his website at www.flamencoinsurance.com.

Saf Keep Storage – 2480 Middlefield Road – The

friendly and reliable team at Saf Keep is ready

to assist you with a variety of storage products

and services to suit all your storage needs. Visit

their website at www.safkeepstorage.com to see

exactly what products and services are available.

Compare them to other facilities and you’ll see

why their service makes the difference.

Schoenstein Physical Therapy – 363A Main St.,

650-599-9482 –The clinical approach of this

independent, community-based physical therapy

practice focuses on thorough physical therapy

assessment, specific treatment strategies and

patient education. Individualized treatment

programs are designed to help meet patient goals

of restoring function, returning to sport or

occupation and maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

St. Regal Jewelers – 850 Main St. – “This is a

great jeweler! Phil, the owner, is amazing. He

crafted a ring on time and on budget. He has an

incredible eye for detail. I can’t say enough. I

would never go anywhere else.” Whether you are

looking for men’s or women’s quality jewelry,

shopping local does not get better than this.

Woodside Terrace

– 485 Woodside

Road, 650-366-3900

– Woodside Terrace

understands that in

choosing a senior living

community, residents

are looking for much

more than a comfortable

living environment to

call home. Brookdale

Living’s Redwood City

community delivers inspired independent living

with the promise of exceptional experiences

every day. As residents’ needs change, they are

provided with a variety of ancillary services and a

personalized assisted living environment that

encourages them to continue to live as they please.


Ahoy, Mate!

Sea Scouts Celebrates

By Julie McCoy,

100th Year

contributing writer

Don Blum, Mike Marzano & Jason Lawrence.

Youth in Redwood City and throughout the Peninsula who

are interested in sailing are getting to learn all aspects

of the sport, thanks to the local chapter of Sea Scouts.

Learning sailing from the bottom up

The youth learn how to conduct safety checks and use

A division of Boy Scouts, Sea Scouts — which

safety equipment, including fire extinguishers, welders

celebrates its 100th anniversary this year — is a

and respirators. They also learn CPR and first aid.

national organization that gives youth between the ages Additionally, they learn how to maintain and operate

of 14 and 21 the opportunity to learn sailing from the the boat itself. The courses are taught by professionals,

bottom up. Those between the ages of 14 and 18 are including members of the Red Cross, local fire

crew members, while those between the ages of 18 and departments and the Coast Guard.

21 are junior officers.

www.SpectrumMagazine.net


Open to both men and women

Some Sea Scout ships are strictly for men.

Others are geared toward women, and still others

are co-ed and open to both men and women.

Approximately 7,000 youth participate in Sea Scouts

nationwide. No prior boating experience is necessary.

Opportunity for advancement

The youth have the opportunity to advance as

they participate in Sea Scouts. They start off as

an apprentice, then become what is known as an

ordinary, then an able scout and, finally, a select

few achieve the highest level of Quartermaster.

The rank of Quartermaster is the Sea Scout

equivalent to the Eagle Scout badge in Boy Scouts.

This means that individuals who achieve Quartermaster

can receive the same benefits as Eagle Scouts

when applying to colleges, jobs and the military.

Room for growth

Currently, 20 people participate in the Pacific Skyline

Council of Sea Scouts, which covers the area from

Brisbane to Mountain View, including Redwood

City, according to Commodore Mike Marzano.

The organization is looking for more people

to get involved, Marzano said, noting there is a

capacity for 150. “We could take a whole bunch

more people,” he said.

Marzano noted, “What I am really after is

for the youth to become better citizens in the

community. If people don’t participate in the

community, it’s not a community.”

The Pacific Skyline Council of Sea Scouts uses

the Sea Scout Gryphon, a 65-foot Army transport

vessel from the Korean War. The youth learn how

to navigate the waters of the San Francisco Bay

and participate in events such as Fleet Week with

the Blue Angels, and KFOG’s KaBoom show

with its fireworks display. They also compete in

regattas with fellow Sea Scout ships.

an event, my job is to make sure everyone is coming.”

Outside of school, Furlanic devotes the majority

of his time to Sea Scouts. “I don’t do anything

else,” he said. “It’s basically Sea Scouts and

school all the time. It keeps me out of trouble.”

Furlanic joined the Pacific Skyline Council of

Sea Scouts in the summer of eighth grade. “When

I joined, I had no idea how to sail,” he explained.

“At the time, I had quit baseball and was looking

for something to do.”

Said Furlanic: “I just love being on the water.

My family has always had a ski boat. My mom

told me about this program. I saw what they were

doing and I thought it was pretty cool. It has

taught me communication skills and leadership

over the years. I just love the program.”

Employers value participation in organizations

like Sea Scouts because it demonstrates

leadership skills, Furlanic pointed out. Furlanic,

who works at an animal hospital cleaning medical

supplies, didn’t have any prior job experience but

put that he was a Sea Scout on his job application

and was hired. “They’re basically trying to gear

us so we’re ready for life,” said Furlanic, who

hopes to do something in the maritime industry

when he is older.

Myles Blackmon, Jason Lawrence, Matti Thurston, Finnian Sheehan.

Sixty-eight years with Sea Scouts

and still going strong

Redwood City resident Don Blum joined the

Pacific Skyline Chapter of Sea Scouts as a

youth in 1944, and 68 years later, at age 84, still

participates with the organization. He works

with the youth on advancement and helps out in

general as needed. “It’s enjoyable,” he said. “It’s

good to help out young kids and stuff. You meet a

lot of nice people along the years.”

Said Blum, “I still enjoy it. I think it’s one of

the best programs for youth there are. It’s kind of

sad more youth don’t get involved.”

Some have found love through Sea Scouts

Sea Scouts brings together those who share a

common interest in, and passion for, sailing.

People have not only met but also fallen in love

and gotten married through their involvement

with Sea Scouts, Marzano pointed out. Marzano

met his wife, Teri, through Sea Scouts. And their

daughter, Lindi Haight, met her husband, Mike,

through Sea Scouts as well. “It’s a lot easier when

your husband is doing the same thing,” Haight

pointed out. Lawrence said his parents also met

through Sea Scouts.

(continues on next page)

From scout to leader

Redwood City resident Jason Lawrence is a leader

with the Pacific Skyline Council of Sea Scouts.

“We teach leadership, teamwork and project

management,” he said. “Basically, it’s life skills.

These are skills that can be applied anywhere. I

have been able to use these skills in any role.”

Lawrence loves sailing. “For me, boating is

freedom,” he said. “I get to be out on the water.

It’s freedom for me. I get away from my everyday life.”

He joined the Pacific Skyline Council of Sea

Scouts as a teen. Lawrence’s father, Woody

Lawrence, was involved with Sea Scouts as an

adult leader, and when Lawrence was 14, he

decided to follow in his father’s footsteps and get

involved with Sea Scouts as well. And he’s been

participating in the organization ever since.

Now 25, Lawrence is working to ensure youth

in Sea Scouts have the same experience he had, if

not better.

“Camaraderie is a huge piece of the program,”

he said. “You have all your friends that are there.

It kind of becomes second family.”

Boatswain a dedicated scout

Sean Furlanic, 17, a senior at Woodside High

School, is a boatswain for the Pacific Skyline

Council of Sea Scouts. “My job is basically

communicating between the officers and the

crew,” said Furlanic, who is working to become a

Quartermaster. “Whenever we have meetings or


Ahoy, Mate! Sea Scouts Celebrates 100th Year

(Continued from previous page)

Relying on donations and fundraisers

The Pacific Skyline Council of Sea Scouts —

which relies on donations and fundraisers for its

funding — has an operating budget of $35,000,

according to Marzano.

Sponsored by the Sequoia Yacht Club

The council is sponsored by the Sequoia Yacht

Club. “We’re certainly supportive,” said Larry

Mayne of the Sequoia Yacht Club. “This goes

beyond learning to tie a knot. We certainly want

to support the activity of boating. They become

part of the general boating community. It’s a good

idea. They have a huge organization behind them.

These kids learn how to use all of this equipment.

It’s wonderful to watch them out on the water.”

Raising awareness

of Redwood City’s waterfront

City Councilwoman Barbara Pierce noted, “It’s

really hands-on. It’s focused on responsibility and

leadership. One of the things that’s unusual about

them is the emphasis on the waterfront. It’s the kind

of experience you can’t get anywhere else. It’s just

a great opportunity. Redwood City is interested in

making more people aware of the waterfront.”

Interested?

The Pacific Skyline Council of Sea Scouts meets twice a week, on Tuesday evenings from 7

p.m. to 8 p.m. and on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the Port of Redwood City.

Youth who are interested in participating are encouraged to check it out for a day and,

if they like it, proceed with an application. There is a $50 membership fee that helps cover

administrative costs, including fuel, insurance and maintenance. It costs approximately $800

over the course of the year to be involved with the Pacific Skyline Council of Sea Scouts.

Scholarships are available for those in need.

More information can be obtained by visiting www.sssgryphon.org or calling 888-946-8673.

Finnian Sheehan, Matti Thurston.

www.SpectrumMagazine.net


Cultural Events (Continued from page 11)

planned for the public without any fees. At 11

a.m., preschool children will be invited to learn

about growing plants for food. They will create

their own vegetable prints and take their artwork

home. Then museum staff will conduct a special

program in the Nature’s Bounty exhibit gallery,

which features displays about farming. Here

the youngsters will hear the story Strega Nona’s

Harvest. At 2 p.m., museum docents will lead

tours of the museum for adults.

Steve Jobs Exhibit Continues

The San Mateo County History Museum is proud

to announce a new addition to our permanent

exhibit San Mateo County History Makers:

Entrepreneurs Who Changed the World.

The exhibit features an original 1988 NeXT

computer and will discuss NeXT Inc., the company

local Woodside resident Steve Jobs founded in

Redwood City after leaving Apple in 1985. Tim

Berners-Lee used NeXT technology to create the

World Wide Web and, according to Jobs’ 2005

Stanford commencement speech, “the technology

… developed at NeXT is at the heart of Apple’s

current renaissance.” Also on view are books,

brochures and an original NeXT decal given away

free with the purchase of the computer.

Playing Grown-Up: Toys From the

Harry P. Costa Collection

This unique exhibit explores those toys from the

1930s, 1940s and 1950s that allowed children to

mimic the activities of adults. Objects highlighted

include an antique pedal-car fire truck and

airplane, Tonka work trucks, a fully electric

1929 Lionel stove and oven, a G-men fingerprint

set, a “Miss Friday” mechanical doll and a

working Lionel train, just to name a few. Objects

are displayed with a backdrop of images that

represent the real activities of adults that children

were mimicking through play.

History Museum Offers Short Course

The San Mateo County History Museum will offer

a short course on the county’s history on Aug.

7, from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. Local experts who

will make presentations include Dr. Al Acena

and Dr. Mark Still of the College of San Mateo’s

history department, columnist Joan Levy and

the museum’s Deputy Director Carmen Blair.

Registration is required. There will be a $10 charge.

Beverages are included. Participants will need to

bring their own lunch. In order to register, or to

find out more, call the museum at 650-299-0104.

The History Museum Is “Buzzing”

On Saturday, Aug. 4, at 1 p.m., the San Mateo

County History Museum will present Catherine

Fraley, a Montara beekeeper, who will speak

about the history of the honeybee in San Mateo

County and the state of California. Fraley will

discuss how the honeybee arrived on the San

Francisco Peninsula shortly after the California

Gold Rush began in 1849. She will also delve

into recent threats to honeybee populations in

the state. Besides being a beekeeper, Fraley is

administrator for a local beekeepers collective

that supplies honey to communities in the Bay

Area. As a member of the San Mateo Beekeepers

Guild, she gives talks and writes articles to raise

awareness about honeybees and their positive

impact on our environment.

The lecture is part of the museum’s Courthouse

Docket program and is included with museum

admission: $5 for adults, $3 for seniors and students.

Redwood City’s Music on

the Square Brings Live

Bands Every Friday Night

The lineup is set, the weather is beautiful and

the community is ready for another incredible

season of FREE Friday night music in Courthouse

Square with Redwood City’s Music on the

Square! Every Friday evening from 6 to 8 p.m.

Aug. 10: Livewire (party band)

Aug. 17: Sun Kings (Beatles tribute)

Aug. 24: Pride & Joy (pop/soul)

Aug. 31: Foreverland (Michael Jackson tribute)

Free Shakespeare in the Park

Saturdays, Aug. 11, 18 & 25, 7:30 p.m.

Sundays, Aug. 12, 19 & 26, 2 p.m.

Sequoia High School campus

Celebrating its 30th year, San Francisco Shakespeare

Festival brings its performance of “Henry V” to

downtown Redwood City for three weekends in August!

Shakespeare in the Park will offer three evening

shows on Saturdays and three afternoon shows on

Sundays while providing an opportunity for everyone

to see high-quality, professional theater in the relaxing

setting of the Sequoia campus, free of charge.

Free Shakespeare in the Park began in 1983 with

its debut production of “The Tempest” in Golden

Gate Park in San Francisco. It is now one of the

major free Shakespeare programs in the nation.

Farmers Markets

in Redwood City

Our community is very lucky to have several

great farmers markets to choose from! Buy

directly from the farmers and producers, and

enjoy fresh, seasonally-grown food and other

products. Farmers markets are a ready source of

healthy, fresh food for the community, and sales

of locally grown food represent an investment of

the community’s food dollar close to home, which

is good for the local economy. A farmers market

is also a community gathering spot, strengthening

local social ties and building community.

Here is the list of farmers markets in Redwood

City so you can make plans to visit them when it’s

most convenient for you. Be sure to try them all!

Tuesdays, 4–8 p.m., May through September

Rotary Farmers Market

Hamilton Street/Broadway

Wednesdays, 10 a.m.–2 p.m.,

May through September

Kaiser Hospital Farmers Market — open to all

(Pacific Coast Farmers Market Association)

Next to Shari’s Java Hut, between the Oak and

Cypress buildings (accessible via Maple Street or

Veterans Boulevard)

Thursdays (selected: see below), 10 a.m.–3

p.m., June through October

San Mateo County Employee Farmers Market —

open to all (Kiwanis)

County Government Center

8/9, 8/23, 9/13, 9/27, 10/11, 10/25

Fridays, 11 a.m.–6 p.m., year-round

Redwood Shores Farmers Market (West Coast

Farmers Market Association)

Redwood Shores Library parking lot

399 Marine Parkway

Saturdays, 8 a.m.–noon, April through November

Kiwanis Farmers Market

850 Winslow Street near Theatre Way

The Spectrum 19


Artists to “Paint the Town” and Then Give Back

By Julie McCoy

If you collect art or simply enjoy art and want to

see some great work by many of Redwood City’s

talented local artists, you won’t want to miss the city’s

first Paint the Town event. To be held downtown

on Saturday, Sept. 9, at the Courthouse Square,

the free event — which is sure to be a hit with the

entire family — will feature art from between 30

and 60 local artists as well as music and drinks.

“I just thought it would be a good thing to

do, paint this town,” said Alisan Andrews, a

watercolorist who is organizing the event. “I just

want them to enjoy the art and the music and

the local things. There is so much vibrancy in

Redwood City. It’s a rich culture.”

The artists will have booths showcasing their

paintings and prints, which will be for sale. They

also will bring one piece of work that will be

photographed and then hung at the front of the

Courthouse Square and auctioned off in the afternoon.

History lover to bring

painting of Sequoia Hotel

Menlo Park resident Berni Jahnke, who has been

an artist her entire life, plans to bring a painting

she made of the Sequoia Hotel on the corner of

Main Street and Broadway in Redwood City,

which was built in 1912. “I love anything old and

historical,” she said.

Additionally, she plans to bring a painting she

did of a picture she took 25 or 30 years ago of

some figures of Spaniards, Indians and priests that

used to be on top of the courthouse.

Jahnke is a member of the Menlo Art League.

Additionally, she is a signature member of the

California Watercolor Association, the Society of

Western Artists and the Transparent Watercolor

Society of America.

Jahnke, who received her bachelor of science

degree in applied arts from the University of

Cincinnati, worked as a freelance artist for

the Gibson Art Greeting Card Company in

Cincinnati. After moving to California, she

specialized in watercolors, deriving much of her

inspiration from her travels abroad.

“I used to be in a gallery in Los Altos,” she

explained, noting that there were festivals there

kind of like the one Redwood City is doing.

Jahnke added, “There are a lot of painters that I

know who will partake in this. It’s [Redwood city

is] an up-and-coming city again. It’s a busy city

now. … I think we all hope people come and look

and buy the paintings.”

Artists to give back

Artists are asked to give back 10 percent of any

amount they earn over $100 to the ?????. Aug. 15

is the last day for artists to register for the event,

but Andrews said there is some flexibility if an

artist happens to be out of town.

A fun-filled time for the entire family

There will be activities for children, including

brushes for them to use to make their own

creations. “We have to encourage them,” Andrews

said. “These are our future artists.”

www.SpectrumMagazine.net

Not a street fair

Paint the Town will be different from a street fair,

Andrews emphasized. The concentration will be

on fine art and, unlike a street fair, there won’t be

any crafts, she noted.

Andrews hopes at least 1,000 people attend. “I

just hope they get the enjoyment of seeing how

many artists we have in the area,” she said. “Some

of the talent we have in this area is so unsung.”

Should attract many of the same

people who attended Art Walk

Paint the Town should attract many of the same

people who attended the Redwood City Art

Walk, which was held for a few years but stopped

when redevelopment money went away, Andrews

pointed out.

Downtown Business Group

providing beer, wine

The Downtown Business Group is providing beer

and wine for Paint the Town. “You have music,”

Andrews said. “You have beer and wine. You

have fabulous art. What’s not to love? … It’s on

our beautiful square. It’s the best of both worlds.”

Three sponsors

help make the event happen

The event is being sponsored by the Downtown

Business Group, the Redwood City Civic Cultural

Commission and the Redwood City Art Center.

“Several years ago we established a strategic

plan for our Civic Cultural Commission to foster

the arts, establish Redwood City as a cultural

art center and help be an economic driver to our

community,” explained Warren Dale, chair of the

Redwood City Civic Cultural Commission.

“This plan was developed as an articulation of

the City of Redwood City general plan’s cultural

element. Our grant to help sponsor and inaugurate

the Paint the Town art and wine festival is an act

in keeping with these objectives. The Paint the

Town festival helps bring visual arts to Redwood

City and enables our community to witness the

birth of an art piece generated by the artist, the

place and the community. It brings people here

to witness a unique cultural experience and to

enjoy the hospitality of our city, its people, its

restaurants and its synergy.”

The Redwood City Arts Center is a nonprofit

entity that has studios and does outreach in the

area of the arts. Paint the Town is innovative,

said Rosemary Filippi Fischer, president of the

Redwood City Art Center’s board of directors.

“It’s something we’ve never done before. It’s

exciting. The bottom line is we want people

to enjoy the arts and enjoy the day. It’s just

something that gives a lot of color to this town.

We’re hoping it goes well. It’s exciting. We hope

that it is successful and we repeat it on an annual

basis. It’s cool. It’s very cool.”

Barbara Britschgi, who also serves on the

Redwood City Art Center’s board of directors

and the city’s Senior Affairs Commission, added,

“This is something so new and I think it really

will take off. It has got all of the elements that

make it really a good event. It’s good to get

the different groups working together. It’s just

building community. It really is. Artists like to

feed off of each other. They talk art. They share.

It does build community.”

Art Center has nearly 20-year history

The Redwood City Art Center, at 625 Broadway,

was started by six women: Britschgi, Ruth

Waters, Angela Kirkner, Karen Duffy, Joan

Jordan and Tamara Piulle.

The center, which will celebrate its 20th

anniversary in 2013, began at the former

Redwood City jail, which had been used by the

SWAT team, according to Britschgi. “We went

in there and thought how could this be,” she said.

“Sure enough, with the city’s help it all came

together.”

The center stayed at that location for three or

four years until City Hall had to move there. The

center has been at its present location ever since.

“We have watercolors and oil and acrylic,”

Britschgi said. “People that are looking for art

really should come to the art center. They get a

big bang for their buck.”

The center is used by hobbyists, professionals

and five in-house teachers. It rents to the Society

of Western Artists (SWA), a group that completely

runs the front gallery, Britschgi said.

“It’s a working, producing studio,” Britschgi

said. “Artists rent studios down there. It’s kind of

a family. It’s really a unique venue downtown. It’s

in the heart of what you would consider the older

part of the city.”

The Redwood City Art Center provides art

scholarships for elementary students, high school

students and seniors who have a passion for and

talent in art. The scholarships enable them to be

taught by an art teacher.

Kids also come to the center for art field trips.

The center is open every day.

“It’s kind of a hidden gem,” said Britschgi.

“People don’t realize we have some really good artists.”

Ready to go?

What: Paint the Town

When: Sunday, Sept. 9 th

Where: Courthouse Square,

downtown Redwood City

When: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.


Artists to “Paint the Town” and Then Give Back

By Julie McCoy

If you collect art or simply enjoy art and want to

see some great work by many of Redwood City’s

talented local artists, you won’t want to miss the city’s

first Paint the Town event. To be held downtown

on Saturday, Sept. 9, at the Courthouse Square,

the free event — which is sure to be a hit with the

entire family — will feature art from between 30

and 60 local artists as well as music and drinks.

“I just thought it would be a good thing to

do, paint this town,” said Alisan Andrews, a

watercolorist who is organizing the event. “I just

want them to enjoy the art and the music and

the local things. There is so much vibrancy in

Redwood City. It’s a rich culture.”

The artists will have booths showcasing their

paintings and prints, which will be for sale. They

also will bring one piece of work that will be

photographed and then hung at the front of the

Courthouse Square and auctioned off in the afternoon.

History lover to bring

painting of Sequoia Hotel

Menlo Park resident Berni Jahnke, who has been

an artist her entire life, plans to bring a painting

she made of the Sequoia Hotel on the corner of

Main Street and Broadway in Redwood City,

which was built in 1912. “I love anything old and

historical,” she said.

Additionally, she plans to bring a painting she

did of a picture she took 25 or 30 years ago of

some figures of Spaniards, Indians and priests that

used to be on top of the courthouse.

Jahnke is a member of the Menlo Art League.

Additionally, she is a signature member of the

California Watercolor Association, the Society of

Western Artists and the Transparent Watercolor

Society of America.

Jahnke, who received her bachelor of science

degree in applied arts from the University of

Cincinnati, worked as a freelance artist for

the Gibson Art Greeting Card Company in

Cincinnati. After moving to California, she

specialized in watercolors, deriving much of her

inspiration from her travels abroad.

“I used to be in a gallery in Los Altos,” she

explained, noting that there were festivals there

kind of like the one Redwood City is doing.

Jahnke added, “There are a lot of painters that I

know who will partake in this. It’s [Redwood city

is] an up-and-coming city again. It’s a busy city

now. … I think we all hope people come and look

and buy the paintings.”

Artists to give back

Artists are asked to give back 10 percent of any

amount they earn over $100 to the ?????. Aug. 15

is the last day for artists to register for the event,

but Andrews said there is some flexibility if an

artist happens to be out of town.

A fun-filled time for the entire family

There will be activities for children, including

brushes for them to use to make their own

creations. “We have to encourage them,” Andrews

said. “These are our future artists.”

www.SpectrumMagazine.net

Not a street fair

Paint the Town will be different from a street fair,

Andrews emphasized. The concentration will be

on fine art and, unlike a street fair, there won’t be

any crafts, she noted.

Andrews hopes at least 1,000 people attend. “I

just hope they get the enjoyment of seeing how

many artists we have in the area,” she said. “Some

of the talent we have in this area is so unsung.”

Should attract many of the same

people who attended Art Walk

Paint the Town should attract many of the same

people who attended the Redwood City Art

Walk, which was held for a few years but stopped

when redevelopment money went away, Andrews

pointed out.

Downtown Business Group

providing beer, wine

The Downtown Business Group is providing beer

and wine for Paint the Town. “You have music,”

Andrews said. “You have beer and wine. You

have fabulous art. What’s not to love? … It’s on

our beautiful square. It’s the best of both worlds.”

Three sponsors

help make the event happen

The event is being sponsored by the Downtown

Business Group, the Redwood City Civic Cultural

Commission and the Redwood City Art Center.

“Several years ago we established a strategic

plan for our Civic Cultural Commission to foster

the arts, establish Redwood City as a cultural

art center and help be an economic driver to our

community,” explained Warren Dale, chair of the

Redwood City Civic Cultural Commission.

“This plan was developed as an articulation of

the City of Redwood City general plan’s cultural

element. Our grant to help sponsor and inaugurate

the Paint the Town art and wine festival is an act

in keeping with these objectives. The Paint the

Town festival helps bring visual arts to Redwood

City and enables our community to witness the

birth of an art piece generated by the artist, the

place and the community. It brings people here

to witness a unique cultural experience and to

enjoy the hospitality of our city, its people, its

restaurants and its synergy.”

The Redwood City Arts Center is a nonprofit

entity that has studios and does outreach in the

area of the arts. Paint the Town is innovative,

said Rosemary Filippi Fischer, president of the

Redwood City Art Center’s board of directors.

“It’s something we’ve never done before. It’s

exciting. The bottom line is we want people

to enjoy the arts and enjoy the day. It’s just

something that gives a lot of color to this town.

We’re hoping it goes well. It’s exciting. We hope

that it is successful and we repeat it on an annual

basis. It’s cool. It’s very cool.”

Barbara Britschgi, who also serves on the

Redwood City Art Center’s board of directors

and the city’s Senior Affairs Commission, added,

“This is something so new and I think it really

will take off. It has got all of the elements that

make it really a good event. It’s good to get

the different groups working together. It’s just

building community. It really is. Artists like to

feed off of each other. They talk art. They share.

It does build community.”

Art Center has nearly 20-year history

The Redwood City Art Center, at 625 Broadway,

was started by six women: Britschgi, Ruth

Waters, Angela Kirkner, Karen Duffy, Joan

Jordan and Tamara Piulle.

The center, which will celebrate its 20th

anniversary in 2013, began at the former

Redwood City jail, which had been used by the

SWAT team, according to Britschgi. “We went

in there and thought how could this be,” she said.

“Sure enough, with the city’s help it all came

together.”

The center stayed at that location for three or

four years until City Hall had to move there. The

center has been at its present location ever since.

“We have watercolors and oil and acrylic,”

Britschgi said. “People that are looking for art

really should come to the art center. They get a

big bang for their buck.”

The center is used by hobbyists, professionals

and five in-house teachers. It rents to the Society

of Western Artists (SWA), a group that completely

runs the front gallery, Britschgi said.

“It’s a working, producing studio,” Britschgi

said. “Artists rent studios down there. It’s kind of

a family. It’s really a unique venue downtown. It’s

in the heart of what you would consider the older

part of the city.”

The Redwood City Art Center provides art

scholarships for elementary students, high school

students and seniors who have a passion for and

talent in art. The scholarships enable them to be

taught by an art teacher.

Kids also come to the center for art field trips.

The center is open every day.

“It’s kind of a hidden gem,” said Britschgi.

“People don’t realize we have some really good artists.”

Ready to go?

What: Paint the Town

When: Sunday, Sept. 9 th

Where: Courthouse Square,

downtown Redwood City

When: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.


WHAT WE DO: A bail bond agent, or

bondsman, is any person or corporation

that will act as a surety and

pledge money or property as bail for

the appearance of persons accused

in court. Although banks, insurance

companies and other similar institutions

are usually the sureties on other

types of contracts (for example, to

bond a contractor who is under a

contractual obligation to pay for the

completion of a construction project)

such entities are reluctant to put their

depositors’ or policyholders’ funds at

the kind of risk involved in posting a

bail bond. Bail Bond agents, on the

other hand, have a standing security

agreement with local court officials,

in which they agree to post an irrevocable

“blanket” bond, which will pay

the court if any defendant for whom

the bond agent is responsible does

not appear.

WHO WE ARE: The San Mateo County

Bail Agents Association is comprised

of a group of licensed and experienced

owner operated businesses

in Redwood City and throughout the

County. Members of our association

will ensure you receive professional

and courteous service.

For the past three decades we have

successfully maintained an ongoing

relationship with the San Mateo

County Sheriff’s Department. Our Association

will continue to maintain and

improve our relationship with all local

city and county departments and law

enforcement.

HOW WE HELP KEEP OUR COUNTY

STREETS SAFE: **There are two

primary methodologies to bail in

America: one run by the privatesector,

commercial surety bail (bail

agents), and the other run by the

government pretrial release agencies.

One costs the public nothing,

the other consumes (much needed)

tax dollars. One system ensures that

their client goes back to court to face

charges, and ensures they commit

fewer crimes while awaiting that court

date. The other option has a poor

track record on both of these counts.

One picks up almost all of its fugitives,

the other seldom, if ever, does.

One works and the other does not.

The system that works is commercial

surety bail (bail agents) and the one

that does not is government-run pretrial

services.

Local law enforcement is strapped for

resources and bondsmen fill the gap

by apprehending absconded defendants.

Commercial bail not only operates more

effectively and safely, but it is a private

enterprise and operates at no cost to

the public. In fact, it pays premium

taxes to the public, and if it fails, it

pays cash forfeitures to the state.

What is bail?

Bail or bond (in this case, bail and bond

mean the same thing) is an amount

of money in cash, property, or surety

bond for the purpose of making sure

that a person attends all required court

appearances. Bond allows an arrested

person (defendant) to be released from

jail until his or her case is completed.

Who can post bond?

Any person can post his or her own

bond. If the defendant can’t afford to

bond himself or herself out of jail, any

other person age 18 or older can post

the bond.

Why would I hire a bondsman?

If you don’t have the cash to cover the

full bond amount and the Sheriff’s fee,

you may wish to hire a bondsman to

bond yourself or someone else out of

jail. Also, sometimes the Court keeps a

cash bond. If you are bonding someone

out of jail and you don’t want to take the

chance that all or part of your cash will

be used to pay the defendant’s court

fines, fees and restitution, you might

want to hire a bail bondsman.

If I’m a consignor, what will I have to do?

If the defendant misses a court date,

you may be expected to help the bondsman

find the defendant, to pay the

bondsman’s expenses for finding the

defendant, and to pay the full amount

of the bond if the defendant cannot be

found.

How do I contact a bondman?

Call any one of the bail bondsmen listed

on our website below. The defendant

and a cosigner will be required to sign the

bond agent’s contract.


A GREAT OPPORTUNIITY

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BCC Recruitment

Run: August issue of

Spectrum ¼ page, color

Billing Reference:

BCC Recruit August 2012

Invoice to Dora Wong

1017 Middlefield Road

Redwood City, CA 94063

APPLIICATIION

DEADLIINE:

TUESDAY, AUGUST 21, 2012 ‐ 5 PM

IInformatiion and

Applliicatiions are Onlliine at

WWW.REDWOODCIITY.ORG/CLERKS

OR CALL 650‐780‐7220

FOR MORE INFORMATIION


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Community Interest

Optimist Club Celebrates 65

Years of Service

to Redwood City

The public is invited to help the Optimist

Club of Redwood City celebrate its 65th year

of service to the Redwood City community.

The group will be holding an old-fashioned

barbecue on Sunday, Aug. 12, at noon at

Huddart Park, 1100 Kings Mountain Road, in Woodside.

The Optimist Club meets every Tuesday at noon at Alana’s Cafe, 1020

Main St., Redwood City. The group welcomes the public and prospective new

members with a “come all and wear a cheerful smile and have fun” attitude.

The Optimist Club of Redwood City is a service organization that has

benefited the local community of Redwood City for over 50 years. As part

of Optimist International, the club is a member of the finest youth servicing

organization in the world. The club has helped maintain the music program at

local Redwood City schools and has supported the Police Activities League,

youth sports groups, youth scouts and many other youth activities. The club

strives to support youth in our community with service projects that impact

their lives in a positive manner.

For more info please call Ed Rosen at 650-366-7589 or Cathy Brada at 650-366-9840.

Elks Lodge Awards Local Scholarships

Port Ready to Modernize Wharves

With $10 million in revenue bonds in place, the Port of Redwood City is

ready to begin modernizing its two wharves to improve waterfront access

and create a new visitor-friendly promenade.

The update will let the port better serve its existing and future customers

while remaining flexible to respond to changing market conditions, according

to Port Executive Director Mike Giari.

The project’s first phase of redevelopment includes demolishing the

wharves and associated piles, knocking down a warehouse and building a

new 426-foot-long-by-58-foot-wide prestressed concrete wharf with two new

access ramps to the shore. The second phase relocates the existing conveyor

system and realigns operations to reduce berth conflicts.

The makeover isn’t limited to just the wharves. The port will also improve

the public access areas between the marina and fishing pier. A major feature

will be the new 12-foot-wide waterfront promenade running parallel to

the shorelines with new handicap access and parking. Visitors can see the

water from a semiprivate sitting area on the new lawn, which will include

landscaping.

The project also calls for removing the existing large concrete planter

barriers and replacing the fishing pier steps with a handicap ramp connected

to the new promenade.

Construction is expected to run through December 2013.

The Port Commission awarded the $13.9 million contract to Manson Construction

Company and will use $10 million in revenue bonds ratified by the City Council.

Fair Oaks Library Receives Donation From Latino

Community Council

The Latino Community Council of Redwood City, with help from the

Redwood City Library Foundation, raised $20,700 for children’s books,

videos and music for the Fair Oaks Library this spring.

The April 29 community festival “Kermes & Dia del Nino” attracted

more than 1,000 people and, coupled with $16,000 raised the previous year,

represents $36,700 raised over two years to buy children’s materials.

LCCRC representatives presented the Fair Oaks Library with a check at the

July 9 City Council meeting.

“We are proud and honored to have been a part of the creation of such a

worthwhile event,” said LCCRC President Arnoldo Arreola in a prepared

statement. “The LCCRC will continue to find ways to give back to Redwood

City while continuing to motivate and inspire our Latino community to

participate in civic engagement.”

PACT (Partnership Academy for Community

Teamwork) Program Is Back!

Front: Yxenia Contreras, April Ochoa, Ahmad Al-Zughoul, Chris Anderson*

Back: Carl Wasserman, Bernadette Hadnagy*, Lyle Personette, Sara Jones*

*Elks Scholarship Committee member

On Wednesday, April 18, the Redwood City Elks Lodge honored four

Redwood City–area high school seniors as Most Valuable Students, awarding

$1,000 to Yxenia Contreras, $1,000 to Ahmad Al-Zughoul, $500 to Carl

Wasserman and $500 to April Ochoa. Students were selected by the Elks

Scholarship Committee. The ceremony and dinner were attended by these

deserving students and their families, and awards were presented by Lyle

Personette, the Lodge Exalted Ruler.

The Scholarship Committee also selected applicants to enter the nationallevel

Most Valuable Students scholarship program, which awards 500 scholarships

nationwide, totaling $2,296,000. Two award recipients recently announced

are Woodside High School student Meet Patel, earning a $10,000 scholarship,

and Sequoia High School student Joab Camarena, earning a $4,000 scholarship.

Registration is now available for the 2012 session of this renowned program.

The deadline to register is 5 p.m. on Aug. 31.

All the details and quick registration is available online at www.

redwoodcity.org/pact. Registration forms are also available in the city

manager’s office in City Hall, 1017 Middlefield Road, or can be requested

by calling 650-780-7300. Enrollment is limited to 40 participants. Middle

school and high school students are encouraged to participate (waiver must be

signed by parent or guardian).

The 2012 program takes place each Wednesday evening from Sept. 12

through Oct. 17, 6–9 p.m., including dinner, and engages in dynamic and

interesting activities illustrating how the city functions.

This once-a-week, six-week citizens’ academy will provide participants

with a hands-on overview of the management and governance of Redwood

City while helping to build relationships that will strengthen our entire

community. The sessions cover subjects from public works to the Police

Department, from the City Council to finance, from the Fire Department to

the library and more. This is a great opportunity for interested community

members to get an insider’s view of where the city is going, become experts

(continues on next page)

The Spectrum 27


Senior Activities

The Veterans Memorial Senior Center, 1455 Madison Ave., Redwood City,

is providing the following activities that are open to the public during the

month of August.

Friday Movies for Everyone

Every Friday, 1:15 p.m. (unless otherwise announced)

Come to the Veterans Memorial Senior Center for a free feature movie in our

state-of-the-art movie theater! Please note: Movies may be changed at any

time due to availability.

Aug. 3: “Big Miracle”

Aug. 10: “Contraband”

Aug. 17: “Salmon Fishing in the Yemen”

Aug. 24: “Being Flynn”

Aug. 31: “Seeking Justice”

West Bay Community Band BBQ & Concert

Friday, Aug. 24, barbecue 4 p.m., concert 5 p.m.

$10/person

The West Bay Community Band always gives a very enjoyable performance.

Don’t miss this opportunity to feast with and listen to a terrific group of musicians.

Fun After Fifty Club Dance

Last Friday of the month, 7:30–10 p.m.

Redwood Room

Members $5, nonmembers $7

Dance to live music on the last Friday of the month. Free punch, water and

coffee. Snacks available. For more information, call 650-747-0264.

Glucose Screening and Understanding the Results

Thursday, Aug. 9, 8:30–11 a.m.

Wellness Center Building, Adaptive PE Room

8:30–10 a.m. glucose testing and a free healthy snack; 10–11 a.m. Suzanne

Lim, RN, will answer your questions about blood glucose and provide

personal consultations about your test results. Please call 650-368-7732 to

reserve a space and time. A four-hour fast is necessary for the screening;

however, drinking water and taking your medications is OK. This program is

co-sponsored by Sequoia Hospital Health and Wellness Center.

Bingo!

Every Sunday and the first and third Wednesdays of each month

Main Building

Sundays, Aug. 5, 12, 19, 26: Doors open at 8:30 a.m. Early bird game begins

at 11:30 a.m. Regular game begins at 12:30 p.m.

Wednesdays, Aug. 1, 15: Doors open at 4 p.m. Game begins at 6:30 p.m.

Support our senior programs by embracing the classic game of bingo! Come

and have fun with other bingo enthusiasts. Everyone ages 18 and older is

welcome. An ATM is available and our gift shop is open during bingo hours.

SAVE THE DATES

Active Aging Week: Changing the Way We Age

Sept. 24–28

Sponsored by the VMSC and Adaptive PE in conjunction with the

International Council on Active Aging. We will be celebrating a week of fun

and exciting activities for seniors to encourage healthy living. We will offer

free classes and lectures, all related to health and wellness. Call 650-368-7732

or visit www.adaptivepevmsc.org for more details.

To learn more about the Veterans Memorial Senior Center, call 650-780-

7270. Redwood City Parks, Recreation and Community Services Department

provides recreational facilities and activities for all ages and interests, and

supplies building and custodial services for city buildings. Redwood City

Parks also operates the Veterans Memorial Senior Center and the Fair Oaks

Community Center, providing social, educational and cultural activities, as

well as information, referral and counseling services to persons living in

Redwood City and neighboring communities. Redwood City Parks is more

than you think! Its website is located at www.redwoodcity.org/parks.

Community Interest (Continued from previous page)

on how the city operates, and help to build a great community together.

The objectives of PACT are to involve and engage people in learning

about and understanding the operation of city government, and to improve

communication between the city and those who live and work here in order

to strengthen and enhance the entire community. Participants will learn how

decisions are made, how city funds are allocated and how city departments

operate with each other, and get an opportunity to sit down with City Council

members for frank discussions of issues, projects, politics and plans for

shaping the future of our community.

Go to www.redwoodcity.org/pact for more info and to sign up!

Volunteer Activities Available in Redwood City

If your summer is not completely full, or maybe if you’re just looking for

a way to give back to the community, take a look at all the great volunteer

opportunities that are listed on Redwood City’s website calendar. Some of them

are one-time, date-specific opportunities; others are more general requests for

volunteers, where you can choose your own days and times. We make it very

easy and convenient to fit some volunteer time into your busy schedule!

Go to www.redwoodcity.org/calendar and take a look — all the volunteer

opportunities are shown in purple-colored text. You can set the filter to view

only the volunteer items: On the upper left side you’ll see a pull-down menu

that says “Show: All Categories.” Click on the arrow, and then select “Show:

Volunteering” and you’ll view only the volunteer opportunities.

Here are some of the kinds of volunteer activities you can choose from:

• Be a construction volunteer for Rebuilding Together Peninsula

• Help in ESL/citizenship preparation classes

• Be a Project READ literacy tutor

• Do a park cleanup project

• Be an after-school sports coach

• Join in parks/community services activities

• Share nature at Edgewood Park

• Help Friends of the Library

• Coach basketball or volleyball at the Boys & Girls Clubs

• Volunteer for library cleanup days

• Read to kids with Traveling Storytime

• Help with library services

• Become a mentor with Friends for Youth

• Join teen volunteer opportunities at the library

• Assist with activities at Fair Oaks Community Center

• Bring the family to spring and fall cleanup days

www.SpectrumMagazine.net


Insurance Tips: Learner’s Permits and

Parental Responsibility

By Hector Flamenco, Special to The Spectrum

Can someone get auto insurance with just a learner’s permit?

Yes, they can. A driver’s or learner’s “permit” is permission to drive and

therefore a temporary license with certain restrictions.

Learners can obtain their own auto insurance or they can be covered under

someone else’s policy, such as parents’ or the vehicle owner’s policy, but they

must have coverage. If a minor wants his own policy, due to the limitations

of contract law, his parent or legal guardian will need to countersign the

insurance application for it to be legally binding.

Is my child considered an excluded or included driver?

A driver’s permit comes with all the responsibilities of anyone, licensed

or not, who operates a motor vehicle on public roads, including financial

responsibility. No state provides exemption from financial responsibility laws

for minors or permitted drivers.

If your child is excluded from driving one of your vehicles, it’s pretty

much a “done deal.” That means that anytime he drives one of your vehicles

— even if it’s just to park the car — he would be excluded. Your insurance

company wouldn’t pay for any damages caused if he had an accident (though

sometimes they will pay the damages to your own vehicle under your firstparty

coverage).

If your child has just gotten a learner’s permit, and you plan on letting

him drive (even with you in the car), the exclusion would still apply. You can

argue with your carrier until you’re blue in the face, but if the exclusion still

exists, they won’t cover damages caused while driving.

Your best bet: Remove the exclusion and, as your carrier suggests, add your

child as an occasional driver. (Some companies don’t offer the “occasional

driver” provision.) You may even save money that way. However, once your

child gets his actual license and starts driving regularly, he needs to be added

on as a regular driver.

As I Was Saying… (Continued from page 6)

Just as predictable is the fast opposition to the tax led by members of

the Occupy Redwood City (ORWC) group, who sent representatives to last

week’s supervisors meeting to speak out against the sales tax increase.

The group and others opposed to the tax point out that “over $44 million of

San Mateo County’s $80 million budget increase this year is earmarked for

the new jail. As a group standing in solidarity with others who are opposed

to a new jail in San Mateo County, ORWC is firmly opposed to a provision

in the proposed ballot measure that would allow the Board to retain full

discretion over where the projected $60 million in increased annual revenue

will be spent.”

The group also stands against the proposed tax measure because “we already

know that the Board is looking to use this money to fund the construction and

operation of the new jail the majority of them have been pushing for despite

recommendations from their own commissioned experts advising them to

explore other options before embarking on such a costly project.”

Joining Pine in his concerns about putting a larger burden on low-income

residents, ORWC also stated, “If it wasn’t bad enough that our tax dollars

will be used to fund incarceration, sales taxes are regressive taxes that

disproportionately impact working-class families and low-income families of

color. The Board of Supervisors is basically proposing that the communities

disproportionately harmed by our county’s rush to incarcerate people up be

the same communities that bear the brunt of funding a new jail.”

I don’t know about you, but it seems to me the passage of this sales tax

increase, just like the other two, has a very uphill battle, especially coming

from a board of supervisors who appear to be out of touch with the changing

constituency they represent and too in touch with organized labor and special

interest groups.

As I was saying…

.…

Editor’s note: Please note that this article is for general information only and is not a

professional consultation. Always seek specific information from a licensed insurance

professional. Hector Flamenco is an agent with State Farm Insurance. Visit his website at

www.flamencoinsurance.com.

The Spectrum 29


A Minute With Julie Mooney

Julie Mooney was born in San Francisco and graduated from Drew Preparatory High School. After that,

she attended St. Francis Nursing Training School in San Francisco. She then attended SF City College

and graduated from SF State with a liberal arts degree.

She married Steve Mooney 1n 1976. He was an officer on a merchant ship. Their blended family includes

five children and two foster children. They raised their children in South San Francisco.

Julie started working for the San Mateo County Community College District (SMCCCD) in 1990. She

began at Skyline College and then opened the downtown Redwood City Center in 1996. She has been

involved with various community organizations, including the Chamber of Commerce and the Redwood

City Library Archives Committee.

Currently she is the project director for the off-campus site of the SMCCCD in Menlo Park. She is the

co-coordinator for the annual Olive Festival at Cañada College, which will be held this year on Saturday,

Oct. 7. The event is partnering with Port Fest to make Redwood City a destination point that weekend.

Julie’s hobbies include genealogy and history.

How will the Olive Fest be?

Fabulous!

Excited that it is in Redwood City?

Very! Very happy to support all the activities in

Redwood City.

Something few know about you?

That I was a widow twice before I married Steve Mooney.

Whom do you most admire?

Dalai Lama.

What phrase do you most overuse?

Fabulous!

Last movie you saw?

I am not a movie person.

What is your motto?

Go for it!

You are inspired by?

The people around me.

Memorable moment?

Birth of my children.

What is a dream you have or something you’d

like to accomplish in your life?

Go to Australia and South Africa.

What would happen if there were no moon?

The sky would be very empty.

What or who is the love of your life?

My children.

What is your idea of perfect happiness?

Sitting with friends and talking about literature.

What would life be like if you had wings?

I have no idea.

At this time next year you will be?

Retired!

If you’re happy and you know it?

Clap your hands.

Donate Your Vehicle

650-363-2423

1952 2012

Proceeds support Kainos Home & Training Center

Providing quality residential, vocational and support services to developmentally

disabled adults, enabling them to become active, contributing members of the

community.

Maximum Tax Deductions – We handle paperwork

Pete’s Harbor

Celebrating Our 60th Anniversary

Thank you for supporting us through the years.

We urge you to contribute and support local

non-profit organizations that do outstanding

work in our community.

Berths & Dry Storage

One Uccelli Boulevard, Redwood City, CA 94063 • 650-366-0922

www.SpectrumMagazine.net


Alpio Barbara

and the team

Supports

the Tuesday

Downtown

Farmers Market

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