Report - London Borough of Hillingdon

hillingdon.gov.uk

Report - London Borough of Hillingdon

To:

COUNCILLOR KEITH BURROWS

CABINET MEMBER FOR PLANNING,

TRANSPORTATION AND RCYCLING

Democratic Services

Location: 3E/05

Ext: 0692

DDI: 01895 250692

My Ref: NJ

c.c. All Members of Executive Scrutiny

Committee

c.c. Chairman of Residents’ & Environmental

Services Policy Overview Committee

c.c. Jean Palmer, Corporate Director

c.c. John Fern, PEECS

c.c. Conservative and Labour Group Offices

(inspection copy)

Date: 24 May 2011

Decision Request Form INDIVIDUAL CABINET MEMBER

WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

Attached is a report requesting that a decision be made by you as an individual

Cabinet Member. I can confirm that the decision has been identified in the Forward

Plan and it is therefore in order for you to make a decision. You should take a

decision on or after Thursday 2 June 2011 in order to meet Constitutional

requirements about publication of decisions that are to be made.

Please indicate your decision on the duplicate memo supplied, and return it to me

when you have made your decision. I will then arrange for the formal notice of

decision to be published. You may wish to discuss the report with the Corporate

Director before it is made. If you do not wish to accept the officer’s recommendation

and the reasons for it, you are urged to contact the Corporate Director before making

this decision.

Please note that your decision may be subject to call-in and will not therefore be

implemented until 5 working days after it has been published.

NAV JOHAL

Democratic Services Officer

Title of Report: Winter Service Operational Plan

Decision made:

Reasons for your decision : (e.g. as stated in report)

Alternatives considered and rejected : (e.g. as stated in report)

Signed ………………………………………………………Date……………………..

Cabinet Member for Planning, Transportation and Recycling


Winter Service Operational Plan

Cabinet Member

Cabinet Portfolio

Officer Contact

Councillor Keith Burrows

Cabinet Member for Planning, Transportation & Recycling

John Fern

Planning, Environment, Education and Community Services

Papers with report Winter Service Operational Plan 2011/12.

HEADLINE INFORMATION

Purpose of report

To provide the Cabinet Member with the Public Highways Winter

Service Operational Plan for the coming winter 2011/12.

Contribution to our

plans and strategies

The Public Highways Winter Service Plan makes a significant

contribution to the council’s duty to maintain the highway and

assists with achieving a ‘safe borough’ and a ‘clean and attractive

borough’.

Financial Cost The operational budget for this winter (2011/12) is £298,800.

Relevant Policy

Overview Committee

Ward(s) affected

Residents’ and Environmental Services.

All

RECOMMENDATION

That the Cabinet Member approves the Public Highways Winter Services Operational

Plan for implementation in 2011/12.

INFORMATION

Reasons for recommendation

The Council has a statutory duty, so far as is reasonably practicable, to ensure that safe

passage along a highway is not endangered by snow or ice. In order to discharge this duty the

Council has in place a Public Highways Winter Maintenance Operational Plan, which details the

policies and procedures in place to manage the road network in adverse winter weather

conditions, as well as providing operational and technical service information. This will be the

fifth winter that the Plan has been used and but for minor alterations it has provided a sound

basis for the Council’s winter maintenance operations.

Alternative options considered / risk management

No alternative options considered.

Cabinet Member report – 24 May 2011 Page 1

PART – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS


Comments of Policy Overview Committee(s)

None at this stage.

Supporting Information

1. A very brief non-technical resume of the policy and procedures is set out below.

2. The objective of the winter maintenance service provided by the Council is to maintain

communications and enable every day life to continue during adverse weather

conditions. In doing so it addresses the issues of safety, highway availability and

ensuring that delays to the travelling public are kept to a minimum on the treated

network. This policy is in line with the principles laid down in the code of good practice

‘Delivering Best Value in Highway maintenance’ published by the institution of Highways

and Transportation. The Operational Plan has also taken account of ‘Well-Maintained

Highways, Code of Practice for Highways Maintenance Management’, by the Roads

liaison Group and ‘Lessons from the Severe Weather February 2009’ also by the Roads

Liaison Group.

3. The winter maintenance season extends from 29 October to 01 April and is a 24/7

operation throughout that period. Weather forecasts are received every day, which

includes road surface temperature information and this information is used to help

determine the appropriate action.

4. The Council salts 26 routes, which approximates to 46% of the adopted highway

network, and amounts to in excess of 413 miles (667 km) of road. In extreme icy

conditions a number of additional roads are also salted. Details of the predetermined

routes and extreme icy routes are given in the Operational Plan.

5. The main factors used in drawing up the predetermined routes are to maintain:

a. Links to the national road network, industry, commercial and business centres.

b. Maintain public transport and access by emergency services.

c. Journeys to and from work and education.

6. There are three principal winter operations:

a. Pre-treatment, commonly known as ‘precautionary salting’ to prevent ice forming.

b. Post-treatment, commonly known as ‘post salting’ to melt ice and snow that has

already formed.

c. Snow clearing to remove significant accumulations of snow by the use of snow

ploughs, other heavy machinery and manual labour.

7. The adoption of the Highway Service Operational Plan is a key decision as it affects all

the residents of the borough. Formal adoption of the Plan will show that the Council has

acknowledged its responsibilities and duties to maintain the network and has a working,

evolving document in place to manage and implement its policy and procedures.

Financial Implications

The 2011/12 operational budget for the Winter Maintenance service is £298,800. The budget is

monitored as part of the standard monthly budget monitoring cycle, with any variations reported

through to Cabinet in the monthly revenue and capital monitoring report.

Cabinet Member report – 24 May 2011 Page 2

PART – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS


EFFECT ON RESIDENTS, SERVICE USERS & COMMUNITIES

What will be the effect of the recommendation?

The implementation of the Public Highways Winter Service Operational Plan will continue to

positively impact on all the residents of the Borough through the maintenance of

communications and will enable every day life to continue during adverse weather conditions. It

addresses the issues of safety, highway availability and ensures that delays to the travelling

public are kept to a minimum on the treated network.

Consultation Carried Out or Required

None.

CORPORATE IMPLICATIONS

Corporate Finance

N/A

Legal

Highway authorities have a statutory duty to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, that the

highway is kept free from ice and snow.

The duty is set out in Section 41 (1A) of the Highways Act 1980 as amended by Section 111 of

the Railways and Transport Act 2003. The relevant part of Section 41 now reads:

“a) The authority who are for the time being the highway authority for a highway

maintainable at the public expense are under a duty, subject to subsections (2)

and (3) below, to maintain the highway.

b) (1) In particular, a highway authority are under a duty to ensure, so far as is

reasonably practicable, that safe passage along a highway is not endangered by

snow or ice.”

The inclusion of the words “so far as is reasonably practicable” mean the duty to keep the

highway free of ice and snow is not absolute. The National Code of Practice for Highway

Maintenance ‘Well-maintained Highways’ published July 2005 (as amended) states that that

due to the scale of the financial and other resources that are potentially involved in delivering a

winter service, and the difficulties in maintaining high levels of plant utilisation for specialist

equipment, it may not be practicable to provide the service on all parts of the network to ensure

running surfaces are kept free of ice or snow at all times, even on the treated parts of the

network.

The Code goes on to state that in these circumstances, in order to comply with the changes in

legislation, it will be necessary to undertake risk assessments to establish which routes should

be included in a programme of treatment during inclement weather.

The Code recommends that Authorities should formally approve and adopt a Winter Service

Policy and Winter Service Operational Plan, it recommends issues to be considered when

Cabinet Member report – 24 May 2011 Page 3

PART – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS


drafting the documents and that all aspects of the Operational Plan should be reviewed annually

in consultation with users and key stakeholders.

Additional statutory duties upon the highway authority relevant to this matter are:

• Section 150 of the Highways Act 1980 which imposes a duty upon authorities to remove any

obstruction of the highway resulting from “accumulation of snow or from the falling down of

banks on the side of the highway, or from any other cause” and

• the Traffic Management Act 2004 which requires authorities to do all that is reasonably

practicable to manage the network effectively to keep traffic moving. In meeting the duty,

authorities are required to establish contingency plans for dealing promptly and effectively

with unplanned events, such as unforeseen weather conditions, as far as is reasonably

practicable.

In addition to the statutory duties and powers, authorities have a general duty of care to users

and the community to maintain the highway in a condition fit for its purpose.

BACKGROUND PAPERS

Public Highways Winter Service Operational Service Plan 2011/12.

Cabinet Member report – 24 May 2011 Page 4

PART – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

FOR PUBLIC HIGHWAYS WITHIN THE

LONDON BOROUGH OF HILLINGDON


2011/2012

(28 th Oct 2011 to 30th March 2012)

VOLUME 1 – Policies and Service Arrangements.

WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

0. Summary

1. Introduction

1.1 Winter Service

1.2 Objectives

1.3 Weather Forecasts

1.4 Winter Service Operations for the 2011/12 Season

1.5 What & When Do We Grit

1.6 Salt Stocks

1.7 FAQs

2. Summary of Revisions

2.1. Changes from 2010/2011.

3. Statement of Policies and Responsibilities

3.1. Policies and objectives.

3.2. Client and Highways Responsive Maintenance Team risks and responsibilities.

3.3. Decision making process and responsibilities.

3.4. Salt Treatments

3.5 Service delivery from the Highways Responsive Maintenance Section, (HRMS).

3.6. Liaison arrangements with other authorities.

4. Quality

4.1 Document control procedures.

4.2 Circulation of documents.

4.3 Information recording and analysis.

4.4 Arrangements for performance monitoring, audit, and updating.

5. Route Planning for Carriageways, Footways and Cycle Routes

5.1. Carriageway routes for pre-treatment.

5.2. Carriageway routes for post-treatment.

5.3. Ad hoc post-treatment.

5.4. Other post-treatment operations.

5.5. Routes for footway treatment.

5.6. Routes for cycleway/footpath and bridge treatment.

5.7. Response and treatment times for carriageway and footway treatments.

5.8. Standard Labour Force Working/Gritting Cyclic Schedule

5.9 Location and maintenance of salt bins and salt stores.

5.10 Resilience Network.

Winter Service Operational Plan Vol 1 2 of 29


6. Weather Prediction and Information

6.1. Forecasting, inspections and other decision support information

6.2. Information to be provided

6.3. Timing and circulation of information

6.4. Reporting procedure

7. Organisational Arrangements and Personnel

7.1 Organisational chart and employee responsibilities.

7.2 Employee duty schedules, Rota and standby arrangements.

7.3 Plant and vehicle manning arrangements.

7.4 Training and development arrangements.

7.5 Health and safety procedures.

8 Plant, Vehicles and Equipment

8.1 Fleet inventory including license requirements and capacity.

8.2 Location of plant, vehicles and other equipment.

8.3 Garaging, servicing and maintenance arrangements.

8.4 Calibration procedures.

8.5 Fuel stocks and locations.

9 Salt and De–Icing Materials

9.1 Location and capacity of stocks for salt and other materials.

9.2 Supply and testing arrangements.

9.3 Delivery arrangements.

9.4 Treatment requirements including spread rates.

9.5 Contacts and purchasing arrangements for supplies.

10 Treatment Methods

10.1 Precautionary Salting

10.2 Snow Clearance

11 Operational Communications

11.1 Technical systems information.

11.2 Reporting arrangements and protocols.

12 Information and Publicity

12.1 Local press and broadcast contact information.

12.2 Responsibilities and guidance for providing information.

Winter Service Operational Plan Vol 1 3 of 29


Volume 2: - Appendices and Annexes

Appendices

Annex

1 Northern Area

A Salting Routes and Winter Maintenance Service.

B Primary and Secondary Footway Treatment.

C Salt Bin Locations.

D Ice Sign Locations.

2 Southern Area

A Salting Routes and Winter Maintenance Service.

B Primary and Secondary Footway Treatment.

C Salt Bin Locations.

D Ice Sign Locations.

3 Weather Forecasting and Decision Making

Procedure.

4 Climatic Domains Map

5 ‘Daily Decision’ – Standard Proforma and Letters.

6

Winter Service Daily Operational & Defect Report

7

Highway ‘Out of Hours’ Duty Engineer Rota.

8 Adjoining Highway Authorities and Contacts.

9 Weather Terminology.

10 Self Care - Guidelines For Highway Users During

Winter.

11 Salt Bins - Guidelines For Their Use.

12 Changes in Winter Service Operational Plan.

Winter Service Operational Plan Vol 1 4 of 29


0. SUMMARY

The Winter Service Operational Plan sets out the objectives for the London Borough of

Hillingdon’s winter service. The Plan details the organisational procedures, the winter weather

forecasts and the decision-making process (i.e. “when we grit”). It explains who is responsible

for the service delivery and sets out the required documentation and information recording

measures for performance and auditing procedures. The list of gritting routes and the process

of gritting treatments for those routes are provided together with the service delivery times. The

plant and equipment required for delivering the service, along with the support to maintain the

service are explained. The arrangements for purchasing, supply and storage of the salt and deicing

materials is provided. Operational communications and technical systems information are

detailed and information given regarding publicity and national contacts.

Winter Service Operational Plan Vol 1 5 of 29


1. INTRODUCTION

1.1 Winter Service

A winter service not only deals with exceptional winter weather events but also with regular,

frequent and reasonably predictable occurrences like low temperatures, ice and snow.

Responsibility for the delivery of Winter Service rests with Hillingdon council as highway

authority for its borough roads, and is a year-round process linked with Hillingdon’s wider

resilience planning.

1.2 Objectives

The objective of the winter service provided by the Hillingdon Council, as highway authority, is

to maintain communications and enable every day life to continue during adverse weather

conditions. In doing so it addresses the issues of safety, highway availability and ensures that

delays to the travelling public are kept to a minimum on the treated network.

The Councils aim is to provide an effective and efficient winter service to allow:

• The safe passage of vehicles and pedestrians on the network of gritting routes.

• To minimise and control delays due to winter weather.

• To carry out operations safely.

The aim of the Winter Service Operational Plan is to set out how the winter service is to be

provided by the London Borough of Hillingdon

1.3 Weather Forecasts

Weather forecasts are provided on an area basis by the Met Office as our forecast provider.

Separate forecasts are provided for each of eight areas (or “domains”) across London, so

gritting operations can be implemented according to the forecast in that particular domain. Each

domain covers areas of similar climatic characteristics; Hillingdon is covered by two domains

(Nos 4 & 7 - see Appendix 4) and the boundary between them runs approximately along the

A40.

Weather forecasts will be received several times a day, and, in extreme weather officers speak

directly to weather forecasters to get the latest information. Forecasts include road surface

temperature information which is used to help determine the appropriate action.

1.4 Winter Service Operations for the 2011/12 Season

For 2011/12 the winter service season extends from 28 October to 30 March and is a 24/7

operation throughout that period.

There are three principal winter operations:

• Pre-treatment, commonly known as ‘precautionary salting’ to prevent ice forming.

• Post-treatment, commonly known as ‘post salting’ to melt ice and snow that has already

formed.

• Snow clearing to remove significant accumulations of snow by the use of snow ploughs

other heavy machinery and manual labour.

Winter Service Operational Plan Vol 1 6 of 29


1.5 What & When Do We Grit

1.5.1 Pre - Treatment

In common with many authorities the borough does not pre-treat all of its road network. The aim

of the service is to salt a network such that road users have a relatively short distance to travel

to get to a salted route. The Borough salts 8 pre-determined routes, which in total approximate

to 190 miles (307 km), or 46% of the adopted highway network which totals 413 miles (667 km)

of road.

The main criterion used in drawing up the predetermined routes was to maintain:

• Links to the national road network, industry, commercial and business centres.

• Maintain public transport and access by emergency services.

• Journeys to and from work.

Depending on the forecasted severity of the weather, precautionary salting will take place over

differing extents of the road network: When the road surface temperatures are expected to fall

below 0 o C and:

• Roads are expected to remain generally dry, then “Blackspots” are treated. “Blackspots”

are hills, junctions and known areas where it is known that frost or ice is likely to form locally

(see Appendices 1A and 2A for location lists)

• Icy frost is expected to form, then Priority Routes are treated - routes of primary

importance which tend to be “A“ roads and “B“ roads (see Appendices 1A and 2A for

location lists).

• Icy patches or widespread ice is expected to form, or snow is expected, then Priority and

Secondary routes are treated. They include all roads which fall under the criterion used to

draw up the predetermined routes (see Appendices 1A and 2A for location lists)

1.5.2 Post Treatment

Post salting will only be considered on minor roads not included in the pre-determined routes in

response to a specific report that a particular road is in an icy condition and then only after it has

been inspected to confirm that treatment is necessary.

Minor roads will not be treated with salt until after the pre-determined routes have been

sufficiently treated to ensure that they remain open to traffic at all times. These roads will then

be treated on a hierarchical basis of importance and in response to specific requests from the

Police, public etc.

No footways, pedestrian precincts or cycle ways are specifically included in pre-determined

routes for precautionary salting. Nevertheless, there will be a certain amount of over spill of salt

onto footways and cycle ways when precautionary salting is being carried out on adjacent

carriageways.

Winter Service Operational Plan Vol 1 7 of 29


Footways will only be treated once snow has settled or during periods of prolonged freezing

conditions on a priority basis at locations including (See Annex B to Appendices 1 & 2):

• Town Centres

• Hospitals

• Old Peoples Homes

• Day Centres

• Schools (during term times only)

• Footbridges

• Bus Stops

Secondary footway treatment will be carried out once Priority footways have been treated (See

Annex B to Appendices 1 & 2). If any reports of icy footways are received for locations not

included on the Priority or Secondary listings, the footway will be inspected to assess whether it

should be treated or not.

1.6 Salt Stocks

Over the last two decades, winters across England have been relatively mild. However,

February 2009 saw a prolonged period of cold weather and snowfall that resulted, across the

country, in significant disruption to travel to a range of public services, and to business. Many

highway authorities would have run out of salt for treating highways had milder weather not

arrived.

The February snow was only one period during a winter which was the most severe for at least

18 years. Freezing conditions and snowfall began in October and continued across the country

during much of December, January and February. Particular issues for highways were the

significantly larger than expected volumes of salt needed from earlier in the winter through to

February to prevent roads and footways freezing and help clear snow.

Focus fell upon the need to ensure salt did not run out by:

• Carrying a higher level of salt stock at the beginning and throughout the winter season (if

suppliers can satisfy the increased demand for salt)

• minimising the area of highway salted, or

• by minimising the amount of salt put down (i.e. minimising the spread rate)

This has lead to highway authorities across the country defining their Resilience Networks, a

“fall back” minimum network of essential roads to be salted when salt stocks are low and resupply

is uncertain. Should it be necessary to reduce salt usage in the face of a national salt

shortage like it was in 2009/10, we have developed Hillingdon’s Resilience network to prepare

for this eventuality and keep the borough moving. We want to be as prepared as possible, and

this network is designed to make best possible use of our stockpiled supplies in extreme

situations.

Hillingdon’s Resilience Network was put into operation in November/December 2010 when the

whole country experienced the coldest winter on record. The Winter Service Plan was tested to

the full and ensured that access to the boroughs network of roads was maintained.

.

Winter Service Operational Plan Vol 1 8 of 29


1.7 Frequently Asked Questions

Here are answers to a number of frequently asked questions about how Hillingdon responds to

winter weather:

• When does salting take place?

• Which roads are salted?

• How does spreading salt help?

• Can I clear the snow outside my house?

• How well did the council cope with last winter 2010/11?

• How has the council learned the lessons of last year’s winter weather?

• Last year’s severe winter weather produced lots of potholes in the roads – what did the

Council do about them?

• Does the Council have enough salt for this winter?

• How do I get my road added to the salting routes?

When does salting take place?

In Hillingdon we define the winter period as starting at the end of October and finishing at the

end of March. Hillingdon has a relatively mild winter climate when compared to other parts of

Britain. This means temperatures often hover around the freezing point and these marginal

conditions can make things difficult when making the decision whether or not to salt.

We work very closely with weather forecasters to ensure that the weather is constantly

monitored and that we take appropriate action.

We try to complete salting outside peak traffic periods and before freezing conditions occur.

This becomes particularly challenging when rain, sleet or hail is forecast which can wash salt off

the roads.

Which roads are salted?

We carry out salting in a priority order in accordance with importance of the road. A map of the

roads salted is available on the Councils website at

http://www.hillingdon.gov.uk/index.jsp?articleid=16915 .

The aim of the service is to salt a network such that road users have a relatively short distance

to travel to get to a salted route. The Borough salts 8 pre-determined routes, which adds up to

approximately 190 miles (307 km), or 46% of the adopted highway network which totals 413

miles (667 km) of road.

How does spreading salt help?

Salt is the best material we have available to treat snow and ice, but it isn’t perfect. How it

helps is by turning ice into salt water, which has a lower freezing point, and the melted water

then drains away. Roads with more traffic clear quicker, even when they have had exactly the

same treatment; tyres grind the salt thus helping the process

However, if temperatures drop to minus six or below as happened during the 2010/11 winter the

salt water itself freezes. When that happens, grit can be added to the salt to help break up the

snow through the action of tyres on the snow.

At the peak of last year’s wintry weather, Hillingdon Council were gritting four or five times a

night, often while residents were asleep. This was giving us plenty of salt on the roads and

helping keep the predetermined routes free of snow and ice and the traffic moving.

Winter Service Operational Plan Vol 1 9 of 29


Can I clear the snow outside my house?

The Department for Transport has issued guidance around the legal issues for residents who

want to clear snow and ice from outside their properties. In response to concerns from the

public about being sued, the guidelines state:

There is no law stopping you from clearing snow and ice on the pavement outside your

property, pathways to your property or public spaces. If an accident did happen, it's highly

unlikely that you would be sued as long as you are careful and use common sense to make

sure that you don't make the pavement or pathway clearly more dangerous than before. People

using areas affected by snow and ice also have responsibility to be careful themselves."

Official Department for Transport tips and advice on clearing snow and ice

“The Snow Code“:

“Prevent slips

Pay extra attention to clear snow and ice from steps and steep pathways - you might need to

use more salt on these areas. If you clear snow and ice yourself, be careful - don’t make the

pathways more dangerous by causing them to refreeze. But don’t be put off clearing paths

because you’re afraid someone will get injured. Remember, people walking on snow and ice

have responsibility to be careful themselves. Follow the advice below to make sure you clear

the pathway safely and effectively.

Clear the snow or ice early in the day

It’s easier to move fresh, loose snow rather than hard snow that has packed together from

people walking on it. So if possible, start removing the snow and ice in the morning. If you

remove the top layer of snow in the morning, any sunshine during the day will help melt any ice

beneath. You can then cover the path with salt before nightfall to stop it refreezing overnight.

Use salt or sand - not water

If you use water to melt the snow, it may refreeze and turn to black ice. Black ice increases the

risk of injuries as it is invisible and very slippery. You can prevent black ice by spreading some

salt on the area you have cleared. You can use ordinary table or dishwasher salt - a tablespoon

for each square metre you clear should work. Don’t use the salt found in salting bins - this will

be needed to keep the roads clear. Be careful not to spread salt on plants or grass as it may

cause them damage. If you don’t have enough salt, you can also use sand or ash. These won’t

stop the path icing over as well as salt, but will provide good grip under foot.

Take care where you move the snow

When you’re shovelling snow, take care where you put it so it doesn’t block people’s paths or

drains. Make sure you make a path down the middle of the area to be cleared first, so you have

a clear surface to walk on. Then shovel the snow from the centre of the path to the sides.

Offer to clear your neighbours’ paths

If your neighbour will have difficulty getting in and out of their home, offer to clear snow and ice

around their property as well. Check that any elderly or disabled neighbours are alright in the

cold weather. If you’re worried about them, contact your local council.”

To find more information about this, and to see the full version of this advice from the

Department for Transport website http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Nl1/Newsroom/DG_191868

Winter Service Operational Plan Vol 1 10 of 29


How well did the borough council cope with last winter?

Hillingdon's official winter service period started on 29 October 2010 and after a very hard

winter which was the coldest on record ended on 1 April 2011. Over the winter there were:

52 nights when road temperatures went below zero, with at least one salting run being carried

out on each occasion. For days, when the borough was under snow, many salting runs took

place in the middle of the night. The total cost for salting and clearing of the borough’s roads

and pavements during the period was £359,795.

What did Hillingdon Council do about the potholes in the roads caused by the severe

10/11 winter weather?

Last winter, the coldest weather conditions on record took a major toll on the country’s roads,

pavements and cycleways. In Hillingdon, we have conducted a massive £2.4 m programme of

permanent pothole repairs in the spring to mend the roads as quickly as possible.

Damage to the roads during wintry weather is caused by rain water and thawing snow seeping

into small cracks in the road. As temperatures dip, the water freezes and expands, enlarging the

cracks. This causes cracks and potholes to appear, overnight in some cases, even in roads that

otherwise appear sound. Once the winter season is over, a full assessment of the road

network’s condition is carried out, and our inspection and repair works are coordinated in order

to return the highway to a safe condition as quickly as possible.

Permanent repairs on main roads are then coordinated into larger programmes of repair work,

which can take several months to complete.

Does the Council have enough salt for this winter?

Yes, we have sufficient supplies for normal winter conditions. However, if we do experience

exceptional winter conditions, we may again be asked by the Department for Transport to

reduce our salt usage and take such a decision in conjunction with other councils across

London.

How do I get my road added to the salting routes?

The list has been reviewed since last year to maximise the efficiency of our salting operations

and so the situation may have changed. A significant amount of work takes place each year to

review the list taking into account our criteria. The list is approved each year by the Cabinet

Member for Planning Transportation and Recycling.

Winter Service Operational Plan Vol 1 11 of 29


2. SUMMARY OF REVISIONS

Changes From 2010/2011

Each year the Winter Service Operational Plan is reviewed and updated accordingly to take

account of changes that are needed to ensure that the Winter Service continues to operate in

an efficient way. Since last year the following changes have been made to the Plan.

• Total Plan: Volume 1 & Volume 2, Revised and Updated, April 2011.

3.0 STATEMENT OF POLICIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

3.1 Policies And Objectives

There are two pieces of legislation that relate to the provision of a Winter Service in England

and Wales :

1. Section 41 (1 A) of the Highways Act 1980, which was modified on 31st October 2003, by

Section 111 of the Railways and Transport Act 2003. The first part of Section 41 now reads:

"a) The authority who are for the time being the highway authority for a highway maintainable at

the public expense are under a duty, subject to subsections (2) and (3) below, to maintain the

highway.

b) (1) In particular, a highway authority are under a duty to ensure, so far as is reasonably

practicable, that safe passage along a highway is not endangered by snow or ice."

This is not an absolute duty, given the qualification of "reasonable practicability" but it does

effectively overturn previous legal precedence, although not retrospectively.

2. Section 150 of the Highways Act 1980 still imposes a duty upon authorities to remove any

obstruction of the highway resulting from "accumulation of snow or from the falling down of

banks on the side of the highway, or from any other cause ".

Also, the Traffic Management Act 2004 placed a network management duty on all local traffic

authorities in England . It requires authorities to do all that is reasonably practicable to manage

the network effectively to keep traffic moving. In meeting the duty, authorities should establish

contingency plans for dealing promptly and effectively with unplanned events, such as

unforeseen weather conditions, as far as is reasonably practicable .

The plan must also comply with the general duty imposed by Section 41 of the Highways Act

1980: to maintain those highways maintainable at public expense in a safe condition.

The London Borough of Hillingdon therefore undertakes to provide a winter service which, as far

as reasonably practical, will permit safe movement of traffic and minimise delays and accidents

directly attributable to adverse weather conditions.

Winter Service Operational Plan Vol 1 12 of 29


The strategy adopted for the London Borough of Hillingdon has been developed in

accordance with the recommendations set within:

• Well Maintained Highways - Code of Practice for Highway Maintenance Management,

published in July 2005 and:

• The guidelines detailed within the design and practice guide for highway winter

maintenance published by ICE (Institution of Civil Engineers) in 2000.

• The UKRLG Report 2009 and its recommendations. The Winter Resilience Interim

Review.

The Highways Responsive Maintenance Team (HRMT) coordinates and ensures the

provision of winter maintenance services. This generally involves spreading rock salt onto the

surface of roads and footways by the use of purpose-built vehicles and hand operated

machines.

3.2 Responsibilities

The winter service is managed by the Street Environment Team, which is part of the Planning,

Environment and Education Community Services Directorate. The service is delivered by the

Winter Service Team (WST), who consist of Street Environment staff, Waste Management Staff

and Fleet Management Staff

3.2.1 The Street Environment team’s responsibilities:

Before the Winter Season

1. Plan a service to deal with an average winter but having the capability to be extended to

handle more severe winters.

2. Update the Winter Service Operational Plan each year following a review of all aspects.

3. Maintain a list of pre-treatment salting routes for carriageways, footways, and cycleways for

different winter weather conditions.

4. Maintain a list of routes for post treatment during prolonged extreme or severe weather

conditions ( The “Resilience Network”)

5. Arrange for adequate weather forecasts during the winter period.

6. Maintain a list of salt bins and their location. Maintain the level of salt within the salt bins.

7. Procure and manage the stock of salt.

8. Ensuring that all operatives are appropriately trained in winter service operations.

9. Providing the Council with communication channels to enable immediate contact between

the Winter Service Call Out Officer, WST and the Council’s emergency control room, and

WST drivers, workshop operatives, shovel driver and fitter.

10. Establishing a list of contractors with suitable plant for snow clearing purposes and hiring in

such plant when necessary.

11. Identify within the council and enlist skilled mechanical salting vehicle drivers, weighbridge

operators, shovel drivers, supervisors, etc. adequate to manage and complete the winter

service operations to the specification within the response times.

12. Ensure temporary ice signs are located at the appropriate locations when conditions apply.

During the Winter Season

13. Contact with a meteorological weather forecaster for advice.

14. Scrutinise the weather forecasts to assess the winter service required.

15. Record and log in writing all decisions relating to the winter service.

16. Determination of appropriate service specifying the start time of treatment, the route number

Winter Service Operational Plan Vol 1 13 of 29


and the salt spread rate.

17. Collection of data for performance measurement.

18. Establish on the service completed such as weighbridge weights, response and treatment

times.

19. Monitor the salt usage and ensuring that new supplies are ordered and delivered to maintain

an appropriate level of salt.

20. To update the PEECS Senior Management Team, the Contact Centre and the Emergency

Planning Team on road conditions during severe weather (snow or widespread ice) and

ensure they are fully briefed and aware of the conditions.

21. Provide accurate information to Fleet Management on plant condition, listing any

mechanical faults, which would prevent satisfactory operation.

3.2.2 Fleet Management’s Responsibilities:

22. Provide and maintain vehicles adequate to carry out the salting of all routes within the

specified response times.

23. Provide the salt spreading equipment calibration test records (BS 1622) prior to the start of

the winter period.

24. To ensure that workshop facilities and appropriate skilled personnel are available on 24-

hour call-out during the winter period to repair and maintain vehicles and to deal with any

mechanical breakdowns that may occur.

3.3 Decision Making and Responsibilities

Service is triggered by information from the Meteorological Office's London Boroughs Winter

Forecast Service (see Section 6.0)

The Winter Service Call Out Officer has responsibility for ordering the service. During severe

conditions he will confirm with the Senior Manager Street Environment the actions to be taken.

The Winter Service Call Out Officer receives and assesses the weather forecast and should this

forecast predict changeable or marginal conditions then clarification can be sought from the

consultant forecaster. Often, a decision cannot be made from the main 11:00 forecast, due to

the changeable or marginal conditions, and later forecasts will need to be assessed. Refer to

Volume 2, Appendix 3 – ‘Weather Forecast and Decision Making Procedure’ and Appendix 5

‘Daily Decision’ Standard Proforma that tabulates the actions and factors to be considered when

making a decision.

It may be necessary to carry out an inspection of the routes to confirm actual conditions. It is

crucial to arrive at a decision, which does not compromise risk but does not lead to unnecessary

salting.

A ‘Daily Decision’ Standard Pro-forma is completed on a daily basis (see Appendix 5). The

completion and circulation of the pro-forma should be by 15:30 hours. It may be that the

‘Decision’ is to await a later weather forecast. Should this be the case the Winter Service Call

Out Officer should update the ‘Daily Decision’ pro-forma the following morning.

Details of the Routes and Priority Lists relating to the following treatments are detailed in

Volume 2; Appendix 1, Northern Area and Appendix 2, Southern Area, with associated

annexes.

Winter Service Operational Plan Vol 1 14 of 29


3.4 Salt Treatments

Pre-treatment salting to selected carriageways would be carried out if the forecast indicates:

• Bravo, Bravo/Charlie, Charlie, Charlie/Delta, Delta or Snow conditions

• Alpha and Alpha/Bravo in some circumstances (e.g. wet spots).

Post treatment salting to carriageways would be carried out when the conditions are:

• Extreme and severe and predicted to last for a prolonged period.

• Icy with formations on surfaces expected to remain after 08:00 hours.

Selective post treatment salting to selected footways and cycleways will be carried out when the

conditions are:

• Extreme and severe and predicted to last for a prolonged period.

• Where snow has been cleared and where conditions are extreme and severe and

predicted to last for a prolonged period.

• Where undisturbed snow accumulations are less than 30mm and where conditions are

extreme and severe and predicted to last for a prolonged period.

• Snow clearing will be programmed should the forecast indicate:

• Extreme and severe weather conditions with settled snow deeper than 30mm and

predicted to last for a prolonged period.

3.5 Service Delivery

The Winter Service Call Out Officer will ensure service provision as soon as the ‘Daily Decision’

pro-forma, (Volume 2, Appendix 5) is completed. Should a decision not be made by 1600hrs

then the Winter Service Call Out Officer will make his intentions known to the WST prior to this

time, indicating the likelihood of the decision. This is to ensure good communications and is

particularly important during severe weather conditions e.g. if snow has been predicted.

Timing of service is critical; e.g., badly timed service can lead to salt being washed away prior to

freezing temperatures. Once ice has formed it requires significant effort to remove it.

Telephone calls (from the Police or members of the public) requesting immediate treatment to

icy patches are often received out of hours. Each case needs to be considered separately.

Should the Police inform of dangerous conditions then immediate action to order treatment from

the Winter Service Call Out Officer is required.

Other reports may require a site inspection Winter Service Call Out Officer should full service

not have been called. When ‘Thames Water’ (TW) leaks are reported, then the Utility will be

contacted and treatment carried out unless confirmation is received that either the problem has

been solved or TW have put in place a salting regime themselves. The WST will recharge the

costs involved directly to TW for implementing the salting regime on their behalf.

3.6 Liaison arrangements with other authorities

There will be an interchange of information with all authorities that border or pass through the

London Borough of Hillingdon. The purpose for which is to ensure continuity of service. See

Appendix 7 for a list of adjoining highway authorities and contacts.

Winter Service Operational Plan Vol 1 15 of 29


4.0 QUALITY

4.1 Document control procedures

All information collated and recorded during the winter maintenance period is filed in the Winter

Service files held by the Responsive Maintenance Manager, (Mr Terry Kenealy). The Winter

Service Operational Plan is held by the Responsive Maintenance Manager, The Street

Environment Manager (Mr James Birch) and the Highway Inspection Manager (Mr John

Fern).The following information will be held:

1. Copy of the London Weather Centre Forecasts.

2. Notes on discussions with the consultant forecaster during normal and out of hours periods.

3. The ‘Daily Decision’ pro-forma.

4. Copy of orders requesting service.

5. WST service returns recording the route number, vehicle registration number, drivers name,

date, start kilometres, finish kilometres, start time of mobilisation, start time of treatment,

finish time of treatment, vehicle weights in and out, (loaded and unloaded), weight of surplus

salt, weighbridge times and any vehicle/plant faults.

4.2 Circulation of documents

The Winter Service Operational Plan is issued on the London Borough of Hillingdon website

www.hillingdon.gov.uk and Intranet. Interested stakeholders will be informed that the Winter

Service Operational Plan is available on the website.

4.3 Information recording and analysis

The Street Environment Manager is to ensure that a Winter Service Operational Plan is

produced compiling the following procedures and checks:

Preparing for winter

1. Checking all of the routes to ensure that they remain appropriate

2. Receiving from the Fleet Management the calibration results for salt spreading equipment

and assessing its accuracy.

3. Receiving from the WST stand-by duty rotas and checking against the specification

requirements.

4. Receiving certification from a recognised Vehicle Plant Authority that all vehicles, plant and

equipment are fit to perform the Services.

5. Checking that the training of operatives is adequate

6. Checking that an appropriate supply of salt is ordered.

7. Checking that salt bins are serviceable and filled with an appropriate amount of salt.

8. Setting up and ordering weather forecasting service.

Action during winter

1. The decision making process.

2. Weather forecasts.

3. Response times and distribution of salt spreading.

4. Monitoring the WST performance.

Winter Service Operational Plan Vol 1 16 of 29


4.4 Arrangements for performance monitoring, audit and updating.

The Highways Inspection Manager will provide sufficient supervision in order to check the

performance of the WST winter weather service. This performance will be checked against the

specifications. Regular reports are to be submitted and issues of concern raised at the

Highways Inspection Manager/ HRMT meeting.

The Highways Inspection manager will be satisfied that:

1. Service is within the specified periods for response and treatment.

2. All roads within routes have been treated.

3. The specified spread rate has been adhered to.

4. The WST equipment is in good working order.

5. The weighbridge procedure ensures that each ticket specifies weight in, weight out, salt

used, time in and time out. A ticket will be available for every operation and vehicle.

6. Salt reserves are monitored and replenished as appropriate.

7. Salt spreading vehicles spread rates are checked during operation by inspection of the

vehicles during service.

8. Salt quality and effectiveness of storage facilities are checked at regular intervals.

Contamination of salt is checked.

9. The following local key performance measures will be compared:

10. Percentage of total network (carriageways) included on pre-treatment salting routes.

o Route optimisation – length of route travelled over length salted.

o Percentage of routes completed within three hours.

o Actual winter maintenance expenditure per kilometre of carriageway.

o The optimum weight of salt used per pre-treatment route at a spread rate of 10g/m2.

o The percentage of salt bins provided on main footways (not a footway priority-salting

route) where the gradient is steeper than 1 in 12.

Winter Service Operational Plan Vol 1 17 of 29


5.0 ROUTE PLANNING FOR CARRIAGEWAYS, FOOTWAYS AND CYCLE ROUTES

5.1 Carriageway routes for pre-treatment

The main criteria used in drawing up the predetermined routes were to maintain:

• Links to the national road network, industry, commercial and business centres.

• Maintain public transport and access by emergency services.

• Journeys to and from work.

When the road surface temperatures are expected to fall below 0 o C and Roads are expected to

remain generally dry, “Blackspots” are treated. “Blackspots” are hills, junctions and known

areas where it is known that frost or ice is likely to form locally (see Appendices 1A and 2A for

location lists)

When the road surface temperatures are expected to fall below 0 o C and Icy frost is expected to

form, Priority Routes are treated - routes of primary importance which tend to be “A“ roads

and “B“ roads (see Appendices 1A and 2A for location lists).There are 8 Priority routes made up

of 16 sections.

When the road surface temperatures are expected to fall below 0 o C and Icy patches or

widespread ice is expected to form, or snow is expected: Priority and Secondary routes are

treated. They include all roads which fall under the criterion used to draw up the predetermined

routes and include all bus routes. (see Appendices 1A and 2A for location lists) There are 8

Secondary routes made up of 12 sections

The routes have some flexibility and the Street Environment Manager will inform the WST of

additions that he requires as a result of reports of water main leaks etc., received during the

day.

No footways, pedestrian precincts or cycle ways are specifically included in pre-determined

routes for precautionary salting. Nevertheless, there will be a certain amount of over spill of salt

onto footways and cycle ways when precautionary salting is being carried out on adjacent

carriageways.

The Street Environment Manager will update the routes as necessary due to new constraints

imposed on access through, e.g. traffic calming measures or parking problems. Any

amendments will be provided to the WST as soon as possible.

Reports of wet areas due to the Statutory Utilities operations or plant, or from Contractor's sites

on the public highway will be treated until written confirmation is received that either the problem

has been solved or they have put in place a salting regime themselves. The WST will recharge

the costs involved in treating these on their behalf.

5.2 Carriageway routes for post-treatment

The primary and secondary salting routes identified above as pre-treatment routes may be

ordered for post treatment as conditions dictate.

Reports of Ice on the Public Highway Information from the police or emergency services will be

actioned in line with the priorities as described in this plan. Clarifications should be sought as to

whether it's one specific site or a general area and to the cause of the slipperiness. For example

Winter Service Operational Plan Vol 1 18 of 29


it could be either a diesel spill or a result of salt in solution

Post salting will only be considered on minor roads not included in the pre-determined routes in

response to a specific report that a particular road is in an icy condition and then only after it has

been inspected to confirm that treatment is necessary.

Minor roads will not be treated with salt until after the pre-determined routes have been

sufficiently treated to ensure that they remain open to traffic at all times. These roads will then

be treated on a hierarchical basis of importance and in response to specific requests from the

Police, public etc.

No action will be taken to treat ice on private roads (i.e. where there are no public right of

highway rights) unless specific arrangements are in place.

5.3 Ad hoc post-treatment

The Highways 24/7 Emergency Call Out team is available with full access to the gritting

vehicles. Should it ever be necessary, this team can call out the Winter Service Team if this

action is required by road conditions.

5.4 Snow Clearance

The decision to move to the snow clearance operation shall be made by the Winter Service Call

Out Officer, following consultation with the Street Environment Manager.

Snow fall of less than 30mm will not normally require any further action than precautionary

salting unless prolonged sub-zero temperatures are forecast.

For snow falls in excess of 30mm or when drifting occurs, post salting and ploughing will take

place on Priority and Secondary routes as soon as is practicable. In the most severe cases it

may be necessary to deploy all available resource to maintain free flow on the major routes and

minimise unsafe conditions.

5.5 Routes for footway treatment.

Footways will only be treated once snow has settled or during periods of prolonged freezing

conditions on a priority basis at locations including (See Annex B to Appendices 1 & 2):

• Town Centres

• Hospitals

• Old Peoples Homes

• Day Centres

• Schools (during term times only)

• Footbridges

• Bus Stops

Secondary footway treatment will be carried out once Priority footways have been treated (See

Annex B to Appendices 1 & 2). If any reports of icy footways are received for locations not

included in on the Priority or Secondary listings, the footway will be inspected to assess

whether it should be treated or not.

Winter Service Operational Plan Vol 1 19 of 29


The street-cleaning workforce are employed on snow treatment when conditions dictate and

routine street cleansing is then suspended. The workforce will be provided with snow shovels

and hand propelled salt spreaders. The Street Environment Manager, with the Director of

Planning, Environment Education and Community Services, will decide on whether additional

resources are required to supplement those already available.

5.6 Routes for cycle way/footpath and bridge treatment.

A review of cycleway treatment has taken place and the on-carriageway cycleway network

within the primary and secondary routes will be treated when the gritting of these routes is done.

The remainder of the cycleway network will be treated on a priority basis depending on level of

use, surface type, gradient and the severity of conditions and predicted duration of extreme

weather when resources allow.

5.7 Response and treatment times for carriageway and footway treatments

For post treatment to footways by the street cleansing service the response and treatment times

will vary. This work will be carried out during normal working hours and the gangs will be

provided targets for the completion of individual tasks. The response times for treatments during

severe weather will depend on the availability of resources.

Winter Service Operational Plan Vol 1 20 of 29


5.8 Standard Labour Force Working/Gritting Cyclic Schedule

All resources will follow the Working Time Regulations with the drivers following the following

shift rota:

Hours Item Comment

0500 - 0730 Gritting

0730 - 1500 Standard Working

Day

1500 - 1900 Stand Down

1900 - 2130 Gritting

2130 - 0500 Stand Down

0500 - 0730 Gritting

0730 – 1330

(1500)

Standard Working

Day

1330 - 1900 Stand Down

1900 - 2130 Gritting

2130 - 0500 Stand Down

0500 - 0730 Gritting

0730 - 1500 Standard Working

Day

1500 - 1900 Stand Down

1900 - 2130 Gritting

2130 - 0500 Stand Down

0500 - 0730 Gritting

0730 – 1330

(1500)

Standard Working

Day

1330 - 1900 Stand Down

1900 - 2130 Gritting

2130 - 0500 Stand Down

Please note that the Standard Working Day finishes at 1500hrs if

evening gritting is not required.

Please note that the Standard Working Day finishes at 1500hrs if

evening gritting is not required.

Note: Due to the dynamic nature of weather systems it is on occasion necessary to

deviate from the Standard Labour Force Working/Gritting Cyclic Schedule. This is

particularly relevant when the weather systems have the potential to create emergency

situations.

Winter Service Operational Plan Vol 1 21 of 29


5.9 Location and maintenance of salt bins and Salt Stores

Salt storage bins are located on the public highway at a number of potential problem locations

within the Borough. They are generally not sited on the salting routes and are provided for

public use. A list of these is shown in Volume 2, Appendices 1 & 2, Annexes C.

The Street Environment Manager will order the HRMT to inspect of all salt bins prior to the

winter season and report on their condition. He will order the HRMT to remove litter and

contaminated salt and to refill them. Following severe conditions the salt bins will be rechecked

and refilled. The Street Environment Manager will consider requests for new bins where the

following criterion is met:

• Salt bins will only be considered on roads with a footway on a steep incline (with a

gradient greater than 1 in 25).

• A salt bin shall not obstruct the passage of pedestrians.

• A salt bin will not be provided for use in private areas.

• Salt bins for public use will not be provided on a priority footway salting route.

• A salt bin will not be provided within 50 metres of another salt bin.

• A salt bin will not be positioned outside an resident’s house without their agreement.

Final decision on the location of Salt bins will be taken by the Cabinet Member for Planning ,

Transportation and Recycling.

5.10 Resilience Network

The Resilience Network is the minimum road network within the borough that will be gritted in

an emergency situation. The Resilience Network will be authorised by the Director of the Group

and may follow recommendation from the Local Government Association when they believe it is

required to keep London moving. When adopted the Priority & Secondary Carriageway routes

together with the Priority and Secondary footways will be maintained where possible but no ‘offroute’

gritting will take place unless ordered by the Group Director

The Resilience Network may be adopted in the following circumstances: -

• Shortage of salt stocks

• Prolonged severe weather forecasts where salt stocks could be compromised

• Other situations where the adoption is required to maintain a satisfactory level of Service

Winter Service Operational Plan Vol 1 22 of 29


6 WEATHER PREDICTION AND INFORMATION

6.1 Forecasting, inspections and other decision support information

Hillingdon subscribes to the Meteorological Office's London Boroughs Winter Forecast Service

which provides a four-times daily email & answer phone forecast service, a five-day forecast

service and direct contact with a weather forecaster. This supports the ‘Decision Making’

process and details of the service are contained in Volume 1, Appendix 3.3 and Volume 2,

Appendix 3. Hillingdon falls within the Climatic Domains Map and weather patterns for these

areas are detailed in Volume 2, Appendix 4.

6.2 Information to be provided

The information provided by the forecast is as detailed in Volume 2, Appendices 3 and 4.

6.3 Timing and circulation of information

The main forecast is at 11:00 hrs with updates at 17:00 hrs, 23:00hrs and 03:00 hrs.

The circulation list for the forecast emails should include those included on the Winter Service

Call Out Officer rota, the Street Environment Manager and a representative of the Emergency

Planning Team. Five day forecasts shall be forwarded by the Street Environment Manager to

the Group Director.

6.4 Reporting procedure

During extreme, severe and snow conditions a Council ‘daily bulletin’ may be issued to provide

information and guidance via All Staff Emails, the Council website and the Intranet. This will be

carried out in conjunction with the Emergency Planning Team and the Corporate

Communications team and at the request of the Group Director.

Winter Service Operational Plan Vol 1 23 of 29


7 ORGANISATIONAL ARRANGEMENTS AND PERSONNEL

7.1 Organisational chart and employee responsibilities

The Winter Service hierarchy for the London Borough of Hillingdon is

• Corporate Director Planning, Environment, Education & Community Services

• Head of Highways, Transportation, Planning Policy

• Senior manager Street Environment

• Highways Inspection Manager

• Winter Service Call Out Officers (4No)

7.2 Employee duty schedules, rotas and standby arrangements

The Street Environment Team shall draw up employee duty schedules, rotas and standby

arrangements at least two weeks before the start of the winter period.

7.3 Plant and vehicle manning arrangements

The Street Environment Team will ensure that adequate manning and standby requirements are

in place to carry out the service to the specification.

7.4 Training and development arrangements

The Street Environment Team shall ensure that all drivers of the Salt Spreading Vehicles shall

have received proper training and instruction in the safe and efficient operation of the vehicles

and their equipment. All drivers shall be qualified in accordance with the ‘Winter Maintenance

Operatives Assessment Scheme 6157’. Operators of loading shovels shall hold a Certificate of

Training Achievement issued by the Construction Industry Training Board, or equivalent. In

addition, all LBH operatives are qualified to City & Guilds 6159.

7.5 Health and safety procedures

The Street Environment Team will provide risk and COSHH assessments for materials and for

operations and explain the significance of these to all operatives. Appropriate PPE equipment

will be issued prior to the start of the winter season.

Winter Service Operational Plan Vol 1 24 of 29


8 PLANT, VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT

8.1 Fleet inventory including license requirements and capacity.

Prior to the commencement of the winter period the Fleet Service Manager will supply the

HRMT a detailed fleet inventory with corresponding license requirements for inspection.

The vehicles/plant provided is as follows:

• 4 No Whale Iveco 12 Tonne Gritters, which carry 4.5 Tonnes of Salt.

• 2 No 4x4 Whale Iveco 12 Tonne Gritters, which carry 4.5 Tonnes of Salt.

• 2 No (Hired) Daf 18 Tonne Gritters, which carry 7.5 Tonnes of Salt.

• 1 No 1 Tonne Econ purpose built spreader on a 4 tonne Daewoo Vehicle.

• 2 No Loading Shovels.

• 6 No 4 Tonne Daewoo Vehicles.

• 6 No Glasdon Cruiser Turbocast 300 Manual Gritting Machines.

8.2 Location of plant, vehicles and other equipment

The WST will operate from the Harlington Road Depot at Hillingdon where the vehicles and

plant will be stored and maintained. In an emergency the WST may operate out of New Years

Green Lane Civic Amenity site, however salt stocks would have to be relocated there.

8.3 Garaging, servicing and maintenance arrangements

The vehicles shall be stored and maintained in an efficient and workable condition to ensure

reliable starting and use/performance.

8.4 Calibration procedures

The calibration of the salt spreading equipment shall be in accordance with BS 1622.

Calibration test record sheets will be provided to prior to Street Environment Team by Fleet

management before the start of the winter service season.

8.5 Fuel stocks and locations

The Fleet Management shall demonstrate to the HRMT that they have access to a guaranteed

supply of fuel for vehicles, which will be maintained and available during prolonged periods of

severe weather and during night salting periods.

Winter Service Operational Plan Vol 1 25 of 29


9 SALT AND DE–ICING MATERIALS

9.1 Location and capacity of stocks for salt and other materials

The HRMT site of operations is at Harlington Depot, Uxbridge. They shall maintain a stockpile

of salt for use during the Winter Service Period. This stockpile will vary in size during the

Service Period but shall be available and accessible at all times for delivery or

loading/collection.

The minimum stockpile at the beginning of the Winter Service Period will be as follows:

Low period – November & March - 1750 tonnes

High period - December January & February- 3500 tonnes

For the purposes of stock control a mean density of 1.3 tonnes /m 2 will be used.

A store of bagged salt will also be kept at Harlington Road Depot for sale to schools and other

such establishments. The minimum stockpile at the beginning of the Winter Service Period will

be 1000 bags

9.2 Supply and testing arrangements

The salt that is used on highways during winter is a naturally occurring rock salt, and shall be to

the requirements of BS 3247 ‘Salt for Spreading – Coarse Rock Salt’ (6mm particle size). It

shall be stored under cover where possible, to stabilise moisture contents, within the councils

premises.

9.3 Delivery arrangements

The HRMT shall provide the necessary mechanical loading shovel, other plant and labour to off

load and stack the salt. Major restocking will normally take place outside the Winter Service

period but may be at any time.

9.4 Treatment requirements including spread rates

The variable nature of winter conditions makes it difficult to define exact treatments and salt

applications. Guidance on appropriate spread rates is given in Appendix 3: It is to be noted that

below -11 degrees C rock salt treatment is ineffective.

9.5 Contacts and purchasing arrangements for supplies

The HRMT will ensure that stocks are monitored and are renewed to the required resilience

levels. The HRMT can purchase rock salt from:

Winter Service Operational Plan Vol 1 26 of 29


Cleveland Potash Ltd

Boulby Mine

Loftus

Saltburn by the Sea

Cleveland

TS13 4UZ

Contact Name: Jan Hunton, National

Sales Manager

Tel.No: 01287 640140 Fax: 01287

640934

Email: enquiries@clevelandpotash.co.uk

www.clevelandpotash.co.uk

Salt Union Ltd

Astbury House

Bradford Road

Winsford

Cheshire

CW7 2PA

Contact Name: National Sales Manager

Tel.No: 01606 59653-0 Fax: 01606

596531

Email: enquiries@clevelandpotash.co.uk

www.saltunion.com

10.0 Treatment Methods

10.1 Precautionary Salting

The target is to pre-salt the precautionary network before ice forms or snow settles on the road.

Essentially it is planned as a result of weather forecasts to pre-set spread rates following the

Decision and Treatment matrices in Appendix 3.

When continuous snow is forecast every effort will be made to ensure enough salt is applied to

melt the initial snowfall and to provide a wet surface.

10.2 Snow Clearance

Snow ploughing shall be undertaken as soon as snow depths exceed 30mm and combined with

successive salt spreading.

Light snowfalls may call for ploughing where local drifting has occurred, or to remove snow not

dispersed by traffic, for instance where traffic is reluctant to use outer lanes of dual

carriageways, or at night when traffic is light.

If snow depths reach 120mm, or when tackling drifts or when working on gradients, ploughing

may be undertaken without salting as the weight of the load may aid vehicle traction. As soon

as the situation is under control spreading will be resumed.

Where heavy or prolonged snowfalls accumulate on well-used (“Priority“ - see section 5.5)

footways , arrangements will be made to clear a route for pedestrians as soon as practical. If

freezing conditions persist, footways cleared of snow should be given a light salting to melt the

ice.

Clearance of snow from less heavily used (“Secondary”) footways will depend upon the

anticipated duration of freezing conditions. Provided the more heavily used footways have been

cleared and freezing conditions are expected to persist, then these footways may be cleared as

well.

Winter Service Operational Plan Vol 1 27 of 29


11 OPERATIONAL COMMUNICATIONS

11.1 Technical systems information

It is important that good communications are maintained during the winter period to ensure that

the response to poor conditions is effective and immediate.

At all times the HRMT supervisor should be available by mobile phone. The HRMT shall ensure

that two-way communication is maintained with all the Winter Service Vehicles. Contact

between vehicle operators and the HRMT Supervisors is to be maintained at all times during

winter service operations, so that salting progress can be monitored and to provide a rapid and

efficient response in emergency situations.

During normal working hours the Street Environment Manager or his deputy will be available via

the Council’s Contact Centre or by his mobile phone if they are away from the office.

The Winter Service Call Out Officer has responsibility for ordering service and is available

through a mobile phone service. During times when service has been ordered he will be

available to the HRMT supervisor by mobile phone.

During severe periods of weather (snow and widespread ice) problem areas may be notified by

phone calls received from the Police and members of the public via the Contact Centre. They

will act as a liaison to the Responsive Maintenance Manager and log these calls along with

reports from patrols on site.

11.2 Reporting arrangements and protocols

The ‘Daily Decision’ pro-forma will be circulated to the following:

1. Street Environment Manager

2. Highways Inspection Manager.

3. Winter Maintenance HRMT.

4. MouchelParkman Stewardship for Transport for London Roads TfL.

5. Surrey County Council.

6. Hertfordshire County Council.

7. Buckinghamshire County Council.

8. London Borough of Harrow.

9. London Borough of Hounslow.

10. London Borough of Ealing.

Contact details are included in Vol 2, App 7.

The ‘Daily Decision’ proforma’ confirms the action that has been taken. A Winter service notice

board is set up to display the current winter service information. Call Centre/Customer Care and

other staff will be able to keep abreast of the latest information.

Winter Service Operational Plan Vol 1 28 of 29


12 INFORMATION AND PUBLICITY

12.1 Local press and broadcast contact information

During extreme, severe and snow conditions a Council ‘daily bulletin’ may be issued to provide

information and guidance via All Staff Emails, the Council website and the Intranet. This will be

carried out in conjunction with the Emergency Planning Team and the Corporate

Communications team and at the request of the Group Director.

12.2 Responsibilities and guidance for providing information

It is the responsibility of the Group Director PEECS to provide information on winter service

matters. Information will be developed as appropriate for publication on the council website.

Winter Service Operational Plan Vol 1 29 of 29


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

0BWINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

FOR PUBLIC HIGHWAYS WITHIN THE

LONDON BOROUGH OF HILLINGDON

2011/2012

(28 th October 2011 to 30 th March 2012

1BVOLUME 2

2BAppendices & Annexes

1


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

Contents

Appendices Annex Page

1 108BNorthern Area 3

A Salting Routes and Winter Operational Service. 4

Revisions to salting routes. 5

Route Location of Hospitals, Railway Stations, Day

Centres, Residential Care Homes, Clinics, Medical

6

Centres, Military Infrastructure, Airfields, etc.

Carriageway Treatment – Hills/Junctions/Known Blackspots. 8

Priority Gritting Routes. 9

Secondary Gritting Routes. 16

Small Salt Vehicle Spreading Routes. 21

B Footways - Priority and Secondary Footway Treatment. 22

C Salt Bin Locations. 25

D Ice Sign Locations. 26

2 109BSouthern Area 27

A Salting Routes and Winter Operational Service. 28

Revisions to salting routes. 29

Route Location of Hospitals, Railway Stations, Day

Centres, Residential Care Homes, Clinics, Medical

30

Centres, Military Infrastructure, Airfields, etc.

Carriageway Treatment – Hills/Junctions/Known

Blackspots.

32

Priority Gritting Routes. 33

Secondary Gritting Routes. 41

Small Salt Vehicle Spreading Routes. 47

B Priority and Secondary Footway Treatment. 48

C Salt Bin Locations. 51

D Ice Sign Locations. 52

3 Weather Forecasting and Decision Making Procedure. 53

4 Climatic Domains Map 56

5 ‘Daily Decision’ – Standard Proforma. 60

6 Winter Service Daily Operational & Defect Report 61

7 Highway ‘Out of Hours’ Duty Engineer Rota. 62

8 Adjoining Highway Authorities and Contacts. 63

9 Weather Terminology. 65

10 Self Care - Guidelines For Highway Users During Winter. 71

11 Salt Bins - Guidelines For Their Use. 73

12 Changes in Winter Service Operational Plan. 74

2


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

17BAPPENDIX 1

Salting Routes and Winter Operational Service

AREA NORTH OF A40

3


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 1

Salting Routes and Winter Operational Service

The following list covers the full range of planned salting routes within the London

Borough of Hillingdon with priority and secondary routes.

18BNORTHERN AREA

1. CARRIAGEWAY PRIORITY ROUTES

Route Section Type Vehicle

1 1N,2N Carriageway Route Large salt spreading vehicle

2 3N,4N,5N Carriageway Route Large salt spreading vehicle

3 6N,7N Carriageway Route Large salt spreading vehicle

8 13N Carriageway Route Small salt spreading vehicle

2. CARRIAGEWAY SECONDARY ROUTES

Route Section Type Vehicle

1 8N,9N Carriageway Route Large salt spreading vehicle

2 11N Carriageway Route Large salt spreading vehicle

3 10N,12N Carriageway Route Large salt spreading vehicle

4


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

3BRevisions to Salting Routes included for 2011/2012

19BNORTHERN AREA

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 1

Route Section Additions Deletions

2 3N Springwell La (to Cripps Farm).

2 4N Warren Rd.

2 5N Freezeland Way, Warren Rd.

3 10N

2 11N

Pamela Gdns, St Lawrence Dr,

Rodney Gdns, Burwood Ave (pt).

Field Way, Heathfield Rise, Manor

Rd,

The Oaks, Court Rd, Burnham Ave,

Sussex Rd (pt).

5


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

Carriageway Treatments

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 1

Route Location of Hospitals, Railway Stations, Day Centres, Residential Care

Homes, Clinics, Medical Centres, Military Infrastructure, Airfields, etc.

The following is a list of hospitals, railway stations, day centres, residential homes,

clinics, medical centres, etc, within the borough.

Type Facility/Centre Road Name Ward Route Section Hierarchy

RS Northwood. Station Approach South Ruislip 1 1N Priority

RS Northwood Hill. Joel Street Nthwd Hills 1 2N Priority

RS West Ruislip High Road Eastcote 2 5N Priority

RS Ruislip Gardens. West End Road Manor 3 6N Priority

RS South Ruislip Station Approach South Ruislip 3 6N,12N Priority/Secondary

RS Ruislip High Street Manor 3 6N Priority

RS Ruislip Manor Victoria Road Manor 3 7N Priority

RS Eastcote Field End Road Eastcote 1 2N Priority

RS Ickenham Glebe Avenue Ickenham 2 11N Secondary

RS Hillingdon Long Lane Hill East 2 5N Priority

MOD RAF Northolt West End Road South Ruislip 3 6N Priority

H Mt Vernon Hospital

Rickmansworth

Road

Northwood 1 1N Priority

H Pinner Road Hospital Pinner Road Nthwd Hills 1 1N Priority

H Bishop’s Wood BMI Hospital

Rickmansworth

Road

Northwood 1 1N Priority

H Harefield Hospital Hill End Road Harefield 2 3N Priority

RCH Coppermill Care Complex Summerhouse Lane Harefield No route

RCH The Harefield Nursing Centre Hill End Road Harefield 2 3N Priority

RCH Cedar House High Street Harefield 2 4N Priority

RCH Denville Hall Ducks Hill Road Northwood 1 1N Priority

RCH Mountview

Rickmansworth

Road

Northwood 1 1N Priority

RCH Eastbury Nursing Home Eastbury Road Northwood 1 8N Secondary

RCH Frithwood Nursing Home Frithwood Avenue Northwood 1 8N Secondary

RCH Eastbury Nursing Home Eastbury Road Northwood 1 8N Secondary

RCH Hallowell House Hallowell Road Northwood 1 8N Secondary

RCH Briarwood Drive Briarwood Drive Nthwd Hills No route

RCH St Vincents Nursing Home Wiltshire Lane Eastcote 1 9N Secondary

RCH Sunningdale House Sunningdale Ave Eastcote No route

RCH

Whitby Dean Residential

Home

Whitby Road Cavendish 1 9N Secondary

RCH Northview Northview Eastcote 3 7N Secondary

RCH The Boyne Park Way Manor 3 7N Secondary

RCH Brachenbridge House Brackenhill South Rruislip 1 7N Secondary

RCH Ruislip Nursing Home West End Road South Ruislip 3 6N Priority

RCH Poplars Ickenham Road W Ruislip 2 5N Priority

RCH The Fairways Ickenham Road W Ruislip 2 5N Priority

RCH Blenheim Care Centre Ickenham Road W Ruislip 2 5N Priority

RCH Charles Curran House Boniface Road Ickenham No route

RCH Woodlands Long Lane Ickenham 2 5N Priority

RCH Bourne Lodge Bourne Court South Ruislip No route

HC & GP Harefield Health Centre

Rickmansworth

Road

Harefield 2 3N Priority

HC & GP Northwood Health Centre Acre Way Northwood No route

HC & GP Northwood Doctors Surgery Eastbury Road Northwood 1 8N Secondary

HC & GP

Northwood Consulting

Rooms

Greenhill Court Northwood No route

HC & GP Eastcote Health Centre

Abbotsbury

Gardens

Eastcote No route

HC & GP St Martin’s Medical Centre Eastcote Road Eastcote 1 2N Priority

HC & GP Ladygate Lane Surgery Ladygate Lane W Ruislip 3 10N Secondary

6


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 1

HC & GP Southcote Clinic Southcote Rise W Ruislip 2 11N Secondary

HC & GP

King Edwards Medical

Centre

King Edwards Road W Ruislip No route

HC & GP Wood Lane Medical Centre Wood Lane W Ruislip 2 5N Priority

HC & GP

King Edwards & Swakleys

MC

Swakleys Road Ickenham 2 4N Priority

HC & GP Dr Patel Wallasey Crescent Ickenham No route

HC & GP The Cedars Medical Centre Elliott Avenue Cavendish No route

HC & GP Dr Solomon & Ptnrs Queens Walk South Ruislip 3 12N Secondary

HC & GP Dr M L R Siddiqui Walnut Way South Ruislip No route

7


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

CARRIAGEWAY

Hills/Junctions/Known

Blackspots

GRITTING ROUTES

NORTHERN AREA

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 1

Item Road Name / Location Limits of Treatment

1

Harvil Road (From The Drive to

Moorhall Road)

Precautionary 10g/m 2

2 Church Hill (From Priory Avenue to DoPrecautionary 10g/m 2

3

4

5

Rickmansworth Road (Twin Hill’s –

From Hill End Road to Woodcock

Hill)

Northwood Road (from Jackets

Lane to Shepherds Hill Farm)

Breakspear Road North (Drakes

Hill – from Gilbert Road North to

Harvil Road)

Precautionary 10g/m 2

Precautionary 10g/m 2

Precautionary 10g/m 2

6 Breakspear Road South Precautionary 10g/m 2

7

New Years Green Lane (from

Breakspear Road North to Harvil

Road)

Precautionary 10g/m 2

NB.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO OPERATIVES

1. Before departure check with your Supervisor on the spread rate

required.

2. Also check that the spinner is set correctly.

3. Ensure that all roads stated above have been thoroughly completed.

UDO NOTU grit UNSTATEDU roads.

4. Return holder to your Supervisor after completing the route assigned

to you.

8


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 1

CARRIAGEWAY

PRIORITY GRITTING ROUTES

NORTHERN AREA

ROUTE 1

SECTION 1N

COMMENCING FROM

105BNorthgate

A4180, Ducks Hill Road Copswood Way

A404, Rickmansworth Road (To Boundary) The Broadwalk

A404, Pinner Road (To Boundary) Links Way

A4125, High Street Northwood Wieland Road

A4125, Watford Road (To Boundary) Shefton Rise

B468, Green Lane and Return Hillside Rise

A4125, Church Road Hillside Gardens

Ravenswood Park

Catlins Lane

Hillside Crescent

Stanley Road

Plus: Mount Vernon Hospital

Kewferry Drive (Only on USnow weatherU condition indicator)

NB.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO OPERATIVES

1. Before departure check with your Supervisor on the spread rate

required.

2. Also check that the spinner is set correctly.

3. Ensure that all roads stated above have been thoroughly completed.

UDO NOTU grit UNSTATEDU roads.

4. Return holder to your Supervisor after completing the route assigned

to you.

9


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 1

CARRIAGEWAY

PRIORITY GRITTING ROUTES

NORTHERN AREA

ROUTE 1

SECTION 2N

COMMENCING FROM

B466, Eastcote Road (From Bury Street)

B466, High Road, Eastcote

Cuckoo Hill (To Boundary)

B472, Joel Street

Northwood Way

Hillside Road

Potter Street Hill

Potter Street

106BCheney Street

Highland Road

York Road

Lincoln Road

Cranbourne Road

Lichfield Road

Winchester Road

Colchester Road

Rochester Road

NB.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO OPERATIVES

1. Before departure check with your Supervisor on the spread rate

required.

2. Also check that the spinner is set correctly.

3. Ensure that all roads stated above have been thoroughly completed.

UDO NOTU grit UNSTATEDU roads.

4. Return holder to your Supervisor after completing the route assigned

to you.

10


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

CARRIAGEWAY

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 1

PRIORITY GRITTING ROUTES

NORTHERN AREA

ROUTE 2

SECTION 3N

COMMENCING FROM

Breakspear Road North (From Fine Bush Lane)

Northwood Road (To Boundary)

Rickmansworth Road , Harefield (To boundary)

Hill End Road

Springwell Lane (to Cripps Farm)

Park Lane (To Boundary)

NB.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO OPERATIVES

1. Before departure check with your Supervisor on the spread rate

required.

2. Also check that the spinner is set correctly.

3. Ensure that all roads stated above have been thoroughly completed.

UDO NOTU grit UNSTATEDU roads.

4. Return holder to your Supervisor after completing the route assigned

to you.

11


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 1

CARRIAGEWAY

PRIORITY GRITTING ROUTES

NORTHERN AREA

ROUTE 2

SECTION 4N

COMMENCING FROM

B467, Swakeleys Road (From Breakspear Road to Long Lane)

Breakspear Road South

Harvil Road

Moorhall Road

Church Hill

High Street, Harefield

New Years Green Lane

Fine Bush Lane

NB.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO OPERATIVES

1. Before departure check with your Supervisor on the spread rate

required.

2. Also check that the spinner is set correctly.

3. Ensure that all roads stated above have been thoroughly completed.

UDO NOTU grit UNSTATEDU roads.

4. Return holder to your Supervisor after completing the route assigned

to you.

12


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

CARRIAGEWAY

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 1

PRIORITY GRITTING ROUTES

NORTHERN AREA

ROUTE 2

SECTION 5N

COMMENCING FROM

B466, Long Lane (From Freezeland Way – Swakeleys Road)

B466, Ickenham Road

Kingsend

Wood Lane

High Road, Ickenham

B467, Swakeleys Road (Swakeleys R/bout to Breakspear Road)

A40, Western Ave (Swakeleys R/bout Only)

Warren Road

Freezeland Way (From Long Lane Junction West to Mini R/bout)

NB.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO OPERATIVES

1. Before departure check with your Supervisor on the spread rate

required.

2. Also check that the spinner is set correctly.

3. Ensure that all roads stated above have been thoroughly completed.

UDO NOTU grit UNSTATEDU roads.

4. Return holder to your Supervisor after completing the route assigned

to you.

13


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

CARRIAGEWAY

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 1

PRIORITY GRITTING ROUTES

NORTHERN AREA

ROUTE 3

SECTION 6N

COMMENCING FROM

Breakspear Road (From Breakspear Arms to Bury Street)

Reservoir Road

A4180, Bury Street (From Breakspear Road)

A4180, High Street, Ruislip

A4180, West End Road To Polish Memorial

107BStation Approach

Windmill Hill

Pembroke Road

NB.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO OPERATIVES

1. Before departure check with your Supervisor on the spread rate

required.

2. Also check that the spinner is set correctly.

3. Ensure that all roads stated above have been thoroughly completed.

UDO NOTU grit UNSTATEDU roads.

4. Return holder to your Supervisor after completing the route assigned

to you.

14


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

CARRIAGEWAY

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 1

PRIORITY GRITTING ROUTES

NORTHERN AREA

ROUTE 3

SECTION 7N

COMMENCING FROM

Bridle Road (Junction Field End Road to Boundary)

Field End Road (To Boundary at Rabournmead Drive)

North View (To Boundary)

Victoria Road

Park Way

Elm Avenue

NB.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO OPERATIVES

1. Before departure check with your Supervisor on the spread rate

required.

2. Also check that the spinner is set correctly.

3. Ensure that all roads stated above have been thoroughly completed.

UDO NOTU grit UNSTATEDU roads.

4. Return holder to your Supervisor after completing the route assigned

to you.

15


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 1

CARRIAGEWAY

SECONDARY GRITTING ROUTES

NORTHERN AREA

ROUTE 1

SECTION 8N

COMMENCING FROM

Thirlmere Gardens

Kewferry Road

Maxwell Road

Murray Road

Eastbury Road

Frithwood Avenue

Elgood Avenue

Woodgate Crescent

Gatehill Road

Hallowell Road

NB.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO OPERATIVES

1. Before departure check with your Supervisor on the spread rate

required.

2. Also check that the spinner is set correctly.

3. Ensure that all roads stated above have been thoroughly completed.

UDO NOTU grit UNSTATEDU roads.

4. Return holder to your Supervisor after completing the route assigned

to you.

16


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

CARRIAGEWAY

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 1

SECONDARY GRITTING ROUTES

NORTHERN AREA

ROUTE 1

SECTION 9N

COMMENCING FROM

Chamberlain Way

Tolcarne Drive

Norwich Road

Wiltshire Lane

Wentworth Drive

Fore Street

Salisbury Road

NB.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO OPERATIVES

1. Before departure check with your Supervisor on the spread rate

required.

2. Also check that the spinner is set correctly.

3. Ensure that all roads stated above have been thoroughly completed.

UDO NOTU grit UNSTATEDU roads.

4. Return holder to your Supervisor after completing the route assigned

to you.

17


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 1

CARRIAGEWAY

SECONDARY GRITTING ROUTES

NORTHERN AREA

ROUTE 2

SECTION 11N

COMMENCING FROM

Hoylake Crescent

Copthall Road East

Bushey Road

Thornhill Road

Woodstock Drive

Swakeleys Drive

Glebe Avenue

Austins Lane

Lysander Road

Lymington Drive

Bembridge Gardens

Chichester Avenue

Sussex Road (Part)

Sharps Lane

Southcote Rise

Westcote Rise

Woodville Gardens

Glenhurst Avenue

Orchard Close

Hill Lane

Heathfield Rise

Manor Road

The Oaks

Court Road

Burnham Avenue

Field Way

NB.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO OPERATIVES

1. Before departure check with your Supervisor on the spread rate

required.

2. Also check that the spinner is set correctly.

3. Ensure that all roads stated above have been thoroughly completed.

UDO NOTU grit UNSTATEDU roads.

4. Return holder to your Supervisor after completing the route assigned to

you.

18


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

ROUTE 3

SECTION 10N

COMMENCING FROM

Howletts Lane

Marlborough Avenue

Ladygate Lane

Midcroft

Manor Way

Hawtrey Drive

College Drive

The Uplands

The Ridgeway

Kings College Road

Park Avenue

Evelyn Avenue

Elmbridge Drive

St Martins Approach

Pamela Gardens

St Lawrence Drive

Rodney Gardens

Burwood Avenue (Part)

CARRIAGEWAY

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 1

SECONDARY GRITTING ROUTES

NORTHERN AREA

NB.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO OPERATIVES

1. Before departure check with your Supervisor on the spread rate

required.

2. Also check that the spinner is set correctly.

3. Ensure that all roads stated above have been thoroughly completed.

UDO NOTU grit UNSTATEDU roads.

4. Return holder to your Supervisor after completing the route assigned

to you.

19


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

CARRIAGEWAY

SECONDARY GRITTING ROUTES

NORTHERN AREA

ROUTE 3

SECTION 12N

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 1

UCOMMENCING FROM

Oak Grove

Southbourne Gardens

Chelston Road

Cornwall Road

Torrington Road

Whitby Road

The Fairway

Long Drive

Queens Walk

Torcross Road

NB.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO OPERATIVES

1. Before departure check with your Supervisor on the spread rate

required.

2. Also check that the spinner is set correctly.

3. Ensure that all roads stated above have been thoroughly completed.

UDO NOTU grit UNSTATEDU roads.

4. Return holder to your Supervisor after completing the route assigned

to you.

20


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

CARRIAGEWAY

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 1

PRIORITY GRITTING ROUTES

NORTHERN AREA

4BROUTE 8

SECTION 13N

Small Salt Spreading Vehicle

Section

13N

13N

13N

13N

13N

13N

13N

13N

13N

13N

Location

Ravenswood Park, Northwood

Northwood Way, Northwood Hills

Northwood Way, Church Road to

Hillside Road, Northwood

Fore Street, Ruislip

Park Avenue, Ruislip

Glenhurst Avenue, Ruislip

Orchard Close, Ruislip

Cornwall Road, Ruislip

The Avenue, Northwood

Pinn Way, Ruislip

NB.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO OPERATIVES

1. Before departure check with your Supervisor on the spread rate

required.

2. Also check that the spinner is set correctly.

3. Ensure that all roads stated above have been thoroughly completed.

UDO NOTU grit UNSTATEDU roads.

4. Return holder to your Supervisor after completing the route assigned

to you.

21


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

ANNEX B TO APPENDIX 1

Footways

Priority and Secondary Treatment (Severe Conditions/Snow)

In the event of snowfall preventing effective sweeping, cleansing operatives

and their vehicles (where appropriate) may be required to carry out snow

clearance or salting duties. During these periods it is likely that the cleansing

operation would be suspended.

The number of operatives / vehicles applied to this task will be at the

discretion of the Winter Service Call Out Officer in consultation with both the

Street Environment Manager and Service Manager (Waste). It is also

dependent on whether the full service is suspended or certain services e.g.

litter bin emptying will continue.

Footway entrances to railway stations; hospitals and many schools have been

included within priority footway treatment routes. The carriageway outside

many of these facilities has also been included within priority carriageway

treatment routes.

For secondary treatment, resources are to be applied in accordance with

severity of conditions and the predicted duration. Treatment will be phased

according to the priorities for pedestrian and vehicle movement after

considering the risk of injury and the level of use. The following to be treated

before clearing residential footways and carriageways;

(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

(f)

(g)

Entrances to hospitals, clinics and medical centres.

Access/ entrances to bus stations and transport interchanges.

Outside schools/ special schools.

Major shopping frontages.

Local shopping areas.

Day centres, homes for older people/ sheltered housing.

Residential areas where access is difficult.

5BOn completion of treatment the resources will be employed on other footways

on a priority basis.

22


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

FOOTWAY

PRIORITY GRITTING ROUTES

NORTHERN AREA

Hand Salting Machines

ANNEX B TO APPENDIX 1

6BPedestrianised areas, bridges, subways, combined footway/cycleway,

footway/footpath.

Item Road Name Feature Limits of Treatment

1.

Rickmansworth

Road

Mt Vernon Hospital

Footway/path

2. Pinner Road Pinner Road Hospital Footway/path

3. Potter Street Northwood School Footway/path

4. Tolcarne Drive Harlyn School Footway/path

5. Wiltshire Lane Hayden School Footway/path

6. Fore Street Coteford School Footway/path

7. Old Hatch Manor Warrender Primary Footway/path

8. Dawlish Drive Lady Banks School Footway/path

9. Field End Road Field End School Footway/path

10. Field End Road Queensmead School Footway/path

11. Queens Walk Deanesfield School Footway/path

12. Stafford Road Ruislip Gardens School Footway/path

13. Herlwyn Avenue Sacred Heart School Footway/path

14. Southcote Rise

Bishop Winnington-Ingram CE

Primary

Footway/path

15. Ladygate Lane Whiteheath School Footway/path

16. Bushey Road Breakspear School Footway/path

17. Warren Road Vyners School Footway/path

18. Long Lane Douay Martyrs School Footway/path

19. Sussex Road Glebe Primary Footway/path

20. Glebe Avenue Ickenham Station Footway/path

21. High Road West Ruislip Station Footway/path

20BShop Front Routes

1 Ruislip High Street Kingsend to Eastcote Road

2 Joel Street Tolcarne Drive to Pinner Road

3 Victoria Road Manor Way to Chelston Approach

4 Green Lane Dene Road to Hallowell Road

5 Station Approach West End Road to West Mead

6 Northwood High Street Pinner Road to Emmanual Road

7 Field End Road Meadow Way to Woodlands Avenue

23


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

FOOTWAY

SECONDARY GRITTING ROUTES

NORTHERN AREA

ANNEX B TO APPENDIX 1

7BShop Front Routes

Hand Salting Machines

1 Harefield High Street

2 Gilbert Road Harefield

3 Howletts Lane Ruislip

4 Swakeleys Road Ickenham

5 Glebe Avenue Ickenham

6 Aylesham Drive Ickenham

7 Ickenham j/w Greenway

8 West End Road New Pond Parade

9 Field End Road Adjacent to BP Garage and Eastcote Arms PH

10 Whitby Road

11 Salisbury Road

24


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

Ref

ANNEX C TO APPENDIX 1

8BSalt Bin Locations

Road

Name

1 Springwell HA

2 Springwell HA

3

4

Welland

Road

Rodney

Close

District Location Details

NH

Adjacent to Springwell

Lock

300m south of

Springwell Lock

Jct. with Richmond

Road.

NH Opposite 17 to 20

Grade 1

in --

Comments

25


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

ANNEX D TO APPENDIX 1

21BIce Sign Locations

10BRef Road Name 1BDistrict Location Details Comments

Breakspear Road

Opp Breakspear Stables cottage

1

Harefield

On Ex post

North

cottages

2

Breakspear Road

Harefield Opp Bourne Farm On Ex post

North

3 New Years Green Harefield Half way down near opp No 4 On Ex post

4

Lane

New Years Green

Lane

5 Rickmansworth Road

Harefield Outside recycling centre On Ex post

Harefield

Outside High Lodge opp

boundary sign

On Ex post

Harefield

6 Rickmansworth Road

After layby just before double On Ex post

bend

7 Wiltshire Lane Northwood Hills Outside no 133 L/C 26

8 Wiltshire Lane Northwood Hills J/W Heatherfold Way L/C 31

With 5T over night

lorry ban

26


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

APPENDIX 2

Salting Routes and Winter Operational Service

AREA SOUTH OF A40

27


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 2

Salting Routes and Winter Operational Service

The following list covers the full range of planned salting routes within the London

Borough of Hillingdon with priority and secondary routes.

9BSOUTHERN AREA

1. CARRIAGEWAY PRIORITY ROUTES

Route Section Type Vehicle

4 2S,5S,6S Carriageway Route Large salt spreading vehicle

5 3S Carriageway Route Large salt spreading vehicle

6 4S,8S Carriageway Route Large salt spreading vehicle

7 7S,9S Carriageway Route Large salt spreading vehicle

8 16S Carriageway Route Small salt spreading vehicle

2. CARRIAGEWAY SECONDARY ROUTES

Route Section Type Vehicle

4 10S Carriageway Route Large salt spreading vehicle

5 13S Carriageway Route Large salt spreading vehicle

6 11S,15S Carriageway Route Large salt spreading vehicle

7 12S,14S Carriageway Route Large salt spreading vehicle

28


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 2

Revisions to Salting Routes included for 2011/2012

2BSOUTHERN AREA

Route 12BSection Additions Deletions

5 3S Lees Road.

4 5S A408 Holloway La.

4 6S Station Rd.

7 7S A408 Park View Rd. Peachey High

St

7 9S Bolingbroke Way.

7 12S The Green (pt), Rowan Rd (pt), Mulberry Pde.

5 13S

Adelphi Way, Leybourne Rd (pt), Ayles Rd,

Welbeck Ave (pt), Strafford Rd, Chatsworth Rd (pt).

7 14S

Carfax Road, Crowland Ave, Clarendon Road,

Carnarvon Drive, Granville Rd (Hayes), Mildred Ave,

Coronation Rd, Bedwell Gdns (pt).

Crowland Rd.

6 15S Park View Rd (Colham Grn r/bout to Colham Grn.

29


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

Carriageway Treatments

ANNEX B TO APPENDIX 2

Route Location of Hospitals, Railway Stations, Day Centres, Residential Care Homes,

Clinics, Medical Centres, Military Infrastructure, Airfields, etc.

The following is a list of hospitals, railway stations, day centres, residential homes, clinics,

medical centres, etc, within the borough.

13BType 14BFacility/Centre 15BRoad Name 16BWard 17BRoute 18BSection 19BHierarchy

RS Hillingdon Long Lane Hilldn East 5 3S Priority

RS Uxbridge High Street Uxb North Pedestrianised

RS West Drayton Station Approach W Drayton 7 7S Priority

RS Hayes & Harlington Station Road Botwell 4 6S Priority

RS Hillingdon Long Lane Hilldn East 5 3S Priority

MOD RAF Uxbridge Park Rd/Hillingdon Hill Uxb North 6 4S Priority

A Heathrow Airport T1,2&3 Heathrow No route

A

Heathrow Airport T4

Southern Perimeter

Road

Heathrow No route

A Heathrow Airport T5 Stanwell Moor Road Heathrow 4 5S Priority

H Hillingdon Hospital Pield Heath Road Brunel 5 3S Priority

RCH Sweetcroft Sweetcroft Lane Uxb North No route

RCH Residential Care Home Devon Way Uxb North No route

RCH

Parkfield House Nursing

Home

Charville Lane West Hilldn East No route

RCH The Old Vicarage The Greenway Brunel 6 8S Priority

RCH Residential Care Home Queens Road Uxb South No route

RCH Residential Care Home Worcester Road Uxb South No route

RCH Marion House Nursing Home Kingston Lane Brunel 6 8S Priority

RCH Merchiston House Colham Road, Brunel No route

RCH Colham Road Home Colham Road, Brunel No route

RCH Residential Care Home Heather Lane Yiewsley No route

RCH Residential Care Home Lowdell Yiewsley No route

RCH Chapel Lane Home Chapel Lane Uxb South No route

RCH Residential Care Home Whiteheart Avenue Brunel No route

RCH Residential Care Home Whiteheart Avenue Brunel No route

RCH Heathfield House Heath Road Hilldn East No route

RCH Residential Care Home Kingsway Botwell 7 14S Secondary

RCH Aston House Care Home Angel Lane Botwell 7 14S Secondary

RCH Ashwood Care Centre Derwent Drive Charvill No route

RCH Grange House Grange Road Townfield No route

RCH Hayes Cottage Care Centre Grange Road Townfield No route

RCH Residential Care Home Bishops Road Botwell No route

RCH Micado Home St Marys Road Townfield No route

RCH Residential Care Home Precinct Road Townfield No route

RCH Residential Care Home 2 Little Road Townfield No route

RCH Blandford Lodge Blandford Waye Yeading No route

RCH Swanage Lodge Swanage Waye Yeading No route

RCH Hatton Grove Home Hatton Grove W Drayton No route

RCH Residential Care Home Frays Avenue W Drayton No route

RCH Franklin House The Green, Swan Road W Drayton No route

RCH The Burroughs Mill Road W Drayton No route

RCH Residential Care Home Money Lane W Drayton No route

HC & GP Medical Health Centre Long Lane Hilldn East 5 3S Priority

HC & GP Acorn Medical Centre Long Lane Hilldn East 5 3S Priority

HC & GP Long Lane Surgery Long Lane Hilldn East 5 3S Priority

HC & GP Oaklands Medical Centre Long Lane Hilldn East 5 3S Priority

HC & GP Belmont Medical Centre Belmont Road Uxb North 6 8S Priority

HC & GP Uxbridge Health Centre George Street Uxb North 6 4S Priority

HC & GP The Medical Centre Brunel University Brunel No route

HC & GP Church Road Surgery Church Road Brunel 7 7S Priority

30


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

HC & GP The Timbers Surgery Shepherds Close Uxb south No route

HC & GP

West London Medical

Centre

Harlington Road Yiewsley 4 2S Priority

HC & GP Dr GN Stearnes' Practice West Drayton Road Yiewsley 6 4S Priority

HC & GP Yiewsley Health Centre High Street Yiewsley 7 7S Priority

HC & GP Otterfield Medical Centre Otterfield Road Yiewsley No route

HC & GP New Medical Centre The Green W Drayton 7 12S Secondary

HC & GP Medical Health Centre Harmondsworth Road W Drayton 4 5S Priority

HC & GP Hayes Stadium Judge Heath Lane Botwell 7 14S Secondary

HC & GP The Cedar Brook Practice Kingshill Close Charville No route

HC & GP Dr Kamaluddin & Partners Lansbury Drive Charville 5 13S Secondary

HC & GP Medical Health Centre Yeading Lane Yeading 5 3S Priority

HC & GP The Willow Tree Surgery Jollys Lane Yeading No route

HC & GP

Uxbridge College Health College Way,

Centre

Coldharbour Lane

Townfield No route

HC & GP The Practice Shakespeare Avenue Barnhill 5 13S Secondary

HC & GP The Warren Medical Centre

The Warren, Uxbridge

Road

Barnhill 5 3S Priority

HC & GP Townfield Doctors Surgery College Way Townfield No route

HC & GP ‘Kincora’ Coldharbour Lane Townfield 4 6S Priority

HC & GP Minet Clinic Avondale Drive Townfield No route

HC & GP The Orchard Practice Station Road Botwell 4 6S Priority

HC & GP Hayes Medical Centre Old Station Rd Botwell No route

HC & GP Elers Road Health Clinic Elers Road Pinkwell No route

HC & GP Medical Health Centre North Hyde Road Pinkwell No route

HC & GP Heathrow Medical Centre St Peters Way Brunel No route

HC & GP Glendale House Surgery High Street Heathrow 4 6S Priority

31


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 2

10BCARRIAGEWAY

Hills/Junctions/Known

Blackspots

GRITTING ROUTES

1BSOUTHERN AREA

Item Road Name / Location Limits of Treatment Comments

1 Stockley Road Precautionary 10g/m 2

2 Charville Lane (from Pole Hill Road to Bury Avenue) Precautionary 10g/m 2

NB.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO OPERATIVES

1. Before departure check with your Supervisor on the spread rate required.

2. Also check that the spinner is set correctly.

3. Ensure that all roads stated above have been thoroughly completed.

UDO NOTU grit UNSTATEDU roads.

4. Return holder to your Supervisor after completing the route assigned to you.

32


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 2

CARRIAGEWAY

PRIORITY GRITTING ROUTES

SOUTHERN AREA

ROUTE 4

SECTION 2S

UCOMMENCING FROM

A437, Harlington Road (From Depot) to Dawley Road and back

A408, Yiewsley By Pass (Stockley Road) to include all slip roads

B465, West Drayton Road to include slip roads.

NB.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO OPERATIVES

1. Before departure check with your Supervisor on the spread rate required.

2. Also check that the spinner is set correctly.

3. Ensure that all roads stated above have been thoroughly completed.

UDO NOTU grit UNSTATEDU roads.

4. Return holder to your Supervisor after completing the route assigned to you.

33


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 2

CARRIAGEWAY

PRIORITY GRITTING ROUTES

SOUTHERN AREA

ROUTE 4

SECTION 5S

UCOMMENCING FROM

A3044, Holloway Lane (From Cherry Lane R/bout to Hatch Lane)

A408, Holloway Lane

A3044, Hatch Lane

A3044, Stanwell Moor Road (To Boundary)

Old Bath Road (To Boundary)

A408, Sipson Road (All)

Harmondsworth Road

NB.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO OPERATIVES

1. Before departure check with your Supervisor on the spread rate required.

2. Also check that the spinner is set correctly.

3. Ensure that all roads stated above have been thoroughly completed.

UDO NOTU grit UNSTATEDU roads.

4. Return holder to your Supervisor after completing the route assigned to you.

34


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 2

CARRIAGEWAY

PRIORITY GRITTING ROUTES

SOUTHERN AREA

ROUTE 4

SECTION 6S

COMMENCING FROM

Coldharbour Lane

A437, Station Road

A437, High Street, Harlington

North Hyde Road (All)

Station Road

NB.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO OPERATIVES

1. Before departure check with your Supervisor on the spread rate required.

2. Also check that the spinner is set correctly.

3. Ensure that all roads stated above have been thoroughly completed.

UDO NOTU grit UNSTATEDU roads.

4. Return holder to your Supervisor after completing the route assigned to you.

35


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 2

CARRIAGEWAY

PRIORITY GRITTING ROUTES

SOUTHERN AREA

ROUTE 5

SECTION 3S

COMMENCING FROM

A4020, Uxbridge Road (Junction Harlington Road to Boundary Canal

Bridge)

A437, Long Lane (To Junction Western Avenue turning In Hillingdon

Station)

Pole Hill Road

Charville Lane (To Langdale Drive)

Yeading Lane

Willow Tree Lane

Glencoe Road

Broadmead Road

Hillingdon Hospital

Lees Road

NB.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO OPERATIVES

1. Before departure check with your Supervisor on the spread rate required.

2. Also check that the spinner is set correctly.

3. Ensure that all roads stated above have been thoroughly completed.

UDO NOTU grit UNSTATEDU roads.

4. Return holder to your Supervisor after completing the route assigned to you.

36


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 2

CARRIAGEWAY

PRIORITY GRITTING ROUTES

SOUTHERN AREA

ROUTE 6

SECTION 4S

COMMENCING FROM

A437, Harlington Road - From depot to Uxbridge Road

A4020, Hillingdon Hill

A4020, Hillingdon Road

B483, Park Road

B467, Harefield Road

Vine Street

High Street, Uxbridge

Chippendale Waye

York Road

NB.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO OPERATIVES

1. Before departure check with your Supervisor on the spread rate required.

2. Also check that the spinner is set correctly.

3. Ensure that all roads stated above have been thoroughly completed.

UDO NOTU grit UNSTATEDU roads.

4. Return holder to your Supervisor after completing the route assigned to you.

37


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 2

CARRIAGEWAY

PRIORITY GRITTING ROUTES

SOUTHERN AREA

ROUTE 6

SECTION 8S

COMMENCING FROM

Hercies Road

Honeycroft Hill

Belmont Road

Oxford Road (To Boundary)

Cross Street

Trumper Way

New Windsor Street

Rockingham Road

A4007, St Johns Road

Cowley Mill Road

The Greenway

Kingston Lane

NB.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO OPERATIVES

1. Before departure check with your Supervisor on the spread rate required.

2. Also check that the spinner is set correctly.

3. Ensure that all roads stated above have been thoroughly completed.

UDO NOTU grit UNSTATEDU roads.

4. Return holder to your Supervisor after completing the route assigned to you.

38


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 2

CARRIAGEWAY

PRIORITY GRITTING ROUTES

SOUTHERN AREA

ROUTE 7

SECTION 7S

COMMENCING FROM

Pield Heath Road

Church Road

Station Road, Uxbridge

A408, High Street, Cowley

A408, High Road, Cowley

B470, Iver Lane

A408, Cowley Road (To Trumpers Way)

Falling Lane

A408, High Street Yiewsley

Station Road West Drayton

Cherry Lane

A408 Park View Road

NB.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO OPERATIVES

1. Before departure check with your Supervisor on the spread rate required.

2. Also check that the spinner is set correctly.

3. Ensure that all roads stated above have been thoroughly completed.

UDO NOTU grit UNSTATEDU roads.

4. Return holder to your Supervisor after completing the route assigned to you.

39


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

CARRIAGEWAY

UANNEX A TO APPENDIX 2

PRIORITY GRITTING ROUTES

SOUTHERN AREA

ROUTE 7

SECTION 9S

COMMENCING FROM

A437, Dawley Road

Shepiston Lane

Swallowfield Way

Rigby Lane

Bolingbroke Way

NB.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO OPERATIVES

1. Before departure check with your Supervisor on the spread rate required.

2. Also check that the spinner is set correctly.

3. Ensure that all roads stated above have been thoroughly completed.

UDO NOTU grit UNSTATEDU roads.

4. Return holder to your Supervisor after completing the route assigned to you.

40


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 2

ROUTE 4

SECTION 10S

CARRIAGEWAY

SECONDARY GRITTING ROUTES

SOUTHERN AREA

COMMENCING FROM

Harmondsworth Lane

Sipson Lane

NB.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO OPERATIVES

1. Before departure check with your Supervisor on the spread rate required.

2. Also check that the spinner is set correctly.

3. Ensure that all roads stated above have been thoroughly completed.

UDO NOTU grit UNSTATEDU roads.

4. Return holder to your Supervisor after completing the route assigned to you.

41


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

ROUTE 5

SECTION 13S

CARRIAGEWAY

SECONDARY GRITTING ROUTES

SOUTHERN AREA

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 2

COMMENCING FROM

Romney Parade

Bury Avenue

Goshawk Gardens

Adelphi Way

Adelphi Crescent

Kingshill Avenue

Balmoral Drive

Lansbury Drive

Park Lane/Park Road

Shakespeare Avenue (Uxbridge Road to Balmoral

Drive)

Greenway

Yeading Gardens

Springfield Road

Granville Road (Uxbridge)

Beaconsfield Road

Windsor Avenue

Ryefield Avenue

Grosvenor Crescent

Sutton Court Road

Snowden Avenue

Weymouth Road

Leybourne Road (Part)

Ayles Road

Welbeck Avenue (Part)

Stratford Road

Chatsworth Road (Part)

NB.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO OPERATIVES

1. Before departure check with your Supervisor on the spread rate required.

2. Also check that the spinner is set correctly.

3. Ensure that all roads stated above have been thoroughly completed.

UDO NOTU grit UNSTATEDU roads.

4. Return holder to your Supervisor after completing the route assigned to you

42


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

ROUTE 6

SECTION 11S

CARRIAGEWAY

SECONDARY GRITTING ROUTES

SOUTHERN AREA

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 2

COMMENCING FROM

Salt Hill Close

Beacons Close

Woodhall Close

Fairlight Drive

Pages Lane

Cambridge Road

Fairfield Road

Bakers Road

Honey Hill

Vine Lane

Court Drive

Windsor Street

Gravel Hill

Blossom Way

NB.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO OPERATIVES

1. Before departure check with your Supervisor on the spread rate required.

2. Also check that the spinner is set correctly.

3. Ensure that all roads stated above have been thoroughly completed.

UDO NOTU grit UNSTATEDU roads.

4. Return holder to your Supervisor after completing the route assigned to you.

43


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

ROUTE 6

SECTION 15S

CARRIAGEWAY

SECONDARY GRITTING ROUTES

SOUTHERN AREA

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 2

COMMENCING FROM

Colham Green Road (Junction Pield Heath Road to West Drayton Road)

Violet Avenue (Part)

Appletree Avenue (Part)

Royal Lane

Cleveland Road

Whitehall Road

Arundel Road (Public Highway Only)

Eskdale Road

Salisbury Road

Wallingford Road to Salisbury Road

Ashley Road

Waterloo Road

Park View Road (Colham Green R/bout to Colham Roundabout)

NB.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO OPERATIVES

1. Before departure check with your Supervisor on the spread rate required.

2. Also check that the spinner is set correctly.

3. Ensure that all roads stated above have been thoroughly completed.

UDO NOTU grit UNSTATEDU roads.

4. Return holder to your Supervisor after completing the route assigned to you.

44


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

ROUTE 7

SECTION 12S

CARRIAGEWAY

SECONDARY GRITTING ROUTES

SOUTHERN AREA

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 2

COMMENCING FROM

Swan Road

The Green (Part)

Mill Road

Church Road

Wise Lane

Rowan Road (Part)

Laurel Lane

Porters Way

Mulberry Parade

Lavender Rise

Horton Road

Tavistock Road

Trout Road (Part)

New Peachey Lane

Peachey Lane

Packet Boat Lane

NB.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO OPERATIVES

1. Before departure check with your Supervisor on the spread rate required.

2. Also check that the spinner is set correctly.

3. Ensure that all roads stated above have been thoroughly completed.

UDO NOTU grit UNSTATEDU roads.

4. Return holder to your Supervisor after completing the route assigned to you.

45


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

ROUTE 7

SECTION 14S

COMMENCING FROM

CARRIAGEWAY

SECONDARY GRITTING ROUTES

SOUTHERN AREA

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 2

Kingsway

Morgans Lane

Angel Lane

Wood End Green Road

Botwell Lane

Judge Heath Lane

Botwell Common Road

Church Road

Central Avenue

Pump Lane

Blyth Road

Clayton Road

Granville Road (Hayes)

Carnarvon Drive

Crowland Avenue

Pinkwell Lane

Skipton Drive

Bourne Avenue

Mildred Avenue

Crown Close

Cranford Lane

Cranford Drive

Roseville Road

Carfax Road

Coronation Road (Part)

Bedwell Gardens (Part)

Clarendon Road

NB.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS TO OPERATIVES

1. Before departure check with your Supervisor on the spread rate required.

2. Also check that the spinner is set correctly.

3. Ensure that all roads stated above have been thoroughly completed.

DO NOT grit UNSTATED roads.

4. Return holder to your Supervisor after completing the route assigned to you.

46


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

ANNEX A TO APPENDIX 2

CARRIAGEWAY

PRIORITY GRITTING ROUTES

SOUTHERN AREA

ROUTE 8

SECTION 16S

Small Salt Spreading Vehicle

Route

17S

17S

17S

17S

17S

17S

Location

Vine Lane, Hillingdon.

Vine Lane from Hillingdon Hill to Court Drive,

Hillingdon.

Thorney Mill Road, continuation of Mill Road.

Yeading Gardens, Hayes.

Yeading Gardens from Yeading Lane to

Shakespeare Avenue, Hayes.

Freemans Lane, continuation of Judge Heath

Lane.

47


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

ANNEX B TO APPENDIX 2

Priority and Secondary Treatment (Severe Conditions/Snow)

In the event of snowfall preventing effective sweeping, cleansing operatives and their

vehicles (where appropriate) may be required to carry out snow clearance or salting

duties. During these periods it is likely that the cleansing operation would be

suspended.

The number of operatives / vehicles applied to this task will be at the discretion of the

Winter Service Call Out Officer in consultation with both the Street Environment

Manager and Service Manager (Waste). It is also dependent on whether the full

service is suspended or certain services e.g. litter bin emptying will continue.

Footway entrances to railway stations; hospitals and many schools have been

included within priority footway treatment routes. The carriageway outside many of

these facilities has also been included within priority carriageway treatment routes.

For secondary treatment, resources are to be applied in accordance with severity of

conditions and the predicted duration. Treatment will be phased according to the

priorities for pedestrian and vehicle movement after considering the risk of injury and

the level of use. The following to be treated before clearing residential footways and

carriageways;

(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

(f)

(h)

Entrances to hospitals, clinics and medical centres.

Access/ entrances to bus stations and transport interchanges.

Outside schools/ special schools.

Major shopping frontages.

Local shopping areas.

Day centres, homes for older people/ sheltered housing.

Residential areas where access is difficult.

12BOn completion of treatment the resources will be employed on other footways on a

priority basis.

48


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

23BPriority Footway Treatment – Hand Salting Machines

ANNEX B TO APPENDIX 2

Pedestrianised areas, bridges, combined cycleway / footway

/footpath

Item Road Name Feature Limits of Treatment

1. Pield Heath Road Hillingdon Hospital Footway/path

2. Hewens Road Mellow Lane School Footway/path

3. Polehill Road Swakeleys School Footway/path

4. Clifton Gardens Abbotsfield School Footway/path

5. Royal Lane Bishopshalt School Footway/path

6. Greenway Uxbridge High School Footway/path

7. Cowley Road Whitehall School Footway/path

8. Belmont Road Hermitage School Footway/path

9. Ryefield Avenue Ryefield School Footway/path

10. Windsor Avenue Oak Farm School Footway/path

11. Colham Green Road Colham Manor School Footway/path

12. Bury Avenue Charville School Footway/path

13. Lansbury Drive Grange Park School Footway/path

14. Raynton Drive Hayes Park School Footway/path

15. Station Road Hayes Station Footway/path

16. Long Lane Hillingdon Station Footway/path

17. High Street Uxbridge Station Footway/path

18. Oxford Road, Uxbridge Footbridge (rear of ‘Pavillions’) Footway/path

19. Cowley Road to Bridge Road, Uxbridge Footbridge (Over River Fray) Footway/path

20. St Andrews Roundabout, Uxbridge Subway Footway/path

21. High Road/New Peachey Lane, Cowley Subway Footway/path

22. Hillingdon Road/Vine Street, Uxbridge Subway Footway/path

23. Uxbridge Road/Fulham Close, Hayes Subway Footway/path

24. Uxbridge Road/Hayes End Road, Hayes Subway Footway/path

25. Glencoe Road/Kings Ash Drive, Hayes Subway Footway/path

Priority Treatment, Shop Front Routes

120BUxbridge High Street

Uxbridge Road

Station Road West Drayton / High

Street Yiewsley

Coldharbour Lane

Station Road, Hayes

St Andrews Roundabout to Harefield Road to include Vine Street, Windsor

Street, Belmont Road to York Road, Uxbridge Bus Garage and Bakers Yard

Long Lane to Yeading Lane

Falling Lane to Swan Road

Birchway to Botwell Lane

Train Station to Botwell Lane

49


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

14BSecondary Footway Treatment – Hand Salting Machines

Secondary Treatment, Shop Front Routes

13BANNEX B TO APPENDIX 2

121BGreenway Uxbridge

Cowley Road Various

Moorfield Road

Swan Road

Porters Way

Harmondsworth Road

Laurel Lane

Harmondsworth Village

Sipson Road

Harlington High Street

St Dunstans Close

Redmead Road

Dawley Road

Bourne Avenue

Kingshill Avenue

12BPield Heath Road

Violet Avenue

Falling Lane

Hillingdon Hill

Sutton Court Road

Ryefield Avenue

Long lane / Hercies Road

Welbeck Avenue

Balmoral Drive

Willowtree Lane

Brookside Road

North Hyde Road

Dawley Road Princess Park

Dawley Road Merrymans

Judge Heath Lane

Woodend Green Road

50


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

ANNEX C TO APPENDIX 2

24BSalt Bin Locations

Ref Road Name 123BWard Location Details Grade 1 in -- Comments

1 Harefield Road Uxbridge North P (fs)

2 Harefield Road Uxbridge North P (fs)

3 Harefield Road Uxbridge North P (fs)

51


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

ANNEX D TO APPENDIX 2

25BIce Sign Locations

None

52


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

Weather Forecasts and Decision Making Procedure

APPENDIX 3

INTRODUCTION

Weather forecasting is provided by the Met Office as part of their London Winter Weather

service. The period of service is 29th October 2010 to 1st April 2011.

From the 29 October, the highways Call Out Officer will contact the London Weather Centre

08704 555801, DAILY inc weekends to ascertain the weather forecast and fill in the

appropriate pre-printed daily weather report form, Appendix 5. The RMS will be contacted

and organise appropriate action.

SERVICE

Service consists of three elements:

• Email Forecast

Main 24-hour forecast issued at 11:00 hrs is emailed to the SSMM and a copy for file.

Copy given to Highway Duty Officer on call ‘out of hours’ with a copy of any order

letters if service has been ordered during working hours by SMSS. Faxed updates

may be issued by the Met. Office at other times and available ‘out of hours’ if the

forecast has significantly changed.

• Answer Phone Forecast

This provides the same information as from the emailed forecasts and can be

accessed ‘out of hours’ to update 11:00 hour forecast. Forecasts are provided at

11:00, 17:00, 23:00 and 03:00. Intermediate forecasts will be issued if there is a

‘weather warning’.

• Consultancy Service direct with forecasters

Direct discussions with the duty forecaster for clarification of latest answer phone/fax

forecast only. Main points of discussion and decisions resulting from these are to be

recorded on the paper forecast and filed ASAP. (Note: Do not divulge PIN number

to others!)

CONDITION INDICATORS

The following indicators are used in all forecasts and this system is the main element of the

Met Offices London Winter Weather Service.

INDICATOR

NIL

ALPHA

BRAVO

CHARLIE

DELTA

SNOW

TEXT DECODE

Road surface temperatures expected to remain above zero degrees Celsius and snow not expected.

Road surface temperatures expected to fall below zero degrees Celsius but roads are expected to

remain dry.

Road surface temperatures expected to fall below zero degrees Celsius and icy frost is expected to

form.

Road surface temperatures expected to fall below zero degrees Celsius and icy patches are expected

to form.

Road surface temperatures expected to fall below zero degrees Celsius and widespread ice is

expected to form.

Snow is expected.

53


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

APPENDIX 3

All messages will commence with a Condition Indicator - or perhaps two Condition Indicators

if required - and this will be followed by amplifying information on timing, (e.g. AFTER 2100)

and, if appropriate, height (e.g. ABOVE 300 FT).

26BDecision Making Procedure

Condition

Indicator/s

Nil

Alpha

Precipitation, etc

No rain, No hoar

frost, No fog

No rain, No hoar

frost, No fog

Predicted Road Condition

Wet/Wet

Pre-salted in last 24

Dry

Patches

hrs - no rain since.

May fall below freezing.

Route coverage

6 6 6 0

Expected to fall below freezing – See Note (E).

1 (note A) 6 (note A) 6 (note A) Black spots only

Alpha Locally Bravo

Bravo

Expected hoar frost

Expected fog 1 1 (note B) 4 (note B) Priorities

Bravo Locally

Charlie

Charlie

Delta

Expected rain

before freezing

Expected rain

during freezing

3 (note C) 3 (note C) 3 (note C) Priorities & Secondaries

2 (note D)

2 or 5

(note D)

2 or 5 (note D) Priorities & Secondaries

Snow Snow 1 1 1 Priorities & Secondaries

The decision to undertake precautionary treatments should if appropriate be adjusted to take

account of residual surface moisture. All decisions require continuous monitoring & review.

27BACTION

1 Salt before frost/Snow. 4 Inspection required.

2 Salt before frost, as

required during rain &

again after rain stops.

5 Inspection required with crews ‘standing by’ in depot for instructions.

3 Salt after rain stops. 6 No action likely, monitor weather

54


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

APPENDIX 3

Note A - Particular attention should be given to wet areas where there is a possibility of

water running onto the highway from adjacent land that could wash off salt previously

deposited. These areas need to be closely monitored and may require treating morning and

evening.

Note B - When a weather warning contains reference to expected hoarfrost considerable

deposits of frost are likely to occur. Hoarfrost usually occurs in early morning and is difficult

to cater for because of the probability that any salt deposited on a dry road too soon before

its onset may be dispersed before it can become effective. Close monitoring is required

under this forecast condition, which should ideally be treated just as the hoarfrost is forming.

Such action is normally not practicable and salt may have to be deposited on a dry road

prior to and close as possible to the expected time of the condition. When hoarfrost is

forecast at other times the timing of salting operations should be adjusted accordingly.

Note C - If under these circumstances rain has not ceased by early morning, crews should

be called out and action initiated as rain ceases.

Note D - Under these circumstances rain will freeze on contact with running surfaces and full

pre-treatment should be provided even on dry roads. This is a most serious condition and

should be monitored closely and continuously throughout the danger period.

Note E - Weather warnings are often qualified by altitudes in which case differing action may

be required from each depot.

Salt Spread Rates shall be according to the following:

55


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

APPENDIX 4

London Boroughs Winter Weather Service

Climatic Domains Map

Version 6, September 2007

The area covered by the London Boroughs can usefully be sub-divided into 8 climatic

domains based on air temperatures in the winter weather season. Road temperatures

cannot be directly inferred from these domains, as many other factors come into play, but

they are a good starting point. Road temperatures will vary across a given domain on a

given night and this will be described in the forecast recording where possible. Bridges and

flyovers are a special case and are generally colder than the surrounding roads and will be

given special mention in the recording if warranted.

Background to the selection of the Domains

Various weather elements can be used to define climatic areas, for example rainfall, wind

strength, temperatures and incidence of air frost. The domains map has been constructed

using average overnight minimum temperatures between November and March, the core

winter weather season. In data sparse areas, height and land use have been used as an

effective way of delineating the domains and feedback from the London Boroughs, plus local

knowledge

Causes of different climatic areas

There are various factors that affect the climatology of an area and any list will include

factors that are not weather related, such as height of the ground above sea level, land use

or underlying soil type, although these factors will often be reflected in the climatological

records. High ground will normally be colder than a low-lying area and as a result has a

higher incidence of snowfall when long-term averages are considered. The air temperature

naturally drops by 1 degree Celsius per 100m of increasing elevation.

Sandy soils and dry chalk ground are more frost prone as they are good conductors and

cool down rapidly. In general, rural areas are coldest, but within the London suburbs land

use varies markedly over short distances. In London the buildings have a significant effect

on the climate, absorbing heat by day and releasing it at night and this is known as the

Urban Heat Island Effect.

The topography of an area is also important because cold air drains from high to low ground

at night given light surface winds, creating frost hollows. The reverse situation can occur with

frost forming on hilltops and not in the valleys. This will occur when cold air sweeps in over

warm ground and the lowest layers can, on this occasion, stay above freezing. This could

occur for example as a cold front clears the area overnight, bringing clearing skies, lower

humidity and lower air temperatures.

Cold dry valleys

The dip slopes of the North Downs and the Chilterns slope towards London and the cold air

draining down from them accumulates at the margins of London. (Cold air is denser and so it

collects in hollows).

The Urban Heat Island Effect

Overnight average minimum temperatures are 2 to 2.5 degrees Celsius higher in Central

London (Domain 1) compared with the coldest boroughs (Domain 8). On an individual night

the strength of the wind and the wind direction will be the main factors determining the

magnitude of the Heat Island effect and its shape. Nights with light winds, under about 10

mph, and clear skies will exhibit the greatest temperature differences between Central

56


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

London and the suburbs and on occasion’s differences of 8 degrees Celsius in air

temperature can occur. Winds blow most frequently from the west or southwest over London

so that the Heat Island extends northeast from the City itself when long-term averages are

examined. Again variations on a given night occur and, for example, with easterly winds the

Heat Island is displaced westwards.

Road meteorology in the winter

General comments

This analysis has again used air temperature data to delineate the domains, but it would be

unwise on a given night to infer a road temperature from air temperature measurements.

The actual road temperatures observed across a domain or borough will be affected by

numerous factors such as road construction, shading of the road and elevation, as well as

meteorological factors, and it is not possible to sub-divide finely enough to cover all stretches

of road. Even within the domains there will be variations with local hot and cold spots. For

example, well shaded roads will be colder by day but overnight, reduced sky-view in heavily

built-up areas, will keep roads relatively warm compared to well exposed roads. The weather

on an individual night will determine the distribution of temperature, but the climatic domains

based on average overnight temperatures remain a useful sub-division.

A possible sequence of events overnight

On calm, clear nights lower areas will in general be colder and the London Heat Island effect

will be at its greatest, with large temperature differences between Domain 1 and the colder

domains. On windy, cloudy nights, higher ground will be coldest, and the Heat Island effect

will be least evident. Warning signs for a cold night are a clear sky, low humidity (dry air)

before sunset and little or no wind.

Dry air cools more rapidly whereas moister air may allow fog to form before the air

temperatures dips to zero, with air and ground temperatures steadying off or even rising as

the fog thickens. In the evening frost may form on grass and other surfaces that cool rapidly

eg cars. The depth of this cold and possibly frosty air will increase as successive layers of

the air are cooled.

The temperature of different surfaces

A frost can occur and hoar frost deposits may be seen on grassy surfaces, car windscreens,

car roofs and house roofs long before road temperatures dip to zero and indeed, frost can

occur on such surfaces without road temperatures falling sub-zero on a given night. As a

general rule of thumb road temperatures are warmer than most other surfaces due to a

reservoir of heat beneath the road surface and the temperature over a grass surface can be

3 to 6 degrees Celsius colder than a nearby road surface.

Blades of grass are poor conductors and do not conduct heat from the ground and air tends

to be still between the blades themselves. Although metal is a good conductor of heat,

parked cars are also cold, being thermally insulated from the ground, and cars can be one of

the coldest surfaces observed overnight by up to 8 degrees. The air coming into contact with

the grass or car will be cooled and dew is then deposited, with hoar frost forming if the

temperature of the surface falls sub-zero.

Hoar frost deposits are a good visual sign of a sub-zero surface, but absence of hoar frost

deposits does not however mean a road, or indeed any other surface, is above freezing.

These dry frosts occur when the humidity of the air is very low, typically with winds from the

east and to a lesser extent the northwest.

57


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

Bridge decks

APPENDIX 4

Bridges and elevated road sections can be colder than surrounding roads, and could be the

only portions of road in a domain or borough affected by ice or hoar frost. A bridge is not in

contact with the ground and is therefore divorced from the heat reservoir, and it also has two

surfaces, which will radiate heat. In winter the air temperature is usually lower than the deep

ground and so bridges tend to be colder and this will be most marked early in the winter

weather season, and they can be colder by around 2 degrees Celsius. However, there are

also occasions when these will be maintained at higher values than lower lying roads. After

a long cold spell when the ground is well cooled at depth, bridge decks will warm more

quickly when the milder air arrives. Bridges over rivers are liable to have more instances of

hoar frost, due to the local increase in moisture content, but equally well may be kept

warmer by the heat from the rivers.

The condition indicators

In this section some more clarification is given on the road condition indicators used in the

London Boroughs Winter Weather Service.

124BNIL

ALPHA

BRAVO

CHARLIE

DELTA

28BSNOW

Road Surface Temperatures are expected to remain above zero degrees Celsius and snow is not

expected.

Road Surface Temperatures are expected to fall below zero degrees Celsius but roads are

expected to remain dry.

Road Surface Temperatures are expected to fall below zero degrees Celsius and hoar frost is

expected to form.

Road Surface Temperatures are expected to fall below zero degrees Celsius and icy patches are

expected to form.

Road Surface Temperatures are expected to fall below zero degrees Celsius and widespread ice

is expected to form.

Snow is expected.

58


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

APPENDIX 4

Nil

This is largely self-explanatory and indicates a night with no expected winter weather

hazards and roads above freezing. The road temperature value quoted should be used

though to gauge risk, for example, plus 10 Celsius is mild but 1 Celsius is more marginal and

worthy of monitoring in later forecast issues.

29BAlpha

This covers occasions when road surfaces are expected to fall sub-zero but are expected to

remain dry. However, this can be qualified by 'locally' if only a few roads are expected to dip

sub-zero. Moisture sources may lead to hoar frost formation and seepage to icy patches,

especially in more rural boroughs, so this often means that alpha, dry roads dipping subzero,

will be qualified by 'locally bravo or charlie'. This indicates a risk of hoar frost for

example on bridges or local icy patches from seepage, water left from showers, re-freezing

snow melt etc. Seepage will only be mentioned if significant eg after a prolonged wet spell.

30Bravo

This indicator refers to the deposition of hoar frost on roads. It may also be qualified for

specific types of roads, eg more rural roads, bridges and flyovers, or by 'locally charlie'. The

latter would be reported firstly if hoar frost was expected to form but some roads were known

to be wet already, with a risk of ice forming, and secondly for conditions with marked hoar

frost where the first vehicles to pass by would cause icy patches.

31BCharlie

This covers icy patches caused by water remaining from showers, rain, snow, hail, and refreezing

snow melt. Seepage will only be mentioned when widespread as the water would

also freeze, but that will largely come down to local Borough knowledge, in the same as

water from Fire Brigade action and burst water mains. Again Charlie may be qualified by

'locally' for specific areas, bridges etc or if showers scattered across London have left roads

damp.

32BDelta

This is the worst category and would be used when widespread rain, snow or widespread

heavy showers have cleared leaving many roads wet. This category is mutually exclusive in

that for an area, alpha locally delta or bravo locally delta would not be reported. Charlie

locally delta may be reported on occasions. Roads will generally dry within two hours of rain

ceasing, but temperature levels need to be considered, as roads cool when drying out, a

process known as evaporative cooling or chilling.

3BSnow

This covers snow events when the snow is expected to be deposited and cause road

problems. Odd flurries of snow are unlikely to warrant use of this indicator, with these

covered in the main text. This indicator will often be qualified by another indicator.

59


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

‘Daily Decision’

APPENDIX 5

WINTER SERVICE ‘DAILY DECISION’ for LONDON BOROUGH OF HLLINGDON

DECISION DURING NORMAL WORKING HOURS

11:00hrs Weather Forecast Condition Indicator

Update of 11:00 hrs Weather Forecast Condition Indicator: (if any)

Cloud Cover: (Nil/partial/total)

Road Condition: (wet/dry etc.)

Snow Cover at 09:00 hrs: (Nil/yes - approx. depth mm)

Inspection Notes: (If any have been carried out):

Estimate of effectiveness of Residual Salt: (no effect/some effect/unknown/etc)

Hours lapsed since Routes were last salted

ACTION TO BE TAKEN: No Action/Action Required/Await Later Forecast (Delete as appropriate)

Decision made by:……………..….. Signature:…………………….. Date/Time:………….

ACTION TO BE TAKEN FOLLOWING LATER FORECAST ‘OUT OF HOURS’. No Action/Action

Required

(Delete as appropriate)

Decision made by:……………..….. Signature:…………………….. Date/Time:……….…

60


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

APPENDIX 6

STREET ENVIRONMENT

WINTER SERVICE DAILY OPERATIONAL & DEFECT REPORT (2010/11)

ACTIVATED DAY...……………....DATE…………………TIME……………..ACTUAL WEATHER ENCOUNTERED.

WEATHER ENCOUNTERED.

ALFA

BRAVO

CHARLIE

DELTA

ACTION TAKEN: PRECAUTIONARY 10 g/m 2 ICE 20 g/m 2 SNOW 40 g/m 2

DRIVER & MATES

NAMES

REG NO. FLEET NO PHONE

HW 1 Phone number

HW 2 Phone number

HW 3 Phone number

HW 4 Phone number

HW 5 Phone number

HW 6 Phone number

HW 7 Phone number

PHONE & TORCH (TO BE

RETURNED AFTER EACH RUN)

1

3+13+Hill hospital

South

2

2+6+9+14

South

3

4+8+11+15

South

4

5+7+10+12

South

5

1+2+8+9

North

6

3+4+5+11

North

7

6+7+10+12

North

DETAILS OF DEFECT

IF NONE X

HW 8 Phone number

Width restrictions & bridges

61


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

Highway ‘Out of Hours’ Call Out Officer Rota

APPENDIX 7

Details of the Highway ‘Out of Hours’ Call Out Officer, has been removed from this

document, as they are for operational use only.

62


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

APPENDIX 8

34BAdjoining Highway Authorities and Contacts

Duty Officers: - Details of individual duty rotas are for operational use only and are detailed in

the RBK Duty Officers emergency file.

Transport for London

Responsible for the following roads within the London Borough of Hillingdon;

A30 (part), A4 (part), A312 (part) and A40 (part)

South and East Stewardship Commission – Mouchel Parkman.

Contact – Kevin Bishop 07889 097284 – Winter Service Operational Plan.

Slough Borough Council.

Included in our routes – Bath Road.

Contact:

Slough Borough Council,

Town Hall

Bath Rd,

Slough,

SL1 3UQ

Tel: 01753 475111

E-mail: Hcontactus@epsom-ewell.gov.uk

35BSurrey County Council

Responsible for roads (included in our routes) adjoining; A3044.

Contact:

Surrey County Council,

County Hall,

Penhyrn Road,

KINGSTON UPON TAMES,

Surrey.

KT1 2DY.

Tel: 020 8541 9896

36BHertfordshire County Council

Responsible for roads (included in our routes) adjoining; A404, Harefield Road, White Hill,

Kewferry Road, Eastbury Avenue, Watford Road, Oxhey Drive

Contact:

Hertfordshire County Council

County Hall

Pegs Lane

Hertford SG13 8DQ

Tel: 0300 123 4047

E-mail: hertsdirect@hertscc.gov.uk

63


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

APPENDIX 8

37Buckinghamshire County Council

Responsible for roads (included in our routes) adjoining; A4020 – Oxford Road, Slough

Road, B470 – Iver Lane, Ford Lane, Thorney Mill Road.

Contact:

Buckinghamshire County Council

Walton Street,

Aylesbury,

Buckinghamshire

HP20 1UA Tel.

Tel: 0845 3708090, Emergency Response Team on 01296 486630

E-mail: Htfb@buckscc.gov.uk

London Borough of Harrow

Responsible for roads (included in our routes) adjoining; - Potter Street, Rickmansworth

Road, Cuckoo Hill, Eastcote Road, Eastern Avenue, Eastcote Lane, Eastcote Lane North.

Contact:

London Borough of Harrow,

PO Box 57,

Station Road,

Harrow,

HA1 2XF.

Tel: 020 8424 1886

E-mail: Hhighways@harrow.gov.uk

38BLondon Borough of Ealing

Responsible for roads (included in our routes) adjoining; - Kingshill Avenue, Yeading Lane,

Broadmead Road, A4020 – The Broadway.

Contact:

London Borough of Ealing,

Perceval House,

14-16 Uxbridge Road,

Ealing,

W5 2HL.

Tel: (020) 8825 6222, 8am-6pm or (020) 8825 5000 (after hours).

E-mail: Hcustomers@ealing.gov.uk

London Borough of Hounslow

Responsible for roads (included in our routes) adjoining; - Park Lane.

Contact:

Highways Maintenance Team

London Borough of Hounslow

Civic Centre

Lampton Road

Hounslow

TW3 4DN

Tel:020 8583 5555

Fax:020 8583 4913

Hhighways@hounslow.gov.uk

64


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

APPENDIX 9

39BWeather Terminology

40BAccretion

The build-up of snow on objects such as overhead cables, road signs and tree branches. It

occurs when wet snow with temperatures close to freezing is accompanied by a strong wind.

The wet snow freezes on to objects under pressure of the wind. The build up of snow can be

quite large, and can cause damage to cables and trees.

41BAir Frost

This occurs when air temperatures, (measured between one and two metres above the

ground) fall below 0 o C.

42Black Ice

Clear ice forms on roads due to the freezing of standing water. Occasionally it may be

formed by the transformation of hoarfrost, under pressure from car tyres. The name black

ice is used, as the road blacktop can be seen through the clear ice. The term is much

beloved by the media, but is used less frequently in road weather forecasts.

43Blustery

Used to describe showers that are accompanied by strong gusts of wind.

4BClimatic domain

An area of a county with broadly similar climatic characteristics, e.g., an urban area, or a high

level area, or a coastal area (see Forecast site).

45BCondensation

This is the change of state of water vapour to liquid water, thus forming a thin film or mist of

water on surfaces such as roads. During the process, heat is released (see Dew point).

46BConfidence Factor

Used by weather forecast organisations to give guidance to highway engineers on the

likelihood of forecasts having to be subsequently amended. Confidence HIGH means that

amends are unlikely, and confidence LOW that amends are likely. Some use is made of

MEDIUM confidence, although usage is discouraged, as it can be confusing.

47BDamped

This is the thermal map type that occurs on cloudy, windy nights. Temperature differences

along a stretch of road are at a minimum, (see Thermal map).

Deposition

This term covers the change of state from water vapour to ice without going through the

liquid water stage, (see Hoar frost).

48BDew

Liquid water formed on a surface by condensation from the atmosphere.

49BDew Point

The temperature to which a sample of air must be cooled for condensation to take place.

Dew point can be measured directly by instrumentation, e.g., road sensors.

50BDrifting

The movement of snow (usually powder snow) under the influences of wind. Snow need not

be actually falling for drifting to take place.

65


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

51BDrizzle

Small droplets that fall from low cloud. Drizzle can last for several hours and cover a large

area, or be intermittent and localised.

52BDry Adiabatic

The temperature fall with height within a sample of air before its lapse rate becomes

saturated. The rate of fall is 0.98 o C per 100m, (around 3 o C per 1,000 feet).

53BDry Frost

The road surface is at 0 o C or below, with most roads expected to be dry. However, ice may

form due to seepage, burst pipes or in known hollows where moisture persists.

54BEvaporation

The change of state from water to water vapour. The process takes in heat and causes

cooling, (see Latent heat).

5BExtreme

The thermal map type that occurs on calm, clear nights. Temperature differences along a

stretch of road tend to be at their maximum, (see Thermal map).

56BFlash Frost

The rapid build up of hoar frost on roads around sunrise. Roads can change from dry to a

significant cover of hoarfrost within 15 minutes, (see Hoar frost).

57BFog

The suspension of water droplets in air at or close to the ground.

Forecast Site

A road sensor site for which a graphical forecast is provided. It is usual to have one forecast

site per climatic domain, (see Climatic domain).

58BFreezing Fog

Fog which forms when air temperatures are below freezing. The fog droplets remain in the

liquid state, but will freeze on contact with trees and other objects, and under some

circumstances the road surface, (see Rime).

59BFreezing Point

The temperature at which pure water will change to ice, (although strictly it is the temperature

at which ice melts), in practice, 0.0 o C.

60BFreezing

A very dangerous condition where raindrops, (from warmer air above) from rain/drizzle fall on

to surfaces below freezing, thus freezing instantly and causing widespread ice. Fortunately,

rare in the UK. Most likely to occur at the end of a prolonged spell of cold weather.

61BFrequent

Used in conjunction with showers. The term frequent showers imply that nearly all areas will

catch a shower, and many places will see more than one shower, (see Isolated and

Scattered).

62BFrost

A generic term to cover temperatures below freezing. Where these temperatures occur

describes the type of frost, (air frost, ground frost, road frost etc). The rather loose term of

‘frost’ is rarely used in road weather forecasts without qualifying it.

66


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

Note that the word frost does not supply deposition on a road surface. The deposition of ice

crystals on to a road surface is known specifically as hoar frost, (see Hoar frost).

63BGale

Mean wind speed of 39 mph or more, or with gusts to 49 mph or more. A severe gale has a

mean wind of 45 mph or more, or has gusts to 70 mph or more.

64BGround Frost

This term is used to describe occasions when temperatures on the ground, (as opposed to in

the air) fall below freezing. The official meteorological definition uses the temperature over

short mown grass. The term has little relevance to winter maintenance, which is concerned

specifically with road temperatures. The term ‘ground frost’ hear on media forecasts, (TV,

radio) does not guarantee that there will also be a road frost.

Hail

Precipitation in the form of balls or pieces of ice. Usually occurs in showers.

65BHoar Frost

Deposition of water vapour directly as ice on to ground surfaces. The ice forms as white

crystals and is usually highly visible. Hoar frost is more common over grass than on roads.

Hoar frost on roads may quickly change to clear ice under pressure from car tyres.

6BIce

A generic term for frozen water. In winter maintenance terms usually refers to clear ice on

road surfaces, (see Black ice).

67BIcy Patches

Used in road weather forecasts to indicate ice formation in prone areas only, (gutters, dips in

the road surface, etc.).

68BIcy Stretches

Used in road weather forecasts to indicate more-widespread ice.

69BIsolated

Used in conjunction with showers. Isolated showers imply that most places will stay dry, but

somewhere within the area of coverage a shower may occur, (see Frequent and Scattered).

70BIntermediate

The thermal map type that occurs on nights where cloud cover, wind speed, (or both) is

variable. Road temperature differences tend to lie between the Damped and extreme

values, (see Thermal map).

71BInterval

Used to describe cloud breaks or amounts of sunshine, generally of less than one hours

duration.

72BLatent Heat

The quantity of heat absorbed or emitted, without change of temperature, during a change of

state of unit mass of a material.

73BMarginal

This describes nights where the road temperature is expected to be very close to freezing

(normally within 1 o C)

67


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

74BPeriod

Used to describe the length of cloud breaks or amounts of sunshine, generally of two hours

or more duration.

75BPowder Snow

The form of snow that occurs when air temperatures are well below freezing, (-2 o C or less).

This form of snow is very fine (like sugar crystals), drifts very easily, but does not tend to

stick to objects, (no accretion). It can be handled by snow blowers. Salt is usually less

effective.

76BPrecipitation

A general term that covers all water (or ice), which ‘falls’ from the skies. As well as rain,

sleet, snow and hail it also includes dew, hoar frost and fog.

7BPrecipitation Type

The individual type of precipitation. In winter maintenance activities, this will be one of rain,

drizzle, sleet, wet snow, dry snow, hail, freezing rain and freezing drizzle, (see Precipitation).

78BProlonged

Used to describe showers that merge together producing a spell or continuous precipitation,

generally lasting more than one hour and covering a relatively large area.

79BRain

Water droplets that fall from clouds. Rain takes many forms, and can be of many different

intensities and duration’s. Within road weather forecasts there will often be differentiation

between rain and showers, the former usually referring to longer-lived but light intensity

precipitation, and the latter to short duration but heavy intensity.

80BRelative Humidity

This is the amount of actual water vapour held in a sample of air at a given temperature,

divided by the maximum amount of water that could be held in that sample of air at that

temperature, expressed as a percentage. Within fog or heavy rain, humidities may reach

100%. On a sunny, warm afternoon in summer, humidities may fall to 30%. On an average

night in winter, humidities rarely fall below 80%, (which is the minimum humidity at which salt

crystals will start to absorb water).

81BRime

Deposition of ice from freezing fog. It is a white form of ice, similar to hoar frost, but has a

finer (at times feathery), structure. On roads, tends to be more of a problem at higher levels

than lower levels.

RST

Common abbreviation for road surface temperature. Saturated Air is said to be saturated

when, at a given temperature, it holds the maximum amount of water vapour possible. Any

cooling below its current temperature will result in condensation. The relative humidity of

saturated air is 100%.

Saturated

The rate at which air temperature falls with height within adiabatic lapse saturated air, e.g.,

within fog or cloud. It is less than the rate dry adiabatic lapse rate, 0.49 o C per 100 metres or

around 1.5 o C per 1,000 feet.

68


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

82BScattered

Used in conjunction with shower. Scattered showers imply that wide covering of showers

across an area is expected. Most places will see a shower but one or two locations may stay

dry, (see Frequent and Isolated).

83BSeepage

Leakage of ground water from roadside verges. Can cause roads to become wet, when

otherwise they would have stayed dry, possibly leading to ice formation later.

84BShower

A short spell of precipitation, generally less than an hour, and covering a relatively small

area. It can be assumed that a shower will be of rain unless qualified by the words snow,

hail or wintry.

85BSleet

Partially melted snow. If precipitation becomes heavy, sleet may readily turn to snow.

Snow

A form of precipitation where tiny ice crystals bond together into flakes. Snow can be either

of Wet or Powder forms.

86BSpell

Used to describe the length of cloud breaks or amount of sunshine, generally between one

and two hours duration.

87BThermal

The temperature trace along a road surface, (usually Fingerprint Recorded by an infrared

thermometer during a thermal mapping run). Regardless of the mean temperature of the

trace, it shows the thermal characteristics of the road surface (warm and cold spots).

Thermal Map

The representation of relative variations in road surface minimum temperature for each of

three weather categories, presented in colour bands, (usually 1 o C).

8BThermal Map Type

Defined as damped, or intermediate or extreme (see previous entries). When using thermal

maps in the forecast mode, the weather forecast organisations will send the thermal map

type with the ice prediction graph.

89BTrend

The likely direction in which the weather is moving over the next two to five days, e.g.,

‘turning much colder with night frosts’ or ‘remaining mild and windy’.

90BWash Off

This occurs when rain is sufficiently heavy to remove salt solution from the road surface.

91BWater Vapour

Water in its gaseous state.

92BWet Snow

Snow, which falls with air temperatures close to freezing point. It melts easily and can be

very sticky (see Accretion). It is more common in the UK than the other variant of powder

snow.

69


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

93BWidespread

Used to describe showers. Implies that nearly all areas will see a shower and some areas

may see more than one (see Frequent).

94BWintry

This term covers precipitation, which contains ice in one of its many variants, (sleet, wet

snow, hail). The term is used extensively in media forecasts, (e.g. wintry showers are

expected, showers will turn wintry over hills). However, the term is ambiguous in road

weather terms and hence any precipitation containing ice will be described more fully, with

likely effects on the road.

70


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

APPENDIX 10

15BSelf Care -

Guidelines for Highway Users during winter

95BIntroduction

London Borough of Hillingdon has a duty to ensure that snow or ice does not endanger the

safe passage along a highway. The law recognises that all highways cannot be treated and

recommends that a prioritised approach should be adopted.

London Borough of Hillingdon has developed a Winter Service Operational Plan to provide

reasonable service during the winter period. It is also reasonable to expect highway users to

take care during the winter months to reduce the chance of mishap caused by wintry

conditions.

To help focus on what can be done by an individual to prepare for their journeys the following

guidelines have been set:

96BInformation on London Borough of Hillingdon Winter Operational Service

It is important to know the service that London Borough of Hillingdon undertakes during the

winter period.

Check the Operational Plan out by visiting the Hwww.hillingdon.gov.ukH website.

Details of the roads and footways that are included for treatment and the location of salt bins

are included.

97BWeather Forecast

• Stay informed of the latest weather forecasts through broadcasts on the radio or

television and try to predict how these may effect you over the coming few days.

• Discuss and exchange information with your family and friends.

• Is your journey essential?

• If the forecast is for severe wintry conditions, is it reasonable to consider whether a

journey is essential.

• Can it be delayed? - If it is essential take time to prepare for it.

• Try to avoid periods of darkness particularly for journeys in remote areas.

• Choosing the best route

• Try to keep to the major routes and bus routes, which are set as the top priorities for

treatment in the Plan.

• Clothing and Footwear

• It is so important to wear appropriate footwear and clothing during the winter period to

reduce the chance of accident or discomfort. A pair of strong shoes or boots with

treads allowing good grip on surfaces is essential.

71


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

Walking

If your journey is on foot then keep to the centre of the footways and cross at controlled

points. Be aware of where your nearest salt bin is and read the instructions within the Plan

for its use and purpose.

98BDriving

The Highway Code provides rules to apply to all road users and some are legal

requirements. It is essential reading and a selection of those relating to winter conditions are

included below.

Prepare your vehicle in advance of winter and ensure that the battery is well maintained and

that there are appropriate anti-freeze agents in your radiator and windscreen bottle.

The following are legal requirements:

• Before you set off you must be able to see so clear all of the ice and snow from all of

the windows.

• You must ensure that lights and number plates are clean.

• Make sure that the mirrors are clear and the windows are demisted thoroughly.

• When driving in snowy weather.

• Drive with care even if the roads have been salted.

• Keep well back from the vehicle in front as stopping distances can be ten times

greater than on dry roads.

• Be prepared for the road conditions changing over relatively short distances.

• Drive extremely carefully in icy conditions and avoid sudden actions as these could

cause a skid.

• Drive at a slow speed in a high gear as possible and brake and accelerate very

gently.

• Drive slowly particularly on bends where skids are more likely. Brake progressively

on a straight before you reach the bend and having slowed down steer smoothly

around the bend.

• Check your grip on the road surface when there is snow or ice by choosing a safe

place to brake gently. If the steering feels unresponsive this may indicate ice and

your vehicle losing grip on the road. When travelling on ice tyres make virtually no

noise.

• During extreme/severe weather if your journey is essential carry a spade, a warm

drink and emergency food in case your vehicle breaks down.

72


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

APPENDIX 11

Salt Bins - Guidelines for Their Use.

London Borough of Hillingdon has developed a Winter Service Operational Plan, which

details the range of services for the salting of the highway during the winter period. Part of

the service is to provide salt bins in various locations on footways and verges.

The following questions and answers provide useful information to residents and guidelines

for using salt bins:

9BWhat are salt bins?

Salt bins are plastic containers located on footway or verges, which hold naturally occurring

rock salt for use during the winter period. The bins are not locked and are easily accessible.

10BWhat is their purpose?

They are to be used by residents to spread salt onto the highway surfaces (normally

footways) during severe winter conditions to prevent or treat the formation of ice and snow.

During severe winter conditions the many of the carriageways will be treated by purpose built

salting vehicles as part of the secondary route network and therefore whilst salt from salt bins

can be used for carriageways there is less urgency to do so.

101BWhere are they located?

They are generally located in quieter roads in places where the footways are steep or where

extreme problems are known to exist. The roads have not been included within the priority

route network for footways. Details can be found within the Winter Service Operational Plan

either at a local library, or alternatively, at the hillingdon.gov.uk website.

102BHow do you spread the salt?

It is important to wear appropriate clothing to minimise the chance of accident or discomfort

caused by the cold weather. A pair of strong shoes or boots with treads allowing good grip

on surfaces is essential. A pair of gloves with good grip is also recommended. A garden

spade or shovel and a small stick would be adequate for spreading the salt. Try not to over

load the spade. Hold the spade in one hand and the small stick in the other and use the stick

to flick the salt onto the surface moving left and right to cover the area in an even layer. Do

not over salt the surface – the salt does not need to be spread like sand. A volume the size

of a bag of sugar is more than sufficient to treat ten paces of footway length. Be careful not

to spread over the grass verges. For areas away from the salt bin a wheelbarrow, if

available, is useful to transport some salt.

103BWhen is the time to spread salt?

Ideally in advance of predicted extreme conditions. Keep abreast of the latest weather

forecasts through broadcasts on the radio or television. It is difficult to remove ice once it

has formed. To be effective in snow conditions the snow needs to be cleared in advance by

spades or brooms.

104BOther considerations!

The salt bins are not locked and people need to be encouraged not to place litter into them or

put graffiti onto the surfaces.

If any damage is caused to the salt bins, or they need refilling then please phone the

Customer Contact Centre on 01895 556000.

If you require any further advice then contact the Customer Contact Centre on 01895

556000.

73


WINTER SERVICE OPERATIONAL PLAN

16BChanges to Winter Service Operational Plan

APPENDIX 12

Changes from Each year the Winter Service Operational Plan is updated to take account of

changes that are needed to ensure that the Winter Service continues to operate in an

efficient way. Minor changes are influenced by information/observations received from a

variety of sources, including, from the contractor’s vehicle driver’s reports, winter

maintenance officers, councillors, residents and highway users within the Borough. Since

last year only one minor change has taken place, with the addition of 2 minor roads to the

secondary routes. However, during the three years prior to this, several significant,

externally influenced, changes had occurred leading to a comprehensive review of the Plan.

The introduction of new legislation (Railways and Transport Safety Act 2003) now places a

duty on a highway authority to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, that safe passage

along a highway is not endangered by snow or ice. This legislation came into force on 31 st

October 2003.

74

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines