Race Across America? - Spokes Magazine

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Race Across America? - Spokes Magazine

Serving Cyclists in the Mid-Atlantic States MAY 2008

FREE

Race Across America?

“Sure,

why not...”

Climb Mt.

Kilimanjaro

Complete

a 24-Hour

Mountain

Bike Race



Swim the Bay


IN THIS ISSUE [ CYCLING IN ARLINGTON COUNTY + BIKE TO WORK MAY 16 + TOURS + MORE ]


photo courtesy: Doug Graham

The Washington, D.C. Region’s Premier Professional Cycling Event

SUNDAY, JUNE 1, 2008 ■

ARLINGTON, VIRGINIA

8:15 AM Amateur Race

10:15 AM Women’s Pro 1/2 Race

11:45 AM Kid’s Races

12:15 PM Men’s Pro

The eleventh annual CSC Invitational will take to the streets of downtown Arlington, Virginia on

June 1st. Some of the world’s best cyclists will race the famous one kilometer course through

the Clarendon business district, past the many charming stores and cafes where race-goers

can take a break from the action. The race course is easily accessible via the Clarendon Metro

Stop. Pro riders will complete 100 laps of the course. Cycling of this caliber doesn’t come to

town every day, in fact, it only happens once a year... at the CSC Invitational. Don’t miss it!

www.arlingtonsports.org


ON

COVER

THE

Having completed many interesting physical challenges, Ken

Shuart (right) will tackle Race Across America. Pictured with

teammate Steve Laurenson.

BY THE END OF MAY, I will want to have one of those

number bumper stickers on my car. You know, the

kind that says 26.2 if you’ve run a marathon, or 140.2

if you’ve done an ironman triathlon.

I’m just not sure what number I should buy. 13.1,

52.5, 90, or 3-4-1? I’m not even sure where people get

those stickers or if they make these numbers. But I

always have fun trying to figure out what the numbers

represent when I see them on cars.

The 26.2 is easy. People who run marathons, cause

they run 26.2 miles.

I’d guess the most impressive is the 140.2. If you see a

vehicle with one of these stickers, stop and smile deferentially

to the driver. That person has likely swum

2.4 miles, biked 112 miles, followed by running a full

26.2 mile marathon, all on the same day and quite

possibly on the island of Hawaii.

As for me, this May my wife has signed us up for our

first ever half marathon (hence the possibility of a

13.1 sticker), my first ever Columbia Triathlon (hence

the 52.5, which represents a combination of the 1.5

kilometer swim, the 41k bike, and 10k run), and lastly

our second annual Kent County Spring Fling.

This last event presents a much more complicated

problem. You see, the Kent County Spring Fling is a

family affair in which my wife and I join 500 cycling

enthusiasts. We’ll travel to Chestertown, Md., captain

two tandems with our two kids for three days, averaging

30 miles a day. Hence, I figure we could get a 90

sticker representing 90 miles ridden with kids over

three days.

Much more impressive in my book is the 3-4-1 sticker,

which I would pay to create. The 3-4-1 represents 3-

days, with 4 people housed in a small 1 room college

dormitory. Running a half marathon is easy compared

to 3-4-1.

If I wanted a sound, unbiased recommendation on

which sticker to get, I would likely turn to my sister

Linda. Her answer would be simple. “Get out that

sticker we got years ago that says ‘This car climbed

Mt. Washington.’ That sticker isn’t so show-offey,”

she'll likely tell me.

Or I guess I could be like one of our neighbors who

has 20 or 50 bumper stickers covering every available

spot on the back of his pick-up truck.

Whatever. Let’s see how the month goes, then you’ll

know simply by checking out the bumper of my car.

Happy Trails,

Neil Sandler

Editor & Publisher

Touring • Racing • Off-Road

Recreation • Triathlon • Commuting

SPOKES is published monthly eight times a year — monthly March

through September, plus one winter issue. It is available free of charge at

most area bicycle stores, fitness centers and related sporting establishments

throughout Maryland, Virginia, the District of Columbia, and parts

of Pennsylvania, Delaware and West Virginia.

Circulation: 30,000. Copyright© 2008 SPOKES.

All rights reserved. No reprinting without the publisher’s written permission.

Opinions expressed and facts presented are attributed to the respective

authors and not SPOKES. Editorial and photographic submissions are

welcome. Material can only be returned if it is accompanied by a selfaddressed,

stamped envelope. The publisher reserves the right to refuse

any advertising which may be inappropriate to the magazine’s purpose.

Editorial and Advertising Office:

SPOKES

5911 Jefferson Boulevard

Frederick, MD 21703

Phone/Fax: (301) 371-5309

e-mail: spokesmag@comcast.net

page 6

MAY 2008

EDITOR & PUBLISHER

Neil W. Sandler

CALENDAR EDITOR

Sonja P. Sandler

GRAPHIC DESIGN

Studio 22

www.studio20two.com
















May 2008

3


Join our celebration in

Emmitsburg, Maryland

July 24 th – 27 th

for the 20 th anniversary of

Cycle Across Maryland

This is a unique opportunity to tour

western Maryland where the spectacular

Catoctin Mountains meet Maryland’s

pastoral rolling farms. Route distances

range from 15 to 100 miles.

MAJOR PARTNER:

PARTNERS:

All registration fees support the advocacy work of One Less Car.

www.onelesscar.org/CAM/2008


The American Diabetes Association presents

Sunday, June 08, 2008

Reston Town Center

www.diabetes.org/tour

100 Mile - Century Ride 32 Mile - Fitness Test

63 Mile - Fitness Challenge 12 Mile - Family Fun Ride

Tour de Tots - Youth Ride

Each participant has a goal of raising at least $175 or more

through flat donations. Corporations, businesses and families

build large teams of co-workers, friends and associates, with

each team member raising money toward an overall team goal.

Register and fund-raise online at www.diabetes.org/tour.

VOLUNTEERS STILL NEEDED!

For more information, please contact Alan Kissick at

202-331-8303 x4532 or akissick@diabetes.org.

www.diabetes.org/tour


Race Across America?

by NEIL SANDLER

“Sure,

why not...”

Become a walk-on member of the

University of Maryland’s football team

Climb Mt. Kilimanjaro

Complete a 24-Hour Mountain Bike Race

Run marathons



Swim the 4.4 mile Chesapeake Bay

Race sail boats in the Bay every

Wednesday after work

Finish tortuous 48 hour team

adventure races

Become an accomplished rock climber

and white water kayaker

Complete numerous triathlons, both

road and off-road

Coach son’s lacrosse team to

county finals









Race your bike across America HUM, okay!

KEN SHUART OF GALESVILLE, MARYLAND, is part of a

four person team training to race their bicycles across

America this June.

For Shuart, it’s no big deal, just another one of the

many life challenges he intends to add to his resume

next month.

“Yes, since December we’ve upped the amount of

miles we ride significantly,” Shuart told SPOKES.

That’s part of ramping up for the legendary Race

Across America (RAAM), which begins June 11 on a

pier that juts out into the Pacific Ocean in Oceanside,

California, and ends 3008 miles away, for the first time

ever, on the Annapolis, Md., waterfront, just a short

ride from Shuart’s home.

“But I was in pretty good shape before the specific

training kicked in, so it’s not that big of a deal,” the

48-year-old systems analyst added.

This from a guy who decided to try a triathlon even

though he wasn’t much of a swimmer. “But by the

time I’d completed a half ironman, I figured I could

already swim two and a half miles, so I might as well

do the Chesapeake Bay swim. It was only another two

miles longer...’ he says almost matter-of-factly.

Much of Shuart’s athletic endeavors seem to occur

that way, they just seem to roll from one into another.

Growing up in Severna Park, Md., just north of

Annapolis, Shuart played lacrosse and football at

Severna Park High. Studying finance and economics

at the University of Maryland in College Park, in 1978

he tried out for the University of Maryland team in

College Park and made the squad as a safety.

Although he’s never been a bike tourist or racer, he

always used bike riding and running as core fitness

training for the many sports he participated in over

the years.

Always one to enjoy new challenges Shuart followed

in his wife Jody’s footsteps. She completed the Marine

Corps Marathon twice, and Shuart did his first with

her in 1999.

Having gone through all the training for that marathon,

Shuart didn’t want to lose his fitness, so joined up

with some friends who’d gotten into adventure sports

like rock climbing, kayaking and mountain biking.

Shuart competed in and completed his first 24 hour

adventure race in 2001 and was hooked by the sport.

“Basically, they give you a map and a compass and

provide a series of checkpoints along the way. In that

event all four teammates had to remain within 100

feet of each other at all times.” This included while

in boats, rock climbing, biking. “You never knew what

was coming up next. You’d ride your bikes, arrive at

Ken Shuart (right) with RAAM teammate Steve Laurenson.

a river, break the bikes down, load them into canoes,

paddle 20 miles, remount the bikes, then do a rope

course or whatever they had in store for us.” His team

also has done 48 hour adventure races.

On- road and off-road triathlons seemed a likely way

to remain in shape over the year.

Over the past few years, he’s found that he gets into

shape for upcoming events by early May and remains

in shape throughout the year.

Along the way he’s added other accomplishments. In

2003 he climbed 14,000 foot Mt. Rainier in Washington

State. In 2005, he did his first half ironman triathlon,

as well as the 4.4 mile Bay swim, and the 24 Hours of

Moab mountain bike relay. In 2007, he climbed the

nearly 20,000 foot Mt. Kilimanjaro in Africa.

But his idea of putting together a team relay to compete

in this year’s RAAM had much different motives.

“My family has had numerous run ins with skin cancer.

A lot of it was the result of our childhoods in

which we were constantly on the beach, out in the

bay sailing, or just playing ball outdoors,” Shuart

explained. “Between me, my two older sisters, younger

brother and parents we’ve probably had 25 or 30

visits for one form of basal cell (skin disease) procedure

or another.”

Three events last summer, caused Shuart to become

an activist in the battle against skin cancer.

The first incident occurred when one of his sisters

went in for a routine examination last year and ended

up having basal cells (not cancerous) removed. A couple

of weeks later, Shuart went in and ended up with

a somewhat more invasive procedure to remove basal

cells. The third event was a combination of Shuart

hearing about the RAAM team relay, and subsequent-

6 May 2008


Shuart (left) with RAAM teammates Jody Bennett, Stuart Levy and Steve Laurenson.

ly hearing that for the first time RAAM would finish in

Annapolis. “It just seemed that someone was sending

me a message to do this.” “This” being to form a team

and enter the four person team category.

On his team are some of his adventure racing buddies

Steve Laurenson and Stuart Levy of northern Virginia,

and Jody Bennett of Washington, D.C.

The team is being coached by long time area long

distance cyclist Josh Simonds. Of the four, Levy

has the most cycling experience. He is a Category 3

road racer and has completed three PAC (Pacific to

Atlantic competitions), the 750 mile Paris-Brest-Paris

randonee, and five Death Valley double centuries.

This past April he went to Arizona to train by riding

100 miles a day for two weeks.

Before coach Simonds took over, Shuart had a varied

training program which includes three bike rides a

week (for a total of about 100 miles). After Simonds

took over, they ride at least five days a week with double

workout on some days.

Mondays consist of core workouts with free weights,

Tuesdays and Wednesdays include a variety of 90 mile

bike workouts (including intervals, hill repetitions,

etc.), Thursdays include weight training and a ride,

Fridays are off days, followed by long rides on both

Saturdays and Sundays (110 miles on Saturday, 85 on

Sunday, during the month of April).

For RAAM, the four person team will split into pairs,

each pair responsible for six hours of riding. The way

they’ve planning it, each of the two riders on a pair

will ride for one hour. After rotating riding responsi-

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RACE continued on p.8

May 2008

7


RACE continued from p.7

bilities for six hours, the two will rest while the other

pair takes over. This gives each pair six hours of offtime

to recuperate.

“This way you get to start recovering right away. We

can get our massage, drink recovery and we hope to

use a cold laser (which is rubbed on the tired legs),

provided by Shuart’s chiropractor.

The team, named Ride4Melanoma, will do two trial

runs by driving out to Ohio and riding home. The

first trial run will be for 24 hours, the second 48

hours. This should enable them to iron out the bugs

and test their bodies and their seven member riding

support crew.

Shuart hopes to raise $100,000 to help the Children’s

Melanoma Prevention Foundation produce a series of

children’s books designed to help kids protect themselves

against skin cancer. They’ve gotten a good start

on fund raising, and even have one pledge of $10,000

from the owner of a Gaithersburg company called

Brainware. Shuart’s dermatologist Dr. Lisa Renfrow

of Annapolis Dermatology Associates, and a company

that manufacturers sun protective clothing, Coolibar,

have also ponied up support for the team.

As for the ride itself, Shuart says “If we can average 17

to 18 miles per hour, we should arrive in Annapolis

on the seventh day.

“We want to have fun, raise money for a good cause,

and of course we are competitive by nature, so we

hope to do well.”

For more information log onto

www.ride4melanoma.com

Finishing the 4.4 mile Bay swim.


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MEMORIAL SERVICE SET FOR MORRIS J.

WARREN, FOUNDER OF THE WB&A TRAIL

Morris J. Warren, considered by many to be the “father of the

Washington-Baltimore & Annapolis (WB&A) Trail,” one of the

mid-Atlantic’s most popular hiker/biker trails, will be honored

at memorial service, May 17, at the Ivy Hill Cemetery in Laurel,

Md. Mr. Warren died of a heart attack January 4 in Fort Myers,

Florida.

Mr. Warren was 81-years young, and husband of legendary

senior triathlete Marge Stall Warren. The two were among the

most notable cycling enthusiasts in the country.

Following the 2 p.m. ceremony, a reception will be held at the

Warren Bowie homestead. For details contact Bill Kelly at (410)

480-1909 or email ws.kelly@att.net

8 May 2008


ANNAPOLIS MAYOR ENVISIONS BIKE FRIENDLY CITY

by NEIL SANDLER

ELLEN MOYER, MAYOR of Annapolis, Maryland’s capital

city, and home to the U.S. Naval Academy, is not

a cyclist, but she has some good ideas of what would

make the city friendlier to cycling enthusiasts.

going to work with the folks who put on that event

and the local cycling community to have a series of

events surrounding that major happening.”

But the challenge of making Annapolis better for

cyclists, can only be part of an overall transportation

strategy, she explained. “In trying to build an ethic

that gets people to choose alternatives to getting into

their cars, we need a full slate of alternatives, a better

bus system, better safer roads, and the bicycle is just

one component.”

“There are so many people who live within one mile

of where they want to go, whether it’s to work or to a

restaurant, and we somehow need to show them that

there are viable, safe alternatives to getting into the

car. People need to know it’s safe to walk or ride bikes

to these amenities. The older neighborhoods lend

themselves to these models. Unfortunately, the engineers

always seem to want to build wider roads, moving

people faster and over longer distances, and that’s

not the best solution.

“If we could reverse the direction we are headed in,

people would be less tense. Many people have a feeling

they are no longer in control of their lives. If we

can get them out of their cars, to the point where

they can occasionally walk or ride bikes to their destinations,

they will be happier, healthier citizens.”

EXPERTISE…

CUSTOMER SERVICE…

VALUE…

Enough Said?

No, Not Enough…

Celebrating Our

22nd Anniversary!

And being host to the finish of the legendary Race

Across America (RAAM) this June is not a bad way to

highlight some of her city’s steps in the right direction.

It’s a plan, though still in development, that would

likely help many similar sized U.S. cities.

“I think the first thing you’ve got to do is get to the

kids and their parents,” she began her explanation.

“We had an education program for children where two

of the things we did was encourage everyone to plant a

tree, and for the students to get their parents to commit

to driving their cars 10 miles less each week.

“Basically, we need similar educational efforts to

get people to use their bikes,” she explained during

an interview at the 2008 Bike/Ped Symposium

in Annapolis this past February. “In a city the size of

Annapolis, with the small busy streets, we can do maps

showing people the safest and most effective way of

getting around by bikes but we also need to encourage

employers to provide the amenities needed to get

their employees onto bikes. Some people might call

having showers installed at the workplace a ‘frill’ but

if you really want to get people out of their cars you

need these so-called frills.”

“Annapolis is an walkable city. It’s compact with small

narrow streets, lots of places to eat, and things to see.

Getting around by bicycle is certainly something we

need to nourish,” she added.

Last year Annapolis introduced a “freewheeling” bike

program. Visitors to the visitor’s center near the docks

downtown could use a loaner bike free of charge. All

they had to do was turn over a credit card to serve

as collateral. The 12 bikes in the program were used

frequently and the city intends to continue and even

expand the program this year.

The city has also outfitted many buses with bike racks,

which also have proven popular among commuters.

Mayor Moyer is excited that her city will, for the first

time ever, serve as the finish line for RAAM. “We’re

We want to say a lot

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May 2008

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DEPARTMENTS

Pedestrians in Peril

Until he was about 12 years old, John Wetmore grew

up in Evanston, Ill., where he started walking to school

in kindergarten and continuing all through grade

school. Then his family moved to Bethesda, Md.

“We lived in a suburb in Evanston, but it was an older

development and our house was built in 1908,” said

Wetmore, a freelance videographer who has been producing

a monthly cable access and satellite television

program called Pedestrians in Peril for 12 years.

“Looking back it strikes me that there were sidewalks

on every street and walking to school was the most

normal thing in the world.”

Halfway through sixth-grade, however, when he

arrived in Maryland - although his home was the

same distance to school as it had been in Illinois -

Wetmore needed a bus to get to school. “Our home

in Bethesda had been built in 1950,” Wetmore said,

noting the crucial post World War II divide when the

car quickly took center stage in newly designed suburban

sprawl.

The walkability issue eventually led Wetmore, now

51, to begin his career as a pedestrian and bicycle

advocate way back in 1980, with a letter asking for a

sidewalk to be put on Bradley Boulevard in Bethesda-

Chevy Chase.

Wetmore graduated from Princeton with an economics

degree, but also had a photography portfolio to

match his resume. He said he just happened to land

his first job with his econ background, working for

years with the federal government and the consumer

price index. He earned his master’s degree in economics

from Harvard.

Also an amateur astronomer, Wetmore first purchased

a video camera in 1991 before traveling to Mexico to

film a total solar eclipse. Soon after that he began to

utilize his photography skills as a freelance videographer.

A few years later, he blended his long interest

in transportation into a monthly report on pedestrian

issues for his original television program, Perils

for Pedestrians, which first aired on Montgomery

Community Television in 1996.

The title of the show is a bit misleading, though the

program opens with a reminder that 60,000 pedestrians

have been killed in the last decade by cars in

the United States, with another million injured. The

show examines a wide-range of issues associated with

pedestrians, bicyclists, handicap access and mass transit

concerns.

The best part is that Wetmore reports on-site from

places all over the country - and sometimes outside

the U.S. - interviewing advocates, planners and public

officials about the real problems pedestrians, bicyclists

and commuters face on a daily basis everywhere.

“Television is the most powerful form of communication

in the world,” said Wetmore, a supporter of

grassroots advocacy organizations like the Washington

Area Bicyclists Association (WABA) and a member

of the Maryland Bicycling and Pedestrian Advisory

Committee, the Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle

Professionals and America Walks.

Wetmore obtains segment ideas about pedestrian,

bicycling and transit issues largely from Internet

research, e-mail and phone contacts when he knows

he’s going to be visiting a new city. He also picks up

tips by paying attention to local newspaper and television

news reports when traveling and, generally, keeps

his eyes open.

“In Moose Pass, Alaska, I saw a spray-painted sign on

the side of the highway that read, ‘Slow up, and let our

children grow up,’ and I thought, ‘There is a story’.”

John Wetmore

Sometimes, it’s just

coincidental timing.

“I was in Toronto for

the 30th anniversary

of their commuter

rail system and people

would say, ‘Jeez, you

went all the way up to

Toronto just for that?’,

Wetmore said. “But I

was up there for other

reasons and just took

advantage of my good

fortune.”

Wetmore first started filming Peril for Pedestrian

interviews on the side while doing camera work for

a now-defunct cable access travel program - which

helped out because he had no travel funds for his

own show.

Wetmore realized that only making episodes built

around Maryland, D.C. and Virginia would soon get

boring for local viewers - and especially for any audience

he was building around the country.

“I don’t have a travel budget,” he said. “When my sister

lived in San Francisco, I would visit her and you’d

see a lot of episodes with segments based in Northern

California. When a high school buddy moved to

Arizona and was bugging to visit him, I knew I’d be

able to knock out interviews in Phoenix, Tucson and

Albuquerque.”

Overall, he’s been to nine countries, including New

Zealand and Australia, where he attended the Walk 21

international conference in Perth in 2001.

“I got six episodes out of that trip,” he said, with a

laugh. Somehow, by episode 96 in 2004, with incredibly

planning, a little luck and creative use of his

frequent flier mileage, he had produced Perils for

Pedestrian in all 50 states. Oddly enough, the last

state he reached was the first state - Delaware.

A typical segment, like episode 110, included

segments on The Rails-to-Trails Conference in

Minneapolis, bicycle engineering at Southern Illinois

University, a bicycle advocate on bicycle education

in Salt Lake City, and an active living partnership in

Omaha, Neb. There are now four ways to see Perils

For Pedestrians:

- The DISH Network’s Universityhouse Channel 9411

on Tuesdays at 9:30 p.m.

- Public Access Cable TV: Perils for Pedestrians

currently airs in 27 states and most Maryland and

Virginia counties, plus the District of Columbia.

- On the Internet: Perils for Pedestrians is webcast by

some stations and most episodes are now available on

Google video.

- And on DVD for $10.

Wetmore says that he does all this because he believes

it’s important that people have transportation choices.

“When the only choice is to drive an automobile, it’s

not a choice at all,” Wetmore said. “You’re a slave to

the car.”

He points to all the research that list the health

benefits of making communities more walkable and

bikeable, and also makes the connection to broader

national and political issues.

“Look at the three big issues in the news,” Wetmore

said. “Gasoline prices–which have national security

implications; greenhouse gas and climate–we need to

push mass transit and how do you do that?; and the

housing crisis–after the mortgage, the automobile is

using the next biggest expense for a family.”

SB 492 passes

Senate Bill 492, a bicycle and pedestrian bridge access

bill passed in Maryland was expected to be signed

into by Gov. Martin O’Malley shortly after SPOKES

went to press this month.

One Less Car assisted in drafting the legislation and

organized grassroots lobbying on the bill, which eliminates

the current prohibition on bicycle and pedestrian

facilities on state-owned bridges.

This means that future and existing bridges can now

be built with bike and walking paths and the advocacy

community can now make a push for bicycle

and pedestrian accommodations on the new Nice

Bridge over the Potomac River, which is now being

planned, as well as on the Hattum Bridge over the

Susquehanna River, which must be refitted in the

near future.

May 16 Bike to Work Day - Washington metro area

Thousands of area commuters will celebrate bicycling

as a clean, fun and healthy way to get to work

on Friday, May 16. The Washington Area Bicyclists

Association has organized 26 pit stops across the

region, enabling riders to peddle into the city with

experienced commuter convoys and meet up at

Freedom Plaza.

Bike to Work Day is a free event and open to all area

commuters and Free Bike to Work Day t-shirts are

available to the first 7,000 registrants, WABA said.

Local pit stops will offer breakfast, entertainment,

dynamic speakers and chances to win bicycles and

other prizes, but commuters must register with your

pit stop location to be eligible for prizes. Pit stops

include: Washington D.C.’s Freedom Plaza, the National

Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Bowie Town Center,

Bowie Old Town, College Park, Hyattsville, Indian Head,

Md., Frederick, North Bethesda, Rockville-Rockville

Town Center, Rockville-Falls Grove Transportation

Center, One Discovery Place in Silver Spring, the

FDA White Oak in Silver Spring, Alexandria, Va.,

Arlington-Rosslyn, Arlington-Crystal City Dulles-AOL

Campus (AOL employees only), Fairfax Corner, Fairfax

University Mall, Leesburg, Reston, Springfield, Sterling,

Tysons Corner and Vienna.

Bike to Work Day Baltimore metro area

Bike to Work Day 2008, sponsored by the Baltimore

Metropolitan Council, will also be celebrated in the

Baltimore region on Friday May 16.

Between 7:00 and 8:30 a.m. bicycle commuters

throughout the Baltimore region will converge on

five locations: in Annapolis at the City Dock, at War

Memorial Plaza at City Hall (100 N. Holliday St.)

in Baltimore, Courthouse Square (400 Washington

Ave., Towson) in Baltimore County, the Government

Center (220 S. Main St.) in Harford County, The Mall

in Columbia by Sears Service Center (10300 Little

Patuxent Parkway, Columbia) in Howard County, and

satellite rallies will also be held in Westminster in

Carroll County and at Northrop Grumman in Anne

Arundel County.

Registration is now open to receive a free t-shirt and

a chance to win a prize The first 225 registrants will

receive a Free T-shirt and musette Bag. The first 500

registrants will receive a Free T-shirt. All participants

will also receive an on-the-go snack with java, and the

chance to win bike accessories or the grand prize:

a bicycle tour for two on the C&O Canal/Great

Allegheny Passage from sponsor Adventure Cycling.

You must be registered and attend a rally to win prizes.

Registration closes on May 9.

May 2008

11


Arlington County

goes for the

Gold

story and photos by LARRY LIPMAN

IT’S 9 A.M. ON A SATURDAY that threatens intermittent

rain and a half dozen members and friends of

the Lanterne Rouge cycling club are gathered outside

the Java Shack in Arlington County.

Over the next few hours they’ll ride more than 50

miles through Northern Virginia and the District of

Columbia, starting and finishing in Arlington.

Arlington County is considered one of the best places

on the East Coast to ride. The county boasts 86 miles

of designated bikeways including 36 miles of shareduse

trails, 38 miles of signed shared roadways, and 12

miles of bicycle lanes.

The trails are one of Arlington’s strongest bike assets

offering riders a choice between flat and hilly and

woods and river.

Best of all, the trails are connected.

At the southeast tip of Arlington, a rider could head

south to George Washington’s home along the Mount

Vernon Trail, or north past Ronald Reagan National

Airport and watch the planes flying low overhead as

they take off and land.

Continuing past the airport, the rider would glide

along the Potomac River with a breath-taking view of

Washington, D.C. on the opposite shore looking like

a postcard you could hold in your hand. From the

Capitol dome to the spires of Georgetown University,

it’s all laid out.

From there, riders could take one of four bridges to

cross into the District: coming across at the Jefferson

Memorial, the Lincoln Memorial, near the Kennedy

Center or the heart of Georgetown.

The Mt. Vernon Trail links up in Rosslyn with the

Custis Trail which offers plenty of steep hills as it

heads west along I-66. Here it’s mostly wooded area.

Eventually, the Custis Trail connects with the W&OD

Trail, a rail-to-trail park that extends westward a good

40 miles to Purcellville. Most of that ride is through

flat, wooded terrain. Eastward, the W&OD links with

the Four Mile Run Trail through Shirlington, along

Four Mile Run and ends where the loop began at the

Mount Vernon Trail.

Lanterne Rouge founder and president Seth Turner

says the paved trails are excellent for commuting to

work, “but when I’m not commuting, I don’t want to

be on them, especially on weekends,” when the trails

are clogged with baby strollers, roller-bladers and

young riders with training wheels.

So Turner and other hardcore riders take to the roads

for serious cycling. That occasionally brings them in

conflict with drivers who don’t think bicycles belong

on the road.

Biking in Arlington “is a two-sided coin,” Turner

recently told SPOKES. “If you know where to ride,

there are some really great places and great roads,” but

there is also a lot of traffic and some roads that were

built for automobiles where riding is discouraged.

The other riders assembled here this morning generally

share Turner’s view of Arlington County as a good

place to ride, citing its well-maintained trails, bike

lanes and the tolerant attitude of most motorists.

Joe Malin frequently rides along Walter Reed Drive, a

county street often used by cyclists. Recently, he noted

a bike lane had been painted on the roadway.

“It seems they actually pay attention to what people are

doing on their bikes. I’m really impressed,” Malin says.

Jack Schur says, “it’s great, but it could be better if

they did more to have more defined shoulders on the

side of the roads.”

Brian Bradley notes that not just serious riders are out.

“You see a lot of commuters, even on the rainy days.”

Douglas Galbi says he was favorably impressed with

the quick time a pothole that could have been dangerous

to cyclists was fixed after he reported it to the

county’s pothole hotline.

The Lanterne Rouge riders, most wearing the club’s

jersey and straddling high-end bikes, are what David

Goodman describes as “Type A riders” — spandexwearing,

hard-core cycling enthusiasts who will ride

long distances in almost any weather and along almost

any path or roadway.

But there is another type of rider that Goodman is

interested in. He describes them as the “Type B riders,”

the casual, recreational riders who, with a bit of

encouragement, might be coaxed into using their bikes

for local errands or an occasional commute to work.

As Arlington’s bicycle and pedestrian program manager,

it’s Goodman’s job to be concerned about both

types of riders, but he’s especially focused on turning

the occasional riders into more frequent riders.

12 May 2008


Arlington County Board member Chris Zimmerman, with

daughter Madeleine, pauses during a ride along the

W&OD Trail at Bluemont Park in Arlington.

It’s his job, he says, to deal with “all of those things

that can help tip the balance between someone saying

‘We have all these facilities, I might as well ride today,’

versus someone saying ‘It’s too much of a hassle. I’ll

just drive.’”

Arlington boasts a 3 percent “mode share,” which

means roughly 3 percent of the commuting public

in a self-reporting survey says it uses a bicycle for at

least a portion of their trips. Goodman says that share

may be higher on the West Coast and in some college

towns, but is among the highest on the East Coast.

“We’re pretty proud of that,” he says. “We’re working

on increasing that.”

Goodman, who was a bike commuter in New York

City for 15 years and now occasionally bikes to work

or to take his daughter to pre-school, says, “people

more like me will sometimes commute on a bike if

the stars are aligned and the weather is right and the

time is right. They need a higher comfort level, otherwise

they may not choose to bother.”

Raising the comfort level of the casual rider is

Goodman’s primary focus. He acknowledges he can’t

change the weather, but he can make it easier to ride,

David Goodman, Arlington’s bicycle and pedestrian program

manager, shows off one of the county’s new bicycle

hitching posts outside the Arlington County office building.

even in the winter, by providing better facilities and

making sure riders have bike lights.

Twice a year when daylight savings time changes, the

Arlington police and the bike department launch a

“Street Smart” program where they give out cycling

information, the rules-of-the-road and a few dozen

bike lights to commuters who don’t have one. The

police give such cyclists a warning ticket and a light.

The fact that Goodman’s job exists says much about

Arlington’s dedication to cycling.

Last year Arlington was designated a Silver-level

Bicycle Friendly Community by the League of

American Bicyclists. In the near future, Goodman

says, the county hopes to be designated a Gold-level

community.

To reach that goal, the county’s citizen-led Bicycle

Advisory Commission adopted a 39-page bike plan last

December to include in the county’s master transportation

plan. The key priority in that plan was to complete

a bikeway network that would link trails, roads

and bike paths throughout the county and make bicycling

facilities an integral part of all street improvement

projects.

The commission identified about 80 projects it says

need to be implemented. While many of them are

small improvements -- such as better marking of bike

lanes on some streets -- others include providing

wider shoulders, more bike lanes, better connectivity

and signage between lanes and trails and better bike

parking and security.

One of the largest projects underway is construction

of an extension of the Four Mile Run Trail that will

help move cyclists from one side of Interstate 395

to the other between Shirlington and Park Fairfax.

The segment, expected to open about a year from

now, will extend Four Mile Run -- which now requires

cyclists to use a pedestrian overpass -- to ride under

the highway, thus linking Shirlington to Glebe Road.

Another major project currently underway is for a

covered bike station near the entrance to the Ballston

Metro station. When completed next year, it will

offer secure, double-decker lighted bike parking, air

pumps and benches for riders to change their shoes.

The facility will replace what is now referred to as the

“bike pit,” where bikes are insecurely left.

The department plans to increase the amount of covered

and lighted bike parking areas at Metro stops

around the county including Clarendon, Crystal City,

Pentagon City and Rosslyn. Another covered bike

shelter is being planned for Shirlington’s bus transfer

station.

“We’re trying to tie biking into the overall transit network,”

Goodman says, by encouraging people to ride

their bicycles to a bus stop.

Another ambitious plan the county hopes to have in

place by the end of this year is for a European-style “bike

share” program where about 200 bikes will be placed

strategically around the county for people to use.

The bikes will be three-speed casual rides with generator

lights, a basket, coaster brakes and upright handlebars.

In order to use a bike, people who pay a $40 annual

fee will call a special toll-free number and receive a

one-time-use combination to a bike lock. They can

then ride the bike and leave it at a designated destination

– rather than having to return it to where they

started.

The first half-hour is scheduled to be free.

The county plans to piggy-back on the Zipcar rentals

and provide share bikes at Zipcar stations, including

those at Metro stations and some major shopping areas.

The idea is to “encourage people who might otherwise

not choose to use a bike to run errands to make

that choice,” Goodman says.

To make it easier to park bikes in shopping areas, the

county is installing numerous bicycle hitching posts

with nifty bicycle-design poles to which riders can

attach their locks.

Another goal for making riding easier for both the

casual user and the legions of tourists who visit the

area annually is to improve signage.

Goodman acknowledges what he call’s “minimal signage,”

on some roads and trails. The goal is to provide

signs that will tell people where the bike network

is, where amenities off the trail can be found, and

how to link to other parts of the community.

For example, Goodman notes that many of the county’s

most popular bike paths, such as the Four Mile

Run Trail and the Custis Trail, don’t have signs that

could inform a rider about the location of bike shops,

retail areas and restaurants. His goal is to make it

easier for residents, tourists and casual cyclists to visit

such places by bicycle.

“People sitting in an apartment in Ballston might

benefit if they knew there is a bicycle system,” he says.

“Why shouldn’t a tourist who comes to D.C. come out

to Arlington and not even worry about getting a map

because once you get on the Custis Trail you can get

to any community you want to? That’s the level we

want to get to with signage.”

Arlington County Board Chairman J. Walter Tejada is an

avid cyclist and can frequently be found riding the

county’s trails and roads.

For those who do want a map, Arlington produces

one and tries to update it every year. It can be found

at commuter stores around the county and on the

county’s website.

Arlington maintains an extensive bicycling website

(www.bikearlington.com) listing facilities such as bike

racks, bike shops and cycling events. The website also

offers bike maps of the county, instructions about how

to use bikes with the bus and rail mass transit systems,

and how to find a group to ride with.

Cycling is part of Arlington’s master transportation

plan that seeks to enhance as many alternatives to the

single-person car as possible.

That means the county is constantly looking for ways

to encourage cycling, walking on sidewalks, and

the use of public transportation along its roadways,

Goodman says.

Arlington’s interest in cycling is not a new phenomenon.

The popular Four Mile Run Trail along the border

between Arlington and Alexandria opened in 1968.

Arlington adopted its first comprehensive bicycle plan

in 1974 and later that year established the Bicycle

Advisory Commission.

GOLD continued on p.14

May 2008

13


GOLD continued from p.13

It’s had a full-time bicycle coordinator for 20 years.

Other bike-related county jobs include: bicycle promotion

manager, bike planner, and bike-sharing program

coordinator.

Two of the county’s top elected officials, County Board

Chairman J. Walter Tejada and Board Member Chris

Zimmerman, are avid cyclists who fall somewhere

between the Type B and Type A riders – they don’t

wear spandex, but they’re frequently on their bikes.

Tejada says he wants “bicycling to be part of the culture

of Arlington.”

The county’s goal is to become “transportation friendly”

by offering as many alternatives to the automobile

as possible, Tejada says.

Zimmerman, who lost about 35 to 40 pounds last year

through diet and exercise — much of it cycling — praises

the county network of trails which can take riders

along the Potomac River and through largely wooded

areas along the northern part of the W & OD Trail.

Zimmerman says he’d like to see a time when riding a

bicycle in Arlington is considered as commonplace as

it is in some European cities such as Copenhagen.

“I think we need to get to where bicycling is something

anybody can do any time,” he says.

To reach that point, Goodman sees the need to make

it easier for the casual rider to take a bike, rather than

a car, for errands and to work.

The first impediment to reaching that goal is where to

ride. Efforts are underway to expand the county’s bike

network by adding five more miles of shared-use trails

and 10 more miles of bike lanes in the near future.

Seth Turner, president and founder of Lanterne Rouge,

an Arlington-based bicycle club.

But Goodman acknowledges that in many places the

network is not connected: bike lanes suddenly disappear

and there are gaps that make it difficult to cycle

from one place to another.

Over time, he says, those gaps are being closed. It

is county policy to create a new bike lane whenever

new roads are installed or, if physically possible, when

existing ones are repaved. But because repaving jobs

often may cover only a few blocks, the new bike lanes

may not connect to existing lanes.

BIKE ALEXANDRIA FUN RIDES

Every Sunday at 2 p.m. meet at Cameron Run Regional Park,

4100 Eisenhower Ave., Alexandria, Va.,. for a free family fun

ride. Trail is paved, two ride options: 5.6 or 6.9 mile loops.

Both lead to nature area. Visit bike.meetup.com/288 or contact

Susan Schneider at (202) 403-1148 for details.

“We’re trying to build a much more connected network

so there are more ways of getting around, not

just a single way of getting from one side of the county

to the other,” Goodman says.

The county is often frustrated by its inability to control

the conditions on many of its major roadways

because they are under state control.

Among those are traffic-heavy highways such as

Arlington Boulevard (U.S. 50), Lee Highway (U.S.

29), Washington Boulevard, Glebe Road, Columbia

Pike and the Jefferson Davis Highway (U.S. 1).

“We don’t have a lot of control over how those get

maintained and designed and built. Sometimes we

would like to make changes on those roads that

VDOT won’t allow us to do,” Goodman says, referring

to the Virginia Department of Transportation, which

he describes as “less bike friendly,” than the county.

But Goodman says the county is relentlessly trying to

find ways to make it easier to cycle in and around the

area. For example, on new development projects, his

department works with developers to provide such

amenities, as putting in shower facilities and restrooms

for cyclists.

The county also participates in the annual Bike to

Work Day in May and hosts an annual bike ride with

Alexandria. This year’s Arlington-Alexandria event —

offering an eight-mile loop and a 23-mile loop — will

be held Saturday, June 7 under the sponsorship of

WABA. Entry fees are $18 for an adult ($15 for WABA

members) and $34 for a family. More details can be

found at http://www.waba.org/events/cbr/index.php.

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14 May 2008


ARLINGTON TO HOST TWO PRO BIKE RACES!

Most communities would be proud to host one major pro bicycling

event. Arlington hosts two.

Okay, maybe it has something to do with the fact that the race

promoter Rob Laybourn lives in Arlington with is wife and two

daughters. And perhaps it helps that the name of his race promotion

company is Arlington Sports, Inc.

But ask Rob and he’ll tell you it’s much more than just that.

“This community just lends itself to these types of events.

Arlington is young, progressive, and the community’s leaders

understand the value of providing citizens with more than just

trash pickup and bus service.

“Come and watch our races and you’ll see bike savvy people

sitting in cafes or restaurants watching the race go by while

reading their Sunday Washington Post. These events are not

just races, they are happenings. CSC (the Computer Sciences

Photos by Douglas Graham

Corporation) Invitational (now in its 11th year) is now an established

event that local businesses put on their calendars six

months in advance. It’s an established happening.”

This year’s CSC Invitational is set for Sunday, June 1.

Laybourn also hosts the U.S. Air Force Classic, CSC’s younger sibling

pro race, in nearby Crystal City on Sunday, May 4. For more

information on both events log onto www.arlingtonsports.org



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WHY SHOP AT LUTHERVILLE

BIKE SHOP?

W&OD TRAIL PATROL SEEKS

NEW MEMBERS

The Washington & Old Dominion (W&OD) Trail runs through

the communities of Arlington, Falls Church, Vienna, Reston,

Herndon, Sterling, Ashburn, Leesburg, Hamilton, and

Purcellville, Virginia. The W&OD Trail Patrol is seeking new

members to be on-scene ambassadors of safety, courtesy,

information, and goodwill. All adult trail users--cyclists, walker,

runners, skaters, carriage pushers, dog walkers, horse riders, or

wheel chair users--are eligible to apply.

Two orientation sessions are scheduled for May: The first will

be at the Raflo Park in Leesburg on Saturday, May 3 from 2 to

4 p.m. and the second will be Saturday, May 17 at the Vienna

Community Center from 10 a.m. to noon.

For further information and sign up please contact John Boone

at (703) 726-6993 or jmboone1@verizon.net.

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May 2008

15


COLUMNS

FAMILY CYCLING 101 by KEVIN BRUGMAN kbrugman@cox.net

“AS EASY AS RIDING A BIKE.” Over the years I have

heard or used that term many times. And for millions

of people that is true. Now I must admit, when I was

running behind my sons trying to get them to balance

and pedal and steer all at the same time, I questioned

that statement. But for lots of children with difficulties,

either physical or psychological, learning to ride

a bike is not easy and takes lots of work. At that is

where the “Lose the Training Wheels” organization

comes to the rescue.

The Lose the Training Wheels (LTTW) program has

developed a process and a collection of bikes to help

children learn how to bike. Some of the bikes have

either unique front or back wheels or adaptive handles

to help balance. The process is a long researched

series of steps to help the children learn how to ride

a bike.

First, some history of the program. Dr. Richard

E. Klein at the University of Illinois in Urbana-

Champaign initially started the research and program

which was later named the Rainbow Trainers, Inc. In

February 2007, Lose The Training Wheels, Inc., and

Rainbow Trainers, Inc., joined together using the

name Lose The Training Wheels. Dr. Klein started

doing research into how bikes worked in the early 80’s.

There he and students in the program worked with

children to see how long it took to learn how to ride.

Training wheels are frequently not the answer. When

my son was first starting to ride and had the training

wheels, he was going down a hill and started to take

a turn. The training wheels would not allow him to

lean into the turn and the training wheels actually

caused him to flip into the air and take a spectacular

fall. Being the true cyclist he is, he was more worried

about the scratch to the bike than the helmet that he

had cracked. (Being a Dad first and cyclist second, I

assured him the bike was alright and was wanted to

show how the other parents on the block why their

kids on training wheels needed a helmet!)

There is a misconception that many children with

disabilities do not have the balancing capabilities to

ride a bike. But when one thinks about the difficulties

of walking, riding a bike should be easy. To walk you

have to constantly shift the balance point from one

foot to the other. Riding a bike only requires a single

balance point and forward motion. Hence, the key

point to biking is just to go forward.

For the children attending the LTTW camps, there

are two major rewards. The first is the ability to ride

a bike and the second is a major boost in self confidence,

now that child is just like everyone else. The

smile on the face of a child who thought that they

could not ride a bike is one of the most infectious

things in life.

During Dr. Klein’s studies they developed a series of

bikes to help train children how to ride. Some of these

bikes have large beveled rollers on the back that allow

the bike to lean without falling over. Others have wide

front tires that help stabilize the bike. Many have extra

handles to allow helpers to run along and help balance.

All of these bikes are specially designed to overcome

the external and internal problems that children

must overcome in learning how to ride a bike.

This program builds upon incremental successes.

With training wheels, the child jumps from a totally

stable platform to riding a standard bike that is not

stable when stopped.

Depending on the skill level, the child may start with

a very stable bike being held up by an adult. They

then work through a series of bikes with narrower

rollers or just one roller that soon allows the children

to ride a standard two wheeler unassisted.

Recently the Fairfax County Park Authority hosted

a camp at the Dulles Expo center with 40 children,

many with disabilities. By the end of the week, 75%

of them were riding unassisted. Some of the children

were able to pick it up very quickly. One child was a

teenager that had never been able to learn how to ride

and by the end of the week was riding around the 5

mile mountain bike trail around Burke Lake Park.

For many of these new riders, they had to overcome

two difficulties one was their disability and the other

was years of believing that they could not ride a bike.

Once they are riding on a bike they know that they

can do it.

Olivia at camp

In studies by Dr. Dale Ulrich of the University of

Michigan, Division of Kinesiology “Only 10 to 12 percent

of people with Down syndrome learn to ride a bicycle

without training wheels. Teaching children to ride a

bicycle independently increases their balance control,

self-confidence, and self-esteem,” After Dr Ulrich contacted

the LTTW team to run a series of camps, they

found that over 68% of the participants had ridden a

two-wheeler at least 30 feet, and many of them were

virtually independent after a 5 day camp. http://www.

umich.edu/~cmbds/bike_study_article.pdf).

One of the children involved in the Fairfax County

camps is 10 year old Olivia. Olivia suffers from shaken

baby syndrome inflicted by a day care provider. As a

result, Olivia is blind in one eye and suffers multiple

balance problems as well as some other problems.

Olivia would try to ride on her bike using training

wheels to keep up with her brother, but would quickly

get discouraged. When her mom heard of the LTTW

camp at the Dulles Center last year, she quickly got

Olivia registered.

The camp was an intense program lasting eight

hours a day. It was highly structured working with

the children on the adaptive bikes and building up

confidence. Unfortunately Olivia was not quite ready

to ride a conventional bike at the end of the camp.

Then in March 2008, the Park Authority held another

LTTW camp at Lee District in the southern part of

Fairfax County. During this camp, Olivia was a little

more relaxed and knew what was going to happen,

and it did. By the end of the camp, she was riding

unassisted on a conventional two wheeler.

To keep up the improvement and interest, Olivia

and her Dad go up to the local school two or three

evenings a week so that Olivia can practice her biking

skills. She is up to riding for 25 – 30 minutes at a time

and is constantly improving.

To her parents, this is all about trying to include all

the family members in common activities. Bicycling

is an important part of their lives. Olivia’s dad is

currently in training for the two-day, 200 mile Pan-

Massachusetts Challenge. While Olivia will not be

ready to participate with her father on the full ride,

perhaps next year they will be able to participate in

some of the shorter family activities.

Fairfax County has gotten very active with the LTTC

camps. This year they will host at least three more

camps in June and July. While these camps are open

to anyone with difficulties learning how to ride a

bike, they are focused on children with disabilities.

In August there will be a LTTW camp for individuals

with autism hosted by the Lower Delaware Autism

Foundation at Mariner Middle School in Milton, DE.

To learn more about the Lose The Training Wheels

camps visit the following: http://www.losethetrainingwheels.org.

For information about the Fairfax County Parks program,

the following web site explains the March camp:

http://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/parks/ada/downloads/

faqLTW2008.pdf or contact Lisa Ruby at (703) 324-

8569 , or email at lisa.ruby@fairfaxcounty.gov.

For the Delaware camp, contact the Lower Delaware

Autism Foundation via www.ldaf.com or by telephone

at (302) 644-3410.

TANDEMS =

Sharing

WHY RIDE A TANDEM?

It’s sharing the fun and experience with

a partner, a child, a parent, or a friend.

Sharing exercise, sharing adventure,

sharing the joy of accomplishment, and

creating a shared memory.

We sell and rent tandems because we’ve

shared these things and found that bicycling

can be even more fun when it is shared.

We’re fighting “oil addiction” with

human powered transportation.

Join the fight – park your car and

ride your bike.

bikes@vienna, LLC

128A Church St, NW Vienna, VA 22180

703-938-8900

www.bikesatvienna.com

COME TO OUR WEBSITE FOR INFORMATION

ABOUT OUR UNUSUAL PRODUCTS AND

CLICK USED BIKES FOR PHOTOS,

DESCRIPTIONS, AND PRICES OF

OUR PRE-OWNED BIKES.

16 May 2008


THE CYCLIST'S KITCHEN by NANCY CLARK, MS, RD

DEPARTMENTS

CARBS: QUICK, SLOW OR CONFUSING?

ONCE UPON A TIME, carbohydrates were referred to as

simple or complex, sugars or starches. Today, the classification

is more complicated; carbs are often ranked

as quick or slow in a very complex system called the

glycemic index. The glycemic index is theoretically

based on how 50-grams of carbohydrates (not counting

fiber) in a food will affect blood sugar levels. For

example, white bread is a high glycemic index carb

and supposedly causes a rapid “spike” in blood sugar,

while beans are considered a low glycemic index carb

and cause a more gradual increase in blood sugar

levels.

The glycemic index was initially developed to help

people with diabetes better regulate their blood glucose.

But people with diabetes generally eat foods in

combinations (for example, a sandwich with bread,

turkey and tomato); this alters the glycemic index

of the meal. Athletes, however, commonly eat foods

solo (a banana, a bagel). Hence, exercise scientists

became curious about the possibility that quick

or slow carbs might impact exercise performance

because they affect blood glucose in different ways.

Could athletes use this ranking system to determine

what to eat before, during, and after exercise?

Theory vs science

In theory—

low glycemic index foods (apples, yogurt, lentils,

beans) provide a slow release of glucose into the

blood stream. Could they help endurance athletes

by providing sustained energy during long bouts of

exercise?

high glycemic index foods (sports drinks, jelly beans,

bagel) quickly elevate blood sugar. Are they best to

consume immediately after exercise to rapidly refuel

the muscles and, thereby, enhance subsequent performance?

According to Kathy Beals PhD RD, associate professor

of nutrition at the University of Utah, athletes

can disregard all the hype about the glycemic index

and simply enjoy fruits, vegetables and whole grains

without fretting about their glycemic effect. Speaking

at the yearly conference sponsored by SCAN, the

Sports & Cardiovascular Nutrition Dietary Practice

Group of the American Dietetic Association (www.

SCANdpg.org), Beals claimed too many factors influence

a food’s glycemic effect, including where the

food was grown (Canada, US?), the amount eaten

(the glycemic index is based on 50-grams of available

carbs (fiber is not digested, hence is not “available”);

that’s a whole bag of baby carrots, not just one serving),

fiber content, added butter, the way the food is

prepared (mashed, baked, boiled?), and if the food is

eaten hot or cold.

To make the glycemic index even less meaningful,

each of us has a differing daily glycemic response

that can vary ~43% on any given day. Among a group

of subjects, the response can vary by~18%. (1) Also

keep in mind, well trained muscles can readily take

up carbohydrates from the blood stream. Hence, athletes

need less insulin than unfit people. This means

athletes have a lower blood glucose response to what

would otherwise create a high blood glucose response

in an unfit person. Exercise is very important to manage

blood sugar—and help prevent Type II diabetes.

All things considered, you, as an athlete, have little

need to concern yourself with a food’s glycemic effect

because you don’t even know your personal response

to the food. Plus, research of exercise scientists fails

to clearly support the theories mentioned above.

The research does indicate the best way to enhance

endurance is to consume carbs before and during

exercise—tried-and-true choices that taste good, settle

well, and digest easily. Hence, you need not choke

down low glycemic index kidney beans thinking they

will help you with sustained energy, when they actually

might only create digestive distress! Simply plan

to consume about 200 to 250 calories of carbs each

hour of endurance exercise and you’ll enhance your

performance.

Recovery carbs

For athletes who do double workouts or compete

more than once a day, choosing a high glycemic

index food for recovery might seem a smart choice.

Theoretically, it provides glucose quickly, more rapidly

refuels depleted glycogen stores, and enhances

subsequent performance. But, research does not show

performance benefits. According to Beals, the more

important task is to eat enough carbs (or carbs+a little

protein) as soon as tolerable post-exercise. What’s

enough? 0.5 g carb per pound of body weight—about

300 calories for a150 lb person, in repeated doses

every two hours.

Insulin and “fattening carbs”

What about the popular notion that high glycemic

index foods are fattening because they create a rapid

rise in blood sugar, stimulate the body to secrete

more insulin, and thereby (supposedly) promote fat

storage? Wrong. Excess calories are fattening, not

excess insulin. Dieters who lose weight because they

stop eating high glycemic index foods lose weight

because they eat fewer calories. A year-long study with

dieters who ate high or low glycemic index meals

indicates no difference in weight loss. (2)

Sugar highs and lows

Some athletes claim to be sugar sensitive; that is,

after they eat sugar they report an energy “crash.”

If that sounds familiar, the trick is to combine carbs

with protein or fat, such as bread+peanut butter, or

apple+(lowfat) cheese. This changes the glycemic

index of the carb. By experimenting with different

types of snacks, you might notice you perform better

after having eaten 100 calories of yogurt (a low

glycemic index food) as compared to 100 calories of

high glycemic index rice cakes. Honor your personal

response when choosing foods to support a winning

edge for your body.

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May 2008

17


COLUMNS

SINGLETRACK by JOEL GWADZ gwadzilla8@yahoo.com

IT WAS A WEEKEND MORNING a few weeks back; my

single speed was tuned, my brand new hydration pack

was filled, my head to toe black and red riding gear

was set aside in the basement, and most importantly I

had clearance from my wife Lisa to go riding.

As I drank my morning coffee I glanced outside the

kitchen window and asked myself that question that

we as mountain bikers are forced to ask ourselves so

often the night/morning before a ride/race... are the

trails too wet for mountain biking?

It is known that mountain biking leaves a footprint;

all of our actions leave a footprint. Everything we do

has some sort of impact therefore mountain biking

has its impact. It is a matter of being a responsible

mountain biker when considering the footprint that

we leave and how we can balance our impact.

How we ride and when we ride can dictate the

amount of impact we make as mountain bikers, but

there is a greater responsibility than just that. This

has me thinking that I should share with the readers

of SPOKES what it means to be a responsible mountain

biker.... and no, I did not go riding on that day, it

would not have been responsible to go mountain biking

on the trails after that much rain but I did have a

fun day with my family.

In an effort to get a greater understanding of The

Responsibilities of a Mountain Biker I turned to some

members of the local mountain bike community for

some answers with more weight than my thin opinion.

One of the first people I contacted was teammate

Joe Foley. For years Joe Foley has been volunteering

for MORE: The Mid-Atlantic Off Road Enthusiasts in

Members of MORE working on a trail at Greenbrier

various capacities but this will be Joe’s first year as the

Maryland/DC At Large More representative.

Joe’s response was simple... respect your abilities and

respect the trails... keep singletrack single... don’t ride

around puddles or obstacles. Stay off trails when you

may damage them, if you are leaving a visible track

than you may be damaging the trails. Joe finished with

the basic notion of respect. Respect other trail users...

courtesy goes a long way; respect your sport... give

back; do trail maintenance or advocate your sport in

another manner, and of course respect the trails.

When I spoke with Scott Scudamore (aka Scud),

the DC Metro Representative for the International

Mountain Bike Association, I was given pretty much

this same set of ideas in greater detail. In effort not to

miss anything Scud delivered the IMBA: Rules of the

Trail as a set of bullet points for easy memorization.

and I quote...

IMBA Rules of the Trail

The way we ride today shapes mountain bike trail

access tomorrow. Do your part to preserve and

enhance our sport’s access and image by observing

the following rules of the trail, formulated by IMBA

, the International Mountain Bicycling Association.

These rules are recognized around the world as the

standard code of conduct for mountain bikers. IMBA

‘s mission is to promote mountain bicycling that is

environmentally sound and socially responsible.

1. Ride On Open Trails Only.

Respect trail and road closures (ask if uncertain);

avoid trespassing on private land; obtain permits or

other authorization as may be required. Federal and

state Wilderness areas are closed to cycling. The way

you ride will influence trail management decisions

and policies.

2. Leave No Trace.

Be sensitive to the dirt beneath you. Recognize different

types of soils and trail construction; practice

low-impact cycling. Wet and muddy trails are more

vulnerable to damage. When the trail bed is soft, consider

other riding options. This also means staying on

existing trails and not creating new ones. Don’t cut

switchbacks. Be sure to pack out at least as much as

you pack in.

3. Control Your Bicycle!

Inattention for even a second can cause problems.

Obey all bicycle speed regulations and recommendations.

4. Always Yield Trail.

Let your fellow trail users know you’re coming. A

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18 May 2008


friendly greeting or bell is considerate and works well;

don’t startle others. Show your respect when passing

by slowing to a walking pace or even stopping.

Anticipate other trail users around corners or in blind

spots. Yielding means slow down, establish communication,

be prepared to stop if necessary and pass safely.

5. Never Scare Animals.

All animals are startled by an unannounced approach,

a sudden movement, or a loud noise. This can be dangerous

for you, others, and the animals. Give animals

extra room and time to adjust to you. When passing

horses use special care and follow directions from the

horseback riders (ask if uncertain). Running cattle

and disturbing wildlife is a serious offense. Leave

gates as you found them, or as marked.

6. Plan Ahead.

Know your equipment, your ability, and the area in

which you are riding – and prepare accordingly. Be

self-sufficient at all times, keep your equipment in

good repair, and carry necessary supplies for changes

in weather or other conditions. A well-executed trip

is a satisfaction to you and not a burden to others.

Always wear a helmet and appropriate safety gear.

Keep trails open by setting a good example of environmentally

sound and socially responsible off-road cycling.

It seemed that Scott Scudamore had covered all the

bases with his well rehearsed answer, but I still needed to

fill the column so I got in touch with a few other people.

The response I got from new president of MORE:

The Mid Atlantic Off Road Enthusiasts Jason Stoner

was very similar to the IMBA Rules of the Trail with

a heavy emphasis on respect; respect for the land,

respect to the wildlife, respect to the trails, respect to

other trail users, respect for others users groups and

respect to other mountain bikers.

Several of the points Jason made to me pertained to

how the actions of the mountain bikers dictate the

future of sport of mountain biking and how giving

proper respect will aid in having mountain biking recognized

as a legitimizing outdoor activity.

Then I spoke with Michael Klasmeier (aka

MikeK) a management specialist for the Maryland

Environmental Service I got a more light hearted

response, but a response that is backed with decades of

riding and equally as much time in the bicycle industry

as well as long history of mountain bike trail advocacy.

MikeK tells me that a responsible mountain biker

looks out for the trails as well as fellow riders. MikeK

stressed that we should all get involved in one way

or another. We can pick up a shovel on the trail days

or we can teach someone to mountain bike. MikeK

ended in saying that riding is fun, racing is fun, but to

love mountain biking is more than just riding a bike.

One Sunday in April while riding out at Greenbrier

State Park I had a good time talking with Jim Carlson

of the Potomac Velo Club. Jim was hard at work with

a solid gathering of MORE volunteers. On each of my

three laps I slowed and said hello to the volunteers. I

snapped a few photographs and tried to express my

gratitude for all that these people are doing for the

trails. Part of me felt guilty for riding the trails while all

these people were working to build and maintain them.

So here I am making my contribution to the cause by

using my public voice to share the word of the responsibility

of the mountain biker and to encourage the

Singletrack readers of SPOKES to get involved.

How can you get involved?

Frank Raiti, the Virginia Advocacy Directory for

MORE, spoke of how we can all get started with our

contribution to the sport of mountain biking by

sharing the 20-25-25 Rule. IMBA: the International

Mountain Bike Association has created a simple rule

for the base level contribution for a mountain biker;

20-25-25; it used to be a clever and cute 20-20-20,

but inflation changed that. This little collection of

numbers asks that each mountain biker contribute 20

hours of trail work, 25 dollars to local trail advocacy,

and 25 dollars to an international mountain bike

trail advocacy group... maybe IMBA. That is the base

level... do not be shy about exceeding the minimum.

Give a little and get a whole lot! Give back to the

sport that gives so much to you!

The numbers do not match up! The numbers of

mountain bike riders in the Mid-Atlantic is far greater

than the numbers that contribute to MORE.

Chris Scott, the IMBA State Representative for

Virginia, stressed that if the people that rode

Schaeffer Farms, Wakefield Park, and Fountainhead

were MORE members... those trails would be even

sweeter than they are... and those trails are SWEET!

But for some reason people have not been doing

their part as responsible mountain bikers... maybe it

is because they were not aware of their responsibilities

as mountain bikers.

Spread the word, share the word, and contribute

where you can... the minimum is not too much to ask.

The people at MORE and IMBA do far more than

trail repairs. These are the people working hard to

keep trails open and open new trails. The responsibilities

of the mountain biker can be seen in how we

ride, when we ride, our volunteer efforts, and our support

to our advocacy groups.

Be a responsible mountain biker. Go straight to the

computer and become a member of both IMBA and

MORE—it is your responsibility as a mountain biker.

This responsibility to the trails is not just up to the mountain

biker. The hikers, the runners, and the dog walkers

need to also be aware of their personal responsibility.

When the trails are super soggy it is unlikely that

any mountain biker responsible or not will bother to

go riding. Slipping, sliding, clogging and crashing...

well... time would often be spent better doing other

things. A little mud splatter is one thing, but it is not

responsible to be snailing through deep mud, sliding

We have always been focused

on trying to make your

cycling experience as

wide on each turn, being forced to skirt the trail to

maintain speed, thus widening the trails and risking

cutting deep ruts in the rail. On these days the mountain

biker may ride on the road or stay home and

watch the game. Meanwhile the runners, hikers, and

dog walkers stay the course and hit the trail.

Then what happens?

The hikers, runners, and dog walkers will walk on the

slippery trail often avoiding getting too wet by skirting

puddles and walking on the trail's edge, staying on

the perimeter of the trail rather than its soggy center.

This widens the trail. This is not an effort to point fingers,

but to explain a little trail use/misuse along with

aiding to dispel that the mountain bike is the villain

on the trail. Because any good mountain biker knows

that responsible trail riding causes no greater impact

than the impact of hiking or running.

As mountain bikers we all have the potential to be

ambassadors to our sport. How we behave when riding

dictates how outsiders perceive us. Use common

sense, basic courtesy, and respect when representing

the sport of mountain biking.

In my talks with Jim Carlson of PVC there was mention

of the satisfaction of knowing that he is “giving

back” to the local riding and racing community.

This May MORE is hosting a number of trail work

days at various locations in the Mid-Atlantic which will

allow for you to get a taste of that satisfaction. Check

the MORE webpage for details.

The discussions with Chris Scott and Scott Scudamore

brought up the Virginia IMBA Mountain Bike Festival

which will occur Memorial Day Weekend. More information

can be found on the IMBA webpage.

IMBA: The International Mountain Bike Association

http://www.imba.com/

MORE: Mid-Atlantic Off Road Enthusiasts

http://www.more-mtb.org/

Laurel Bicycle Center

enjoyable as possible. Striving to provide

the highest quality of service plays a big

part in reaching that goal. Whether you ride

only a few times each year or cycle every

day, have a basic bike or the latest racing

machine, we make a point of treating every

cyclist as an important customer. We want

you to have fun riding! Regardless of what

and how much you ride, we are here to

help. We have a small but talented staff of

older and extremely experienced people,

dedicated to making your visit to our store a great one. They are truly

motivated to help people, and really care about you, not just how

much you spend. We know how to work on bikes old and new, and our

advice and guidance for purchasing a new bike is simply the best. We

are proud to have been here to serve this community for over 50 years,

and intend to be here for many more.

—The Sawtelle Family and staff of Laurel Bicycle Center

Laurel Bicycle Center

14805 Baltimore Ave.

US Rt.1 across from Laurel Mall

www.bicyclefun.com

301-953-1223/301-490-7744

Monday-Friday 10 am-7 pm

Saturday 9-6/Closed Sunday

May 2008

19


DEPARTMENTS

TRISPOKES by RON CASSIE ron_cassie@yahoo.com

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Shapiro Disappointed, but Not Down

After the 2008 U.S. Olympic Team Trials on April

19 in Tuscaloosa, Ala., Herndon, Virginia’s Margie

Shapiro sent a heart-felt summary to a big group

of friends and family after returning from what she

called her “disappointing race.”

Competing for one of the two remaining slots on the

U.S. squad that will head to Beijing, Shapiro finished

11th out of 11 selected to compete. The woman’s side

was won by Julie Swail Ertel of Irvine, Calif.in 2:02:21.

Mary Beth Ellis, originally from Rehoboth Beach,

Del., took 6th place in 2:06:19, with Rebeccah

Wassner of Gaithersburg, Md. and now New York

City, taking 10th 2:09:57 — just ahead of Shapiro in

2:10:04.

Nonetheless, the Virginia-native called the whole

experience “a long and exciting road,” and remembered

that her initial dream was simply to reach the

Olympic Trials. She said she only began to consider

the notion of pursuing the Olympics after her coach

told her it was “ridiculous to get that far and not aim

higher.”

Expectations and hopes were raised, naturally. In

her e-mail, Shapiro, who is a co-owner with husband

Brendan, and Cathy and Ray Pugsley, of Potomac

River Running, a chain with stores in Ashburn, Burke,

Reston and Arlington, and mother of a 7-year-old

boy and a 5-year-old girl, thanked everyone for their

support. She wanted to post a better finish, but felt

assured that she “gave all I had.” She added, “And the

bottom line is that life is good no matter where I finish

in a race.”

Shapiro called it a tough day from the get go, admitting

she stumbled and face-planted on the sidewalk

during the warm-up, pulling her quad in the process.

“I have a history of falling right before big events,”

she joked. Like the morning of her wedding when she

face-planted on a trail run with her sister Cathy and

“the day before the 2005 World Championship” when

she once again face-planted running with her sister.

Shapiro called the swim “somewhat disastrous,”

describing it as filled with confusion and poor sighting

and said she eventually felt relief “when finally I exited

about 90 seconds behind the stragglers, who themselves

were behind the leaders by a good margin.”

She said she fumbled through the transition, struggling

to get her wet suit off. Then mounting her bike

“less-than-gracefully, but with a smile on my face,” she

resumed her attack.

It took nearly three laps to chase down the one straggler

who had fallen off the main chase pack, she continued,

and ineffectively, they rode together the rest

of the way as the two packs ahead gained ground.

The second transition went smoothly and she reminded

herself that “part three of the race was a new race

in itself,” and was determined to run aggressively from

the start. Though the first lap was painful, “both generally

and locally to my sore quad,” she started to feel

better on lap two and was running well until midway

through lap three.

At this point, “I was running for the joy of it, to finish

hard, to give it my all, more than thinking about

placement or time, and by the last lap I’d nearly spent

it all.”

Shapiro said she “fought through the moments

of self doubt and did my best to take in the sights

and sounds of the Olympic Trials...” She added she

wouldn’t trade the experience for a big-money win

somewhere else and that Tuscaloosa was completely

behind the race.

Shapiro said “I really felt like a professional sports

star!” noting that USA Triathlon’s media team had

put together trading cards of all the athletes. Each

athlete also went into an elementary school to speak

and show a triathlon video (“and hand out the cards,

of course”).

She said it was great fun to talk with 6- to 12-year olds

about sportsmanship (with much discussion about

not pushing people off their bikes or into the water).

Shapiro added she loved hearing the kids’ thick

southern accents and watching their eyes pop out

when she showed them how light her bike was.

Additionally, the town put together an Opening

Ceremony complete with a parade (she sat on the

back of a convertible and waved to the crowd with

her name on a gigantic magnet on the side of the car,

amidst the company of the Miss Senior Tuscaloosa

and Miss Tuscaloosa, who later sang patriotic and

inspiring songs to the crowd).

Although she said her results didn’t show it, Shapiro

felt she “carried out an effective training peak and

taper for this race.” She said she found herself at a

new fitness level that she hopes will bring more excitement

in the future.

Shapiro needs to get her quad healed and take care

of other nagging injuries, but intends to continue

with her planned race schedule, including the Des

Moines World Cup. However, it is not likely as an

Olympic Trials race as it currently stands.

Shapiro lists several reasons for her ability to juggle

her myriad of responsibilities, first and foremost, she

said, she leans “heavily on the support of my family”

and “particularly my husband Brendan.”

She also acknowledged help from her sister Cathy

and her husband Ray, co-owners of the stores, “who

indulge my triathlon career.”

The three of them, Brendan included, she said, “do

the lion’s share of the work as owner/operators of

the stores so that I can concentrate most on training,

coaching, and presenting seminars and clinics.”

She’s also grateful for her parents, in-laws and siblings

“who help with baby-sitting quite a bit so that I can

20 May 2008


manage my travel, training, and work.” She also relies

on the support of her community, Shapiro said, particularly

the TeamSpirit group (established last year by

Michelle Joubran and Taneen Carvell to raise money

through the Greater Washington Sports Alliance to

help cover travel and training costs).

Shapiro said she reminds herself that’s she’s “surrounded

by some very smart people around me” and

that life is about living-it is a journey, a process, a

way... not an end.”

Metabolix/Erickson Triathlon Team

Lutherville, Md.’s Metabolix/Erickson Triathlon Team

members Krista Schultz and Todd Crandell competed

in the inaugural Ironman China in Haikou, China

April 19.

In her first Ironman performance this season, Schultz

finished 2nd in the 20-29 age group in a time of

12:30:06, placing her 118th overall. Crandell finished

29th in his age group and 165th overall in a time of

13:20:12.

Ironman China limited registration to 1200 participants.

According to China Daily, 789 competitors

RECUMBENT =

Comfort

PEOPLE ASK US

WHO RIDES RECUMBENTS?

We tell them avid cyclists

overcoming discomfort from a physical

condition, people coming back to cycling

for exercise who want more comfort,

and people that like to be different.

We welcome them all and try to help

them find the recumbent that

will get them out riding.

We’re fighting “oil addiction” with

human powered transportation.

Join the fight – park your car and

ride your bike.

bikes@vienna, LLC

128A Church St, NW Vienna, VA 22180

703-938-8900

www.bikesatvienna.com

COME TO OUR WEBSITE FOR INFORMATION

ABOUT OUR UNUSUAL PRODUCTS AND

CLICK USED BIKES FOR PHOTOS,

DESCRIPTIONS, AND PRICES OF

OUR PRE-OWNED BIKES.

took part in the event from 40 different countries.

Ironman China is one of three Asian qualifying

triathlons leading up to the annual championship

event that takes place in Kona, Hawaii and China

Daily reported the prize money for the Haikou event

totaled $50,000 with plans to make it an annual event

on the International Ironman circuit.

The course consisted of two 1,900 meter loops in the

swim portion, a hilly bike course and a fairly flat run.

It was won by men’s German pro Olaf Sabatschus in

a time of 8:52:14 and by women’s pro Belinda Jane

Granger of Australia in a time of 10:08:37.

The Metabolix Tri Team will be in action again at

St. Anthony’s Triathlon later this month and the

Columbia Triathlon in May.

Nation’s Triathlon – 91 percent sold out

The Sept. 14 Olympic distance Nation’s Triathlon,

bound to become of the country’s premier multi-sport

events given it’s historic and picturesque venue, was

91 percent sold out as of late April.

One of the new features about this race, is already

up and running — on its website — www.thenationstriathlon.com.

An excellent preview video there,

complied by Racedayfilms.net, takes viewers across the

entire course, while utilizing aerial imagery, photos

and video from last year’s event, plus taped tracking

on the new course. And it’s all put to music. It seems

like a great idea, not just to attract participants, but

give newbies and world-class stars alike a feel for the

course long before race day.

This year’s race features a single loop bike course,

an under-the-Memorial Bridge swim and a run that

goes past the Jefferson Memorial, the Tidal Basin and

wraps up at Freedom Plaza on Pennsylvania Avenue.

Triathletes will race on a wide, mostly flat course

that will be completely closed to traffic by D.C.

metro police and U.S. Park police officers. The 1.5

K swim launches from temporary floating pier in

the Potomac, sending swimmer upstream in the

currents at first toward the Memorial Bridge, then

continuing along the bridge and back to the start.

The 40K bike, in particular, sounds like fun, moving

from Independence Ave., past the Mall and heading

west waving at the Kennedy Center and Georgetown

before leaving the city. The bike continues for a

speedy 12-mile loop out Canal Rd. and Clara Barton

Parkway before returning for sprint through Rock

Creek Park and back. The 10K run heads south along

East Potomac Park and goes to Hains Point and then

north on Ohio Drive toward downtown again.

DU2R

The central Maryland

based DU2R Multisport

team is back for another

season and hoping to

equal last year’s performances,

team founder

Don Forgione recently

told SPOKES.

At the Virginia Duathlon in Virginia Beach, DU2R

members Kristina Adams placed 3rd woman overall

with a time of 2:02:03 and Jeff Timm won the 55-59

age group with a time of 1:53:36. At the Brandywine

Duathlon in Pa., Kerri Robbins was the 3rd woman

overall with a time of 1:26:34. Steve Ruckert won

the 55-59 age group with a time of 1:23:41 and

Ken Fowler took 3rd in the 40-44 age group. At the

Charlotte’s Finest Duathlon in N. Carolina, Jeff Timm

won the 55-59 age group and placed 11th overall

with a time of 1:25:41. Jeff came back the next day to

race the Carrbor Classic Duathlon in N. Carolina in

2:46:09, to again take the 55-59 age group.

The USAT short course (run 10k, bike 40k, run 5k)

duathlon National championship and off-road championship

was scheduled to take place on April 26 and

27 in Richmond, Va. and DU2R Multisport expected

to have eight or nine competitors there vying for honors

there.

Reach Over

30,000

Bicycling Enthusiasts

Call 301-371-5309

ARE YOU READY FOR

SUMMER?

Now is the best time to bring your bike in

for a tune-up — or to schedule an

appointment for a cleat alignment or bike fi tting.

Stop in and check out our great selecton of

parts, accessories and bikes from

Trek, Lemond, Fisher, Felt, Serotta & Parlee

ALL AMERICAN

BICYCLE CENTER WWW.AABIKES.COM

SERVING CYCLISTS SINCE 1994

26039 Ridge Road (Route 27), Damascus, MD 20872

301-253-5800

VISIT OUR WEB SITE FOR MORE INFO

WWW.AABIKES.COM

STORE HOURS: Mon, Wed, Fri 10am-8pm

Tue, Thu, Sat 10am-6pm & Sun 12pm-5pm

May 2008

21


COLUMNS

SPOKESWOMEN by ANNE MADER

…a look at women’s cycling issues in the

mid-Atlantic

A Holistic Approach to Bike Fit.

In mid-April I went to a two day bike fitting seminar

put on by Michael Sylvester from Trek University. I

have been to a number of seminars on bike fittings

and while each seminar has been a little different

they have focused primarily on using body measurements

and angles to determine the best size and set

up for a person’s bike. This is a good method to use

and we have used it successfully for a long time in our

shop to fit numerous people on road, mountain, and

triathlon bikes.

However the fundamental fitting techniques we

learned in the Trek Bike Fit seminar were different.

For instance, instead of learning about the proper

geometry of the body while on the bike we learned to

first look at the individual off of the bike. From this

and a lot of the right questions, we learned to determine

how the bike should fit the individual’s body

instead of making the body fit the bike.

We spent a lot of time doing yoga which focused on

good body alignment and range of motion. We also

spent a lot of time learning about the biomechanics

of the body and how an individual’s riding style,

anatomy, flexibility, and range of motion should be

the basis of how they are fit to a bike.

By the end of the two days everyone had the opportunity

to use this knowledge to assess and fit each other

to their individual bikes. For many it was surprising to

see the modifications made to their bikes. Seats were

raised or lowered, stems were swapped out for various

lengths and angles, and fore and aft saddle positions

were changed.

On my bike, we lowered my saddle about 1⁄2 inch

and lengthened and lowered my stem. We also

noticed that I hunch my shoulders when I ride and

we worked on relaxing and opening up my chest

in order to breathe better. To help I learned yoga

exercises that would help me maintain strength and

increase my flexibility.

I have very long legs and hardly a torso to speak of.

I am constantly raising my saddle and shortening my

reach to the handle bars by using short stems. I am

so used to making these adjustments that when I get

a new bike I automatically swap everything out and

raise my saddle without having anyone properly fit

me. And I like the way my current bikes fit, or at least

I thought I did. So, I was pretty skeptical of the new

adjustments that we made but I figured I would give

them a shot.

The day after the seminar I took my newly adjusted

bike out for a spirited three hour road ride with

some friends. Throughout the ride I was aware of

my positioning on the bike, trying not to hunch over

and I properly stretched after the ride (which I don’t

do often enough). I was amazed at the difference.

During the ride I could climb easier, descend better,

and I lasted an hour longer than I thought I would.

And the next day my legs felt fresh and recovered! It

was a huge improvement.

So, why did these changes make such a difference?

And why had I not noticed that my bike was not properly

fit? Thinking back it is easy to see how my bike

fit got so screwed up. As a shop owner, I have been

telling people how important it is to get properly fit

for a bike but I forgot to do it for myself. I figured I

had been fit once or twice and knew enough about

my body that I didn’t need anyone assessing my fit. Of

course, that was seven years ago and I have had two

children since then. Due to yoga and regular stretching

I am also more flexible than I was but I have a

few more injuries. And my reasons for riding have

changed as well. Instead of focusing on short fast

races I have begun to enjoy long endurance racing.

Which means my training rides and my races are longer.

So, not only has my body changed over the years

but my riding style has too. So, it makes sense that I

should be positioned differently on my bike.

So what I learned was this; when trying to get the

proper fit on a bike it is easy to get caught up in measurements

and angles but we need to remember to

take our entire physiology into account and look at

the whole picture.

When working with a bike fitter make sure the fitter

has an understanding of your riding style, physiology,

flexibility, riding history, etc. Make sure you tell them

about any injuries or health conditions you have and

tell them about any concerns you have with your

current bike position. And be open-minded to

changes. Your new bike position may feel different at

first but you might be surprised at the benefits of a

few little changes.

PERRY NAMED DIRECTOR OF BIKEWALK VIRGINIA

BikeWalk Virginia announced

on March 25 that Kimberly

Likens Perry, Ed.D. has been

named Executive Director for

the state-wide advocacy and

education organization effective

March 31. Dr. Perry will succeed

Allen Turnbull, Ph.D. the

founder of BikeWalk Virginia,

who announced in 2007 his

desire to step down in order to

pursue new opportunities.

Perry was previously Dean

and Director of the Bon Secours School of Medical Imaging

in Richmond, a position she held for eight years. She earned

a Bachelor of Science degree in Vocational and Technical

Education and a Master of Science in Education degree in

Health Promotion from Virginia Tech University in Blacksburg,

Virginia. She also earned a Doctor of Education degree in

Educational Leadership from the University of Phoenix.

Perry’s personal interests are well-aligned with the BikeWalk

Virginia’s underlying mission. She is an avid cyclist and water

sports enthusiast who participates in a wide variety of outdoor

recreation across Virginia. She also serves as Vice President of

the Richmond Area Mid-Atlantic Off Road Enthusiasts Cycling

Organization, co-leader of Mountain Bike Kids in Richmond,

and was a Cycling Merit Badge Counselor for the Boy Scouts of

America.

“We feel very confident that Kimberly is the right person to

lead BikeWalk Virginia at this important time in the organization’s

development,” said Richard Elder, BikeWalk Virginia

Board of Directors Chair. “She has a personal passion for

cycling, a track record of building community-based organiza-

tions, and a ‘can-do’ attitude that will help drive BikeWalk

Virginia’s continued growth.”

“This is also an important moment to recognize and thank Allen

Turnbull for his vision and leadership over the past 20 years.”

Elder continued. “Allen is widely recognized across the state as

a passionate and resourceful advocate, not only for biking and

walking, but also for the importance of building communities

that encourage active lifestyles. We wish Allen the best in his

new pursuits.”

BikeWalk Virginia was founded as a 501 (c)(3) organization in

2000. Originating in 1988 as a bicycling event, BikeWalk Virginia

continues to organize nationally recognized Bike Virginia rides

to fund education and advocacy work for non-motorized transportation

safety and access. BikeWalk Virginia holds an annual

conference as a forum for legislators, planners, educators and

advocates on key issues critical to pedestrians and cyclists.

In 2004, the Virginia Trails Association joined BikeWalk. The

group’s mission was broadened to include on and off road riders,

hikers, kayakers, canoeists, and equestrians.

BikeWalk Virginia members and chapters keep in touch with

local issues and provide local policymakers and planners

with information on best practices from around the county.

They are helping communities make changes to become more

bicycle and pedestrian friendly. BikeWalk Virginia chapters

have formed in the Alexandria, Roanoke, New River Valley,

Fredericksburg, and Northern New areas. New chapters are

forming in Norfolk, Central Shenandoah Valley, and Middle

Peninsula.

To follow national, state, and local issues affecting non-motorized

transportation and to work with BikeWalk Virginia to

improve recreation and transportation options for Virginians

and visitors to Virginians, visit www.bikewalkvirginia.org to

become an individual or business member or sponsor.

22 May 2008


COLUMNS

SPOKESWOMEN by ANNE MADER

…a look at women’s cycling issues in the

mid-Atlantic

A Holistic Approach to Bike Fit.

In mid-April I went to a two day bike fitting seminar

put on by Michael Sylvester from Trek University. I

have been to a number of seminars on bike fittings

and while each seminar has been a little different

they have focused primarily on using body measurements

and angles to determine the best size and set

up for a person’s bike. This is a good method to use

and we have used it successfully for a long time in our

shop to fit numerous people on road, mountain, and

triathlon bikes.

However the fundamental fitting techniques we

learned in the Trek Bike Fit seminar were different.

For instance, instead of learning about the proper

geometry of the body while on the bike we learned to

first look at the individual off of the bike. From this

and a lot of the right questions, we learned to determine

how the bike should fit the individual’s body

instead of making the body fit the bike.

We spent a lot of time doing yoga which focused on

good body alignment and range of motion. We also

spent a lot of time learning about the biomechanics

of the body and how an individual’s riding style,

anatomy, flexibility, and range of motion should be

the basis of how they are fit to a bike.

By the end of the two days everyone had the opportunity

to use this knowledge to assess and fit each other

to their individual bikes. For many it was surprising to

see the modifications made to their bikes. Seats were

raised or lowered, stems were swapped out for various

lengths and angles, and fore and aft saddle positions

were changed.

On my bike, we lowered my saddle about 1⁄2 inch

and lengthened and lowered my stem. We also

noticed that I hunch my shoulders when I ride and

we worked on relaxing and opening up my chest

in order to breathe better. To help I learned yoga

exercises that would help me maintain strength and

increase my flexibility.

I have very long legs and hardly a torso to speak of.

I am constantly raising my saddle and shortening my

reach to the handle bars by using short stems. I am

so used to making these adjustments that when I get

a new bike I automatically swap everything out and

raise my saddle without having anyone properly fit

me. And I like the way my current bikes fit, or at least

I thought I did. So, I was pretty skeptical of the new

adjustments that we made but I figured I would give

them a shot.

The day after the seminar I took my newly adjusted

bike out for a spirited three hour road ride with

some friends. Throughout the ride I was aware of

my positioning on the bike, trying not to hunch over

and I properly stretched after the ride (which I don’t

do often enough). I was amazed at the difference.

During the ride I could climb easier, descend better,

and I lasted an hour longer than I thought I would.

And the next day my legs felt fresh and recovered! It

was a huge improvement.

So, why did these changes make such a difference?

And why had I not noticed that my bike was not properly

fit? Thinking back it is easy to see how my bike

fit got so screwed up. As a shop owner, I have been

telling people how important it is to get properly fit

for a bike but I forgot to do it for myself. I figured I

had been fit once or twice and knew enough about

my body that I didn’t need anyone assessing my fit. Of

course, that was seven years ago and I have had two

children since then. Due to yoga and regular stretching

I am also more flexible than I was but I have a

few more injuries. And my reasons for riding have

changed as well. Instead of focusing on short fast

races I have begun to enjoy long endurance racing.

Which means my training rides and my races are longer.

So, not only has my body changed over the years

but my riding style has too. So, it makes sense that I

should be positioned differently on my bike.

So what I learned was this; when trying to get the

proper fit on a bike it is easy to get caught up in measurements

and angles but we need to remember to

take our entire physiology into account and look at

the whole picture.

When working with a bike fitter make sure the fitter

has an understanding of your riding style, physiology,

flexibility, riding history, etc. Make sure you tell them

about any injuries or health conditions you have and

tell them about any concerns you have with your

current bike position. And be open-minded to

changes. Your new bike position may feel different at

first but you might be surprised at the benefits of a

few little changes.

PERRY NAMED DIRECTOR OF BIKEWALK VIRGINIA

BikeWalk Virginia announced

on March 25 that Kimberly

Likens Perry, Ed.D. has been

named Executive Director for

the state-wide advocacy and

education organization effective

March 31. Dr. Perry will succeed

Allen Turnbull, Ph.D. the

founder of BikeWalk Virginia,

who announced in 2007 his

desire to step down in order to

pursue new opportunities.

Perry was previously Dean

and Director of the Bon Secours School of Medical Imaging

in Richmond, a position she held for eight years. She earned

a Bachelor of Science degree in Vocational and Technical

Education and a Master of Science in Education degree in

Health Promotion from Virginia Tech University in Blacksburg,

Virginia. She also earned a Doctor of Education degree in

Educational Leadership from the University of Phoenix.

Perry’s personal interests are well-aligned with the BikeWalk

Virginia’s underlying mission. She is an avid cyclist and water

sports enthusiast who participates in a wide variety of outdoor

recreation across Virginia. She also serves as Vice President of

the Richmond Area Mid-Atlantic Off Road Enthusiasts Cycling

Organization, co-leader of Mountain Bike Kids in Richmond,

and was a Cycling Merit Badge Counselor for the Boy Scouts of

America.

“We feel very confident that Kimberly is the right person to

lead BikeWalk Virginia at this important time in the organization’s

development,” said Richard Elder, BikeWalk Virginia

Board of Directors Chair. “She has a personal passion for

cycling, a track record of building community-based organiza-

tions, and a ‘can-do’ attitude that will help drive BikeWalk

Virginia’s continued growth.”

“This is also an important moment to recognize and thank Allen

Turnbull for his vision and leadership over the past 20 years.”

Elder continued. “Allen is widely recognized across the state as

a passionate and resourceful advocate, not only for biking and

walking, but also for the importance of building communities

that encourage active lifestyles. We wish Allen the best in his

new pursuits.”

BikeWalk Virginia was founded as a 501 (c)(3) organization in

2000. Originating in 1988 as a bicycling event, BikeWalk Virginia

continues to organize nationally recognized Bike Virginia rides

to fund education and advocacy work for non-motorized transportation

safety and access. BikeWalk Virginia holds an annual

conference as a forum for legislators, planners, educators and

advocates on key issues critical to pedestrians and cyclists.

In 2004, the Virginia Trails Association joined BikeWalk. The

group’s mission was broadened to include on and off road riders,

hikers, kayakers, canoeists, and equestrians.

BikeWalk Virginia members and chapters keep in touch with

local issues and provide local policymakers and planners

with information on best practices from around the county.

They are helping communities make changes to become more

bicycle and pedestrian friendly. BikeWalk Virginia chapters

have formed in the Alexandria, Roanoke, New River Valley,

Fredericksburg, and Northern New areas. New chapters are

forming in Norfolk, Central Shenandoah Valley, and Middle

Peninsula.

To follow national, state, and local issues affecting non-motorized

transportation and to work with BikeWalk Virginia to

improve recreation and transportation options for Virginians

and visitors to Virginians, visit www.bikewalkvirginia.org to

become an individual or business member or sponsor.

22 May 2008


DEPARTMENTS

BMX MID-ATLANTIC by BRIAN CARON coolbmx2c4me@aol.com

BMX Track Spring Tune-Ups

Spring always seems to surprise everyone with its

arrival. Maybe it’s because this year it never seems

to get here and stay. We keep getting teased with a

warm day or two and then contend with rain, wind

and cold for a few days. This always makes for a nailbiter

for BMX race scheduling. As with any sport, the

scheduling must be done in advance to coincide with

other events and holidays. Either way, as riders get

out their tools and repair stands in order to get their

bikes prepared for the season and the BMX tracks try

to revamp during the off season to be ready by opening

day.

There is a lot more that goes into BMX racing than

what the racers and families see on race day. This

month we’ll take a look into what goes on behind the

scenes at most local BMX tracks in order to get ready

for the first race of the season.

One of the first things new BMX tracks encounter is

the problem of startup cost and insurance coverage.

Most tracks even if they are already established still

need to seek out some local sponsors in order to get

their season underway. The main costs associated

with running a track are trophy costs and insurance

coverage. This is why the network of rider recruitment

is so important to both new and existing tracks.

With more riders, you get more families, with more

families you have more opportunities to make contact

with people who own local businesses or have connections

within the local community.

It does take some legwork but a lot of local (and

national) companies will find it well within their budgets

to help out local organizations that run the BMX

tracks. These companies may sponsor a single race,

a series, or even a season of racing to help cover the

cost of trophies and awards. In return they may want

a sign or a T-shirt printed with their logo on it, or

maybe a banner ad on the track website or race program.

Most tracks establish a group of public relations

representatives who help seek out sponsors, but everyone

at the track is really able to seek out sponsorships

at any level.

As far as insurance coverage goes, there are national

affiliations that provide local tracks with liability insurance.

The National Bicycle League and The American

Bicycle Association are the two organizations that

provide this service for as little as $1 per rider/per

race. These organizations also provide national rules,

and points systems that keep riding competitive on a

National level. It’s kind of like a BMX franchise of sorts.

Most BMX tracks are primarily comprised of dirt

which without grass or vegetation to help hold it

together erodes pretty quickly. This is the reason

most tracks are opting for the use of asphalt for their

starting hills and some (if not all) of their corners. It

sounds crazy when you hear it for the first time but

if the asphalt is applied correctly it still feels like dirt

when you ride it, except with much more traction.

From an engineering standpoint the asphalt retains

its shape and is way more durable than even the hardest

packed clay. This addition cut our race day track

preparation time in half if not more. The drawback is

the expense.

Our local track is located within a public park where

federal grants are available from time to time. With

the cooperation of the city we were able to make the

single biggest upgrade to our track in 2003. Some pri-

vately owned tracks will have to seek out sponsorships

from one (or several) businesses to help defray the

expense of this “investment.”

Our asphalt application had an overall cost of over

$20,000, not a drop in the bucket for a sport that only

charges riders $7-10 per rider to race! The beauty of

this upgrade is the fact that erosion can only affect

the jumps and straightaways.

Wintertime snow and ice really take a toll on the

tracks and for the most part, the entire track surface

including all of the jumps need to be compacted back

down before they are race worthy. Here’s where that

dedicated group or BMX enthusiasts have to come

together and help out.

Most tracks have scheduled pre-season work days

set up for this “track-prep” but this season has been

tough with all of the rain. Some tracks will even

change the overall layout or design of their track

before the season gets underway to keep the riders

returning to race year after year.

Winchester BMX did this major face-lift last season

and “what an undertaking it was,” explained Kevin

Lochner, WBMX’s acting Track Director. As you can

see a quick spring tune-up on your trusty steed for the

season seems pretty easy as compared to the “tune-up”

involved in making a place to ride it!

Hopefully after all of the meetings, organizing, trophy

orders, personnel training and track work days you

still have a dedicated staff available and willing to help

out on race day. That’s where the fruits of everyone’s

labor are realized when riders of all ages flock from

all around to see how they stack up to other local and

regional competition.

24 May 2008


At press time we are rapidly approaching our opening

days for 2008 and hopefully it will be another banner

year with plenty of new faces and returning friends

that all make up the Mid-Atlantic BMX following.

BMX Briefs

From all early indications 2008 is looking to be a banner

year in our area. The hype and enthusiasm for the

upcoming Olympic Games in Beijing that will include

BMX racing for the first time has noticeably helped

the overall exposure Nationwide and in our region.

The weather has been the culprit for all of the area

tracks late openings it seems. At Press-time Richmond

BMX seems to be the first area NBL track to get

underway as of Sunday, April 13th. They’ve also were

able to revamp their track a bit during the off-season

with the addition of asphalt on the starting hill as well

as the first corner. To take advantage of the new racing

surface they’ve established a NEW OPEN series

to be run at local events. They refer to it as “Put your

money where your mouth is,” and it’s got people talking.

All kidding aside, they have set up a 15 & Under

OPEN, and a 16 & Over OPEN class with 100% payback!

Here’s how it will work: A racer will have to

run their regular age class that day and there is a 3

rider minimum in the OPEN classes. First place takes

50% of the entry fees, Second place takes 30% and

Third will get 20%. It’s a cool series to promote some

healthy cross-class competition as they will let any gender

and any wheel size enter as well!

NOVA BMX in Woodbridge Va., will have hosted

(after this issue of SPOKES is distributed) an early

season National Event, the Freedom National on April

25-27th. If you’re in, or plan to visit the Northern

Virginia area, make plans to check out NOVA BMX,

it is a world class BMX track right in your own back

yard. It’s located within the Prince William County

Stadium Complex just off of the Prince William

County Parkway.

Maryland BMX launched a new website for news and

information on the NBL Maryland State Points series

at www.mdbmx.org . Check it out to keep in touch

with what’s going on with the NBL series in Maryland.

Taking clues from Virginia State BMX the State of

Maryland had their first BMX jersey days for students

on March 28th and again on April 11. The idea is to

strike up some interest within the schools about BMX

and maybe get some new riders at the local tracks.

Hagerstown BMX is spreading the word in the schools

as well. Thanks to Steve Weddles of City Park Imaging

and local track representative Diane Fulk they distributed

over 1000 full color flyers within their local

school system to get some kids interested in giving

BMX a try.

Chesapeake BMX, an ABA affiliated track got underway

on April 13th as well with a record opening day

attendance of 112 riders! That’s pretty impressive to

say the least. Looks like they’ve done their recruiting

homework for sure.

The weekend of April 19/20th was a busy weekend in

our area as both Winchester BMX, and Riverside BMX

held their opening days on April 19th. Hagerstown

BMX, Hampton Supertrack, First State BMX all got

underway on April 20 after battling the early season

weather blues. I’ll have some news on the opening

days and early season racing in next month’s issue.

BMX Rider Profile – Ryan P. Hullinger

This month’s rider profile features a young man that

has really been thoroughly into BMX racing for almost

half of his life, and he’s only 17 years old! I first saw

Ryan P. Hullinger during his first years of racing and

later found myself side by side on the track with him at

various races. In actuality, I was only beside him at the

gate because once it dropped I just tried to chase this

15 year old expert around the track.

Ryan has dealt with his fair share of set-backs through

the years of racing/riding. He suffered a broken collar

bone not once, but twice on the same shoulder.

While riding the dirt jumps at Camp Woodward during

the summer of 2007 he fractured his jaw. Even

with almost six weeks off of the bike and drinking

puree’ed meals he still managed to win the LEAP

point’s race and the Hat-Trick Series at his local track

at the end of the season.

He was among only a handful of riders that went

on to represent the state of Maryland at the annual

President’s Cup Race in Ohio in December. This 17

year old Expert now plans to take it to the next level

and may even be competing in the pro class before

too long. With his determination I wouldn’t put anything

past him.

Birthday: May 30th, 1991

Hometown: Hagerstown, MD

Type(s) of riding you do (BMX/Street/MTB/Road

Etc.): I race BMX and when I’m not doing that I’m

riding street/park/trails

Does anyone else in your family share your interests

in bicycles? My cousin

Please list the bike(s) you have, and which ones are

your favorites. Include any special modifications or

custom tricks: I have a Standard 125R that I race with

and I have a Standard 250L that I ride street/park/

trails with. They are both built up as light as possible.

I like riding my 250L because I’m able to be rougher

on it and not have it get very beat up and also to do

more tricks on it since it’s shorter than my race bike.

How long have you been riding? About 7 years

What got you interested in bicycles? When my step

brothers said they were going to start racing.

Please list any sponsors that you have: Currently riding

for Groove Merchants Bykes. Jamie helps me out

with discounts on parts/service to keep both of my

bikes in working order.

What positive things have happened in your life that

you attribute to your riding? I’ve formed a closer relationship

with my mother. She has stuck by me and

supported me through all of my years of racing. I

have a lot of positive friends who keep me laughing

all of the time. I meet a lot of great families around

the country at various BMX tracks.

What are your future goals in the sport? To make a

career out of it by turning pro and to progress even

further in the sport!

Who are your heroes or favorite riders? My heroes

would be all of my friends who have put up with me

for so long! My favorite riders are Kyle Bennett,

Mike Aitken, Mike Gonzalez, Will Greathouse, James

Foster, Scotty Cranmer, and the list goes on and on.

Where is your favorite track or riding spot? Central

Jersey, Hagerstown BMX, Woodward, and anyplace

worth riding.

Please include any additional info about yourself or

personality and how it influences your riding style:

I’m a super mellow kid who can get along with just

about anybody. I joke around all of the time but once

I get on the race track and race I get serious.

Other Hobbies: Playing Rock Band or Guitar Hero,

and hanging with friends/girls.

301.663.0007

May 2008

25


COLUMNS

THE ROOKIE +1 by MATT COOKE youvebeencooked@yahoo.com

THE SEASON IS OFFICIALLY UNDER WAY and I’ve

already had my first crash. I like to get them out of

the way early.

Here is what happened and why.

After a good prologue for me, 18th, and a great one

by my teammate Rory Sutherland, first, we had the

yellow jersey to defend in stage one of the Redlands

California Classic.

The short of it is we messed up that first day, big time.

There were time bonus sprints located just at the top

of a tough climb on several of the laps of the circuit.

The best plan of action in this scenario is to allow a

breakaway to get up the road that contains riders who

are not considered threats to Rory’s lead. This breakaway

will take the time bonus sprints and neutralize

any more attacks on the field behind the break.

Because the field is settled down a bit it is easier for

the leaders team to control the race and in theory

bring back the break before the finish which would

allow them to keep the yellow jersey. This is great is

theory but if the leader’s team can’t bring back the

break before the finish, well, they just may lose the

lead. And that is exactly what happened to us.

Several strong riders got up the road. One of them

being Santiago Botero, a two time world time trial

champ. He showed that day that he deserves those

titles because he soloed away from the break, won

the stage and took the yellow jersey from Rory. The

reason we didn’t pull them back like you’ve seen so

many times in the Tour de France comes down to

miscommunication. We were not sure of the time gap

and not sure of who was in the break. Those are critical

pieces of information.

It was a quite ride back to the team house that day.

The next day was a crit that was fast and technical but

thankfully uneventful. As my old competitors in DC

and Maryland know, I can ride crits but I really don’t

like them.

The last day was the famous and dreaded Sunset

Circuit Race. We did two laps of the crit course then

headed up to a very hilly and technical 10k loop that

we did 12 times before coming back to town for five

more crit laps. The great part is that exactly half of

the 10k loop is a brutal uphill that just drags up and

up. Everyone on the team has a job in a race as tough

as this and for me it was to make the other teams hurt

as much as possible.

We did the two crit laps and then headed out of town

toward Sunset. The field was extremely tightly packed,

like I could have stuck out my tongue and touched

the rider next to me. There is always some bumping

and screeching of breaks that I have grown to expect

by now but a full on crash just sucks.

I could see a few guys in front of me go down and I

thought I might stop in time but there was just too

much speed. I went over the handlebars and landed

on my teammate Matt Crane, who’s wheel I was following.

The next thing I remember was him telling

me to get up fast because I was laying on his bike. I

got up sort of slowly and started looking for my bike.

I had to untangle the bars from some other guys

wheels but soon Crane and I were riding our asses off

to get back to the pack.

We did make it back and like good racers we went

right to the front, there is no reason to mess around

in the back. I could tell right away my wrist was broken.

It hurt like hell but I kept riding and did pretty

much exactly what I was told to do for the day.

After some huge efforts for one of my teammates I

blew big time and my director signaled for me to pull

the plug and drop out of the race. I hate not finishing

but when you blow up that hard there is little else

you can do.

A small bone called the pisiform in my wrist is broken

but I am still training and I will be at the Tour

of Georgia in less than a week. It’s the same bone

I broke two years ago en route to winning Green

Mountain. It’s more uncomfortable than painful but I

think I can still race well on it.

I finally got a stack of “trading cards” or whatever

those things are called and I am super stoked about

it. I finally have something to give to people when

they don’t believe that I race a bike for a living.

EDITOR’S NOTE:

Matt Cooke, 28, of Washington, D.C., upset the nation’s elite

road racing hierarchy, July 8, 2006, by winning the 176-mile

national championship road race in Seven Springs, Pa.

He rode as an amateur member of the LSV/Kelly Benefit

Strategies team in Baltimore, but last year he became

a pro racer. After his team Navigators Pro Cycling Team

folded, Matt signed on to race for Health Net-Maxxis in

2008. Matt will continue to educate and entertain SPOKES

readers each month with his description of life on the

road. Matt would love to hear from you, email him at

youvebeencooked@yahoo.com

A-1 Cycling

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Mon - Sat 10am-9pm

Sun 12pm-6pm

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26 May 2008


CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Griffin Cycle

4949 Bethesda Ave.

Bethesda, MD 20814

(301) 656-6188

www.griffi ncycle.com

Road, Hybrids, Mountain, Kids

Parts & Accessories for All Makes

Trailers & Trikes

Family Owned – In Bethesda for 37 Years

FEATURING BIKES FROM:

To be listed, send information to Spokes, 5911 Jefferson Boulevard, Frederick, MD 21703 or e-mail: spokesmag@comcast.net

MAY 3 – PEDAL THE PARKWAY

Ride the Colonial Parkway from Jamestown to

Williamsburg, Va., without a car in sight. The nine mile

section will be closed to traffic from 8 a.m. until 1 p.m.

For more information log onto www.wabonline.org/

MAY 4 – AIR FORCE CYCLING CLASSIC

Cyclists of all abilities from rank beginners to

America’s top pro racers will be able to participate

in U.S. Air Force Cycling Classic in Arlington,

Va.Participants will be able to ride on a 12 1⁄2 kilometer

circuit in Arlington, Va., that will challenge

them for up to 8 laps or 100 kilometers. Following

this amateur ride, a series of amateur and pro races

will be held on route in Arlington and Crystal City.

Registration for the amateur participatory ride is now

open. Log onto www.arlingtonsports.org. Active duty

and reserve military personnel receive a $10 discount.

MAY 10 – JAMESTOWN TO RICHMOND

A new ride for this year, the Virginia Capital to Capital

ride follows the proposed trail route that will connect

Jamestown to Richmond. The ride will have starts in

both Richmond and Jamestown. There are parts of

the trail that have been completed at both ends and

a new section is scheduled to open about the time of

the ride. Gov. Kaine has committed to complete the

Capital to Capital Trail by the end of his administration

in 2010. Families can ride from Jamestown for

shorter distances on a paved off road trail or continue

on the road for different distances. Registration and

information can be found at www.virginiacapitaltrail.

org/events.html.

MAY 16 – BIKE TO WORK DAY

Join thousands of area commuters for a celebration

of bicycling as a clean, fun and healthy way to get to

work! Meet up with your neighbors at one of 26 pit

stops all over the Washington metro region, ride into

the city with experienced commuter convoys and meet

your colleagues at Freedom Plaza on Pennsylvania

Avenue. Washington Area Bicyclist Association and

Commuter Connections invite you to try bicycling

to work as an alternative to solo driving. Help the

Washington region become a better place to ride. Bike

to Work Day is a FREE event and open to all area commuters!

For details log onto www.waba.org

MAY 16-18 – TOUR DE CHESAPEAKE

Celebrate the arrival of spring with a bike tour

through the wonderful, scenic and flat Mathews

County backroads along the Chesapeake Bay. Join 800

cycling enthusiasts on this tour, perfect as a family’s

first biking adventure, or maybe the intermediate

rider’s, and even the experienced veteran’s, season

warm-up. Choose tours of 17, 40, 60, or 80 miles.

Families especially will enjoy the abundant quiet,

scenic lanes winding down to forgotten coves on the

Chesapeake Bay, the East River and the North River.

Pedal in and out of the beautiful salt marshes instead

of traffic. Visit www.bikechesapeake.org for details and

to register online. For inquiries, call (757) 229-0507

or email info@bikechesapeake.org.

MAY 17 – NATIONAL CAPITAL CENTURY

Young Life Metro DC hosts this 100 mile ride, with

shorter rides of 25 and 50 miles, to benefit Metro

Washington teens with special needs, teen moms,

disadvantaged and typical teens. Rides begin and end

near the FDR Memorial in West Potomac Park, D.C.

and loops into Virginia and Maryland. Food, support,

and T-shirts for all riders. Details and registration

at www.NationalCapitalCentury.com or by phone at

(703)549-2246.

MAY 17-18 – BIKE MS: BEYOND THE BELTWAY

Join over 750 participants from across the mid-

Atlantic to celebrate the National Capital Chapter’s

26th Anniversary Bike ride. Presented by the

Washington D.C. area Land Rover retailers, this

year’s ride begins and ends from Franklin Park in

Purcellville, Va. The ride takes you through beautiful

Northern Virginia wine country over a one or two day

period. Choose from a variety of mileage options, and

enjoy this unforgettable experience complete with

live entertainment, great food, picturesque views and

more. For details log onto www.MSandYOU.org; call

(202) 296-5363, or email MSBike@MSandYOU.org

MAY 17 – BIKE & BOAT DEMO DAY

From 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. at Lake Needwood Park in

Rockville, Maryland. Hudson Trail Outfitters invites

you to this popular event at which representatives from

Giant, Felt, Rocky Mountain and Fuji, as well as well as

a number of boat manufacturers to permit test rides.

Admission is free. For details and directions to the park

go to www.hudsontrail.com for more information.

MAY 17 – MOONLIGHT MEMORIAL RIDE

See our Nation’s Capital as few have - on your bicycle

under the glow of the moon and stars. From the

Capitol to the Washington Monument, the Lincoln

Memorial to Hains Point on the banks of the serenely

rippling nighttime Potomac. Participants will be

given a route sheet and receive limited emergency

mechanical support from roving mechanics on bikes,

but organizers request that bikes be in working shape

before beginning the 15 mile ride. The ride is free of

charge; donations, recommended $10, are encouraged

for the Potomac Area Council of the non-profit

Hostelling International, (formerly AYH). Ride begins

at the PAC HI Hostel, 11 th & K Street, NW, at 9 p.m.

Refreshments served beginning at 8 p.m. Bikes must

be equipped with working lights, and organizers will

have some available at wholesale cost. Support and

refreshments provided by Mt Airy Bicycles/College

Park Bicycles. Please be aware the ride is on city

streets and NOT closed to traffic. For further information,

call Larry Black at (301) 831-5151 or 301-538-

5637 or go to www.bike123.com.

MAY 18 – COLUMBIA TRIATHLON

Celebrating its 26th year, the Columbia Triathlon is

famous for its outstanding race organization and its

fun and extremely challenging race course. Held in

Centennial Park, Ellicott City, Md. Consists of a 1.5k

swim, 41k bike, and 10k run. For more info call (410)

964-1246 or visit www.tricolumbia.org

MAY 18 – SOUTHERN MD CRITERIUM

A new, technical course with 11 turns on tight 1 mile

loop on the beautiful LaPlata campus of the College

of Southern Maryland. Benefits the Special Olympics.

A MABRA BAR Event. Register on-line at BikeReg.

com. Non-licensed racers must obtain a one-day USCF

license at a cost of $10 the day of the race; this is for

WHAT A NEIGHBORHOOD

BIKE SHOP IS ALL ABOUT!

9544 Old Keene Mill Road, Burke, VA 22015

Monday-Friday 10:00-8:00 • Saturday 10:00-6:00 • Sunday 12:00-5:00

SPONSORS OF:

Trips for Kids Metro DC

www.tfkmetrodc.org

Evolution Cycling Club

www.Evolutioncycling.org

Potomac Velo Club

www.potomacvelo.com

CALENDAR continued on p.28

SPONSORED EVENTS:

• MORE Trailwork Series

• Cranky Monkey Mtb series

• Wednesdays at Wakefield

• Reston Town Center Grand Prix

• Fitness Concepts Greenbriar Challenge

• Venturequest and more!

Join the Bike Lane’s Weekly Ride/Event Announcements for our:

• Weekly Mountain and Road Rides • Monthly Bike Maintenance Clinics

• Monthly Skills Clinics • Family Rides and Bike Rodeos • Sales and other events!

(703) 440-8701 www.thebikelane.com

May 2008

27


CALENDAR continued from p.27

insurance coverage. Race Day registration opens at

7:15 a.m. and closes 20 minutes before the start of

each race. Held rain or shine. For details contact Jerry

Phelps at riderunrow@yahoo.com

MAY 21 – BIKE REPAIR 101

From 7 - 8:30 p.m. at the Rockville, Fairfax, Tenley

Circle, Pentagon Row, and Annapolis locations of

Hudson Trail Outfitters. Learn how to change a flat

tire and clean a chain. Join HTO’s bike experts and

learn the basics of bike repair. Learn how to fix a bike

on the trail, how to make sure your tires are patched

correctly and how to degrease your chain. We will

teach you what repairs you can do yourself, and how

to know when you need a mechanic. Go to www.hudsontrail.com

for more information.

Chesapeake Bay Asthma Ride

Bike Tour & Inline Roll

May 30-June 1, 2008

Salisbury, MD

www.AsthmaRide.org • 1.800.642.1184

AMERICAN LUNG ASSOCIATION®

of the Atlantic Coast, Inc.

MAY 23-26 – VIRGINIA IMBA FESTIVAL

The 3rd Annual Virginia International Mountain

Bike Association (IMBA) Festival is a family party

designed to raise money for mountain bike advocacy

in Virginia. Last year over 300 people attended. A

400 person limit. Sign up at: http://go.imba.com/

site/Calendar/ There will be demo bike rides, plenty

of off-road and road rides, hiking in the George

Washington National Forest, lots of food, music

and fun, family events. $50 per person pre-reg covers

camping for 3 nights, 4 days of riding, plus two

pancake breakfasts on Sat and Sunday morning, one

burrito dinner on Sunday night plus appetizers at the

Potluck Dinner on Saturday night. and other activities

throughout the weekend. A portion of your fee will

go back to your Virginia IMBA Club. Since this is a

fundraiser for Virginia Mountain Biking there are no

refunds. If you cannot attend, you will able to deduct

the whole amount as a donation on your taxes.

Already registered and want to volunteer! Email Scott

Scudamore (mtbmore@comcast.net)

17 th

11 th

2008

Wilderness Road Ride

Annual

A scenic tour of the New River Valley with four choices of routes

ranging from a family-friendly 14-mile option to a 57-mile

challenge for the fittest athlete.

th

Annual

Mountains of Misery

May 24-25, 2008

The New River Valley, Virginia

Two days of cycling

adventure in the

mountains of

Southwest Virginia

A challenging day of climbing in the mountains. Your choice of

two routes, a 100 mile option with 10,000 feet of climbing or, for

the truly hardy, a 125 mile route with 13,000 feet of climbing.

For more information, call

540-552-9339

or visit our website at

www.cyclingdoubleheader.com

MAY 24-27 – KENT COUNTY SPRING FLING

Join the Baltimore Bicycling Club and Washington

College as they host this 26th annual weekend event

along Maryland’s Eastern Shore. Rides range from

11 to 100 miles on flat to rolling terrain. Stay at

Washington College’s dorm and enjoy great food, an

ice cream social, live music, blue grass on the square,

contra dancing, sock hop, and much more. For details

contact Frank and Kathy Anders at (410) 628-4018 or

email KCSF@verizon.net

MAY 30-JUNE 1 – CHESAPEAKE BAY ASTHMA TOUR

This bike tour is a American Lung Association event

to benefit children with asthma through programs

and desperately needed pulmonary research efforts in

order to find treatments and cures for lung disease.

Routes go through Wicomico and Worcester Counties

to Assateague Island or along the shorelines. Saturday

rides are 20, 40, 62.5 or 100 miles; Sunday rides are

10, 20 or 40 miles. Chose between one or both day

tours. Start/finish, lodging, and activities are held at

Salisbury University in Salisbury, Md. A crab feast follows

Saturday’s ride. For more info or to register visit

www.asthmaride.org or call 1-800-642-1184, ext. 221.

JUNE 1 – CSC INVITATIONAL PRO BIKE RACE

Some of the world’s best pro bike racers will compete

on the streets of Arlington, Va., in this 11th annual

race. The men’s pro Invitational begins at noon.

Team CSC will be on hand, along with every other

top US based pro team. The CSC Invitational is part

of USA Cycling’s National Racing Calendar (NRC)

and the American Criterium Championship Series

(ACCS). For additional information, visit www.arlingtonsports.org.

JUNE 7 – WORLD NAKED BIKE RIDE

Beginning at 3 p.m. at McPherson Square in downtown

Washington, the 3rd annual World Naked Bike

Ride is designed to celebrate the bike as alternative

transportation and protest our dependency on oil.

The ride will go past the Capital Building and in

front of the White House. For details log onto www.

wnbr-dc.org. For more information email: info@wnbrdc.com

or naturerunner@yahoo.com

CALENDAR continued on p.30

28 May 2008


CALENDAR continued from p.28

JUNE 7 – PATUXENT RIVER LEGACY RIDE

Celebrate National Trails Day with a bike ride on

country roads in the Rural Tier of Prince George’s

County, Md. Routes of 24, 46, and 64 miles from the

Merkle Wildlife Sanctuary will take you to scenic rest

stops overlooking the Patuxent River. Fully supported

by the Oxon Hill Bicycle and Trail Club. For details,

visit www.ohbike.org or call (301) 567-0089.

JUNE 7-8 – WELLS FARGO MS TOUR DE SHORE

Join the Maryland Chapter of the National MS Society

for a one or two day ride on Maryland’s Eastern

Shore. Routes range from 30 -100 miles on Saturday

and 30 & 50 mile on Sunday. Overnight at Salisbury

University. Route is fully supported with rest stops,

bike techs and support vehicles. To Register or find

out more, visit www.marylandmsbikeride.org or call

(443) 641-1220.

JUNE 8 – RESTON TOUR DE CURE

The American Diabetes Association again hosts

this very popular series of bike rides, ranging from

a Tour de Tots youth ride, to a 12 mile family fun

ride, a 32 and 64 mile fitness challenge, and a full

century. Starting and finishing at the Reston Town

Center Pavilion the longer rides head through scenic

Northern Virginia countryside including the W&OD

Trail and western Loudoun County. Register online at

www.diabetes.org/tour or call 1 (888) DIABETES.

JUNE 7-14 – BICYCLE RIDE ACROSS GEORGIA

Come discover Georgia by bicycle on the 29th annual

Bicycle Ride Across Georgia. The 2008 edition will

ride from Atlanta to St. Simons, and will feature

beautiful scenery, historic sites, street festivals, ice

cream socials, an End-of-the-Road party, and more!

Great fun for the family, groups or individuals. Daily

rides average 60 miles, approximately 400 miles total.

Longer Hammerhead options for serious cyclists.

Fully supported with rest stops every 10-15 miles. For

more information, please visit our website at www.

brag.org, or email info2@brasg.org

JUNE 7-8 – SUZUKI 24 HOURS OF BIG BEAR

Coming up on its 17th year, the 24 Hours of Big

Bear, Hazelton, W. Va. (formerly the 24 Hours of

Snowshoe and 24 Hours of Canaan) is rolling out

the bike trail for as many as 200 teams, 50 solo riders

and more than 1,000 spectators. The race will take

place at Big Bear Lake Campland. While the racing

is a blast, you can also have fun as a spectator, volunteer,

or as support crew for one of the teams. In the

shadow of the legendary 24 Hours of Canaan, THE

original 24 hour mountain bike race, and then the 24

Hours of Snowshoe, this Laird Knight, Granny Gear

Productions event returns to the roots of the original

event, with great all around riding, fun camping venues

and a festival atmosphere. The location is about

three hours from Washington/Baltimore. For details

or to register visit www.grannygear.com

LUTHERVILLE WEEKLY ROAD RIDES

Lutherville Bike Shop will lead two weekly road bike

rides. Both rides will leave from the shop at 5:30 p.m.

Proper riding attire required. Easier Ride: Monday

nights at 5:30 p.m. 14-16 mph Approximately 30 miles

A scenic road ride through Loch Raven Reservoir and

surrounding areas. We keep the hills to a minimum

and invite all riders to the sport. Racers recovering

from the weekend are welcome as well. We’ll ride as a

group and no one will be left behind.

Fast Ride: Tuesday nights at 5:30 p.m. 18+ mph

Approximately 40 miles A fast ride through Loch

Raven Reservoir and northern Baltimore county. This

is a hilly ride with sprint points to keep the heart rate

up and the competition fierce. The goal of this ride

is to ride fast and ride hard. Great for racers training

during the season. We will set a few designated wait

points. Call the shop for details (410) 583-8734. www.

luthervillebikeshop.com

THURSDAY EVENING FREDERICK RIDES

A 15-19 mph road ride out of Frederick Bike Doctor,

5732 Buckeystown Pike, just off Route 355. Meet every

Thursday at 5:30 p.m. for a 25 mile +/- ride. No one

will be dropped. Beginning May 1 the ride time will

change to 6 p.m. Rides cancelled if roads are wet, it

is raining, temps are below 40 degrees or winds are

20 mph or above. Contact (301) 620-8868 or log onto

www.battlefieldvelo.com for details.

HUDSON TRAIL OUTFITTERS RIDES

Join “HTO’s Cycling Club” for local touring and mountain

biking rides. Rides will be lead by experienced

HTO staff and will range from 10-20 mile trail rides to

20-30 mile road rides. Arrive at 8:30 am for pre-ride

group stretching, rides will start promptly at 9:00 am.

Go to www.hudsontrail.com for more information.

May 18 – Loch Raven Reservoir Mt. Bike Ride: Enjoy

14 miles of logs, creek crossings and fast downhills

on this intermediate to advanced mountain bike ride.

Meet at the church on Seminary Road, corner of

Seminary and Delaney.

June 22 – Rosaryville Beginner Mountain Bike Ride:

Ride an eight mile smooth groomed track loop. Mt. Bike

is a must. Meet at Rosaryville State Park, $3 parking fee.

COLUMBIA TUESDAY ROAD & IRONGIRL RIDES

Spirited Tuesday evening road rides, 25.5 miles (or 18

for Iron Girl Triathlon participants) from the parking

lot of Princeton Sports, 10730 Little Patuxent

Parkway, Columbia, Md. Ride is same as that used in the

Columbia Triathlon (25.5 mile) or IronGirl competition

(18 miles). Weather permitting. Call (410) 995-1894 or

email ttomczak@princetonsports.com for details.

WEDNESDAY NIGHT MT. BIKE RIDES AT LOCH RAVEN

Lutherville Bike Shop will lead a weekly mountain

bike ride every Wednesday evening at 6 p.m. from

the shop. The ride will leave from the shop and go

through Loch Raven Reservoir. Distance and speed

will vary based on rider skill level. Call the shop for

details (410) 583-8734. www.luthervillebikeshop.com

SPIRITED SUNDAY ROAD RIDES

Join the folks of the Bicycle Place, just off Rock Creek

Park, every Sunday morning (beginning at 8:30

a.m.) for a “spirited” 36-40 mile jaunt up to Potomac

and back. This is a true classic road ride that runs

year round. While the pace is kept up, no one is

left behind. No rainy day rides. The Bicycle Place

is located in the Rock Creek Shopping Center, 8313

Grubb Road (just off East-West Highway). Call (301)

588-6160 for details.

BALTIMORE SATURDAY RIDE

A fun but spirited group ride through Baltimore

County every Saturday morning at 9 a.m. Depending

on turnout there are usually 2-3 different groups of

varying abilities. When the weather doesn’t cooperate,

we will have the option to ride indoors. Call Hunt

Valley Bicycles at (410) 252-3103 for more information.

Great Gear For Cyclists...

Dual Action

Knee Strap

Patented strap takes pain

relief from knee degeneration

and overuse syndromes to

a higher level. Provides

increased support and

stability. Sizes: Sm-XL

1-800-221-1601 • www.cho-pat.com

HELP WANTED

LASSIFIEDS

THE BIKE LANE in Burke and Reston, Va., is now

hiring for full time mechanic, sales, and assistant management

positions. We are looking for enthusiastic self

motivated people who love cycling and enjoy working

with people. Experience is preferred. Excellent pay

and benefits. Please fill out an on line application at

www.thebikelane.com or email info@thebikelane.com

for more information.

BIKES FOR SALE

CUSTOM MADE ROAD BIKE – Top quality components,

56 cm, 21-speed. Black with chrome trim. Frame-Raleigh

531 steel. New was $1,200. Asking $425 OBO. Contact Jeff

at (410) 526-4850.

PINARELLO – 54cm; aluminum frame; carbon fork,

seat stays; 10-speed Campy Record group; Eurus wheels;

beautiful pain; excellent condition. $2000 firm. Call (443)

506-5587.

ROAD BIKE – Bianchi Eros, men’s 23 inch frame, 21

speeds, excellent condition, all original, early 1990’s

model. $225. Cash. (301) 797-1713.

FOR SALE – 1955 racing bike Frejus Toreno, all

Campagnolo, 1960 two California choppers. 2006 Trek

Madone 5.2, all Dura Ace. Best offer. Call Dutch (410)

208-1497 in Ocean Pines, Maryland

MISCELLANEOUS

YAKIMA ROOF RACK – Carries two bikes with a special

rail to hold a tandem bike. For car without roof

rails. $200. (301) 371-5309.

$10.00

CLASSIFIEDS

FOR PRIVATE

PARTIES

Details: NO PHONE ORDERS. Ad listed in next

issue. Limit of 25 words. Add 50¢ per word over.

Print or type message, including classification.

Send to:

Spokes Classifieds

5911 Jefferson Boulevard

Frederick, MD 21703

30 May 2008


08FR_HiFiAd_Spokes.indd 1


VISIT THE STORES BELOW TO CHECK OUT THE THE FISHER HIFI

2/26/08 3:02:10 PM

VIRGINIA

ARLINGTON

REVOLUTION CYCLES

2731 Wilson Boulevard

(703) 312-0007

BURKE

THE BIKE LANE

9544 Old Keene Mill Road

(703) 440-8701

LEESBURG

BICYCLE OUTFITTERS

19 Catoctin Circle, NE

(703) 777-6126

STAFFORD

REVOLUTION CYCLES

100 Susa Drive, #103-15

(540) 657-6900

MARYLAND

ANNAPOLIS

BIKE DOCTOR

160-C Jennifer Road

(410) 266-7383

ARNOLD

BIKE DOCTOR

953 Ritchie Highway

(410) 544-3532

BEL AIR

BIKE TIME

Festival at Bel Air

(410) 569-2307

COLLEGE PARK

COLLEGE PARK BICYCLES

4360 Knox Road

(301) 864-2211

COLUMBIA

RACE PACE

6925 Oakland Mills Road

(410) 290-6880

DAMASCUS

ALL AMERICAN BICYCLES

Weis Market Center

(301) 253-5800

ELLICOTT CITY

RACE PACE

8450 Baltimore National Pike

(410) 461-7878

FREDERICK

BIKE DOCTOR

5732 Buckeystown Pike

(301) 620-8868

WHEELBASE

229 N. Market Street

(301) 663-9288

HAGERSTOWN

HUB CITY SPORTS

35 N. Prospect Street

(301) 797-9877

LUTHERVILLE

LUTHERVILLE BIKE SHOP

1544 York Road

(410) 583-8734

OWINGS MILLS

RACE PACE

9930 Reisterstown Road

(410) 581-9700

ROCKVILLE

REVOLUTION CYCLES

1066 Rockville Pike

(301) 984-7655

SILVER SPRING

THE BICYCLE PLACE

8313 Grubb Road

(301) 588-6160

WALDORF

BIKE DOCTOR

3200 Leonardtown Road

(301) 932-9980

WESTMINSTER

RACE PACE

459 Baltimore Boulevard

(410) 876-3001

DELAWARE

REHOBOTH

BETHANY CYCLE OF REHOBOTH

19269 Coastal Highway,

Suite 1

(302) 226-1801

WASHINGTON, D.C.

CAPITOL HILL

CAPITOL HILL BIKES

709 8th Street, SE

(202) 544-4234

GEORGETOWN

REVOLUTION CYCLES

3411 M Street, N.W.

(202) 965-3601

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