the wilcox family cyclists - Spokes Magazine

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Serving Cyclists in the Mid-Atlantic States JULY 2008

the wilcox family cyclists

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IN THIS ISSUE [ CYCLING "THE GAP" + RACING'S MASTERMIND + RAAM FINISHES IN ANNAPOLIS ]


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6-7

Columbia, MD


www.ulmancancerfund.org


ON

COVER

THE

The Wilcox family of Olney, MD ranks cycling as their favorite

activity. Photo by Neil Sandler.

page 4

$4 A GALLON GAS. In a couple of years you’ll be wishing

it was that cheap.

My dad owned a gas station and I grew up pumping

the stuff. (Trust me when I tell you the leaded gasoline

smells sweeter than today’s unleaded. My wife

Sonja says my growing up sniffing gas explains a lot

about my personality.)

I remember how distraught everyone was when it hit

$1 a gallon in the late 1960s. But in the scheme of

things $4 gas is still really cheap.

Around the time gas hit a buck, my parents sold our

house and moved into an apartment. My sister Linda

and I had gone away to college. (Let that be a warning

to those of you young’uns getting ready to move

out of the family home. Sometimes, there’s no going

home.).

My dad boasted of the killing he was making selling

the three bedroom, one bathroom family Cape Cod.

He only paid $12,000 for it, and sold it for $32,000.

It was my dad’s best year in business (he had an Esso

station, and I still have the huge plastic oval Esso sign

hanging in our basement). He made almost $25,000

that year. Now, keep in mind, good ole Abe Sandler

worked seven days a week, and Sandler family vacations

were a long weekend in Atlantic City (some

years dad headed home early cause things weren’t

being run the way he liked).

RECUMBENT =

Comfort

PEOPLE ASK US

WHO RIDES RECUMBENTS?

We tell them avid cyclists

overcoming discomfort from a physical

condition, people coming back to cycling

for exercise who want more comfort,

and people that like to be different.

We welcome them all and try to help

them find the recumbent that

will get them out riding.

We’re fighting “oil addiction” with

human powered transportation.

Join the fight – park your car and

ride your bike.

bikes@vienna, LLC

128A Church St, NW Vienna, VA 22180

703-938-8900

www.bikesatvienna.com

COME TO OUR WEBSITE FOR INFORMATION

ABOUT OUR UNUSUAL PRODUCTS AND

CLICK USED BIKES FOR PHOTOS,

DESCRIPTIONS, AND PRICES OF

OUR PRE-OWNED BIKES.

So let’s make some comparisons. A house like my parents'

in our old neighborhood just sold for $170,000,

over five times what my folks sold their place for when

gas was a buck. A hard working, independent business

man today should earn at least $100,000 to $125,000 a

year, five times what my dad earned back then.

So what’s the big deal about $4 gas? To be on par, it

should be five bucks a gallon, not four.

Last night I took the family to a tiny local carnival for

kiddie rides, a couple of hot dogs and chicken platters.

It was over 60 bucks. When we went to the good

ole Allentown Fair—15 bucks covered the

whole night.

$4 gas. What’s the big deal?

Folks are just beginning to think about changing

their habits when it comes to gas consumption.

Now $10 a gallon gas. That will be something. If you

think your local bike shop is busy now, wait until it

hits $10 a gallon. Trust me, it’s not very far away. I can

smell it coming.

Happy Trails,

Neil Sandler

Editor & Publisher

TANDEMS =

Sharing

WHY RIDE A TANDEM?

It’s sharing the fun and experience with

a partner, a child, a parent, or a friend.

Sharing exercise, sharing adventure,

sharing the joy of accomplishment, and

creating a shared memory.

We sell and rent tandems because we’ve

shared these things and found that bicycling

can be even more fun when it is shared.

We’re fighting “oil addiction” with

human powered transportation.

Join the fight – park your car and

ride your bike.

bikes@vienna, LLC

128A Church St, NW Vienna, VA 22180

703-938-8900

www.bikesatvienna.com

COME TO OUR WEBSITE FOR INFORMATION

ABOUT OUR UNUSUAL PRODUCTS AND

CLICK USED BIKES FOR PHOTOS,

DESCRIPTIONS, AND PRICES OF

OUR PRE-OWNED BIKES.

Touring • Racing • Off-Road

Recreation • Triathlon • Commuting

SPOKES is published monthly eight times a year — monthly March

through September, plus one winter issue. It is available free of charge at

most area bicycle stores, fitness centers and related sporting establishments

throughout Maryland, Virginia, the District of Columbia, and parts

of Pennsylvania, Delaware and West Virginia.

Circulation: 30,000. Copyright© 2008 SPOKES.

All rights reserved. No reprinting without the publisher’s written permission.

Opinions expressed and facts presented are attributed to the respective

authors and not SPOKES. Editorial and photographic submissions are

welcome. Material can only be returned if it is accompanied by a selfaddressed,

stamped envelope. The publisher reserves the right to refuse

any advertising which may be inappropriate to the magazine’s purpose.

Editorial and Advertising Office:

SPOKES

5911 Jefferson Boulevard

Frederick, MD 21703

Phone/Fax: (301) 371-5309

e-mail: spokesmag@comcast.net

JULY 2008

EDITOR & PUBLISHER

Neil W. Sandler

CALENDAR EDITOR

Sonja P. Sandler

GRAPHIC DESIGN

Studio 22

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July 2008

3


the wilcox family cyclists

by ROLAND LEISER photos NEIL SANDLER

IMAGINE A FAMILY that can boast of its own biking

club. In Olney, Md., the Wilcoxes must surely go

down in the record books with a total of 20 bikes for

dad, mom and eight children. Child number nine, a

toddler, has already begun her training on a tricycle.

Lt. Commander Barry Wilcox II, a medical officer at

the National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Md.

has led his clan on rides ranging from neighborhood

jaunts to the 25-mile long Rock Creek Park trail.

This year, Barry and his two oldest sons have become

road racers, racing for the Artemis Racing team. An

experienced triathlete in his “former life,” Barry has

inspired these two oldest sons to also train for triathlon

competition.

Family biking excursions, a sight to behold to outsiders,

include the entire family with the toddler in tow

or subgroups of up to five children “whose skills are

close together.”

In order of age, his children are Callandra, 17, Barry

III or Buddy, 15, Rachel, 14, Joshua, 12, Emma, 11,

Benjamin, 10, Nathan, 8, Timothy, 6 and Abigail, 2.

His wife Terry occasionally bikes with the brood but

he admits “she’s not a big cyclist.”

The cycling bug bit Wilcox as a teenager and he has

never looked back. At age 14, he completed his first

century ride and as he recalls, “not too many 14-year

olds could do that.”

Over the years, he has ridden as far as 137 miles,

mountain-biked in Colorado and used his bike for

transportation “out of necessity.”

A native of upstate New York, he earned a degree in

nursing at California’s Humboldt State University and

joined the Navy after graduation.

We caught up with Wilcox one Saturday morning

before he picked up his wheels at City Bikes in Chevy

Chase, Md., for replacement of a rear wheel hub. The

shop is one of the sponsors of the Artemis Racing

team in which he, Buddy and Josh compete.

Wilcox takes credit for introducing his family to bikes

and giving each child basic instruction. The family’s

remarkable devotion to the sport will likely be the

stuff of legends one day.

As first born, Callandra was initiated into biking when

she was four or five years old.

“All the children seemed to start riding early,” Wilcox

remembers, adding that they began learning on tricycles.

He avoids training wheels as he contends they

are counter-intuitive for proper turning. Once the

children feel comfortable on a two-wheeler, Wilcox

will run behind them and hold on to their seats.

“As soon as they can understand what right and left

are, that’s all they need to know. I’ll say, turn your

handlebars to the left and I’ll lean the bike a little bit”

in that direction. Gradually, the children figure out

how to “lean into the turn.”

“My son Nathan made the transition from tricycle to

two wheels without any help from me. It was incredible,”

Barry told SPOKES.

No family member has refused to participate in biking,

says Wilcox.”They all want to do it. Possibly sib-

ling rivalry plays a part but it’s good exercise and it

uses up their energy,” he explains. At the same time,

he’s challenged to figure out how to accommodate

skill and speed levels for a group whose ages range

from two to 17.

4 July 2008


“When all family members join in group rides, we try

to find the speed that’s going to be, well, not necessarily

the least common denominator, although that’s

a good place to start. We don’t want to leave anybody

behind,” the dad explained.

Sometimes three or four of the smallest will head

out as a group into a wooded area for a trail ride. An

older child will ride in front but “I stay behind to call

out the obstacles or reel in the front rider if he takes

off too far.” Felled trees and other trail obstacles help

to slow down the kids. If a slow pace frustrates fast

riders, the children need to “develop tolerance and

understanding of each other’s needs with older ones

serving as mentors to the younger ones.” Yes, there

are complainers when the older, more experienced

kids ask, “do I have to go out with your group?” On

the other hand, “Buddy, Josh and I ride year around

and the trio has biked the entire length of the Rock

Creek Park trail."

Instruction goes beyond the outdoors sessions. At

home, there is stationary equipment to convert recreational

bikes into training bikes and training videos.

With the bike-obsessed family, equipment is often

handed down from older to younger children. Wilcox

owns four bikes, Buddy, Josh and Terry two each and

the rest of his family each own one. With a couple

stray extras, they count “about 20” bikes in their home.

Almost all of the children have mountain bikes.

“Stability is a factor along with versatility –they want to

ride their bikes everywhere--but durability was probably

the determining factor” in the choice of equipment,

dad explains. But Buddy and Josh, however,

also have road bikes for racing.

For the most part, he generally buys used equipment

from CraigsList or Ebay provided that the frames

carry lifetime warranties. Trek is the brand of choice.

So far, he’s experienced only one mishap when a

frame broke and Trek replaced the entire bike with a

new model and charged only for shipping it. He’s willing

to pay for good quality as the bikes have to last.

Much of the responsibility for upkeep falls on Wilcox,

but Buddy, he says, can fix a flat tire, clean and otherwise

maintain the equipment.

When out for a “full family group ride” on-lookers

comment about “the parade” as he humorously put it.

Ideally, he’d like to head out to the Rock Creek Park

trails on weekends but with nine bikes and a toddler’s

trailer, “just getting there is a feat in logistics and

planning. I don’t have a big flatbed.”

The family’s 15-passenger van can carry four or five

bikes, which he’s used on camping vacations in Rocky

Gap State Park in western Maryland but he focuses

on riding where he lives. Unfortunately, the amount

of road traffic in his immediate neighborhood discourages

street biking. But nearby is an area where

the family can safely bike on streets, sidewalks or on

paved walking trails.

As a medical professional, he makes sure that his clan

carries enough water bottles to avoid dehydration.

DOZEN continued on p.10

July 2008

5


CYCLING'S MASTERMIND VISITS D.C. AREA

by NEIL SANDLER

JOHAN BRUYNELL, mastermind of the team that

enabled Lance Armstrong to win the Tour de France

seven consecutive times, as well as manager of one

of pro cycling’s hottest new teams Astana, which won

the Giro d’Italia (Tour of Italy) last month, visited the

Washington metro area June 18 to promote his new

book “We Might As Well Win.”

He also took the time to entertain and answer the

questions of a hundred plus cyclists on hand at the

Revolution Cycles Clarendon location.

He took ample opportunity to poke fun at the organizers

of the Tour de France for not inviting his new

team Astana and its leader Alberto Contador back to

defend his 2007 Tour title. Not only did the young

Spaniard win last year’s drug plagued Tour de France,

just a month ago he took top honors at another of

cycling’s Grand Tours – the Giro d’Italia. Contador

has not been implicated in any of the drug scandals.

He was not invited to defend his title until allegations

about possible doping are cleared. He has never tested

positive for doping.

Bruynell opened his talk with “I’m here to answer

stuff like: ‘how much do I love the French?’”

With the winner of the Giro wearing the leader’s pink

jersey, as compared to the yellow jersey worn by the

Tour de France’s leader, Bruynell joked “pink is the

new yellow.”

“We received no congratulations or any comments

at all from (ASO, the owners of the Tour de France)

after Alberto’s win (at this year’s Giro). They wouldn’t

look very good if they changed their minds and invited

us. Of course, we’re disappointed. How could you

not be disappointed to not be invited to return and

defend your title. But they will be the biggest victims

of their decision (not to invite team Astana). There

aren’t too many stars in this year’s Tour. Sure, I’d

like to get the call from ASO, but at this point I’d say

thanks a lot, we’ll see you next year... It seems to me

like they have an ego problem.”

Bruynell spoke about the challenge of building a

team that works well together.

Growing up in cycling-mad Belgium, Bruyneel dreamt

of winning the most prestigious cycling race, the Tour

de France. Of course, like every other Belgian kid, he

pictured himself on the podium as a rider, not the

champion sports director he later became.

Though he may not have captured the Tour de

France title as a professional cyclist, his 10 year riding

career was highlighted by two Tour de France stage

wins (1993 & 1995), as well as a day in the Tour’s

coveted yellow jersey in 1995. That same year, he also

placed 3rd overall in another Grand Tour, the Vuelta

a Espana.

Bruynell’s ability to observe, prepare and tactically

implement strategies, coupled with his heart and

determination, led him to be a respected bike rider in

the pro-peloton, but more importantly paved the way

for his future career as sports director.

After connecting on the roads of Europe with the

young Texan Lance Armstrong, Bruynell was offered

the Sports Director position of Lance’s American

team in 1998. It was then that the 34 year-old, newly

retired, first year Director of the United States

Postal Service Pro Cycling Team (2005-2007 named

Discovery Channel) instilled his master plan. He convinced

the cancer survivor that he could win more

than stages at the Tour de France; he could become

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Since then, Armstrong and Bruynell have become

professionally inseparable. With his record-setting

seventh title, Armstrong is regarded by many as the

greatest cyclist in history. But Armstrong would be the

first to tell you cycling is a team sport, and that without

Bruynell he would never have won a single tour.

Bruynell made the young American something he

had never been, a prepared and efficient rider. He

convinced him to spend winters training in the Alps

and Pyrenees. He altered his pedaling cadence. They

went into wind tunnels, seeking better positioning to

save fractions of seconds. They experimented with

new bike technologies. Together they redefined the

approach to cycling.

Their differences proved to be the perfect complement

to each other: Bruynell’s tactical intelligence

and Armstrong’s extraordinary will; Bruynell’s gift

for preparation and Armstrong’s physical capacity to

execute any plan. They shared a tireless work ethic,

mutually inexhaustible ambition, and a vision.

Though Lance Armstrong will always be Bruynell’s

most popular success story, his ability to create champions

did not stop with the seven-time Tour winner.

After a brief rebuilding year in 2006, Bruyell took

his latest phenom, Spaniard Alberto Contador and

guided him to his first Tour de France title; Bruynell’s

eighth. His Discovery Channel Team dominated the

2007 Tour, with two stage wins, 1st and 3rd place (Levi

Leipheimer) overall finishes, as well as the Best Young

Rider (Alberto Contador) and Team classifications.

In 2008, Bruynell embarked on a new journey as

General Manager of the Astana Cycling Team.

Though Bruynell may no longer be directing from

the driver’s seat, his leadership and philosophy are

strongly rooted with his new team. Like the USPS and

Discovery Channel Teams, Team Astana has reaped

the benefits of Bruynell’s wisdom and produced a winning

season, highlighted by Contador’s Giro victory.

Bruynell’s teams have won an unprecedented 11

Grand Tours (eight Tours de France, two Giros

d’Italia, and one Vuelta a Espana).

“While it’s a complex thing to build a team,” he told

the crowd gathering in Arlington, “at the same time

you need to keep it simple. When I started in 1999

(with U.S. Postal) I did what I felt in my heart. Seven

or eight years afterwards I’m only beginning to discover

how I did it. I’m seeing certain patterns that repeat

themselves.

“Sometimes it’s deceivingly simple. So simple that

people don’t see it.”

Q. Why hasn’t (American) George Hincapie (who

served as Armstrong’s second in command during

most of the seven Tour wins) won the Tour de France?

A. George’s problem is that he does not excel at any

one thing. While he is certainly one of the fastest

riders he’s not one of the best sprinters. While he’s

a strong time trialist, he’s not one of the best. While

he’s a strong climber, he’s not the best. (To win the

Tour) you need to be the best in at least one of these.

Q. If you’re a top American amateur racer, what do

you need to do to become a top pro?

A.The first thing is you need to race in Europe. That

is where you will learn what real cycling is like. The

roots of bicycling are in Europe. Sure you can learn

and train here in the U.S. but you need the experience

of racing in Europe as early as possible in your

career. Preferably by 15 years old. I’m Belgian and I’d

recommend they go to Belgium. There is a cycling

academy there, it’s got my name on it. I recommend

you go there!

Q.There’s talk of banning the use of radios in the

sport. What are your thoughts on that?

A.Radios are a great tool. If there’s an accident up

the road, or wet roads, or an oil leak from one of the

vehicles up ahead. It’s a safety issue and it’s helped

saved the riders from injury. Of course, tactically they

are also important. I don’t believe you can or should

stop technology. Stopping using them would be a

giant step backwards.

Q.Your thoughts on young cycling star Tom Boonen’s

recent incident involving cocaine use.

A.Tom Boonen is a star in my home country of

Belgium. He was on my team at one time. I see

his problem as he became too famous too fast. He

assumed he was untouchable. I knew he likes to party.

So, he goes and gets tested positive for cocaine use.

It’s actually not illegal in our sport (to be banned from

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racing) but in the context of everything that is going

on right now it’s bad for him and bad for our sport.

Q.Predictions on this year’s Tour?

A.I predict there will be a lot of mistakes being made.

There are no clear favorites, and without favorites,

risks and poorly calculated risks will be made.

Q.Your thoughts on the elimination of time bonuses

in this year’s Tour?

A.Not necessarily a bad thing. The sprints will definitely

be more risky as a result.

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July 2008

7


Cycling

“The GAP”

by BARBARA SHELLENBERGER

LEAVING FROM HAGERSTOWN, MARYLAND to explore

the Great Allegheny Passage (which is adjoins the

C&O Canal in Cumberland) was just absolutely

extraordinarily beautiful. Our journey was to take

us about 130 miles through a most picturesque

area of Pennsylvania and Maryland framed by the

Youghiogheny, and the Casselman Rivers plus the

Allegheny Mountains without ever having to climb a

difficult hill.

It is a beautiful day at the crack of dawn at the middle

of summer. Our bicycle packs are loaded in the drop

off car to be driven by our friend and husband. We

will ride in the return car that will be left at the end

of our trip in Cumberland, Md. After planting our

return car in Cumberland, we board the drop off car

containing our packs and bicycles to follow map quest

directions to McKeesport, Pa. It is a very scenic driving

route with a few miles on the Pennsylvania Turnpike;

we soon arrived to our destination – McKeesport, Pa.

Now the first challenge begins, for it is very difficult to

find the point of the Youghiogheny River Trail or the

Great Allegheny Passage. Missing signs and confusing

one-way streets with construction added to our frustration

for finding the onset of the trail.

As luck would have it, we did find a knowledgeable

person, who verbally directed us correctly. It was

rather challenging to keep on the trail as it rambled

over bridges and around businesses in McKeesport.

It was quite apparent that we were to experience a

most picturesque trail when we entered the trailhead

at Boston (very close to McKeesport, Pa.). It was in

Boston that we found a convenient parking lot and

the trail was very evident.

Excitedly, we took to our pedals and made our

way enjoying the scenery of this lovely area. The

Youghiogheny River running to our left would be a

scenic companion of interest throughout the first two

days of the journey.

Our first memorable waterfall was white in color flowing

high on our left and sounding its stately presence.

With this waterfall high on our right and the river low

on our left. We quickly felt submerged in nature’s theater

of perfection as the streaming sun warmed the

area into a bright late morning.

Traveling on came a second waterfall this one was as

broad as it was high; its color was of the normal earth

tones and announced its presence with the delightful

sounds of calm consistent falling water. We now

understood why this bicycle trail was so popular, for

we too were engrossed in its remarkable beauty.

Pedaling while being submerged in the joy of cycling,

we came across other bicyclists, who lived in the

area and were out for a day ride. It was nice to have

conversation until our route came to the Sutterville

trail access this forwarded us the three miles to our

first trail town, West Newton with viable places to eat,

drinking water (for our water bottles), even an interesting

bicycle shop –just in case you forgot something

or needed a map.

Moving on from the quaint viable trail town, we

came to Cedar Creek Park. Had we been more energetic,

we could have enjoyed a wonderful game of

Frisbee on this park’s many acres of lush lawn. The

Youghiogheny River running along as the park’s border

added to the park’s charm. Since there were many

picnic shelters here, this was an ideal spot for the

lunch we brought along in our bicycle packs.

Following lunch, we continue on the stone chip trail

through many very small locations mostly being parking

areas for the YRT trail, Smithton, Van meter, then

we spotted Jacobs Creek’s rushing waters spilling

foamingly into the Youghiogheny River. This was just

another beautiful photographic moment to savor.

Passing Whitsett, we arrived at Layton, to a sign

announcing another water view. From this area

through Linden Hall to Dawson, wild flowers held our

interest in their variety and scope of colorful designs.

It was now becoming late afternoon and a mild

fatigue was beginning to set in.

When to our delight, we came to the Connellsville

Trail Station here we had been instructed to make a

call to our bed and breakfast the Victorian Tea House

proprietor, who would come to get us and our bicycles

to bring us up a three mile hill to his original home

place now “rearchitectured” into a magnificent home

with lovely gardens situated high on the Connellsville

hill looking down into the town.

After a shower and tour of the Victorian remodeled

house, our host gave us a tour of their outside gardens

then drove us to a wonderful restaurant where

we savored a most delicious dinner- all within our

budget. After a restful night in this superb Victorian

atmosphere, a breakfast casserole with trimmings and

fruit enabled us to encounter our second trail day

with enthusiasm.

Bidding our host and hostess fond “goodbyes” we

were driven to the trailhead and began our second

day zestfully.

Pedaling from Connellsville, we were reminded of

the great work accomplished on the building of the

Pennsylvania railroad. Crossing a wooden bridge (formerly

used by trains) we could witness the mountains

and valleys into farmlands that presented a construction

challenge to the early rails.

The Youghioheny River on our left now reveals large

stones in its depth as the waters seems to speed revealing

rushing sounds of rapids. Through the trees small

waterfalls dropped from high rocks on our right. Just

as the land again opened, we witnessed a train in full

speed onto its destination. The sounds of trains were

heard throughout this day and into the next.

Coming to an interesting bridge we were fascinated by

hundreds of kayakers enjoying the rapids – some right

side up and others upside down. This was the ideal

spot to have lunch while watching this show. This ushered

us into the town of Ohiopyle. Had we prepared

to stay another day, we could at this spot have visited

Frank Lloyd Wright’s home and also Kentucky Knob.

These were built and today are museums of Wright’s

architecture.

We played typical tourist in Ohiopyle tasting the ice

cream and visiting the museum and shops then onto

the bicycles for more miles.

Passing Ramcat Run into Confluence, where the river

was now the Casselman River that we were to follow

until the next day when it disappeared.

The Casselman River is fly fisherman’s haven.

Everywhere you looked, you could see fishermen in

their hip boots enjoying the challenge of the “catch.”

Confluence was indeed a tourist delight as well with

many shops and places to eat and enjoy this scenic

area. At this point, we had 18 miles to continue for

our second day bed and breakfast. Plus, this was

indeed an uphill grade, so the Great Allegany Passage

trail calls us away from touristy delights to the end of

day pedaling challenge. This area was shady with trees

and the low flowing rocky Casselman River on our

left. It was slightly upgrade, as a result we relished as

a few resting places, where we stopped and pondered

nothing in particular.

Hurrah, the Pinkerton Tunnel! But alas, if only it was

still in use. Riding through it would have saved two

miles. Oh Dear, it has a detour. We pedal those two

miles to the end of the tunnel, where a sign tells us

we have only six more miles. These miles came to an

end in Rockwood, our second night’s bed and breakfast.

The Rockwood Trail House B&B presented itself

8 July 2008


placidly on the trail and not a person in sight. We

walked into the house (honor system at its best).

On the dining room table were written directions for

us to follow, cookies to savor, a key in the door of our

room, plus other travelers to meet. We really enjoyed

the company, the antique furniture of its “heyday”

with a huge back porch for us to place our bikes for

the night.

After showering, we took in the town. The place of

most interest was the Opera house. While it did not

offer a play for us to enjoy this particular weekend

(just a reunion), it did have supper. Since we were

rather late getting in, the choice of entrees was not as

vast as the menu suggested, but it was a very tasty end

to a long day outdoors.

The next morning we were awakened to noises in the

kitchen. Our host had arrived to fix us breakfast. She

lives on a nearby farm and uses the B&B as additional

income for the family. Aromatic fumes of kioshe,

fruit, biscuits quicken our energy and out we came

with the other guests to enjoy a wonderful breakfast

with interesting conversations about the area and

what everyone had experienced and what they were

looking forward to experiencing this day.

It was Sunday and to the notes of the train whistles,

we began pedaling. Again small waterfalls greeted us

on our right as the Casselman River flowed to our left.

Mountain Laurel blossoms revealed the fact that their

summer season is late.

All at once to our amazement we noted white windmills

turning. We learned from a local resident

that this was an energy experiment brought in

GAP continued on p.10

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July 2008

9


GAP continued from p.9

from Switzerland to help with the energy problem.

Unfortunately, it seems the local energy companies

did not endorse it. The wind mills were pretty against

the blue sky, as they were high and the Casselman

River quietly flowed below the bridge as we crossed it.

At one point on this bridge we could see the windmills,

the highways (we were crossing), the train

in the mountains and the Casselman River flowing

peacefully. This was a magnificent scene to behold.

This dreamlike existence lead to the town of

Meyersdale. Where the stop was a railroad museum

used to commemorate not only the rail roads, but

also the coal and steel industries of yesteryear. There

was also an old beautiful house of this past era being

restored, known as the Deal House two blocks from

the station.

Astoundingly, the the next 25 miles, our final 25 miles

of this adventure, ran downhill from Meyersdale into

Cumberland!! What a treat! We thought we were on a

theme park ride!

The downhill decent took us through the Big Savage

Tunnel, the Borden Tunnel into Frostburg, Mt.

Savage, and finally into Cumberland, Maryland.

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We were truly sad to come to an end of this wonderful

cycling adventure. After loading our bicycles and

gear, off we drove onto the highway to Hagerstown,

DOZEN continued from p.5

As in any family, bruises and scrapes will happen.

On a group training ride in Frederick, his oldest son

took a spill when a rider just ahead of him suddenly

slammed on his brakes. In the collision, Buddy broke

his helmet, skinned one knee but still finished the

ride using only one gear. But “just in case” dad took

him to a hospital’s emergency room.

The Wilcox family is also involved with Civil War reenactments,

and frequently does “roughing it” camping

weekends, in which the entire family sleeps in canvas

tents and uses amenities only found during the Civil

War era.

For large families into biking, what advice would he

give? First, if there’s a choice on where to live, find

a bike-friendly neighborhood. In the Wilcox’s case,

and home, where we would tell all our cycling friends

about our wonderful cycling the GAP adventure.

there is a public park across the street with miles of

places to ride. Then, instruct the children on basic

bike-handling and rules of the road. Finally, make

sure the equipment is in good condition, especially

the brakes, provide proper clothing and helmets, and,

oh, “and have lots of money!”

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10 July 2008


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D.C.’S TEAM XTREME WINS RAAM’S MIXED 4 COMPETITION by LISA KILDAY

FORTY CYCLING TEAMS AND 27 SOLO RACERS began

the Race Across America (RAAM) in Oceanside, CA

on June 8. RAAM is an ultra-cycling event that travels

through 13 states and finishes 3,018 miles later in

Annapolis, Md. As of press time, 17 teams or solo racers

had withdrawn from the race due to time disqualifications,

medical reasons, accidents, or most notably,

solo racer Jennifer Krebs quit due to “an epiphany.”

In 1993, Eric Goetz of Washington, D.C., had his own

epiphany on a self-supported cycling trip across the

U.S. with two friends. He wanted to race in RAAM. In

2007, Eric made it happen and enlisted the talented

triathletes Patrick Serfass, Phil Schmidt, and Andrea

Vasquez to form Team Xtreme 4. In addition to training

nonstop and fundraising for RAAM, Team Xtreme

4 promoted environmental awareness by asking supporters

to pledge to go car free or buy carbon offsets

during race week.

The DC-based team recruited a large crew of 12

friends and family members to act as their sherpa during

RAAM. In record time, Team Xtreme 4 easily won

the mixed four person team division with a finishing

time of 6 days 4 hours and 18 minutes.

Team Xtreme’s main competition was four lads on

Team Ireland’s Navan Avonmore. Due to RAAM’s

staggered start, Team Xtreme started eight minutes

after Team Ireland. After consistently maintaining a

20.33 mph pace, they caught up with Team Ireland’s

caravan in Ohio. Team Xtreme was within a 30 minute

striking distance for the rest of their journey.

Team Xtreme’s blog initially reported the battle

between Team Xtreme and Team Ireland. But, Team


Xtreme 4 stopped updating their website daily and

sending e-mails because their internet connection in

remote areas was poor and the crew were operating

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Team Xtreme 4 at the Annapolis finish.

on a grueling 24-hour schedule with little sleep. This

added to the difficulty of following the race back at

home. Although some race statistics were relayed via

the websites of RAAM and Team Xtreme 4, the race

organizers were posting limited information, such as,

arrival times for each team at the 54 time stations, but

not their overall standings.

Crew members of Xtreme 4 resorted to using their

friends in D.C. as stringers by calling them and providing

them with updates to post on the DC Triathlon

Club and Team Xtreme’s websites. A devoted follower

of Xtreme 4 compared RAAM to the Tour de France

except that the riders are “friends” and the followers

have to figure out the positions of the teams on their

own without a video feed from the funny French guy

on a moped.

During the last 24 hours as the teams approached

West Virginia, supporters of Team Xtreme posted

messages wildly on DC Tri’s and Team Xtreme’s websites

about the battle between DC and Ireland.

Crew member, Kip Pierson, reported on Xtreme 4’s

blog that despite a wrong turn Team Xtreme closed

the gap in West Virginia. They tried a new rider rotation

and were hammering back home to the finish

line in Annapolis. While a large group of supporters

gathered late Tuesday night at the finish line at the

City Dock in Annapolis, Team Xtreme 4 and Team

Ireland raced each other at speeds in excess of 30

mph for the last 11 miles of the race. Team Xtreme

finished third overall for all 4-persons teams sadly losing

to Team Ireland by one minute. That’s right, their

battle came down to a one minute difference over

3,008 grueling miles in one of the most memorable

finishes in RAAM’s history.


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Ken Shuart of Galesville, Md., (who was featured as the cover

story in the May issue of SPOKES) and his Race Across America

(RAAM) teammates on Team Ride4Melanoma finished the

3,000 mile event in 16th place overall in the four person team

and fifth place in the four person mixed team. They finished

with a time of 7:16:30 and speed of 16.34 mph. The team raised

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12 July 2008


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SLOVENIAN WINS RAAM IN

RECORD FASHION

Three time defending Race Across America (RAAM) solo champion

Jure Robic of Slovenia crossed the finish line on the waterfront

in Annapolis, Md., June 17 after starting in Oceanside,

California, 3,014 miles away, in a new record time of 8 days, 23

hours, and 33 minutes. He averaged 13.98 miles per hour.

He far outpaced the second and third place riders. Mark

Pattinson finished nearly a full day later in a time of 9 days, 17

hours, 29 minutes, with an average speed of 12.91 mph. David

Haase finished in 9 days, 23 hours, 19 minutes, with an average

speed of 12.68 mph.

Robic is the only solo racer in the 27 years of the competition to

have won four times.

The Norwegian-based eight-person Byggkjop/BMC Cycling

Team won the team division, setting a new record. Beating the

team record by 5 hours, 47 minutes set by Team Type 1 in 2007.

The Byggkjop/BMC Cycling Team finished the race in 5 days, 9

hours, and 56 minutes, averaging 23.20 miles per hour. This was

the first year Byggkjop/BMC Cycling Team competed in RAAM,

and the first year the eight riders of the team had participated

in this coast-to-coast race.

Terry Zmrhal, race director for RAAM, said, “I want to congratulate

both Jure Robic and the Byggkjop/BMC Cycling Team for

their record-breaking wins this year. To see such outstanding

races from a champion race veteran like Robic, and then the

amazing win from the BMC rookie team makes this a spectacular

year.”

Samuel Zbogar, Slovenia’s Ambassador to the United States,

was on hand at the Annapolis finish to congratulate Robic, a

member of the Slovenian Armed Forces.

Robic has completed this race five times now, winning it four,

and taking second place his rookie year. In another attempt he

was forced from the race course due to illness.

More than 250 men and women from 17 countries took part in

this year’s RAAM

Robic is 43 years old, and all 8 members of the Byggkjop/BMC

Cycling Team are over the age of 40.

As of press time the solo women’s division leader had not

crossed the finish line.

Visit www.raceacrossamerica.org for the most comprehensive

information about the race.

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July 2008

13


TENS OF THOUSANDS PARTY AT CSC INVITATIONAL

TENS OF THOUSANDS OF CYCLING ENTHUSIASTS lined

the one mile inner city circuit at the CSC Invitational

in Arlington, Va., June 1, to observe one of the strongest

road race fields in the mid-Atlantic.

But the event has become much more than just a bike

race, with hundreds of children entered in specially

designed kids races, dubbed the largest kid’s race in

the country, and thousands of cycling and non-cycling

fans sitting course-side at outdoor restaurants just be a

part of the race scene.

As for the races themselves, in the men’s pro race,

Luca Damiani took first place giving team Colavita

Olive Oil/Sutter Home another win to add to their

recent dominating record. Dominique Rollin (Toyota

United) and Karl Menzies (Healthnet) took second

and third place, respectively.

The CSC Invitational is known as one of the most difficult

criterium races in the U.S. due to the technical

demands of the 1 km course.

The 100 mile (100 laps) race got off to a quick start,

when Magnus Backstedt (Slipstream/Chipotle)

immediately broke away from the field during the

first of 100 laps. The move eventually became a

13 person breakaway that lapped the field. Rollin

showed his strength and endurance by placing second

even though he was competing without teammates.

Backstedt was awarded most aggressive for his role in

starting the break away.

The hot and humid conditions did not deter the

eager riders. Roger Hammond (Team High Road)

suffered a face-first crash but rallied to finish 8th

overall. Local favorite Russ Langley of Battley Harley

Davidson, the only amateur team invited to compete,

was among the 13 person break away. Langley was on

Rollin’s when at 250m to go, but “overcooked” the

final turn, hitting the ground.

Not to be outdone by the men, the Elite Women

Category 1/2 was a thrilling 50 km race ending

in a huge upset by champion Catherine Cheatley

(Cheerwine).

Cheatley beat out two former champions and favorites

to take the title, and was part of a three-person

breakaway. It came to a neck and neck exciting sprint

to the finish, with Lara Kroepsch (ValueAct Capital

Cycling Team) placing second and Andrea Dvorak

(Colavita/Sutter Home) placing third. 2006 winner

Tina Pic placed 4th while defending champion Laura

Van Gilder placed 5th.

Spectators were treated to a full day of cycling on a

course perfectly situated for viewers. The day started

with a 40 km Masters 35+ category, won by Nima

Ebrahimnejad; followed by the Men’s 1/2/3 category,

won by David Bozak. Kids were also able to show off

their abilities while parents proudly watched during

the largest kids’ race in the country.

Proceeds raised through the CSC Invitational’s

Breakaway Club will go to Fisher House, in conjunction

with Charity Works.

For a complete list of the day’s race results log onto

arlingtonsports.org

14 July 2008


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COLUMNS

SINGLETRACK by MATTHEW BUTTERMAN

Big Bear, Big Deal

The Suzuki 24 Hours of Big Bear is the real deal. Tons

of exhibitors, a massive Suzuki mobile stage display,

hundreds of riders, campers and tents everywhere, and

little sons and daughters of the racers on the shoulders

of their grandparents, watching the start. Coming

from a background almost exclusively in road and

cyclocross racing, I didn’t know what to expect from

mountain biking when I came to the 24 Hours of Big

Bear to get the story. I’ve come away a believer in the

popularity- and the potential - of this style of racing.

It’s a format that saw its genesis and development in

the mind of Laird Knight, founder and president of

Granny Gear Productions, the Davis, W. Va.-based

event promotion company that currently produces the

Suzuki 24 Hour National Mountain Bike Points Series.

Seventeen years ago, Knight came up with the idea

for the inaugural 24 Hours of Canaan – a way to

concentrate the challenge and fun of cross-country

mountain biking into a 24-hour period, centered at a

single venue and overflowing with spirit and enthusiasm,

sort of like a Woodstock on wheels. The venue

moved twice during the years, first to Snowshoe resort

and later to its current location at Big Bear Lake

campground, outside Hazelton in the far north of the

state near the Maryland and Pennsylvania borders,

and a mere four miles off Interstate 68. The same

course used for the 24 Hours of Big Bear is open season-long

to the general public for a $5 fee to enter

the campgrounds.

The classic, technically-challenging course at Big Bear

is the hallmark of the second most popular stop of

Granny Gear’s 24 hour race series. This six-race series

has spread beyond its West Virginia base to such iconic

mountain bike venues as Killington, Vt., and Moab,

Utah, as well as the 1996 Olympics Games course in

Conyers, Ga., near Atlanta. The nationwide scope of

the series – as well as its popularity and cult-like following

– attracted the corporate support this year

of Suzuki Automotive, and of industry stalwarts like

Ellsworth bicycles, Infinit Nutrition and NiteRider.

But, as far-flung as the impact of 24 hour racing has

spread, it’s important to remember that this is at its

core a mid-Atlantic phenomenon.

That fact is not lost on Granny Gear Productions’

home state. “Outdoor recreation is the second largest

tourism-related activity in the state, and part of a

$77 billion market nationwide,” Justin Gaull of the

West Virginia Department of Tourism, told SPOKES.

Mountain biking is an important boost to the state’s

economy that was once dominated by “king coal,” and

Knight was named West Virginia Tourism Person of

the Year in 2001.

“Granny Gear’s events, with their focus on providing

fun and memorable experiences, exemplify why West

Virginia is, and shall remain wild and wonderful,”

concludes Gaull.

So, if West Virginia shares a long and symbiotic relationship

with the sport of mountain biking, and if the

course at Big Bear Lake represents a classic venue, it

was only fitting that one of the sport’s legends dominated

this year’s 24 Hours of Big Bear. David “Tinker’

Juarez was one of the trailblazers in the early years of

mountain biking, and he became one of its biggest

stars as it blossomed into an internationally popular

sport. But, it took more than a decade after his ride

for the U.S. team at the Atlanta Olympics in 1996 for

Juarez to find time in his busy schedule to make an

appearance at the mid-Atlantic’s biggest 24 hour race:

“I’d always wanted to ride the 24 Hours of Canaan or

Snowshoe, but never got the opportunity during my

international pro career. I’d heard wonderful things

about the courses, and Laird is known for producing

quality events worth traveling for,” said Juarez.

More recently, the 47-year old Juarez is making a

name for himself as an ultra-endurance mountain

biker. The southern California native came to Big

Bear for the first time this year as part of this second

coming. In addition to 24-hour mountain bike racing,

he’s also challenged himself on the road in the Race

Across America (RAAM), and he secured a victory in

southern California’s Furnace Creek 508 endurance

road race.

The Big Bear 24 provided all the challenge Juarez had

hoped for: a great course and a surprisingly strong

field of competitors. This combination made his victory

all the more sweet. Spectators were treated to one

of the closest battles seen in the sport for a long while.

“This was one of the only 24-hour races I’ve ever had

to race for the entire time in order to win,” Juarez

said in an interview on the awards podium.

The Men’s Expert and Men’s Masters classes also

produced riveting struggles in which the leaders were

separated by only a few minutes until the very end.

Heavy rains during the week before the race left conditions

wet and in places, slick. But intense heat before

the weekend helped to dry the well-drained course.

This same heat, in the high 80s to low 90s, changed

the normal expectation of cooler conditions in the

Appalachian highlands of West Virginia. This factor,

added to several new faces - and returning racers riding

under aliases, made it difficult to predict a winner.

Juarez had his own doubts about his ability to win

the Men’s Solo division at Big Bear. The dreadlocked

rider from Downey, Calif., is a bit out of his element

on technical, muddy East Coast courses, but in the

end his experience with endurance events mitigated

any unfamiliarity with regional course conditions.

Juarez even used a familiar race strategy from his days

on the international XC scene: a fast start to open

up a sustainable gap on his competitors. His first lap

came third-placed overall, even on time with team riders

from Custom Contracting Cancer Awareness and

Just4Brothers, at 1 hour, 16 minutes. For the next 5

laps, Juarez stayed in the top ten places in the overall

standings, before stepping off the gas slightly.

Meanwhile, Ernesto Marenchin of Stow, Ohio, followed

the reverse plan, holding back slightly in the

opening three laps.

Going into the night, Marenchin started turning faster

lap times than Juarez, and shortly after daybreak he

went past the Californian to take the race lead. Juarez

kept his cool in the sweltering heat, however, and

kept the pressure on Marenchin, who discovered that

riding ahead of a competitor of Juarez’s caliber is not

16 July 2008


as easy as riding behind him. Juarez quickly resumed

the lead and surged away, finally completing 15 laps

of the 12.2-mile course with a 52-minute advantage

over Marenchin.

“Marenchin deserves to be commended, he kept

the pressure on me the whole race. I knew that I

shouldn’t panic, though, and just focused on my own

performance and keeping it steady” concluded Juarez.

Behind Juarez and Marenchin was former Canadian

national team member Jesse Jakomait in third, who

bettered last year’s champion Steve Schwarz.

Schwarz, a Rockville, Md., resident and D.C. attorney

by trade, challenged Juarez early on, before slipping

back to third behind Marenchin, and finally to fourth

after a mechanical problem on Sunday morning.

In the Women’s Solo race, a racer registered mysteriously

as “Ms. Cookie” displayed her own experience

and consistency to win the class.

Further research revealed “Ms. Cookie” to be the

pseudonym of Carol Clemens, a Pittsburgh, Pa., resident

who finished second in 2007.

The early challenge was mounted by Liz Baumgardt-

Kays of Rockford, Ill., who turned two fast early laps

before fading to third overall behind the quickening

pace of Clemens and Heidi Shilling of Whitehall, Ohio.

Baumgardt-Kays is racing all six rounds of the 2008

Suzuki National 24 Hour Series for the experience -

and the fun. She’ll have another three rounds to work

out her pacing effort - an effort already well understood

by Big Bear’s Solo Women’s winner:

“I knew from previous years that you can’t start out

too fast, and have to really gauge your efforts to survive

the whole race,” concluded Clemens, displaying

the wisdom of a seasoned 24 racer.

If the marquee name of Tinker Juarez, and the nailbiting

challenge brought forth by Ernesto Marenchin

proved the story of ths year’s Big Bear, the number of

registered teams and the wacky names they entered

with, gave it its substance and style. Registrations were

up almost 20% over last year, thanks in large part to

the number of teams signed up in any of 22 separate

categories. As the results revealed at the conclusion of

the event at noon on Sunday, teams from the Men’s

Pro, Expert, Veterans or Masters categories occupied

the top ten results overall.

Pro and Expert Men’s teams dominated the overall

results, with the iplayoutside.com/WVMBA Pro Men

winning overall and category honors. The four-man

squad boasts three members from nearby areas

of West Virginia, and is co-sponsored by the West

Virginia Mountain Bike Association (WVMBA).

Team captain Jason Cyr, from Granny Gear

Productions’ home town of Davis, said that local

knowledge of the course at Big Bear - which is set up

throughout the season and open to the general public

- played into the team’s dominant performance:

“The course is well-balanced and technically challenging.

All of us having raced it before - even if not part

of this particular team - definitely played into our

hands,” said Cyr.

Pennsylvania-based Expert Men’s team Dirty Harry’s,

which includes three members of the Spreng family

- Robert, Henry, and 16-year old Henry Spreng, III,

were fastest of the Men’s Expert teams, and second

overall only to iplayoutside.com/WVMBA.

Other strong performances came from local team

Big Bear Masters, and last year’s second place overall

squad, Just4Brothers in the Men’s Veteran category.

West Virginia mountain biking icon Gunnar Shogren

- racing under the identity of “Sam Hill” as part of

the DuoPro pair Hipster Doofus & the Kessel Run

- set the fastest lap with a 1:07:42. Wife Betsy made it

a family affair with a 1:19:04, fastest women’s lap on

the day. Both Shogrens were a few minutes slower

than the course record lap times they both set back

in 2006, which is not surprising considering that on

Sunday morning the muddy sections were described

by Jacomait as being “like peanut butter.”

When mountain biking developed in the mid-1980s,

it quickly became the domain of a different sort of

cyclist – rogue and free spirits who felt hemmed in by

the traditions and old-world customs of road cycling.

Over the past 20 years, the sport has seen the ebb and

flow of corporate sponsorship and mainstream media

attention, but the same passion and independent spirit

of the early years keep it rolling. And if the sport

thrives on passion and spirit, it’s why the 24 Hours of

Big Bear is a healthy and growing event.

Perhaps the inexorable pull of competing in a 24

hour event was best summed-up by Sal Ruibal – a D.C.

area resident and famous cycling correspondent for

USA Today – who competed in the Men’s Solo division

at Big Bear. Ruibal contributed to the event’s

webcast in between laps out on the course, where he

eventually finished 9th (and first of men over 55 in

the solo category):

“The race was a lot of fun, difficult at times, and

always challenging. This is definitely my last solo 24.”

One sentence later, Ruibal continued, “I’ll come back

next year to do it for fun, as part of a team.”

Another year, another 24...

SEVEN SPRINGS LIFTS OPEN FOR

MT. BIKERS

Seven Springs Mountain Resort opened the Seven Springs

Bike Park on May 31. Bike park staff is currently prepping last

season’s “Trail-007” with lofty goals for park expansion during

the 2008 season.

With a successful inaugural year complete, the resort will

expand the bike park and provide more events and services

to mountain biking guests by adding both machine-built and

hand-built trails to give riders more trail variety, mileage and

challenge. Additionally, Seven Springs will establish a bike shop

and a bike park yurt, where riders can chill and spend time

with their friends after a run through the park.

Seven Springs has contracted the consulting and construction

services of Alpine Bike Parks, LLC, to assist in the park’s

development. Alpine’s pro-level designer/builders include Eric

Carter (Mongoose/SRAM/Kenda), Randy Spangler (Santa Cruz/

Marzocchi/Oakley), as well as former pro rider Judd de Vall.

“The trails at the Seven Springs Bike Park are all about flow,”

says project manager Judd de Vall. “We want to build a diversity

of trails that will provide an exceptional experience for a

broad range of riders, from first-timers to experts. Some of our

trails will be extremely challenging, but we also want to communicate

that lift-accessed trails aren’t just for hardcore downhillers,”

added de Vall.

“Meandering, lift-accessed trails are a perfect experience for families

who are looking for a way to ride together without long climbs.

The trails can be an especially good way to introduce family members

and children to our favorite summer experience.”

The park is open 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the following schedule:

June 28 to Sept. 1: Daily

Sept. 2 to Oct. 26: Weekends and Holidays

Daily park passes are $29. Season Passes are $199. Kona mountain

bikes and Fox Racing protective gear are available for

rental. For more information, visit www.7springs.com.

Seven Springs Mountain Resort, located in Seven Springs, Pa.,

is the state’s largest ski and four-season resort and was recently

rated the number one resort in the mid-Atlantic region by

the readers of SKI magazine. The resort is easily accessible

from either exit 91 or 110 of the Pennsylvania Turnpike. Seven

Springs Mountain Resort can accommodate more than 5,000

overnight guests in its 10-story high-rise hotel, nearly 1,000

condominiums and town homes, cabins and chalets. For more

information on Seven Springs, visit www.7springs.com or call

(800) 452-2223.

A-1 Cycling

TWO LOCATIONS OPEN 7

DAYS A WEEK!

Mon - Sat 10am-9pm

Sun 12pm-6pm

HERNDON

Clock Tower Shopping Center

2451-13 Centreville Rd.

(703) 793-0400

MANASSAS

Next to Best Buy

7705 Sudley Rd.

(703) 361-6101

www.A1Cycling.com

Bicycles & Equipment for the Whole Family!

COMPETITIVE PRICES WITH HOME TOWN SERVICE SINCE 1980

A-1 is a family-run business focusing on quality and service. Our staff is trained

to superior standards to create a bicycle enthusiast's dependable source.

COME EXPERIENCE THE DIFFERENCE!

We stock products from:

Giant

Thule

Specialized Burley

Raleigh Speedplay

Felt

Sigma Sport

Haro

Descente

Hoffman Camelbak

Minoura Continental

CTS

Serfas

July 2008

17


COLUMNS

SPOKESWOMEN by THERESA RICHARDSON t_richardson@verizon.net

…a look at women’s cycling issues in the

mid-Atlantic

Size Matters!

Bikes designed specifically for women started hitting

the market about five years ago. Since then, more and

more companies are offering bikes with women’s fitting

issues in mind. The number of bikes offered, in

both road and mountain, has also increased.

As a shop owner and a pro racer, I often get asked

if there is a true advantage to “women’s” bikes and

products. I believe there is. Of course, a women’s

geometry is not going to work for every woman, but

the having the extra offering has expanded our choices

and options.

Every bike company’s geometry and designs (for all

their bikes) vary and getting a proper bike fitting

helps determine which bike company and which

model is best for each rider’s need and body measurements.

Each bike design will have variations in top

tube length, head tube angles etc and one company’s

design may fit you better than another’s. This is the

case for women’s bikes as well. A proper fit will help

you determine whether a women’s design, and which

one, is best for you. At our shop, about 80% of the

women we work with fit a women’s geometry, and

about 20% fit better on men’s/unisex frame.

Important differences that play a part in an ideal

bike fit for women include the fact that, in general,

women have longer legs and shorter torsos. It is not

uncommon, for example, for a 5’10” woman to have

the same length/inseam as a 6’0” tall man. Because of

this, most of the women’s designs have a shorter top

tube length in relation to the seat tube. For example,

presents...

A Festival of Women’s Cycling

Sunday September 14, 2008

Oregon Ridge Park in Cockeysville, MD

Join us for a full day of fun in celebration of women’s cycling.

Ride Baltimore’s scenic roads and then enjoy a women’s-specific

cycling expo, including lectures on bike basics and training,

activities and exhibits, plus a cycling fashion show. The fully

supported rides are for women only of all abilities. Trek will also

be on-site with their line of women’s bikes for you to check out

and ride.

Cost: $22 in advance (includes t-shirt, ride, lunch and expo); $30 day

of (does not include t-shirt)

Rides: Three spectacular routes through casual to challenging terrain

Pre-registration is suggested via www.active.com

or in-person at Joe’s Bike Shop at 5813 Falls Rd (410/323-2788)

for more info visit SheGotBike.com

a men’s 54 road bike has a squared geometry—a 54

cm seat tube and a 54 cm top tube. A 54 cm women’s

frame has a 54 cm seat tube and a 52 cm top tube.

This allows for a shorter reach to the bars to accommodate

a shorter torso, but does not compromise

proper leg extension.

As I stated before, not all frame sizes are the same

from bike company to bike company, and a proper

fitting will help guide you in choosing which bike fits

you best. Before you get set on a particular model or

bike company, get a fitting. Some brands do not offer

large enough sizes for some women. For example,

LeMond bikes women’s road frames only go up to a

53 cm, which, in general, works for a woman whose

height ranges from 5”4 to 5’7”. Trek and Cannondale

offer women’s road bikes up to a 56 cm which, in

general, work for women 5’9” to 5’11”.

Your specific body measurements are not the only

thing that guides fitting and which bike and bike

company is best for you. If you have back problems

or are not as flexible, you may want to go with a bike

with a taller head tube, which will put you up higher

in a more comfort-oriented position.

In addition to differences in frame design, women’s

bikes accommodate differences in women’s bodies in

other ways. To accommodate for narrower shoulders,

the handlebar width is narrower, as well as the diameter

of the handlebar itself. Other changes in women’s road

bikes that work to accommodate smaller hands are that

STI levers can be adjusted with a shim to reduce the

reach from the handlebar to the lever. Additionally,

women’s bikes, road and mountain, usually have shorter

crank arms which helps us generate more power

with each pedal stroke. Using the 54 cm road bike

frame as an example again, a men’s/unisex frame has

a 172.5 cm crank arm, while a women’s 54 cm has a

170 mm crank arms. Also, women’s road and mountain

bikes are generally spec’ed with women’s saddles that

are designed to take pressure off soft tissue.

Another difference in women bikes specific to mountain

bikes at the entry to mid-range level is the front

fork. The forks on these bikes are set up for a 120 lb.

rider whereas the unisex/men’s bikes are rated for

a 175 lb. rider. This is done by placing a softer coil

spring in the fork. A woman weighing less than 175

lbs is not going to adequately engage the suspension

of a fork set up for a heavier rider. At the high end,

forks are air-controlled and can be set up specifically

to the weight of an individual rider, female or male.

It is important to stress that you should not be

uncomfortable on your bike. If you are experiencing

discomfort, there is probably a way to alleviate it.

Getting the right frame size is a start, but there are

many other adjustments that can be made to alleviate

a wider range of discomforts and physical issues. For

example, hand numbness in one hand may be caused

by an arm length discrepancy and can be alleviated

by changing the position of your hoods. Knee pain

or IT band tightness may be due to incorrect saddle

position or length discrepancies. Pronation and supination

of the feet often cause loss of power or pain in

the knees, and can be corrected for with orthotics.

With such a wide range of offerings, there should be

a bike out there for every body and every need and

once it is found, it is not uncommon to have to tweak

it to get everything dialed perfectly for your ride. Of

course, you can check out women’s bikes at your local

bike shops, or look for demos that various bike companies

offer. The Trek East Coast Women’s Demo will

be at the She Got Bike! Festival September 14 and at

Revolutions Cycles’ Biketoberfest in Prince William

Park in Virginia October 18-19. You can check out

Cannondale’s website for test ride events in the area

at http://www.cannondale.com/testride/schedule.

html.

Theresa Richardson is a Pro XC Racer for Bear Naked

Cannondale, and co-owner of the Bike Doctor, Waldorf, Md.

18 July 2008


DEPARTMENTS

TRISPOKES by RON CASSIE ron_cassie@yahoo.com

COACH TROY OFFERS THE AREA'S BEST

MULTISPORT COACHING AND TRAINING PRODUCTS!

Spinervals Cycling DVDs • Camps • Online Coaching • VO2max Testing

Personal Training • Personal Training/Coach Business Consulting

Visit www.coachtroy.com or call (410) 823-7000

The accidental triathlete:

Anne Arundel woman wins age group at Eagleman

Before Kerri Robbins stumbled into triathlon, she

stumbled into a chiropractor’s office.

She’d entered numerous local 5 and 10K races after

graduating from Penn State in 1992 while logging up

to 70 and 80 miles of running a week, but the distances

and roads were beginning to take their toll.

“I ran a lot in my 20s, pretty competitively,” said

Robbins, who won the 36-39 age group at the

Eagleman Triathlon in Cambridge, Md., last month to

start just her fourth triathlon season.

“I kept getting injured however and my chiropractor

told me to stop pounding my body and get off the

pavement.” Robbins, who lives in Davidsonville, Md.,

near Annapolis, substituted biking for some of her

running workouts initially and eventually attempted

her first duathlon in Hanover, Pa., in late September

2004 — which she won.

“I was on a heavy tank of a bike, didn’t know anything,”

Robbins recounted. “I didn’t know I was winning

until the final run and I was like, ‘Huh?’

“Then I thought, ‘Maybe, I’ll do this again’.” The

next year, in 2005, she took on bigger duathlon challenges,

entering at Cape Henlopen, N.J., Lums Pond

in Delaware and in the Virginia Duathlon — where

she qualified for the Duathlon World Championships

in Australia.

“Then I was hooked,” she told SPOKES. “And I just

kept going and going and going.” And getting faster

and faster and bringing home medals and more

medals. In 2006, she won a silver medal at the World

Championships in Newfoundland in 2007 she won

her age group at the Duathlon World Championships

in Hungary. The World Championships were in May

that year which meant she didn’t stop training all

winter for the 10K Run, 40K Bike, 10K run event.

Afterwards, upon reaching her goal of capturing the

age group championship, it was almost natural that

she suffered a little letdown.

“Postpartum race syndrome I call it,” said Robbins,

who also noted that, like for a number of moms, her

multi-sport training was made a little easier when her

nine-year old daughter Brooke got to school age. “I

accomplished that goal and then, it was, ‘Now, what

do I do?’ “So what do you do when you’re lost?,” she

continued. “You look for something new.”

It’s hard to believe but her first triathlon was last June.

She said she did well, after, as expected, a “horrible”

swim. She caught up on the bike and run portions

of the race. She was excited and encouraged enough

by the race and her performance to sign up next for

half-Iron man distance Whirlpool Steelhead in southwest

Michigan in August. There she took ninth in her

age group.

From Michigan, she went to the 70.3 Ironman

Cancun race in late September and improved to a second-place

finish in her age group. Swimming remains

a challenge, however, largely because she is still simply

so new to it. Robbins, who finished 14th overall on

the women’s side of Eagleman’s 1.2 mile swim, 56

mile bike and 13.1 mile run event, came out of the

water in 129th place. She did put up the 11th best

split over the bike course and also the 11th best split

on the run to the finish line, but admitted to some

impatience with the time it’s taking to develop a consistent

and fast freestyle stroke.

Robbins completed the race in just under five hours,

4:58: 18, on an incredibly hot day where temperatures

spiked well into the 90s.

Pro’s Joanna Zeiger, 38, of Boulder, Colo., and Dede

Griesbauer, 37, of Boston, finished first and second,

respectively, on the women’s side. Megan Knepper, 25,

from Fairfax, Va., took 9th and Shandra Richardson,

of Gainesville, took 13th overall on the women’s side

and were the top area female finishers along with

Robbins. All of the above mentioned women finished

the swim leg of the race in the top 13 spots, highlighting

further Robbin’s need/desire to improve her

technique.

On the men’s side, Paul Amey, 34, of Cardiff by

the Sea, Calif., won in 3:53:333. He was followed by

Terenzo Bozzone, 23, of Auckland, New Zealand

in the second-place. Matias Palevencino, 26, of

Washington, D.C., was the top male local finisher, taking

the 9th spot in 4:14:26.

Vinnie Monseau, 39, of Morgantown, W. Va., was the

next top local athlete, coming in 14th, and Karl Kahsar,

19, of Richmond, grabbed 17th on the men’s side.

An Ellicott City-based Du2R team member and a

member of the Annapolis Triathlon Club and member,

Robbins credits joining the Annapolis Bike

Racing Team (ABRT Latitude) for her great strides

since picking up cycling several years ago.

20 July 2008


COMMUTER CONNECTION by RON CASSIE ron_cassie@yahoo.com

DEPARTMENTS

D.C. to begin nation’s first bike-sharing program

The District Department of Transportation and Clear

Channel Outdoor together are planning to bring to

Washington D.C. the first self-service European-style public

bike rental program ever in the U. S. this summer.

“SmartBike DC” is expected to begin operation in late

July or August with 120 bikes at 10 downtown locations

and hopes to serve as a new alternative transportation

network, much like the Zipcar.

The SmartBike DC rental bike and bike racks are

designed to combine user-friendly cell phone access

and computer technology for easy bike pick-ups and

drop-offs. It’s hoped, ultimately, that the commuter

bike program will eventually enhance the city’s overall

public transportation system.

D.C. bicycle coordinator Jim Sebastian told SPOKES

that the program, the small in scope at least initially,

reflects a changing commuter culture in the nation’s

capital.

“We had a 55 percent increase in people commuting

to work by bicycle between 1990 and 2000 and,

according to a recent American community survey,

a 70 percent increase in work trips by bicycle since

2000,” Sebastian said.

Although free bike rentals were set-up in ad-hoc

fashion in cities like Portland, Copenhagen and

Amsterdam in the past, the first similar self-service

bike rental program, utilizing phone and computer

technology like Smart Bike DC, was launched in the

French city of Rennes in 1998. That effort subsequently

spread to Scandinavia and Spain. And back to

France, Lyon and Paris, specifically.

Last July 15, the day after Bastille Day, the annual celebration

of the French Revolution, Paris became the

official center of the bicycle revolution. Thousands of

low-cost rental bikes at hundreds of high-tech bicycle

stations are now scattered throughout the City of

Lights, an ambitious program created to cut traffic,

reduce pollution, improve parking and enhance the

city’s image as a greener, quieter, more relaxed metropolitan

environment.

The Paris program started with roughly 7,000 bikes

last year and has expanded, as planned, to 20,000

bicycles at more than 1,400 stations across the entire

city. By all indications, Parisians are taking to the

bikes and the bicycles are becoming part of the city’s

culture, much like it’s renowned bread, wine, art and

architecture.

Located at key locations in the U St., downtown and

Georgetown districts, the Smart Bike DC bicycles will

provide a cheap way of discovering and moving around

the city. The bike stations are modular and the bicycles

are basic, three-speed, light-weight and comfortable

machines in a distinct design. Bicycles are parked at

docking points which use a proprietary locking system

to ensure that each bicycle is securely stored.

Euan Fisk, the SmartBike DC project manager, said

the bikes themselves are “decent quality chrome-moly

frames designed by our SmartBike team in Oslo,

Norway and manufactured in Taiwan.” He said they

use a Shimano Nexus 3 speed internal rear hub with

a roller brake, Deore front V-brake. They have a 24

inch rear wheel and a 20 inch front wheel - designed

to allow a lot for stand-over height. The seat post

extends up and down to allow full leg extension for

someone up to about 6’2 and down to about 5 feet

tall. There’s a chromed handlebar unit that incorporates

a basket and bungee cord. Full fenders front

and rear in addition to a full [almost enclosed] chain

guard. Front and rear motion/light sensitive LED

lights are also built in.

“They’re truly designed to be all weather & all clothing

compatible,” Fisk said. “As for rideability - I did

a 17 mile loop from Glover Park through downtown

and back yesterday and didn’t have any trouble.

Ride-sharing bicycles to be offered at 10 stops by the city’s new Smart Bike D.C. program.

“Yes, I would probably have been a bit more comfortable

on my Waterford,” Fisk continued but these are

really practical bikes that are going to be left outside

and used in all weather and they need to be durable,

subsequently they are a bit hefty.”

CONNECTION continued on p.22

CLEARANCE SALE

ON ALL REMAINING 2007 BIKES

www.bikerackdc.com

1412 Q Street NW 202.387.BIKE [2453]

July 2008

21


COMMUTER continued from p.21

The service is accessible via online subscription.

Subscribers, for about $40 annually, will receive a personalized

SmartBike DC user card that provides access

to any station of the program at any time.

The turnkey program includes full-time operational

service. Clear Channel will manage the rotation of

bicycles for each station to assure a proper ratio

between available bicycles as well as drop-off locations.

The company runs the bike-sharing programs in more

than a dozen European cities, including Barcelona

and Oslo. Clear Channel’s director of SmartBikes,

Martina Schmidt, recently said that the company sees

the bicycles as another free outdoor amenity, like bus

shelters, that it can offer cities and use to generate

advertising revenue.

In most cities where the program operates, Schmidt

explained that advertising is attached to the bike stations

or on the bikes themselves, but in D.C. there

will not be any advertising initially. Schmidt said that

could change if the program is expanded.

Eric Gilliland, director of the Washington Area

Bicyclist Association (WABA), said Smart Bike DC,

which was originally scheduled to begin in March has

had issues with Pepco about getting electricity to the

bike racks. The power company apparently decided to

require meters be hooked up to the bike racks, however,

he said, although they are only expected to consume

about the same amount electricity as well-lit bus

shelter, making the decision to attach meters curious.

“It’s still a couple of weeks away, “but they’re getting

closer and closer,” Gilliland said in mid-June. “I think

it’s great, it’s the first of its kind in the country and

the way we look at it, at WABA, if we hadn’t been

doing our job day-in, and day-out for 35 years, it probably

wouldn’t have happened here. It’s taken a lot of

hard work. If it's successful it will be expanded.

“The Paris system is so huge it’s difficult to comprehend,

but from what I’ve heard it’s doing extremely well

and that the number of trips by bike has skyrocketed.”

Gilliland took time also to praise D.C. bicycle coordinator

Jim Sebastian for having the foresight three

years ago to tie the city’s bus shelter advertising contract

to the mandated operation of a bike-sharing

program. He added that he didn’t see any downside

to the effort (other than being a little late getting off

the ground.)

“And no taxpayer dollars will be used,” Gilliland said.

SmartBike DC plans to be open from 6 a.m. to 10

p.m., Monday through Sunday. The last rental can

be made at 10 p.m. and bikes can be dropped off

24 hours a day; however, one rental may not exceed

three consecutive hours, Clear Channel Outdoors

said. Helmets are not offered, but are encouraged.

Paul DeMaio, owner of Metro Bike, LLC, a local

bicycle community and commuter consulting company,

visited Paris three weeks before their program

kicked off last year and is now working with Arlington

County to bring a bike-sharing program there in the

Spring of 2009.

That program, called Nextbike, DeMaio said, will

feature between 100 and 200 bicycles, that will be

stationed at 20-40 Zipcar poles along the Rosslyn-

Ballston-Clarendon commercial, retail and housing

corridor just over Georgetown’s Key Highway on the

Virginia side of the Potomac River. As with Smart Bike

DC, there will be roughly a $40 initial membership

fee, DeMaio said, which will include a free first-half

hour of riding each time a bike is used by a commuter.

After that, there will be small, incremental

half-hour fees electronically billed to the commuter’s

account. The bikes are not meant to be used all day,

but for transit purposes, DeMaio told SPOKES.

“D.C. will be the first city in the U.S. to have what

I call a ‘third generation’ bicycle commuter transit

system,” DeMaio said. “The first generation system

experiment didn’t last, bikes just got painted white or

22 July 2008

yellow and they weren’t locked up and they got stolen.

The second generation started in Copenhagen and

the bikes were locked at specifically-designed stations,

but there was no electronic tracking of the bikes. So,

this has been coming for years. Governments are simply

going to have to develop new transit facilities and

specifically bike facilities.”

Capital Crescent Trail re-opens after debate

Sections of the Capital Cresent Trail, closed for two

weeks last month while the Montgomery County, Md.,

Department of Parks sought make improvements

- including the implementation of a controversial

speed limit on the trail - re-opened for full-time

Monday, June 16.

For two weeks, from June 2 to June 13, sections of the

Montgomery County portion of the Capital Crescent

Trail, about 5.5 miles of paved surface trail from

Bethesda Avenue to the District line, were closed to

public access as a center line was added to the trail, trail

intersections and crosswalks were marked and 15 mileper-hour

speed limit signs were placed along the trail.

The 15 mph speed limit signage highlighted the first

time a speed limit has ever been imposed on the trail.

During the work, the trail remained opened for use

on Saturdays and Sundays and during peak commuter

bicycle times during the week, before 9 a.m. and after

3 p.m., to minimize service disruption.

“We expect these changes will improve safety and

provide a better experience for all trail users,” said

Department of Parks South Region Division Chief

Brian Woodward. But during the closure the debate

over posting speed limit signs gathered steam.

“It proved to be extremely contentious,” WABA executive

director Eric Gilliland said. “No one was really

consulted by the Montgomery County Department of

Parks planners except the Coalition for the Capital

Crescent Trail, which signed off on it, but everyone

was left out. It’s really just a band-aid. The 15 mile per

hour speed limit is okay for safety sometimes, other

times it is too fast (when the trail is crowded, for

example). What is needed is more education rather

than trusting enforcement. The county is having a

lot of difficulty implementing its bicycle plan and

yet they’re spending money (on speed limit signage)

when they need more bike trails and need to stripe

more bike lanes. There should’ve been more discussion

about how to spend their resources.”

In a letter to Mary Bradford, the director of Parks for

the Maryland National Capital Planning Commission,

WABA called for a discussion of the new speed limit

signs, and also listed several other safety concerns.

For example, “the behavior of other trail users such as

runners, walkers and those with dogs is unaddressed.”

And widening the trail in order to separate user types

was not considered.

Arlington and Alexandria Community Bike Ride

The fourth annual, non-competitive Arlington and

Alexandria Community Bike Ride June 7, like always

provided first-hand view of some of the best trails,

bike routes, and facilities the region has to offer. Valet

bike parking, entertainment, prize giveaways were

included as part of the 23-mile “Community Tour”

and the 8 mile “Family Ride,” both of which started

just 2.5 blocks from the Crystal City Metro.

“We had 250 people, great rider turnout, our biggest

yet and if you remember it was quite hot that day,”

said Arlington bicycling consultant Paul DeMaio.

“Arlington has a ‘silver’ rating by the League of

American Bicyclists and D.C. just earned a ‘bronze’

designation,” DeMaio said. “Alexandria is just starting

to catch up. They hired their first bicycle coordinator

two years ago and will probably earn a ‘bronze’ designation

next year. So, collectively as an urban region

we are all very bike much ‘bike friendly’ - one of the

most bike-friendly regions in the country, I’d say.”


FAMILY CYCLING 101 by KEVIN BRUGMAN kbrugman@cox.net

COLUMNS

No Game Room

Fortunately “no game room” was about the only bad

news generated out of the Baltimore Bicycling Club’s

Kent County Spring Fling. Despite a historical precedence

of liquid sunshine, better known as rain,

the weather was fantastic. As Goldilocks of the three

bears would say, “It wasn’t too hot, it wasn’t too cold,

it was just right.” This year’s weekend was great time

for families from previous Spring Flings to get back

together and a great chance for new families to get

connected.

The notice of the game room struck terror into the

hearts of many parents when they considered the rain

that often accompanied the weekend. The organizers

had reserved another common room for the families

to get together to play and folks brought board

games, golfing tees and wiffle balls in anticipation.

Due to the great weather, the missing game room was

hardly noticed. Instead Frisbees on the lawn grabbed

the attention of many of the teens while a free form

of wiffle ball mixed with keep away with the tennis

ball in the outfield kept the attention of many of the

preteens.

The family ride on Saturday had one of the largest

turnouts of the weekend and we probably had one

of the widest varieties of riders of the weekend. We

had folks on singles, tandems, triplets, tag-a-longs and

while there were not any trailers on this ride, there

were children in trailers on some of the other rides.

Children who were once in trailers are now on tag-alongs

or on the backs of tandems or triplets. Stokers

have been turned into single bikers and some of the

single bikers are dreaming of when they will be captaining

a tandem or gaining their tandem seat back

with their spouse. The children on these rides exceed

national expectations of child cyclists.

A couple of years ago I tried to organize a bike ride

through the local PTA. The other PTA members

thought that a five mile ride for their grade school

children was too much. We had 3rd-graders riding 20

miles and ready for more.

What is interesting was the age gap of families. While

we had young children on the ride, we also had adult

folks that were along for the ride at a comfortable pace

FAMILY continued on p.24

July 2008

23


FAMILY continued from p.23

that both the husband and wife were comfortable with.

One of the benefits of no longer towing the trailer

is the lack of things that are brought back from the

mid-point. The children hop off the bikes and are

attracted to the water just like iron filings to a magnet.

The shoes come flying off and are scattered all

along the shore line while the children look for pretty

rocks or good skipping stones. With the trailer, there

was no limit of how much could be loaded into the

trailer before Mom or Dad noticed. With the children

on the bikes, there are only so many stones or pretty

pieces of sea glass that can be tucked into the back

pockets of a bike jersey.

During the ride back from the water, the few hills on

the route tested the mettle of some of the weaker riders.

Not only are the children learning perseverance,

but they are learning how to use those gears. I would

often suggest that my son gear down a bit so it would

be easier to ride, I would remind him that I had paid

for those lower gears, so he might as well use them.

Normally my boys would prefer to be in the bigger

gears going faster. One of the key points on the family

rides is that no-one gets left behind. This often means

that the group gets spread out, but all the riders are

comfortable knowing that there will always be a stronger

rider at the back to provide encouragement.

Once we got back to Chestertown, we all headed

straight down to the Chestertown Tea Party Re-enactment.

We have all heard of the Boston Tea Party, but

few have heard of the Chestertown Tea Party. It seems

that the British wisely moved their freight ships out of

Annapolis after the Boston incident. Now so wisely they

moved them up to Chestertown and the rest is history.

The Re-enactment brings up all the issues that surrounded

the revolution and why it often pitted neighbor

against neighbor and even brother against brother.

But to keep the Re-enactment fun and bring in business,

there are also street vendors with everything

from carved fish, paintings, clothing, and about every

boutique item that you can imagine. And then there

is the food. The churches and civic groups set up

food stands that tempt with fragrant scents of ribs

over the coals, crab cakes being fried, hamburgers

being grilled and just about everything else.

Then after you have had you entrée, the funnel cakes

are being offered with a long queue with more getting

in line. I frequently enjoy a lemon with the peppermint

stick straw stuck into it as my after lunch aperitif.

That evening we had dinner in the new temporary

dining hall. Along with rehabbing Hodson Hall where

the Game Room is, the college was also rehabbing the

connected Dining facility. So a temporary building

was built next to the dining hall to accommodate the

students for the next year. The KCSF folks were the

first diners in the new facility which should be in use

for about 12 to 18 months if all construction stays on

schedule. As such, the college was experiencing some

transition pains, however the staff worked hard to

ensure that all meals were top notch and responded

quickly to any issues.

After dinner some of the preteens gathered out on the

lawn to play wiffle-ball, the teenagers found a Frisbee

and the adults adjourned to visiting and reviving

old friendships. As the light started to fade away the

deserts were put away and the caller for the contradancing

to started the activities for the night. While it

would have been fun to stay and dance the night away,

we soon headed back to the room along with a lot of

other parents and got the boys to bed early.

After a leisurely breakfast and chatting over several

cups of coffee, it was time to get ready for the Sunday

morning ride out to the picnic at Worton Park. The

family ride again attracted a large number of participants

as we headed out. One of the attractions on

the ride is the Go cart track at Nicholson Speedway

where they have a sprint course. Many of the riders

are young children starting at age 8, racing their carts

at speeds that look appear to be close to 50 mph on

an asphalt road course with right and left hand turns,

hairpins and straight-aways. It is an interesting dichotomy,

here are a bunch of cyclists quietly riding down

the lanes stopping and studying the racers with all the

noise and fueled engines. At the same time, many of

the racers were studying our tandems and tag-a-longs

with interest. Yes, even SPOKES editor Neil Sandler was

seen hanging on the fence watching these 8 year old

kids burning up the track. It was difficult to pull the

kids away from the fence to keep on riding, and I am

not talking about the kids in age, I am focusing on the

kids at heart! But soon our stomachs started telling us

it was time to get on the road and head to the picnic.

After another lavish meal we took the short ride back

to the campus. Jason and I were on the tandem riding

with a dad/daughter team. We got to talking and

riding along, not realizing we were each pushing each

other along until we realized that we had left some of

the others in the background. Fortunately there is a

convenient place to stop at the only turn on the route

back. After we all rejoined we started on the last leg.

Once back to the campus we decided to grab a long

cable lock and continue to the boat races on the

other side of town. The boat races were spectacular

as always. While some of the designs leave some practicality

to question, imagination is always on display.

For shear impracticality, my favorite was the coffee

bar raft complete with table, chairs, umbrella, potted

plants and stuffed dog. Unfortunately the stability of

the raft was not as solid and the umbrella, plants and

dog were jettisoned before the start of the race. The

other boats included the Batmobile, a pirates raft,

a cardboard Viking Longboat, and even one simply

titled: “Will It Float”

The boats were required to be human powered

and had to go out past two buoys and then make

it back to the starting line. The winner was the

Viking Longboat closely followed by a raft called the

Headhunters. While the completion of the route

determines the official winner, just getting the boats

around the course was a feat.

On Monday morning we joined another small family

ride for the “MacDonald’s Farm Ride.” This morning

Jason decided he was going to ride his single bike

leaving me on the tandem by myself. Fortunately

Jeremy came to my rescue. Jeremy is a young teenager

that has been at the Spring Fling on his single for a

number of years and had often wished he could be

on a tandem when he was younger, so he grabbed the

opportunity and rode with me. We had some minor

technical difficulties so we were delayed in starting

off. However once we got on the road, it was great to

have a really strong stoker pushing me along. Jeremy

on the other hand was amazed at how fast we were

going with reasonable effort.

We soon caught up with the rest of the group at the

first farm stop. After the obligatory pictures with the

horses in the background we were off once again. As

we riding along, someone mentioned that my oldest

son had taken off the front of the pack and there

was some question as to whether he had made a

turn or kept going straight so Jeremy and I used that

excuse to pick up the pace and track Jonathon down.

Jonathon had indeed followed the cue sheet correctly

and was waiting at the second photo stop to get the

pictures with the cattle in the background.

We then headed back for the final leg back to the

campus and packing up. Jonathon kept a good pace

for the last leg and 8 year old Jason followed along at

a good clip.

As we packed we said our silent goodbyes to the campus

once again. We are already looking forward to

seeing our friends again. Pictures of the 2007 and

2008 Spring Flings are available on the BBC Spring

fling web site at: “http://www.baltobikeclub.org/

index.pl/kcsf

24 July 2008


BMX MID-ATLANTIC by BRIAN CARON coolbmx2c4me@aol.com

DEPARTMENTS

Maryland’s NBL State Series Underway

The summer racing season is underway after a slow

start at most area tracks. The Maryland NBL tracks,

like others in the area were plagued by rain during

most of April and May. The rain subsided long

enough for a FULL weekend of racing on June 7-8,

although the mercury soared to almost unbearable

heights giving us a true taste of summer with racetime

temperatures in excess of 100 degrees.

The new schedule for the 2008 season includes State

Qualifier weekends with racing on both Saturday

and Sunday once a month at each Maryland track.

The first full weekend in June was a big bicycle weekend

in the Mid-Atlantic all around, as Granny Gear

Productions played host to the 17th Annual 24 Hours

of Big Bear in nearby West Virginia as well.

I had my sights set on a bicycle tri-fecta by scheduling

to attend three races in two days. I set off for Big Bear

bright and early Saturday morning arriving in time

for breakfast and a morning orientation ride of the

immense venue in the hills of West Virginia.

Although I wasn’t scheduled to race at Big Bear, it

was my first time attending this incredible event, trying

to cheer on and document a few friends who

were racing there for the first time. I was able to see

the 12 o’clock LeMans style start and the first few

laps before shoving off en-route to Riverside BMX in

Cumberland, Maryland a few hours later.

Race time at Riverside was at 7 pm and the muggy

temperatures were still in the nineties. This track is

aptly named as it’s proximity to the Potomac River

affords some easy access for boaters and fishermen

but also makes for some incredibly humid conditions

most times as well.

The track is a four straightaway, three 180 degree

turn configuration with a few big doubles and triples,

as well as a rhythm section before the finish line. It

takes a few laps to get it all sorted out but the snappy

A lone rider at Avalon Skatepark lays one out .

gate and the smooth paved corners make for great

racing action. The staff at Riverside worked all week

preparing the track after some rather intense rain

storms earlier in the week, and the track conditions

We have always been focused

on trying to make your

cycling experience as

enjoyable as possible. Striving to provide

the highest quality of service plays a big

part in reaching that goal. Whether you ride

only a few times each year or cycle every

day, have a basic bike or the latest racing

machine, we make a point of treating every

cyclist as an important customer. We want

you to have fun riding! Regardless of what

and how much you ride, we are here to

help. We have a small but talented staff of

older and extremely experienced people,

dedicated to making your visit to our store a great one. They are truly

motivated to help people, and really care about you, not just how

much you spend. We know how to work on bikes old and new, and our

advice and guidance for purchasing a new bike is simply the best. We

are proud to have been here to serve this community for over 50 years,

and intend to be here for many more.

—The Sawtelle Family and staff of Laurel Bicycle Center

Virginia State series in Hampton VA | photo by Jon Larson

were well suited for a night full of racing.

I decided that I would flip the script and actually participate

in the racing during the weekend instead just

Laurel Bicycle Center

14805 Baltimore Ave.

US Rt.1 across from Laurel Mall

www.bicyclefun.com

BMX continued on p.26

Laurel Bicycle Center

301-953-1223/301-490-7744

Monday-Friday 10 am-7 pm

Saturday 9-6/Closed Sunday

July 2008

25


BMX continued from p.25

being a part of the staff. Thankfully at 36 years old I

wasn’t the oldest racer there as we had a 41 and 45

year old joining my class as well. The youngest racer

of the night was a mere four years old, and there were

at least six female racers in attendance. There were

even a few first-time racers on hand!

The best thing about having a large turn-out is that

everyone has some similarly skilled riders to race

against. There were only 16 motos but each class was

filled with some great competitors with lots of lead

changes and great bar to bar racing action.

Cumberland’s Doug Widdows, Frederick’s Guerry

Montano, and Hagerstown’s Ryan Hullinger were

the Expert standouts with Aaron Kerns, Robert

Sensabaugh, and Mike Hagenbuch rounding out the

closest and fastest class of the evening in the 14-19

Novice/Expert. These guys all raced the open race

at the end of the night and really put on quite a show

to finish off the hot Saturday night of racing around

9:30 p.m.

The weekend was only half over as the second of

the two qualifiers was to be held the following day at

Hagerstown BMX. I knew we were in for another hot

day of racing when I was heading for the track shortly

after 10 a.m. and the thermometer at the bank downtown

was at 94 degrees already. Summer is here with

a vengeance! Well, at least it wasn’t raining?!

There were over 50 riders signed up for day two, some

of them racing both 20” and 24” wheel classes. Racing

two classes on back to back 100 degree days seems as

crazy as racing a 24 hour MTB race but a few riders

braved the conditions.

Mike Hagenbuch gets credit for racing the most

motos over the long weekend! After registration

closed the 19 motos were posted and the racing

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began around 2:30 p.m. Again, there were a WIDE

range of ages competing throughout the day and the

five and under Rookie class was the largest of the day,

including three year old first time racer Benjamin

Claypool!

The cool thing about BMX is that you get a few

chances for a win as most classes did not have mains

so the final placings were decided by the rider’s placings

in each moto.

Other weekend standouts were; five year old rookie

Kage McMahon, who missed having a perfect weekend

with one crash in Cumberland, first year racer

seven year old rookie Jake Yokum, who had perfects

all weekend (three motos wins each day), 10 year old

rookie Jack Slider who ran strong all weekend long,

10 year old expert Matthew McGoey is stomping it as

well, Julia “Goolia” Price, who aced in 20” and cruiser

as well as a mid-pack finish against some boys in the

open class, John Stanton from Mercersburg, Pa., who

is lightning fast in the 17 and over Novice/Expert

class, 41 year old Bill Gorsuch, who manages to raise

three kids, work full-time and maintain a racing

career, Alan Arthur, a 45 year old expert who raced

20” and cruiser class with the big boys.

There are so many standout riders at this series, it’s

hard to just single out anyone.

By 5:30 p.m. the second big day of racing drew to a

close and it all seemed just a blur at the time. I was

able to pull off the anticipated tri-fecta and attend

three races in two days, even taking home some trophies,

by racing both days in the process.

It’s not too late to get involved yourself. There are two

more “Qualifier Weekends” coming up for the Maryland

NBL series on July 19/20th and August 16/17th. The

NBL State championship will be held at Riverside BMX

on September 27. See the Maryland State website for

further details log onto www.mdbmx.org

BMX Briefs

Richmond BMX is making good use of their freshly

paved first straight and corners. After some rain-outs

and struggles during the early season they’ve been able

to get some great racing action in the record books

including a Virginia State Qualifier and some jam

packed local races as well! www.richmondbmx.com

Virginia State series in Hampton VA | photo by Jon Larson

Riders from the 10 yr old rookie class

7 yr old rookies race down the front straight at the

second Maryland State Qualifier

First State BMX in Milford, Delaware races on

most Tuesdays and Saturdays. Their Delaware State

Championship Race is scheduled for Saturday, July 26.

They are always looking to pick up some new racers,

so if you are in the area or know an eager BMXer in

the area check them out at: www.firststatebmx.com

Southern MD BMX, an ABA affiliate in Budds Creek

is going off the hook with over 75 riders in attendance

for their State Qualifier race in June.

BMX-posure is at an all time high around the region

with the excitement mounting with the upcoming

Beijing Olympics. There may be future Olympians

racing right beside you at your local track, you never

know?! www.somdbmx.com

26 July 2008


Chesapeake BMX is gearing up for their ABA

Maryland State point’s race scheduled for July 13.

Chesapeake BMX is always trying to make improvements

to be the best in BMX in Maryland. They’ve

added some new bleachers and are making provisions

to keep the track open to the public as much as possible.

The track is located in Severn, Md.. Check them

out at: www.chesapeakebmx.com

Bumps and Berms, an ABA affiliate in York Springs,

Pa., hosted the Quaker State National Series May

30-June 1st. They had a great turnout with over 250

riders including three riders in the 51+ Cruiser class!

The track holds races almost every Wednesday AND

Sunday so if you ever find yourself itching for a race,

check them out at: www33.brinkster.com/bnbbmx

and see if they’re racing.

registration for day one. After practices, the racing

begins at 11 a.m. With the size of this event and the

amount of riders expected, racing will last into the

evening on Saturday. Day number two gets underway

with the first gate dropping at 8 a.m. Along with a

50-50 raffle drawing there will be a Limited Edition

‘Monster’ bicycle raffled off before the Mains begin

on Sunday. It will be a big weekend and not one to

miss, especially if you plan to be in the area over the

July 4 holiday.

Your Turn

Although I try to stay on top of what’s going on in

the region as far as BMX/Freestyle goes, I can’t be

everywhere at once or know it all. If your organization

or shop has an upcoming event or you know a person

that helps promote or participates in BMX related

events or has helped to shape BMX in any way in the

Mid-Atlantic please let me know. I’m always looking

for up and coming riders within the BMX community

to showcase their local talents, or help shops and individuals

advertise their upcoming events or report on

events that took place.

Please call or email with any story suggestions or

comments: Brian Caron (301) 582-1452 or email

coolbmx2c4me@aol.com

Next Month

More rider profiles from area BMX moms and dads as

well as a report from the AST Dew Sports Tour from

Charm City.

Winchester BMX, reported a great turn out for both

the Bob Warnicke Scholarship and the Gage Stevens

Memorial Race in May and June. Their next big weekend

is coming on July 25-27 as they host a Virginia State

Qualifier, and they hope to have some of the berms

paved by that time. www.winchesterbmxracing.org

The Groove Merchants Bike/Skate Shop in

Martinsburg, W. Va., is in the planning stages for a very

unique contest later in the summer. The plan is to have

two man teams armed with bikes and a video camera

leave his shop and get as much good riding footage

around the area as possible in the specified three

hour time limit. Each team will bring their raw footage

back to the shop after their time is up where it will

be judged by a specific panel of judges some of which

will be the riders from the opposing teams. Riders can

scope the area out ahead of time or plan their riding

locations so they can get the best footage in the least

amount of time. Street, trails, ramps are included. If

you’re interested in participating, check their website

for more details: www.groovemerchants.net

Avalon Skatepark has completed some additions and

reconfigurations of their indoor and outdoor wooden

skatepark over the last few weeks as well. New hip

jumps and bowled corners add to the possible line

and create better flow through the park. Donald

always tries to keep things fresh and interesting with

some new terrain, call the shop or check their website

out for hours of operation and upcoming events:

www.avaloncycles.com/about/skatepark.html

Hampton Supertrack hosting NBL Regional Race

The NBL Sanctioned Hampton, Va., Supertrack will

be hosting the NBL Northeast Regional race dubbed,

“The Battle at the Bay” Friday, July 4 through Sunday,

July 6. The weekend will kick off beginning on Friday

at noon with an Accel Racing/Powers Bike Shop race

clinic with Chad Powers and company demonstrating

and teaching techniques that help beginning riders

learn the basics as well as helping more advanced riders

hone their skills to take their riding to the next

level. The cost of the clinic is a mere $8 and lasts from

12-2pm. Be sure to arrive early to sign up and learn

from the pros.

Next on the agenda is the second annual Eddie

Townsend Memorial Pro-Am Race. Eddie Townsend

was a former track director at the Hampton BMX

track as well as a team Manager for the Accel Racing

Team whose life was cut short as the result of a rare

disease three years ago. The memorial race will get

underway at 6:30 p.m. Friday and races into the evening

under the lights. This race will act as the kick-off

for the weekend and the $2000 purse and 100% payback

are sure to draw in some heavy hitters.

That’s just the beginning, as the next morning things

kick off at 6:30 a.m. with bike inspection and post

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July 2008

27


CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Griffin Cycle

4949 Bethesda Ave.

Bethesda, MD 20814

(301) 656-6188

www.griffincycle.com

Road, Hybrids, Mountain, Kids

Parts & Accessories for All Makes

Trailers & Trikes

Family Owned – In Bethesda for 37 Years

FEATURING BIKES FROM:

To be listed, send information to Spokes, 5911 Jefferson Boulevard, Frederick, MD 21703 or e-mail: spokesmag@comcast.net

JULY 12-13 – CATOCTIN CHALLENGE

Beautiful terrain, screaming downhills, fabulous rest

stops, plus riders cycle thru some of the mid-Atlantic’s

best historical sites, including the Gettysburg area.

Three ride options include: Saturday century with

a 45 mile return Sunday. 65 mile Saturday ride with

a 45 mile return Sunday and a 50 mile Saturday/25

mile Sunday. $80 Live entertainment...The Atomic

Mosquitos, The Fugitives and The Joe Grushecky

Band, all playing poolside after Saturday’s ride. All

you do is bring your camping gear to the starting

points and go. Ride begins and ends in Frederick

County, Md. A minimum of $250 in pledges for

Habitat for Humanity. For more info contact Phil at

(301) 662-5518 or pheffler@aol.com

JULY 20-26 – BONTON ROULET

This legendary event is a festival on wheels through

New York State’s Finger Lake region. Limited to 400

riders, visit dozens of wineries, quaint shops, beautiful

lakes, and plenty of historic sites. For details call (315)

253-5304 or log onto www.bontonroulet.com

JULY 20-26 – FANY RIDE

The Great Big FANY Ride will spin Five hundred

miles Across New York – for it’s 8th annual ride.

Explore Niagara Falls, visit farm stands near the Erie

Canal, sample wines at Finger Lake region vineyards,

ride over 100 miles without a traffic light in

the Adirondack Mountains, and arrive in Saratoga

Springs at the peak of horse racing season. SAG support,

marked roads, cue sheets, luggage transfer to

overnight campsites, optional bus to parking at start/

finish. In honor of each biker the FANY Ride makes

a donation to the Double H Ranch – a camp for children

with chronic illnesses. No pledges are required.

ww.FANYride.com (518) 461-7646

JULY 25-27 – CYCLE ACROSS MARYLAND RIDE

One Less Car’s bike tour and annual fund raiser is

back! This year the CAM Tour will move to Mount St.

Mary’s College in Emmitsburg, Md. Rides will cross

many of the most scenic parts of Frederick and Carroll

Counties. Contact cchatman@onelesscar.org for

more information. All proceeds go to One Less Car,

Maryland’s campaign for better walking and bicycling.

AUGUST 9 – CUMBERLAND VALLEY CENTURY

The Cumberland Valley Cycling Club again hosts

this very popular (over 300 riders last year) tours of

Washington County, Md. Rides include a 25, 65 and

101 miler over low traffic roads going over stone

bridges and by green, picturesque farmscapes. Rides

start in Boonsboro, Md., about 1.5 hours from D.C.

and Baltimore. Great food! Portions of the proceeds

go to San Mar Children’s Home (last year over $2,000

was contributed). For details, or to register go to www.

bikecvcc.com

AUGUST 30-31 – SEVEN SPRINGS 24 HOUR CHALLENGE

In its 9th year, the Subaru 24-Hour Champion

Challenge combines recreational fun and a challenging

adventure, while creating good-natured competition

for teams of friends, co-workers and individual

racers who compete for prizes and glory. The goal is

to complete as many laps as possible on the 12-mile

Seven Springs Mountain Resort, Pa., course in 24

hours. Competitors can race as a part of team or on

their own. The race begins at 12 p.m., Sat., Aug. 30,

and ends at 12 p.m., Sun., Aug. 31. Endurance, teamwork

and the ability to have fun are required! For

more information and to register call (800) 452-2223,

ext. 7757. For more information on Seven Springs,

visit www.7springs.com or call (800) 452-2223.

The 18th annual Shenandoah Fall Foliage Bike Festival

October 17 -19, 2008

New rides for all skill levels from easy family rides to a challenging century

Enjoy spectacular cycling in the beautiful Shenandoah Valley

For more information and to register go to: www.shenandoahbike.org

Call 540 885-2668 or Fax 540 885-2669

SEPTEMBER 6 – 24 HOURS OF BOOTY

24 Hours of Booty, Inc., which runs the Official

24-Hour Cycling Event of the Lance Armstrong

Foundation and the only 24-hour road cycling charity

event in the country, will be hosting the 24 Hours of

Booty of Columbia, Md. on the “Booty Loop” at the

Gateway Business Park from noon, Saturday, Sept. 6 to

noon, Sunday, Sept. 7. A registration fee of $45 per participant

and minimum $150 fundraising are required

by August 22. Proceeds from the 24 Hours of Booty

of Columbia will benefit the Ulman Cancer Fund for

Young Adults and Lance Armstrong Foundation. The

24 Hours of Booty is a non-competitive charity cycling

event that is geared for teams and individuals and is

open to participants of all ages and skill levels. For

more information, visit www.24hoursofbooty.org or call

toll-free at 1-877-365-4417.

SEPTEMBER 6 – AMISH COUNTRY BIKE TOUR

Tour the bucolic farmlands of Delaware’s flat Amish

countryside in this popular 22nd annual event. Nearly

1,400 riders participate in this tour. Loops range

from 15 to 100 miles. Food & entertainment. “Surf &

Turf” packages available for the entire weekend! Kent

County Tourism (800) 233-5368; or register at www.

visitdover.com Ask for free bicycling map of the area.

SEPTEMBER 7 – SOUTHERN MARYLAND CENTURY

The Indian Head 100 has routes of 16, 30, 63, and

100 miles through the scenic Potomac Heritage Area

28 July 2008


of Southern Maryland. Register and go 7-9 a.m. from

the Village Green in the Town of Indian Head, 20

miles south of the Washington Beltway. Fully supported

by the Oxon Hill Bicycle and Trail Club. For

details, visit www.ohbike.org or call (301) 567-0089.

SEPTEMBER 13 – SKIPJACK BIKE TOUR

This first annual event, hosted by the Deal Island/

Chance Volunteer Fire Company, is a series of fully

supported road rides past beautiful marshlands, harbors

and wild bird sanctuaries. Rides begin and end at

the Deal Island Harbor. Rides, which run from 8 a.m.

to 3 p.m., include 15, 30 and 50 mile routes. From

Princess Anne, Md., go 14 miles west on Rt. 363, right

after bridge at harbor. Pre-registration is $30 before

Aug. 30. Register online at www.visitsomerset.com or

www.dealislandmaryland.com

SEPTEMBER 14 – SHE GOT BIKE!

A Festival of Women’s Cycling, She Got Bike was a

huge success last year. Held beginning at 8 a.m. at

Oregon Ridge Park in Cockeysville, Md., this is the

area’s largest women-only bike ride around – a full

day of fun and activities in celebration of women’s

cycling. You’ll ride Baltimore County’s scenic roads

and then enjoy a women’s-specific cycling expo, fashion

show, yoga class and a lecture on cycling training

and nutrition and more. The rides are for women

cyclists of all abilities and rides of varying lengths are

available. All rides are on mixed terrain – flat, rolling

and hilly – challenging, but fun and doable even for

beginners. Rides are for women; festival is open to all.

$22 (includes t-shirt, lunch, festival and complimentary

subscription to Lifestrength’s e-newsletter). Preregister

at www.active.com. For more information visit

www.SheGotBike.com.

SEPTEMBER 14-19 – SEPTEMBER ESCAPADE

A relaxed tour of central Indiana hosted by the state

park inns. This six-day tour will visit three state parks,

with two layover days that allow time for hiking,

browsing stores and art galleries, or more cycling.

Catered breakfasts and dinners are served in the inn

dining rooms. Bring a camera to capture the scenes

you’ll see along the way, from historic covered bridges

and barns to old stone carvings and unusual street

signs. For more information, see www.triri.org, email

triri@triri.org, or call (812) 333-8176.

SEPTEMBER 20 - AMISH 100

Enjoy the quiet rural charm of St. Mary’s and Charles

County. Steeped in history and culture, the Amish

area of Southern Maryland is laced with quiet country

roads made for cycling. Donations support the Three

Notch Trail. Preregister by Aug. 31, 2008 to receive a

T- Shirt. Ride day registration is from 7 - 10 a.m. Visit

www.paxvelo.com or email riderunrow@yahoo.com.

15 to 100 mile routes for all

ages and abilities. Join us again

this year or for the first time.

Register online at:

www.visitdover

.visitdover.com

.com

or call for a brochure. 800-233-5368

What has:

Over 3000 wheels

More than enough spandex

Hundreds of Amish pies

Over 1400 satisfied stomachs?

Sept. 6, 2008

8:00AM

“Surf & Turf”

Packages for the

w e e k e n d .

Cycling,

Kayaking

and Hotel Package.

Call us to reserve.

or third century along the scenic back roads of the

Northern Neck. Visit www.riverride.org for details and

to register online. For inquiries, call (757) 229-0507

or email info@riverride.org.

OCTOBER 17-19 – SHENANDOAH FALL FOLIAGE

FESTIVAL

Enjoy spectacular cycling in the beautiful Shenandoah

Valley of Virginia at this very popular 18th annual

event. Featuring all new routes on Saturday with rides

each day for all skill levels from easy family cycling

to a challenging century. Delicious food--Saturday

(lunch, afternoon apple dumpling social) Sunday

brunch. Saturday night dance. Sag support on every

route. Visit Grand Caverns (with discount on route),

and historic attractions in Staunton and the valley.

Family friendly and group discounts. Please check our

website www.shenandoahbike.org or call (540) 885-

2668, fax (540) 885-2669

RIDES IN OCEAN CITY

Looking to ride near Ocean City, Md., during your

visits to the beach? Join members of the Worcester

Wheelmen Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Rides

go 30-40 miles averaging 15-16 mph. Meet 8:30 in

the parking lot in front of Happy Harry’s on Manklin

Creek Road near the south gate of Ocean Pines. No

one gets left behind. For details call Dutch at (410)

208-1497.

WEDNESDAYS AT WAKEFIELD

June 25, July 2, 9, 16, all Wednesdays, are mountain

bike race evenings at Wakefield Park, along Braddock

Rd in Annandale, Va. Fun, fast, 1 hour races in the

evening. Great for new riders to try the sport, plus

classes for good competition for seasoned racers.

5:30 pm Junior race with 6 classes for 14 and under. 6

pm race for beginners, single speeds, 35+, 45+, 15-18

Juniors. 7 pm race for sport, expert, clydesdale. For

details, log onto www.potomacvelo.com or contact Jim

Carlson at jcarlsonida@yahoo.com.

LUTHERVILLE WEEKLY ROAD RIDES

Lutherville Bike Shop will lead two weekly road bike

rides. Both rides will leave from the shop at 5:30 p.m.

Proper riding attire required. Easier Ride: Monday

nights at 6:00 p.m. 14-16 mph. Approximately 30

miles. A scenic road ride through Loch Raven

Reservoir and surrounding areas. We keep the hills to

a minimum and invite all riders to the sport. Racers

recovering from the weekend are welcome as well.

We’ll ride as a group and no one will be left behind.

CALENDAR continued on p.30

Join our celebration in

Emmitsburg, Maryland

July 24 th – 27 th

for the 20 th anniversary of

Cycle Across Maryland

This is a unique opportunity to tour

western Maryland where the spectacular

Catoctin Mountains meet Maryland’s

pastoral rolling farms. Route distances

range from 15 to 100 miles.

MAJOR PARTNER:

SEPTEMBER 20 – CEDAR RIDGE RIDE FOR YOUTH

Includes a century and metric century bicycle ride.

Registration fees vary by ride, but include: lunch,

snack/drink stops, souvenir photos, “goody” bags and

dessert. For more information, visit www.cedarridge.

org or call (301) 582-0282 x122.

PARTNERS:

SEPTEMBER 26-28 - NORTHERN NECK RIVER RIDE

Virginia’s Northern Neck, “the Garden of Virginia,”

serves as the host for the Third Annual Northern

Neck RiverRide. Tour this special and unique peninsula,

located between the Rappahannock and

Potomac Rivers, with 700 cycling enthusiasts and

experience the heritage, culture and incomparable

scenery that this region has to offer. Celebrate

National Century Month with an English, metric, half

All registration fees support the advocacy work of One Less Car.

www.onelesscar.org/CAM/2008

July 2008

29


LASSIFIEDS

CALENDAR continued from p.29

Fast Ride: Tuesday nights at 5:30 p.m. 18+ mph

Approximately 40 miles A fast ride through Loch

Raven Reservoir and northern Baltimore county. This

is a hilly ride with sprint points to keep the heart rate

up and the competition fierce. The goal of this ride

is to ride fast and ride hard. Great for racers training

during the season. We will set a few designated wait

points. Call the shop for details (410) 583-8734. www.

luthervillebikeshop.com

THURSDAY EVENING FREDERICK RIDES

A 15-19 mph road ride out of Frederick Bike Doctor,

5732 Buckeystown Pike, just off Route 355. Meet every

Thursday at 5:30 p.m. for a 25 mile +/- ride. No one

will be dropped. Beginning May 1 the ride time will

change to 6 p.m. Rides cancelled if roads are wet, it

is raining, temps are below 40 degrees or winds are

20 mph or above. Contact (301) 620-8868 or log onto

www.battlefieldvelo.com for details.

DC CYCLING CHICKS

Women’s only bike rides for beginners or those interested

in casual rides. DC Cycling Chicks offers weekday

and weekend bike rides. Visit http://bike.meetup.

com/340 or contact Susan Schneider at (202) 403-

1148 for details.

COLUMBIA TUESDAY ROAD & IRONGIRL RIDES

Spirited Tuesday evening road rides, 25.5 miles (or 18

for Iron Girl Triathlon participants) from the parking

lot of Princeton Sports, 10730 Little Patuxent

Parkway, Columbia, Md. Ride is same as that used in the

Columbia Triathlon (25.5 mile) or IronGirl competition

(18 miles). Weather permitting. Call (410) 995-1894 or

email ttomczak@princetonsports.com for details.

WEDNESDAY NIGHT MT. BIKE RIDES AT LOCH RAVEN

Lutherville Bike Shop will lead a weekly mountain

bike ride every Wednesday evening at 6 p.m. from

the shop. The ride will leave from the shop and go

through Loch Raven Reservoir. Distance and speed

will vary based on rider skill level. Call the shop for

details (410) 583-8734. www.luthervillebikeshop.com

SPIRITED SUNDAY ROAD RIDES

Join the folks of the Bicycle Place, just off Rock Creek

Park, every Sunday morning (beginning at 8:30

a.m.) for a “spirited” 36-40 mile jaunt up to Potomac

and back. This is a true classic road ride that runs

year round. While the pace is kept up, no one is

left behind. No rainy day rides. The Bicycle Place

is located in the Rock Creek Shopping Center, 8313

Grubb Road (just off East-West Highway). Call (301)

588-6160 for details.

BALTIMORE SATURDAY RIDE

A fun but spirited group ride through Baltimore

County every Saturday morning at 9 a.m. Depending

on turnout there are usually 2-3 different groups of

varying abilities. When the weather doesn’t cooperate,

we will have the option to ride indoors. Call Hunt

Valley Bicycles at (410) 252-3103 for more information.

BIKES FOR THE WORLD - Collection Schedule

Bikes for the World collects repairable bicycles in the

United States, for donation to charities overseas, for

productive use by those in need of affordable transport.

Note: $10/bike donation suggested to defray

shipping to overseas charity partners. Receipt provided

for all material and cash donations. Bikes for the World

is xxx_Spokes.qxd a sponsored project 3/20/07 of the Washington 12:56 PM Page Area 1Bicyclist

Association, a 501 c 3 non-profit charity. Collections

HELP WANTED

THE BIKE LANE in Burke and Reston, Va., is now

hiring for full time mechanic, sales, and assistant management

positions. We are looking for enthusiastic self

motivated people who love cycling and enjoy working

with people. Experience is preferred. Excellent pay

and benefits. Please fill out an on line application at

www.thebikelane.com or email info@thebikelane.com

for more information.

BIKES FOR SALE

RARE MEN’S FREE SPIRIT – blue, 54cm, FS 12

road bike. Refurbished, cro-moly lugged steel frame.

Exceptional shape. Three front rings X 6 spds. $249. Call

Roelof (410) 208-1497.

CUSTOM MADE ROAD BIKE – Top quality components,

56 cm, 21-speed. Black with chrome trim. Frame-Raleigh

531 steel. New was $1,200. Asking $425 OBO. Contact Jeff

at (410) 526-4850.

PINARELLO – 54cm; aluminum frame; carbon fork,

seat stays; 10-speed Campy Record group; Eurus wheels;

beautiful pain; excellent condition. $2000 firm. Call (443)

506-5587.

WOMEN’S REFURBISHED MOTOBECANE - Leaf green

French, 52 cm. Original components. 2 chainrings x 5-

spd. Cro-moly frame. Very good shape. $199. Call Dutch

(410) 208-1497.

ROAD BIKE – Bianchi Eros, men’s 23 inch frame, 21

speeds, excellent condition, all original, early 1990’s

model. $225. Cash. (301) 797-1713.

RALEIGH RELIANT – men’s 3 chain rings X 5 spd, 54

cm, road bike. Made in England. Very good condition.

$199. Call Roelof (410) 208-1497.

MISCELLANEOUS

YAKIMA ROOF RACK – Carries two bikes with a special

rail to hold a tandem bike. For car without roof

rails. $200. (301) 371-5309.

$10.00

CLASSIFIEDS

FOR PRIVATE

PARTIES

Details: NO PHONE ORDERS. Ad listed in next

issue. Limit of 25 words. Add 50¢ per word over.

Print or type message, including classification.

Send to:

Spokes Classifieds

5911 Jefferson Boulevard

Frederick, MD 21703

Great Gear For Cyclists...

Dual Action

Knee Strap

Patented strap takes pain

relief from knee degeneration

and overuse syndromes to

a higher level. Provides

increased support and

stability. Sizes: Sm-XL

1-800-221-1601 • www.cho-pat.com

will take place rain or shine. For further info, visit www.

bikesfortheworld.org or call (703) 525-0931.

Bicycles may also be dropped off for Bikes for the

World during store hours at selected bicycle retailers:

Bikes of Vienna, 128-A Church Street, Vienna VA;

Bob’s Bike Shop, 19961 Fisher Avenue, Poolesville MD;

Race Pace, 8450 Baltimore Natl Pike, Normandy

Shopping Center, Ellicott City MD;

Pedal Pushers, 546 Baltimore & Annapolis Road,

Severna Park MD.

Please remember to leave a $10 donation (check

preferred, payable to “BfW”) with each bike; BfW will

mail you a receipt good for tax purposes.

30 July 2008


LASSIFIEDS

CALENDAR continued from p.29

Fast Ride: Tuesday nights at 5:30 p.m. 18+ mph

Approximately 40 miles A fast ride through Loch

Raven Reservoir and northern Baltimore county. This

is a hilly ride with sprint points to keep the heart rate

up and the competition fierce. The goal of this ride

is to ride fast and ride hard. Great for racers training

during the season. We will set a few designated wait

points. Call the shop for details (410) 583-8734. www.

luthervillebikeshop.com

THURSDAY EVENING FREDERICK RIDES

A 15-19 mph road ride out of Frederick Bike Doctor,

5732 Buckeystown Pike, just off Route 355. Meet every

Thursday at 5:30 p.m. for a 25 mile +/- ride. No one

will be dropped. Beginning May 1 the ride time will

change to 6 p.m. Rides cancelled if roads are wet, it

is raining, temps are below 40 degrees or winds are

20 mph or above. Contact (301) 620-8868 or log onto

www.battlefieldvelo.com for details.

DC CYCLING CHICKS

Women’s only bike rides for beginners or those interested

in casual rides. DC Cycling Chicks offers weekday

and weekend bike rides. Visit http://bike.meetup.

com/340 or contact Susan Schneider at (202) 403-

1148 for details.

COLUMBIA TUESDAY ROAD & IRONGIRL RIDES

Spirited Tuesday evening road rides, 25.5 miles (or 18

for Iron Girl Triathlon participants) from the parking

lot of Princeton Sports, 10730 Little Patuxent

Parkway, Columbia, Md. Ride is same as that used in the

Columbia Triathlon (25.5 mile) or IronGirl competition

(18 miles). Weather permitting. Call (410) 995-1894 or

email ttomczak@princetonsports.com for details.

WEDNESDAY NIGHT MT. BIKE RIDES AT LOCH RAVEN

Lutherville Bike Shop will lead a weekly mountain

bike ride every Wednesday evening at 6 p.m. from

the shop. The ride will leave from the shop and go

through Loch Raven Reservoir. Distance and speed

will vary based on rider skill level. Call the shop for

details (410) 583-8734. www.luthervillebikeshop.com

SPIRITED SUNDAY ROAD RIDES

Join the folks of the Bicycle Place, just off Rock Creek

Park, every Sunday morning (beginning at 8:30

a.m.) for a “spirited” 36-40 mile jaunt up to Potomac

and back. This is a true classic road ride that runs

year round. While the pace is kept up, no one is

left behind. No rainy day rides. The Bicycle Place

is located in the Rock Creek Shopping Center, 8313

Grubb Road (just off East-West Highway). Call (301)

588-6160 for details.

BALTIMORE SATURDAY RIDE

A fun but spirited group ride through Baltimore

County every Saturday morning at 9 a.m. Depending

on turnout there are usually 2-3 different groups of

varying abilities. When the weather doesn’t cooperate,

we will have the option to ride indoors. Call Hunt

Valley Bicycles at (410) 252-3103 for more information.

BIKES FOR THE WORLD - Collection Schedule

Bikes for the World collects repairable bicycles in the

United States, for donation to charities overseas, for

productive use by those in need of affordable transport.

Note: $10/bike donation suggested to defray

shipping to overseas charity partners. Receipt provided

for all material and cash donations. Bikes for the World

is xxx_Spokes.qxd a sponsored project 3/20/07 of the Washington 12:56 PM Page Area 1Bicyclist

Association, a 501 c 3 non-profit charity. Collections

HELP WANTED

THE BIKE LANE in Burke and Reston, Va., is now

hiring for full time mechanic, sales, and assistant management

positions. We are looking for enthusiastic self

motivated people who love cycling and enjoy working

with people. Experience is preferred. Excellent pay

and benefits. Please fill out an on line application at

www.thebikelane.com or email info@thebikelane.com

for more information.

BIKES FOR SALE

RARE MEN’S FREE SPIRIT – blue, 54cm, FS 12

road bike. Refurbished, cro-moly lugged steel frame.

Exceptional shape. Three front rings X 6 spds. $249. Call

Roelof (410) 208-1497.

CUSTOM MADE ROAD BIKE – Top quality components,

56 cm, 21-speed. Black with chrome trim. Frame-Raleigh

531 steel. New was $1,200. Asking $425 OBO. Contact Jeff

at (410) 526-4850.

PINARELLO – 54cm; aluminum frame; carbon fork,

seat stays; 10-speed Campy Record group; Eurus wheels;

beautiful pain; excellent condition. $2000 firm. Call (443)

506-5587.

WOMEN’S REFURBISHED MOTOBECANE - Leaf green

French, 52 cm. Original components. 2 chainrings x 5-

spd. Cro-moly frame. Very good shape. $199. Call Dutch

(410) 208-1497.

ROAD BIKE – Bianchi Eros, men’s 23 inch frame, 21

speeds, excellent condition, all original, early 1990’s

model. $225. Cash. (301) 797-1713.

RALEIGH RELIANT – men’s 3 chain rings X 5 spd, 54

cm, road bike. Made in England. Very good condition.

$199. Call Roelof (410) 208-1497.

MISCELLANEOUS

YAKIMA ROOF RACK – Carries two bikes with a special

rail to hold a tandem bike. For car without roof

rails. $200. (301) 371-5309.

$10.00

CLASSIFIEDS

FOR PRIVATE

PARTIES

Details: NO PHONE ORDERS. Ad listed in next

issue. Limit of 25 words. Add 50¢ per word over.

Print or type message, including classification.

Send to:

Spokes Classifieds

5911 Jefferson Boulevard

Frederick, MD 21703

Great Gear For Cyclists...

Dual Action

Knee Strap

Patented strap takes pain

relief from knee degeneration

and overuse syndromes to

a higher level. Provides

increased support and

stability. Sizes: Sm-XL

1-800-221-1601 • www.cho-pat.com

will take place rain or shine. For further info, visit www.

bikesfortheworld.org or call (703) 525-0931.

Bicycles may also be dropped off for Bikes for the

World during store hours at selected bicycle retailers:

Bikes of Vienna, 128-A Church Street, Vienna VA;

Bob’s Bike Shop, 19961 Fisher Avenue, Poolesville MD;

Race Pace, 8450 Baltimore Natl Pike, Normandy

Shopping Center, Ellicott City MD;

Pedal Pushers, 546 Baltimore & Annapolis Road,

Severna Park MD.

Please remember to leave a $10 donation (check

preferred, payable to “BfW”) with each bike; BfW will

mail you a receipt good for tax purposes.

30 July 2008

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