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ON

COVER

THE

Whatever your passion, keep cycling through the winter

months. Spring will soon be upon us. Photo: Mike Joos

TRYING TO SAVE A MINUTE OR TWO by incorporating

a minuscule training tip almost cost me my first triathlon.

And I learned my first major lesson: even the

smallest of adjustments should NEVER be made on

race day. Even if that means not pouring water over

your body when it’s burning up! But more on that in

a moment.

So without further delay, please allow me to boast: I

am a triathlete. Or at least I feel like one, having completed

the Nation’s Tri on the hottest day of the year

this past September.

To those of you who read this column regularly,

you may recall I failed miserably in attempting the

Columbia, Md., Tri earlier this year. Having never

swum in open water, never worn a wet suit before,

and never before having swum with thousands of athletes

around me, I freaked out, and after 20 minutes

of thrashing about in freezing cold water, I begged to

be pulled from the lake.

Totally immersing myself in planning and preparation

for my second attempt, I picked up a few tips

here and there. One minuscule tip sounded simple

enough, so I took it and began training without wearing

socks for either the bike ride or run. The idea was

to save a minute or more just by not having to dry my

feet and pull on socks. For two months I rode and ran

without socks, no problem.

RECUMBENT =

Comfort

PEOPLE ASK US

WHO RIDES RECUMBENTS?

We tell them avid cyclists

overcoming discomfort from a physical

condition, people coming back to cycling

for exercise who want more comfort,

and people that like to be different.

We welcome them all and try to help

them find the recumbent that

will get them out riding.

We’re fighting “oil addiction” with

human powered transportation.

Join the fight – park your car and

ride your bike.

The day of the Nation’s was into the 90s, with equally

high humidity. Organizer Chuck Brodsky had us old

guys (and gals) off last at about 8:40 a.m. This meant

my 10 k run wouldn’t begin until around 10:30. The

swim went well, and I didn’t freak out this time.

I hammered the bike, and at the bike/run transition,

I took a quick look at the socks I’d brought just in

case I felt a need to wear them. I left them off. But as

everyone who has ever done a competitive event ever

will tell you, DO NOT do something different on race

day than what you have trained for, no matter how

insignificant it may seem. I broke this rule.

The one thing I’d never done before but did on race

day was so stupidly simple, it embarrasses me to admit

it. I poured water over my head and body.

At the exit of the bike/run transition, two nice ladies

stood handing out paper cups of cool water. They

handed me two cups. Two cups? Why two? I watched

others around me drink one and pour the other over

their steaming head and shoulders. Aaaaha! I did the

same. Half a mile later I did it again at another stop.

By the time I reached the first mile mark, I could

hear a squishing sound from my running shoes.

They’d filled with water that had run down my body

into the shoes.

By mile one my heals were getting hot spots. By mile

marker two some half dollar sized blisters were forming

on my now soft skinned heels. By mile three my

heels were really burning. I refused to look down. By

mile four, yikes, I could screech. If it wasn’t for the

gravel and the scorching hot, sun-baked macadam I

would have taken the shoes off.

I ran/walked the slowest 10k I’ve ever run.

Regardless, with a cheering crowd lining the final 200

meters, I sprinted to the finish!

Lesson learned. Leaving socks off probably cost me 10

minutes or more. Next time (yes, you heard me correctly,

next time I enter a triathlon, which will be in

2009) I’ll be better prepared. And I’ll have nice dry

socks waiting for me. I can’t wait!

Happy trails,

Neil Sandler

Editor & Publisher

bikes@vienna, LLC

128A Church St, NW Vienna, VA 22180

703-938-8900

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throughout Maryland, Virginia, the District of Columbia, and parts

of Pennsylvania, Delaware and West Virginia.

Circulation: 30,000. Copyright© 2008 SPOKES.

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WINTER 08/09

EDITOR & PUBLISHER

Neil W. Sandler

CALENDAR EDITOR

Sonja P. Sandler

GRAPHIC DESIGN

Studio 22

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Winter 08/09

3


AT KELLEY ACRES,

SPEED IS KING...ERR QUEEN!

by NEIL SANDLER

On a cool windswept evening just after sunset two strong cyclists are working up a sweat pulling into and out

of each other’s draft. Eyes piercing straight ahead, they are among a group of eight riders all working through

the night to become stronger cyclists. But they are not looking at the road ahead. They are looking at a chart

projected on a wall inside a converted two car garage on the western Maryland property of Fred and Chris Kelley.

THE CHART SHOWS THE PROFILE of a 25 mile long

course, indicating where each rider is on the course

(riding up a hill or down), the amount of power

they are generating on their bikes (in terms of wattage),

their riding speed, plus a lot more information

including how far ahead or behind they are of the

other seven cyclists.

“There’s no doubt you become competitive and

look at the numbers for the other riders,” says Chris

Kelley, a former collegiate tennis player, and former

Maryland amateur tennis champion, who converted

to cycling over a decade ago, when she began dating

and eventually married former District 20 time trial

champion Fred Kelley, and became District 20 time

trial champion herself.

Fred, long a fixture on the local road racing scene

(for years with the National Capital Velo Club), is perhaps

most well known for being the brawn and brains

behind Alpine Cycles, one of the nation’s most well

respected custom road frames built in Rockville in the

1980s. Fred closed the business when a bad back prevented

him from continuing the grueling work.

The eight station CompuTrainer setup, built largely

by craftsman Fred Kelley, has become just the latest

in a development process that is making “Kelley Acres

Speed Shop” one of the mid-Atlantic’s centers of

cycling activity.

The first weekend of October this past fall, over 500

cyclocross fanatics descended on their former dairy

farm on the outskirts of Middletown, Maryland.

Welcoming cyclists to their part of the world is nothing

new to USA Cycling instructor Chris Kelley and

Fred. Over the past decade, hundreds of area roadies

and racing clubs have used Kelley Acres as the start

and finish for fun but punishing training rides in the

hills of the nearby Catoctin Mountains.

Although both are strong athletes in their own rights,

the two did not meet through sports. Chris, who

played collegiate tennis at Jacksonville University, got

to know Fred through their work as real estate agents.

Chris knew little about cycling, other than using a

cheapie bike to ride to tennis matches. Fred had been

one of the mid-Atlantic’s strongest road racers, but was

recuperating from another of his back surgeries, when

they met. Fred had closed Alpine Cycles in the late 1980s

(ironically just after earning a rave review in Bicycling

Magazine) because his back could no longer tolerate the

physical punishment of building bike frames.

By 1998, Fred was recuperating from another back

surgery. Chris, who Fred knew in local real estate

circles, invited him to a spin class. Neither had ever

done spin before.

Shortly afterwards, Fred tempted Chris to try cycling

“outdoors.” The day before her first group ride,

Fred pulled out one of his few remaining brand new

Alpine frames and built it up for Chris.

“It was still wrapped in bubble wrap,” Chris recalls.

“I quickly became addicted to wanting to go fast,” she

adds. She readily admits she has a competitive personality

and doesn’t enter any sport or business proposition

lightly.

But unlike Fred, who has a simple mantra when it

comes to training “ride hard and fast all the time,”

Chris came from a collegiate tennis environment that

was wrapped up in planning. “In college we had a

running coach, a weight coach and everything else

designed to keep us fit and motivated. Those years in

Florida taught me the value of creating and following

a plan, setting goals and adjusting the plan if things

don’t go as you planned, rather than just giving up.”

Chris says this background has successfully carried her

through life.

“We’re in real estate sales, so needless to say, these

days we’ve got time on our hands. But neither Fred or

I are the type to sit around.”

Since Fred’s bad back problems prevent him from

racing or riding bikes, a few years back he got into

autocross racing. He spends many weekends racing

at tracks around the mid-Atlantic. Now, he’s taken

his mechanical talents, that once created some of the

finest hand built bike frames in the country, to handcrafting

parts that make race cars go fast. And people

from all around seek his custom built racing parts.

Fred’s built a huge building at Kelley Acres to house

his growing car business.

But less than 100 yards away, Chris has her new playground.

The former, detached two car garage, has all the

facilities needed for training cyclists to become better.

On this particular Tuesday night, seven cyclists

and Chris set up their own bikes on the high tech

CompuTrainers designed to track their every move on

the bikes.

Since this is the first CompuTrainer ride for a number

of the riders, Chris urges them to warm up and “get

to know yourself a bit by looking at your numbers.

We’re coming up to your first hill and the hill will hit

each one of you a bit differently.”

Many of the riders pay most attention to the power

(measured in watts) they are generating. But Chris

explains that just because one rider produces more

wattage, that does not mean they necessarily are

riding fastest or hardest. Wattage is measured with

respect to a rider’s weight, so a heavy rider generally

produces more power than a lighter rider.

While most cyclists this night are experienced “spin

class” riders, with one a spin instructor, everyone

agrees this is more focused riding. A computer program

controls the resistance on the rollers the rear

wheels spin on, and a hill feels like a hill, and downhill

feels like going downhill. You cannot “cheat”

as on a spin bike. Riders who get near each other

can “draft” because the computer sees they are near

enough to benefit from that.

This night Chuck Kovalchick, 39, a Cat. 4 racer for

NCVC, and teammate Ray Trentini, 43, exchanged

pulls by drafting each other.

“Ray and I try to mix it up,” Kovalchick told SPOKES.

“This is a great way to keep in shape during the winter.

4 Winter 08/09


Normally, I just ride a stationary fluid trainer, but with

that you have to come up with your own workout. The

biggest difference here is being able to ride with other

riders. We all look at each others numbers (on the

projection screen) and that’s motivation enough.”

Trentini, who only began racing at 40 also uses a fluid

trainer at home, but likes the CompuTrainer sessions

much better. “You ride a course rather than try to create

a ride. Having a power meter (providing instantaneous

output) provides a good reference point. I

don’t find following my heart rate that reliable. I can

have a high heart reading if I’m tired and not riding

particularly hard. That’s not so with a power meter.

It measures what kind of power you are producing. I

rarely look at my speed because my goal is to produce

consistent power.

Vicki Bate, 50, a spin instructor who has done several

full length Ironman triathlons including the Florida

Ironman this past November, told SPOKES Chris

Kelley’s classes help her in ways spin cannot. “I’m

learning to determine my power cadence. With spin, I

was putting on too much resistence and riding a slower

less efficient cadence. I’m retraining my body to adapt

to riding at a higher cadence. Spin is a great workout

but the riding is not as real world as you’d think.”

Bate averaged 17.7 miles per hour in Florida, and

hopes to improve to 20 mph average through this

power training program, which she attends twice

a week. “I need a higher power output at a higher

cadence. In spin class you don’t maintain cadence for

long periods,” she explained. “In these classes, I learn

a lot by riding with stronger, better cyclists and I definitely

keep an eye on what they are doing.”

Bate hopes to qualify for next year’s national halfironman

championships in her hometown of

Oklahoma City.

Geoff Irwin, 43, who has returned to the triathlon

fold after leaving it 15 years ago, did nearly 10 tri’s in

2008. On this particular day, Irwin is out in front of

the other riders in Kelley’s class.

Since his bike training consists of three outdoor rides

a week with friends, or riding a Schwinn aerodyne

(the only indoor trainer he’s ever used) he hopes

Kelley’s classes help him focus his training.

“I like the variety with the hills, plus being able to

compete with the people you’re riding with. This does

a much better job of giving you a feel for riding hills

and drafting other riders than the aerodyne. It’s not

completely like riding outdoors, but it’s the closest

I’ve gotten to that.”

Irwin, who was competitive sprint-freestyle swimmer at

the University of Maryland in College Park, says in the

CompuTrainer class he stays with the stronger riders

on the flats then works to drop them in the hills.

Irwin’s goal for 2009 is to finish in the top 10 of his

age group at the Columbia Triathlon, do well at the

Chicago Triathlon and possibly complete his first full

length Ironman event later in the year.

Gregg Salsi, 43, a self-professed recreational cyclist

who rides several times a week with the Cumberland

Valley Cycling Club told SPOKES “I want to increase

my endurance and overall speed. I’m normally in the

middle of the pack and I hope that by next spring I’ll

be at or near the front of the pack. Even though his

workouts at Kelley Acres are only one hour long once

a week “you are always working, pedaling all the time

and you know you’re getting a quality workout.”

Salsi says this indoor workout is definitely more interesting

and challenging than riding his fluid trainer at home.

Chris Kelley, who currently races for HPC Cycling,

explained that one of the many benefits of the

CompuTrainer program is the ability to program

virtually any course from the legendary Alp d’Huez

mountain climb in the Tour de France to any local

course into the system. Teams can ride and train

together, for example, two four man time-trial team

can race against each other.

Chris emphasizes that she intends the classes, which

are held generally at night, to be for riders of all ability

levels. She recently held a class in which a husband

and wife road hybrids and the woman a strong recreational

rider would ring the handlebar bell on her

bike every time the group was about to ride hard. The

triathletes in the group got a huge laugh about that.

“She just wanted to do something that was harder

than spin class. She was definitely not intimidated,”

Chris recalled.

“This experience is about learning about a better way

to train. You can come in here with specific training

goals, or you can just get a great workout. Either way,

it’s a great way to share an indoor riding experience.

It’s more engaging for the riders. There’s more to

look at (than in spin classes) plus you get to ride your

own bike.”

Both Fred and Chis are real estate agents and know

that there is some downtime with today’s slow real

estate sales. “But we’re not the type to sit around and

mope. This downtime gave me time to do something

I’m very passionate about. When I got into racing

I didn’t find the coaching, particularly for women,

to be that great. And I come from a (tennis) background

that is built on strong coaching. That’s one

reason I got my (USA Cycling) coaching license in

2005. I wanted to get more involved in moving the

sport forward. I hope we help a lot of cyclists become

better at what they are passionate about. That seems

to be why they come to Kelley Acres.”

For more information log onto www.kelleyacres.net

Winter 08/09

5


COACH TROY SAYS

FOCUS ON STRENGTH & TECHNIQUE

Troy Jacobson, one of the mid-Atlantic’s leading proponents of

cycling and triathlon training (although Troy recently moved his

family to the warmer clime of Arizona says this is the time of

year to “shift to post season training.”

“You should be incorporating strength and technique work

into your program,” says Jacobson, who is the founder of the

extremely popular Spinerval training videos.

“Maintaining a moderate level of fitness is key as you don’t

want to have to start back from ground zero, but allowing for a

little bit of fitness decline (or deconditioning) is ok,” he says.

“Slow things down now and do lots of work in that aerobic

energy zone (Zone 2 or 10-15 heart beats per minute below

anerobic threshold). In the swim, don’t worry about cranking

out the yards but rather - focus on improving your glide and

reducing your strokes per length to improve efficiency. On the

run - work on your posture, focus on more of a mid-foot strike

and try to get your stride frequency up with ‘quick’ steps.

“On the bike - keep that cadence slightly higher than usual, in

the 90-100rpm range - thinking about pedaling fluid and fast

circles. Slowing things down at this time of year and focusing

on these technique details will greatly lend to boosting your

efficiency.

“For strength training,” Jacobson continues, “get to the health

club and enlist the help of a trainer who knows a thing or two

about working with endurance athletes. If you prefer to workout

at home, check out one of our strength training workout

DVDs.

“Remember - slow it down now and focus on your strength

and technique for greater efficiency. Laying the foundation of

technique and strength now will improve your speed at a lower

energy cost in 2009!”

Feel free to contact Coach Troy with comments or questions:

troy@coachtroy.com

Laurel Bicycle Center

We have always been focused

on trying to make your

cycling experience as

enjoyable as possible. Striving to provide

the highest quality of service plays a big

part in reaching that goal. Whether you ride

only a few times each year or cycle every

day, have a basic bike or the latest racing

machine, we make a point of treating every

cyclist as an important customer. We want

you to have fun riding! Regardless of what

and how much you ride, we are here to

help. We have a small but talented staff of

older and extremely experienced people,

dedicated to making your visit to our store a great one. They are truly

motivated to help people, and really care about you, not just how

much you spend. We know how to work on bikes old and new, and our

advice and guidance for purchasing a new bike is simply the best. We

are proud to have been here to serve this community for over 50 years,

and intend to be here for many more.

—The Sawtelle Family and staff of Laurel Bicycle Center

Laurel Bicycle Center

14805 Baltimore Ave.

US Rt.1 across from Laurel Mall

www.bicyclefun.com

301-953-1223/301-490-7744

Monday-Friday 10 am-7 pm

Saturday 9-6/Closed Sunday

6 Winter 08/09


SEA-TO-SEA TIMES 3

by NEIL SANDLER

“I AM spoiled,” admits 53-year-old electrical engineer/computer scientist Georgia Glashauser when pressed.

“Most cyclists dream of being able to ride their bikes across the United States once. I’ve done it three times

over a four year period (2002, 2003 and 2005) and I imagine I’ll do it again.” After that, she sat down and wrote

an enjoyable and informative book about her experiences, but more on that in a moment.

PERCEPTIONS CAN BE EVERYTHING. So after the terrorist

attacks of 2001, the Westminster, Md., resident

found herself asking “Why am I working so hard?”

The following summer, Glashauser, her cycling partner

and inspiration Susan Chapman (who has ridden

a bike in all 50 states) and 28 other cyclists from

around the U.S. did the 3,190 mile Disney to Disney

ride across the southern U.S.

A year later, after her employer unexpectedly closed

its engineering division and laid all its engineers off,

Glashauser again found solace on her bike.

“I sat with several co-workers at the Ruby Tuesday

restaurant near our office in Germantown, Md. It was

lunchtime, but mostly we all just had several drinks.

Consumption of alcohol, especially at lunchtime, was

not our normal model. We were totally unprepared

when we had been told to pack our personal belongings

and leave that day by noon.”

“I'D LIkE tO rIDE

mOrE

thIS yEar”

is one

resolution

we can help

you keep.

Schedule a tune up or personal bicycle fitting session!

MATT MCGOEY, OWNER & MICHAEL BRENNAN, SERVICE MANAGER

ALL AMERICAN

BICYCLE CENTER WWW.AABIKES.COM

SERVING CYCLISTS SINCE 1994

26039 Ridge Road (Route 27), Damascus, MD 20872

301-253-5800

VISIT OUR WEB SITE FOR MORE INFO

WWW.AABIKES.COM

STORE HOURS: Monday–Friday 10am-7pm

Saturday 10am-6pm & Closed Sunday

Emailing friends from home the next day, one friend,

who’d done the first cross country trip with her,

responded “Good for you! Now you can bicycle the

American Lung Association’s Big Ride.”

“I emailed back: ‘Chuckle, chuckle! No, I’m going

back to work.’” But too late. The seed was planted in

her mind, and Glashauser’s couldn’t stop thinking

about the great time she had a year earlier. Before

she knew it, she was raising money to do the ALA ride

that summer. This second crossing, 3,308 miles from

Seattle, Washington, to Washington, D.C., traversed

the northern states.

Two years later, another unexpected layoff from a

company closing down its assembly line, resulted in

what Glashauser calls “an act of defiance.”

“Fine,” she said angrily, “if they are going to lay me

off, I am going to bicycle across the United States

again. I will bicycle the central route!” This third

crossing, covering 3,850 was the toughest of the three.

After that ride, she set out to put her thoughts and

observations about all three rides on paper. The

resulting 220-page paperback, “Bicycle from Sea to

Shining Sea” was self-published in 2007 and is available

by logging onto www.bikeseatosea.com or emailing

her at georgia@bikeseatosea.com

_____________

When I began reading Glashauser’s book, I almost

closed the book after just its first page. She begins

by writing about being able to average 25 miles per

hour for a full century. I almost folded the book

closed. I can’t relate to that kind of a cyclist, and for

a winter read, I wanted something I could relate to.

Fortunately, I continued reading. And a few graphs

later, Glashauser confessed that this almost never happens,

unless she’s has a huge day-long tailwind or a

monster downhill that lasts forever.

Normally, she averages 11 miles per hour. Oh goodie,

she’s a normal person. I continue reading all the way

to the end.

The book is a fun read in a variety of ways. She writes

about the internal battles of undertaking these rides,

about tackling each of the three rides with totally different

types of bikes (a touring bike, a recumbent,

and her latest wheels a titanium racing bike (converted

to touring gearing).

8 Winter 08/09


“I am addicted to bicycling,” she begins. While she

admits to treasuring the handful of fast rides she has

done, “the truth is that without descents or strong tailwinds,

my riding abilities move me along at a pokey,

yet delightful, average pace of 11 mph.

A self described “average cyclist of average fitness,”

Glashauser entertains throughout her book. “I

always need to lose five to ten pounds,” she ponders.

“Perhaps if I did lose those pounds, the climbs would

be easier.”

During an interview, Glashauser admits that “cycling

all day for seven weeks is like playing. I don’t have

to be a responsible adult for this time. I don’t worry

about the roof that needs to be replaced on my house,

problems with my broken down car or anything other

than getting to the day’s appointed rest spot.”

Though she has though of attempting a cross country

ride solo, or with a small group, she realized because

of the large western distances away from civilization,

that option was out of the question, preferring the

company of an organized trip. “It’s safer, plus they

take care of all the details. But,” she cautions, “there

are different levels of care.”

Most days on all three crossings began early because

a typical day included 85 miles of riding on average.

Generally the riders tried to avoid mid-afternoon

heat. She also admits that “the gypsy life” of packing

all her belongings into a duffel bag and pushing on to

another destination became wearisome “even without

the extreme physical, bicycling demands.”

A few tips within her book:

On headwinds: gear down, spin and remain optimistic.

On rain: Pedaling in rain all day makes me think that

flowers must rejoice on those wet days.

On cold rain: With my senses enhanced and my body

invigorated with fresh air and vitality, the experience

of being wrapped in the vaporizing cloud formations

was a stirring, spiritual elation long remembered and

treasured.

On the first trip hosted by Tim Kneeland & Company,

the riders were truly pampered. “If we wanted a ride

to Wal Mart to buy toothpaste they’d take us. That

wasn’t true of the other two trips. But the other two

were fundraisers, and raising money to help was the

primary reason for the central and northern tours.”

Pampering was not part of the deal.

Each ride lasted seven weeks and each had about 30

riders. “That size gives you a chance to truly bond

with each other. You each faced the same obstacles,

the same wind, heat or rain every day.

Gourmet food, including an occasional personalized

birthday cake for anyone celebrating his or her birthday,

was a highlight of the southern crossing. Special

cakes were also presented for hitting the 1000, 2000

and 3000 mile marks. Glashauser doesn’t believe any

of the riders lost weight on this tour.

On this first tour, entertainment was very much a part

of weekly routines. They were serenaded by musicians

and even entertained at a “bloodless” cock fight

across the border in Mexico.

SEA continued on p.10

301.663.0007

Winter 08/09

9

Winter 08/09

9


SEA continued from p.9

Tim Kneeland is now offering tours through Four

Seasons Cycling Events (www.fourseasonscycling

events.com).

The second crossing was a fund raiser for the

American Lung Association, and as such involved

tenting and traveling as inexpensively as possible.

Each cyclist had to raise a minimum of $5,000 with

costs per rider at around $2,500. The 30 cyclists on

this trip netted over $180,000 for ALA.

The riders took turns on various chores on this ride.

Each cyclist, for example, had the responsibility two

times along the tour to get up at 4:30 a.m. to light the

propane burner to begin bringing the ten-gallon kettle

of water to a boil. No hardships on this ride, but

none of the extras to which Glashauser had become

accustomed. On occasion, teams of four or five would

take turns preparing the meals.

Overall, Glashauser really enjoyed this tour because of

the scenery, generally very good roads plus the good

feelings involved with raising money for a good cause.

Log onto www.cleanairadventures.org/big-ride or contact

the American Lung Association about this ride.

The third route would travel from San Francisco west

through the heartland of America, Nevada, Utah,

Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio,

Pennsylvania then north into New York, Vermont

before ending in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

This was much more of a challenge for Glashauser

with longer routes, fewer rest days and less comfortable

roads. The event began with 11 straight days of

riding long distances. Despite the challenges of the

longer harder days, America by Bicycles’s excellent

staff more than made up for the difficulties, going

beyond the call of duty on numerous occasions.

America by Bicycle’s web address is www.abbike.com

Asked to describe in a sentence each of the three

rides, she replies:

“Southern route: too hot. Mostly flat and easy riding.

West Texas was tough, nothing to see there but rocks

and scraggly brush and blacktop roads that are hard

to roll on.”

“Central route: long and grueling. The mountains

seemed higher.”

“Northern route – lots of wonderful things to see.”

Guess which was her favorite?

_____________

On her first cross country ride, she rode a recumbent

bike which worked wonderfully. However, she says:

“When I rode the recumbent in the slipstream (of

other cyclists) I was not acquiring as much draft assistance

as the upright cyclists.” She also tired of being

dropped on uphills and having to chase downhill.

On the second crossing, she rode on an upright traditional

road bike. She found that her years of yoga,

in which she learned to keep her back, torso, spine,

neck and head in a straight line, beneficial in using

her abdominal muscles to hold her torso.”

On her third crossing, she rode a full-titanium road

bike converted to touring mode. Converting this bike

to a triple chainring made all the difference and it is

her bike of preference for this type of riding.

Advice she gives to those considering such a tour:

“These cross-country rides are a trade-off between

time and money. Seven weeks is a long time to not be

bringing in a paycheck. Many think that they cannot

be away from their jobs for seven consecutive weeks.

Some think that they are irreplaceable. Others think

that the employer would not give them that much

time off even without pay. Maybe they are wrong.”

In addition to her three cross country tours, Glashauser

has done a variety of week long and multi-day tours

including rides in Michigan, Louisiana, a lighthouse

tour in Maine, Bicycling Across Georgia (Friend Susan

Chapman joking told anyone with earshot: “we’re riding

across you,” pointing to Georgia.), BonTon Roulet

in New York’s Finger Lakes region, and numerous

other rides in the mid-Atlantic and out west.

Glashauser says she normally averages 2,000 miles riding

a year (except for the year that include a 3,000

cross U.S. tour), mostly local tours and commuting

to her job as a software engineer for a company that

makes brakes for commuter railroad trains.

This winter, Glashauser is not planning a cross country

adventure for 2009. She expects to get into shape

commuting to work on her bike whenever possible,

doing a lot of hiking when it’s too cold, doing some

swimming and yoga.

As for her next cross country ride? “It will happen

again. But how can I plan for it?,” she told SPOKES. “As

you can see from what I’ve told you about my first three

crossings, they just seem to happen on their own!”

10 Winter 08/09


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COLUMNS

FAMILY CYCLING 101 by KEVIN BRUGMAN kbrugman@cox.net

Light Houses & Canals

“The Nova Scotia Light House Tour was great because

of all the small villages and great scenery, but I liked

the Erie Canal tour because of all the historical places

we got to visit.” That was Andrew’s review of the two

tours taken with his father over the past two years.

Earlier this year I wrote about families taking bike

tours from their homes. Other families like to go off

and see some of the sights in detail. Over the past two

summers Martin and Andrew Shaw have taken tours

of Nova Scotia and the Erie Canal as well as lots of

other East Coast rides.

Martin and Andrew have been riding together since

before Andrew started school. My first experience riding

with them was several years ago at the Baltimore

Bicycling Club’s Kent County Spring Fling. Martin was

distracting Andrew by calling out math equations and

Andrew was quickly answering them.

Two years ago they signed up with In Motion Events

to do the Light House Tower tour through Nova

Scotia. As a 12 year old, Andrew was eager to do his

first big tour. They had long enjoyed visiting Light

Houses and when they saw someone wearing a Light

House Tour t-shirt at The Great Peanut Rally in southern

Virginia they decided that was the trip for them.

The tour, hosted by “In Motion Events,” started in

Portland, Maine with a trip on the catamaran to

Yarmouth, Nova Scotia. From there they headed up

the Atlantic coast for three days visiting light houses,

stopping in scenic villages and viewing the fishing

fleets along the way. Each day they would start the

days off by packing up their camp site and taking

their luggage to the sag truck and then heading off

for breakfast.

The daily rides up the coast averaged about 60 miles

a day. One rider who was particularly focused solely

on finishing the daily ride quickly would playfully ask

Martin and Andrew whether they were there to ride

or take pictures when they would frequently stop for

photo opportunities at the light houses and churches.

But as the opening quote by Andrew shows, they were

more interested in seeing the sights than riding as fast

as they could.

Each night they would finish at a village park or high

school where they would pick up their luggage, set up

camp, take a shower. If they finished early enough,

Martin and Andrew would go over to the Camptel site

where Andrew would help the crew set up tents for

the folks that had chosen the option of having their

camp sites all set up for them.

The coastal terrain in Nova Scotia is nothing like the

coastal region along the Delaware/Maryland coast.

In Nova Scotia the coast is very rugged with steep

cliffs and lots of short steep ups and downs. During

the ride along the coast, Martin experienced a derailleur

malfunction that left him with only his high gear

in the front for a full day of riding along the coast.

Fortunately Martin was able to find a bike shop that

evening that had the parts he needed and had the

full range of gears for the rest of the tour.

On the fourth day they crossed over to the west coast

of Nova Scotia and started following the Bay of Fundy

coast south. The Bay of Fundy is known for its high

tides and whale watching. Unfortunately they were

not able to do any whale watching, but they did get

to see some of coast line where the 15 – 20 foot tides

occur twice daily.

After doing the Nova Scotia tour in 2007, they opted

to tour the Erie Canal hosted by Parks and Trails New

York this past summer. The Erie Canal Tour started

in Buffalo and ends 400 miles later in Albany. Along

the way, they went through four of the nine National

Park sites in upstate New York.

While the Nova Scotia trip was on fast paved roads

favoring road bikes, the Erie Canal tour was on dirt

and gravel requiring fat tires. The Nova Scotia trip

had wide open vistas with great scenery while much

of the Erie Canal was in more forested areas but had

many more historic stops.

Among the highlights of the historical sights for

Andrew were the homes of Amelia Jenks Bloomer in

Seneca and General Herkimer. Amelia Jenks was best

known for promoting the use of bloomers, freeing up

women from their restrictive clothing. Of probably

more historical interest is her introduction of suffragettes

Elizabeth Stanton and Susan B. Anthony to each

other. Gen Herkimer was a Revolutionary War Hero

whose descendents still lead tours of his home.

Although they had ridden by many of the locks as the

tour progressed, Andrew still had not seen any of the

locks in action. But then towards the end of the ride,

he was able to take a couple of barge roads. The first

was through a set of double locks where he was able

to experience the locks in action. Later on Andrew

was able to enjoy a barge pulled by mules. They

showed how they manipulated the ropes to allow two

barges to pass each other and they were going up

and down the canal and not get the mules or ropes

tangled up.

After they had started the Erie Canal tour, they met

up with many of the same staff that had supported

the Nova Scotia, Light House Tour. Al Hastings, one

of the tour leaders is both the Bike Tour Director for

Parks and Trails New York and one of the co-directors

of In Motion events. They also ran into many of

the same crew from the Camptel company setting up

campsites every night.

As they approached Utica, local police gave the

tour group an escort to the Saranac Brewery where

Andrew and Martin enjoyed some of the best root

beer they ever had. They were also introduced to

Saranac Brewery’s Orange Cream soda. The other riders

tasted some of the other brews that the Saranac

Brewery is know for.

Andrew really enjoys the slower pace on the bike

tours where he gets a chance to stop and see things or

talk to people. During the two tours he had a chance

to talk to a lot of the local folks along the route. In

Nova Scotia, the folks in the area had lots of different

jobs depending on the season. In the summer many

of them worked the fishing and tour boats while in

the winter they would become carpenters and other

land based jobs. The folks also shared their enthusiasm

about curling. Along the Erie Canal, he found

out how hard the economy had hit the areas over the

years. Where this area had once been a thriving manufacturing

area thanks to the canal, there were not a

lot of jobs and there had been a shift towards tourism

and the localities really welcomed the bikers.

Martin had been an active cyclist when he was younger

but then with all the distractions of a career and

raising a family, he had drifted out of bike riding until

a friend inviting him along on the Seagull Century in

Salisbury, Md. From that point on he has cycled regularly

first with his daughter and now with his son.

Andrew did the “The Great Peanut Tour” when he

was only five and then rode to the first rest stop on

the Seagull Century when he was 6. He made it to the

second rest stop when he was seven and finally completed

the Seagull Metric Century when he was eight.

In addition to the Erie Canal tour last year, Martin

and Andrew did the Tour du Cure raising over $1000

for cancer research as well as making the Kent County

Spring Fling a family affair with mom and sister riding

as well. While Andrew never gets tired of riding, he

really enjoys the social aspect of riding with others.

His favorite thing about riding is to see things.

2009 Rides

There are several family friendly rides in early 2009

that sellout early. The first is the Tour du Chesapeake.

The ride this year will be held May 15 -17 with the

main ride on Saturday and other activities being available

on the 15th and 17th. Registration should open

early 2009. For more information go to the Tour de

Chesapeake web site at “www.bikechesapeake.org”.

14 Winter 08/09


From previous year’s experience, nearby hotels are

scarce and fill up fast so make reservations early.

This is a friendly ride about 45 miles north of York, in

Mathews, Va. The routes travel across very quiet back

roads with lots of rest stops.

Two years ago on this ride, my sons and I noticed a lot

of folks with special t-shirts from “David’s Good Vibe

Ride”. David lives in the Northern Virginia area and

had recently been diagnosed with Burkitt’s lymphonia.

David’s family and friends determined that the

most important thing that David needed right now

was support. There were at least three generations

of family riding in support of David. This year while

doing the Between the Waters ride, we ran into some

of the riders that had supported David and found that

David was in full remission and doing well.

A favorite family ride for many families is the

Kent County Spring Fling hosted by the Baltimore

Bicycling Club in Chestertown, Md., over Memorial

Day weekend. Over the four days there are rides for

everyone from 10 to 100 miles daily. Besides the great

riding, there are great meals, evening dances and

activities for the children. Over the years, many of

the children have developed friendships where they

look forward to seeing each other once a year and are

always looking to expand the group.

In addition to the outstanding riding, there are

many activities downtown to keep people busy. On

Saturday there is the re-enactment of the May 1774

Chestertown Tea Party, on Sunday there is a raft

race with some very inventive rafts. Finishing up on

Monday morning is the traditional Memorial Day

parade. Registration should start in January and fre-

quently sells out by mid April. For more information

and registration forms go to the Baltimore Bicycle

Club web site at “www.baltobikeclub.org”.

These are just a couple of rides that are early next

year. The biggest thing is to just go out and enjoy

doing things with your family. Schedules tend to get

busy, so this winter is the time to start planning activities

with your family. As the financial advisors say,

pay yourself first. The same is for your schedule, get

their time in first because your children are not your

future, they are your now!

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Winter 08/09

15


COLUMNS

SINGLETRACK by JOEL GWADZ gwadzilla8@yahoo.com

Mountain Biking and the Winter

It is said that...

Painters... paint

Writers... write

So it would only make sense to say that mountain bikers...

mountain bike?

But what do mountain bikers do in the winter?

Bicycle Trainers or Rollers

Personally I would rather dress in a thousand layers

and ride outside than sit in my basement with my bike

on the trainer, but the bicycle trainer or rollers was a

recommendation of a number of riders I consulted.

Anna Kelso, who races road for HPC and mountain

for DCMTB, suggested that riding on the trainer can

Winter is rapidly approaching, and though a few

leaves still cling to forlorn branches here and there, it

will not be long before the last one has fallen and we

are in the thick of winter. With winter comes shorter

days that can often be brutally cold. So what are the

options for a mountain biker who is trying to stay

active and fit now in order to be healthy and strong at

the start of next year’s mountain bike season?

Bicycle Commuting

Bicycle commuting is a great way for a cyclist to make

themselves ride. my brother Marc Gwadz commutes

by bicycle year round from his Glover Park home in

Washington, D.C., to his place of work in Bethesda,

Md., using the Capital Crescent Trail. Marc admits

that sometimes the hardest part about working out in

general is finding the motivation to put on the gear.

Commuting by bicycle removes that barrier. It is just

part of his routine to suit up and throw his leg over

the bike. Motivated or not, we all feel better once we

are on the bike. Commuting takes away the excuses

because we all have to get to work.

Photo: Mike Joos

Photo: Joe Whitehair

SINGLETRACK continued on p.20

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18 Winter 08/09


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SINGLETRACK continued from p.18

be made more entertaining by turning the indoor

ride into a social bicycle-themed movie night. Anna

recommended scheduling a weekly gathering by issuing

an open invitation to an assortment of cycling

friends. This step creates a social obligation of sorts to

combat the tendency to slack off that everyone experiences

from time to time.

Mid-Atlantic Single Speeder Jonathan Wheaton recommended

the training DVDs from Spinervals or

Carmichael Training Systems to help the rider focus

on tempo and get a solid workout while also being

entertained. If it is not convenient to attend social

meetings, then combining movies with indoor training

could function like a book club. The act of loaning

and borrowing movies not only offers a better

selection of flicks to watch, but acts to reinforce the

idea of riding the trainer to make the cyclist more

accountable for his or her behavior.

For me, a few times on the trainer is usually all it takes

to inspire me to put on some long tights and maybe

even my snowboard pants and head outside for some

winter mountain biking.

Winter Trail Riding

It was Joe Whitehair, the “Single Speed Outlaw”, who

pointed out to me that winter is not the “off season”,

but really just another riding season.

Mike Klasmeier, a mountain-biking buddy of mine,

got right to the point before refusing to answer any

further questions, saying simply, “there’s no such

thing as bad weather, only bad clothing.” This seemed

to be a recurring theme in most of the responses. In

the interviews there were tech tips and gear recommendations—too

many to mention. But one constant

was the idea that riding through the winter is entirely

possible provided the cyclist dresses appropriately.

TANDEMS =

Sharing

WHY RIDE A TANDEM?

It’s sharing the fun and experience with

a partner, a child, a parent, or a friend.

Sharing exercise, sharing adventure,

sharing the joy of accomplishment, and

creating a shared memory.

We sell and rent tandems because we’ve

shared these things and found that bicycling

can be even more fun when it is shared.

We’re fighting “oil addiction” with

human powered transportation.

Join the fight – park your car and

ride your bike.

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Proper gear can mean the difference between having

a good time on the bike and refusing to ride again

until spring. The trails could be epic and your bike

could be righteous, but if you are overly distracted

because your toes are frozen or your fingers feel like

they‘ve fallen off, well, chances are good that you will

not want to make winter mountain biking part of your

routine.

Warm, windproof and waterproof gloves and shoes

are your tickets to consistent winter riding in all that

Mother Nature throws at you.

Really cold temperatures can offer many advantages

over mild conditions. The trails often get wet and stay

wet in the winter so things often improve when the

temperature drops below freezing. Sure, stream crossings

can be brutal on sub-freezing days. But remember:

cold temperatures increase the odds of getting a

good parking space at the trailhead!

During my discussions about winter trail riding with

this assortment of riders, I was reminded about the

importance of responsible trail-riding. After Jason

Stoner, the president of MORE (Mid-Atlantic Off-

Road Enthusiasts), enlisted my help in reminding

riders to join MORE or renew their memberships, he

pointed out that riders should be aware that some

trail networks are more resilient to bad weather

than others, and should make their riding decisions

accordingly. Single-speeder Jonathan Wheaton recommended

the trails at Gambrill State Park in Frederick,

Maryland, where nearly continuous rocky surfaces

mean an absence of muddy soil during the cold, wet

months. With the right clothing, very cold temperatures

often make frozen trails far more pleasant (and

durable) to ride on than during the warm days of

summer, when the ground is often soft and sloppy or

dry and dusty.

Photo: Steve Spearman

Night Riding

Get together with a group of cycling friends to talk

about how cool it is to night ride in the winter and,

perhaps after a few beers, you may see them spitting

in the palms of their hands to make a night-riding

pact. After the official secret handshake (optional, of

course), the deal is sealed, and you may find that you

have riding buddies for mid-week mountain bike rides

to get you through the cold, dark months of winter.

Joe Whitehair started a winter night ride of this fashion

seven years ago, saying that he owes its success to

the fact that beer is the perfect motivator.

Holiday Tradition

Start a tradition! It may not be possible to ride your

bike on every holiday during the cold season, but it

is a good goal to set. Being out of town on a holiday

provides the ideal opportunity to combine a family

visit with a nice ride on a trail whose joys you may not

otherwise get to experience often. Such rides may

take the form of the get-out-of-the-house New Year’s

Day afternoon ride or the gotta-burn-off-all-that turkey-and-mash-potatoes

jaunt the day after.

Mountain Bike Vacation

One of the greatest ways to stay in shape is to plan

a winter mountain-bike vacation. A planned trip to

Guatemala will cost a few bucks. This means that

when you meet up with some guides like the guys

from Old Towne Outfitters in Antigua you will want to

have some legs and lungs so that you can chase them

up and down the volcanoes of Guatemala. A goal

like this often acts to inspire a workout on those days

when you may not feel up to it, and promises to give

you mountain-bike memories to share at the campfire

with your cycling buddies for years to come.

Getting on a plane and going somewhere exotic is not

the only option. Drives southward to the Carolinas or

to Georgia can lead you to some excellent early spring

off-road riding.

Anna Kelso recommends heading down to Ashville,

North Carolina, or maybe dropping farther south for

some dirt riding in North Georgia.

Snow Riding

Photo: Joe Whitehair

Snow can also be a strong inspiration to get out on

the bike. Many people love the pleasure of mountain

biking in the snow. Riding in this frozen medium

presents an assortment of challenges. The smallest

hill can call out for the greatest effort and the slightest

obstacle may initiate an unexpected crash. Frozen

puddles are fun if the ice is thin and crusty rather

than thick and slick, because spinning on an ice rink

should not be done without studded tires. For some,

the winter offers an excuse to tinker and innovate.

The creative mountain biker may piece together a

frankenbike tailored for snow riding.

Chris Scott gave me detailed instructions for making

studded mountain bike tires with small screws and

duct tape and suggested wrapping an old inner tube

around the brake levers and taping it in place to keep

the chill off your fingers.

Cross-Training

Time off the bike can be healthy for the body. Using

the time that you would normally spend on the bike

to do a different sport allows the muscles used for

cycling to rest while other muscles are strengthened.

Yoga is a good winter athletic activity that strengthens

the body in ways that cycling does not.

Many people take up running or swimming in the

cold months. Personally I like to take advantage of

what the season has to offer and get in some snowboarding

and cross-country skiing.

Of all the great information I received from the many

people I interviewed, I think the best advice comes

from Becky Bafford of the Single Speed Outlaw

Factory Team (SSOFT) in Frederick, Md., who

stated, “As far as staying motivated...KEEP IT FUN!!!

ALWAYS!”

20 Winter 08/09


COMMUTER CONNECTION by RON CASSIE ron_cassie@yahoo.com

DEPARTMENTS

Bicycle Commuter Benefits

As part of House Bill 1424, the $700 billion Wall

Street bailout package that was passed in early

October and signed into law by President George W.

Bush, the Bicycle Commuter Benefits Act was included

in the final legislation deal.

Led by Congressman Earl Blumenauer (D-Or.),

employers will be allowed to provide bicycle commuters

with up to a $20 per month benefit beginning

in 2009. Under the new law, employers will be able

to reimburse employees – tax free –for reasonable

expenses related to their bike commute, including

equipment purchases, bike purchases, repairs, and

storage, if the bicycle is used as a significant contribution

of the commuter’s trip to work for the month.

“We are delighted that the bicycle commuter benefits

act has passed after a lengthy and persistent campaign

spearheaded by Congressman Blumenauer,” said

Andy Clarke, president of the League of American

Bicyclists. “Bicycle commuters will now be extended

similar benefits to people who take transit and drive

to work – it’s an equitable and sensible incentive to

encourage greater independence, improve air quality,

and health, and even tackle climate change.

This new plan must be incorporated into a company’s written

fringe benefit plan this year. Now’s the time to contact

your company’s benefits administrator and explain how

you’d like this benefit offered at your company.

League of American Bicyclists First State Rankings

The League of American Bicyclists (LAB) recently

announced their first annual ranking of bicyclefriendly

states, scoring all 50 states on more than 70

factors. According to their LAB website, the states

were scored on responses to a questionnaire evaluating

their commitment to bicycling and covering six

key areas: legislation, policies and planning, infrastructure,

education and encouragement, evaluation

and planning, and enforcement.

Four of the five states with the highest ranking were,

ironically, cold-weather states: 1) Washington; 2)

Wisconsin; 3) Arizona; 4) Oregon; and 5) Minnesota.

The bottom five states are also amongst the lowest

ranking states, traditionally, in terms of income and

education: 46) North Dakota; 47) Mississippi; 48)

Alabama; 49) Georgia; and 50) West Virginia.

In the Atlantic region, New Jersey ranked highest at

No. 9. North Carolina placed No. 13. Virginia came in

at No. 23, Delaware at No. 31, New York at No. 33, followed

by Maryland at No. 35 and Pennsylvania at No.

38. Washington, D.C. was not included in the survey, but

did recently receive a “bronze” ranking for their bicycle

education and engineering improvements in the city.

Virginia, with Arlington ranked as a “silver” city

and the University of Virginia college town of

Charlottesville recently earning a “bronze” distinction

from the LAB, got kudos for their U.S. numbered

routes that are signed and managed, but suitability

is not included in the state bike map. They also lost

points because there are no cycling-related questions

on the state’s automobile driving test.

The reason for Maryland’s below average ranking was

multi-fold according to survey. The state got credit for

having a signed and mapped route network, but, for

example, got knocked down because of their discriminatory

mandatory bike lane law, and the fact there

are no cell phone use restrictions for automobile drivers.

Other issues for Maryland included the lack of a

three-foot or greater passing law, no “complete streets”

or bicycle and pedestrian accommodation policy, no

mountain biking plan, no policy requiring bike parking

at state-owned facilities, no system in place to

determine the percentage of state highways that have

pave shoulders, no CO-2 reduction plan that includes

bicycle usage, no dedicated state funding source for

bicycling projects and programs, no questions regarding

the responsibilities of motorists towards cyclists

on the state automobile driving test, and no police

education program on the rights and responsibilities

of bicyclists.

New Jersey, scored well because it has a dedicated state

funding mechanism for bike projects, and a statewide

mountain biking plan. However, like Maryland, they

do not have a safe passing distance law.

“While every state has room to improve in making

bicycling a preferred mode of transportation and

accessible form of recreation, Washington is making

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the greatest strides to make this a reality,” LAB president

Clarke said. He points to Washington’s model

bike laws, signed and mapped statewide bike route,

dedicated funding from the state for bicycle related

programs and projects, and an active statewide bicycling

advisory committee as a few examples of why

Washington scored the top ranking.

On the other hand, while West Virginia may offer

some great trails and mountain biking opportunities,

they fall short in every other category, according to

the survey.

“Their low bicycle usage rates and high cyclist crash and

fatality rates are indicative of a state that does not adequately

provide for the needs of cyclists,” Clarke said.

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DEPARTMENTS

TRISPOKES by RON CASSIE ron_cassie@yahoo.com

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Nation’s, Brierman, World’s & Winter Stuff

Bill Schultz, a Bowie landscaper and former swimmer

at Florida State University, won the third Nation’s

Triathlon Sept. 14 on a hot and humid Indian summer

day that had already sent temperatures near 90

degrees by the time he crossed the finish line. He

joked afterwards about the heat, which nearly wore

him down over the last leg, and about bumping into a

competitor during the swim, which may have inspired

him early on.

Almost 2,500 athletes competed in the Olympic distance

(1.5 K swim, 40 K bike, 10 K run) event, albeit

only the second Nations’s Triathlon race that included

all three disciplines, but Schultz was dominant, winning

in 2:01:50, more than four minutes faster than

his closet competitor.

In fact, Schultz’ time included a two-minute penalty

assessed on the bike leg; otherwise he would’ve won

by more than six minutes.

Vinnie Monseau, 39, of Morgantown, W. Va., was the

second-place finisher overall, in 2:06:02, followed by

Charles Graf, who took third in 2:07:15. Kyle Hooker,

a Naval Academy senior from Burke, Va., finished

fourth in 2:08:06.

Twenty-five year old Megan Knepper, another

ex-collegiate swimmer, from Fairfax, Va. and the

University of Maryland, captured the women’s title in

2:17:37. She was followed by Heather Leiggi, 32, of

Philadelphia, in a time of 2:18:01. Rebecca Newton,

32, of Lexington Park, Md., was third overall in 2:18.

14. Last year’s female runner-up, Hilary Cairns, 37, of

Washington, D.C. took fifth in 2:21.16.

“You couldn’t have a better venue, race course or support,”

Schultz said. “The run was the toughest part,

with the sun beating down on you at the end. But it

was the same conditions for everyone, so I really can’t

complain.”

Schultz recounted, however, that he was briefly dismayed

earlier during the swim when he realized that

the competitor he was bumping into was a female

athlete. It was Knepper it turned out, a former All-

America, but Schultz said it made him that much

more determined to “get going” on the bike.

100 hundred yards from the finish line

“I was like ‘Oh my God’,” said Schultz, “when I saw I

was bumping into a girl during the swim. I felt good

enough, though, and put in a good pace on the bike.

I skidded into every one of those 180 degree turns

and never looked back.”

22 Winter 08/09


D.C. Mayor Adrian Fenty post-race

Knepper was actually second out of the water of the

men - and women, behind only Stuart Martens. She

was at least two minutes faster than the rest of her top

overall female competitors. She hung on to her lead

on the bike and run, and never relinquished her lead.

“If I don’t get out there in my strongest event, I’m

done,” she told SPOKES.

Of course, other than the top finishers on each side,

spectators and athletes alike kept their eyes searching

for the mayor of Washington D.C., Adrian Fenty.

Fenty is an avid triathlete and the mayor, just six weeks

removed from a bicycle accident, finished in 2:30.07.

“In fact, it’s healed,” said Fenty, who walked in a soft shoe

cast for several weeks while recovering. “No excuses.”

He joked that an assistant would be writing down the

names of everyone who beat him this year. Fenty finished

10th last, versus 168th overall this year.

“The crowd keeps you going,” said Fenty, who also

praised race founder Chuck Brodsky for creating and

organizing the event for the past three years.

Fenty added, “We’ve grown in two years from a couple

of hundred people at the start to several thousand

today. Triathlon in this region, Maryland, Virginia and

D.C. is booming.”

Brodsky told SPOKES he got the idea for the Nation’s

Tri while sitting in airport waiting to fly to Idaho to

participate in an Ironman competition there.

“Why should I have to travel halfway around the

country, or halfway around the world, to compete in

a world-class race,” Brodsky said. “Now, I’ve been able

to start a great event for the District and also start a

great business which is allowing us to do some great

things in the community with Achieve D.C.”

Registration for the 2009 event is already available online.

Brierman Triathlon

On a beautiful - and brutal - course at Greenbrier

State Park in Boonsboro, Md., former hockey player

A.J. Baucco, 22, of Cleveland Heights, Ohio, won the

longer of two punishing triathlon races staged Oct. 12

just off the Appalachian Trail. The “Half-Lite” event

(so named because the distances are slightly shorter

than a regular Half-Iron man race), included an 0.85-

mile lake swim, mountainous 40-mile bike ride, and

extremely hilly 9.3 mile run, which Baucci won in

3:30.19.

Suzy McCulloch, 28, of Ellicott City, a former junior

U.S. triathlon national team member, won the women’s

side of the Half-Lite, posting a time of 4:06.12.

“This race just fit perfectly in the calendar,” said

McCulloch, a Howard County middle school physical

education teacher who was preparing for Ironman

Florida No.1 with her boyfriend Danny Serpico.

“The weather is a little risky this time of year, but a

triathlon is always risky,” Serpico told SPOKES. “She

would’ve done better, but she was looking back for

me on the run, wondering if I was going to make it.”

Michael Hamberger, 29, of Washington, D.C., and

Kevin Kendro, 29, of New Market, were the top local

finishers on the men’s side of the Half-Lite, taking

third and fourth, respectively.

Forty-one-year old Kent Buckner of Rehoboth Beach

won the sprint-distance race in 1:55.50. Even the

shorter 0.45-mile lake swim, up-and-down 21-mile bike

ride, and a steep 4.9-mile run – significantly longer

final leg than most sprints was a challenging battle

given the terrain.

“Anybody who did this course is tough in my book,”

said Baucco, who came to the race to prepare for the

Half-Ironman World Championships in Clearwater,

Fla. early next month.

Frederick’s Michele Trdina won the Brierman

Triathlon women’s sprint race, with her husband

– and cycling coach – Brian Trdina, taking second in

his first-ever triathlon on the men’s side of the sprint.

Trdina, a 38-year-old mother of three, completed

the sprint in 2:07.19, two and a half minutes faster

than her next closet female challenger. She took

eighth overall, including the men’s results. A former

high school basketball player while growing up in

Lancaster Pa., it was her fourth sprint triathlon win

this season.

Brian Trdina, also 38, took second in the men’s sprint

behind Buckner after posting the best bike split in the

race, finishing the 21-mile Alps-like cycling course in

1:01.07.

The Brierman Triathlon at Greenbrier State Park was

a new event this season and the last of the 11 Piranha

Sports-series triathlons this year. Nearly every competitor

interviewed afterwards had words of praise for

Piranha’s organization of both events.

Race director Eric Conrad called it the most difficult

sprint course in the Piranha Sports-series, noting that


pic: precaliber 24



athletes from 13 states had registered for the opportunity

to tackle the event.

Tri Camps for Women

Triathlete, author, and coach David Glover is working

with triathlon coach Krista Schultz of Total

Performance, Inc. and offering two new triathlon

camps for women next spring. The She Does Tri

weekend camps will cover all aspects of triathlon with

both instruction and practice in order to prepare participants

for their first sprint-distance triathlon. The

camps are a non-competitive, welcoming environment

that will address the specific needs of women for

training, nutrition, equipment and racing.

The two camps, based at the Hampton Inn Warrenton

in Warrenton, Va., are scheduled for March 20-22,

2009 and April 24-26, 2009. Attendance is limited to

20 women, reservations are now being accepted. For

more information, visit www.shedoestri. com. David

Glover can be contacted at www.endurnaceworks.net.

Krista Schultz www.totalperformanceinc.net

Baltimore Indoor Triathlon

The Tri To Help triathlon will be hosted at Brick

Bodies Reisterstown Health Club and Merritt Athletic

Club Towson to raise money for epilepsy research at

the Johns Hopkins Pediatric Epilepsy Center. This

event, presented by the Stroup Kids For Kids Epilepsy

Foundation, is scheduled for Sat., Feb. 21, at 8 a.m. at

two locations: Brick Bodies Reisterstown Health Club

and the Merritt Athletic Clubs Towson. Online registration

closes Feb. 19. For more information: www.

tritohelp.org


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Winter 08/09

23


DEPARTMENTS

BMX MID-ATLANTIC by BRIAN CARON coolbmx2c4me@aol.com

A Little Different Kind of BMX Racing

The sun came up on a brisk fall morning just north

of Baltimore and shed its light on the purpose

built venue for the annual Hereford Fall Festival’s

Biketober Jam. I arrived shortly after that not knowing

what to expect as I was directed into a farm field

just off of Interstate-83 North. I tried to navigate my

lowered sports car through a recently harvested corn

field in search of a parking place and a peek at the

venue that I had heard about earlier in the week

from the race promoter Mike Hartlove. He represents

Racer’s Edge, a group that promotes a series of

Downhill Mountain Bike and Dual Slalom races in the

Mid-Atlantic area. Most of the races are held at WISP

Ski Resort so the courses there are pretty much laid

out year round. This race was going to be different

because nobody would have the home-field advantage

as it was constructed solely for this weekend’s event.

This dual-slalom event tends to attract a cross-section

of riders from different riding disciplines, including

cross-country MTB, Downhill MTB, BMX racers and

Dirt Jumpers on all sizes of bikes. (Since my column

focuses on BMX, and I’m limited on space, I’ve limited

coverage of the race to just the smaller wheeled

classes.) Mike’s family has some BMX racing roots

so he really advertised to the region’s BMX community

and even included separate classes for 20/24”

Wheeled BMX bikes!

His recently rekindled enthusiasm for BMX racing

aided in his design cues and layout of the track. The

course, carved into an adjacent hillside consisted of

a six straight-away, five turn track. Being intended for

just two racers at a time, the first two corners of the

Two-year-old Colin Mulally

track are divided into two lanes and merge soon after

where racers go head to head through the last half of

the tack.

The technically challenging track had a host of

jumps, bumps and berms that tested the skills of even

the best bike handlers, with varying height step-ups,

step downs, and tabletop jumps.

The event was open to any rider of any age and the

track was built with that in mind, so you didn’t need

to be a crazy down hiller to navigate it. In fact, almost

20 kids that raced were under the age of 13, and half

of those were under 9 years old! The crowd favorite

of the day being 2 year old Colin Mulally who made

his way down the course on a pedal-less sidewalk bike

with a little help from his father and brother to get up

some of the jumps. He had to be one of the bravest

riders of the day mostly due to his size, his age and

the fact that his bike didn’t have ANY brakes!

A total of 75 riders signed up and were divided into

classes by age/proficiency and bike size. Hat’s off

to Mike and the rest of his Racers Edge staff who

really put on a top-notch event. A special thanks to

Nick at www.nicholasdmack.com for capturing some

great photos and submitting them for my article. I’d

encourage any BMX racers to give the dual-slalom

thing a try. Heck, it’s better than having to race 7

other people on the same track if nothing else! Check

out www.racersedgeonline.com for additional pictures

and race coverage and get geared up to give it a try

when they set the schedule of events up for ‘09!

Wrapping Up the 2008 Season and Looking

Forward to 2009

Maryland’s ABA State Champs

24 Winter 08/09


2008 was a banner year for BMX in general as it

marked the first time in history that it was included as

an International Olympic sport in Beijing.

Cumberland, Md.’s Riverside BMX had a busy Fall

Season including hosting the NBL Maryland State

Finals on Oct 4th with over 70 riders in attendance.

With memberships up and new riders each week,

Riverside is hoping to send more than a few Maryland

riders to the President’s Cup Invitational Race being

held on December 27th in Lexington, Va.

As their 2008 grand finale, Riverside BMX hosted

their annual end-of-season Halloween Rick Kaylor

Memorial Bonfire Race on Saturday November 1. The

actual race is a mere formality as the night is more

like a family party picnic including a pumpkin carving

contest, pumpkin based baked goods contest, Trick-or-

Treat bags of goodies for the kids, the huge bonfire...

oh yeah, there’s a BMX race thrown in there too.

“The weather was unseasonably warm and dry so the

turn-out was great,” said Russ Keller who is the track’s

director and also a racer.

As the 2008 season draws to a close, plans are

already in the works for 2009. The big news is that

this Cumberland track will be hosting a Northeast

Regional Race on May 16-17. This will mark only the

second Regional race ever held at the track. For additional

info on their upcoming race season see www.

riversidebmx.org

Speaking of big races, Severn, Md.’s Chesapeake BMX

hosted the ABA Maryland State Championship on

September 26-28 with over 50 racers of all ages now

sporting their State number plates! Their track has

come a long way in a short amount of time including

the addition of asphalt berms for 2008 as well as hosting

their first National Race this past summer. They’ve

already begun working on a track redesign for the ‘09

season including additional drainage improvements

so they can have the track open as much as possible

which will help to recruit new riders to the sport of

BMX. www.chesapeakebmx.com

Richmond BMX hosted the NBL’s Virginia State

Finals on Oct 18th against all odds as the rain showers

they received the night before almost forced them

to reschedule. Due to the persistence and help of a

group of volunteers, not to mention a LOT of labor,

a few four wheelers, Speedy-Dri, and whatever else it

took, they were able to hold the race with only minor

delays. Also on tap for the day was the VABMX.com

Pro-Am race with a $600 cash payout for first place!

Definitely a roller coaster weekend with a successful

ending to a great 2008 season for the NBL Virginia

State Series! www.richmondbmx.com

First State BMX in Milford, Del., caters to those who

love BMX racing by holding over 50 local and State

races during 2008. This ABA affiliate holds races

on Tuesday and Saturdays during the peak summer

season and has races scheduled all the way through

December 13th! It may be worth the trip to keep in

shape as BMX racing in the Mid-Atlantic gets pretty

scarce from November through March. Also keep in

touch with them as the 2009 schedule is posted up at

www.firststatebmx.com

The members of Hagerstown BMX recently participated

in the largest and longest continuously held

night-time parade on the entire East Coast. It’s always

the last track organized event for the season and the

kids always look forward to it. The 2008 Mummer’s

Parade marks the second year that the members, riders,

friends and family of Hagerstown BMX organized

and built a float for all of the local riders to show

their BMX spirit and dedication to the new Olympic

sport of BMX racing! The track will celebrate its 10th

Anniversary during the 2009 season and plans are in

the works for a much needed “make-over” when race

time rolls around in the spring. Check ‘em out at

www.hagerstownbmx.com

Chad Harner rounds a turn during practice

Speaking of parades, The Hampton Supertrack will be

participating in the Hampton Holly Days on Saturday

December 13th. The Hampton track had a great

2008 season with their local Accel Racing/Powers

Bike Shop team making a great showing both locally

and Nationally. In fact, local rider and team member

Andrew Townsend made the cover of the latest issue

of BMX Today. The East Coast is representin’ this

year! Hampton is finishing up their season with two

double-headers on November 16th and 22nd. Stay up

to date on www.hamptonsupertrack.com

Woodbridge, Virginia’s NOVA BMX, like other

tracks in the area had to try to extend the season

into November in order to make up for some races

that were cancelled earlier in the season. Local rider

Nigel “Hoppy” Hopkinson warmed it up at a recent

National race in Woodward PA, and ended up gracing

the pages of the NBL’s BMX Today magazine aboard

his cruiser. Nigel and the rest of the Groove Merchant

Team also did a few race clinics at some area tracks

during the latter part of 2008. Look for them to host

even more Pro-Clinics at tracks throughout the Mid-

Atlantic next year. www.novabmx.org

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS

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JANUARY 1 – BBC NEW YEAR’S DAY RIDE

Celebrate the New Year with a moderate hilly ride to

Hampstead Jiffy Mart. Riders of all ability levels, begin at

10:30 a.m., ride about 33 miles from Oregon Ridge Park.

For details contact Gloria Epstein at (410) 665-3012.

JANUARY 10 – PPTC ANNUAL MEETING

The popular annual meeting of the nation’s largest

bicycle club, the Potomac Pedalers Touring Club

(PPTC) will be held at the River Road Unitarian

Church, 6301 River Road, Bethesda, Md. It’s mostly a

social event, with a pot luck lunch, awards, elections

and more eating. For details log onto www.bikepptc.

org or call (202) 363-8687.

JANUARY 17 – CRABS POTLUCK

The Baltimore Bicycling Club’s tandem group

(Couples Riding A Bike Simultaneously) will hold

its annual potluck dinner at 4:30 p.m. at Ascension

WHEEL

NUTS

Lutheran Church in Towson. Be prepared to boast

of your tandem adventures to the group, and learn

of the 2008 ride schedule. New members always welcome.

Contact Peggy or Tom Dymond at (410) 272-

9139 or email tedymond@comcast.net.

FEBRUARY 4 – MARYLAND BIKE/PED SYMPOSIUM

Maryland’s One Less Car, a statewide bicycling and

pedestrian advocacy non-profit, will sponsor the 12th

Annual Maryland Bicycle and Pedestrian Symposium,

from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. in the President’s

Conference Center at the Miller Senate Office

Building in Annapolis. The Symposium is an opportunity

to meet and hear from elected state and local

officials, planners, community leaders as well as other

bicycle and pedestrian advocates who want more bike

lanes, wider sidewalks, better trails, and a statewide

Complete Streets policy. The Symposium is free and

open to the public and a registration link can be

found at www.onelesscar.org. Organizations and business

who’d like to exhibit at the Symposium are asked

BIKESHOP

Old Town Alexandria's #1 bike shop,

specializing in the family experience!

703-548-5116

302 Montgomery Street, Alexandria, VA 22314

to e-mail executive director Richard Chambers at

rchambers@onelesscar.org.

FEBRUARY 8 – STOP, SWAP & SAVE MD

This 12th annual bicycle swap meet will take place

from 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. (snow date February 15th) at the

Carroll County Agricultural Center in Westminster,

Md. Featuring over 300 vendors. Road, mountain,

BMX, tri or vintage, there is something for everyone.

Admission is $5. All buildings are heated and breakfast

and lunch are available. For details visit

www.stopswapandsave.com

MARCH 1 – STOP, SWAP & SAVE VA

This first Virginia event from the folks who for the

past 11 years have put on the swap in Westminster,

Md., will be held in Chesterfield, Va., from 9 a.m. – 2

p.m. (snow date March 8th). Vendors will sell road,

mountain, BMX, tri or vintage, there is something for

everyone. Admission is $5. All buildings are heated

and breakfast and lunch are available. For details visit

www.stopswapandsave.com

MARCH 10-12 – NATIONAL BIKE SUMMIT

The League of American Bicyclists and leaders of the

nation’s cycling community will meet with members

of the Congressional Bike Caucus, host workshops

and speeches, and honor several member of Congress

for their efforts to make America more bicycle friendly.

For details log onto www.bikeleague.org or call

(202) 822-1333.

26 Winter 08/09

NEW BIKES NEED STUFF!

with this coupon

Buy any adult bike and get a $50 Wheel Nuts Gift Card!

Offer valid thru January 31, 2009

KIDS' BIKES NEED STUFF!

with this coupon

Buy any kids bike and get a $25 Wheel Nuts Gift Card!

Offer valid thru January 31, 2009

SAVE $20

with this coupon

Take $20 off our Precision Tune Up Package (Reg. $85, Now $65).

Offer valid thru January 31, 2009

View our lines:

www.jamisbikes.com and www.diamondback.com

SALES


REPAIRS


RENTALS

Monday-Friday 11am - 7pm

Saturday 9am - 6pm

Sunday 10am - 5pm

APRIL 16-19 – ST. MICHAELS SINGLE &

TANDEMS WEEKEND

Members of the Potomac Pedalers Touring Club

and tandemists who attend the Eastern Tandem

Rally will join forces for this Eastern Shore weekend.

Lodging will be both at the Best Western Motor Inn

and nearby camping facilities. Four days of riding: no

hills, sparse traffic, wide shoulders, many roads near

the water. If you would like to rent a tandem, you can

contact Mt Airy Bicycles (Maryland) at 301-831-5151

or Tandems East (New Jersey) at 856-451-5104. To

register for the event contact Ed and Cindy Brandt

ed.b.brandt@gmail.com (301) 657-4657 or Bob and

Willa Friedman at bob-f@cox.net or (703) 978-7937.

APRIL 17-19 – SPRING TUNE-UP

All cyclists and their families are invited to join this

15th annual weekend ride held in Madison, Ga.,

hosted by BRAG (Bicycle Ride Across Georgia). Flat

to gently rolling hills. This is a fun time for the whole

family and a great time to get in shape for BRAG!

Various ride options available daily as well as daily

rates for those who cannot ride all weekend. Plenty

of food, music and entertainment. For more info visit

www.brag.org or email info@brag.org or call (770)

498-5153.


APRIL 25 – 5th ANNUAL TOUR DE CARROLL

Check out the scenery of Carroll County, Md., and

get those winter-lazy legs in shape for the summer.

Ride the 5th Annual Tour de Carroll and enjoy the

beauty and great rides that the county has to offer. All

proceeds benefit West End Adult Day Care Services,

Carroll County’s only private, non-profit service for

low income seniors. There are four rides for all skill

levels ranging from a full metric (63 miles) 36 miles

spring classic, 25 mile recreational ride, and 8 mile

family fun ride. Check out this event and register at

active.com. Call (410) 840-8381 for details.

NIGHT RIDES AT GAMBRILL

The Bicycle Escape, in conjunction the Mid-Atlantic

Off Road Enthusiasts (MORE), is hosting night mountain

bike rides at Gambrill State Park on the 1st and

3rd Wednesday of each month through the winter.

The rides begin at 7 p.m. Because Gambrill offers

some of the most technical terrain in the region these

rides are for experienced mountain bikers only. It is

also necessary to have a high quality lighting system.

Due to the extreme popularity of these rides and

the group’s agreement with Maryland’s Department

of Natural Resources riders must register to attend.

More information and registration is available at www.

thebicycleescape.com or call (301) 663-0007.

LASSIFIEDS

BIKE SHOP continued from p.29

“We practice what we preach, it’s not just talk.”

Scott began riding his first “two-wheeler” when he

was about five and has been riding ever since. His

first bike was a banana-seat Schwinn. After getting a

degree in outdoor recreation from Southern Illinois

University, he worked for The Biking Expedition

in New Hampshire, taking children on two- and

three-week biking tours through locales in Utah and

Colorado.

From 1992 to 1998, Scott was service manager at the

REI store in Bailey’s Crossroads in Northern Virginia.

He returned to Chicago and managed two bike

shops there for four years while his wife earned a law

degree. Returning to Northern Virginia, he became

assistant manager at REI. That’s where he met Jody.

Jody began serious bike riding when she was 14 and

got her first job and had to commute by bike. She

worked for 17 years in sports marketing including

nine years on behalf of FedEx at FedEx field.

Shortly after moving to the Washington area, Jody

walked into REI to buy a mountain bike and Scott was

the salesman. Within three months, Jody was doing

mountain bike racing and multi-day adventure racing.

She also began working part-time with Scott at REI.

“We just hit it off and became very good friends,” she said.

While at REI, the two would talk about the bicycle

retail industry and “what we would do differently and

better if we owned our own bike shop.” They talked

about it so much, that Scott’s wife finally told them

they ought to just do it. In April, 2006, Scott quit REI

and began making the Conte’s store dream a reality.

Jody held on to her sports marketing job until this

past April.

Conte’s of Arlington opened in December 2006 and

has been steadily expanding. A year after it opened,

the store adjacent to the bike shop became vacant. The

landlord explored the possibility of leasing to a pet

shop or a dry cleaner. Instead, Scott and Jody leased

the empty store and subleased it to a running store

whose clientele are similar to those of the bike shop.

At the end of 2008, the two owners expect to open

their second Conte’s, this one in Bethesda at Old

Georgetown Road and Woodmont. There are 10

Conte’s stores on the East Coast, but the closest other

one is in Richmond.

Conte’s Bicycles and Fitness Equipment

3924 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, Va.

703-248-9600

www.contebikes.com/goto/Arlington

Open Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.,

Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday 1 p.m. to 6 p.m.

EDITOR’S NOTE:

A good independent bicycle shop still remains one of the

treasured resources of bicycling–among the best places

to learn about places to ride, meet locals to ride with, and

learn about new products. Oh, and they also do a super

job fixing the bike stuff you break. “My Bike Shop” is a

regular feature of SPOKES in which we give you a look into

a local shop and the folks behind it.

MISCELLANEOUS

YAKIMA ROOF RACK – Carries two bikes with a special

rail to hold a tandem bike. For car without roof

rails. $200. (301) 371-5309.

BIKES FOR SALE

LIKE LANCE’s – 58 cm, Trek Madone, 5.9SL, full Dura

Ace, Project One custom paint, full carbon frame & fork.

Complete with Race X Lite carbon bars, carbon seatpost,

new Race X Lite wheels, and upgraded Dura Ace triple

chainring. Less than half of new. Asking $2,200. Call

(301) 371-5309.

PINARELLO – 54cm; aluminum frame; carbon fork,

seat stays; 10-speed Campy Record group; Eurus wheels;

beautiful pain; excellent condition. $2000 firm. Call (443)

506-5587.

WOMEN’S REFURBISHED MOTOBECANE - Leaf green

French, 52 cm. Original components. 2 chainrings x 5-

spd. Cro-moly frame. Very good shape. $199. Call Dutch

(410) 208-1497.

RALEIGH RELIANT – men’s 3 chain rings X 5 spd, 54

cm, road bike. Made in England. Very good condition.

$199. Call Roelof (410) 208-1497.

$10.00

CLASSIFIEDS

FOR PRIVATE

PARTIES

Details: NO PHONE ORDERS. Ad listed in next

issue. Limit of 25 words. Add 50¢ per word over.

Print or type message, including classification.

Send to:

Spokes Classifieds

5911 Jefferson Boulevard

Frederick, MD 21703

5th ANNUAL

TOUR DE CARROLL

Save the date: APRIL 25, 2009

Get those bikes and

cycling legs in shape

& enjoy the beautiful

Carroll County countryside!!

Show and Go – 8am to 11am

Lunch (included) – 11:30am to 1:30pm

Bike Route Options:

Bike Route Options:

63 mile High Tech Metric Century

36 mile Spring Classic

25 mile Recreational Ride

8 mile Family Fun Ride

Radio sag and sweep on all routes until 12 noon.

Rest stops, maps, cue sheets.

Plenty of free parking and nearby motels.

Easy location at Dutterer’s Park in Westminster, MD

(just off Rt.140; 25 miles W of Baltimore, 20 miles E of Frederick).

$30.00 Registration includes:

Lunch

T-shirt

30 day pass to Westminster

Family Center, full service

gym. ($55 value)

RAIN

OR

SHINE!

Entry into drawing for door

prizes (totaling $1,000.00).

Winners posted at Noon.

Raffle for $250 cash prize.

Drawing at Noon.

To register and for further information go to or call:

www.active.com or www.tourdecarroll.com

Call 410-840-8381

100% of the funds raised directly benefit

West End Place Adult Day Care Services

(Carroll County’s only private, non-profit

service for low income seniors).

Winter 08/09

27


MY BIKE SHOP by LARRY LIPMAN

COLUMNS

CONTE’S OF ARLINGTON

IT DOESN’T TAKE LONG for the customer walking into

Conte’s Bicycles and Fitness Equipment in Arlington,

Va., to realize this is not a typical bike shop.

Sure, there are racks of bicycles and clothes and gear

in the spacious shop, but a quick look reveals that

these are among the best, and most expensive, bikes

in the world.

Conte’s of Arlington, as it’s commonly known, carries

the East Coast’s largest collection of Cervelo

bicycles as well as other high-performance models by

Pinarello, Fondriest and Wilier, an Italian bicycle company

founded in 1906.

Co-owners Jody Bennett and Scott McAhren, two

bicycling enthusiasts and racers who hail from the

Chicago area, are unabashed about their business

model: they stock the top performance bikes in the

world for the serious rider who can afford a seriously

expensive bicycle.

“We came in with the vision that this market can support

a high-end product base. We’re trying to appeal

to those guys who own the Mercedes, Porsches and

BMWs you see in the parking lot,” Scott said, pointing

to a large parking lot the store shares with a Gold’s

Gym near the Ballston Mall.

Bennett compared the bike competition to the automobile

industry competition. Ford, Chevrolet and

Chrysler compete at one level; Porsche, Mercedes,

Lexus and BMW compete at another level. But the

two levels don’t really compete against each other for

the same customers.

Jody, who completed as part of a team that finished

the Race Across America last June in seven days, 16

hours on a Cervelo R3SL, takes enormous pride in

Conte’s extensive line of bikes and gear for women.

There are four women on the sales staff at Conte’s,

which makes a big difference in dealing with female

customers, Jody said.

“That was one of my big gripes,” about other bike

shops, she told SPOKES. “It’s a little overwhelming

for a woman because most guys talk technical” about

the gear. She finds that female customers feel more

comfortable talking about shorts and saddles with a

woman than with a man. Women also find it easier

talking with other women about what clothes to wear,

particularly when the seasons change and two weights

of clothing might be needed.

“When you’re a woman and you’ve done Race Across

America, it’s a validation that not only do I run a

small business, I love riding, I love racing. I get out

there in all kinds of weather and temperatures, I’m

out there year-round,” Jody said.

Scott, who used to race road bikes in the 1980s, now

does an occasional mountain bike race. He jokes that

he owns about 1,000 bikes — the store’s stock — but

has two road bikes and five mountain bikes he’s particularly

fond of. His favorite is a Cervelo SLCSL, but

he said he’ll sell any of his bikes.

The owners take pride in another key facet of the

store: there is an entire area devoted to fitting the

bikes to the riders. Using video cameras and sophisticated

computer software, employees can observe and

measure how a particular bike and rider interact to

make sure they get the most efficient stroke.

To help riders of all levels meet their training goals,

Conte’s recently began an individualized coaching

program with Coaching by Cadence. To kick off the

start of the program, the store hosted a session with

Brian Walton, a former pro racer and silver medalist

in the 1996 Olympics.

While it’s not hard to

find racers and riding

enthusiasts at most bike

shops, Conte’s has taken

it to a new level. All

of the employees are

required to take a one

to two hour ride at least

once a week during

store hours on one of

the bikes in the Conte’s

inventory.

In addition, the store’s

service and sales managers

each get a bike out

of the Conte’s inventory

for their exclusive use

— the only condition is

that Scott decides when

to replace the bike with

a newer model. The

idea is for the people

selling and working on

the bikes to become

intimately familiar with

the store’s inventory,

Jody explained.

“This is our passion. We

love this. We want to go

out and ride. We want

to ride all of the bikes

that we sell. Why not get

FREE

paid for doing it?” she

said.

Often employees will

FREEMEMBERSHIP

WEEKS

go for a ride with a customer.

“If a customer

cycling workout that blitzes up to 1,000 calo-

RPM ® is the ultimate calorie-killing studio

walks in and asks if anybody

wants to go for a

sity, so RPM ® is ideal for any level of fitness.

ries in just 45 minutes. You control the inten-

ride, there will be lots of Use the FREE week’s membership* and experience the ride

people saying ‘yes.’ We of your life! *Limit 1 per customer.

encourage it,” Jody said.

Scott McAhren & Jody Bennett

BIKE SHOP continued on p.27

JOIN A

BIKE GANG

GOLD'S GYM

5728-B Buckeystown Pike

Frederick, MD 21703

301-698-GOLD

MAY 3

OPEN HOUSE

NEW MEMBER

SPECIALS!

Winter 08/09

29


COLUMNS

SPOKESWOMEN by ANNE MADER info@thebikelane.com

…a look at women’s cycling issues in the

mid-Atlantic

Staying Fit and Motivated through the Winter

Fall is my favorite time of year. I love everything about

this season; the color of the leaves, the smell of burning

wood, the crispness in the air, and the excitement

of the holidays. But every year it seems to get harder

and harder to stay motivated and on track with my

fitness goals. The mornings are cold and dark, making

it hard to get out of bed for an early ride. In the

evenings, by the time I get home from work, it seems

too dark to go for a run. As I get older, the motivation

to “Just Do It” seems to get more difficult. Meanwhile,

the temptation to cook all of the comfort foods that I

see on the cover of Gourmet magazine gets easier and

easier; which I don’t need, since all I have to do is look

at a picture of a pumpkin pie and I gain five pounds!

So this year is going to be different. My goal is not

only to stay fit but to get more fit throughout the fall

and winter months. I want to start my spring training

in better shape than ever before. So, I have a lot of

work to do. I need to stay motivated and resist the

temptation to just let a “few pounds” on over the holidays.

As I think about how I am going to keep the will

power and my training on track, I decide to get some

advice from two very good friends of mine.

Dr. Kathy Coutinho is a local Sports Chiropractor and

owner of Positively Chiropractic. She is a competitive

XTERRA athlete and avid mountain biker as well as a

mother of two young daughters. Dr. Kathy is my idol

when it comes to staying motivated over the winter.

Her positive attitude is unyielding and contagious.

She is definitely someone to hang around when you

need an extra little pep in your routine workout.

Coach Melissa Dalio, of EnduraCoaching has been

coaching triathletes and cyclists for 10 years. She is

incredibly knowledgeable about how to keep the body

and mind motivated. As a coach, her job is to keep her

athletes going through tough training times and keep

their eyes set on the goals they are trying to achieve.

This time of year is especially hard for clients since the

events they are training for may be months away.

I asked Dr. Kathy and Coach Melissa their advice on

staying motivated and focused this time of year.

Q. Coach Melissa, what do you recommend women

should do throughout the winter to stay motivated

and focused?

A. In my 10 years of coaching experience I have

always encouraged my athletes to have some fun in

the off-season by trying some new sports or activities

that keep in line with their off season needs. Cycling

and running are basically linear movements. The fun

part comes in when you try to learn something that

requires lateral movements. Last year several of my athletes

took salsa dance lessons. We started with a group

of folks that struggled to move side to side and had no

rhythm. By the end of the lessons we had group of people

with much greater coordination and experienced

a much healthier injury free race season. Already my

athletes are demanding another dance season.

For most women, a training schedule keeps you on

task which keeps you from getting derailed by the

holidays and family responsibilities. While you keep

with your training plan, take off your heart rate monitor

and just workout for fun. This can remind you

how much you love riding and help keep you from

getting burned out. Ride for fun with your friends or

try a new training group. Take a yoga class; it is a fun

way to increase flexibility. Keep yourself around other

people that enjoy a healthy lifestyle.

Photo: Gary Ryan

Dr. Kathy Coutinho

Q. Dr. Kathy, as a competitive athlete, how do you stay

motivated through the winter and prepare yourself

mentally and physically for your next year’s goals?

A. Training through the winter season is fun and easy

for me because I HAVE GOALS—and I already love

the activities for which I’m training! I plan my racing

season ahead of time and have a strictly scheduled

training plan for the off-season. I stick to this no matter

what. It helps that I have the world’s most supportive

run/bike-addicted husband who happily shares

parental duties while I am off running the trails! I also

train more with friends in the off season. This helps to

keep things fun and it also helps when no one wants

to be the wimp when it is too cold to ride.

Q. Coach Melissa, what are your goals for your clients

over the winter months?

A. From the coach’s point of view, we want to evaluate

the limiters of the client, work on biomechanics and

establish next season’s goals. Put together an annual

plan that develops the limiters of the client. Strength

training is typically a priority for woman during the off

season as well as increasing your leg, back and abdominal

strength. This will improve your cycling ability,

help keep you injury free and increase bone density.

Q. Dr. Kathy, how to you keep a positive attitude

towards training through the winter, when there are

no races and events to keep you competitive?

A. Committing to a HEALTHY training routine that

maximizes efficiency and quality, keeping the FUN

element in my workouts, and keeping the GOALS

never far from my mind, I maintain a very positive

workout schedule that helps me achieve the results

I want during the bleak winter months. As I tell my

little daughter, sports are fun, especially when you try

your very best.

Q. Coach Melissa, what advice can you give to women

who are dreading the holiday season because they are

worried they may sabotage their training goals?

A. Since it “Tis the season of giving” truly give the gift

of health! Don’t bake the butter cookies; make a high

protein and fiber version. Give a personal training

session to your loved one or a walking V02 test that

will help spur your inactive family members in to a

walking exercise program. Yes, it is true. A V02 test

can be performed walking and the information can

be used to establish an exercise program that provides

a great deal of motivation.

Q. Dr. Kathy, as an athlete and sports chiropractor

what is your advice to women who continue training

routines throughout the winter?

A. As a sports medicine based chiropractor, I treat

a majority of competitive athletes comprised mostly

of triathletes and distance runners. I decided to specialize

in sports chiropractic and active release technique

because of my underlying passion for training

and racing XTERRA and for mountain bike racing.

Staying injury-free makes for a happy training and

racing season too. So, getting chiropractic adjustments

and Active Release therapy once a month during

the off-season and once a week during the in-season

for various back and extremity joints that become

out of alignment from the repetitive motion--or even

blunt trauma--that athletic activities may cause. I also

suggest receiving sports massage therapy once every

2-6 weeks, which is equally vital for good mental and

physical recovery.

Dr. Kathy Coutinho, is owner of Positive Chiropractic

www.posichiro.com.

Coach Melissa Dalio is owner of Enduracoaching

www.enduracoaching.com

30 Winter 08/09


COLUMNS

SPOKESWOMEN by ANNE MADER info@thebikelane.com

…a look at women’s cycling issues in the

mid-Atlantic

Staying Fit and Motivated through the Winter

Fall is my favorite time of year. I love everything about

this season; the color of the leaves, the smell of burning

wood, the crispness in the air, and the excitement

of the holidays. But every year it seems to get harder

and harder to stay motivated and on track with my

fitness goals. The mornings are cold and dark, making

it hard to get out of bed for an early ride. In the

evenings, by the time I get home from work, it seems

too dark to go for a run. As I get older, the motivation

to “Just Do It” seems to get more difficult. Meanwhile,

the temptation to cook all of the comfort foods that I

see on the cover of Gourmet magazine gets easier and

easier; which I don’t need, since all I have to do is look

at a picture of a pumpkin pie and I gain five pounds!

So this year is going to be different. My goal is not

only to stay fit but to get more fit throughout the fall

and winter months. I want to start my spring training

in better shape than ever before. So, I have a lot of

work to do. I need to stay motivated and resist the

temptation to just let a “few pounds” on over the holidays.

As I think about how I am going to keep the will

power and my training on track, I decide to get some

advice from two very good friends of mine.

Dr. Kathy Coutinho is a local Sports Chiropractor and

owner of Positively Chiropractic. She is a competitive

XTERRA athlete and avid mountain biker as well as a

mother of two young daughters. Dr. Kathy is my idol

when it comes to staying motivated over the winter.

Her positive attitude is unyielding and contagious.

She is definitely someone to hang around when you

need an extra little pep in your routine workout.

Coach Melissa Dalio, of EnduraCoaching has been

coaching triathletes and cyclists for 10 years. She is

incredibly knowledgeable about how to keep the body

and mind motivated. As a coach, her job is to keep her

athletes going through tough training times and keep

their eyes set on the goals they are trying to achieve.

This time of year is especially hard for clients since the

events they are training for may be months away.

I asked Dr. Kathy and Coach Melissa their advice on

staying motivated and focused this time of year.

Q. Coach Melissa, what do you recommend women

should do throughout the winter to stay motivated

and focused?

A. In my 10 years of coaching experience I have

always encouraged my athletes to have some fun in

the off-season by trying some new sports or activities

that keep in line with their off season needs. Cycling

and running are basically linear movements. The fun

part comes in when you try to learn something that

requires lateral movements. Last year several of my athletes

took salsa dance lessons. We started with a group

of folks that struggled to move side to side and had no

rhythm. By the end of the lessons we had group of people

with much greater coordination and experienced

a much healthier injury free race season. Already my

athletes are demanding another dance season.

For most women, a training schedule keeps you on

task which keeps you from getting derailed by the

holidays and family responsibilities. While you keep

with your training plan, take off your heart rate monitor

and just workout for fun. This can remind you

how much you love riding and help keep you from

getting burned out. Ride for fun with your friends or

try a new training group. Take a yoga class; it is a fun

way to increase flexibility. Keep yourself around other

people that enjoy a healthy lifestyle.

Photo: Gary Ryan

Dr. Kathy Coutinho

Q. Dr. Kathy, as a competitive athlete, how do you stay

motivated through the winter and prepare yourself

mentally and physically for your next year’s goals?

A. Training through the winter season is fun and easy

for me because I HAVE GOALS—and I already love

the activities for which I’m training! I plan my racing

season ahead of time and have a strictly scheduled

training plan for the off-season. I stick to this no matter

what. It helps that I have the world’s most supportive

run/bike-addicted husband who happily shares

parental duties while I am off running the trails! I also

train more with friends in the off season. This helps to

keep things fun and it also helps when no one wants

to be the wimp when it is too cold to ride.

Q. Coach Melissa, what are your goals for your clients

over the winter months?

A. From the coach’s point of view, we want to evaluate

the limiters of the client, work on biomechanics and

establish next season’s goals. Put together an annual

plan that develops the limiters of the client. Strength

training is typically a priority for woman during the off

season as well as increasing your leg, back and abdominal

strength. This will improve your cycling ability,

help keep you injury free and increase bone density.

Q. Dr. Kathy, how to you keep a positive attitude

towards training through the winter, when there are

no races and events to keep you competitive?

A. Committing to a HEALTHY training routine that

maximizes efficiency and quality, keeping the FUN

element in my workouts, and keeping the GOALS

never far from my mind, I maintain a very positive

workout schedule that helps me achieve the results

I want during the bleak winter months. As I tell my

little daughter, sports are fun, especially when you try

your very best.

Q. Coach Melissa, what advice can you give to women

who are dreading the holiday season because they are

worried they may sabotage their training goals?

A. Since it “Tis the season of giving” truly give the gift

of health! Don’t bake the butter cookies; make a high

protein and fiber version. Give a personal training

session to your loved one or a walking V02 test that

will help spur your inactive family members in to a

walking exercise program. Yes, it is true. A V02 test

can be performed walking and the information can

be used to establish an exercise program that provides

a great deal of motivation.

Q. Dr. Kathy, as an athlete and sports chiropractor

what is your advice to women who continue training

routines throughout the winter?

A. As a sports medicine based chiropractor, I treat

a majority of competitive athletes comprised mostly

of triathletes and distance runners. I decided to specialize

in sports chiropractic and active release technique

because of my underlying passion for training

and racing XTERRA and for mountain bike racing.

Staying injury-free makes for a happy training and

racing season too. So, getting chiropractic adjustments

and Active Release therapy once a month during

the off-season and once a week during the in-season

for various back and extremity joints that become

out of alignment from the repetitive motion--or even

blunt trauma--that athletic activities may cause. I also

suggest receiving sports massage therapy once every

2-6 weeks, which is equally vital for good mental and

physical recovery.

Dr. Kathy Coutinho, is owner of Positive Chiropractic

www.posichiro.com.

Coach Melissa Dalio is owner of Enduracoaching

www.enduracoaching.com

30 Winter 08/09

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