Forest Park School Travel Plan - Active Transportation Policy

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Forest Park School Travel Plan - Active Transportation Policy

Forest Park

School Travel Plan


Forest Park

School Travel Plan

Presented by Active Transportation Alliance December 2011


Acknowledgements

This plan was developed by a committee of key stakeholders and residents. It represents the combined vision for creating safer

routes to school. Thank you to the Steering Committee members for donating their time to this project:

Heather Ash, Parent

Elizabeth Axtell, Forest Park Chamber of Commerce

Ed Brophy, Forest Park School District 91

Anthony Calderone, Mayor, Village of Forest Park

Lou Cavallo, Forest Park School District 91

Christopher Chin, Forest Park Police Department

Heather Cianciolo, Resident

Sally Cody, Village of Forest Park

Karen Dylewski, Howard Mohr Community Center

Mary Flannagan, Resident

Timothy Gillian, Village of Forest Park

Doug Gotham, Christopher Burke Engineering

Chris Harris, Village of Forest Park

John Hosty, Village of Forest Park

TJ Januopoulos, Forest Park Fire Department

Tom Mannix, Village of Forest Park

John McNett, Oak Park Cycle Club

Bill Milnamow, Forest Park School District 91

Vanessa Moritz, Village of Forest Park

Denise Murray, Village of Forest Park

Mike O’Connor, Forest Park Police Department

Letitia Olmsted, Village of Forest Park

Erin Parchert, Park District of Forest Park

Ray Paulin, Forest Park School

Drew Peterson, Resident

Melinda Holmes Peterson, Resident

Jessica Rinks, Forest Park Community Garden

Jamie Stauder, Forest Park School District 91

Gina Thomas, Forest Park Community Garden

Rebecca Vnuk, Resident

Michelle Woehrle, Resident

About the Consultants

The mission of Active Transportation Alliance is to make

bicycling, walking, and public transit so safe, convenient, and

fun that we will achieve a significant shift from environmentally

harmful, sedentary travel to clean, active travel. We advocate

for transportation that encourages and promotes safety,

physical activity, health, recreation, social interaction, equity,

environmental stewardship, and resource conservation.

We are both Chicagoland’s voice for better biking, walking,

and transit and a premier consultancy. Our staff includes

planning, policy, and education experts who developed many

of the best practice programs and policies included in this plan.

By partnering with us on this project, you not only get the best

plan possible, you also support our mission to improve active

transportation throughout the Chicagoland region.

The Active Transportation Alliance Project Team:

Heather Schady – Safe Routes to School Manager

Brett Mohr – GIS Planner

Ruth Myers – Suburban Coordinator

About Communities Putting Prevention to Work

The Forest Park School Travel Plan was made possible through

funding from the Department of Health and Human Services:

Communities Putting Prevention to Work (CPPW) grant. CPPW

is a joint project between the Cook County Department of Public

Health and the Public Health Institute of Metropolitan Chicago.

Forest PARK School Travel Plan


Contents

Acknowledgements

Executive Summary 4

1 Introduction 6

1.1 Community Overview and Vision 7

1.2 Goals 8

1.3 School Travel Plan Process 8

1.4 Timeframe 9

2 Existing Conditions 10

2.1 Student Travel Environment 13

2.2 School Arrival and Dismissal Process 14

2.3 Existing Roadway Conditions 14

2.4 Walkways and Crossings 16

2.5 Bike Infrastructure 18

2.6 Road User Behavior 18

2.7 Personal Safety Concerns 19

2.8 School Policies 19

3 Recommendations 20

3.1 Education 21

3.2 Encouragement 22

3.3 Enforcement 23

3.4 Engineering 25

3.5 Evaluation 28

4 Implementation and Oversight 29

4.1 Implementation 30

4.2 Oversight 30

5 Appendices 32

5.1 Appendix A: Bike Rack Siting Report 33

5.2 Appendix B: Education Resources 45

5.3 Appendix C: PBIS Matrix 46

5.4 Appendix D: International Walk to School Day Resolution 47

5.5 Appendix E: Preferred Walking Route Maps 48

5.6 Appendix F: Evaluation Tools 53

Executive Summary

3


Executive Summary

Forest PARK School Travel Plan


Executive Summary

Safe Routes to School (SRTS) is an international movement that enables and encourages students to safely walk and bike to and from

school. Recognizing that safety—or the perception of safety—is dependent on a variety of factors, Safe Routes to School programs take

a holistic approach to addressing the barriers to walking and bicycling to school. SRTS seeks to both improve walking and bicycling

infrastructure (sidewalks, crosswalks, bike facilities, etc.) as well as change social norms and behaviors around student transportation

(increased awareness, better road user knowledge, increased popularity of walking and biking, etc.)

The Village of Forest Park and Forest Park School District 91 partnered with Active Transportation Alliance to create a school travel

plan centered on “the Five E’s” of Safe Routes to School: education, encouragement, enforcement, engineering, and evaluation. The

school travel plan acts as a road map designed to analyze the social and physical barriers to walking and bicycling to school in Forest

Park and provide recommendations to make walking and bicycling to school the safe, healthy, and convenient choice.

The recommendations addressed in this plan are divided into the Five E’s of SRTS. When applied in the right combination, these

strategies have been shown to increase rates of walking and bicycling to school, decrease vehicle traffic on and around the school

campus, and improve safety along the route to school.

Recommendations included in this plan for each of the Five E's are as follows:

Education

• Adopt school bicycle and pedestrian curricula.

• Create public educational tools on school zone safety.

• Hold annual summer bike rodeos.

• Educate parents on a Positive Behavioral Interventions and

Supports (PBIS) matrix.

Enforcement

• Continue targeted enforcement events, focused on issues at

schools.

• Increase crossing guards on Village streets.

• Hold trainings for police and crossing guards.

• Distribute preferred walking route maps to parents.

Encouragement

• Celebrate International Walk to School Day.

• Create a "Caught Being Good" Program.

Engineering

• Install directional signage and on-street bike facilities along

school routes.

• Install new bike racks at schools.

• Create safer routes along Circle Avenue, Roosevelt Road,

and Des Plaines Avenue.

Evaluation

• Disseminate annual Parent Surveys.

• Conduct annual Student Travel Tallies.

Executive Summary

5


Introduction

1.1 Community Overview 7

1.2 Goals 8

1.3 School Travel Plan Process 8

1.4 Timeframe 9

1

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Forest PARK School Travel Plan


1.1 Community Overview and Vision

Forest Park is a community that works together to maintain the

health, safety, and well-being for all residents.

Despite being located just 10 miles west of the City of Chicago,

the Village of Forest Park has a traditional, small-town feel.

Tree-lined streets connect neighborhoods to parks, schools, and

businesses, a historic main street is centered in the heart of the

community, and residents are always willing to lend a hand.

Consistent with the historic nature of the community, Forest

Park schools are centered in the neighborhoods they serve. No

student lives further than a mile from their school, and most live

much closer.

The Village of Forest Park has many assets when it comes

to walkability. All of its schools are neighborhood schools,

supported by a near-complete network of sidewalks, and

recent traffic calming strategies have helped to slow traffic at

intersections along school routes. Yet, more can be done to

improve safety and conditions for students travelling to school

in Forest Park. For example, narrow sidewalks and high vehicle

speeds along the Circle Avenue Bridge make it hazardous for

students going school. Unsafe driver behavior during school

arrival and dismissal time makes parents question whether it is

truly safe for their kids to walk or bike to school. Lack of adult

presence on school routes is another cause for concern.

The connection between home, community, and school is a

critical component of Forest Park School District 91’s mission.

With that in mind, this plan was developed by a steering

committee made up of diverse representatives from community

agencies and organizations.

The steering committee was tasked with developing a common

vision and identifying shared goals to increase the number of

walking and biking trips, improving walking and bicycling

conditions, and reducing the number of vehicle trips. The Forest

Park School Travel Plan aims to strategically address barriers to

walking and bicycling to school to ensure that students can enjoy

safe, healthy, and physically active transportation as a means of

travel to school.

The shared vision of the steering committee is as follows:

Form community and school partnerships that aim to foster good life

habits, improve student health, and create a safe environment for all

students in Forest Park.

Members of the Forest Park School Travel Plan steering committee and others participate in a community bike ride.

Introduction

7


1.2 Goals

1.3 School Travel Plan Process

The Forest Park School Travel Plan provides practical solutions

to increase safety for students and their families when walking

and biking to school. The recommendations will help strengthen

partnerships between the Village, Police Department, School

District, parents, and other community partners to ensure that

student health and safety is addressed.

The following goals were identified by the Forest Park School

Travel Plan steering committee:

• Improve unsafe or insufficient crossings and walkways on

school routes.

• Increase student health through active forms of

transportation.

• Reduce speeding and reckless driving near schools.

• Address community concerns regarding student safety.

The strategies recommended in this plan aim to address these

goals through a comprehensive approach.

The recommendations made in the Forest Park School Travel

Plan are based on input from parents, residents, school district

staff, and municipal staff. The consultant team and the steering

committee engaged in the following community engagement

activities:

Forest Park School District 91 surveyed students in May

2011 about their mode of travel to and from school.

• Community members attended an Active Transportation

Plan Open House on June 28, 2011. School-specific

recommendations were incorporated into this plan.

• Community members and parents attended a Safe Routes to

School/PBIS Workshop on September 28, 2011. Participants

were asked to identify the barriers and solutions to walking

and biking to school through a polling activity.

• Consultants conducted field reviews of school walk zones.

• Consultants gathered other information, including crash

data, traffic speeds, and crime and public safety statistics.

Students vote on education, encouragement, and enforcement strategies during the Forest Park Active Transportation Plan Open House.

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Forest PARK School Travel Plan


1.4 Timeframe

The recommendations in this plan are divided into three

categories: near-term, mid-term, and long-term. These categories

should help the Village and the District coordinate efforts with

staffing plans and work plans.

1.4.1 Near-Term Priorities

Education, Encouragement, and Enforcement: Near-term projects

should be completed in less than two years. These projects

involve little to no start-up costs or long-term organization. Many

education and encouragement initiatives are proposed for nearterm

implementation to build support for later projects.

Engineering: Near-term recommendations are generally school

routes and intersections that are currently walkable and bikeable

but may be aided by some low-cost improvements, such as

signage, pavement markings, or bike racks.

Bike rodeos and other special events can be achieved in a short period of time

with minimal cost.

1.4.2 Mid-Term Priorities

Education, Encouragement, and Enforcement: Mid-term means

completion is expected in three to five years. Some projects

will require preliminary work in the near term. These projects

may have initial start-up costs and require coordination with

community organizations. Mid-term projects generally involve

more planning.

Engineering: Mid-term recommendations are projects on school

routes where current conditions could be easily improved,

with a moderate construction budget. Examples are sidewalk

completion and traffic calming measures.

1.4.3 Long-Term Priorities

Education, Encouragement, and Enforcement: These projects,

expected to begin implementation after five years, frequently

depend on the completion of earlier projects and local support.

Engineering: Long-term recommendations are often complicated

by jurisdictional issues. These recommendations may have other

feasibility issues, such as high average daily traffic (ADT) or

restricted road width or right-of-way.

Sidewalk gaps and other infrastructure projects are considered long-term

projects.

EXISTING CONDITIONS

9


Existing Conditions

2.1 Student Travel Environment 13

2.2 School Arrival and Dismissal Process 14

2.3 Existing Roadway Conditions 14

2.4 Walkways and Crossings 16

2.5 Bike Infrastructure 18

2.6 Road User Behavior 18

2.7 Personal Safety Concerns 19

2.8 School Policies 19

2

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Forest PARK School Travel Plan


2 Existing Conditions

Each morning and afternoon during the school year, hundreds

of vehicles, pedestrians, cyclists and buses converge on school

property in a 15- to 30-minute window. In Cook County, nearly

15% of morning traffic is created by trips to school. The amount

of traffic and congestion at a school during arrival and dismissal

time greatly impacts parents’ perception of safety. Schools with

more congestion are perceived to be less safe, which causes more

parents to drive, creating less safe conditions.

The Forest Park School Travel Plan addresses the needs of

students and families of Forest Park School District 91. The

following schools are included in the plan:

Betsy Ross Elementary School

Field-Stevenson Elementary School

• Betsy Ross Elementary School

• Field-Stevenson Elementary School

Forest Park Middle School

• Garfield Elementary School

• Grant-White Elementary School

A map of Forest Park schools is included on page 12.

Forest Park Middle School

Garfield Elementary School

Grant-White Elementary School

EXISTING CONDITIONS

11


2 Existing Conditions

12

Forest PARK School Travel Plan


2.1 Student Travel Environment

Forest Park School District 91 surveyed Forest Park Middle School students in the spring of 2011 about modes of transportation to

school. Three-hundred-eleven students responded to the survey. The following is a summary of the data collected:

The majority of respondents walk to and from school during the warmer months. After-school clubs and sports appear to have no

impact on the way that students travel to school. There is a dip in the number of students who walk to school during the winter

months, though the percentage of students who walk is still significantly higher than the national average — greater than 40%. Forest

Park School District 91 provides a winter bus for students, though it did not significantly reduce the number of student walkers.

Instead, it appears that most students who stop walking to school in the winter months are driven by their parents.

EXISTING CONDITIONS

13


2.2 School Arrival and Dismissal Procedures 2.3 Existing Roadway Conditions

Each school in Forest Park School District 91 is equipped with

crossing guards, a designated school bus drop-off area, and a

vehicle drop-off area. Since no District 91 school has a parking

lot, conflicts between vehicles and walkers are not an issue on

school grounds. However, traffic congestion at intersections

surrounding schools creates complications and safety issues.

Forest Park schools are challenged by a lack of space for vehicle

drop-off, which can be viewed as an opoprtunity to encourage

more walking and biking trips to school.

The consultants inventoried existing traffic signals, crosswalks,

and signage in the Village of Forest Park. The existing

engineering conditions are detailed in the Existing Conditions

map on the following page.

Traffic re-routing helps ease congestion in Forest Park.

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Forest PARK School Travel Plan


CENTRAL AVE

LINDEN ST

LATHROP AVE

S MAPLE AVE

FRANKLIN AVE

PARK AVE

WASHINGTON BLVD

CIRCLE AVE

HARLEM AVE

GALE AVE

VINE ST

MADISON ST

MONROE ST

ELGIN AVE

WILCOX ST

ADAMS ST

ROOSEVELT RD

JACKSON BLVD

HARRISON ST

20

BELOIT AVE

THOMAS AVE

S MAPLE AVE

ELGIN AVE

HARVARD ST

HANNAH AVE

TROOST AVE

DUNLOP AVE

MARENGO AVE

ELGIN AVE

FILLMORE ST

15TH ST

16TH ST

2.3 Existing Roadway Conditions

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HAWTHORNE AVE

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RANDOLPH ST

ASHLAND AVE

WASHINGTON ST

WARREN ST

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CHICAGO-KANSAS CITY EXPY

LEXINGTON ST

YORK ST

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DES PLAINES AVE

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HANNAH AVE

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LEGION ST

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Forest Park

Existing Crossing

Conditions

! Ladder Crosswalk

! Signal

! Standard Only

! Stop Sign Only

! Stop Sign, International Crosswalk

! Stop Sign, Standard Crosswalk

0 700 1,400 2,800 4,200 5,600

Feet

Prepared By: Active Transportation Alliance 7/14/2011

All data on this map is for planning purposes only.

EXISTING CONDITIONS

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2.4 Walkways and Crossings

Traffic crashes within two-miles of schools

The Village of Forest Park had several of pedestrian and bicycle

crashes between 2006 and 2009. Pedestrian crashes were

primarily concentrated along corridors - Harlem Avenue, Circle

Avenue, Des Plaines Avenue, Roosevelt Road, Madison Street,

and Randolph Street. The reported pedestrian crashes most

often occurred at intersections.

Bicycle crashes were more sporadic over the same period. Des

Plaines Avenue, Harlem Avenue, and Roosevelt Road had the

highest crash rates. Circle Avenue had several possible crashes,

as did neighborhood streets, such as Filmore Street, Washington

Street, and Brown Avenue. The majority of bike crashes on the

arterial streets occurred at intersections, whereas the crashes on

residential streets often occurred mid-block.

While the crash rates in Forest Park are on par with

communities of similar size and density, they still represent a

barrier to active forms of transportation to school. Therefore,

improvements to intersections and roadways with higher crash

rates are a focus of this plan.

Bump-outs adjacent to Garfield Elementary help to calm traffic.

Crossing streets is difficult or dangerous

The Village of Forest Park has installed bump-outs on several

roadways, including Harvard Street, Madison Street, and

Franklin Street. The new bump-outs have helped to reduce

crossing distance for pedestrians and increase their ability to see

drivers and drivers’ ability to see pedestrians. Yet, education is

needed to help residents better understand the role that bumpouts

play in traffic safety, particularly along school routes.

Intersections along Roosevelt Road, Des Plaines Avenue, Circle

Avenue, Madison Street, and Randolph Street are of critical

concern. Each of these roadways has a history of crashes.

Residents who participated in the school travel planning process

reported them as hazards to students walking to and from

school. This plan recommends that students who must cross

these streets use crossings with crossing guards.

Drivers often do not obey traffic laws.

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Forest PARK School Travel Plan


2.4 Walkways and Crossings (continued)

EXISTING CONDITIONS

17


2.5 Bike Infrastructure 2.6 Road User Behavior

No safe place to ride a bike to school

Currently, only middle school students are allowed to bike to

school in Forest Park School District 91. While the Village has

an extensive network of sidewalks, it currently lacks on-street

bike facilities. The Village of Forest Park will be working to

install more on-street facilities in compliance with its new

Complete Streets policy and its Active Transportation Plan.

Dangerous driving and/or speeding on streets

Members of the steering committee, school principals, and

members of the public who attended the Safe Routes to School

Workshop identified several common and unsafe behaviors

that occur on trips to and from school, including: drivers failing

to stop for pedestrians in crosswalks and when exiting alleys,

drivers using cell phones in school zones, parents double-parking

to drop off students, students darting out from parked cars

into traffic to cross the street, and drivers failing to stop for

school bus stop signs. Each of these behaviors creates an unsafe

environment and dissuades parents from allowing their children

to walk and bike to school. The recommendations contained in

the strategies section of this plan focus on educating all users of

the road about laws that impact pedestrian and bike safety and

working with local law enforcement to target unsafe behaviors

when needed.

Drop-off or pick-up process is unsafe

Providing on-street bike facilities increases safety and awareness of cyclists

and can encourage more cyclists to ride on Village streets.

All schools experience some level of chaos during morning

drop-off and afternoon pick-up. Forest Park schools are no

exception. The schools are particularly challenged due to high

traffic volumes and limited space dedicated for vehicle drop-offs.

Parent education about drop-off and pickup procedures and the

benefits to walking and biking to school can help create a safer

environment.

Texting while driving is one of many safety concerns that was reported by

parents and participants in the School Travel Plan process.

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Forest PARK School Travel Plan


2.7 Personal Safety Concerns 2.8 School Policies

Parents reported concerns about the safety of students along

the route to school. Of particular concern was a lack of trusted

adult presence. The recommendations included in the Forest

Park School Travel Plan aim to ensure that parents' concerns

are addressed by creating opportunities for more community

surveillance of student walking environments (i.e. "eyes are on

the street").

Bike ban

Currently, Forest Park School District 91 does not allow

kindergarten through 5 th grade students to bike to school. The

district is considering lifting the bike ban for students in grades 3

through 5. By doing so, the district would remove a barrier and

enable more students to choose physically active forms of travel

to school.

School lacks bike parking

If the bike ban for students in grades 3 through 5, Forest Park

School District 91 will need to install bike racks at schools to

accommodate increased demand. In the spring of 2011, the

Village of Forest Park worked with the consultant team to help

identify bike parking needs for all Forest Park schools. The Bike

Rack Siting Report is attached in Appendix A.

Providing secure and convenient bike parking at schools can help encourage more trips by bike.

EXISTING CONDITIONS

19


Recommendations

3.1 Education 21

3.2 Encouragement 22

3.3 Enforcement 23

3.4 Engineering 25

3.5 Evaluation 28

3

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Forest PARK School Travel Plan


3.1 Education

In order to meet Forest Park’s goals identified in Section 1.2,

each recommendation is designed to mitigate the physical and

social barriers identified by the community and the consultants.

The steering committee and community members who

participated in the development of this plan have prioritized the

following strategies for each of the Five E’s of SRTS.

Education efforts are critical to creating a safe environment

for student walkers and cyclists. Education efforts should be

focused on all users of the road during school time—including

motorists, bus drivers, walkers, and cyclists. All road users need

to understand their rights and responsibilities to ensure the

safety of others. Parents will benefit both from education on safe

driving practices and on ways to participate in walk- or bike-toschool

initiatives; students will benefit from bike and pedestrian

safety training; and the community as a whole will benefit from

exposure to and awareness of Safe Routes to School.

The following strategies are recommended based on the barriers

that were identified by the consultants and steering committee:

3.1.1 Create or Adopt Educational Materials

Priority: Near-term

The Village, Police Department, Park District, and School

District have supported several bike safety initiatives over the

years, but neither have been coordinated nor institutionalized.

In order to prioritize Safe Routes to School and ensure that

students are equipped with the knowledge to safely travel to and

from school, as well as within the community during non-school

hours, this plan recommends that Village agencies and Forest

Park School District 91 coordinate efforts around bike and

pedestrian safety education. Education efforts for students could

take shape in the following ways:

Forest Park School District 91 could adopt or create a bicycle

and pedestrian curriculum that are provided to all students

each year.

• The Park District of Forest Park could continue to hold an

annual bike rodeo on Bike Safety Day or in conjunction with

its youth summer activities.

• The Village of Forest Park could use community events to

promote bike and pedestrian safety in school zones and

provide educational messages for children, parents, and

drivers.

Any efforts that are undertaken by Village agencies should be

coordinated to ensure broader participation and involvement.

A listing of additional educational resources can be found in

Appendix B.

Forest Park Police Officers lead a community bike rodeo.

Safe Routes to School educational information can be handed out at community

events.

RECOMMENDATIONS

21


3.1 Education (continued) 3.2 Encouragement

3.1.2 Educate Parents on the Safe Routes to School

PBIS Matrix

Priority: Near-term

Forest Park School District 91 is encouraging the use of PBIS at

home, at school, and within the community. The School District

created a PBIS matrix for walking to school, which includes

positive behaviors for ensuring that students make enough time

each morning to walk to school. The School District should

continue to host workshops to ensure that parents, use, and

embrace this model. See Appendix C for a PBIS matrix.

Encouragement strategies are fun events and activities designed

to get students, their families, and the broader community to test

out and celebrate walking and biking to school. Encouragement

programs are often low-cost or no-cost and are a great way for a

community to start implementing a comprehensive Safe Routes

to School program.

Many communities find success in working with PTAs to

organize Walking School Buses or Bike Trains, which are

adult-supervised walking or biking groups that travel along a

pre-determined route and make pre-determined stops. Regular

events such as these can help establish long-term change and

remind parents and children how fun it is to walk and bike to

school. Providing incentives and holding competitions amongst

classrooms or buildings can help increase support for Walk to

School Day programs.

3.2.1 Host International Walk to School Day

Priority: Near-Term

Forest Park School District 91 should join the hundreds of

communities in Illinois each year and celebrate International

Walk to School Day each year. International Walk to School

Day is a worldwide celebration of the simple act of walking and

biking to school. Walking safety information and preferred

walking route maps should be distributed to parents and

students prior to the event. The Village of Forest Park should

adopt an International Walk to School Day resolution to support

the celebration. Appendix D includes a draft International Walk

to School Day resolution.

District 91 PBIS values are on display at Garfield Elementary School.

International Walk to

School Day celebrations

encourage families to

choose active forms of

transportation for the trip

to school.

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Forest PARK School Travel Plan


3.2 Encouragement (continued)

3.3 Enforcement

3.2.2 Create a Regular Schedule for Walk to School

Day Events

Priority: Mid-term

Following a successful Walk and Bike to School Day event, many

schools find success in choosing to hold a regular walking and

biking event on a selected day of the week or month. Several

students reported that they are driven during the winter months.

By holding special Winter Walk to School Days, parents may

"warm up" to the idea of allowing their children to walk to school

in cold weather. The district should partner with PTOs to help

organize and support a regular Walk to School Day schedule.

Students could also be encouraged to organize walking clubs

that follow school routes.

3.2.3 Distribute Preferred Walking Route Maps to

Parents at the Beginning of the School Year

Priority: Near-term

The consultant team developed a Preferred Walking Route

Map for the district. Maps for each of the schools in the district

are included in Appendix E. The maps can be distributed to

parents to help identify walking routes for walking school buses

or other events. The District and Village of Forest Park could

also partner to seek funding for printing and distribution of the

maps. As changes are made to infrastructure in the community,

the Village and District should work together to ensure that the

routes are up to date and safe for student walkers.

Law enforcement is an important component in any Safe

Routes to School initiative, but enforcement need not be limited

to the role of the local police department. Parents, students,

and community volunteers can work together with police

departments to ensure that safe walking, biking, and driving

practices are demonstrated at district schools each day.

The following recommendations should be implemented by the

Village of Forest Park:

3.3.1 Start a Crossing Guard Training Program

Priority: Near-term

The presence of crossing guards is often cited by parents as the

most important factor in their decision to allow their children

to walk or bike to school. These public servants are crucial to

any robust SRTS program to help students navigate difficult

intersections and street crossings. This plan recommends

providing high-quality training to all crossing guards on an

annual basis. Crossing guards should also be provided with highvisibility

uniforms and hand-held signs.

3.2.4 Develop a “Caught Being Good" Program

Priority: Near-term

Student pedestrians and cyclists who are following the rules

of the road could be rewarded for practicing safe skills. Even

a small reward will significantly increase good behavior and

encourage more people to engage in safe cycling. To encourage

safe behavior, the Forest Park Police Department can issue

“tickets”— to student cyclists “caught” following the rules of

the road. These good behavior citations can be issued for any

number of biking or walking actions including wearing a helmet,

stopping at stop signs and red lights, and crossing the street at a

permitted location.

Crossing guard at Oak Park Avenue.

RECOMMENDATIONS

23


3.3 Enforcement (continued)

3.3.2 Increase Adult Presence on School Routes

Priority: Mid-term

Stakeholders noted that lack of adult presence along school

routes is a barrier to encouraging students to walk to school. ,

This plan recommends that the Village of Forest Park and Forest

Park School District 91 explore opportunities for increasing

adult presence at key intersections, including: Roosevelt Road

and Circle Avenue, Franklin Street and Circle Avenue, and

Jackson Boulevard and Des Plaines Avenue. The following

strategies could be implemented to increase adult presence:

In addition, special consideration should be given to new

and existing laws that impact bicycle and pedestrian safety,

particularly in school zones.

These laws include:

• Must stop for pedestrians in crosswalks

• Handheld device ban in school zones

School zone fines

• Train adult volunteers to watch school routes during

morning arrival and afternoon dismissal times.

• Work with Neighborhood Watch groups to increase

monitoring during school arrival and dismissal times.

• Increase the number of crossing guards on Village streets.

3.3.3 Provide Training for Police

Priority: Near-term

Police in Illinois are required to participate in annual

professional development opportunities. The Forest Park Police

Department should ensure that all officers engaged in traffic

safety enforcement receive introductory training on bicycle and

pedestrian safety, followed by semi-annual refresher sessions.

Information can be provided in live sessions, online, or by video.

Trainings should include information about Safe Routes to

School. The officers should receive practical training focused on:

• Rules of the road for bicyclists and pedestrians

• Illegal motorist behaviors that endanger bicyclists and

pedestrians

Traffic detail at First Avenue and Roosevelt Road.

• Most dangerous types of bicycling behaviors

• Most common causes of bicycle and pedestrian crashes

• Importance of reporting bicycle and pedestrian crashes

• Importance of investigating serious bicycle and pedestrian

crash sites

• Best ways to prevent bicycle theft

• Best practices for policing by bicycle

Transportation, health, and environmental benefits of

bicycling

24

Forest PARK School Travel Plan


3.3 Enforcement (continued)

3.4 Engineering

3.3.4 Create Targeted Enforcement Efforts

Priority: Near-term

No police department can aggressively enforce all laws in

all locations at all times. The Forest Park Police Department

can continue to use existing crash data to identify the most

dangerous locations and target enforcement at those sites.

Stings focused on reckless behavior by motorists have proven

particularly successful in other communities. The Police

Department should continue to hold targeted enforcement

events for crosswalk violations as well as other types of

infractions, such as speeding in school zones. The Village of

Forest Park should review these efforts on an annual basis to

ensure appropriate allocation of enforcement resources.

Having safe and accessible walking and bicycling infrastructure

is a prerequisite for any SRTS effort. Infrastructure

improvements can be made to calm traffic and create safer

conditions for student pedestrians and cyclists. Although many

of the recommended changes will be implemented in the long

term, many low-cost and easily implemented solutions such as

repainting crosswalks or patching sidewalks can be done right

away. The Village of Forest Park should prioritize the following

areas for infrastructure updates:

3.4.1 Construct, Repair, and Replace Sidewalks

Priority: Long-term

Circle Avenue

Circle Avenue is one of two main north-south school routes.

Its narrow sidewalks, present one of the biggest challenges

to ensuring that students have a safe route to school. Several

options may be available. First, the Village may be ale to work

with IDOT to construct a cantilevered bridge on the west side

of the Circle Avenue Bridge over I-290. A cantilevered bridge

can provide a separated facility for cyclists and pedestrians,

eliminating the need for bridge reconstruction or reducing

vehicle lanes. Additional analysis is needed to determine if this

recommendation is feasible.

Forest Park cell phone enforcement campaign.

An alternative recommendation for the Circle Avenue Bridge

include, is to widen the sidewalk on the east side, remove the

sidewalk on the west side, and stripe bike lanes along the length

of the bridge. Finally, the Village and IDOT may be able to

partner to re-construct the bridge to include at minimum 6-footwide

sidewalks and two 5-foot-wide bike lanes.

Forest Park cell phone enforcement campaign.

Narrow sidewalks on Circle Avenue are a barrier to safety.

RECOMMENDATIONS

25


3.4 Engineering (continued)

3.4.2 Create On-Street Bike Facilities

Bike facilities were not a focus of the Forest Park School District

91 School Travel Plan as the Village is also currently engaged

in creating an Active Transportation Plan. The bike corridors

recommended in the Active Transportation Plan will also

support safer bike trips to school for middle school students in

Forest Park.

Bike lanes are recommended for Des Plaines Avenue.

Shared lane markings are recommended for narrower streets, such as

Harrison Street.

Directional bike route signage will be located on residential streets, such as

Lathrop Avenue.

26

Forest PARK School Travel Plan


3.4 Engineering (continued)

3.4.3 Install Street Crossing Improvements

Priority: Mid-term

Update crosswalks as needed

Decorative crosswalks

are appropriate for use

on residential streets.

Pursuant to the Village’s Complete Streets policy, crosswalks

along school routes should be restriped in conjunction with

roadway projects. All crosswalks along school routes should

be either upgraded to be highly visible per 2009 Manual for

Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD), or should be

upgraded to reflect the existing character of the surrounding

neighborhood.

Install "Must Stop for Pedestrian" signage

"Must stop for pedestrian" signage should be added to

intersections where crossing guards are positioned. Other key

intersections along school routes that could be signed include:

• Circle Avenue and Roosevelt Road

• Circle Avenue and Lehmer Street

• Des Plaines Avenue and Jackson Boulevard

Highly reflective crosswalks

are appropriate

near schools and on

roads with high pedestrian

volumes.

Install pedestrian countdown timers on school routes

All signalized crossings along school routes should be upgraded

to countdown pedestrian signals. These signals show pedestrians

how much time they have to cross the street and prevent

pedestrians from running across the street when there is not

enough time.

3.4.4 Make Existing Walkways Accessible to Students

with Disabilities

Priority: Long-term

Pedestrian countdown

timers give pedestrians

more information

about when to cross a

street.

Crossings along school routes should be prioritized for

reconstruction to facilitate safe crossings for students with

disabilities. Americans with Disabilities Act guidelines strongly

recommend two curb ramps at every corner. Providing two

ramps ensures that pedestrians enter the roadway within the

crosswalk, and provides better guidance to visually impaired

pedestrians. Curb ramps must be perpendicular to the curb.

ADA guidelines also require use of truncated dome warning

strips at the bottom of every curb ramp. These domes provide

a tactile warning to visually impaired pedestrians who would

otherwise be given warning by the presence of a curb. They also

must be a contrasting color.

RECOMMENDATIONS

27


3.4 Engineering (continued)

3.5 Evaluation

3.4.5 Install Bike Parking Near Schools

Priority: Near-term

Install bike parking at all 3-5 and 6-8 schools to improve access

for cyclists. Bike parking should be placed in highly visible

locations near building entrances. Use wave-shaped bike racks

for more security and durability. Wherever possible, racks

should be installed on concrete pads. See Appendix A for

specific recommendations.

Regular evaluation of SRTS programs helps communities keep

track of progress and assess whether or not the strategies being

implemented are working. Forest Park School District 91 should

conduct student travel tallies each school year during the fall and

spring and survey parents at least once a year to gauge changes

in attitudes and opinions towards walking and biking to school.

Free travel tally sheets and parent surveys are available through

the National Center for Safe Routes to School. The center also

provides free analysis of data collected by school districts. Both

evaluation tools are included in Appendix F.

3.4.6 Install Traffic Calming and Speed Reduction

Measures

Priority: Long-term

Tighten turning radii on Randolph Street at Circle

Avenue

Wide curb radii at the intersection of Randolph Street and

Circle Avenue allow turning vehicles to move more quickly

than desirable in a school crossing. The turning radii can be

tightened to force vehicles to turn more slowly.

Tightening the curb radius can help reduce the speed of turning vehicles.

28

Forest PARK School Travel Plan


Implementation and Oversight

4.1 Implementation 30

4.2 Oversight 30

4


4.1 Implementation 4.2 Oversight

Throughout the Forest Park School Travel Plan, the consultant

has listed implementation strategies and parties responsible for

each recommendation. The plan outlines strategies that will be

implemented over several years. Effective implementation of the

Forest Park School Travel Plan requires successful partnership,

oversight, and ownership by parents, the School District, the

Village, and the community at large. The recommendations

may also require partnerships with the Illinois Department of

Transportation and the Cook County Highway Department.

The Safe Routes to School steering committee should continue

to meet on a regular basis to ensure that the goals and strategies

recommended in the Forest Park School Travel Plan are being

implemented. The Forest Park School Travel Plan should be

updated at least once every five years to ensure that goals are

being met and strategies are effectively contributing to the

overall goals of the School District and community.

30

Forest PARK School Travel Plan


4.1 Implementation (continued)

4.1 Implementation Matrix

Below is an implementation matrix for the Village of Forest Park and Forest Park School District 91. Included is a comprehensive list

of recommended strategies, and a timeline for prioritization and completion.

Strategy Task Who Is Responsible? Timeline Funding Recommendations

Education

Create or Adopt Educational

Materials

Forest Park School District

91

Village of Forest Park

Near-term

National Center for Safe Routes to School

Mini Grant Program

Education

Educate Parents on the Safe

Routes to School PBIS Matrix

Forest Park School District

91

Near-term No funding necessary

Encouragement

International Walk to School Day

Forest Park School District

91

Near-term

No funding necessary

Encouragement

Weekly or Monthly Walk to School

Day Events

Forest Park School District

91 and PTA

Mid-term

PTA fundraiser

Encouragement

Distribute Preferred Walking

Route Maps to Parents

Forest Park School District

91

Near-term

No funding necessary

Encouragement

Develop "Caught Being Good"

Program

Forest Park Police

Department

Near-term

Donations from local businesses

Enforcement

Provide Training for Police &

Crossing Guards

Forest Park Police

Department

Near-term

402 Safety Grants

Enforcement

Increase the Number of Crossing

Guards

Forest Park School District

91

Mid-term

Local funding source

Enforcement

Create Targeted Enforcement

Efforts

Forest Park Police

Department

Near-term

402 Safety Grants

Engineering

Feasibility Study for Sidewalk

Reconstruction on Circle Avenue Village of Forest Park Long-term Illinois Department of Transportation and

Village of Forest Park

Engineering

Install New Signage Village of Forest Park Near-term

Communities Putting Prevention to Work

Grant

Engineering

Make Existing Walkways

Accessible to Students with

Disabilities

Village of Forest Park

Long-term

Done in conjunction with other roadway

reconstruction projects

Engineering

Install Street Crossing

Improvements

Village of Forest Park Mid-term Federal Safe Routes to School Grant

Engineering

Create On-Street Bike Facilities

Village of Forest Park

Mid- to

Long-term

Federal Safe Routes to School Grant

Congestion Mitigation

Air Quality Grant

Transportation Enhancements Grant

Engineering

Install Bike Parking Village of Forest Park Near-term

Communities Putting Prevention to Work

Grant

Engineering

Install Traffic Calming and Speed

Reduction Measures

Village of Forest Park Long-term In conjunction with other roadway projects

Implementation and oversight

31


Appendices

5.1 Appendix A: Bike Rack Siting Report 33

5.2 Appendix B: Education Resources 45

5.3 Appendix C: PBIS Matrix 46

5.4 Appendix D: International Walk to School Day Resolution 47

5.5 Appendix E: Preferred Walking Route Maps 48

5.6 Appendix F: Evaluation Tools 53

5

32

Forest PARK School Travel Plan


5.1 Appendix A: Bike Rack Siting Report

appendices

33


5.1 Appendix A: Bike Rack Siting Report (continued)

34

Forest PARK School Travel Plan


5.1 Appendix A: Bike Rack Siting Report (continued)

appendices

35


5.1 Appendix A: Bike Rack Siting Report (continued)

36

Forest PARK School Travel Plan


5.1 Appendix A: Bike Rack Siting Report (continued)

appendices

37


5.1 Appendix A: Bike Rack Siting Report (continued)

38

Forest PARK School Travel Plan


5.1 Appendix A: Bike Rack Siting Report (continued)

appendices

39


5.1 Appendix A: Bike Rack Siting Report (continued)

40

Forest PARK School Travel Plan


5.1 Appendix A: Bike Rack Siting Report (continued)

appendices

41


5.1 Appendix A: Bike Rack Siting Report (continued)

42

Forest PARK School Travel Plan


5.1 Appendix A: Bike Rack Siting Report (continued)

appendices

43


5.1 Appendix A: Bike Rack Siting Report (continued)

44

Forest PARK School Travel Plan


5.2 Appendix B: Education Resources

Education Resources

Contact Active Transportation Alliance for trainings and

teacher resources. Active Transportation Alliance offers

curricula and instruction for multiple grade levels and courses,

as well as walking and bicycling safety skills trainings.

Visit http://www.activetrans.org/education for more information.

The League of Illinois Bicyclists offers downloadable bike

safety sheets for Grades K-3 and Grades 3-7 focused on safe

riding skills. The single-page format can easily be reprinted in

newsletters, copied for bike rodeos, etc.

Visit http://www.bikelib.org/safety-education/kids/bike-safetysheet/

to download or learn more.

Metra’s Operation Lifesaver Train Safety Awareness Program

provides free safety trainings for students from Pre-K to high

school.

Visit http://metrarail.com/content/metra/en/home/utility_

landing/riding_metra/rail_safety_security/school_safety.html for

details.

National Resources

The Safe Routes to School National Center offers a listing of

educational resources searchable by state. To view, visit:

http://www.saferoutesinfo.org/program-tools/access-classroomresources

Visit the Safe Routes to School National Partnership for a

downloadable “Bicycle and Pedestrian Curricula Guide.” View

the guide for a full inventory of bicycle and pedestrian curricula

and several best practices and case studies. Available for

download at:

http://www.saferoutespartnership.org/mediacenter/publications

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

published a free and comprehensive K-5 pedestrian

safety curriculum available at http://www.nhtsa.gov/

ChildPedestrianSafetyCurriculum.

appendices

45


5.3 Appendix C: PBIS Matrix

Bicycling

Walking

Be Respectful

Wait for your crossing signal

Walk your bike across the street

Follow Crossing Guard's Directions

Wait for your crossing signal

Follow Crossing Guard’s Directions

Be Responsible

Know your Route

Check your air, brakes and tires

Check your surroundings

Obey traffic

Look for cars

Know your Route

Look to the left and right, then left again before

crossing the street

Know your crossing signals

Walk inside crosswalk

Be Safe

Wear a helmet that fits

Keep hands on handlebars

Ride on Right side of road

Walk on the sidewalk

Walk on leftside facing oncoming traffic

Walk across the street

Cross at the corner

46

Forest PARK School Travel Plan


5.4 Appendix D: International Walk to School Day Resolution

Sample International Walk to School Day Resolution

Whereas, the Safe Routes to School National Partnership, the

Safe Routes to School National Center, the Illinois Department

of Transportation, the Active Transportation Alliance, the

Illinois Safe Routes to School Network, and schools across the

State of Illinois are working together to promote Walk to School

Day in Illinois; and,

Whereas, the health and safety of our children is of highest

concern to the citizens of Illinois; and,

Whereas, a lack of physical activity plays a leading role in

rising rates of obesity, diabetes and other health problems among

children and being able to walk or bicycle to school offers an

opportunity to build activity into daily routine; and,

Whereas, driving students to school by private vehicle

contributes to traffic congestion and air pollution, creating over

25% of community traffic at the beginning and end of each

school day; and,

Whereas, an important role for parents and caregivers is to

teach children about pedestrian safety and become aware of the

difficulties and dangers that children face on their trip to school

each day and the health and environmental risks related to

physical inactivity and air pollution; and,

Whereas, community members and leaders should make a

plan to make immediate changes to enable Illinois' children to

safely walk and bicycle in our communities and develop a list of

suggestions for improvements that can be done over time; and,

Whereas, children, parents and community leaders around

the world are joining together to walk to school and evaluate

walking and bicycling conditions in their communities; and,

Whereas, Walk and Bicycle to School Month in October and

Walk and Bicycle to School Week the first week in October have

proven to be helpful in encouraging children to safely walk and

bicycle to school and in creating and promoting local Safe Route

to Schools programs across the United States and throughout the

world:

Therefore, Be It Resolved that, [INSERT MUNICIPALITY

NAME], proclaims the month of October [YEAR] as Walk and

Bicycle to School Month [AND/OR] proclaim October [DATE,

YEAR], "International Walk to School Day." The [INSERT

MUNICIPALITY NAME] urges all students, parents, teachers,

administrators, schools and school districts to participate in

these events, and encourage everyone to consider the safety and

health of children this month and every month.

appendices

47


HARVARD ST

CIRCLE AVE

HANNAH AVE

HARLEM AVE

ROOSEVELT RD

HARRISON ST

ELGIN AVE

MARENGO AVE

BELOIT AVE

S MAPLE AVE

DUNLOP AVE

LATHROP AVE

FERDINAND AVE

LEXINGTON ST

TROOST AVE

THOMAS AVE

FILLMORE ST

YUBA ST

15TH ST

5.5 Appendix E: Preferred Walking Route Maps

Forest Park

Betsy Ross

School Travel Plan

Secondary Route

# North

!( Crossing Guards

St. Bernardine

South

#

Betsy Ross

West

#

n

n

Main Route

East

#

!(

!(

21B

21B

CHICAGO-KANSAS CITY EXPY

!(

n

# #

# #

# #

!(

# # # #

# # # #

# #

13TH ST

#

#

MAPLE AVE

!(

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

n

#

14TH ST

#

#

# #

16TH ST

HANNAH AVE

!(

!(

# # # #

#

YORK ST

#

#

#

POLK ST

Betsy Ross School District Boundary

0 390 780 1,560 2,340 3,120

Feet

Prepared By: Active Transportation Alliance 11/29/2011

Data Source: Active Transportation Alliance, Village of Forest Park & Navteq

#

# #

#

# #

#

#

# #

#

#

#

21A

DES PLAINES AVE

48

Forest PARK School Travel Plan


HARVARD ST

CIRCLE AVE

HANNAH AVE

ELGIN AVE

HARLEM AVE

ROOSEVELT RD

HARRISON ST

MARENGO AVE

BELOIT AVE

S MAPLE AVE

DUNLOP AVE

LATHROP AVE

FERDINAND AVE

LEXINGTON ST

TROOST AVE

MAPLE AVE

THOMAS AVE

FILLMORE ST

YUBA ST

15TH ST

5.5 Appendix E: Preferred Walking Route Maps

Forest Park

Field Stevenson

School Travel Plan

Secondary Route

# North

!( Crossing Guards

St. Bernardine

South

#

Field Stevenson

n

n

West

#

Main Route

!(

!(

!(

21B

21B

CHICAGO-KANSAS CITY EXPY

n

n

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

# #

# #

# #

#

#

# # # # # # #

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

# #

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

!(

!(

# # # #

# # #

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

# #

# # #

!(

# #

#

# # #

# # #

# # #

#

# #

#

#

!(

YORK ST

POLK ST

13TH ST

14TH ST

#

#

# #

16TH ST

East

#

Field Stevenson School District Boundary

0 385 770 1,540 2,310 3,080

Feet

Prepared By: Active Transportation Alliance

Data Source: Active Transportation Alliance, Village of Forest Park & Navteq

HANNAH AVE

21A

DES PLAINES AVE

appendices

49


S MAPLE AVE

FRANKLIN AVE

LATHROP AVE

MADISON ST

ADAMS ST

HARLEM AVE

S MAPLE AVE

HANNAH AVE

KEYSTONE AVE

THATCHER AVE

PARK AVE

GALE AVE

ROOSEVELT RD

RANDOLPH ST

VINE ST

HARVARD ST

SOUTH BLVD

LINDEN ST

JACKSON BLVD

THOMAS AVE

WISCONSIN AVE

MARENGO AVE

BURKHARDT CT

MONROE ST

ELGIN AVE

WILCOX ST

HARRISON ST

20

BELOIT AVE

WENONAH AVE

TROOST AVE

FILLMORE ST

MARENGO AVE

WISCONSIN AVE

WENONAH AVE

ELGIN AVE

15TH ST

5.5 Appendix E: Preferred Walking Route Maps

Forest Park

Forest Park Middle School

School Travel Plan

Secondary Route

# North

!( Crossing Guards

Forest Park Middle School

South

#

St. Johns

West

#

St. Bernardine

East

#

n

n

n

Main Route

Forest Park Middle School District Boundary

0 650 1,300 2,600 3,900 5,200

Feet

Presented By: Active Transportation Alliance

Data Source: Active Transportation Alliance, Village of Forest Park & Navteq

S MARION ST

FRANKLIN ST

#

# # #

#

# # #

# #

# #

!(

#

!( !(

#

#

#

#

#

#

# #

# #

# #

DIXON ST

#

n

n

##

#

# #

# #

ASHLAND AVE

#

#

!( !(

# # # # # #

#

# #

# #

!(

# # # # #

!(

# #

#

#

# # # #

# # # #

#

LEHM ER ST

T

VAN B UREN S

# #

# ##

#

#

21B

CHICAGO-KANSAS CITY EXPY

GARFIELD ST

!(

!(

!(

n

# #

# #

# #

#

#

YORK ST

LINCOLN CT

CHESTNUT LN

WISCONSIN AVE

ELGIN AVE ELGIN AVE

LEXINGTON ST

LEXINGTON ST

#

#

#

#

#

#

# #

# #

# #

POLK ST

# #

# #

# #

# #

# #

13TH ST

#

14TH ST

#

CIRCLE AVE

#

#

#

MAPLE AVE

# #

#

16TH ST

ADAMS ST

21B

HANNAH AVE

DES PLAINES AVE

CHICAGO-KANSAS CITY EXPY

FOREST AVE

MAYBROOK DR

50

Forest PARK School Travel Plan


HAWTHORNE AVE

CIRCLE AVE

FRANKLIN AVE

BELVIDERE AVE

HARLEM AVE

LATHROP AVE

ELGIN AVE

ASHLAND AVE

MARENGO AVE

VINE ST

MADISON ST

MONROE ST

HANNAH AVE

ELGIN AVE

ADAMS ST

BELOIT AVE

WILCOX ST

WASHINGTON ST

BURKHARDT CT

MARENGO AVE

THOMAS AVE

5.5 Appendix E: Preferred Walking Route Maps

Forest Park

Garfield Elementary

School Travel Plan

Secondary Route

# North

!( Crossing Guards

Garfield Elementary

South

#

St. Johns

West

n

n

#

Main Route

East

#

Garfield School District Boundary

0 310 620 1,240 1,860 2,480

Feet

Presented By: Active Transportation Alliance

Data Source: Active Transportation Alliance, Village of Forest Park & Navteq

#

FRANKLIN ST

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

# #

# #

#

#

BROWN AVE

LINDEN ST

#

#

#

# # #

#

DIXON ST

#

# #

#

#

#

#

#

# #

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

# #

#

#

# #

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

# #

# #

#

# #

#

#

# #

#

!(

!( !(

RANDOLPH ST

n

n

!( !(

# # # # # # #

!(

FERDINAND AVE ROCKFORD AVE

WASHINGTON BLVD

LINCOLN CT

BERGMAN CT

WASHINGTON ST

WARREN ST

JACKSON BLVD

DES PLAINES AVE

#

GROVE LN

ELGIN AVE

VAN BUREN ST

LEHMER ST

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

21B

CHICAGO-KANSAS CITY EXPY

CHICAGO-KANSAS CITY EXPY

!(

EXISTING CONDITIONS

51


HAWTHORNE AVE

CENTRAL AVE

CIRCLE AVE

FRANKLIN AVE

BELVIDERE AVE

LATHROP AVE

ELGIN AVE

ASHLAND AVE

MARENGO AVE

VINE ST

MADISON ST

HARLEM AVE

MONROE ST

HANNAH AVE

ELGIN AVE

ADAMS ST

BELOIT AVE

WILCOX ST

WASHINGTON ST

BURKHARDT CT

MARENGO AVE

THOMAS AVE

5.5 Appendix E: Preferred Walking Route Maps

Forest Park

Grant White Elementary

School Travel Plan

Secondary Route

# North

!( Crossing Guards

Grant White

South

#

St. Johns

n

n

West

#

Main Route

East

#

Grant White School District Boundary

0 310 620 1,240 1,860 2,480

Feet

Presented By; Active Transportation Alliance

Data Source: Active Transportation Alliance, Village of Forest Park & Navteq

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

FRANKLIN ST

# #

BROWN AVE

# #

#

DIXON ST

#

#

# #

!(

n

#

#

#

!( !(

#

RANDOLPH ST

LINCOLN CT

#

#

!(

# # #

n

# #

BERGMAN CT

WASHINGTON ST

#

# #

!(

# #

WARREN ST

#

#

#

#

#

# #

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

#

# # # #

#

!(

# #

#

FERDINAND AVE ROCKFORD AVE

JACKSON BLVD

#

#

#

#

21B

!(

# # # #

#

#

#

#

# # #

DES PLAINES AVE

ELGIN AVE

LEHMER ST

CHICAGO-KANSAS CITY EXPY

CHICAGO-KANSAS CITY EXPY

LINDEN ST

WASHINGTON BLVD

GROVE LN

VAN BUREN ST

52

Forest PARK School Travel Plan


5.6 Appendix F: Evaluation Tools

Evaluation Resources

The Safe Routes to School National Center provides free

analysis of Parent Surveys and Student Travel Tallies to school

districts participating in Safe Routes to School Programs.

Data collection forms are available by using the following URL:

http://www.saferoutesinfo.org/data-central/data-collection-forms

Data is submitted and stored using this link:

http://www.saferoutesdata.org/

appendices

53


5.6 Appendix F: Evaluation Tools

54

Forest PARK School Travel Plan


5.6 Appendix F: Evaluation Tools

appendices

55


5.6 Appendix F: Evaluation Tools

56

Forest PARK School Travel Plan


9 West Hubbard Street

Suite 402

Chicago, IL 60654-6545

t 312.427.3325

f 312.427.4907

info@activetrans.org

www.activetrans.org

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