Report - London Borough of Hillingdon

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Report - London Borough of Hillingdon

Cabinet agenda

Meeting Date: THURSDAY 4 TH MARCH 2004

Time:

Venue:

7.00 P.M.

COMMITTEE ROOM 6, CIVIC CENTRE

HIGH STREET, UXBRIDGE

COUNCILLORS IN THE CABINET

Councillor Ray Puddifoot

Councillor David Simmonds

Councillor Jim O’Neill

Councillor Philip Corthorne

Councillor Solveig Stone

Councillor Jonathan Bianco

Councillor Douglas Mills

Councillor Mike Heywood

Leader of the Council

Deputy Leader and Member for

Social Services and Health

Environment

Housing

Education, Youth and Leisure

Finance and Corporate Services

Performance, Partnerships and

Regeneration

Planning and Transportation

This agenda contains papers which detail the business of and decisions to be made by

the Cabinet for the month of March. If you would like further information or copies of

the agenda please call Hillingdon’s Cabinet Office on 01895 250472 or by visiting the

Council’s website:

www.hillingdon.gov.uk

Mark Braddock - Cabinet Secretary

Involving you in the way we do business…

This agenda is

Members of the Public and Press are very welcome to attend this meeting.

Parking is available via the entrance in the High Street, Uxbridge. available Please in large

enter from the Council’s main reception, where you will be print directed to the

relevant Committee Room.


Cabinet Agenda – 4 th March 2004

Agenda issued on 25 th February 2004

1. Apologies for Absence

2. Declarations of Interest – in matters coming before this meeting

3. To receive the minutes of the Cabinet meeting held on 12 th February

2004, copy attached (pages i – xi)

4. To confirm that the items of business marked Part 1 will be considered

in public and that the items marked Part 2 will be considered in private

5. Consideration of Cabinet reports

PART 1 – MEMBERS, PUBLIC AND PRESS

This section lists the reports to be considered by the Cabinet in public. The

number in brackets after each report title indicates the reference number in

the Council’s Forward Plan, which is published monthly.

Page

1 Annual Audit Letter 2002/2003 1

2 Fair Funding Arrangements 2004/2005 19

3 Controlled Drinking Zones – Formal Designation 42

4 Local Cultural Strategy for Hillingdon 54

5 A review of the Animal Welfare Charter 83

6 Hillingdon Borough Transport Strategy – Response to the

93

Preliminary Consultation

7 Behaviour Support Plan 2004/2005 133

8 Hillingdon LEA/DfES Compact 136

9 Review of Welfare Meals Service, Meals in the Home, Dining

150

Centre, Day centre Meals and Civic Centre Banqueting Service

10 Early Years Development and Childcare Partnership Implementation 152

Plan 2004/2005

11 Revenue Budget 2003/2004 Monthly Monitoring Report Month 9 157

(December 2003)

12 Opening of Private Equity Tender Off Site 174

PART 2 – PRIVATE, MEMBERS ONLY

The reports listed below in Part 2 are not made public because they contain

confidential information as defined in the Local Government (Access to

Information) Act 1985. This is because:


Items 13 and 14 deal with ‘any terms proposed or to be proposed by or to the

Authority in the course of negotiations for a contract for the acquisition or

disposal of property or the supply of goods or services.’

13 The provision of Fleet Vehicles on long and short term hire 176

14 Voluntary Sector Leasing Policy TO FOLLOW

6. Any business transferred from Part 1 of the agenda.


CABINET 12 TH FEBRUARY 2004

DECISIONS SHEET PUBLISHED BY THE CABINET OFFICE

ON 16 TH FEBRUARY 2004

Officer contact

1A

PRESENT

Members of Cabinet – Councillors Ray Puddifoot, David Simmonds,

Jonathan Bianco, Philip Corthorne, Mike Heywood, Douglas Mills, Jim

O’Neill, Solveig Stone.

Other Party Leaders/Deputy Leaders – Councillors Steve Carey and Rod

Marshall.

Overview & Scrutiny Chairmen/Vice Chairmen – Councillor Anthony Way

(Item 1A), Councillor Keith Burrows (Item 8).

Members congratulated Councillor Rod Marshall on his recent marriage.

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Councillor Rod Marshall declared a general personal and non-prejudicial

interest as Dean of Faculty at Buckinghamshire Chilterns University

College, which was a provider of courses to the Council’s Social Services

Group and as a member of the Board of Hillingdon Homes. Councillor Rod

Marshall also declared a personal and prejudicial interest in Items 4 and 5

and left the meeting for the discussion on those items.

MINUTES

The minutes of the meeting held 15 th January 2004 were agreed as

correct.

ALLOCATION OF FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE TO THE VOLUNTARY

SECTOR 2004/2005

DECISION

1. That the Cabinet agrees the recommendations on the allocation of

grants to Voluntary groups as set out in the schedule attached to the

report, with the exception of the grant to Hillingdon Autistic Care and

Support which is to be £25,000 and not as printed.

2. That it is confirmed that the sum of £264,000 is to be set aside for

grant to Hillingdon Citizens’ Advice Bureau until the Council is

satisfied and has received the outcome of the review being

undertaken by the National CAB.

REASON FOR DECISION

Nigel Cramb

01895

250394


To allocate money to voluntary sector organisations.

ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED

To vary the allocations or to make no decisions.

1B THE COUNCIL’S BUDGETS 2004/2005

The Leader advised the meeting that subject to promises made to him that

day by the DfES being delivered, the budget shortfall was now reduced to

£1.15m. It was noted that the Cabinet would be meeting again before the

Council tax setting meeting on 26 th February 2004, to make

recommendations about the budget.

Leigh

Whitehouse

01895

227457

Thanks were recorded to the Members of Parliament for the

Constituencies in the Borough and to the Leader of the Council for the

negotiations they had carried out with Government Ministers about the

funding requirement arising from the Hillingdon Judgment.

Thanks were also recorded to officers who had supported the Leader of

the Council in the meetings with Government Ministers, in particular Leigh

Whitehouse and Kamini Rambellas.

It was noted that the amount in the capital budget for Chrysalis funding had

been increased to £900,000 and that 20% of this funding would be

allocated for community safety items.

DECISION

1. To note the proposals put forward to offset the impact of the

Hillingdon Judgment in 2004/05

2. To note the revised growth list in Appendix B

3. To note the proposed reductions included in Appendix C and

authorises officers to begin work on implementation in the current

year.

4. To note the Capital Programme as outlined in Appendix E,

including the internally financed schemes detailed in Appendix D

5. To note the Prudential Indicators for 2004/05 as detailed in

Appendix F

6. To note the Director of Finance’s recommendations regarding his

responsibilities under the Local Government Act 2003

7. To note the requirement for further consultation to be undertaken

as a result of the amendments to the draft budget proposals

REASON FOR DECISION


To comply with the Budget and Policy Framework Rules and allow the

presentation to the Council of a recommended budget for 2004/2005.

ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED

To amend the proposals.

This Item had been dispatched less than 5 clear days before the meeting.

The Chairman agreed that it be considered as urgent because

fundamental changes have been made to the draft budget issued for

consultation as a result of continuing uncertainty over funding for services

to Unaccompanied Asylum Seeking Children arising from the Hillingdon

Judgment. In order to allow for consultation on the revised proposals it has

been necessary to issue a further budget report.

2 HOUSING REVENUE ACCOUNT (HRA) RENT SETTING 2004/2005

DECISION

1. That it is agreed to continue to use formula rents under the ODPM

rents restructure policy to calculate HRA dwelling rents for

2004/2005.

Ola Ajala

01895

250795

2. To approve the HRA rent, charges and allowances for 2004/2005 as

set out in Table A of the report.

3. To note the latest projected expenditure for 2003/2004 and

2004/2005 in Appendix 1 to the report. Appendix 1 is estimating HRA

uncommitted balance at the end of 2003/2004 at £2.78m and £2.13m

for 2004/2005.

4. That the HRA capital programme is granted exemption from the

moratorium on capital expenditure as imposed for 2004/2005.

REASONS FOR DECISION

To review the levels of rent, service charges and allowances for 2004/2005

to ensure that the HRA does not go into deficit and the cost of providing

services is recovered from HRA service users.

ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED

To set alternative levels charges for non dwelling services.

3 IMPROVEMENT PLANNING : HILLINGDON’S RESPONSE TO THE CPA

REFRESH 2003

DECISION

Brian Murrell

01895


1. To note the work done in improvement planning in 2003/04 as set

out in the report, and the positive qualitative assessment report from

the Audit Commission.

250612

2. To agree the arrangements for improvement planning for 2004/5

and beyond as set out in the report.

3. To note the proposed changes to CPA from 2005 and instructs the

officers to submit a proposed response to the consultation to the

Leader of the Council and to the Cabinet Member for Performance,

Partnerships and Regeneration.

4. To instruct officers to arrange an independent “peer” review

conducted by the IDeA to benchmark the Council’s progress in

improving its corporate capacity.

5. To instruct officers to assess all capacity building options and

submit a report with recommendations to the Leader of the Council

and to the Cabinet Member for Performance, Partnerships and

Regeneration.

REASONS FOR DECISION

The CPA process requires all Councils to carry out improvement planning

based on their CPA result.

ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED

To not support and resource all or some of the proposals for Improvement

Planning.

4 HILLINGDON ADULT EDUCATION SERVICE POST-INSPECTION

ACTION PLAN AND 3 YEAR DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2003/2006

DECISION

1. To endorse the Post Inspection Action Plan (page 10 of the green

pages) and request an updated plan to be presented to the Cabinet

after the full autumn inspection.

Roger

Turner /

Tricia Collis

01895

250789 /

676690

2. To endorse the Three Year Development Plan (page 1 of the green

pages) and associated actions and targets, including the Options

Appraisal (Appendix C, page 46 of the report) and request a further

report on the Options Appraisal. It was also agreed that the third

paragraph in Appendix C (starting ‘Whatever recommendations

reached..’) was to be deleted.

3. To agree use up to £25k of the EYL budget for 2003/04 and request

an option appraisal as soon as possible.

REASON FOR DECISION


To ensure the Authority can improve the quality of the learning

opportunities it offers to adults and draw down funding from the LSC to

provide learning opportunities in the most efficient and effective way.

ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED

To modify the Action Plan and the 3 Year Development Plan.

5 HILLINGDON ADULT EDUCATION SERVICE ACCOMMODATION

STRATEGY 2003/2007

DECISION

1. To endorse in principle the Hillingdon Adult Education

Accommodation Strategy

2. To instruct officers to continue to develop detailed costed

proposals for:

the replacement of the Frays Centre in Uxbridge in partnership with

Uxbridge College

the redevelopment of Victoria Centre in its current location, including

the option of including a new replacement library for Ruislip

Manor

the redevelopment of the North Hillingdon site in partnership with

The Douay Martyrs school

the provision of an adult learning facility as part of the new Ruislip

High School

Roger

Turner /

Tricia Collis

01895

250789 /

676690

3. To endorse the Capital Bid for the provision of an Adult Learning

Centre at Hayes Manor School and a similar bid for Harefield at the

Harefield Academy

REASONS FOR DECISION

To enable the Authority to continue to offer high quality adult learning

opportunities in DDA part 4 compliant buildings and to enable the

development of learning opportunities to meet the needs of residents

through continued funding from the LSC.

ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED

To request additional information at a later stage on two of the buildings.

6 POST-16 BASIC NEEDS CAPITAL ALLOCATION

DECISION

To endorse the decision to allocate capital funding to Mellow Lane

and Vyners Secondary Schools in order for the two schools to

Roger

Turner

01895


expand their sixth form accommodation.

250789

REASON FOR DECISION

Cabinet approval is required to the level of expenditure for the two

projects.

ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED

To withdraw funding for the projects.

7 JOINT ALLOTMENTS STRATEGY

DECISION

1. To note the investment made to date in site improvements and

endorses the proposed programme of works for 2004/05 and beyond.

2. To declare Site A (shown hatched black on plan G.1075/A) surplus

to requirements

3. To agree to the rationalisation of Site B and, subject to negotiation

with the allotment holders and the grant of Secretary of State’s

consent to its release from allotment use, declares the part hatched

black on the plan G.1075/B surplus to requirements

Stuart

Hunt/Jackie

Hodgson

01895

250916 /

250932

4. To instruct the Head of Property Services to:

(i) give twelve months notice to the plotholders on the surplus

sites;

(ii) prepare development proposals for each site and, with the

approval of the Cabinet Member for Finance and Property

Services make outline planning applications

(iii) market the sites and seek informal bids for report back to

Cabinet

5. To allocate 10% of the capital receipt up to a maximum of £800,000

over the four years 04/05 to 08/09 from the proceeds arising from the

sale of Site A and Site B for reinvestment in the remaining allotment

sites.

6. That the release of the monies allocated for reinvestment in the

allotment sites be subject to approval by the relevant Cabinet

Member of detailed programmes of works within the overall

framework of the Allotment Strategy.

REASON FOR DECISION

To set priorities for investing in allotments from fundraising and

rationalisation of allotment land that is surplus.

ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED


To not dispose of the sites or not to invest resources in other allotments.

8 CHOICE BASED LETTINGS - LOCATA

DECISION

1. To agree the continuation of Hillingdon's membership of Locata

and the Choice Based lettings scheme for a further 12 months, when

it will be reviewed again by Cabinet.

Ann Lander

01895

250717

2. To confirm the continuation of the current assessment criteria

adopted on 4 th December 2001 as part of the pilot. The criteria is

attached at Appendix 1.

3. To agree that in conjunction with other Locata partners’, officers

continue to develop and improve the scheme as outlined in the

enhancements plan attached at Appendix 2.

4. To note with reservations the attempt of the Notting Hill Housing

Group to join the Locata partnership and instructs officers to oppose

their inclusion until such time as there is a clear and demonstrable

improvement in their standard of estate management.

REASON FOR DECISION

Choice based lettings has been successfully introduced in Hillingdon and

has increased options for residents to find housing. Continuing in

membership of LOCATA will deliver choice to applicants and tenants in the

social housing sector.

ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED

To withdraw from choice based lettings. To enter into an alternative

partnership to offer choice based lettings. To return to the previous means

of allocation and assessment scheme.

9 REVENUE BUDGET 2003/2004 MONTHLY MONITORING REPORT

MONTH 8 (NOVEMBER 2003)

DECISION

To note the improved position of the revenue budget and agrees to

officers continuing to take appropriate actions to ensure the

budgeted revenue surplus for the current year is achieved.

Paul

Whaymand

01895

556074

REASON FOR DECISION

To achieve the Council’s expected surplus in line with the approved

budget.


ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED

None.

10 USE OF CONTINGENCY FUNDING FOR HARLINGTON ROAD DEPOT

SITE INVESTIGATIONS

DECISION

To authorise the release of £24,000 of contingency in 2003/4 to fund

the site investigation work authorised by officers.

Pacey

Cheales

01895

250118

REASON FOR DECISION

To enable progress on site investigation work at Harlington Road Depot to

begin as a matter of urgency.

ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED

None.

11 COUNCIL OPPOSITION TO THE PROPOSED THIRD RUNWAY AT

HEATHROW - CONSIDERATION OF THE AVIATION WHITE PAPER

AND PROPOSED ACTIONS

DECISION

1. On the basis of the legal advice which has been obtained

from Leading Counsel, Cabinet instructs the Borough Solicitor to

write to the Government for the purpose of seeking clarification on

the Northolt issue and depending on the Government's response, to

take such action as is deemed necessary and appropriate.

Raj Alagh /

Brian Murrell

/ Tim Jurdon

01895

250617/

250612 /

250610

2. The Cabinet agrees that the Council should join in a legal

action commenced by a consortium of local authorities led by the

London Borough of Wandsworth.

3. That future options for the campaign against the third

runway, including the use of consultants, lobbyists, and support for

NOTRAG be deferred for consideration following any resolution in

respect of the legal challenge.

4. That consideration of detailed impacts of the possible third

runway, relating to any information received from BAA or details of

any blight scheme received, be referred to a future meeting of the

Cabinet.

REASON FOR DECISION

The Council has limited time to decide on whether it will legally challenge

any aspects of the Aviation White Paper. There is also a need to review

the current arrangements for public relations, parliamentary lobbying, and


support for NOTRAG following publication of the White Paper, and this is

considered best done in consultation with wider campaign stakeholders.

ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED

To not challenge the White Paper and to end the campaign against the

third runway.

The report was considered in Part 2 because it contained confidential

information as defined in paragraph 12 of the Schedule to the Local

Government (Access to Information) Act 1985, namely ‘Any instructions to

counsel and any opinion of counsel whether or not in connection with any

proceedings and any advice received, information obtained or action to be

taken in connection with any legal proceedings by or against the authority

or the determination of any matter affecting the authority whether, in either

case, proceedings have been commenced or are in contemplation.

12 APPOINTMENT OF CORPORATE ADVERTISING SERVICES

SUPPLIER TO THE LONDON BOROUGH OF HILLINGDON AND THE

LCSG

DECISION

To award the contract for the supply of all advertising and Public

Notice services to TMP Worldwide Ltd.

Danesh

Sharma

01895

277934

REASON FOR DECISION

The contract offers best value to the council and will result in cost savings.

ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED

To retender the contract.

The report was considered in Part 2 because it contained confidential

information as defined in paragraph 9 of the Schedule to the Local

Government (Access to Information) Act 1985, namely ‘any terms

proposed or to be proposed by or to the Authority in the course of

negotiations for a contract for the acquisition or disposal of property or the

supply of goods or services.

13 APPOINTMENT OF CONSULTANT TO DELIVER HRA DEVELOPMENT

PROGRAMME AND OTHER MAJOR PROJECTS

DECISION

To appoint Redloft Partnership for a 2 year period from February

2004.

Ann Lander

01895

250717

REASONS FOR DECISION

The appointment offers the most effective way of delivering the HRA


Programme.

ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED

To not appoint Redloft Partnership.

The report was considered in Part 2 because it contained confidential

information as defined in paragraph 9 of the Schedule to the Local

Government (Access to Information) Act 1985, namely ‘any terms

proposed or to be proposed by or to the Authority in the course of

negotiations for a contract for the acquisition or disposal of property or the

supply of goods or services.

14 PROPOSED GRANT OF LEASES OF PROPERTIES FOR MORE THAN

SEVEN YEARS

DECISION

That Cabinet authorises grant of leases for a term exceeding seven

years in respect of the two properties identified in the report upon

terms to be agreed by the Head of Property Services.

Martin White

01895

250936

REASON FOR DECISION

To allow the Council to receive increased rental income.

ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED

To not proceed with the leases.

The report was considered in Part 2 because it contained confidential

information as defined in paragraph 9 of the Schedule to the Local

Government (Access to Information) Act 1985, namely ‘any terms

proposed or to be proposed by or to the Authority in the course of

negotiations for a contract for the acquisition or disposal of property or the

supply of goods or services.

15 APPROVAL TO ACCEPT A NEGOTIATED TENDER FOR THE SURVEY

OF CORPORATE STOCK SITES AND BUILDINGS FOR DISABILITY

DISCRIMINATION ACT REQUIREMENTS - PHASE THREE SURVEYS

DECISION

To accept the negotiated tender from Vectra Property Consulting in

the sum of £68,934.77 to undertake Phase 3 access surveys to sites.

Gerry

Edwards

01895

250903

REASON FOR DECISION

To enable surveys to be progressed.


ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED AND REJECTED

To retender the contract.

The report was considered in Part 2 because it contained confidential

information as defined in paragraph 9 of the Schedule to the Local

Government (Access to Information) Act 1985, namely ‘any terms

proposed or to be proposed by or to the Authority in the course of

negotiations for a contract for the acquisition or disposal of property or the

supply of goods or services.

The meeting closed at 9.17 p.m.

THESE DECISIONS WILL COME INTO FORCE AND WILL THEN BE IMPLEMENTED UNLESS

THEY ARE CALLED-IN. THE DEADLINE FOR CALL-IN TO BE RECEIVED BY THE HEAD OF

DEMOCRATIC SERVICES IS 5PM ON MONDAY 23 RD FEBRUARY 2004.

COUNCILLORS AND OFFICERS WILL BE NOTIFIED OF ANY CALL-INS RECEIVED.

This is a summary of the Cabinet’s decisions.

If you wish for more detailed information on any of the decisions please contact Hillingdon’s Cabinet

Office - Mark Braddock on 01895 250470 or Susan Came on 01895 250472.

The right hand column indicates the name of the officer(s) responsible for implementing/following up

the decision in each case. Circulation of this decisions sheet is to Members of the Council, Corporate

Directors, Group Secretariats.


ANNUAL AUDIT LETTER 2002/3 ITEM 1

SUMMARY

Contact Officer: P Whaymand

Telephone: 01895 556074

This report summarises the main points raised in the District Auditor’s letter on

2002/3 audit and inspection issues. The District Auditor has been invited to present

his Letter to the Cabinet and to answer Members’ questions. The letter notes the first

unqualified accounts since 1996/7, the unqualified Best Value Performance Plan, the

generally sound internal controls and the promising improvements shown on

inspections. It also notes the good record in financial management, the need for

reserves to be higher as currently planned, the improvement in the use of resources

CPA rating from 2 to 3 out of 4, and the plan to improve the Council’s overall CPA

rating.

RECOMMENDATIONS

1. That the annual Audit Letter attached be noted.

2. That staff be commended for achieving the improvements noted by the

District Auditor.

REASON FOR RECOMMENDATION

The Cabinet is required to consider the annual audit letter.

OPTIONS

Not relevant.

COMMENTS OF OVERVIEW & SCRUTINY COMMITTEE

The Corporate Services Overview & Scrutiny Committee will be commenting on this

report at its meeting in March 2004.

INFORMATION

1. This is the second joint audit and inspection Annual Letter for members. The

Letter summarises the conclusions and significant issues arising from the 2002/2003

audit and inspection programme and comments on other current issues.

2. The key messages in the Annual Letter (a full copy of which is attached) are as

follows:

PART I – MEMBERS & PUBLIC (INCLUDING THE PRESS)

Cabinet Reports - 4 th March 2003 Page 1


Audit Assurance Work

3. An unqualified opinion on the Council’s 2002/2003 accounts and Pension Fund

was issued in December 2003. This is the first time since 1996/97 that the Council

has received an unqualified opinion on its accounts. The Council’s draft accounts

were prepared for audit by August 2003 and supporting documentation was once

again of a good standard. The letter goes on to note that the Council is well placed to

tackle the challenge of the earlier audit opinions that will be required in future years.

4. The Council also received an unqualified opinion on the 2003/2004 Best Value

Performance Plan.

5. In relation to grant claims the letter says that overall, the audit of the Council’s

grant claims for 2001/2002 was successful. Claims were generally well prepared for

audit, accurate, and the audits conducted efficiently. However, there are still some

claims where the supporting documentation can be improved. The Director of

Finance is taking steps to ensure that the preparation of these claims is improved by

increasing the central review of the claims.

Financial Aspects of Corporate Governance

6. The letter comments that in recent years, the Council has developed a good track

record in financial management, exercised restraints where needed, and begun to

build its reserves.

7. However the letter also comments that the reserves are still too low to provide

protection against unforeseen cost pressures. The financial forecast for 2003/4

provides for further improvement on this, as does the longer term financial plan.

8. The letter comments that the Council’s arrangements for maintaining internal

financial control, for ensuring standards of financial conduct and the prevention of

fraud and corruption, and for maintaining the legality of financial transactions are

generally sound.

Inspections

9. The Audit letter comments that inspections undertaken on Housing Management

and ICT Service during 2003 show promising improvement prospects.

10. The Housing Management Service was found to have clear aims, good access,

an effective complaints system, good caretaking and cleaning services and

improving rent collection procedures.

11. The ICT service had promising prospects for improvement because:

• Senior officer, members and ICT staff are leading the e-government agenda;

• There is a good track record of partnership working to deliver e-government

plans;

• Additional funding has been committed to ICT developments.

PART I – MEMBERS & PUBLIC (INCLUDING THE PRESS)

Cabinet Reports - 4 th March 2003 Page 2


CPA Scorecard

12. The Letter comments that the Council has generally maintained its services at

the level of the previous year. Both Housing and Education Services have

maintained their good status. The use of resources rating has improved from 2 to 3

which reflects improvement in financial and management processes. The only area

of deterioration was in social care for children, but this had a significant impact on

the Council’s overall performance rating, dropping it from ‘fair’ to ‘weak’. Report also

comments that Waste recycling, services for the under-fives and careers’ guidance

to teenagers have improved and that the Planning service is making progress.

13. The letter also comments that the Council has put in place plans to improve our

rating and that these plans will be monitored over the next 12 months. Cabinet at its

meeting of 12 February agreed revised arrangements for improvement planning for

2004/5 and beyond, operating as part of the Hillingdon Improvement Programme.

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

14. There are no direct financial implications flowing from the report. The

improvements planned to address some of the issues raised in the letter have been

built into the service planning process for 2004/5. The letter refers to the cost of the

external audit service for the 2002/3 audit being £673k.

LEGAL IMPLICATIONS

15. There are no specific legal implications arising from this report.

BACKGROUND DOCUMENTS

2002/3 Annual Letter from District Auditor

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FAIR FUNDING ARRANGEMENTS 2004/05 ITEM 2

SUMMARY

Contact Officer: David Tully

Telephone: 01895 250076

Officers have worked with schools over the last few months to establish the most

appropriate way of distributing the Schools Budget for 2004/05, including the

operation of the Fair Funding formula. Two rounds of consultation have taken place

and the proposals put forward in the second consultation form the basis of the

recommendations in this report. Schools are due to articulate their collective view on

the proposals at Schools Forum on 3 rd March 2004, so a summary of their

recommendations will be provided to Cabinet before it is asked to make final

decisions.

The recommendations ask that the full extent of any uncommitted funds within the

Schools Budget for 2004/05 are allocated to primary schools to address funding

differentials which have developed between Hillingdon primary schools and primary

schools in other Outer London Boroughs.

The other recommendations largely propose modifications to the distribution of

funding in the Fair Funding formula.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That Members:

a) Agree to distribute to primary schools the whole of any uncommitted

funding that is available within the Schools Budget (ie any amounts

beyond the Minimum Funding Guarantee and any commitments for SEN

and other budgets)

b) Agree to seek formal permission from the DfES to omit three factors from

the calculations of the Minimum Funding Guarantee for schools: SEN

proxy, Specialist Resourced Provision and Closing Schools.

c) Agree to an Increased weighting for social deprivation and turnover

factors, as set out in the consultation paper (No 2) proposals:

d) Agree the use of Key Stage 1 data instead of baseline data for Foundation

and Key Stage 1 pupils for Non-Statemented SEN funding and for high

incidence SEN proxy funding and for the weightings to be calculated as

set out in the consultation paper (No 2).

e) Agree to introduce a minimum protection factor for primary, secondary

and special schools.

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f) Agree to introduce a closing schools factor to allow for the arrangements

associated with the closure of Evelyns Community School, as set out in

the consultation paper (No 2).

g) Agree to introduce a formal delegated budget for McMillan Nursery, as a

maintained nursery school and for that budget to be composed of three

factors: place factors, a nursery factor and a nursery school factor.

h) Take up the whole of the Advanced Skills Teachers (AST) Standards Fund

grant on the basis that each school with an AST makes a voluntary

contribution to create the matched funding.

i) Retain certain elements of the School Development Grant as set out in the

consultation paper (No 2).

j) Allocate any excess School Development Grant beyond the minimum

entitlement for each school on the basis of PLASC January 2004 pupil

numbers.

REASONS FOR OFFICER RECOMMENDATION

The Council, as Local Education Authority, is required to consider changes annually

to its Fair Funding scheme, to consult on any changes with schools and with the

Schools Forum, and to take account of their views before final decisions. Any

changes should be implemented in time for budgets to be published on or before

31 st March 2004.

The recommendations are put forward as the proposals which officers believed were

appropriate after the first round of Fair Funding consultation with schools;

recommendations may be revised, subject to the outcomes of the second round of

consultation.

OPTIONS AVAILABLE

To accept the recommendations.

To propose amendments to the recommendations.

To accept alternative recommendations which might be proposed either by officers

or by Schools Forum after the Schools Forum meeting on 3 rd March 2004.

COMMENTS OF OVERVIEW AND SCRUTINY COMMITTEE

Overview and Scrutiny Committee considered the contents of the first consultation

paper on Fair Funding at its meeting on 8 th January 2004.

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INFORMATION

1. The Fair Funding Consultation Paper (No2) is in Appendix 1 and it explains all of

the proposals being considered by schools. The outcomes from the consultation

paper are being considered by Schools Forum on 3 rd March 2004 and their views will

be conveyed to Cabinet prior to final decisions being made.

2. One important element within the proposals is that any uncommitted funding

within the Schools Budget be allocated to primary schools. Officers have made this

recommendation on the basis of the resolution made by Schools Forum at its

meeting on 22 nd January 2004 that funding for each sector move to the level of the

Outer London Borough average. Moreover, the evidence on which the Schools

Forum made their resolution has also heavily influenced the officer recommendation.

3. There are three pieces of evidence now available that support the view that any

uncommitted funding be allocated in 2004/05 to primary schools:

a) The comparison of primary, secondary and special needs budgets for 2003/04

with the component sub-blocks of the Education Formula Spending Share

indicate that primary schools are being funded £4.6m below the level of the

FSS. There has not been such a large movement in the FSS for 2004/05 to

suggest that this pattern is not still valid. In the first consultation paper on Fair

Funding issued in December 2004, the analysis was as follows:

Table 4: Analysis of Education FSS Sub-blocks

Nursery &

Secondary Special Total

Primary

Total Schools budget on

a basis comparable to the

FSS for Schools

58,157,035 49,084,536 14,485,861 121,727,431

FSS for schools 62,715,003 48,383,678 12,790,662 123,889,343

Difference between

budget and FSS

-4,557,968 700,858 1,695,199 -2,161,912

Officers explored the methodology for this analysis with the DfES to ensure that

a like-for-like comparison was being made.

b) At the 9 th December 2003 meeting of the Schools Forum a paper was

considered which analysed the ratio of primary – secondary relative funding. It

used publicly available statistics, using budgets and actuals. It concluded that,

compared to other Outer London Boroughs Hillingdon primary pupils were being

funded at an average ratio of 67.4% of the value of secondary pupil, whereas

the Outer London ratio was 75.35%. This did not imply that secondary pupils

were overfunded, rather that primary schools were being funded consistently

below the average. Schools Forum has asked for some independent

verification of the validity of the analysis and conclusions and officers are

arranging for this to happen. There does not, however, appear to be any

obvious flaw in the analysis and it does reinforce the conclusions about the

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elatively worse funding for primary schools identified in the FSS analysis

above.

c) The Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy has issued draft

statistics on detailed 2003/04 budgets for schools. This provides the basis on

which the Schools Forum resolution can be considered.

The average Individual Schools Budget (ISB) Share per primary pupil in Outer

London for 2003/04 was £2,552, compared to the amount per Hillingdon primary

pupil of £2,395. To fund Hillingdon primary pupils at that average level would

require an additional £3.6m. Hillingdon primary schools were ranked 16 th out of

20 in the amount of ISB per pupil.

The average Individual Schools Budget Share per secondary pupil in Outer

London for 2003/04 was £3,363, compared to the amount per Hillingdon primary

pupil of £3,441. Hillingdon secondary schools were ranked 7 th out of 20 in the

amount of ISB per pupil.

These figures demonstrate that, to reach the Outer London Borough average,

additional funding needs to be found for primary, but not secondary schools.

This situation would be reviewed again in 2004/05 for future years.

CORPORATE CONSULTATIONS CARRIED OUT

Resource Implications

4. The report deals with how the available funding should be distributed. Decisions

about the level of funding for schools will be taken at Council on 26 th February 2004.

The financial aspects of the School Forum resolution to fund at the level of the Outer

London Borough average are explained in the text.

Legal implications

5. There are no legal implications arising directly from this report.

Property implications

6. There are no property implications arising directly from this report.

EXTERNAL CONSULTATIONS CARRIED OUT

7. Schools and the Schools Forum have been formally consulted and their views will

be reported to Cabinet prior to any final decision being taken.

BACKGROUND DOCUMENTS

1 st Fair Funding Consultation – December 2003 and the outcomes.

Schools Forum minutes December 2003 and January 2004

Cabinet reports on the Council’s budget – December 2003 and February 2004

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Education, Youth and Leisure Services

Consultation Paper (No 2) – February 2004

Fair Funding Arrangements 2004/05.

Target audience:

Deadlines

response:

for

Headteachers

Governing Bodies

Senior Managers

Finance Officers

Teachers Professional Associations

Wednesday 25 th February 2004 (to allow

consideration of responses at Schools Forum on

3 rd March 2004)

Queries on this consultation paper should be directed to:

David Tully

Assistant Director: Finance &

Resources

Tel: 01895 250076

Fax: 01895 250831

Email: dtully@hillingdon.gov.uk

School Finance Team

Jane Rana

Tel: 01895 250432

Geoff Trott

Tel: 01895 250458

Colin Osafo

Tel: 01895 250451

Martyn Callister

Principal Accountant: Schools

Tel: 01895 277687

Fax: 01895 277007

Email: Mcallister@hillingdon.gov.uk

Special Needs Team

Linda Jackson

Tel: 01895 250489

Email: Ljackson2@hillingdon.gov.uk

Formal responses should be sent to:

Janet Watson

EYL Directorate

4E.01 Civic Centre

Uxbridge

Middlesex UB8 1QU

Tel: 01895 277970

Fax: 01895 250831

Email: jwatson2@hillingdon.gov.uk

By Noon Wednesday 25 th February 2004

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Consultation Paper (No 2) – February 2004

Fair Funding Arrangements 2004/05

Contents

Item Description Page

1 Introduction 3

2 Consultation issues 3

3 Feedback from Consultation (No 1) 4

4 Overall Financial Position 4

5 Minimum Funding Guarantee 8

6 Formula Factors 9

7 Standards Fund – Take-up of grants 13

8 Standards Fund – Distributional issues 14

9 Data in the Draft Budgets 14

10 Timetable 15

Appendix 1 Outcomes from the Schools Forum’s consideration of 16

Consultation Paper (No 1) and officer comment.

Appendix 2 Composition of the Schools Budget 2003/04 19

Annexes on School Draft budgets are circulated separately.

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1. Introduction

1.1 This is the second of two consultation rounds on the Fair Funding

arrangements for 2004/05. In the first round, Schools Forum considered the 7

questions posed by the LEA on the arrangements for 2004/05. This second

consultation paper draws on the outcomes of the first to make firm proposals

for Fair Funding for 2004/05. It also provides an update on the overall

financial position. Annexes to this paper with draft budget information are

being circulated to schools separately.

2. Consultation issues

2.1 The LEA is consulting the Schools Forum and individual schools on

the following matters:

a) Distribution of funding. Officers propose to recommend to Cabinet

to distribute to primary schools the whole of any uncommitted

funding that is available within the Schools Budget (ie any amounts

beyond the Minimum Funding Guarantee and any commitments for

SEN and other budgets)

b) The operation of the Minimum Funding Guarantee (MFG) for

2004/05. In particular, proposals to omit three factors from the

calculations: SEN proxy, Specialist Resourced Provision and

Closing Schools.

c) Changes to the Fair Funding Formula for 2004/05. The following is a

list of the proposed or possible changes for 2004/05:

Primary

• Increased weighting for social deprivation and turnover

factors:

• The use of Key Stage 1 data instead of baseline data for

Foundation and Key Stage 1 pupils for Non-Statemented

SEN funding and some changes to weightings.

• Revisions to the proxy factor for high incidence SEN,

• Introduction of a factor providing minimum protection

for primary schools.

Secondary

• The introduction of a closing schools factor to allow for

the arrangements associated with the closure of Evelyns

Community School.

• The introduction of a minimum level of funding through

the proxy factor for high incidence SEN,

• Introduction of a factor providing minimum protection

for secondary schools.

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Special

• Introduction of a factor providing minimum protection

for special schools.

Nursery

• Introduction of a formal delegated budget for McMillan

Nursery, as a maintained nursery school.

• The introduction of a place factor, nursery factor and

nursery school factor for the first year as the basis of

allocating that delegated budget.

d) Standards Fund take-up. The whole of the Advanced Skills Teachers

grant is to be taken up on the basis that each school with an AST

makes a voluntary contribution to create the matched funding. Also,

within the School Development Grant the LEA proposes to retain

certain elements as agreed by Schools Forum.

e) Standards Fund distribution mechanisms. For the School

Development Grant to allocate any excess beyond the minimum

entitlement for each school on the basis of PLASC January 2004

pupil numbers.

f) Data used in the formula. Each school is asked to consider the data

used in the formula and advise the School Finance Team of

instances where errors or omissions appear to have occurred.

3. Feedback from Consultation (No 1).

3.1 The Schools Forum considered the responses to the consultation paper

and their views (as recorded in the draft minutes) are set out in Appendix 1.

The rest of this paper sets out information regarding an updated position.

4. Overall financial position

4.1 The analysis in the December 2003 consultation paper identified that

there was estimated to be £1.2m of unearmarked funding available within a

passported Schools Budget for 2004/05. A number of items have changed in

the preparation of detailed budgets (eg the calculation of minimum budgets

using PLASC data for 2004 and some of the provisions for special needs

budgets, in particular, have proven to be too prudent (ie we set aside too

much). The amount of unearmarked funding available within a passported

Schools Budget for 2004/05 is now in the region of £2.9m.

4.2 Nonetheless, the Council is facing difficult choices in setting the overall

budget for 2004/05 and it is still far from certain whether Members will be able

to afford any growth beyond the minimum passporting requirement. Indeed,

in some scenarios it might prove difficult for Members to even meet the

passporting requirement. Before any final decisions are taken the Cabinet are

due to issue a revised consultation on the Council’s budget at its meeting on

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Thursday 12 th February 2004. Schools Forum has already made it clear what

its views are on the level of school budgets, but Forum may wish to comment

further. The Cabinet will meet again on Thursday 26 th February 2004 to

recommend a budget to the full Council, which will meet later that evening to

make final decisions.

4.3 Budgets for schools overall will be considered at Cabinet on 4 th March

2004, where the final arrangements for Fair Funding for 2004/05 and the

allocation of the available funding for distribution will be agreed.

4.4 The latest calculation of the amount to be passported for 2004/05 is set

out in Table 1.

Table 1: Calculation of passporting total 2004/05

Schools Budget 2003/04, as per Section 52

Statement Table 1 line 1.7

£136.079m

The increase in the FSS for schools

+£8.431m

The increase in the Excellence in Cities grant

+£0.059m

The increase in LSC grant for Post 16

+£1.230m

Target total to meet passporting requirement

2004/05 £145.799m

4.5 The detailed review of commitments and the preparation of detailed draft

budgets has identified some changes to the overall financial position. To

provide a passported budget, the Schools Budget is currently estimated to

have £2.896m uncommitted (as set out in Table 2). This figure will fluctuate if

the data changes within the draft schools budgets (eg any changes in pupil

numbers will directly impact on the Minimum Funding Guarantee)

Table 2: Consideration of commitments for 2004/05

Devolved Retained Total

2003/04 Section 52 125,454,541 10,624,459 136,079,000

Minimum 4% budget increases and natural

inflation on retained budgets 5,210,309 273,513 5,483,822

Increases in LSC funding 1,139,649 90,205 1,229,854

Changes to SEN (estimated) 0 (35,217) (35,217)

Changes to Standards Funds (145,859) 0 (145,859)

Final tranche of funding for 3 Year Olds 70,000 70,000

EiC increase 59,000 0 59,000

Budget pressure in Early Years Centres 173,000 173,000

Windfall arising from Evelyns City Academy 500,000 500,000

Remainder to schools 2,386,253 2,386,253

Total 2004/05 (current DfES control total) 134,603,894 11,195,960 145,799,854

4.6 The first consultation paper asked whether it was appropriate for the LEA

to increase the retained element of the Schools Budget by more than the

devolved element of the Schools Budget. The clear answer from schools was

no. Some of the figures have changed, in particular the detailed estimates for

SEN and for Early Years. The calculation in Table 3 identifies that the

increase in retained budgets would be less than that for devolved budgets.

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Given that increases attributable to matched funding for the Standards Fund

and Early Years do not count against the excess, it does not appear that this

is now a problem. Appendix 2 identifies what the components of the retained

element of the Schools Budget are.

Table 3: Calculation of devolved v retained budget increases.

Devolved Retained Total

Budgets 2003/04 125,454,541 10,624,459 136,079,000

less LSC devolved funding -11,575,000 -1,293,000 (12,868,000)

Less DfES adjustment for new City

Academy -947,678 0 (947,678)

Revised budget 2003/04 112,931,863 9,331,459 122,263,322

Forecast budgets 2004/05 134,603,894 11,195,960 145,799,854

less LSC devolved funding (12,714,469) (1,383,205) (14,097,674)

Revised forecast budget 2004/05 121,889,425 9,812,755 131,702,180

Increase 7.93% 5.16% 7.72%

4.7 Levels of funding for sectors have not been determined, as final decisions

are yet to be made. Draft budgets are set out in the annexes relevant to

individual sectors. The introduction of the Minimum Funding Guarantee

overrides the formula in most cases where levels of funding overall are below,

at or just above the overall level of the MFG. As funding increases, fewer

schools are funded by the MFG and more by the formula. This of course

means that, for some schools, additional funding might not produce any

additional funding for their school and this ought to be borne in mind

when setting budgets.

4.8 The Schools Forum at it meeting on 22 nd January 2004 advised Cabinet

that the per pupil funding position for each sector for 2004/05 should be at the

Outer London mean and that for future years Cabinet should increase beyond

that to reflect the higher costs in Hillingdon schools. Primary schools are at

the lower end of the Outer London mean, whereas secondary schools are

broadly at the Outer London mean. The implication of the Schools Forum

resolution is that any funding that is available for 2004/05 should be

allocated to primary schools. Officers intend to recommend to Cabinet

that this happen.

4.9 So, for primary schools, indicative levels of funding have been given in

increments of £0.5m up to £2.5m beyond the MFG level to assist schools in

understanding how their budget is likely to be affected by different levels of

increase to the primary sector.

4.10 Funding for special educational needs in mainstream schools is

critically important and further work has been done to establish the

appropriate level of support required for 2004/05. Table 4 sets out what the

original assumptions were for assessing the appropriate level of funding for

the proxy factor for 2003/04.

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Table 4: Funding levels for proxy high incidence SEN factor 2003/04

Original 2003/04 Primary Secondary Total

New statements 280,000 70,000 350,000

Year 7s (7/12ths) 105,000 105,000

280,000 175,000 455,000

4.11 In reviewing the requirements for 2004/05, officers considered the

average number of new high incidence statements agreed in the three years

prior to 1 st April 2003. Account was taken of:

• the proportion of statements which previously would have been

regarded as high incidence, but for 2004/05 will be included in the low

incidence category.

• the average value of a high incidence statement, based on the funding

for those statements which continue to be funded on a per pupil basis;

and

• the actual Year 6 pupils moving to Year 7 in a mainstream school (not

SRP) for both September 2003 and September 2004.

4.12 Table 5 sets out the calculations for 2004/05. Within these totals, there

are half a dozen or so pupils in Year 6, moving to Year 7 in September 2004

and in the current Year 7, where their “high incidence” statement would qualify

as low incidence under the statementing criteria for 2004/05. Individual

schools will be consulted on the appropriateness of this for the individual

pupils. When these details are finalised the funding for the proxy factor will be

reduced and the amount for the individual statemented pupil funding for low

incidence statements will be increased.

Table 5: Calculation of funding needed for high incidence SEN proxy 2004/05

New 2004/05 Primary Secondary Total

Full-year effect of 2003/04 new statements 578,269 111,923 690,192

Provision for new statements 2004/05 289,135 55,962 345,096

Full-year effect of 2003/04 Year 7s 200,000 200,000

Provision for new Year 7s (7/12ths) 130,000 130,000

Uprated to 2004/05 prices (+4%) 34,696 19,915 54,612

902,100 517,800 1,419,900

4.13 Within the Schools Budget the funding for high and low incidence SEN

and statemented pupils is summarised in Table 6. Funding for special needs

continues to increase significantly faster than the rate of inflation. What Table

6 demonstrates is that there are more resources available to all schools to

deal with special needs. It is hoped that these significant increases will allay

some of the fears that many heads had about the pattern of funding for the

proxy SEN factor in particular. Moreover, officers would hope that schools

can use their resource for the needs in their own schools, as well as perhaps

in clusters or in learning partnerships, if the levels of funding are considered to

be worth pooling.

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Table 6: Comparison of schools SEN funding 2003/04 v 2004/05

Component

Section 52

2003/04

Draft

2004/05 Difference

High incidence protected per pupil 2,346,242 1,952,069 -394,173

High incidence proxy SEN 455,000 1,419,900 964,900

Low incidence SEN 1,262,758 1,567,666 304,908

Specialist Resourced Provision 1,029,966 1,411,747 381,781

Special Schools 6,304,268 6,556,888 252,620

TOTAL 11,398,234 12,908,270 1,510,036

5. Minimum Funding Guarantee

5.1 The minimum funding guarantee includes the Section 52 budget for

2003/04 for each school, including any Additional Budget Support Grant for

2003/04 (of which there was none for Hillingdon in 2003/04) and excludes:

• class size funding

• rates funding

• prior year adjustments

• funding with respect to individual named pupils (eg high incidence

protected or low incidence per pupil funding)

• newly qualified teachers funding.

5.2 LEAs may apply to the DfES for permission to exclude other factors from

the calculation where the inclusion of them might cause difficulties locally.

Officers have identified three areas where it is believed that it would be more

practical to exclude them, than leave them in the calculations for the Minimum

Funding Guarantee. These are:

• Proxy SEN factor for pupils with high incidence SEN;

• Factors used to distribute funding for Specialist Resourced Provision;

and

• Funding for the proposed new factor for “Closing Schools” in the

secondary sector (which is only proposed for one year to take account

of the arrangements for the closure of Evelyns Community School).

5.3 If the two special needs elements above were included in the MFG

calculations, any increase in these would be netted off against any reductions

elsewhere in the formula and the school would stand a chance of not seeing

any benefit of the additional SEN resource. Excluding the funding from the

MFG avoids this circumstance arising.

5.4 For the third item on closing schools, schools will recall that this is a

proposed new factor to take account of the large deficit which falls to the LEA

when Evelyns closes at the end of August 2004 and Stockley Academy

opens. The funding is available for this in the one-off windfall arising with the

FSS for 2004/05, which will also allow £0.5m of additional growth for other

schools that otherwise would not exist. Nonetheless, the technicalities of

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dealing with the deficit are such that it is more practical to have it as a formula

factor for one year, rather than retain the funding in an expanded contingency

fund. To include it in the MFG calculations would not be comparing like-withlike.

Given that it is a one-off adjustment, it seems more straightforward to

keep it outside the MFG calculations.

6. Formula Factors

Primary

6.1 The LEA proposes to make four changes to the arrangements for the

primary formula for 2004/05.

a) Increased weighting for social deprivation factor. Consistent with

proposals set out in consultation for 2003/04, the LEA proposes to

continue to increase the amount of funding distributed through the

social deprivation factor by 1% a year to reach the proportion of the

FSS for Primary which is distributed on Additional Educational Needs

indices (8.4% for 2004/05). For 2003/04 6.4% of the net budget for

primary schools (ie excluding statemented pupil funding and

Standards Fund grants) was distributed on social deprivation indices.

The MFG distorts the amount being distributed on social deprivation

and other factors, if the level of funding overall is less than, at or (for

some schools) moderately more than the level of the MFG.

Nonetheless, the weightings for the social deprivation factor will be

increased by 61% (all other things being equal, this would increase the

2003/04 allocations from £0.676m to £1.088m) and the weightings for

the turnover factor will be increased by 100% (all other things being

equal, this would increase the 2003/04 allocations from £0.150m to

£0.300m).

b) Replacement of baseline data for Foundation and Key Stage 1 pupils

for Non-Statemented SEN funding with the use of the last four year’s

Key Stage 1 data where pupils have not attained level 2c in Reading.

The weightings for Foundation / Key Stage 1 to be 0.83, compared to

1.0 for Key Stage 2 pupils.

The methodology for 2004/05 will be:

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Table 7: Basis of distributing Non-Statemented SEN funding 2004/05

Nursery, Data source: Key stage 1 Reading test data.

Reception, Calculation: number of pupils not achieving 2C or below in the last

Years 1 and 2 four years.

Weighting: 0.83 (ie the sum of Nursery (0.5), Reception (0.83),

Year 1 (1.0) and Year 2 (1.0), divided by 4)

Years 3 to 6 Data source: Key stage 1 Reading test data

Calculation: number of current pupils not achieving 2C or below

Weighting: 1.0 (ie the sum of Year 3 (1.0), Year 4 (1.0), Year 5

(1.0) and Year 6 (1.0), divided by 4)

Discussions with primary colleagues led to a debate about the most

appropriate set of KS1 data to use for the SEN factors. There was

some debate about whether KS1 Writing, Reading or Maths should be

used. The proposals all use Reading, which is similar to the

arrangements for secondary schools, which use an NFER reading test.

c) Revision to the proxy factor for high incidence SEN, such that 90%

of the funding be distributed on the same Key Stage 1 data as in the

Non-Statemented SEN factor above, but that Nursery, Reception and

Year 1 pupils be given a supplementary weighting of 1.5, to mirror the

arrangements in the per pupil allocations for pupils with statements.

Table 8: Basis of distributing Proxy High Incidence SEN funding 2004/05

Nursery, Data source: Key stage 1 Reading test data.

Reception, Calculation: number of pupils not achieving 2C or below in the last

Years 1 and 2 four years.

Weighting: Nursery (0.75), Reception (1.25), Year 1 (1.5) and

Year 2 (1.0)

Years 3 to 6 Data source: Key stage 1 Reading test data

Calculation: number of current pupils not achieving 2C or below

Weighting: Year 3 (1.0), Year 4 (1.0), Year 5 (1.0) and Year 6

(1.0)

The remaining 10% of the funding to be distributed on the basis of the

number of pupils eligible for Free School Meals. That number to be

calculated on the basis of the number of pupils in Reception to Year 6

eligible for free school meals on January 2004 PLASC day, divided by

the number of Reception to Year 6s pupils on that day, multiplied by

the number of full-time equivalent pupils enrolled at the school on that

day.

A minimum level of funding be introduced for the proxy factor for

high incidence SEN, representing the 2003/04 allocation plus 4%.

d) Introduction of a factor providing minimum protection for primary

schools. This factor is necessary to allow the Minimum Funding

Guarantee (MFG) to operate. Schools are entitled to the higher of the

formula allocation (for the comparable factors) and the MFG.

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6.2 Some primary schools raised the issue of reverting to the historic

approach to funding Newly Qualified Teachers, with updates of funding each

month for any changes to the numbers of teachers. It is not proposed to

revert to this method as it would run counter to the principles of having as

much funding as possible in schools’ budgets on 1 st April and of encouraging

schools as much as possible to consider their revenue budget as a single

resource, rather than individual components.

6.3 Discussions with primary colleagues led to a brief consideration of the

possible use of ACORN data, instead of free school meals eligibility data for

the high incidence SEN proxy factor for 2004/05. Officers did not have

sufficient information available in time to use them for 2004/05, but would

expect this to be considered carefully for use in future years.

6.4 The Primary Forum response to the first consultation paper noted the

outcomes of the work of the Foundation Stage Working Group and asked that

the LEA set out its intentions on this and the arrangements for SEN proxy

factors, such that schools and the LEA are clear of the direction of travel by

September 2004. Officers are working on a timetable and this will be

discussed through the Strategic Advisory Groups.

Secondary

6.5 There are three proposed changes for the secondary school formula:

a) The introduction of a closing schools factor to allow for the

arrangements associated with the closure of Evelyns Community

School and the opening of Stockley Academy at the end of August

2004. This would be a lump sum for every school due to close before

1 st September 2004. This is the mechanism preferred by officers to

deal with the deficit at Evelyns. As set out earlier in this paper the

funding is available for this in the one-off windfall arising with the FSS

for 2004/05, which will also allow £0.5m of additional growth for other

schools that otherwise would not exist. The alternative is to provide

for the deficit in the contingency fund.

b) The introduction of a minimum level of funding through the proxy

factor for high incidence SEN, representing the numbers of pupils in

Year 7 in January 2004 with high incidence statements (according to

2004/05 statementing criteria) multiplied by 1.583 (ie one year and 7

months), multiplied by half of the average value of a high incidence

statement. This responds to the concerns of some schools where

they were admitting pupils with high incidence statements, but their

level of funding was significantly less than previously.

c) Introduction of a factor providing minimum protection for secondary

schools. This factor is necessary to allow the Minimum Funding

Guarantee to operate.

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6.6 The Hillingdon Association of Secondary Headteachers asked that two

changes be made to the funding formula for 2004/05.

6.7 The first was that the OFSTED Free School Meal bands be used

instead of the average Free School Meal eligibility for the social deprivation

factor. Officers have no problem in principle with this alternative approach

and would be prepared to consult separately on this change. Unfortunately,

there has not been the opportunity for further discussion on how this change

might work, so no alternative models have been developed. If secondary

schools are funded at or very close to the MFG, any change in the social

deprivation factor is likely to be cosmetic (ie most schools would continue to

be funded at the MFG level). Regrettably, there is little time to develop

models at this stage and it may be best to consider the use of OFSTED FSM

bands alongside the ACORN data for 2005/06 and beyond.

6.8 The second was that the fixed factor should be reduced in 2004/05 to

80% of the absolute value of that factor for 2003/04, then to 50% of the

absolute 2003/04 value for 2005/06 and for the factor to disappear completely

in 2006/07. This proposal was put forward with no explanation as to the

reasoning behind it and it was acknowledged that the proposal had not yet

been formally endorsed by HASH at their meeting in January 2004. No

further information has been provided about either the status of or the

rationale for such a change.

6.9 Officers would have concerns about a proposal which removed protection

for the smallest secondary schools without some analysis of the impact that it

would have, the reasoning behind it and the evidence that demonstrated the

reasonableness of funding a school of 1,700 and a school of 450 with no

account taken of the different proportions of fixed to variable costs. If

secondary schools believe that this, collectively, is appropriate in principle,

this ought to be considered in more detail for 2005/06. The MFG may prove

to be a barrier to introducing a phased withdrawal of this factor as the impact

of it may not be experienced by schools in the way that the initial phasing

intended.

Special

6.10 The only proposal is to introduce a factor providing minimum

protection for special schools. This factor is necessary to allow the Minimum

Funding Guarantee to operate.

Nursery

6.11 It is a requirement that the Governing Bodies of maintained nursery

schools are consulted on two issues for the first time for April 2004.

6.12 The first is the determination of a delegated budget for the school

within the Fair Funding scheme. Currently, maintained nursery schools (ie

McMillan Nursery in the case of Hillingdon) are not part of Fair Funding.

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6.13 The second is to introduce a formula for the school. It is proposed

that the place factors and nursery factor for McMillan be the same as those for

similar sized nursery classes in maintained primary and infant schools, and

that a lump sum factor be added to recognise the responsibilities of a

separate infant school.

7. Standards Funds – Take up of grants

Advanced Skills Teachers

7.1 Schools Forum recommended that schools with Advanced Skills

Teachers be invited to make a voluntary contribution to the matched funding

for the Standards Fund for 2004/05. They recommended that, should a single

school in a sector choose not to buy back, that the grant not be taken up at all

for that sector. It is proposed to adopt this method for funding ASTs for

2004/05.

School Development Grant

7.4 The proposals for the split between the retained and devolved amounts of

the Schools Development Grant are to be consistent with the

recommendations of Schools Forum. Of the £0.416m which the LEA wished

to retain for a range of on-going SEN initiatives, £35k for the Schools SEN

Training Programme is to be devolved to schools. Of the £93k for the support

staff training and development component, funding is to be retained for

primary schools, but devolved for secondary and special schools.

8. Standards Funds – distribution issues

8.1 Standards Funds will be distributed on the basis required by the DfES in

the first instance (eg where a minimum level of budget must be provided) or,

in the absence of that, on the basis used in 2003/04.

8.2 For that part of the School Development Grant in excess of the

minimum required, this will be distributed on the basis of the PLASC January

2004 full-time equivalent pupil numbers.

9. Data in the draft budgets

9.1 Schools are invited to check the data used for their school and to alert the

School Finance Team of any errors or omissions. There are some aspects to

the data to which schools need to pay particular attention:

a) Nursery sizes. Where there is evidence of a significant variation

between the actual number of pupils enrolled for a nursery class and

the number of places for which that nursery is funded, the LEA will

propose to increase or decrease the size of the funding. The schools

identified below are ones where officers have identified such

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variances and this consultation paper is the mechanism being used to

both alert those schools of the proposed change and to consult them

on their views, prior to a final decision being taken.

Table 9: Schools where nursery funding is proposed to change.

School Current Place

Size

Proposed

place size

September

2004

Likely change in

funding in a full

year

(decease)/increase

Belmore 45 fte places 40 fte places (£28,062)

Bourne 20 fte places 15 fte places (£2,097)

Charville 45 fte places 35 fte places (£30,161)

Field End Infant 50 fte places 60 fte places £12,887

Glebe 20 fte places 15 fte places (£2,097)

Guru Nanak Primary 15 fte places - (£58,193)

Hermitage 20 fte places 15 fte places (£2,097)

Hillingdon 35 fte places 30 fte places (£19,410)

Rabbsfarm 20 fte places 25 fte places £2,099

St Bernadettes 30 fte places 25 fte places (£2,097)

b) Per pupil statemented allocations. Schools are asked to consider

these carefully and to identify any instances where pupils are no

longer at the school or where the category or year group is not

appropriate. Please alert the Special Needs Team if you have any

queries on this matter.

c) Post 16 Funding. The figures in the draft for secondary schools

reflect those provided by the Learning and Skills Council. There is

certainly a query regarding the information provided for Evelyns

School, but other schools may have other issues. Discussions with

the LSC directly may resolve any queries, otherwise contact the

School Finance Team.

d) Ethnic Minority Achievement Grant. The revised data from PLASC

2004 is not yet available. Illustrations will be despatched to schools

shortly.

e) Minimum Funding Guarantee. Schools are asked to consider the

calculation here very carefully as in many cases it is this calculation

which will drive the level of the budget, rather than some of the other

components of the pure formula.

f) Key Stage 1 attainment data. Key Stage 1 data is to be used as a

proxy for Foundation / Key Stage 1 pupils in infant / primary schools,

as well as for Key Stage 2 pupils in junior / primary schools.

For infant / primary schools the data should reflect the scores of the

pupils who sat the tests when they were in that school over the last

four years. That is what the draft budgets reflect.

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For junior / primary schools the data should reflect the scores of the

pupils who are currently in Key Stage 2. Currently, the draft budgets

reflect the scores of the pupils who attended the school in the year

immediately following the one they took the test. The final budgets

will update the data to reflect the pupil profile now. This is only likely

to result in significant change where the pupil profile is radically

different to the one previously, due to pupil turnover.

10. Timetable

10.1 Timescales are short, but the issues have been considered previously

by schools in the first consultation paper. Formal consultation responses are

due by noon on Wednesday 25 th February 2004. This is so that the Schools

Forum papers can be prepared and despatched in time for their meeting on

3 rd March 2004. Schools may wish to convey key issues to their Schools

Forum representatives.

10.2 Officers will be attending the LEA headteachers meeting on 1 st March

2004 and will discuss issues arising from this paper. Council will agree final

budgets for all services at its meeting on 26 th February 2004.

10.3 Cabinet will consider the arrangements for Fair Funding for 2004/05 and

the allocation of budgets within the Schools Budget at its meeting on 4 th

March 2004. The views of Schools Forum will be reported to Cabinet before

they make final decisions.

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Appendix 1

Extract from Draft Minutes of Schools Forum (22 nd January 2004), where

they considered the issues raised in Consultation Paper (No1). Officer

comments have been added in parenthesis.

1. Are there any observations on the way in which it is proposed that minimum

budgets for schools be calculated?

No problems were identified at this stage.

(Officers have identified modifications to the operation of the MFG which are

the subject of consultation in this paper).

2. What advice would schools give the LEA in determining priorities for the

allocation of any growth which might exist within the available funding,

beyond unavoidable commitments and other earmarked sums?

Schools Forum endorsed the views of Primary Forum and Hillingdon

Association of Secondary Headteachers that they were deeply concerned at

the lack of movement to close the £1.2m gap between the Formula Spending

Share and the Schools Budget.

Schools Forum agreed that Cabinet be reminded that, at the Schools Forum

meeting in February 2003, they asked that: “Cabinet gives a commitment

to fund schools at the level of the FSS within three years”. Given that a

year has passed, they would now expect the gap to be closed within two

years. They strongly recommended that the £1.1m growth be included in

this year’s budget as the first step in addressing parity with FSS by 2005/06.

In considering the priorities for the estimated £1.2m headroom in the Schools

Budget for 2004/05, Schools Forum agreed by 9 votes to 0, with 3

abstentions, that:

“Forum advises Cabinet that the per pupil funding position for each

sector for 2004/05 should be at the Outer London Borough mean and

that for future years Cabinet should increase beyond that to reflect the

higher costs in Hillingdon schools."

It was recommended that any growth be distributed through age-weighted

pupil factors.

Schools Forum confirmed that they want officers to seek a dispassionate

view of the report prepared by primary colleagues on the relative funding for

primary and secondary schools in Hillingdon, compared to other outer

London Boroughs. David Tully is to deal with this and report back.

(Officers intend to recommend to Members that the whole of any available

growth for 2004/05 go to Primary Schools).

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3. The current calculations of the amount of funding likely to go to retained and

devolved budgets within the Schools Budgets suggests that the retained

element might increase by 1.2% more than the devolved element. If this

situation were not to change, what would schools views be of the LEA

applying to the Secretary of State for permission to increase retained

elements in the Schools Budget by this amount in excess of the increase in

the devolved elements in the Schools Budget?

Schools Forum did not support the increase in retained elements of more

than the increase in devolved elements within the Schools Budget. Members

asked for further details of the components of the Schools Budget.

(Officers indicate in the paper that this is no longer an issue.)

4. All LEAs have access to a Universal Support Grant to assist schools in

difficult financial circumstances. The grant is essentially an advance on the

LEA’s funding for 2005/06. What are schools views on the principle of

accessing this grant at all? And, if there is no objection in principle to

accessing the grant, what advice would schools wish to give the LEA on the

circumstances in which it might be appropriate to allocate funding from this

grant to individual schools in financial difficulties?

Schools Forum did not support the LEA’s access to the Universal Support

Grant.

(Officers do not intend to take up the Universal Support Grant)

5. What are schools views on the need for any changes to formula factors for

2004/05? In particular, what aspects of the proxy based high incidence SEN

funding arrangements need to change for 2004/05?

Schools Forum supported the conclusions reached by Resources SAG the

previous day on the issues of SEN funding. The Resources SAG outcomes

had been reported as follows:

“It was felt by Resources SAG that much more time needed to be invested by

LEA officers on this issue. They felt that major changes could not take place

for 2004/05, but that the LEA still had to put forward a firm proposal on how

the arrangements would operate for 2004/05.

It was agreed that there would be an urgent meeting offered to primary

headteachers (particularly those on Resources SAG and Inclusion SAG, but

open to all) to explore the issues regarding the proxy factors. The LEA was

asked to produce a timetable to identify what work needed to be done, what

the plan for savings in the LEA being passed to schools was, and when it

would be implemented. It was expected that a firm position about the future

of mainstream SEN funding be resolved by September 2004.”

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(Officers have had a meeting with primary colleagues and have put forward a

firm proposal for 2004/05. A timetable for dealing with issues by September

2004 will be considered at the next round of Strategic Advisory Group

meetings. Consultation Paper (No 2) deals with proposed changes to

formula factors.)

6. The LEA is proposing to retain two elements of the School Development

Grant for 2004/05 at the level of the retained funding for 2003/04 and for the

type of expenditure incurred in 2003/04. What are schools’ views on this

proposal? How ought the LEA to distribute any funding beyond the minimum

increase for School Development Grant?

Schools Forum supported the LEA’s proposals to retain funding for: SENJIT

subscription (£8k); Speech and Language therapy pilots (£220k);

Occupational therapy / physiotherapy (£43k); and the projects supporting

inclusion (£40k), green paper (£40k), P scales (£20k) and the SEN

component of the primary literacy strategy (£10k). This totals £381k.

It was asked that the funding for projects be managed by the Head of

Inclusion / SEN and that a report be provided next year identifying how the

funding was used and how effective it had been. It was also asked that a

transparent approach be adopted in advertising the availability of funding and

evaluating candidate projects.

Schools Forum endorsed the Resources SAG view that the £35k for Schools

SEN Training be devolved and that a sector specific approach be adopted for

the £93k Support Staff Training and Development (ie special and secondary

devolved, primary retained).

(Officers have included the Schools Forum recommendations in Consultation

Paper (No 2).)

7. Are there any other observations of schools on the funding arrangements

for 2004/05 which they want to bring to the attention of the LEA before final

proposals are shaped?

Schools Forum endorsed the approach agreed by Resources SAG that

schools with ASTs be invited to make a voluntary contribution to the matched

cost of ASTs. A sector based approach would be adopted in that all schools

with ASTs in a sector would need to agree to payback the matched cost for

the grant for the sector to be taken up.

(Officers have proposed this method for funding ASTs.)

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Appendix 2

Analysis of Schools Budget 2003/04, split between devolved and retained

Devolved Retained

£'000 £'000

1.0.1 Individual Schools Budget 121,349 0

1.0.2 School Standards Grant 0 0

1.0.3 Standards Fund allocation - revenue 1,733 0

1.0.4

Nursery School Funding (not nursery classes in

primary schools) 235 0

1.1.1 Provision for pupils with statements 0 1,271

1.1.2 Specialist support; pupils with statements 0 0

1.1.3 Specialist support; pupils without statements 0 740

1.1.4

Fees for pupils at independent special schools &

abroad 0 4,316

1.1.5 Collaboration and integration 0 0

1.1.6 Inter-authority recoupment 0 433

1.2.1 Pupil Referral Units 0 50

1.2.2 Behaviour Support Implementation 0 0

1.2.3 Education out of school 0 34

1.2.4

Nursery education provided other than in maintained

nursery schools/classes 0 2,385

1.3.1 School Meals - nursery, primary and special schools 0 0

1.3.2 Free School Meals - eligibility 0 0

1.3.3 Milk 0 0

1.3.4 School Kitchens - repair and maintenance 0 0

1.3.5

Fees to independent schools for pupils without

statements 0 0

1.4.1 Insurance 0 0

1.4.2 Museum services 0 0

1.4.3 Library Services - nursery, primary and special schools 0 130

1.4.4 School admissions 0 244

1.4.5

Licences/subscriptions (not more than 0.2% total net

SB) 0 0

1.4.6 School-specific contingencies 0 69

1.4.7 Miscellaneous (not more than 0.1% total net SB) 0 54

1.4.8 Servicing of schools forums 0 3

1.4.9 Staff costs - supply cover (not sickness) 0 82

1.4.10 Supply cover - long term sickness 0 0

1.5.1 Standards Fund - Non-Devolved 0 813

1.5.2 Non-Standards Fund specific grant 0 0

1.5.3 Specific formula grant: Excellence in Cities (EiC) 1,484 0

1.5.4 Performance Reward Grant 0 0

1.6.1 Capital Expenditure from Revenue (CERA) 653 0

1.7.1 TOTAL SCHOOLS BUDGET 125,455 10,625

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CONTROLLED DRINKING ZONES – FORMAL

DESIGNATION

ITEM 3

Contact Officer: David Brough

Telephone: 01895 250636

SUMMARY

This report seeks confirmation of the areas of the Borough that are to be

recommended to the full Council for designation for controlling the drinking of

alcohol.

RECOMMENDATIONS

1. That, subject to 2 below, the Council be recommended to exercise its

powers under the provisions of the Criminal Justice and Police Act 2001

(as amended) to designate the following areas as public places for the

purposes of controlling the drinking of alcohol:

• Hayes Town Centre (including Botwell Green)

• Ruislip Town Centre (including Churchfield Gardens and Manor Farm)

• Ruislip Manor (Victoria Road)

• Uxbridge Town Centre (including Fassnidge Park)

Hillingdon Court Park

2. That the Cabinet note the responses to public consultation received up to

the date of its meeting and any further responses received before the

close of consultation on 17 th March be reported to the Council meeting on

25 th March.

REASONS FOR OFFICER RECOMMENDATIONS

The Cabinet has previously decided to support the principle of designating the

places listed in recommendation 1for the purposes of controlling the drinking of

alcohol and it is now necessary to make a formal recommendation to the Council in

the light of consultation with the Police and the public.

OPTIONS AVAILABLE

The Council is not obliged to set up controlled drinking zones and has the option of

not proceeding with any or all of the proposals depending on the outcome of

consultation.

COMMENTS OF OVERVIEW AND SCRUTINY COMMITTEE

The Corporate Services Overview and Scrutiny Committee has not asked to

comment on this subject.

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INFORMATION

1. At the Cabinet meeting on 18 th December 2003 a report was received on the

possible use of the Council’s powers to designate certain areas of the Borough as

public places for the purposes of controlling the drinking of alcohol. The report

highlighted that there were increasing problems in town centres and in a number of

parks and open spaces caused by the drinking of alcohol and that these could be

addressed by the Police following designation of the areas concerned by the

Council.

2. It was noted that the Council has to consult with the Police, the public and

affected licensees before designating an area. Once designated there is a power for

a Constable to require a person to stop drinking and to hand over any open or

unopened containers of alcohol. There is not a total ban on drinking within the area

concerned and the power is to deal with people who are creating a nuisance or

annoyance to others or who are involved or likely to be involved in disorder.

3. It was also noted that the local Police had already expressed support in principle

for the designation of areas on a trial basis and that they believed it would contribute

effectively to the community safety strategy.

4. In the light of this information the Cabinet made the following decisions:

(1) That approval in principle be given to the designation of the following places for

the purposes of controlling the drinking of alcohol under the provisions of the

Criminal Justice and Police Act 2001:

• Hayes Town Centre

• Ruislip Town Centre ( including Churchfield Gardens and Manor Farm)

• Uxbridge Town Centre

• Botwell Recreation Ground Hayes

Hillingdon Court Park

(2) That the designation of the selected areas be subject to the following

conditions:

• Confirmation by the Police and the Council’s Community Safety Team that

there is sufficient evidence of alcohol-related crime and anti-social

behaviour to justify this course of action and

• Agreement between the Council and the Police on the boundaries of each

area to be designated.

• Consultation with the public and with licensees and other retailers within the

proposed control zones.

(3) That the responses to public consultation be reported to the Cabinet meeting on

4 th March 2004 with a view to recommendations being made to the full Council

on 25 th March for the formal designation of the selected areas.

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(4) That the operation of the zones be monitored and reviewed after 6 months’

operation and, if successful, additional proposals be brought forward for the

designation of further areas subject to adequate evidence and resources for

implementation and enforcement.

5. At the December Cabinet meeting a request was made from the Leader of the

Liberal Democrat Group that Ruislip Manor should be added to the list of designated

areas and the Leader of the Council agreed that this should be investigated. When

considering the decisions sheet at a subsequent meeting on 15 th January 2004 it

was agreed that this area should be added.

6. In accordance with the second resolution set out above there has been

consultation between the Council and the Police and there have also been

discussions about the boundaries to be adopted so that the chances of moving

problems into an adjoining area can be minimised. The outcome of these

discussions is set out below and plans of the proposed areas are enclosed with this

report

Data from the Custody Database, CADMIS Disorder and Parks Patrol during 2003

Uxbridge Town Centre (including Fassnidge Park)

Custody Type Custody CADMIS Disorder CADMIS Disorder Parks Patrol

Drunk and Disorderly 64 Type 34: Drunkenness 162 4

Drunk in public place 10

Drunk on licensed premises 8

Disorderly conduct/behaviour 13 Type 26: Disturbance - public 537

Total 95 699 4 798

Hayes Town Centre (including Botwell Green)

Drunk and Disorderly 25 Type 34: Drunkenness 9

Drunk in public place 5

Drunk on licensed premises 1

Disorderly conduct/behaviour 1 Type 26: Disturbance - public 73

Total 32 82 0 114

Ruislip Town Centre (including Churchfield Gardens and Manor Farm)

Drunk and Disorderly 1 Type 34: Drunkenness 2

Drunk in public place 0

Drunk on licensed premises 0

Disorderly conduct/behaviour 1 Type 26: Disturbance - public 16

Total 2 18 0 20

Ruislip Manor (Victoria Road)

Drunk and Disorderly 2 Type 34: Drunkenness 1

Drunk in public place 0

Drunk on licensed premises 0

Disorderly conduct/behaviour 1 Type 26: Disturbance - public 10

Total 3 11 0 14

Hillingdon Court Park

Drunk and Disorderly 0 Type 34: Drunkenness 0 3

Drunk in public place 0

Drunk on licensed premises 0

Disorderly conduct/behaviour 0 Type 26: Disturbance - public 8

Total 0 8 3 11

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Notes:

(1) Custody - gives details of people arrested by Police and in Police Custody.

(2) CADMIS (Computer Aided Dispatch Management Information System) – this is

information from the telephone calls that the CAD room takes from the public

(e.g. 999 calls).

7. The official data for the selected sites is in some cases lower than might be

expected. It needs to be borne in mind that these records are based on those

received through the computerised system and do not include calls to local Police

Community Action Team Officers. In the case of Manor Farm Ruislip there has also

been a petition and many complaints to the Council about vandalism and anti-social

behaviour, some of which is related to the consumption of alcohol.

8. Public consultation is currently taking place on the proposals and a copy of the

consultation document is attached to this report. Letters have been sent to local

residents associations and other groups. The Police are arranging the distribution of

copies to licensees and to local residents and the Uxbridge and Hayes Town Centre

Managers are using their networks to collect views of businesses and other relevant

organisations

9. The legislation requires that a public notice is placed in a local newspaper

circulating in the district and that 28 days are given for responses. The notice

appeared in the Gazette on 18 th February and as a result the consultation period will

not close until 17 th March. The Cabinet will be informed of responses received by

the date of its meeting and a summary of later responses will be submitted to the

Council meeting on 25 th March.

CORPORATE CONSULTATIONS CARRIED OUT

Financial Implications

10. The report to the December 2003 meeting estimated that it would cost in the

region of £10,000 to carry out the public consultation and to erect signs on the

boundaries of the areas to be designated. This cost will be met from within the

Community Safety budget.

11. There will also be resource implications for the Parks Patrol Service in enforcing

the provisions within those parks that are designated and they have been fully

involved in the development of the proposals.

Legal implications

12. The Criminal Justice and Police Act 2002 (as amended) specifies various

procedural steps that the Council must take before designating an area and these

are set out in the report.

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Other consultations

13. The Green Spaces Division of the Environmental Services Group initiated the

first report to the Cabinet and have been involved in the follow up work.

EXTERNAL CONSULTATIONS CARRIED OUT

14. The arrangements for consultations with the Police, licensees and the public are

set out in the report.

BACKGROUND DOCUMENTS

Report and decisions of Cabinet meeting 18 th December 2003

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CONTROLLED DRINKING ZONES FOR HILLINGDON

YOUR QUESTIONS ANSWERED

What is being proposed?

Hillingdon Council is proposing to create Controlled Drinking Zones in the following

locations:

• Hayes Town Centre (including Botwell Green)

• Ruislip Town Centre (including Churchfield Gardens and Manor Farm)

• Ruislip Manor (Victoria Road)

• Uxbridge Town Centre (including Fassnidge Park)

Hillingdon Court Park

What is a Controlled Drinking Zone?

The Criminal Justice and Police Act 2001 (as amended) gives local Councils the

power to make an Order designating a part of the Borough as a public place in order

to control the drinking of alcohol in that area.

Before designating an area the Council must be satisfied that there is sufficient

nuisance, annoyance or disorder to justify its action and it must consult the Police,

licensees, retailers and the public.

Once an Order has been made a Constable can require a person to stop drinking in

the designated area and to surrender any open or sealed containers of alcohol. If

the person refuses he or she may be arrested.

What is the penalty if somebody refuses to stop drinking?

A Constable may issue a £40 Fixed Penalty Notice to anybody who refuses to stop

drinking or to hand over any open or sealed containers of alcohol. A person who

refuses may be arrested and prosecuted with a fine of up to £500.

Will it prevent drinking in pub gardens, pavement cafés and parks?

No, this is not a total ban on drinking of alcohol in public. The power will be used

only if a Constable believes that the person concerned is creating a nuisance or

annoyance to others or is involved or likely to be involved in disorder

Why is the Council proposing to introduce these Zones now?

There have been increasing complaints from the public about the effects of drinking

in public places. These include vandalism, excessive noise, abusive behaviour and

the feeling of being unsafe, especially at night time. There are also problems in some

areas with street drinkers in the day time.

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The new Licensing Act will abolish the current controls on licensing hours later this

year and many pubs and clubs are likely to be opening for extended hours. Nobody

knows what effect this will have and the introduction of Controlled Drinking Zones will

help reduce any nuisance that may arise.

Do the Police support what is proposed?

Yes, the Police are keen to see this new power introduced for the same reasons as

the Council.

How have the locations been selected?

The Council and the Police have looked at past crime figures and complaints from

the public and have selected those places where there are most problems. Most of

the locations are town centres but there are also some parks. The operation of the

Zones will be monitored and if successful they will be extended to other Town

Centres and parks where there are problems.

Won’t the zones just shift the problems elsewhere?

There is clearly a danger that the designation of an area will simply move the

nuisance into another area. The drawing of the boundaries is therefore very

important and this is one of the reasons that the proposals for Hayes, Ruislip and

Uxbridge also include nearby parks. The Council and the Police would particularly

welcome comments from members of the public on the proposed boundaries using

their local knowledge.

Isn’t this simply dealing with the symptoms of a much deeper problem?

Stopping individuals from drinking in public on one occasion will deal only with that

immediate situation. The introduction of these Zones is therefore linked with other

measures by the Council and its partners to increase youth facilities, educate young

people about the risks of binge drinking and offer treatment for street drinkers who

want to tackle their drink problems.

What is the timetable for this to happen?

Public consultation is open until 17 th March. A final decision will be made by the full

Council meeting on 25 th March. If all goes to plan the new Zones will then be well in

place for the summer.

How do I make my views known?

Please send your comments in writing to the Community Safety Team at the Civic

Centre Uxbridge UB8 1UW or by email to mhankins@hillingdon.gov.uk Further

information can be obtained by calling the Team on 01895 277295.

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LOCAL CULTURAL STRATEGY FOR HILLINGDON ITEM 4

SUMMARY

Contact Officer: Trisha Grimshaw

Telephone: 01895 50625

This report introduces the proposed Cultural Strategy for Hillingdon and the action

plan for its implementation.

RECOMMENDATION

That members endorse the Cultural Strategy and instruct officers to implement

the action plan.

REASONS FOR OFFICER RECOMMENDATION

The report supports work to improve the quality of life in Hillingdon and the

development of partnerships across services and with community partners. The

adoption of the Cultural Strategy will achieve Best Value Performance Plan indicator

BV114, which in turn contributes to the CPA assessment.

OPTIONS AVAILABLE

Members can decide not to approve or to amend the Cultural Strategy.

COMMENTS OF OVERVIEW AND SCRUTINY COMMITTEE

The Overview & Scrutiny Committee has not asked to comment on the report.

INFORMATION

1. In requiring local authorities to develop local cultural strategies, the Government

asked local councils to work cross-sectorally in a partnership of services and with

other external organisations and partners to improve the quality of life for local

communities.

2. Initially the development of a local Cultural Strategy was a statutory requirement.

Following the Government review of the range of plans required of local authorities,

a Cultural Strategy is no longer a statutory planning document, however, an

endorsed local Cultural Strategy remains a Best Value Performance Indicator.

3. The vision for the Cultural Strategy for Hillingdon was defined as follows:

‘To help develop Hillingdon as a place in which residents can find fulfilment and

achieve their potential as valued members of a community which embraces diversity

and encourages active citizenship. Participating in cultural activities enhances quality

of life, enriches mind and body, brings communities and generations together and

has the power to transform peoples lives for the better’.

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4. Participating in cultural activities is for many people an essential part of their

quality of life - for some it is developing knowledge and skills or fitness and health, it

is the building of social networks, the fostering of self-confidence and the sense of

well-being, the development of a sense of inclusion and prevention of feelings of

isolation. For others it is about celebrating their cultural traditions and history and

sharing this with others both within their own communities and more broadly. Even

small-scale cultural activities can have a major impact on the lives of individuals and

local communities which can read through into the local economy and have

beneficial social and regenerative effects.

5. The Cultural Strategy supports key objectives and the short, medium and longer

term targets set out in the Leader’s Statement, particularly in terms of:

• A borough of learning and culture

• A council working in partnership with its communities and partners

• A borough where opportunities are open to all

• A cleaner, more pleasant borough

6. Recent government policy documents continue to highlight the role expected of

sport, arts, libraries, and museums, galleries and archives, in supporting themes

such as social inclusion by enabling people to realise their potential and contribute to

the regeneration of a local community. It is the aim of this cultural strategy to

maximise the opportunities for lifelong learning, putting people and groups in touch,

helping people to engage with what is available, making connections, and supporting

easier access.

7. Cultural Strategy Format - attached as Appendix 1

Section 1

Section 2

Section 3

Section 4

Appendix 2

The case for culture

Findings from surveys and consultation

Local and national frameworks and research

Themes, aims and priorities of the Cultural Strategy

Cultural Strategy action plan

Key themes of the Cultural Strategy

8. The Cultural Strategy, set out in full in Section 4, has three main themes to give a

clear focus on what is important for the borough and how these ambitions we will

achieve our ambitions:

A: Hillingdon People – everyone should have the chance to enjoy and benefit from

cultural opportunities.

B: Hillingdon Spaces and Places – the importance of our built and natural

environments need to be promoted and opportunities provided for everyone to

benefit from them now and into the future.

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C: Hillingdon Partners – every organisation, whether in the public, voluntary or

private sectors should have an active role in developing culture and improving our

quality of life.

9. Each theme has a set of aims and priorities. The priorities for the Cultural

Strategy are determined as follows:

Theme A:

Hillingdon People

• A1 Ensure better access for all by developing strategies and provision that

meet the needs of groups that do not access or make little use of our cultural

facilities and services.

• A2 Promote cultural activity that celebrates our diverse communities and

develops greater understanding of the borough's rich cultural inheritance.

• A3 Work positively with the voluntary sector and the volunteers who provide

a wealth and variety of local sports, music, visual arts, drama, heritage,

environmental and other activity alongside the services provided by the Council.

• A4 Improve our communication with local communities helping to ensure

that they have access to information about the cultural activities and

opportunities available.

• A5 Ensure culture improves life opportunities for all sections of the

community, working with partners in education, health and other sectors to

improve individual and community opportunities and well-being.

Theme B: Hillingdon Spaces and Places

• B1 Widen access to and enhance the opportunities to benefit from

Hillingdon's cultural spaces and places so that everyone can enjoy Hillingdon's

considerable assets.

• B2 Work to improve the quality and range of cultural facilities available to

our residents and try to ensure that we can respond in relevant and exciting

ways to changing and developing needs for cultural expression.

• B3 Ensure we provide a range of appropriate facilities for children and

young people that are attractive to them and that we create safe environments

for children and young people, particularly those who may feel excluded for

whatever reason.

• B4 Support initiatives to preserve and enhance our natural and built heritage

seeking to maximise community access to and appreciation of our heritage

whilst preserving it for future generations.

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Theme C: Hillingdon Partners

• C1 Work with other cultural providers to help deliver the Cultural Strategy’s

priorities and to ensure a high profile for cultural development to help meet the

quality of life objectives for the borough.

• C2 Extend working links between cultural providers and services and

education, youth, health, environmental, community, and other agencies to

ensure that culture can play its full role in individual and community

development.

• C3 Enhance the community role of cultural facilities as key points for

contact, information and communication as well as spaces enabling enjoyment

and access to a range of leisure, educational, entertainment and cultural

activities.

10. The Cultural Strategy identifies the main areas of work required to deliver these

priorities and these tasks/actions are further detailed in the action plan set out in

Appendix 2.

The Development of the Cultural Strategy

11. In 2002, officers began work on the Best Value Review of Cultural Services

(arts, leisure, libraries, music and the youth services) and individual Best Value

reviews of these services. The programme included a wide-ranging agenda of

consultation over several months covering general cultural issues, service specific

consultation with the users of services, open events and consultation with the

Citizens Panel.

12. The Cultural Strategy is based on the outcomes of this work. The Best Value

Review identified five key development themes which have been taken through into

the Cultural Strategy.

• Working together and with the community to deliver better services and

ensuring we work closely with and support the voluntary sector

• Increasing access to our cultural services by ensuring they are relevant and

available to all sectors of our community

• Improving the marketing of our services so we are better informed of need and

can provide better information on what is available

• Improving buildings and facilities including those not included in major new

developments

• Working together to improve services for young people and to meet their

particular needs.

13. Building on the outcomes of this Best Value Review agreed by Cabinet in June

2003, a programme of interviews with key partners was completed during the

summer. Meetings with young people and minority communities were arranged.

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14. A meeting was then held with representatives of services, voluntary agencies

and a range of partners to view the evidence collected thus far and to enable

participation in a analysis of the way forward for Hillingdon. The first draft of the

Cultural Strategy was then circulated widely and the views and responses received

incorporated. A seminar was held for elected members in October 2003 on the

second draft of the Cultural Strategy and some further refinements made.

15. During the autumn 2003, further meetings and discussions have been held to

explore particular aspects of the strategy. Cross-service planning events have been

held to support further exploration of collaborative working to deliver some of the

priorities of the Strategy, to secure commitment to undertaking this work and build

the projects into service plans.

Links to Other Council Plans and Strategies

16. The Cultural Strategy underpins and links into many of the strategies and plans

of the authority, including:

• Library Service Position Statement

• Green Spaces Strategy

• Education Development Plan 2

• Community Safety Strategy

• Transforming Youth Work plan (draft)

• Arts and Leisure Services team plans

17. These plans already include strategies, projects and programmes of work that

support and enhance the cultural life of the borough. The Cultural Strategy

examines where services and partners can work collaboratively together in a joinedup

way to create new opportunities, widen access and broaden participation and

address needs of all parts of the community.

18. The Cultural Strategy identifies the need for a fundamental revision of the Sport

and Recreation Strategy and the creation of an Arts Strategy as well as the need for

an agreed Corporate strategy for working with the partners in the voluntary sector.

Community Plan/Local Strategic Partnership

19. The implementation of the Cultural Strategy has to be closely interlinked with the

Community Plan. Both plans have at their core the intention to improve the quality of

life of local people, both actively seek to broaden opportunities for all sections of the

community, the delivery of both will be through a rich mix of providers and their aims

and objectives are determined by local views and aspirations. A process will need to

be developed to enable proposed cultural activities to be included in the prioritisation

for inclusion in the Community Plan.

The Cultural Contribution to Achieving Future Cross-cutting Objectives

20. Culture’s contribution to improving the well-being of communities increasingly

features in emerging national policy initiatives and proposals. The Statement of

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Shared Priorities (2003) that sets out central and local government’s commitment to

improving local services through investment and reform focuses on quality of life

issues. Culture and the implementation of the cultural strategy can make a

substantial contribution to the delivery of crosscutting themes such as:

• Raising standards in schools

• Improving the quality of life of children, young people, families at risk and older

people

• Creating safer and stronger communities

• Transforming our local environment

• Promoting the economic vitality of communities

Capacity to Deliver the Cultural Strategy

21. The Strategy identifies areas for development and the need for certain

tools/resources to support achieving change. These include:

• An annual market research survey undertaken corporately to generate fuller

current data covering the cultural needs and aspirations of the residents of

Hillingdon to support the development of plans and projects.

• ACORN data for areas beyond the boundaries of Hillingdon for corporate use.

• Training programme for officers on community profiling.

• Better promotion of cultural activities in the community is a key strategic

objective. A part time support post to undertake the organisation/collection of

information for a regular sponsored listing of cultural events and activities

organised both by services and by voluntary and community organisations. An

external partner would be sought for the advertising content, production and

distribution of such a Hillingdon listing.

• Arts Development Officer (SO2) to work with schools and community groups to

maximise opportunities to enhance pupils' experience, support raising

achievement, developing projects to extend access and build capacity and selfesteem

in communities and linking to the Extended Schools programme.

22. Officers have not made a growth bid in relation to the Cultural Strategy for

2004/05. As work on delivering the strategy develops , officers will need to submit

proposals to enable the strategy to fully progress.

LEGAL IMPLICATIONS

23. There are no legal implications

RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS

24. The report identifies priorities for service initiatives, but this includes specific

proposals which will have resource implications. The ‘Capacity to deliver’ section of

the report identifies an additional Arts Officer and a part time support post. These

posts would cost in the region of 40k.

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These items would need to be considered as part of the budget setting process for

future years.

PROPERTY IMPLICATIONS

25. Property Services welcome the development of the Cultural Strategy for

Hillingdon and will work with Cultural Services in the implementation of the action

plan.

BACKGROUND DOCUMENTS

Best Value Review of Cultural Services - Cabinet June 2003

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HILLINGDON LOCAL CULTURAL STRATEGY Appendix 1

Section 1

Introduction

THE CASE FOR CULTURE

This document shows how Hillingdon Council and its partners will work together to

create and extend opportunities to take part in cultural activities available to people

living and working in or visiting Hillingdon. It is intended to be a strategy for everyone

involved in making or enjoying cultural activity.

WHAT IS CULTURE?

Cultural activities can inspire, educate, support the local economy and give immense

pleasure and personal satisfaction. Culture is key to quality of life and to mental and

physical well-being. It is an inclusive concept that embraces a wide variety of

activities, places, values and beliefs that contribute to a sense of identity and pride

for everyone in our communities.

Culture promotes understanding and a sense of belonging and cohesion and can

bring together people from diverse cultural, faith and historic backgrounds. Cultural

activities offer a wide range of opportunities for people of all ages, abilities and

interests to realise their potential, to feel a sense of achievement, to increase social

contacts and develop a sense of well-being. A cultural strategy will make a

significant contribution to the health and lives of individuals and communities.

Many facilities, activities and opportunities for cultural involvement already exist in

Hillingdon and people living in, working in or visiting Hillingdon can spend time in

many pleasurable and rewarding ways. Across our communities are thousands of

people who regularly participate in cultural activities, as, for example, being a

member of an audience for a choral society concert, taking a role in a theatrical

production, visiting an exhibition of the work of a local artist, supporting local

societies/groups by giving time to serve on a management committee.

People in Hillingdon take part in cultural activities every day when they:

• Research their family tree in the local history room in Uxbridge Library

• Help out as a cricket or hockey coach in a local sports club

• Enjoy a wine-tasting session or study garden design with the Hillingdon

branch of the University of the Third Age

• Go to see a film

• Pilot a narrow boat through Coppermill Lock or paddle a canoe at the Outdoor

Activities Centre in Harefield

• Join in a production with Magnetic North Youth Theatre at Compass or learn

animation skills

• Improve DJ ing skills at West Drayton Youth Centre or practise street dance in

Hayes Campus

• Go for a picnic in Colne Valley Park

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• Sing in a Tamil choir at Hayes Festival or join with friends in a henna painting

session run by Hillingdon Asian Women’s Group

• Learn to play violin or guitar with the borough’s Music Service

• Walk for health in one of Hillingdon’s many green spaces

Many in the borough, too, earn a living from culture and leisure, working in sports

centres, Fitness Zones or libraries, providing educational activities for old or young.

New technologies are part of our cultural infrastructure and make an invaluable

contribution not only to our quality of life but also to the local economy.

WHY A CULTURAL STRATEGY?

The Government has asked local councils to work in partnership with a wide range of

other organisations, to improve the quality of life for local communities. In order to

be clear about the best way to tackle Hillingdon’s needs, the outcomes of the

consultation for the Community Plan and the work supporting the recent Best Value

Review of Cultural Services were used to inform the Strategy.

To realise the aims of the Strategy, the council will need to work increasingly crosssectorally,

and collaboratively with voluntary bodies and private sector companies,

and look for support from regional organisations and our neighbours in West London.

Having a strategy should help to:

• Celebrate and make the most of Hillingdon’s many assets - its people, its

places and its activities

• Communicate more effectively so that everyone can clearly know what is

going on in the borough.

• Collaborate in bringing communities together, and help to make Hillingdon a

harmonious, dynamic and prosperous borough

• Promote the wealth of talent and activity already present in the area

• Plan and act jointly with our partners to increase opportunities for all to enjoy

and take part in arts, sports, leisure or heritage activities

• Pool resources, skills and potential to make the most of joint working and

helping to lever in additional benefits to the community

THE VISION

To help develop Hillingdon as a place in which residents can find fulfilment and

achieve their potential as valued members of a community which embraces diversity

and encourages active citizenship. Participating in cultural activities enhances

quality of life, enriches mind and body, brings communities and generations together

and has the power to transform people’s lives for the better.

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Section 2

Examples of the findings from consultation and surveys

The Council has undertaken a number of surveys to assess which services are used

by residents and how satisfied they are with them.

It is clear from both surveys and consultation that cultural services and facilities are

of great importance to people in Hillingdon. They are services that people choose to

use - be it participating in a theatre production, exercising, swimming or borrowing

books from the library.

Asked about which cultural services are most used those surveyed said that:

• Libraries are the most regularly used service with over 70% of people using

them at least once a year, with 53% using the Central Library

• Parks and playgrounds are also popular with nearly 70% of people using them

• The Beck Theatre is visited by 37% of people with at least 20% people also

visiting the Compass Theatre and Winston Churchill Hall

• Swimming pools are the most popular sport and leisure facility and are used

by 35% of people with other sports centres attracting 16% of people

• Museums and Galleries are visited by 54% of survey respondents but this will

include visiting places outside Hillingdon. Within the borough the Cow Byre

Gallery attracts 23% and the Manor Farm Site 20% of respondents.

When asked what cultural activities were most important to them, the

respondents said that:

• Reading is enjoyed by practically everyone, 98% rate this as most important

• Listening to the radio, to recorded music and watching television are also

important to at least 80% of people

• Shopping is important to 85% of people

• Going to parks is important to over 80% of people, with walking or rambling

enjoyed by over 70%

• Libraries are important to nearly 80% of people

• Cinemas are important to over 70% of people

How satisfied are people with the cultural provision in the borough?

• A very high proportion of people, up to 93%, are at least satisfied with their

local or the Central Library

• The Hayes Carnival also achieved satisfaction ratings of around 90%

• Users of venues like the Beck Theatre, Compass Theatre, Winston Churchill

Hall give these venues high satisfaction ratings, sometimes of 90%

• Golf courses achieve the highest rating for sports facilities with 85% finding

them at least satisfactory

• Swimming pools achieve a satisfaction rating of over 70%

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Whilst there was obvious appreciation of many of Hillingdon's cultural facilities only a

very small number of residents surveyed expressed themselves as very

satisfied with some services such as youth centres, sports in parks, parks and

playgrounds, sports centres and swimming pools.

In addition, when asked what services were least well provided for in the borough,

over 50% of people surveyed considered that the borough lacked

• opportunities for visiting historic houses and sites,

• live sports

• youth centres

• events

• a museum

• reading and writing groups.

Young people were also asked about cultural provision in the borough. They

appreciate the library book and video collections and quiet study areas, summer arts

and drama programmes, some of the youth centre activities and the discounts that

are available to them. But they disliked the limited nature of some services including

library opening hours, leisure and fun facilities at swimming pools, the poor condition

of some buildings, the high cost of activities and limited publicity.

Young people want to see a range of activities which are suited to them, not too

distant and at prices they can afford including paintballing, ice-skating,

skateboarding, bowling and snooker. They would like to see more music and media

projects; a large-scale leisure pool and more sports clubs open to all abilities and

less gender discrimination across sports.

When asked what would most improve their ability to benefit from cultural

services and activities in the borough, residents said:

• Better information about what was available to people in Hillingdon was felt to

be important by over 90% of residents

• Improved parks and green spaces was supported by 90% and cleaner streets,

better public toilets were felt important by nearly 90%

• Community safety was considered an important factor by 85%

• Better buildings and facilities were also an important factor with over 80% of

residents feeling improvement would improve enjoyment

• Easier parking and better public transport were considered important by over

75%

• Pricing and more live shows and events were also important to over 75% of

people.

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Section 3 Local frameworks and national policy initiatives

The Best Value Review of Cultural Services (Libraries, Arts, Leisure, Youth and

Music Services) agreed by Cabinet in June 2003, set out a programme with five

themes which have been carried forward into the work for the Cultural Strategy.

• Working together, and with the community to deliver better services and

ensuring we work closely with and support the voluntary sector

• Increasing access to our cultural services by ensuring they are relevant and

available to all sectors of our community

• Improving the marketing of our services so we are better informed of need

and can provide better information on what is available

• Improving buildings and facilities including those not included in major new

developments

• Working together to improve services for young people and to meet their

particular needs.

As part of the above programme, individual Best Value Reviews were completed for

the Leisure Service, Library Service, Arts Service, Youth Service and Music Service.

The resulting approved action plans set out three-year programmes for service

improvement.

Existing Service plans and strategies

The development of the Cultural Strategy has to be viewed in the context of existing

service plans and strategies, e.g.

• Library Service Position Statement 2003/04. Responds to the DCMS guidance

and requirements set out in ‘Framework for the Future’

• Green Spaces strategy

• Draft ‘Transforming Youth Work’ plan

• Educational Development Plan (EDP2)

• Specific sports strategies

• Arts and Leisure Services team plans

• Community Safety strategy

• Corporate ICT strategy, including plans to deliver e-government

Hillingdon Grid for Learning plans

The Council's plans and framework

Hillingdon’s Cultural Strategy needs to respond to residents' views and their

experience of cultural life in the borough. It will also support and link with ways in

which the Council is already improving services and working with its partners to

respond to residents' needs and views.

The Council Leader’s Statement, 2003/2004 asserts that Hillingdon will be 'A

borough of learning and culture'. The statement identifies a number of key points

that support cultural development of the borough:

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• Continuing investment in front line services including parks, the environment

and libraries

• Improvements in library stock, opening hours and in library buildings

• The Chrysalis environmental programme with £0.75m available each year

• Additional funding for Youth Services of £0.8m

• Support for improvements in our town centres

The Cultural Strategy has to work closely with the Community Plan for the borough.

Working together for a better future sets out six key aims for the Council and its

key partners, including Brunel University, the Police and the Primary Care Trust, to

regenerate and modernise Hillingdon and to develop strong, secure, self confident

and healthy communities. The aims are to make Hillingdon:

• A borough of learning and culture

• A safer borough

• A cleaner and more pleasant borough

• A borough with improving health, housing and social care

• An economically prosperous borough

• A borough where opportunities are open to all

The vision of the Local Strategic Partnership is to ensure Hillingdon is a pleasant and

vibrant place to live and work, where every member of its communities has access to

excellent services and the opportunity to fulfil their potential. This links in turn to the

vision and ambition of creating a borough 'where cultural, leisure and educational

opportunities are open to all children, young people and adults to improve their skill

levels, education and creativity so as to enhance their working and leisure lives'.

(Community Plan 2003/04).

The implementation of the Cultural Strategy is best linked with the Community Plan.

Both plans have at their core the intention to improve the quality of life of local

people, both actively seek to broaden opportunities for all sections of the community,

the delivery of both will be through a rich mix of providers and their aims and

objectives are determined by local views and aspirations. A process will need to be

developed to enable proposed cultural activities to be included in the prioritisation for

inclusion in the Community Plan.

National policy initiatives and research

Culture’s contribution to improving the well-being of communities increasingly

features in the emerging policy initiatives and proposals.

The Statement of Shared Priorities (2003) that sets out central and local

government’s commitment to improving local services through investment and

reform focuses on quality of life issues. Culture can make a substantial contribution

to the delivery of crosscutting themes such as:

• Raising standards in schools

• Improving the quality of life of children, young people, families at risk and

older people

• Creating safer and stronger communities

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• Transforming our local environment

• Promoting the economic vitality of communities

The development of the Comprehensive Performance Assessment 2005 round is

likely to bring an increase in the recognition of culture’s contribution to community

well-being as a core service.

A MORI presentation (2002) on Quality of Life indicators included Access to Culture,

Sports and Leisure Facilities and Community activities amongst key items which

people think are important to making somewhere a good place to live. Facilities and

activities for young people scored high on the list of things that would make places

even better.

The ODPM’s survey of English Housing which lists aspects of their area that

householders would like to see improved, revealed that 38% of those surveyed

(2001/02) wanted opportunities and facilities for children and young people.

A new measure of child poverty proposed by Department of Works and Pensions will

include lack of access to leisure, hobbies, swimming and other cultural activities as

an indicator of deprivation.

In all these policy initiatives and programmes, the recognition of a basic

entitlement to opportunities for cultural expression and recreation is

increasingly taken to be a significant part of the life of every individual.

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Section 4

AIMS AND PRIORITIES FOR THE CULTURAL STRATEGY

Culture can make a major contribution to social, economic and environmental wellbeing

and to the health of individuals and communities. This Strategy will show how

it is intended to work together to improve the quality of life right across Hillingdon.

We want to do this by bringing culture within everyone’s reach, to make sure that

activities thrive in the longer-term and by building on active partnerships.

Three themes for the Cultural Strategy have been chosen to give a clear focus on

what we believe is important for the borough and how we will achieve our ambitions:

Hillingdon People – everyone should have the chance to enjoy and benefit

from cultural opportunities

Hillingdon Spaces and Places – the importance of our built and natural

environments needs to be promoted and opportunities provided for everyone

to benefit from them now and into the future

Hillingdon Partners – every organisation, whether in the public, voluntary or

private sectors should have the chance to play an active role in developing

culture and improving our quality of life.

The aims and priorities of our strategy reflect the outcomes of the surveys,

consultation, interviews and meetings. It seeks to address the concerns and needs

identified by residents of Hillingdon. It will link with and support other initiatives

seeking to improve the lives of everyone living in or visiting the borough.

A. HILLINGDON PEOPLE

People are at the very heart of the Cultural Strategy. They are the most important

source of creativity and inspiration, past, present and future. We want our residents

to enjoy life to the full and to have the opportunities for developing a rewarding and

healthy life.

The borough’s population now has a fifth of residents below the age of sixteen and

20% of all Hillingdon people will belong to ethnic minority communities by 2011.

Together with the 12,000 students at Brunel University who come from 110 different

countries, the borough enjoys a rich and vibrant mix of nationalities and their

cultures.

Surveys by the Council indicate that some groups do not utilise many facilities.

Consultation suggests that these groups, including some children and young people

and ethnic minorities, do feel excluded and do not feel that their cultural needs are

being addressed. It is also necessary to ensure that the needs of older-people,

people with disabilities or learning needs to engage in a full cultural life are met.

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Much of our cultural life is dependant on volunteers and the work of voluntary groups

and clubs. The role of volunteers and voluntary organisations is an essential part of

the picture in Hillingdon, a natural extension of what the Council itself provides. We

must do more to actively support and encourage this sector. If the Council is to work

in effective partnership with the voluntary sector it needs to speak with a clear and

consistent voice and promote the work of volunteers.

Consultation consistently indicated a demand for better information on cultural

activities and the strategy needs to identify ways in which it can address this issue.

Aims

Culture has the power to transform the lives of individuals, families and whole

communities. If we are to build a better quality of life for the people of Hillingdon, the

Cultural Strategy should help ensure that:

• Everyone can take part in cultural activities and opportunities that are

creative, enjoyable and educational, fit in with their way of life and are

appropriate to all ages, ethnic background, abilities and cultural heritage.

• We help to remove barriers to participating and enjoying the cultural life of our

area (whether through cost, lack of information or childcare, transport or

inaccessible buildings, for example)

• Culture plays a full role in strengthening community bonds and that we boost

voluntary activity and make full use of cultural activities to help us bridge

divides including those of age, income or ethnicity

• Culture plays an important role in our economy in offering learning

opportunities and employment for local people as well as attractions for

visitors.

• Culture makes a significant contribution to improving health and supporting

active lifestyles.

Priorities

Our priorities for the Cultural Strategy are to:

A1: Ensure better access for all by developing strategies and provision

that meet the needs of groups that do not access our cultural facilities and

services.

We will:

• Identify a range of routes and facilitators for finding out the needs and

interests of groups and communities not fully benefiting from cultural

provision and develop a phased programme to respond to these needs.

• Ensure that cultural services work to remove, whenever possible, any

barriers to children, young people and adults accessing services,

including the appropriate use of new technology.

• Ensure services have access to up to date socio-economic information

and regular market research which covers the cultural needs and

aspirations of the community and a more effective, integrated use is

made of data already held.

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A2: Promote cultural activity that celebrates the diverse communities

and develops greater understanding of the borough’s rich cultural inheritance.

We will:

• Work across services, with schools and other education providers and

with community groups to develop cultural projects and activities that

celebrate and reflect our diversity and enable creative expression.

A3: Work positively with the voluntary sector and volunteers who

provide a wealth and variety of local sports, music, arts, heritage,

environmental and other activity alongside the services provided by the

council.

We will:

• Develop the Council strategy for its relationship with the voluntary sector,

recognising the key role fulfilled by the voluntary sector and volunteers to

cultural life in Hillingdon, identify clear objectives for its support and

definitions and priorities for the allocation of funding.

A4: Improve our communication with local communities helping to

ensure that they have access to information about cultural activities and

opportunities.

We will:

• Review current service publicity and publications to assess how effective

they are in providing information and promoting wider cultural

participation.

• Establish a cultural marketing and promotion plan with a budget.

• Investigate the re-introduction of a regular listing of cultural activities and

events

• Ensure better service webpages, web-sites, enable free access to the

Internet for cultural information, including provision for feedback from

users.

A5: Ensure that culture improves life opportunities for all sections of

our community including working with partners in education, health and

other sectors to improve personal and community opportunities and wellbeing.

We will:

• Develop and provide a range of life and skills opportunities within the

cultural sector

• Promote healthy living and encourage the adoption of active life-styles

through cultural provision and activities.

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B. HILLINGDON SPACES AND PLACES

Hillingdon’s spaces and places, its natural and built environment and its cultural

places must also be at the heart of the cultural strategy. Hillingdon is a very green

borough with the second largest area of green belt of all London boroughs. Our open

space is one of our most important assets, including our 165 parks. We also benefit

from four woodlands that are national nature reserves, two country parks and

important waterways including the Grand Union Canal and the River Colne.

The quality of our built environment is also important. Our cultural facilities including

our libraries, leisure centres, swimming pools, theatres and art centres, youth and

community centres are a focus for individual expression and community activity.

Pressures on resources mean the continual review and re-prioritising of the

development and refurbishment of facilities to meet new and growing cultural needs.

Our town centres are places not just for shopping but also for socialising and

community activity. All have their distinctive character and some are already

developing local street activities.

We also need to preserve and restore our built heritage particularly places like the

Manor Farm site and Barra Hall and Park which offer so much to the local

community.

All these spaces and places are important in the lives of the community and the

Cultural Strategy must seek a sustainable way to ensure that all parts of the

community benefit from them. In particular the needs of children and young people

for play and exciting and enjoyable recreational activity, including music and media

projects, should be recognised if we are to help lay the foundations for the healthy

and lively Hillingdon community of the future.

Aims

Hillingdon’s spaces and cultural facilities are important to the quality of life of all its

residents and visitors and the Cultural Strategy should help ensure that:

• We make the most of and improve access to our green spaces and natural

environment ensuring that we preserve it for future generations to enjoy

• We maintain and improve the quality of cultural facilities taking care to see

that they meet the needs of all sections of the community

• We help make our public spaces and places attractive and safe for use by all

the community.

• We ensure that we protect and enhance access to and appreciation of our

built heritage

Priorities

Our priorities for the Cultural Strategy are to:

B1: Widen access to and enhance the opportunities to benefit from

Hillingdon’s cultural spaces and places so that everyone can enjoy Hillingdon’s

considerable assets.

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We will:

• Revise the Sports and Recreation strategy bringing together Leisure

Facilities, Green Spaces, Sports Development, schools, Uxbridge College

and Brunel University and the sports voluntary sector to maximise the

sports opportunities both indoor and outdoor in Hillingdon.

• Develop an Arts strategy that encompasses the work being undertaken in

the Best Value Review, the need for community arts development and

work with partners within Hillingdon and West London.

• Promote interest in green spaces and public spaces through engaging

local people in initiatives such Minet Country Park and a street arts

festival. Support Town Centre Managers and work with community safety

groups and the private sector to enliven town centres and make them

safe and attractive places for everyone.

• Enable personal engagement with our history by developing public

access to the rich collection of archives and artefacts in partnership with

Brunel University and other local partners.

B2: Work to improve the quality and range of cultural facilities available to

our residents and try to ensure that we can respond in relevant and exciting ways to

changing and developing needs for cultural expression and creativity.

We will:

• Support the Education, Youth & Leisure Asset Management Review plan

for new leisure provision, the opportunities to refurbish and renew

Hillingdon's libraries, and plans for enhanced Adult Education facilities to

revitalise Hillingdon's cultural and lifelong learning facilities.

• Initiate a strategic review of new cultural facility provision with our

partners within the borough including schools, Uxbridge College and

Brunel University and with neighbouring boroughs to ensure that we

maximise the potential benefits to residents and visitors.

B3: Ensure we provide a range of appropriate facilities for children and

young people that are attractive to them and that we create safe environments for

children and young people, particularly those who may feel excluded from use for

whatever reason.

We will:

• Work with Youth Services to deliver the Youth Plan and seek to maximise

links with cultural activities and providers in meeting the cultural and

development needs of young people

• Work with the Green Spaces team and other agencies to support the

development of play provision and conservation activities for young

people.

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B4: Support initiatives to preserve and enhance our natural and built

heritage seeking to maximise community access to and appreciation of our heritage

whilst preserving it for future generations.

We will:

• Work with partners to develop a borough wide approach to supporting the

built and natural environment to ensure we speak with a single voice to

funding and other supporting agencies.

• Support applications to heritage bodies for the restoration and conservation of

key facilities like the Manor Farm Site, Ruislip Woodlands and the Lido, Barra

Hall and Park, open spaces and canal path developments.

C: HILLINGDON PARTNERS

Very few of the priorities identified in this strategy could progress without close

working with many departments in the Council as well as organisations and agencies

outside the Council. The Council is not an island. Through the Hillingdon Strategic

Partnership and the Hillingdon Community Plan it is already working with a wide

range of organisations to improve life in the borough for everyone. Through the

cultural strategy we need to explore with our partners how we can together further

improve the community’s quality of life.

Neither is our borough an island. Hillingdon is part of a World City and centre of

creativity as well as a European capital, and home to Heathrow Airport - a physical

and symbolic link to the rest of the world and its diverse cultures. Hillingdon is also

home to many international companies and has excellent transport links with the rest

of London.

Hillingdon is a great place to live and work and it has a vision of its place in the future

set out in its Community Plan. If the Cultural Strategy is to be effective it must

encourage and promote collaborative work with partners both within and outside the

borough boundaries.

Aims

Partnership will be critical to the success of initiatives to improve cultural life in the

borough and our Cultural Strategy should help ensure that:

• We maximise the linkages between the Cultural Strategy and the Community

Plan and other key strategies in education, economic and urban development,

health, community safety and the environment showing how cultural activities

can make a significant contribution in all these areas.

• We maximise resources, physical, financial and human for cultural

development through partnerships both within and outside the borough to

provide the highest quality cultural experience for our residents and visitors.

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Priorities

Our priorities for the cultural strategy are to:

C1: Work with other cultural providers to help deliver the Cultural Strategy’s

priorities and to ensure a high profile for cultural development to help meet quality

of life objectives for the borough

We will:

• Develop a Cultural Strategy Group of service representatives and partners to

monitor and develop the Strategy.

• Ensure the linking of the Cultural Strategy to the development of the

Community Plan.

C2: Extend working links between cultural providers and services and

education, youth, health, community, environmental and other agencies to

ensure that culture can play its full role in individual and community development.

We will:

• Initiate a series of bi-lateral and group meetings with key partners to assess

current linkages between their programmes and to develop ways in which

cultural activity can help meet their social and community objectives.

• Work with sub-regional and regional partners to maximise benefits for

provision in Hillingdon.

C3: Enhance the community role of cultural facilities as key points for contact,

information and communication as well as spaces enabling enjoyment and access to

a range of leisure, educational, entertainment and cultural activities.

We will:

• Explore ways in which the cultural facilities in the borough could provide

access for the community to a wider range of information and inter-action with

the Council, in partnership with other services.

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HILLINGDON LOCAL CULTURAL STRATEGY APPENDIX 2

ACTION PLAN

DRAFT

A1

Theme: Hillingdon People

Priority Actions Partners Outputs Timescale

Ensure better access

Within Year

for all

1

Identify a range of routes and

facilitators for finding out the needs

and interests of groups and

communities not fully benefiting

from cultural provision and develop

a targeted programme to respond

to these needs.

Ensure that Cultural Services work

to remove, whenever possible, any

barriers to children, young people

and adults accessing services,

including the appropriate use of

new technology.

Cultural Services

Connecting

Communities

EMASS

Community groups

Hillingdon Music Service

Specific voluntary

organisations

Cultural Services

EYL IT (HGfl)

Hillingdon Music Service

CIT

Representative planning group

formed and first targeted

programme developed

Programme delivered.

Second and third programmes

devised and delivered

Outcomes include :

Service membership requirements

simplified

Strategy for fees and charges in

place

Years 2 - 3

Year 1 and

on-going

Ensure services have access to up

to date socio-economic information

and regular corporate market

research which covers the cultural

needs and aspirations of the

community and more effective

integrated use is made of data

already held .

Cultural Services

Chief Execs -Information

& Intelligence

Consultation

Other council services

Pilot automatic library membership

with HGfl and work towards use of

smartcard

Plans supported with ACORN data

and integrated use of service data

Market research programme

agreed and implemented

Officers trained in community

profiling

Year 1,2&3

Year 1 and

on-going

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A2

A3

Priority Actions Partners Outputs Timescale

Work across services, with schools

Planning group formed. First joint Within Year

and other education providers and

programme finalised and

1

with community groups to develop

implemented

cultural projects and activities that

celebrate and reflect diversity and

On-going programmes planned & Years 2 - 3

enable creative expression.

implemented

Promote cultural activity

that celebrates diverse

communities

Work positively with

voluntary sector and

local organisations

Develop the corporate Council

strategy for its on-going relationship

and support with the voluntary

sector.

Cultural Services

Hillingdon Music Service

SIS/schools

Adult Education

Youth Service

Community cultural

providers

Healthy Hillingdon

Community Resources

team

Voluntary sector

HAVS

Mapping exercise of cultural activity

in Hillingdon completed by the

group

Corporate Audits of internal

funding/support provided to the

voluntary sector, and of voluntary

sector in Hillingdon, in partnership

with HAVS, completed

Within Year

1

Corporate Strategy developed and

agreed.

Year 1/2

A4

Improve our

communication with

local communities

Review current service publicity and

promotions to assess how effective

they are in providing information

and promoting wider cultural

participation.

Arts Service, Leisure

Service

Sports Development

Youth Service

Green Spaces

As above

Cultural Services

Green Spaces team

Other cultural providers

Community cultural

providers

HGfl

Advice and help provided to

voluntary sector on accessing

external funding

Develop service networking with

HAVS to publicise capacity

building, good practice training

opportunities

Cultural marketing and promotion

group formed Review completed

On-going

Year 1 and

on-going

Within Year

1

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A4

Priority Actions Partners Outputs Timescale

Establish a cultural marketing and Cultural Services

Within Year

promotion plan with a budget. Green Spaces

1

Improve our

communication with

local communities .

Investigate the re-introduction of a

regular listing of cultural activities

and events provided through

services/cultural community.

Marketing and promotion

team

External partners

Marketing and promotion plan

developed including service data

and new data from priority A1

Sponsor/external partner sought.

Bid for p/t post to coordinate.

Publication programme agreed

Year 1,2,3

By Year 3

A4 Ensure better service webpages,

free access to the Internet for

cultural information, including

provision for feedback from users.

A5

Ensure that culture

improves life

opportunities and

enables active lifestyles

for all sections of our

community

Develop and provide a range of life

and skills opportunities within the

cultural sector

Cultural Services

Cultural Services

Green Spaces

HGfl

Horizon

CIT

Cultural Services

Youth Service

Adult Education

SIS,& schools

Brunel and other

education providers

Music Service

Healthy Hillingdon

Community cultural

providers

Programme of designated service

information and publicity points

completed for all cultural venues,

theatres, leisure centres, youth

centres, libraries, adult education

centres

Content and design Web

information improved. Links from all

service web pages.

Free Internet access from cultural

venues as well as libraries.

Service and Cross-service/partner

opportunities planned and

provided. To Include e.g.:

IT skills, work placements,

arts/theatre experience/training,

life-guard training, career

development information through

links to Connexions. MA

courses(leisure).

Programme developed

Years ! & 2

Year 3

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Priority Actions Partners Outputs Timescale

A5 Promote healthy living and

encourage the adoption of active

life-styles through cultural

provision and activities.

Cultural Services

Healthy Hillingdon

Green Spaces

Community

organisations

Social Services

Cross-service programme for

older people developed. and

delivered

Inter -generational project

planned and delivered

Year 2

By Year 3

Years 1-3

Programme developed by

services over 3 year period.

To include

GP Referral

Fitness provision

Sport in Parks

Health Fair

Writing/reading groups

Walks programme

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B1

Theme: Hillingdon Spaces & Places

Priority Actions Partners Outputs Timescale

Widen access to and

Strategy developed and agreed Within Year 1

benefit from Hillingdon’s

cultural spaces and

places

Revise the Sports and Recreation

strategy bringing together Leisure

Facilities, Green Spaces, Sports

Development, schools, Uxbridge

College and Brunel University and

the sports voluntary sector to

maximise the sports opportunities

both indoor and outdoor in

Hillingdon.

Leisure Service

Green Spaces team

Schools

Brunel University,

Uxbridge College

Sports voluntary sector

West London providers

B1 Develop the Arts strategy Arts Service

Brunel University

Schools

Community partners

West London partners

Service partners

B1 Promote interest in green spaces

and public spaces through

engaging with local people in

initiatives such Minet Country Park

and a street arts festival. Support

Town Centre Managers and work

with community safety groups and

the private sector to enliven town

centres and make them safe and

attractive places for everyone.

Green Spaces team

Arts Service

Healthy Hillingdon

Town Centre managers

and Town Centre groups

Community Safety Team

Community groups

Schools

Strategy implemented

Strategy developed and agreed

Strategy implemented

Collaborative programme

developed by year 3 to include

Events in Parks programme

(Green Spaces strategy)

Medieval Festival at Manor Farm

Uxbridge Street Arts Festival

Years 2 & 3

Year 1 /2

Years 2/3

By year 3

B1 Enable personal engagement with

our history by developing public

access to the rich collection of

archives and artefacts in

partnership with Brunel University

Library Service

Brunel University

Local Studies and

Family History Groups

Hillingdon Race Equality

'Bridging the gap' oral history

project completed, with travelling

exhibition.

(If HLF bid successful) 'Heritage

Year 1

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Theme: Hillingdon Spaces & Places

Priority Actions Partners Outputs Timescale

and other local partners.

Council

Schools

builds bridges' joint project makes

archives accessible on-line and

digitised on HGfl

Year 1 to 3

B2

Work to improve the

quality and range of

cultural facilities

Ensure we provide a

range of appropriate

facilities for children and

young people

Support the Education, Youth &

Leisure Asset Management

Review plan for new leisure

provision, the opportunities to

refurbish and renew Hillingdon's

libraries, and plans for enhanced

Adult Education and Youth Service

facilities to revitalise Hillingdon's

cultural and lifelong learning

facilities.

Initiate a strategic review of new

cultural facility provision with our

partners within the borough

including schools, Uxbridge

College and Brunel University and

with neighbouring boroughs to

ensure that we maximise the

potential benefits to residents and

visitors.

Work with Youth Services to

support the delivery of the Youth

Plan and seek to maximise links

with cultural activities and

providers in meeting the cultural

and development needs of young

people.

Cultural Services

Schools

Brunel University

Uxbridge College

Youth Service

Adult Education

Property Services

Cultural Services

Schools

Brunel University

Uxbridge College

Private providers

Neighbouring Boroughs

Property Services

Cultural Services

Youth Service

Work progressed with partners

towards a borough museum

Progress made in providing

accessible, attractive, 'fit for

purpose' cultural and lifelong

learning facilities for Hillingdon

Years 1-3

Years 1-3

Strategic review completed End year 2

Best Value Review action plan for

review of Compass Theatre in

partnership with youth service and

other agencies completed

Joint project to deliver mystery

shopper programme to enable

Year 1

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Theme: Hillingdon Spaces & Places

Priority Actions Partners Outputs Timescale

young people scrutinising the

delivery of services.

Plan developed for promoting

services and events through

schools

B3 Work with the Green Spaces team

and other agencies to support the

development of play provision, and

conservation activities for young

people.

Cultural Services

Youth Services

Green Spaces team

On-going action plan developed Year 2 & 3

Green Spaces strategy supported Year 1

and on-going

B4

Preserve and enhance

natural and built heritage

Continue to contribute to a

borough wide approach to

supporting the built and natural

environment to ensure we speak

with a single voice to funding and

other supporting agencies.

Cultural Services

Environment Services

Voluntary sector

External Funding officer

Common approach agreed with

regular review and liaison process

Year 1

and on-going

Support projects to restore and

conserve Hillingdon's built and

natural heritage such as the Manor

Farm Site, Ruislip Woodlands and

the Lido, Barra Hall and park etc,

to enable greater public access

and interpretation.

Cultural Services

Green Spaces team

Community support

groups

Schools

External funding achieved to

enable major projects to proceed

within the timescale of the

strategy

Link to Priority A4 to develop

publicity and promotion of

Hillingdon's heritage

Years 1 to 3

By year 2

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C1

C2

C3

Theme: Hillingdon Partners

Priority Actions Partners Outputs Timescale

Work with other cultural Develop a Cultural Strategy Group Cultural Services, other Strategy regularly reviewed and Year 1 to 3

providers to help deliver of service representatives and key partners

monitored

the Cultural Strategy’s partners to monitor and develop the

priorities and to ensure strategy.

a high profile for

Years 1 to 3

cultural development to Ensure the linkage of the Cultural Local Strategic

Cultural Strategy themes and

help meet quality of life Strategy to the development of the Partnership

activities adopted through the

objectives for the Community Plan.

Lifelong

planning process for inclusion in

borough

Learning/Cultural the Community Plan..

Extend working links

with other

services/agencies

Enhance community

role of cultural facilities

Initiate a series of bi-lateral and

group meetings with key partners to

assess current linkages between

their programmes and to develop

ways in which cultural activity can

help meet their social and

community objectives.

Work with sub-regional and regional

partners to maximise benefits for

provision in Hillingdon.

Explore ways in which the cultural

facilities in the borough could

provide access for the community

to a wider range of information and

inter-action with the Council, in

partnership with other services.

.

Development Group

Cultural Services

Wide range of other

agencies and services

Cultural Services

Cultural Services

HIP Customer contact

project team

Corporate IT

HGfl

Other Council Services

On-going discussion process and

the implementation of joint working

on projects

Development projects within

Westwords, (Literature),WELIC for

Libraries, Western Wedge for Arts,

London West LSC, London

Libraries Development Agency

identified and delivered

Feasibility started for First Stop

access t o the Council for the

community and the use of cultural

facilities as community base for

other services.

If agreed, schemes progressed

and delivered

Years 1 - 3

Years 1 to 3

Year 1

Years 2 & 3

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A REVIEW OF THE ANIMAL WELFARE CHARTER ITEM 5

SUMMARY

Contact Officer: Peggy Law

Telephone: 01895 277403

The report details a review of the Animal Welfare Charter summarising progress and

achievements made since its endorsement in 2001. The report also includes some

proposed amendments to the Charter and a summary of draft animal welfare

legislation currently being considered by government.

RECOMMENDATION

That Cabinet:

1. Notes progress being made since the endorsement of the Charter.

2. Agrees to the proposed amendments to the Animal Welfare Charter.

3. Instructs officers to carry out a review of the Charter once the Animal

Welfare legislation is implemented.

REASONS FOR RECOMMENDATION

To ensure that the Charter is kept under review and to take on board the implications

of proposed new legislation.

ALTERNATIVE OPTIONS AVAILABLE

The Cabinet could instruct officers to carry out further work at this stage.

OVERVIEW & SCRUTINY COMMITTEE COMMENTS

The Overview & Scrutiny Committee did not ask to comment on the report.

INFORMATION

1. The Environment Committee endorsed the Animal Welfare Charter on 2 nd

October 2001, which is appended to this report. It was agreed that the Charter

would be reviewed regularly and if necessary revised from time to time to reflect

changes in legislation and other relevant issues.

2. The recent review is focussed on three areas as follows:

• Progress and achievements made since the endorsement of the Charter

• Amendments to the Charter as a result of policy developments and further

comments from the RSPCA

• Recent developments and proposals on animal welfare legislation and the

Hunting Bill.

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A Review on Progress and Achievements

3. The following are a summary of the progress and achievements made since the

endorsement of the Charter:

• A Local Biodiversity Action Plan is being developed to encourage and protect

biodiversity in the borough.

• A general enforcement policy has been developed for enforcement work, which

includes dealing with unlicensed animal boarding and breeding establishments

and licence contraventions. It is anticipated that once the proposed Animal

Welfare Bill becomes an Act, it would enhance local authorities’ role in respect

of promoting animal welfare through advice, education, inspection, enforcement

and prosecution.

• In response to many residents who were experiencing problems with urban

foxes, general information and detailed practical advice on the use of repellent

to deter foxes has been made available on Council’s website, Hillingdon People

and in leaflet form. Further information on responsible dog ownership is to be

introduced on the website. It is hoped that we could continually build on the

amount of information and advice available on the website and eventually cover

all aspects of animal welfare.

• In order to encourage responsible dog ownership, a publicity campaign

involving the issuing of penalty notices for littering and dog fouling is being

planned in conjunction with the police. By consolidating the enforcement

actions, it makes a more effective use of the resources and sends a clear

message that such anti-social behaviour is unacceptable.

• Close liaison has been developed between Animal Control Officers (ACO),

Entertainment Licensing Officers and Leisure Services to ensure that ACOs are

informed of all forthcoming events involving animals. Whenever possible, ACOs

will attend events where live animals are involved to protect the welfare of the

animals.

• For the Animal Welfare Charter to be meaningful, it is important to raise public

awareness on animal welfare issues. It is important to show how the policies in

the Charter are being implemented in a practical way. To this end, an article is

being planned in Hillingdon People to illustrate some of the animal welfare

issues being tackled by our ACOs.

Proposed Amendments to the Charter

4. The following relates to comments received from the RSPCA.

5. In Section 1.2 of the Charter as attached, it is probably more appropriate to use

the term ‘animal freedom’ rather than ‘animal rights’ which is often associated with

animal rights activists whereas the intended meaning is associated with animal

welfare.

6. In section 1.3 of the Charter, the five basic freedoms were first developed by the

Farm Animal Welfare Council (FAWC) and have since gained increasing acceptance

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within Government, veterinary and animal welfare groups as the basic principles,

which should govern the care of all animals. It is suggested that ‘RSPCA’ should be

replaced with ‘Farm Animal Welfare Council’.

7. The fifth freedom as stipulated by the FAWC is ‘freedom to express normal

behaviour’ and not ‘freedom from unnecessary constraint’.

8. There were other comments made regarding provision of further information and

clarifications on licensing of pet shops, boarding and breeding establishments, riding

establishments, training of staff etc. It is felt that such details should not be in the

Charter but could be made available separately, either as an appendix to the Charter

or as information leaflets and published on our web site. This area of work will form

part of the next review.

9. Other updates relate to Section 1.1 of the Charter, the Animal Control Service

was not included in the Best Value Review in 2002 and the last sentence should be

deleted.

10. In section 2.3 of the Charter, it is suggested that the second action concerning

biodiversity should be deleted and replaced with the following. ‘A Local Biodiversity

Action Plan (LBAP) is being produced, which is a plan of action for protecting

conserving and enhancing wildlife, at a local level. LBAPs focus resources to

conserve and enhance biodiversity by means of local partnerships, taking account of

both national priorities, including rare and endangered species, and local priorities

identified by local communities’.

Animal Welfare Bill

11. The Government is proposing to introduce an Animal Welfare Bill that would

consolidate the existing animal protection legislation. It is widely acknowledged that

the current laws on animal welfare is fragmented and requires updating.

The main aims of the bill are:

• The improvement of the enforcement regime and to promote coherent animal

welfare policies.

• Extension of the current licensing arrangements operated by local authorities in

respect of certain businesses that keep animals as part of their trade, to include

other types of animal establishment.

12. The bill may also enhance local authorities’ role in respect of animal health and

welfare and could include provision of advice, education, inspection, enforcement

and prosecution. It is recognised that local authorities currently have limited statutory

responsibility for the enforcement of animal health and welfare legislation.

13. Once the Animal Welfare Bill becomes an Act, the current scope of the Charter

may need to be extended to reflect the legislative changes. It may also be necessary

to re-examine and revise the format of the Charter to ensure that policy statements

remain clear and given sufficient emphasis. It is therefore proposed that the Charter

is reviewed and revised once the legislation is implemented.

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Hunting Bill

14. The Bill remains in limbo following its passage through the Houses of Parliament

last year. It was amended by the Lords to allow hunting to continue under a

registration scheme. When the Bill returned to the House of Commons, the

government put forward a late amendment to the Bill, which would have allowed

dogs to continue to be used below ground in certain circumstances. Although the Bill

was left out of the Queen’s Speech in November 2003, assurances were given by

government that the hunting issue will be resolved in this parliament.

CORPORATE CONSULTATIONS CARRIED OUT

Finance

15. The recommendations to agree the amendments and to carry out a review have

no financial implications.

Legal

16. Members should note that at present no direct legal issues arise from the report.

BACKGROUND DOCUMENTS

Animal Welfare Charter

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Animal Welfare Charter

1.0 The animal welfare charter provides an opportunity for animal welfare issues

to be promoted and to send a clear message to the community the Council’s

commitment to animal welfare and its strong opposition to cruelty to animals.

1.1 This charter identifies a number of areas where the Council can promote and

bring about improvement in the health and welfare of animals. To ensure that the

Council delivers on these objectives, an action plan will be drawn up and the

performance reviewed and assessed on a regular basis. The assessment process

will be linked to the Council’s Best Value review programme that encourages the use

of best practice and setting of achievable targets. The Animal Control Service is

scheduled for Best Value Review in 2002.

1.2 The animal welfare charter will be reviewed regularly and if necessary revised

from time to time to reflect changes in legislation and to address local concerns and

specific topical issues.

1.3 This charter enshrines the rights of animals to enjoy the five basic freedoms

as supported by the RSPCA:

♦ freedom from hunger and thirst

♦ freedom from discomfort

♦ freedom from pain, injury or disease

♦ freedom from fear and distress

♦ freedom from unnecessary constraint

These five animal rights will form the guiding principles when formulating council

policies on animal welfare. The charter intends to raise awareness on welfare of

animals and has been prepared within the overall framework of our Local Agenda 21

Strategy and Unitary Development Plan (UDP).

There are animal welfare groups who campaign against cruelty to animals such as

the RSPCA, League Against Cruel Sports and many others. This charter will

concentrate on issues that are directly under the Council’s remit where any action

taken is more likely to make a real difference.

Wildlife and habitat conservation

2.0 The London Borough of Hillingdon has one of the greatest diversity in land

use compared to other London Boroughs. It has a unique combination of

environment, being both rural and urban, with a mix of traditional and modern,

industrial and residential developments.

Hillingdon has a rich diversity of wildlife habitats and species. There are six Sites of

Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) within the Borough. The Council has designated 5

sites within the Borough as Local Nature Reserves and the London Ecological Unit

has identified a further 11 sites as Sites of Metropolitan Importance for Nature

Conservation, 42 sites as Sites of Borough Importance and 7 sites as Sites of Local

Importance. It is the only London Borough with a National Nature Reserve, namely

Ruislip Wood, which represents 10% of London’s semi-natural ancient woodland.

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Elsewhere in the Borough, the Yeading Valley Park Corridor, the open land adjoining

Ickenham and Ruislip, and even narrow strips of open land such as the River Pinn

Corridor and the Grand Union Canal, all link together to form ‘Green Chains’ of open

land which extend across the Borough boundaries, providing wildlife corridor.

2.1 Many of the nature sites also contain rich and diverse aquatic wildlife and

include rivers and watercourses in the Borough such as River Colne, R. Frays, R.

Pinn and the Grand Union Canal to the west of the Borough and River Crane and

Yeading Brook to the east.

As part of our commitment to LA21, it is important to protect, enhance and manage

these rich habitats, to ensure that plant and animal life thrive in these areas. Local

bio-diversity should be encouraged and development constrained within the carrying

capacity of the natural environment.

2.2 The Council is committed to

♦ protect and promote the rich diversity of habitats within the borough including the

sites of special scientific interest, local and other nature reserves

♦ protect wildlife and maintain bio-diversity in these areas

♦ seek to create new habitats to attract a variety of wildlife

2.3 Action

‣ This is being achieved through land use planning policies in the borough’s

Unitary Development Plan. The Council will not permit development which would

adversely affect these habitats and nature conservation as a positive land use is

actively promoted

‣ The Greater London Authority (GLA) is due to produce a bio-diversity action plan

for London. Public consultation will commence in the near future. Once

published, the plan will form the framework of an action plan for encouraging and

protecting bio-diversity in the borough

‣ This area of work overlaps with our Local Agenda 21 Strategy for Hillingdon. This

strategy is based on our commitment to sustainable development through

protecting and enhancing the environment. The strategy seeks to ensure that the

natural environment, (including the urban natural environment) in the borough is

conserved and enhanced.

Improve animal welfare through inspection, licensing and enforcement

3.0 Improvement and protection of animal welfare could be achieved by effective

enforcement of licensing conditions. Local authorities have the power under a

number of legislation to licence pet shops, breeding and boarding establishments,

riding establishments, zoos and dangerous wild animals.

3.1 Under the Pet Animals Act 1951, pet shops have to be licensed by local

authorities to ensure that the welfare of the animals is protected. Problems that may

occur in some pet shops include overcrowding of animals, lack of adequate exercise,

lack of proper supervision, inadequate diet, poor hygiene and lack of trained staff.

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The Council discourages the selling of pets without proper regard to the welfare

needs of the animal.

3.2 The Breeding of Dogs Act 1973 and Animal Boarding Establishments Act

1963 require these premises to be properly managed having regard to the conditions

of the accommodation and the welfare of the animals in these establishments. The

Breeding of Dogs Act 1991 gives local authority power of entry to unlicensed dog

breeding establishments, allowing officers and vets to seek a warrant to inspect

unlicensed premises.

3.3 In addition to maintaining and improving the welfare of animals in these

premises, a significant number of animals also pass through Heathrow Airport. It is

one of the main routes by which live animals are imported into this country through

the Airport’s Live Animal Border Inspection Post. The UK has adopted the

International Air Transport Association’s Live Animal Regulations, which stipulate

conditions to ensure that proper welfare standards are monitored and met. The

Council will continue working in partnership with City of London Corporation to

ensure that the regulations are rigorously enforced and animal welfare standards are

maintained.

3.4 The Council has an important role to play in preventing cruelty to animals

through enforcement. The present legislation on cruelty to animals is based on the

Protection of Animal Act 1911. This has been reinforced over the years by other Acts

of Parliament and by statutory regulations. Some parts of the legislation apply only to

dogs, whilst other parts apply to other domestic animals and wildlife. The Council will

assist and work in partnership with RSPCA to investigate and whenever possible

prosecute those who perform acts of cruelty to animals.

3.5 The Council will

♦ undertake animal welfare inspections to ensure that licensing conditions are met

so as to secure the health and welfare of animals in pet shops, in boarding and

breeding establishments. These conditions would seek to ensure such measures

as suitable accommodation, adequate food and drink, precautions to prevent the

spread of disease and suitable emergency procedures.

♦ promote responsible ownership of exotic pets through licensing conditions.

Many of the animals are also listed under the Dangerous Wild Animals Act

♦ in conjunction with veterinary officers, continue to ensure that horse-riding

establishments comply with licensing conditions. Under the Riding

Establishments Act 1964, there is a requirement for riding establishment to be

licensed and regular inspections carried out by a veterinary surgeon.

♦ take enforcement action to counter unlicensed premises and contravention of

licence conditions

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♦ continue our partnership with City of London Corporation to ensure that proper

health and welfare standards of all animals imported through Heathrow Airport’s

Live Animal Border Inspection Post are maintained

♦ The Council will assist and work in partnership with RSPCA to investigate and

whenever possible prosecute those who perform acts of cruelty to animals

3.6 Action

‣ Review and consolidate existing licensing conditions on pet shops, boarding,

breeding and riding establishments to ensure they meet animal welfare needs.

‣ Develop a robust enforcement policy to deal with unlicensed premises and

licence contraventions

Provision of Animal Control Service

4.0 One of the key functions of the Animal Control Service is to collect stray dogs

and ensure that they are treated in a humane manner and are not subjected to any

further stress or discomfort. On average, the Council collects about 20 stray dogs

per week. Our aim is to actively promote responsible dog ownership and to reduce

the number of stray dogs in the Borough. As part of our campaign, the Council aims

to provide an information pack to raise public awareness on the benefits of

mircochipping and the neutering of cats and dogs. Pet ownership is a partnership

that combines pleasure with responsibility.

4.1 The Council currently provides a microchip implant service for pets and is

being publicised in pet shops and public places. Each microchip is given a unique

number, which is linked to a national microchip identification database. The system

is one of the quickest ways of returning any lost animal back to its owner.

4.2 The Animal Control Officers also ensure that all reported injured or sick

animals and wildlife receive proper treatment and that they are relieved of any pain

and suffering as soon as practicable. Complaints of cruelty to domesticated animals;

wildlife and exotic species within the Borough are always thoroughly investigated in

conjunction with RSPCA and other welfare organisations with a view to possible

prosecutions.

4.3 The Animal Control Service also plays an important part in providing advice

and support to members of the public on aspects of less common species of animals

such as the removal and re-siting of poisonous adder snakes from sensitive areas to

safe areas. Officers will work with the relevant organisations to protect badgers from

disturbance and interference. Practical support is also given to other departments of

the Council and agencies on evictions involving animals and transport of live

animals.

4.4 The Council will

♦ continue to fund and operate a animal control service incorporating animal

welfare as a key element of the service

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♦ actively encourage responsible dog ownership by producing an information pact

to raise public awareness

♦ continue to fulfil our legal obligation on the collection and kennelling of stray dogs

in the borough

♦ enforce against owners of dogs who fail to clear up after their dogs

♦ provide advice on all aspects of animal welfare

♦ continue to provide microchip implant service for animals

♦ provide support for removal of animals when evictions are carried out

♦ promote responsible pet ownership by enforcement and raising public awareness

4.5 Action

‣ Publicise the microchip implant service by distribution of leaflets and public

awareness campaigns

‣ Introduce initiatives to promote animal welfare and responsible dog ownership.

Advice and information on animal welfare to be made more accessible to the

public via the internet

‣ Produce an information pack to encourage responsible pet ownership and

highlight the importance of the following:

a) Microhipping

b) Neutering of cats and dogs

c) Meeting the welfare needs of the animals

d) Social responsibilities such as keeping dogs under control in public places,

clean up after their dogs and making sure that they do not cause a noise

nuisance to neighbours by persistent barking

Influence the use of Council land for events to ensure good animal welfare

practice

5.0 As landowners, local authorities have the power to refuse permission for

certain activities to take place on their land. These activities include hunting with

dogs, animal circuses, tethering of horses and ponies and giving animal prizes.

Hunting with dogs include a range of activities such as fox hunting, stag hunting and

hare coursing. In hare coursing, beagles or harriers are used to chase the hare and

the aim is not to kill the hare – although some are caught and killed, but to test the

speed and agility of the dogs.

5.1 Hunting with dogs is considered by many, including the RSPCA and other

animal welfare organisations, to be cruel. A number of options are currently being

considered by Government, which includes a complete ban on hunting with dogs, or

allow only licensed events. The Youth and Leisure Sub-Committee in 1999

supported a ban on activities relating to hunting with dogs at all future Middlesex

Country Show which takes place annually in the Borough.

5.2 In respect of animal circuses, the Leisure Sub-Committee on 10 October 1995

reviewed the policy on the letting of Council owned sites to circuses. The committee

resolved that sites be let only to circuses which are members of the Association of

Circus Proprietors and that do not include live animal acts in their programmes.

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5.3 The Council will enforce the Protection Against Cruel Tethering Act 1988 and

will not allow tethering of horses and ponies as a method of keeping equines on a

permanent basis when there is no regular daily exercise. If tethering is temporary or

regular daily exercise is provided then Code of Practice for tethering horses and

ponies should be followed.

5.4 The Council will

♦ ensure that where animals are involved in public display or performances, their

welfare and conditions are inspected and regulated

♦ ban animal circuses from council owned sites where it is legal to do so and it is

supported by local interested groups

♦ enforce the Protection Against Cruel Tethering Act 1988

♦ discourage animals being given as prizes usually with little or no preparation for

the welfare needs of the animal

♦ oppose the use of all snares and traps to control pests which would cause

unnecessary suffering

5.5 Action

‣ Closer liaison with entertainment licensing officers and leisure services to ensure

that events involving performing animals are monitored

‣ Review current policies on the use of Council land for events involving animals.

Where it is lawful to do so, incorporate relevant policies to protect the welfare of

animals

Ensure that animal welfare is considered in Council policies when carrying out

its functions either as service provider or as purchaser of goods and services

6.0 The Council will

♦ ensure that all pest control treatments are carried out humanely and by trained

and experienced operatives

♦ introduce animal welfare measures into council emergency plans

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HILLINGDON BOROUGH TRANSPORT

STRATEGY: RESPONSE TO THE PRELIMINARY

CONSULTATION

ITEM 6

Contact Officers: Janet Rangeley/Veronica Pinto

Telephone: 01895 250553/01895 250000 ext 2449

SUMMARY

Since July 2003, officers have been developing the Borough Transport Strategy. Part

of this has included undertaking preliminary consultations with a diversity of

organisations and individuals within the Borough’s business and residential

community to assist in the identification of the key issues affecting the community

and the priorities for the strategy’s action plan. This report provides Cabinet with

details of the outcomes of the preliminary consultations and informs members of the

next stages and timetable for progressing towards the target date for adoption of

June/July2004.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That Cabinet:

(a) Agrees the contents of the report,

(b) approves the timetable for the next stages in preparing the Borough

Transport Strategy as detailed in paragraph 14 of the report, and

(c) requests officers to bring the draft Borough Transport Strategy to the next

meeting of Cabinet for consideration for formal consultation purposes.

REASON FOR OFFICER RECOMMENDATIONS

The Borough Transport Strategy will provide:-

• an essential framework for the Council’s Borough Spending Plan,

• a contribution to the emerging Local Development Framework, and

• a significant component to implementing the Council’s Community Plan. As

such, it has been included as a medium term objective in the Leader’s

Statement and a target date of June/July 2004 set for the adoption of the

Strategy.

In order to meet this timescale and for Cabinet to gain an appreciation of the issues,

as identified by the Borough’s community prior to considering the draft Transport

Strategy officers, have submitted this report for consideration.

OPTIONS AVAILABLE

There are none.

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OVERVIEW AND SCRUTINY COMMENT

This Cabinet report on the response to the preliminary consultation will be on the

agenda for the proposed Overview and Scrutiny meeting of 1sr March and any

comments will be reported to the Cabinet meeting on 4 th March.

INFORMATION

1. In May/June 2003, work commenced on preparing Hillingdon’s Borough

Transport Strategy (BTS). Two officer working groups have been established to

ensure that the strategy is both a corporate document and also provides the

framework for the future bids within the Council’s Annual Borough Spending Plan

submission.

(a) a representative Internal Working Group comprising of Council officers meets

regularly to provide input on detailed transport issues into the Strategy,

including parking, air quality, cycling, road safety, planning, traffic management,

etc. Secondly, and in conjunction with this, a Corporate Steering Group has

been established to ensure that the different issues such as health, education

and air quality are integrated into the Strategy, and

(b) practical issues highlighted by the Internal Working Group are considered by

corporate heads, local-strategic partners and stakeholders such as HAVS

(Hillingdon Association of Voluntary Services) and Healthy Hillingdon and taken

forward into the various themes of the emerging strategy.

2. Both these groups have been instrumental in developing the preliminary

consultation for the Transport Strategy, which is detailed in paragraphs 2 to 13 of this

report. The strategy once adopted will contribute to the Council’s Local

Implementation Plan for Transport - a requirement of Local Authorities by Central

Government.

Preliminary Consultation

3. The overarching themes of the Transport Strategy are to be based on the

Community Plan objectives. In order to establish the key issues facing the borough’s

business and residential community, a period of preliminary consultation has been

undertaken between June 2003 and January 2004. The outcome of this consultation

is detailed in the report and the key issues, concerns and comments raised have

enabled priorities to be identified in developing the Strategy. Many of the local details

(topic and location) are being considered as officers prepare the transport action

plan which is the implementation element of the Strategy.

4. In developing the Hillingdon Transport Strategy, extensive public consultation has

been conducted to reach as many stakeholders as possible. Briefly, consultation

exercises have involved:

• Stakeholder meetings undertaken with key groups, including the Hayes Town

Partnership, Uxbridge Initiative, the Hillingdon Cycling Working Group,

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Hillingdon Chamber of Commerce and DASH in the Borough initiated the

consultation process.

• Public Consultation with Borough residents and tenants associations (see

Appendix 1.

• An Internet questionnaire linked to an article in ‘Hillingdon People’.

• A very successful Borough Transport Conference in November 2003 with a

cross representation of interests (see Appendix 2)

• Presentations made to the Environment Overview and Scrutiny Committee

which has the Borough Transport Strategy as part of its work programme for

2003/04.

5. On the 24 th November 2003, the Borough hosted its first conference on transport

in Hillingdon. Nearly 100 delegates represented transport users and operators and

included Transport for London, Healthy Hillingdon and Primary Care Trust (PCT), the

Disablement Association of Hillingdon (DASH), Hillingdon Carers, Metropolitan

Police, BME groups, London Cycling Campaign, HAVS, the Uxbridge Initiative, BAA

and other local businesses. Comments and issues arising from the earlier

preliminary consultations with some of the key stakeholders held June – September

2003, were instrumental in developing the themes and workshops at the Conference.

Presentations were given on:-

• the need for and the context to the Borough Transport Strategy;

• the participation process for developing the Strategy.

• freight

• mobility

• Green Travel Plans

• Safer Routes to School, and

• Health.

6. These were followed by five workshops on the following themes:-

• Air quality and transportation

• Business

• General accessibility issues

• Parking

• Public transport

7. Details of the outcomes from the various workshops are contained in Appendix 3,

but the main issues focused on:-

• local flexibility of the parking standards,

• better enforcement of parking regulations particularly along bus lanes and at

bus stops to allow the free flow of traffic.

• Costly parking fees, including those for London Underground.

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• Promote park and ride (for local commuters) as it could be effective

• Parking controls (particularly Parking Management Areas for residential areas)

and enforcement

• Local bus services successful especially at Hayes, but poor links north-south.

• Need for schools to plan for public transport access to them and encourage

school travel plans.

• Need for improvements to public transport for disabled people, the elderly and

young families

• Need to promote clean vehicles

• Better integration of the transport system, encouraging the use of canals and

waterways.

• Concentrate on local transport initiatives

• Undertake disability audit and set up a mobility forum

• Improved design of disabled persons parking spaces

• Better public transport information and access to it

• Encourage green travel plans for local businesses

• 20mph zones (home zones) to be identified

• need for a heavy commercial vehicles strategy to deal with problems of freight

on Hillingdon’s roads

• freight vehicles in bus lanes contribute to congestion

• public transport linkages to the west (into the Counties) need to be improved.

8. Overall, the feedback from the Borough Transport Conference has been very

positive. Many key issues have been identified and discussed and will be invaluable

in developing the Transport Strategy. The Conference was successful as a platform

for engaging stakeholders in developing the Transport Strategy and many delegates

have expressed an interest in further transport discussion forums as the strategy

emerges. Officers are currently considering the detailed outcome from the various

workshops and other consultations

Stakeholder Consultation

9. A range of interest groups, residents associations and individuals has been

consulted on the Borough Transport Strategy. More recently officers have been able

to consult those groups who were unable to attend the Conference. This has

included a presentation to the Connecting Communities Consortium, the translation

of the Transport Strategy website questionnaire into minority languages and a link to

the Transport Strategy website in the HAVS website which will enable responses to

the Strategy questionnaire from minority groups. In December 2003, officers

contributed to the motorists’ forum now established and will be considering how

issues raised at the first and subsequent meetings can be incorporated into the

emerging strategy. Further consultation involves officers making a presentation and

holding a discussion session at the Hillingdon Youth Council Conference and the

Joint Strategy Group for Physical and Sensory Disabilities in February 2004 and are

currently investigating involvement in the Voluntary Services Health and Social

Carers Forum, the Disability Forum and the Older Persons Assembly.

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Local Residents Groups / Associations

10. The consultant commissioned to assist in the consultation part of developing the

strategy has met with various local tenants and residents associations (see Appendix

1 to this report) and will complete this work by the end of January. Cabinet should

note that the list is not comprehensive as it reflects only those groups which

responded to the invitation from the consultant to attend their meetings to consult on

the Borough Transport Strategy. Officers are keen to extend this consultation to

other residents’ associations and local groups during the formal consultation period

proposed for mid April to late May In a structured approach, the consultant sought

views on the following six overall objectives:

• To improve safety

• To improve health and the general quality of life in local streets

• To improve the overall reliability of the transport system

• To improve access to transport

• To promote economic regeneration and support local business

• To encourage greater use of public transport, cycling and walking

• To achieve greater understanding of the issues and greater consensus on the

way forward

11. The key findings from this consultation exercise include:-

• the need to improve safety through accident reduction and enforcement of lower

speeds,

• improve reliability of and access to public transport,

• the provision of short term parking to support local shops, and

• the opposition to cycle lanes.

Questionnaires

12. The local community and interest groups have been able to provide comments

on transport in Hillingdon via an on-line questionnaire and a similar hard-copy

questionnaire, in connection with the first in a series of articles in Hillingdon People

(October/November 2003 issue). 77 responses were received on-line and 16 people

completed the hard-copy questionnaire. Although not a statistically valid sample, to

date, the questionnaires have provided a useful insight into the public view of

transport in Hillingdon. Respondents rated the public transport in the Borough as

average and commented on the bus and tube services, lack of good north-south

links, and the continuity and reliability of the public transport service.

13. From the questionnaire analysis, four key challenges / issues facing those

travelling in the Borough were identified as:

• Congestion;

• Need to improve the public transport system;

• Traffic calming / safety; and

• Parking and related issues

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14. The most frequently raised issues included:

• The continued promotion of walking and cycling initiatives

• The provision of cheap all-day car parks

• Regard for motorists

• West London Tram

15. Together with the analysis of consultation responses from local residents

associations, a summary of which will be included in the next issue of Hillingdon

People (February/March 2004), the feedback from questionnaires will be considered

as part of the emerging Borough Transport Strategy. Further responses to the

Strategy questionnaire are expected in the future as a link to the questionnaire is

currently available on the HAVS website.

Transport Operators

16. Officers are due to seek views/discuss the transport strategy with transport

operators and will be integrating comments and operator priorities into the emerging

strategy for further consideration.

Next Stages

17. As indicated in the paragraph containing the reason for the officer

recommendations in this report, there is a commitment to achieve the adoption of the

Borough Transport Strategy by June/July 2004. Table 1 below details the stages

towards meeting that target.

Table 1

STAGES

TIMESCALE

Hillingdon Youth Council Conference: Presentation and discussion 26 February 2004

(am)

Hillingdon Assembly for Physically Disabled and Sensory Impaired

People

Prepare for advertising consultation programme in: Hillingdon People

in the April/May issue, other publications, and the Transport Strategy

website

Environment Overview and Scrutiny Committee:

Consideration of 4 th March Cabinet report on response to the

preliminary consultation

26 February 2004

(pm)

March 2004

1 st March 2004

Cabinet :Consider the report on preliminary consultation response 4 th March 2004

Environment Overview and Scrutiny: consider Cabinet report on

draft Transport Strategy

29 th March 2004

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All Members seminar on the content of the draft Borough Transport

Strategy (BTS) and programme of consultation as contained in the

1 st April Cabinet report.

Cabinet: consider draft Borough Transport Strategy for formal

consultation

Formal consultation on the draft BTS

30 th March 2004

7-9pm

1 st April 2004

Mid April– mid/late

May 2004

Presentation to and consultation with the Local Strategic Partnership 19 April 2004

Environment Overview and Scrutiny Committee: consider Cabinet

report on the final Transport Strategy for adoption

June 2004

Cabinet : consider final Transport Strategy for adoption June 2004

BOROUGH SOLICITOR’S COMMENTS

18. There are none to be reported at this stage in the preparation of the Borough

Transport Strategy.

DIRECTOR OF FINANCE COMMENTS

19. All of the costs incurred in preparing the strategy are being met from existing

Planning and Transportation Services’ budgets and also from the Parking Revenue

Account, which has funding ring-fenced specifically to meet the costs of preparing

the Borough Transport Strategy.

BACKGROUND DOCUMENTS

Borough Transport Conference 24 th November 2003: feedback from the workshops.

Consultant’s analyses of comments from individual questionnaires and residents and

tenants’ association meetings.

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APPENDIX 1

Residents and Tenants Associations consulted September 2003 – January 2004.

• Hayes Town Centre Residents Association

• Cranford Cross Residents Association

• Harefield Tenants and Residents Association

• Whitehall Residents Association

• Harmondworth and Sipson Residents Association

• Harlington Residents Association

Hillingdon Alliance of Residents Associations

• North Uxbridge Residents Association

• Northwood Hills Residents Association

• Violet Avenue Tenants and Residents Association

• Northwood Residents Association

Hillingdon Tenants and Residents Association.

Residents and Tenants Associations that did not respond are:

• Home Farm Residents Association

• North Hayes

• Colham Green

• The Larches

• Oak Farm

• Pastures Mead

• Vine Lane

• West Ruislip Commuters Association

• Ferndale Area

• Glebe

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HILLINGDON BOROUGH TRANSPORT CONFERENCE: INVITEES

APPENDIX 2

Councillors

NAME INVITED ATTENDANCE ADDRESS TELEPHONE E-MAIL

Cllr Mike Heywood 26/9/03

Overview and Scrutiny

Cllr Baker 26/9/03 Yes Member bbaker@hillingdon.gov.uk

Cllr Peter Ryderson 26/9/03 Yes Member

Cllr Bishop 26/9/03 Yes Member 01923 826610 dbishop@hillingdon.gov.uk

Cllr. N. Nunn-Price 26/9/03 Yes Member 01895 478916 Nnunn-price@hillingdon.gov.uk

Cllr. R. Puddifoot 26/9/03 No

Cllr S.Stone 26/9/03 Yes Member cllsstone@hillingdon.gov.uk

Cllr D. Routledge 26/9/03 Yes Member 01895 27050

Cllr A. Banks 26/9/03 Yes Member 01895 436112

Cllr J Rhodes 26/9/03 Yes Member 01895 234348

Cllr John Hensley No Member

Cllr Harmsworth 26/9/03 No Member 01895 250127

Cllr John Major 26/9/03 Yes Member 01895250780

Cllr Lakham Yes Member

Cllr R. Barnes 26/09/03 No Member

Cllr S. Jenkins 26/09/03 Yes Member sj@hillingdon.gov.uk

Cllr J. O’Neill 26/09/03 Yes Member 01895676501 Jo’neill@Hillingdon.gov.uk

Cllr Paramit Sethi Yes Member

Cllr Phoday Jarjussey Yes Member

Chief Officers

Chief Executive 26/9/03

Ruth Willis 26/9/03

PART I – MEMBERS & PUBLIC (INCLUDING THE PRESS)

Cabinet Reports - 4 th March 2003 Page 101


NAME INVITED ATTENDANCE ADDRESS TELEPHONE E-MAIL

Jean Palmer 26/9/03

Philomena Bach 26/9/03

Brian Murrell 26/9/03

Council Officers

Janet Rangeley 22/9/03 Yes

Veronica Pinto 22/9/03 Yes

Tom Fisher 22/9/03 Yes

Gary Collier 22/9/03 Yes

Mary Worrall 22/9/03 Yes

Chandra Raval 22/9/03 Yes

Jack Webster 22/9/03

Sabeeha Mannan 22/9/03

Shane Brackenbury 22/9/03

Elaine Carter 22/9/03

Julie Evans 22/9/03 Yes Education Youth

7697 jdevans@hillingdon.gov.uk

Leisure

Denis Judge 22/9/03

Paul Williams 22/9/03

Peter Friend 22/9/03 Yes

Nigel Coates 22/9/03 No

Andy Codd 22/9/03 Yes

Wendy Rogers 22/9/03 Yes

Val Beale 22/9/03

Peggy Law 22/9/03

Doug Williamson 22/9/03 Yes

Jonathan Westell 22/9/03

Andy Stubbs 22/9/03 Yes 01895 251281 astubbs@hillingdon.gov.uk

PART I – MEMBERS & PUBLIC (INCLUDING THE PRESS)

Cabinet Reports - 4 th March 2003 Page 102


NAME INVITED ATTENDANCE ADDRESS TELEPHONE E-MAIL

MPs

John Randall 22/9/03 Yes

John McDonnell 22/9/03 Yes 02085690010

John Wilkinson 22/9/03 Yes johnwilkinson@parliament.uk

PART I – MEMBERS & PUBLIC (INCLUDING THE PRESS)

Cabinet Reports - 4 th March 2003 Page 103


NAME INVITED ATTENDANCE ADDRESS TELEPHONE E-MAIL

STAKEHOLDER GROUPS

Arandale Couriers

Piers Scrimshaw-Wright 22/9/03 Arlington House

0118 930 4141 p.scrimshaw_wright@arlington.co.uk

Arlington Business Park

Theale, Reading

RG7 4SA

Arriva the Shires and Essex

Nick Knox No 934-974 Marchwood House

01923662325

Watford

Herfordshire

WD25 9NN

Tony Tallant 20/10/03 General Manager(Buckinghamshire)

Arriva the Shires Ltd

Newlands Bus Station

High Wycombe

Bucks HP11 2HU

BAA

Andy Wadham 22/9/03 No BAA

8745 6169

Heathrow Point West

234 Bath Rd

Harlington

UB3 5AP

Nicola Hooper 13/10/03 Yes BAA Heathrow 0208745 5966 Nicola_hooper@baa.com

BA

Steve Smith 22/9/03 Airport Policy Manager

8738 9808

British Airways

Waterside (HDA3)

PO Box 365

Harmondsworth

MIDDX UB7 0GB

British Waterways

Annie Hilder 29/9/03 Landscape Architect

British Waterways

The Toll House

Delamere Terrace

Little Venice

London W2 6ND

3552

PART I – MEMBERS & PUBLIC (INCLUDING THE PRESS)

Cabinet Reports - 4 th March 2003 Page 104


NAME INVITED ATTENDANCE ADDRESS TELEPHONE E-MAIL

Brownes Minibuses

Eddie/Pam Brownes 22/9/03 10 Old Orchard Close

01895 440145

Hillingdon

UB8 3LH

Capital Call

Paul Jones 22/9/03 Transport Co-ordination Centre

7275 2446 Capitalcall@hackneyct.org

C/o HCT

Ash Grove bus depot, Mare Street, LONDON, E8

4RH

Chiltern Railways

Steward Yateman Great Central House

02073333032

Marylebone Station

Melcombe Place

London

NW1 6JJ

Connecting Communities / Hillingdon Muslin Council

Mr Amir Ahmed 22/09/03 15/10/03

Yes

DASH

Angela Wegener 22/9/03 Yes, e-mail

reply

Hillingdon Muslin Council

5 Harries Road

Hayes

UB4 9DD

Wood End Centre

Judge Heath Lane

Hayes

Middx

UB3 2PB

02088418097

Fax

02085811424

8848 8319 Info@dash.org.uk

Pauline Cooper 22/9/03 Yes 01895 672568 Pauline@cooper63.fslife.

co.uk

Freight Quality Partnership

Mike Slinn 22/9/03 MVA House

Victoria Way

Woking

Surrey

GU21 6DD

Friends of the Earth

22/9/03 Rosemary Bennett, 3 Rectory Way, Ickenham,

UB10 8BP

PART I – MEMBERS & PUBLIC (INCLUDING THE PRESS)

Cabinet Reports - 4 th March 2003 Page 105


NAME INVITED ATTENDANCE ADDRESS TELEPHONE E-MAIL

HAVS

Carol Coventry 22/9/03 Key House

01895 442722

106 High Street

Yiewsley

UB7 7BQ

J. Betteridge Yes 01895442929 jenib@havs.org.uk

Hayes Town Centre Partnership

Mohammed Haniff 22/9/03 Yes Hayes Town Centre Manager

02088137733 mhaniff@hillingdon.gov.uk

72-74 Station Rd

Hayes

Heathrow Airport

Roads Policy Officer Heathrow Point

234 Bath Road

MIDDX

UB3 5AP

Heathrow Area Transport Forum

Alastair Duff 29/9/03 Westward House

155-157 Staines Rd

Hounslow

Middx TW3 3JB

Healthy Hillingdon

Angela Flux 30/9/03 Fountains Mill

81 High Street

Uxbridge

Dr. Hilary Pickles Yes Director of Public Health 01895452045 Hiliary.pickles@hillingdon.nhs.uk

Hillingdon Chamber of Commerce

Mike Langan 22/9/03 Yes 19 Station Rd, Hayes

UB3 4BD

0208 5691197 info@hillingdonchamber.com

Hillingdon Chat

6/10/03 webmaster@hillingdonchat.com

Hillingdon Community Transport

John Reid 30/9/03 General Manager

Harlington Road Depot

Block B

Hillingdon Cycling Forum

Steve Ayres 22/9/03 Yes 90 Hercies Rd

UB10 9ND

01895 230953 Steve1.ayres@hotmail.com

PART I – MEMBERS & PUBLIC (INCLUDING THE PRESS)

Cabinet Reports - 4 th March 2003 Page 106


NAME INVITED ATTENDANCE ADDRESS TELEPHONE E-MAIL

Beryl Bell 22/9/03 No 1 Leven Way

colinberyl@compuserve.com

Hayes

UB3 2SR

Cliff Jones 22/9/03 Yes 18 Pepys Close

01895 638317 Cliff.jones@btinternet.com

UB10 8NL

Sarah James 22/9/03 29/9/03

Yes

64 Bridle Rd

HA5 2SH

Hillingdon Hospital NHS Trust

Wendy Scarr Yes 01895279961 wendy.scar@thh.nhs.uk

Tina Dinch 13/10/03 Yes 01895 279856 tina.dench@thh.nhs.uk

Hillingdon Primary Care Trust

Dr Hilary Pickles

Yes 01895 452045 hilary.pickles@hillingdon.

Director Public Health

Shirley Goodwin 22/9/03 Yes Hillingdon Primary Care Trust

Kirk House

97-109 High Street

Yiewsley

West Drayton, MIDDX, UB7 7HJ

Hillingdon Times and Gazette

Rachel Sharp 6/10/03 Yes Bucks Free Press & Times Group

Gomm Road

High Wycombe

Bucks HP13 7DW

Hindu Cultural Association

Anil Mitra 3/10/03 Yes

10/10/03

gov.uk

01895 452094 shirley.goodman@hillingdon.gov.uk

01494755112 rsharp@london.newsquest.co.uk

01494677916?

Dr. Bhargava 3/10/03 Yes

10/10/03

IBM

Les Johns Yes

23/10/03

Global Logistics Procurement & Projects Manager

UK & Ireland

IBM Integrated Supply Chain (ISC)

Greenford

01895676939

020 88325213 JOHNSL3@UK.IBM.COM

PART I – MEMBERS & PUBLIC (INCLUDING THE PRESS)

Cabinet Reports - 4 th March 2003 Page 107


NAME INVITED ATTENDANCE ADDRESS TELEPHONE E-MAIL

Liftshare

Marcus Seaman 22/9/03 Yes

25/9/03

marcus@liftshare.com

Butterfly Hall

Attleborough

Norfolk

NR17 1AB

Gateway Enterprise

Jay Seeburrun 22/9/03 Unit K

International House

Bridge Park

Southall UB2 4AB

Groundwork Thames Valley

Keren Jones 22/9/03 Colne Valley Park Centre

Denham Court Drive

Denham

UB9 5PG

HACCA

Heather Callender Yes HACCA 02085820664

The Licensed Taxi Drivers Association

The General Secretary 9-11 Wood Field Road

London

W9 2AB

Living Streets

Paul Holdsworth 22/9/03 31-33 Bondway

London, SW8 1SJ

London Ambulance Service

David Court Yes Royal Lane

Hillingdon

MIDDX

UB8 3QX

London Buses Operating Services

Adrian Dempsey Area Traffic Controller NW

Bakers Road

Uxbridge, Middlesex

LFB

R. Goodman-Brown No 02085680199

London Fire Emergency Planning Authority

Marion House

61 Staines Road

Hounslow

Middlesex TW3 3JQ

8917 9286 jayseeburrun@jjewel.com

7820 1010 Info@livingstreets.org.uk

01895 255242 david.court@lond-amb.nhs.uk

PART I – MEMBERS & PUBLIC (INCLUDING THE PRESS)

Cabinet Reports - 4 th March 2003 Page 108


NAME INVITED ATTENDANCE ADDRESS TELEPHONE E-MAIL

London Buses

Jeff Tucker 22/9/03 First Uxbridge Garage

01895 236598

Bakers Court

Uxbridge MIDDX

UB8 1RJ

George Goodridge First Uxbridge Garage

01895 258647 Adrain.Dempsey@tfl-buses.co.uk

Bakers Court

Uxbridge MIDDX

UB8 1RJ

Many Shades of Green

Denise Chetram Yes

01895422333

10/10//03

Metroline

Norman Law 118-122 College Road

020 82188888

Harrow

Middlesex

HA1 1DB

Metronet

Roger Hedley 22/9/03 Metronet

02079326200

40 Melton St

London

NW1 2EE

Metropolitan Police

Mark Toland 22/9/03 Borough Commander

8246 1492

Uxbridge Police Station

1 Warwick Place

Uxbridge

Middlesex UB8 1RG

Chief Inspector Ian Brooks 10/10/03 Yes Metropolitan Police

02082469801 Ian.brooks@met.police.uk

Alperton Road

Middlesex HA0 1EW (sent by e mail)

PC Paul Richards Yes NW Partnership Focus Desk

02082469811 Paul.Richards@met.police.uk

Athlon Road

Alperton

Wembley

Middlesex

HA1 1EW

Mick Morris Yes 02082461473 Mick.m.morris@met.police.uk

NOTRAG

No Gill Cannon gill.cannon@infonotrag.org.uk

PART I – MEMBERS & PUBLIC (INCLUDING THE PRESS)

Cabinet Reports - 4 th March 2003 Page 109


NAME INVITED ATTENDANCE ADDRESS TELEPHONE E-MAIL

Christine Taylor 6/10/03 Yes 22 Raywood Close

02085648345 mathewstc@aol.com

Harlington UB3 5NL

Older People’s Forum

Surgit S Gill

Open Spaces Society

David Williams 22/9/03 30 Sweetcroft Lane

Uxbridge

UB10 9LE

Securiplan

6/10/03 Chevron House

346 Long Lane

Hillingdon

Stockley Park Consortium

Robert Burlumi 22/9/03 Operations Director

01895 444100 Robert_burlumi@stockleypark.co.uk

Stockley Park Consortium

The Management Suite

5 Ironbridge Road

Stockley Park

Uxbridge

Middlesex

UB11 1HB

Andrew Van Der Mersch 22/9/03 Stockley Park

Stockley Park Consortium

The Management Suite

5 Ironbridge Rd

Stockley Park

Uxbridge

UB11 1HB

Strategic Rail Authority

Mr Graham Cross 22/9/03 Rail Development Manager

55 Victoria Street

London

SW1H 0EU

Steve Shaw No steveshaw@sra.gov.uk

SWELTRAC

John Barclay 22/9/03 Maybe 16 Rydal Drive

West Wickham

KENT

BR4 9QH

PART I – MEMBERS & PUBLIC (INCLUDING THE PRESS)

Cabinet Reports - 4 th March 2003 Page 110


NAME INVITED ATTENDANCE ADDRESS TELEPHONE E-MAIL

TFL

Richard Carr 22/9/03 TfL London Bus Services Ltd

79183416

172 Buckingham Palace Rd

LONDON

SW1W 9TN

Nick Atkinson 29/9/03 TFL North/West Team

02079417079

Windsor House

42-50 Victoria Street

London SW1H 0TL

Peter Livermore 22/9/03 TfL

02079414731

Head of Borough Partnerships

Windsor House

42-50 Victoria Street

London

SW1H 0TL

Phil Cummings Yes TFL 02070279105 philcummings@gov.uk

Darren Womack 29/9/03 Project Director

02070279108

WL Tram Project

Victoria Station House

191 Victoria Street

London SW1E 5NE

Mr G. Beswick Bus Priority: TfL

Street Management

1 st Floor Faith Lawson House

15-17 Dacre Street

SW1H 0NR

Thames Trains

Royce Mumby Turbo Maintenance Depot

Cow Lane

Reading

Royce.mumby@

thamestrains.co.uk

TfL Public Carriage Office

Robin Gillis

(Cab Rank Officer)

Yes

15 Penton Street

London

N1 9PU

Trimite Ltd

Mr Steve Griggs 6/10/03 Yes Arundel Road

Uxbridge

Middx

02079417829 Robin.gillis@pco.org.uk

01895251234 Steve.griggs@trimite.com

PART I – MEMBERS & PUBLIC (INCLUDING THE PRESS)

Cabinet Reports - 4 th March 2003 Page 111


NAME INVITED ATTENDANCE ADDRESS TELEPHONE E-MAIL

Uxbridge Buses

Stavros Heracleous 13/10/03 Yes First Uxbridge Garage

01895236598 Stavros.heracleous@firstgroup.com

Bakers Court

Uxbridge

Middlesex

Peter Stringer Yes As above 01895236598 Peter.stringer@firstgroup.com

Uxbridge Initiative

Clive Godsave (yes) 22/9/03 No (John

Palmer)

Pavilions Shopping Centre

18 Chequers Square

01895274059

C.Godsave

UB8 1LN

Tony Dunn 22/9/03 Management Suite

The Chimes Shopping Centre

High Street

Uxbridge

UB8 1UV

01895 819400 Tony-dunn@capshop.co.uk

Uxbridge Skip Hire

S. Manlet 6/10/03 No Skip Lane

Harvil Road

Harefield

Uxbridge UB9 6JL

West Drayton Car Spares

Mr. O’Dell 6/10/03 The Common

West Drayton

West Drayton Initiative Group

6/10/03 Tony Pilkington

Bell Farm Church

Bell Farm Estate

West Drayton

West London Buses Ltd

Macmillon House

Paddington Station

London

W2 1TY

West London Business

Kate Ashton Yes 02086072509

Wings

Fred Gritt 22/9/03 8573 8388 fred@wingstravel.co.uk

PART I – MEMBERS & PUBLIC (INCLUDING THE PRESS)

Cabinet Reports - 4 th March 2003 Page 112


NAME INVITED ATTENDANCE ADDRESS TELEPHONE E-MAIL

Yiewsley West Drayton Town Action Group

Doreen Tarrant 6/10/03 Yes Mrs. D. Tarrant

01895851168

35 Warwick Rd

West Drayton

Youth Council

Jennifer McChee Youth & Community Services

Civic Centre 3S/07

PART I – MEMBERS & PUBLIC (INCLUDING THE PRESS)

Cabinet Reports - 4 th March 2003 Page 113


NAME INVITED ATTENDANCE ADDRESS TELEPHONE E-MAIL

RESIDENTS GROUPS

Whitethorne Estate Residents

Paul Carney 22/9/03 66 Yew Avenue

Yiewsley

MIDDX

Eastcote Residents Association

M.A. Platti 22/9/03 No 7 Robarts Close

Pinner

MIDDX

HA5 2QA

Philpots Farm Residents Association

22/9/03 17 Heather Lane

Yiewsley

Middx

Harmondsworth and Sipson Residents Association

Mrs B Sobey 22/9/03 No 486 Sipson Rd

02087591677

Sipson

UB7 OHZ

Hillingdon Village Residents Association

Mr D Venn 22/9/03 High House

33 Harlington Rd

HILLINGDON

UB8 3HX

Townfield Association

Mrs J Agius 22/9/03 9 Manor Rd

Hayes

UB3

Harefield Village Forum

Frazine Johnson 22/9/03 8573 6533 frazinejohnson@lawyer.com

Ruislip Chamber of Commerce

Tony Unger

Northwood Residents Association

Simon Varnals 22/9/03 Yes 12 Kewferry Road

Northwood

Middx

019234500917 simon@varnals.com

PART I – MEMBERS & PUBLIC (INCLUDING THE PRESS)

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NAME INVITED ATTENDANCE ADDRESS TELEPHONE E-MAIL

Hillingdon Federation of Tenants

John Waylett 22/9/03 Yes 103 Moorfield Road

01895823326

Cowley

Middx

Ickenham Residents Association

22/9/03 32 Swakeleys Drive

Ickenham

UB10 8QD

London Borough Hillingdon Tenants & Residents Federation

Mrs. Grace Ganden 22/9/03 67 The Larches

Hillingdon

Harefield Tenants and Residents Association

Mrs. P Crawley 22/9/03 Yes 32 Sanctuary Close

Harefield

Middx

Botwell Tenants & Residents Association

22/9/03 Townfield Community Centre

Townfield Road

Hayes Middx

Brookgreen Residents Association

Peter Clark 22/9/03 3 Welbeck Court Welbeck Avenue

Hayes

Cranford Cross Residents Association

Mr. D F Bell 22/9/03 Yes 83 Saunton Avenue

Harlington

Harlington Village Association

Dean Langley 22/9/03 3 Gothic Court

Harlington, Middx

Hayes Town Centre Residents Association

Robert McGowan 22/9/03 Yes

Mr. & Mrs

60 Skeffington Court

Silverdale Road

Hayes

Road Sea Express

Les Eastlake Unit 6

Wyvern Way

Uxbridge

0208 8488384 Chris@hayes.townta.com.uk

01895 811888

PART I – MEMBERS & PUBLIC (INCLUDING THE PRESS)

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NAME INVITED ATTENDANCE ADDRESS TELEPHONE E-MAIL

Pastures Mead Residents Association

Miss C G Kenway 22/9/03 20 pastures Mead

Hillingdon

Home Farm Residents Association

M Greengrow 22/9/03 Yes 67 Blacklands Drive

Hayes End

North Hayes Residents Association

Mr. J E Rutter 22/9/03 50 Weymouth Rd

Hayes

The Larches Residents Association

Mrs. Grace Gganden 22/9/03 67 The Larches

Hillingdon

Vine Lane Residents Association

Philip Coleham 22/9/03 82 Vine Lane

Hillingdon

Violet Ave Tenants & Residents Association

Mr. R. Cook 22/9/03 8 Bramble Close

Hillingdon

Gatehill (Northwood) Residents Association

Mr. S. Lee 22/9/03 17 Gatehill Road, Northwood stephenwlee@btinternet.com

South Ruislip Residents

Mrs. D. Wingrove-Owens 22/9/03 4 Diamond Road

South Ruislip

West Ruislip Commuters Association

Miss S F Sweeting 22/9/03 125 The Greenway

Ickenham

Brearley Close residents Association

Mrs. E. Brennan 22/9/03 18 Brearley Close

Uxbridge

Ferndale Area Residents Association

Mr. R. Swallow 22/9/03 28 Ferndale Crescent

01895 239951

Uxbridge

Middx UB8 2AX

North Uxbridge Residents Association

Mrs. S. Confavreux 22/9/03 18 Water Tower Close

sue@confavreux.co.uk

Uxbridge

Uxbridge Moor Residents Association

Robert English 22/9/03 36 Cobden Close

Uxbridge

English@safeway.co.uk

PART I – MEMBERS & PUBLIC (INCLUDING THE PRESS)

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NAME INVITED ATTENDANCE ADDRESS TELEPHONE E-MAIL

Whitehall Residents Association

Mrs. E. Saunders 22/9/03 2 walford Rd

Uxbridge

Middx

Glebe Residents Association

Community Café 22/9/03 60 Byron Way

West Drayton

South Ruislip Residents Association

Mr. R. Dean 22/9/03 Yes 9 Manor Gardens

Ruislip HA4 6UB

Dial A Ride

22/9/03 Yes Keith Matthew 0208 2330011

Oak Farm Residents Association

Tom Crow 22/903 Yes 114 Granvillle Rd

Hillingdon

UB10 9AG

Ruislip Residents Association

6/10/03 Lewis Hawken

21 Sherleys Court

Wood Lane

Ruislip HA4 6DH

Eastcote Chamber of Commerce

Jennifer Boutique 22/9/03 125 Field End rd

Eastcote

MIDDX

Laurel Lane Tenants and Residents Association

Mr. Banks 6/10/03 No

21/10/2003

HA5 1QH

92 Rowan Road

West Drayton

UB7 7UD

02088457096 bob@dean09.fsnet.co.uk

01895 237523

0208866 7106

PART I – MEMBERS & PUBLIC (INCLUDING THE PRESS)

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APPENDIX 3

BOROUGH TRANSPORT CONFERENCE

FOCUS GROUP NOTES

This report outlines the key / consensus points made at the 5 focus groups of the Borough Transport

Conference. These focus groups were:

• Parking

• Public transport

• Air Quality and transport

• General Accessibility Issues

• Business

Priorities identified in both focus groups sessions have been underlined. Notes taken correspond with

the discussion themes identified and the format therefore varies between the groups.

PARKING

Commercial and Residential Car Parking Restraint

1. All commercial development should have adequate provision – also applies to flats

2. Hillingdon different to other parts of London

3. Can the standards be altered so that there may be local flexibility?

4. Hillingdon charge less than Harrow for car parks

5. Free all day parking in residential roads stops car parks being fully utilised

6. Councillors and residents annoyed at off-street parking restrictions

7. Freight should be off-loaded at a central point and have a commercial free-zone

8. Concern at effect on local businesses if parking is limited

9. Park and ride is a good idea and reduces the need for town centre car parks

10. 2 hours free parking should be made available for lunchtime

11. No free permits should be made available for developments that do not provide on-site

parking

12. Developments should make more provision for disabled users

13. There is a lack of parking provided on developments

14. Increasing in off-street parking reduces on-street pressure

15. Hillingdon attracts external workers

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Re-allocation of Road Space from Parking

1. Hayes and Harrow pedestrianised areas have resulted in a drop in business activity

2. Enforcement of bus lanes needs to be done sensibly

3. Priority must be given to buses

4. Parking must not interfere with bus services

5. Concern at problems caused by disabled parking

6. Residents should have overnight permits for night time space in car parks

7. Lack of enforcement on Sundays

8. Re-allocation is difficult in the Borough despite working well in Uxbridge

9. Bus lanes are beneficial but not in narrow roads

10. Bus stops should be better enforced

11. Businesses have difficulty with bus lanes, delays are created

12. School run should be reduced

13. Disabled parking causes obstruction

14. S106 money can be used for school buses

15. Reduce disabled parking from 3 to 2, or 1 hours

16. Get bus drivers to pull into stops

17. Why are cars allowed to park free of charge on roads near the tube station?

Competitions and Comparisons with Other Areas

1. Free or cheap parking increases use of car parks

2. Costly parking fees restricts freedom of movement

3. Park and ride may be effective

4. Problems of tube stations caused mostly by Borough residents

5. New parking schemes deter commuters

6. LT parking is expensive – price matters and needs to be discussed with LT

7. Park and ride is sensible

8. Free on-street parking determines car park use

9. Money into bus services from the shires

10. Problems caused by Hillingdon being at the end of lines

11. Need LT to have a combined tube parking ticket

12. Figures of travel patterns to Borough required

13. Park and shop

Parking Controls and Enforcement

1. Council taking reactive rather than proactive view on parking controls

2. Public Consultation on PMAs are pointless due to the lack of consensus

3. Let Councillors decide on scheme introduction

4. Little enforcement of zigzags outside schools

5. Every resident should be issued with a parking permit to park on their street

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6. Number of police officers on traffic controls down, limiting enforcing ability of Council

7. Parking attendants need to be increased

8. Enforcement needs to be more targeted and longer hours

9. Residents are willing to pay for parking permits

10. Parking restrictions near stations – a yellow line or some other restriction

11. Parking causes obstruction to emergency service vehicles

12. Need a balance between needs of commuter and safety

Other Parking Users

1. Indiscriminate parking causes severe problems – disrupts loading and unloading

2. Some blue badge holders have them without justification

3. Ruislip High Street and Ruislip Manor parking cause problems including safety

4. Misuse of blue badges by relatives of disabled

5. Written warning for disabled who park badly

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PUBLIC TRANSPORT

What Aspects of Public Transport within Hillingdon are Successful?

1. Local bus services successful especially at Hayes

2. North-South Borough links are poor

3. U9 route in Harefield is good

4. The 331 service is not so good

5. 282 is a good route but only to the East of the Borough – there are problems getting to

Uxbridge

How can Public Transport be Improved?

1. Problems for taxis – too few ranks to service the large number of registered vehicles

2. Cab ranks compliment taxi offices. Enhance the use of this form of transport and method of

improving taxi service and public perception

3. The R1 bus route needs to be more regular. Presently, there is only 1 bus per hour. Needs

to be extended to Watford.

4. Use of freedom passes on busses passing into the Borough from the shires, etc.

5. Lorries on the road during rush hour are contributing to congestion

6. Suggested that lorries need be banned from roads during peak times as in France.

7. Request for local run of the 207 from Uxbridge to Hayes By-pass

8. Problem with Heathrow bus capacity reaching its limit

9. Request to have U4 stop closer to the emergency exit

10. School planning for public transport; need to ‘plan for red’ to ensure access to all schools via

good public transport

11. School green travel plans must be easy to understand and implement

12. Problems related to routing bus services through heavily populated areas as there is a lack of

road space

13. Design of buses not always good on the 140 service

14. Need for greater frequency of services in the North of the Borough and outlying areas

Safer Routes to School – Do they induce a Modal Shift?

1. Question of how many schools serviced by a bus service

2. Metropolitan police hitting schools – enforcement of parking and speed offences

3. Walking buses needed

4. Car sharing between parents

5. Free bus travel for under 11’s

6. Information coming from schools is that children do want to walk

7. Problem that there are too many initiatives in schools at the moment

8. Need to bring across to parents the benefits of kids walking and cycling to school

9. Problems with air pollution for children walking

10. Changes in catchment areas has led to a problem with distances from schools

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Does Bus and Cycle Priority Work?

1. Works very well abroad

2. Enforce parking regulations where buses traditionally get held up

PART I – MEMBERS & PUBLIC (INCLUDING THE PRESS)

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AIR QUALITY AND TRANSPORT

Key themes for the workshops:

1. Reduction in traffic, use of hard and soft options.

2. The use of cleaner vehicle technology,

SESSION I

1. Incentives to promote the use of cleaner vehicles

2. Promote cycling to school, work, etc. Careful management of traffic appears to make more

impact. Promoting the use of cleaner vehicles may have less impact.

3. Need to have alternatives before penalising with hard options

4. Lower road tax for cleaner vehicles

5. Poor cycle lanes in places, no facilities in the Civic Centre

6. Stop heavy vehicles during rush hour to ease burden; staggering working hours

7. Working with Highway Agency / government to promote high occupancy and the more

effective use of roads

8. Encourage Park and ride Schemes

9. Publicity to switch off car engine while in a traffic jam

10. Support for trams – links with other transport modes

11. Adequate rail routes already exist to Central London, tram route will make roads narrower

12. Integrated transport policy with tram playing a role

13. Some support for congestion charging

14. Trams are more energy efficient than buses; would encourage modal split

15. Public transport is not accessible to everyone

16. Trams will take more cars off the road

17. Use of canals taken thousands of lorries off the road. More publicity required. Need to

extend the use of waterways.

18. Specific objectives for freight partnership

19. Local action on freight is too late, it is becoming a national problem

20. Local transport issues are more important. As a local authority we can do more them to effect

changes.

21. North-South transport link in the Borough needs to be improved

22. Improve transport interchanges

23. Bring in school buses

24. Walking buses will improve health of children and traffic congestion. Will have greater impact

as the initiatives are practical and can be started very quickly. Road safety also an issue.

Parents could treat their children about road safety.

25. Traffic fragmented; lack of co-ordination

26. Parents car sharing reduces the cost of initiating cycle lanes

27. More travel information

28. Illegal parking, parking on pavements, and lack of enforcement on parking on bus lanes.

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6 Key Issues

• Promote clean vehicles

• Integration of transport system; bus with rail, etc. More accessibility required

• Encourage use of canals and waterways

• Concentrate on local transport initiatives where we can something about it

• Promote safer routes to school and walking buses. Likely to have significant impact.

• Promote park and ride

Provide positive options

SESSION II

1. Integration of air quality policies with neighbouring local authorities

2. How to get dirty vehicles off the road. Cleaner buses in Hillingdon. More enforcement on

dirty vehicles.

3. Look to reduce shorter journeys when catalytic converters are not working

4. Availability of alternative fuels

5. Need to work with parents and the younger generation

6. Put pressure on vehicle manufacturers to produce cleaner vehicles

7. Support for tram link will mean less cars on the road

8. Need to approach transport problem holistically

9. Car free town centres, but can force cars into adjacent residential areas

10. Park and ride would encourage more cars into the Borough to park. The ability to reduce

traffic is dependent upon where the car parks are located.

11. Some traffic schemes may increase pollution. Need to ensure a balanced approach.

12. Road pricing could reduce quality of life by limiting choice

13. Weighing up different options to improve the environment

14. Poor North-South transport links in the Borough

15. Young people cannot travel to the South of the Borough to access services

16. Free public transport

17. Hillingdon website could provide links to other websites providing travel information

18. Educate children to use public transport

19. Free shuttle buses to transport hubs. Transport for London to provide free shuttle buses /

feeder buses.

20. Integrated transport system and better integration of transport hubs

21. To promote green travel plans requires leadership, information, and the need to make work

place changes

22. Swap parking pass with a travel pass (exempt from tax)

23. Gradually reduce parking to companies using planning powers

24. Public education

25. Integration of health and transport

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26. Appears to be a lack of traffic restraint measures in Hillingdon

27. A reduction in traffic can lead to speeding and a reduction in road safety

6 Key Issues

• Need to be consistent in terms of policies and strategies

• How to weigh importance of air quality against other criteria when evaluating traffic

schemes

• Need to target dirty vehicles at relevant locations. Raise public awareness also

important

• Integration of public transport system

• General reduction in traffic and other safety issues

Need to implement ‘hard options’ type of policy

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GENERAL ACCESSIBILITY ISSUES

Themes Identified:

• Access to hospitals and other health and community facilities

• Walking and cycling routes to school

• Safe and convenient routes to parks and open spaces

• Access routes from disabled parking spaces to local shopping centres and community

facilities

• Safe and convenient access to public transport

• Safe access to work

SESSION I (Ideas for Improvement)

Access routes from disabled parking spaces to local shopping centres and community

facilities

1. Better lighting

2. Parking spaces at Hillingdon Hospital

3. Better signage

4. Better policing of blue badge system

5. User friendly public transport system especially for the disabled

6. Improved design of disabled persons parking spaces e.g. dropped kerbs

7. Set up disability audit and mobility forum

8. Restrict the number of disability passes issued

9. Working with local business to provide better disabled parking facilities

10. Location of disabled parking bays needs review

Safe and convenient access to public transport

11. Better information and access to it

12. Better trained staff on public transport

13. Study required of where people are originating and their destination. Facilitate the

planning of appropriate transport services.

14. Safety of access to public spaces needs review

15. Greater emphasis on accidents and perception of threats to road safety

16. Improved driver training – accommodate the needs of a variety of vulnerable users.

17. Improved access to Hillingdon Hospital particularly for the aged

18. Information such as street plans can be provided that outline, for example, the location of

bus stops on different routes

19. The waiting time for the U3 bus service has reduced

20. Questions of access to cars / vans. Access to public transport requires improvement.

21. Improvements need to be focussed so as to achieve the best results

22. Integration of cars with public transport. Inter-modal links need to be accommodated.

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23. Address fear / perception of danger on public transport and getting access to these

services. Perception is an important element. Links to crime and disorder strategy need to

be highlighted.

24. Speedy repair of bus stops. Hardier material is required to resist vandalism.

25. Speeding along Harlington Road is an issue

26. Greater levels of social inclusion are necessary. Inclusion is reduced with restricted

access to public transport and traffic congestion.

27. Pedestrian phasing of traffic lights – allow pedestrians more time at crossing facilities

28. Negative impacts of tactile paving and need for auditory signals so that access for people

with all types of impairments is improved

29. Reduce the distance between bus stops

Safe access to work

30. Encourage business travel plans. These need to accommodate issues of impairment,

disablement, and carers.

SESSION II (Ideas for improvement)

1. Better lighting at bus stops

2. Move taxi rank to the front of Uxbridge Station (Priority)

3. Improve physical infrastructure e.g. at Hayes Station

4. Improve cycle parking availability at Hayes Station

5. Greater flexibility in modal change – interchange facilities

6. Introduce DLR type service between Staines and the airport

7. Stronger bus shelters

8. Better transport integration and the promotion of the seamless journey

9. Time to get on and off trains needs to be extended

10. Countdown information should also be provided for trains

11. Promote the habit of using public transport through education

12. Improve access to platforms and lifts at train stations (Priority)

13. Improve travel information at bus stops

14. Improve the quality of the public transport service

15. Better links between Hounslow and Uxbridge

16. Address congestion at Uxbridge station

17. Yellow lines at bus stops to discourage stopping and parking by private vehicles

18. Engineering challenge: pupils are given the task of suggesting ideas on how disabled access

can be improved (Priority)

19. Improve cycle lanes

20. Bus reliability (Priority)

21. Provide more and widespread information so that additional markets can be tapped into

22. Improve the whole environment of Uxbridge bus station

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23. Understand and address impairment issues

24. Enhancing comfort on public transport would enhance perceptions and potentially use (top

priority)

25. Improve ease of access to buses

26. Promote taxis and taxi cards

27. Improve disabled parking facilities

28. Discourage car use through disincentives

29. Safety tips provided for public transport users

30. Better planning of the public transport system (Priority)

31. Reduce barriers for getting luggage on and off trains, buses, etc. (Priority)

Walking and cycling routes to school

32. Study required on the nature of movement to and from schools

33. Create safe crossing points

34. Introduce Safe Routes to Schools

35. Change overall public attitude through a social campaign that highlights links with health and

quality of life

36. Carefully consider the width of cycle lanes

37. Stop parking on cycle lanes

38. Parking should be provided by employers

39. Encourage multi-agency approach to traffic, enforcement, etc.

40. Cycling in parks – study required to resolve conflict between park users

41. Deal with cyclists on pavements and fear for children

42. Provide segregation on pavements to allow safe use by a variety of users. Conflict resolution

is necessary.

43. Create greater inducements for staff to reduce car use and explore alternative modes

44. Better cycle education

45. Means of transporting bags etc. should be provided to children wanting to participate in a

walking bus.

46. Better road maintenance is required especially on cycle lanes

47. Teachers should be setting an example by not using cars to get to school

48. 20mph zones need to be explored (Priority)

49. Close roads outside schools during the school run

50. Sign up parents, children and staff for walking to school

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BUSINESS

SESSION I

Freight

1. Need a definition for freight. Freight exists because people need something. Freight quality

partnership.

2. Size of lorries makes access into residential roads difficult. Greater collaboration with

Transport for London is needed.

3. 70% of freight is distribution

4. Deliveries are for everyone

5. Balance is required that brings vitality and benefits to towns and villages

6. Supermarket deliveries at night cause disturbance through vibration

7. More signage is required to reduce congestion

8. Heavy commercial vehicles plan / strategy – outlining where HGV’s should and should not go

9. Electric directions device

10. Builders merchants should have one lorry at a time so as not to disrupt road traffic

11. Need to bring business on board. Bus network delivery within funding available.

Green Travel Plans

1. Larger companies are more structured.

2. London Borough of Hillingdon should be leading the way. Business looks to the Council to

ask for help in developing green travel plans.

3. School traffic accounts for 20% of traffic in the mornings. Studies of American style school

buses.

4. Keep cyclists off the pavements. What about the disabled on pavements?

5. Business should be encouraged to produce a green travel plan. Loss from travelling is built

into salaries.

6. How do you recruit, train and retain staff?

Parking

1. Parking is a major issue: for customers (ease of accessibility), free parking and workers /

employees taking up free parking.

2. Do parking restrictions achieve what they set out to do? It is driving people to use their cars

3. Road closing kills business

4. People abuse free parking

5. Problems with emissions

6. Delivery times needs to considered. No deliveries between 10am-4pm. The business

economy.

7. Permit system. Controlled parking and enable a mix of deliveries. Contract and extend

permit time.

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8. Enforcement

9. Congestion charging at Heathrow

10. Park and ride created problem of congestion in the surrounding streets

11. Charge for parking but offer people an alternative. In central London public transport

provision is good.

12. Bus station in Uxbridge has no more space to expand

13. Linkages between the counties

14. Slough highway – improve interchange

15. Major shops are threatening to move

16. Flaws in the congestion charging process and question whether problems would be created

at Heathrow if it were introduced

SESSION II

Freight

1. Flow of traffic is important however lorries and delivery vehicles hold up traffic

2. Distribution centres need to be relocated as they are close to residential areas. This would

remove time restrictions.

3. Question why deliveries on the high street are at 10am instead of 7am?

4. Routes for lorries. 45 tonne lorries cannot get under the bridge in South Ruislip up Pembroke

Road. A bottleneck is created.

5. Better to unload at rear of shops. However, there is usually poor access to the rear of

shopping centres. Would be willing to pay for better lanes and access. Question of

ownership and levels of agreement with shopkeepers.

6. Small improvements could make a significant impact

7. There is no joined up thinking between shopping parades. Shops are struggling.

8. Lack of discussion

9. Lorries parking in bus lanes contribute to congestion

10. Who decides where the bus lanes are? 24 hour bus lanes and restricted bus lanes. Good

knowledge of the area is required. More co-ordination and collaboration between Boroughs is

required.

11. Should be a designated freight lane (bus lane). Business is losing money when it cannot

deliver on time.

12. Traffic drives up cost

13. BAA Central Distribution Depot – significant reductions in congestion and emissions

Green Travel Plans

1. Green travel plans cost a lot but it also saves a lot of money. Savings are made in office

space. Travel plan can be cost neutral.

2. What is the threshold of business size where a travel plan is required? 5 staff

3. The Council is to appoint a Green Travel Plan co-ordinator in the near future.

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4. Public transport infrastructure needs to be in place in order for people to get out of their

cars. Uxbridge is poorly accessible via public transportation.

5. More motorbike parking spaces required

6. Public transport convenience and reliability needs to be improved

7. Business is being driven away. Planning decisions of 20 years ago would promote

supermarkets with free parking. A lack of parking affects parking and shopping parades

die as a result.

8. Green travel plans are not anti-car or anti-business. Occasional changes can be made.

9. Car sharing works well but needs organisation

10. The Council has no green travel plan yet but it intends to develop one

11. Cycle lanes are put in for the sake of it because they are not used. Lanes cause

congestion.

12. While density on cycle lanes is low they are nevertheless used throughout the day.

13. Access into Oxford and Hillingdon Road is poor and can impact negatively upon Uxbridge

14. Park and ride around the Borough is agreeable by surrounding Boroughs. Needs to be

used for local people and not for those going into central London.

15. Provision for local workers. Parking is unaffordable.

16. Improve local stations as interchanges and improve links with other stations

17. People who live and work in the Borough should be prioritised

18. Transport for London has a lot to answer for. Several businesses contribute but do not

get enough in return from Transport for London. They do not want to discuss parking and

traffic issues with Hillingdon.

19. Reduce charges in Chimes and the Pavilions. May attract the community to park and

shop in the centres.

20. Planning decisions are causing problems

21. Building above stations

22. Car boot sales in South Bucks takes business away from Uxbridge

Accessibility

1. North-South connections in the Borough are poor and there and people are therefore forced

to use their cars. No bus link between South Ruislip and Uxbridge. Orbital routes are

required within and outside the Borough.

2. Integrated travelling throughout the Borough

Pedestrianisation

1. Pedestrianisation of Hayes is a partial solution. A one-way system could open the centre up.

A by-pass that is a car park. Joined up thinking.

2. Town centres need people not cars.

3. Key workers need parking to avoid getting fined

4. Weekend demand for parking

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5. Uxbridge is growing fast. It needs to be integrated. Rules should be set. Business move into

a safe and attractive place.

6. Quality of stations and bus services is poor

6 Key Issues

• Plan / strategy required for heavy vehicles (as to where they can go)

• Green Travel Plans should be produced by local businesses. Travel costs should be

built into salaries. Does this in fact happen?

• Parking is a major issue for customers

• Better enforcement of parking regulations; permit system - priority, controlled parking;

and park and ride

• Poor tube services to Uxbridge

• Linkages between the Counties (Slough – High Wycombe, improved interchange)

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BEHAVIOUR SUPPORT PLAN 2004-5 ITEM 7

SUMMARY

Contact Officer: Christine Sullivan

Telephone: 01895 256524

Section 527A of the Education Act, 1996 places a duty on LEAs to prepare a statement

setting out the arrangements for the education of children with behavioural difficulties, to be

known as a Behaviour Support Plan. The first plan was produced for 1 April 1999 to be

reviewed with a revised plan published by 1 April 2001. Thereafter it was intended that the

plans be of 3 year duration.

The government’s revised intention is for there to be one overarching education plan to

replace the Education Development Plan, Inclusion SEN Strategy and Behaviour Support

Plan to be known as the Single Education Plan (SEP). This will be phased in with all

authorities by 2007. Hillingdon is currently in the tranche to complete by 2006 but in the

interests of efficiency of planning has received agreement from the DfES to produce an early

SEP by January 2005.

Hence the Behaviour Support Plan, originally intended to be a 3 year plan will be for one

year only, from 2004-5. It has been written to dovetail with the Community Plan, EDP

activities, the Inclusion/ SEN Strategy Action Plan and the Child & Adolescent Mental Heath

Strategy Action Plan.

The DfES Improving Behaviour and Attendance Department has agreed that the plan be

simplified to meet local needs and recognises it is a transition plan. Nonetheless it has

requested that the Plan be submitted to the department by March 31 st 2004.

The Draft Behaviour Support Plan 2004-5 is attached at Appendix 1. The Plan has been

produced by a sub group of the Behaviour Forum, a multi-agency group whose terms of

reference include monitoring and reviewing the Behaviour Support Plan and providing a

mechanism for sharing and for coordinating planning relating to pupil behaviour across

relevant strategic groups. The Forum is well attended by Education (officers and

headteachers), Health, Social Services, Police and the Voluntary sector. Councillor Elaine

Webb is a regular attendee. The draft plan has also been sent to all schools and governing

bodies for comment.

This Plan attempts to find a coherent way forward relating to provision for children with

behaviour, emotional and social difficulties in a time of significant change and varied

initiatives promoted by the DfES. Such developments include the Key Stage 3 Strategy

Behaviour and Attendance Strand, the Primary Strategy Behaviour and Attendance pilot and

the roll out of the Behaviour Improvement Programme (BIP) to the Hillingdon Excellence

Cluster. In addition, the Green paper ‘Every Child Matters’ will result in national and local

changes in children’s services which will affect the implementation of this plan and future

planning for the SEP.

Key priorities in the Plan are to:

1. Review behaviour provision in Hillingdon.

2. Implement DfES strategies relating to behaviour and attendance.

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3. Develop a coherent database system to support pupils with behaviour,

emotional and social difficulties.

4. Develop multi-agency initiatives to improve identification and support systems

and target vulnerable pupils, improving their life chances.

5. Develop a coherent network of support for parents in managing their children.

6. Improve communication systems re behaviour initiatives.

7. Provide more effective options for pupils at risk if exclusion.

8. Promote emotional literacy within the authority to improve social inclusion and

raise attainment.

9. Develop early intervention initiatives with a proven evidence base for success.

10. Develop a whole system approach for children and young people with

behavioural, emotional and social difficulties.

11. Integrate and assimilate the CAMH strategy and Behaviour Support Pla.

12. Consider in depth other implications of the Green Paper, Every Child Matters,

for pupils with BESD and create an action plan.

13. Support the roll out of the Behaviour Improvement Programme (BIP) to the

Excellence Cluster.

The full Behaviour Support Plan is being circulated to Cabinet Members and

Group Leaders and copies are available for inspection in Party Group Offices.

Further copies are available on request to the Cabinet Office.

RECOMMENDATION

That Cabinet endorses the Draft Behaviour Support Plan 2004-5.

REASON FOR RECOMMENDATION

Officers have made this recommendation in order that LBH complies with the LEA duty to

ensure it has coherent, comprehensive and well understood local procedures for tackling

pupil behaviour and discipline problems that cover the full range of needs. It creates an

opportunity for review of local provision and strategic planning to promote more effective use

of resources.

A key aspect of the legislation is the requirement for LEAs to consult all the relevant interests

locally to promote more effective co-ordination. A list of consultees is on the report checklist

attached.

OPTIONS AVAILABLE

1. To approve the draft Behaviour Support Plan 2004-5 and require officers to

implement its actions when fully signed;

2. To suggest amendments as appropriate but taking into account the full

consultation that has taken place with resulting amendments.

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COMMENTS OF OVERVIEW AND SCRUTINY COMMITTEE

The Education Overview and Scrutiny Committee has not asked to comment on this

report.

INFORMATION

Legal

As the Report sets out, the preparation of a Behaviour Support Plan is a statutory

requirement placed on the LEA. The DfES has agreed to the LEA producing an early Single

Education Plan by next January. The proposed Draft Behaviour Support Plan will therefore

be for one year only and at the request of the DfES should be submitted to them by 31

March 2004. As such there are no legal implications arising from this Report.

Resource Implications:

The Behaviour Support Plan sets out how different funding streams are used to

deliver the aspirations in the plan, whether that be a retained budget, a devolved

budget or an external funding source. The plan does not seek additional funding, but

identifies priorities for how the existing funding is to be used.

The Behaviour Support Plan sets out the funding available in section 4.4. It also

comments on the role of funding for each of the key agencies and groups identified

in section 5.

BACKGROUND DOCUMENTS:

Circular 1/98, LEA Behaviour Support Plans, Statutory Guidance, March 1998

Behaviour Support Plans – Transitional arrangements, DfES communication,

October 2003

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HILLINGDON LEA/ DFES COMPACT ITEM 8

SUMMARY

Contact Officer: Michael Dennison

Telephone: 01895 277356

In July 2003 Charles Clarke, Secretary of State for Education and Skills, and Sir

Jeremy Beecham, Chair of the Local Government Association, signed a joint

Statement of Intent to working in partnership to achieve better educational outcomes

for children and young people. The statement sets out the shared vision for the

educational system, a commitment to genuine partnership working and the education

agenda for the coming academic years. It reflects the common understanding that

educational objectives can best be pursued through a strong and productive

relationship in which local authorities and the DfES support and respect each others’

contribution and work together on a shared agenda.

To implement the Statement of Intent locally, each local education authority and the

DfES will agree a Compact, setting out at a strategic level which of the authorities

priorities are of short and medium term importance within that authority. It is

expected that the local Compact will be signed by the Director and Lead Member for

Education, on behalf of the authority, and by the Schools’ Directorate Adviser, on

behalf of the DfES. This does not represent the signing of a new plan but rather the

commitment to a working relationship. An outline has, therefore, been drafted and

shared with the Adviser, as required by the DfES.

Since EYL and schools in Hillingdon are embarking on forging a new working

agreement which is aimed at defining the leadership and management of the

education service to meet future requirements, it is essential that schools are

engaged with and committed to the Compact the education authority signs with the

DfES. EYL held a major conference with headteachers at the end of January to

agree its future priorities for action. It was agreed with headteachers to incorporate

the DfES/LEA Compact within the programme for the conference. For this reason

Hillingdon has requested an extension before signing the Compact with the DfES.

This was granted.

The draft Compact is attached at Annex 1. The six key objectives reflect the priorities

identified from the audit of the Education Development Plan 2002/2007 [which has

previously been endorsed by Cabinet] and the Action Plan from the Vision and

Values Conference held in September 2002. These have been widely discussed and

agreed. The remaining elements were subject to further discussion and consultation

with schools at the January conference and were finalised immediately afterwards to

reflect fully the views of the headteachers.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That Cabinet:

1. Agrees the draft Compact attached at Annex 1.

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2. Requires officers to monitor the implementation of the Compact and

submit a further report on progress in December 2004.

REASONS FOR OFFICER RECOMMENDATION

Officers have made these recommendations in order that LBH complies with DfES

requirements for local education authorities to develop and sign Compacts to

achieve better educational outcomes for children and young people.

OPTIONS AVAILABLE

1. To approve the draft Hillingdon LEA/ DfES Compact and require officers and

advisers to implement its actions when finally signed;

2. To suggest additional or alternative actions they would wish officers and

advisers to implement.

COMMENTS OF OVERVIEW AND SCRUTINY COMMITTEE

Because of the tight timescale for the creation, consultation and signing of the

Compact, it has not been possible to include it on the agenda for the Education

Overview and Scrutiny Committee.

INFORMATION

Hillingdon/DFES Compact

1. During the Autumn 2003, each LEA had the opportunity to agree an individual

Compact with the DfES setting out how they will work together, including the effort

and resources each will commit to the local priorities requiring the most immediate

attention. It is intended that this Compact will set out the LEA’s priorities for action

over the next 18 months i.e. for the remainder of the current academic year and

2004-5.

2. DfES conferences were held in October to inform LEAs about the scope and

expectations of Compacts. In addition, a meeting has been held between the EYL

Corporate Director, EYL Lead Member, and the DfES Adviser with the Schools

Directorate. Since EYL and schools in Hillingdon are embarking on forging a new

working agreement for the education service, it is essential that schools were fully

engaged with and committed to the Compact the education authority signs with the

DfES. EYL held a major conference with headteachers at the end of January to

agree its future priorities for action. It was agreed with headteachers to incorporate

the DfES/LEA Compact within the programme. For this reason an extension before

finally signing the Compact with the DfES was agreed with DfES.

3. The key priorities for the local education authority over the next 18 months are

set out as 6 objectives. The first 4 reflect the priorities already identified in EDP 2:

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• Inclusion through achievement – all schools

• Inclusion through achievement – primary age pupils

• Inclusion through achievement –secondary age pupils

• Leading and managing learning.

4. The other 2 objectives arose from the Action Plan from the Vision and Values

Conference held in September 2002:

• Mapping and managing diversity, excellence and choice; Building Schools for

the future

• Strategic Planning, collaboration and Best Value.

LEGAL

This report sets out the LEA’s continuing obligations to further the aim of school

improvement and there are no legal implications arising from this report.

RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS:

The Compact identifies what the LEA's priorities are and where resources will be

targeted to support those priorities. It does not seek additional resources and, to that

extent, there are no resource implications.

BACKGROUND DOCUMENTS

DfES Guidelines for CEOs and Executive Members for Education and LEA Staff:

“Compacts – Partnerships working to deliver shared priorities” 15/08/2003

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LONDON BOROUGH OF HILLINGDON

LEA/DfES COMPACT

2004-05

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HILLINGDON EDUCATION SERVICE & DFES COMPACT

Hillingdon’s Compact with the DfES is set in the context of the Community Plan priorities, the Council’s corporate values and themes, the

‘Education, Youth and Leisure priorities, the EDP2, Hillingdon Schools’ Improvement Plans and other related LEA statutory and service plans.

Linked plans are identified in an appendix to this document. Relevant references to the Council’s Themes and Objectives are included in the

Compact to indicate where contributions are being made. The Compact also takes account of the development of a Single Education Plan,

proposed for 2005.

This Compact comprises a shared agreement between the London Borough of Hillingdon and the DfES to work in partnership to achieve

better educational outcomes for children and young people according to the National Statement of Intent for Partnership Working. Key, shared

priorities are identified for the period from April 2004 to March 2005.

The following 6 Priority Objectives in this Compact have been developed in close collaboration with LBH Elected Members, headteachers and

representative governors.

1. Inclusion through achievement: all pupils

2. Inclusion through achievement: primary age pupils

3. Inclusion through achievement: secondary age pupils

4. Leading & managing learning

5. Responding to diversity and providing excellence

6. Strategic Planning, Collaboration, Building Schools for the Future & Best Value.

These 6 Key Objectives have been subject to wide and effective consultation. Importantly, they were considered and the Key Actions

developed further at the LEA’s partnership conference, ‘Remodelling Hillingdon’s Education Service’, that took place in January 2004. They

coincide closely with the Director’s vision for schools, set out at the same conference. At this conference, the Priority Objectives were

endorsed and specific activities were agreed, to be implemented through the EDP2, EYL Service and Team Plans. Targets are linked and

referenced to statutory and other plans.

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Priority

Objectives

HILLINGDON EDUCATION SERVICE & DfES COMPACT 2004/05

Hillingdon Targets and

Outcomes

Hillingdon Key Actions DfES Contribution Council and

Community Plan

Priorities

1.

Inclusion

through

Achievement:

all pupils

Targets Ref

EDP2 targets

Inclusion/SEN

Strategy

Data Sharing

Protocol [IRT]

Behaviour

Support Plan

Local PSA

School

Improvement

Plans

1a.

Establish effective cross- service/

inter agency structures to focus on

the needs of all children.

1b.

Meet EDP2 Priority 3 objective to

provide effective education for all

pupils, particularly those identified

as most vulnerable and those at

risk of underachieving.

Implement effective strategies to improve the

delivery of Children’s' Services across

Education, Youth & Leisure (EYL), Social

Services, Health and the Voluntary Sector

Implement the Hillingdon Inclusion/SEN

Strategy by establishing partnerships of

schools, developing shared specialist

provision and tackling exclusion together.

Implement BSP actions aimed at improving

behaviour and reducing exclusions, linked to

Managed Moves initiative.

Develop the use of pupil performance data

with and across schools, at senior and

middle management levels.

Guidance following

legislation from Green

Paper ‘Every Child Matters’

Support funding through

the Vulnerable Pupils'

grant.

Continued advice, support

and Standards Fund

through BIP, BSP and IRT

programmes

Learning & Culture

Learning & Culture

1c.

Improve the SEN provision and

funding stream by minimising

statements and out-Borough SEN

provision and deploy budgets

locally

1d.

Introduce single IRT structure for

children across LBH services and

Health

Implement the Hillingdon Inclusion/SEN

Strategy. Review partnerships and clusters of

schools to share specialist provision

effectively and reduce exclusions.

Implement the actions from the agreed Data

Sharing Protocol [draft Dec.2003], which

provides guidance and responsibilities for

partner organisations

Provide support, advice,

guidance and share

examples of effective

practice, including with the

West London project

review of SEN Transport

funding. (Current activity

with DfES)

Remove current legislative

barriers for the effective

sharing of pupil-level

information across services

and agencies, as proposed

in the Green Paper.

Learning & Culture

Learning & Culture

PART I – MEMBERS & PUBLIC (INCLUDING THE PRESS)

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Priority

Objectives

Hillingdon LEA Targets and

Outcomes

Hillingdon LEA Key Actions DfES Contribution Council and

Community Plan

Priorities

2.

Inclusion

through

Achievement:

primary age

pupils

Targets Ref.

EDP2 targets

Incl. No

schools in

OfSTED/LEA

categories

Inclusion/SEN

Strategy

EYDCP

targets

Local PSA

2a.

Improve performance of all children

by at least two-thirds of a level

each year [equivalent % ] ,

particularly LAC and other

Underachieving Groups identified

in EDP2 (2002 - 2007) at Key

Stages 1 & 2

2b.

Improve performance of

LAC/EOTAS, G&T & SEN groups

of pupils at the end of Foundation

Stage and Key Stages 1 & 2

(including P level performance)

2c.

Continue to improve standards

and provision for literacy,

numeracy and ICT for all pupils in

nursery and primary schools and

achieve LEA KS2 targets for

2004/5.

Ensure that pupils in all Hillingdon

primary schools are making good

progress.

Publish, analyse and monitor data on the

performance of underachieving groups.

Work with schools to develop and track the

impact of targeted and effective teaching and

learning strategies to improve the attainment

of underachieving groups and share good

practice

Support the development of the EiC Cluster

across Standards and Inclusion Services

Targeted work with schools, groups and

clusters of schools to develop and share

effective ways of increasing the achievement

of children looked after, gifted and talented

and with SEN.

Clarify Hillingdon’s Primary Strategy and

service provision.

Develop a Primary curriculum entitlement,

reference to “Excellence and Enjoyment” to

incorporating creativity, and citizenship

Develop the use of pupil performance data in

schools so that all make effective use of

pupil-level information in order to drive up

standards.

Advice and support on the

use and development of

data with school senior and

middle managers, including

use of PAT.

Brokering networks to

develop and share

effective strategies,

particularly relating to key

underachieving groups

(SDA)

Maintain EiC Cluster

funding for the contractual

period

Support networking and

sharing of good practice

across London LEAs

(SDA)

Maintain Standards Funds

for the Primary Strategy

and NGfL, and support

developments with the

‘Excellence & Enjoyment’

Strategy.

Regional director

infrastructure provides

continuing and flexible

programmes according to

agreed profile of need (RD)

Learning & Culture

Learning & Culture

Learning & Culture

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Priority

Objectives

School

Improvement

Plans

Hillingdon LEA Targets and

Outcomes

Ensure those schools in

challenging circumstances are

achieving at least to the level of

"floor targets" and none is in

OfSTED categories or causing

concern.

Hillingdon LEA Key Actions DfES Contribution Council and

Community Plan

Priorities

Expand programmes to support senior and

middle management development in line with

London Challenge and NCSL initiatives.

2d.

Further improve standards and

quality of provision in Early Years

Maintain and embed Early Years strategy as

set out in the EYDCP and EDP2.

Foundation stage profile to have compatibility

with P levels to inform targets, track and

measure attainment into KS1

Provide guidance,

materials and examples of

good practice

Learning & Culture

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Priority

Objectives

Hillingdon LEA Targets and

Outcomes

Hillingdon LEA Key Actions

DfES

Contribution

Council and Community

Plan

Priorities

3.

Inclusion

through

Achievement:

secondary

age pupils

Targets Ref.

EDP2 Targets

No schools

below the floor

target

3a.

Improve standards and quality of

education at all levels at KS3 and

achieve local PSA "stretch targets"

for 2005

Work with and across schools to target

support through the Key Stage 3 strategy

development and NGfL teams.

Implement effective recruitment and retention

teachers linked to the TTA initiatives to

support recruitment and NRT support for

Remodelling West London.

Establish KS2–3 Transition project to ensure

consistency of teaching and assessment for

learning.

Develop the use of pupil performance data in

schools so that all make effective use of pupillevel

information in order to drive up

standards.

Maintain Standards

Funds for KS3 and

NGfL.

Regional director

infrastructure

provides continuing

and flexible

programmes

according to agreed

profile of need.(RD)

Advice and support

on the use and

development of the

London Schools

Family data (London

Challenge).

Learning & Culture

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Priority

Objectives

Hillingdon LEA Targets and

Outcomes

Hillingdon LEA Key Actions DfES Contribution Council and

Community Plan

Priorities

No schools in

OfSTED/LEA

categories

causing

concern

Local PSA

BSP

14-19 Strategy

School

Improvement

Plans

3b.

Ensure that all Hillingdon secondary

schools are making good progress.

Ensure those in challenging

circumstances are achieving at

least to the level of "floor targets"

and none is in OfSTED categories

or causing concern.

Standards and Inclusion services to provide

targeted support to secondary schools below

or near "floor targets" and/or in Amber or Red

categories and focused support for school

senior and middle management with schools.

Build on the good practice and effective

management in Hillingdon secondary schools

[Beacon, Leading Edge, Specialist, Training

College, City Academy etc] to share good

practice and drive up standards.

Expand programmes to support senior and

middle management development in line with

London Challenge and NCSL initiatives

Work in close liaison with

the LEA and link with LEA

strategy, to provide

continued and well coordinated

support and

funding from LIG,

Academies, EiC,

Excellence in Cities and

London Challenge Advisers

and developments.

Use of NRT to support local

development of

Remodelling Strategy.

Support and monitor

progress (SDA.)

Learning & Culture

3c.

Improve advice and guidance for

young people and reduce NEETs

by 10% by 2005

Develop 14 -19 strategy aimed at enhancing

curriculum provision, increasing access and

participation and raising standards

Support for developing Pan

London links and vocational

options through the LSC

(London Challenge)

Learning & Culture

3d.

Develop student voice and active

citizenship in line with London

Challenge priorities

Expand and enhance the Healthy Hillingdon

Schools programme to focus on the

development of School Councils and the

active engagement of students.

Opportunities through the

London Challenge.

Learning & Culture

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Priority

Objectives

Hillingdon LEA Targets and

Outcomes

Hillingdon LEA Key Actions DfES Contribution Council and

Community Plan

Priorities

4.

Leading &

Managing

Learning

Targets Ref.

4a.

Establish Hillingdon Curriculum

Entitlement for each Key Stage to

incorporate ‘Excellence and

Enjoyment’, Citizenship etc.

Review curriculum documents to incorporate

breadth, balance, innovation, creativity,

Citizenship.

Develop a targeted CPD programme to

integrate the new curriculum at each Key

Stage.

Advice and guidance from

relevant DfES curriculum

strategy teams.

Support and monitor

progress (SDA).

Learning & Culture

EDP2 targets

HGfL Strategy

WRS Action

Plan

4b.

Continue to develop and improve

school leadership and management

so that 80% of schools’ leadership

and management are good or

better.

Develop a cohesive programme for Middle

Management development, based on Leading

from the Middle.

Expand and enhance programmes to support

senior and middle management development

in line with London Challenge and NCSL

initiatives.

Maintain support through

LIG, Primary Leadership

Programme, training and

funding, London Challenge

& Academy Adviser support

and develop CPD through

London Leadership Centre

Encourage continuous

improvement culture

Recruitment

Strategy

4c.

Develop and enhance the

curriculum through ICT and

opportunities offered through

broadband technology.

Focus on programmes to improve induction,

mentoring and CPD – with schools as

providers.

Establish and embed the benefits of HGfL and

provide effective joint management with

schools.

Maintain funding for NGfL

development and provide

on-line assessment for ICT

Provide guidance, material

and good practice networks

Learning & Culture

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Priority

Objectives

Hillingdon LEA Targets and

Outcomes

Hillingdon LEA Key Actions DfES Contribution Council and

Community Plan

Priorities

4d.

Recruit, retain and maintain the

provision of high quality staff and

governors

Maintain and expand the programmes for

R&R at local level, to build on the ALCEO

initiatives.

Workforce Remodelling Strategy (WRS)

implemented, developed and monitored.

Maintain DfES funding for

WRS and links with

TTA funding for RSM

function (NRT)

Retain and recruit high

performing people

Develop a strategy to recruit governors and

improve the quality and effectiveness of

governing bodies.

4e.

Embed effective self-evaluation

and Performance Management in

schools and the LEA

Enhance the Annual School Review for all

schools to emphasise the supported selfevaluation

element and enabling schools to

work towards the OfSTED S4.

Support for the

development of selfevaluation

and monitor the

impact. (SDA)

Manage performance for

improvement

Support and promote effective Performance

Management through programmes for staff

and governors.

Establish the National Standards for School

Improvement Services as the basis for service

specification with schools.

Develop the Annual School Review to further

enhance the role of school leaders.

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Priority

Objectives

Hillingdon LEA Targets and

Outcomes

Hillingdon LEA Key Actions DfES Contribution Council and

Community Plan

Priorities

5.

Responding

to diversity

and providing

excellence

Targets Ref.

EDP2 targets

School

Organisation

Plan

Community

Plan

5a.

Strategy jointly agreed with

Hillingdon schools for promoting

and disseminating excellence and

diversity

5b.

Develop the community dimension

of schools including extended

schools and full service schools

Support and promote applications for

Specialist status, Leading Edge, Chartermark,

IiP, Achievement Awards, Curriculum Awards,

etc and develop City Academies, as

appropriate.

Exploit and build on the effective extended

schools practice in some schools to develop

pilot programmes with LBH through the

extended & full service schools programme,

developing aspects identified in the Green

Paper ‘Every Child Matters’ regarding

provision of local community services .

Advice and guidance from

Specialist College, Leading

Edge and Academies

teams.

Advice and support with

Support and monitor

progress (SDA).

Advice and guidance from

extended and full services

schools teams and on

developing full service

provision and community

service provision as an

integral part of raising

achievement, increasing

inclusion and lifelong

learning.

Learning & Culture

Working in partnership with

community and partners

5c.

Establish effective sharing of good

practice across partnerships and

phases.

Develop and implement strategy from the

January 2004 ‘Remodelling Hillingdon’s

Education Service’ conference between the

LEA, school headteachers and representative

governors.

Monitoring of progress

(SDA).

Support through London

Challenge and DfES

collaborative networking

projects and developments,

good practice websites,

publications and materials.

(e.g. LIG, Federations,

Innovations Unit)

Learning & Culture

Working in partnership with

community and partners

Support and monitoring

(SDA)

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Priority

Objectives

Hillingdon LEA Targets and

Outcomes

Hillingdon LEA Key Actions DfES Contribution Council and

Community Plan

Priorities

6.

Strategic

Planning,

Collaboration,

Building

Schools for

the Future

and Best

Value

Targets Ref.

Corporate

Plan/CPA Plan

Milestones

EDP Targets

for

development

of SEP

Post Ofsted

Action Plan

6a.

Improved CPA rating to achieve 3*

rating for Education by 2005

Schools improve by 1 grade for

VFM on re-inspection by OfSTED

6b.

Improve Strategic Planning rating

in Audit Commission Annual Survey

of Schools into next quartile by

2005

6c.

Review the mechanisms for

decision-making and

communication with schools to

improve the level of joint leadership

6d.

Hillingdon schools to engage in the

development and enhancement of

partnerships by 2005.

6e.

Rationalise and refocus the

‘Education, Youth and Leisure’

services planning through the

development of the SEP

LEA will develop its planning and consultation

procedures

Develop rigorous and systematic selfevaluation

against the Ofsted LEA Inspection

JRSs.

Implement Action Plan from Headteacher

Conference [January 2004] to review the

Strategic Advisory Groups and reduce the

number of standing groups involving

headteachers.

Implement recommendations from Hillingdon

Collaboration Project (Mouchel) as agreed

with HTs at the January 2004 Conference

Reduce number of meetings and improve

quality of decision-making and

communication.

Audit existing clusters and partnerships and

ensure all schools have access to

collaborative support in line with SIP priorities;

develop and disseminate the work with all

schools through the Hillingdon

Collaboration[Mouchel] Project.

Draft SEP across all EYL Services to ensure

greater coherence of planning

Advice and guidance from

relevant DfES teams.

Advice and monitoring of

progress ( SDA.)

Advice and monitoring of

progress (SDA).

Support and monitor

progress (SDA).

Publish good practice

networks on learning

partnerships on the web

Support and monitor

progress (SDA).

Use SEP website and

examples of good practice

to inform development of

SEP.

SDA and SEP policy team

support for endorsement

Provide excellent services

to community and

customers;

Manage finance and

assets effectively

Encourage continuous

improvement culture

Plan and prioritise

effectively

Working in partnership with

community and partners

Modernise Council

processes

Plan and prioritise

effectively

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REVIEW OF WELFARE MEALS SERVICE, MEALS

IN THE HOME, DINING CENTRE, DAY CENTRE

MEALS AND CIVIC CENTRE BANQUETING

SERVICE

ITEM 9

Contact Officers: Jeremy Ambache/Steve Smith

Telephone: 01895 27727401895 250518

SUMMARY

This report sets out the progress made since the last report to Cabinet on 18 th

December 2003.

Following the recommendations from Cabinet, to explore Options 3a and 3b, Officers

have set out a programme to market test ‘Meals in the Home Services’ and

Banqueting Services.

RECOMMENDATION

That Members note the progress made in market testing the meals and

banqueting services.

REASON FOR RECOMMENDATION

The Cabinet requested an update to be presented to this meeting.

OPTIONS AVAILABLE

None at this stage

COMMENTS OF OVERVIEW & SCRUTINY COMMITTEE

The Committee has not asked to comment on the report.

INFORMATION

1. A project group (comprising managers of the services, commissioning and

procurement staff), has been set up to meet the requirements of the market testing.

2. To ensure compliance with European legislation an advertisement was placed in

the Official Journal of the European Union in February and notification of our

intentions to market test was placed in both the local and trade press.

3. In accordance with legislation 37 days is required for this purpose and for

expressions of interest to made back to the London Borough of Hillingdon. All

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Cabinet Reports - 4 th March 2003 Page 150


expressions of interest are due to be returned to the Council by 23 rd March 2004. An

evaluation of the questionnaire responses will then be made.

4. An invitation to tender will be made to suitable contractors and they will be

provided with the specification and contract conditions. This is planned to

commence in April 2004, and tenders will be returned to the authority by the end of

May 2004.

5. A panel will then be set up to evaluate the tenders. Suitable companies will be

interviewed and invited to present their proposals to the Council. Information in

respect of the outcome of the tender evaluation exercise will then be reported to

Cabinet in September 2004. This will include an assessment of the TUPE

implications.

6. It is proposed that a three-year contract, commencing in January 2005, with an

option to extend is sought.

CORPORATE CONSULTATIONS CARRIED OUT

Legal Implications

7. The various stages of the procurement process are outlined in the body of the

report. At this stage, there is nothing further that can be added by way of legal

comments.

Finance Implications

8. There are no financial implications from this report. Social Services’ Procurement

Manager is involved in the project team and will ensure that the prescribed format for

responses to the Invitation to Tender will enable all bids to be evaluated on a

consistent basis.

BACKGROUND DOCUMENTS

Report to Cabinet 18 th December 2003

Meals Review Committee Report to Social Services 19 th March 2002

Report on Asha Day Centre Users Petition 13 th September 2001

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EARLY YEARS DEVELOPMENT AND CHILDCARE

PARTNERSHIP IMPLEMENTATION PLAN 2004/05

ITEM 10

Contact Officer: Roger Turner/Alison Booth

Telephone: 01895 250789/01895 277348

SUMMARY

The Hillingdon Early Years Development and Childcare Partnership (EYDCP) has

been working together on the 2004-06 Early Years Development and Childcare

Partnership Implementation Plan. Three years ago the Government (DfES/Sure

Start) and Members approved fully the EYDCP strategic Plan 2001-04 and this time

last year the Implementation Plan for 2003-04 received full approval. The current

Implementation Plan has been guiding the work of the Partnership and considerable

progress has been achieved during the last year. Although Sure Start no longer

require submission of a Plan, they have specified a number of priority areas for the

focus of the EYDCP’s work during the 2 years 2004-06. This plan is a 2 year plan, to

run parallel with the 2 year funding allocation for 2004-06 that has already been

agreed with the Sure Start Unit. This report, together with the Implementation Plan,

provides Members with the details contained in the new plan for its consideration.

A full copy of the Plan is available to any Member who wishes to access a copy.

RECOMMENDATION:

That members:

1. Note the achievements made in response to the targets set out in the

current Plan (03-04);

2. Approve the proposals set out in the new Plan (04-06);

REASONS FOR OFFICER RECOMMENDATION

To ensure that the Partnership contributes appropriately and strategically to national

and local targets to ensure high quality childcare and early education provision in

Hillingdon and thus the continuance of £3.1M external funding from Sure Start for

2004-06.

OPTIONS

1. To approve the plan for 2004-06;

2. To approve the plan for 2004-06, with modifications

3. To not approve the plan for 2004-06. Were this option to be considered the

EYDCP would be unable to drawn down funding from the Government.

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COMMENTS OF OVERVIEW AND SCRUTINY COMMITTEE

Education, Libraries and Arts Overview and Scrutiny Committee have provided no

comments.

INFORMATION

1. During 2003-04 the DfES/Sure Start required the EYDCP to set targets in 14

areas in its Implementation Plan for 2003-04. All of these areas of working are

reflected in the 2004-06 plan that follows the same format as the Sure Start Delivery

Guidance 2004-2006.

Free Early Education for 3 Year Olds

2. Through partnership between maintained school nursery places, day nurseries,

playgroups and independent schools Hillingdon has established a position of

providing free early education for all three year-old children who live, and are

educated, within Hillingdon borders. This resulted in an early achievement of the

Sure Start target to provide universal provision by eighteen months.

3. The School Standards and Framework Act has placed a duty on local authorities

to provide free early education for all four year-old children at point of delivery from

1998. This Act has now been extended to include all three year-old children.

Funding for this element of education will be within the Education Formula Funding

from April 2004.

Expansion of Childcare Places

4. Despite substantial barriers to the attainment of the targets set in the 2001-04

strategic plan, for example:-

• Change of national regulator (OfSTED) and to national regulations (Care

Standards);

• Lack of suitable premises;

• National shortage of suitably qualified workers.

5. Good progress has been made towards the target for 03-04 and, in the 9 months

to December 2003, 70% of the target for the creation of childcare places has been

achieved. Comparison between target and actual performance over 3 and 1 year

are as follows:-

Area of expansion

Revised

target

01-04

Actual

performance

01-Dec 03

Target

2003-04

Performance Apr

03-Dec 03

Out of School

985 798 370 183

childcare

Pre-school childcare 444 543 152 186

Childminding places 1471 1203 579 311

Total 2900 2544 1101 739

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6. Funding of £72,000 has been secured to help providers towards the cost of

starting up new schemes. Expressions of interest in bidding for the funding resulted

in 3 responses and funding is likely to be given to providers starting clubs at Colham

Manor, Hayes Park Primary and Charville Schools.

Recruitment

7. 2 fundays have been held in Harefield and Northwood to which over 2,000

parents and children attended. The events resulted in increased interest in

childminding and working in the early years and childcare sector. In total, 169

people have expressed a strong interest in working in the sector since April 2003.

8. The EYDCP will continue to offer a startup package of £100 to all newlyregistering

childminders.

Training

9. The strategic target for 2003-04 is for 400 childcare workers to receive

qualifications based training. This has been exceeded and 547 childcare workers

have accessed qualifications based training funded through the Childcare Grant and

European Social Funding. The strategic target for a total of 1,200 workers to receive

training by 2004 has been met and exceeded by 2003. The target for 2004-05

reflects the increased demand for training and has been raised to 250 workers to be

75% funded for level 2 and level 3 courses and to provide 375 non-qualifications

childcare training places. The target is the same for 2005-06.

10. The strategic target for 2003-04 is to provide the equivalent of four days training

per Foundation Stage practitioner (staff in school nurseries, playgroups, day

nurseries and independent schools) during the year. This target was reached

through the provision of over seventy short courses. From April 2003 to February

2004, 733 practitioners had attended the training events that have been provided.

The course programme has been funded through European Social Funding and a

direct grant from the DfES. The EYDCP is required to provide this level of

Foundation Stage training over the next two years. DfES funding will be available to

support the coming training programmes.

11. The EYDCP were required to deliver the equivalent of 3 days training per setting

Special Education Needs Coordinator (SENCO) over the last 3 years (2001-2004).

The implementation of this target was to provide one days training per setting

SENCO in each of the three years. This was achieved this year through the

provision of approximately eighteen training events, and last year included modular

SENCO courses that will hopefully be accredited in the spring of 2004. From April

2003 to February 2004 185 participants have attended the 18 courses that have

been provided. This year’s course programme has been funded through a direct

DfES grant. Funding for training will be continued for the next two years.

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Quality in Early Education

12. Grants have been paid to childminders, all full daycare, sessional and out of

school providers to enable them to purchase and renew equipment to raise quality

throughout the sector. A quality childminding network is being developed in

collaboration with Sure Start in Hayes and it is hoped that this will receive

accreditation by Spring 2004.

13. The Partnership have made good progress in the promotion of quality

accreditation schemes and 1 provider has attained accreditation and an additional 23

providers have been recruited this year making a total of 40 providers and

childminders who are now fully or part funded to work towards quality accreditation.

The target for 15% of providers (20) to be working towards QA accreditation set for

2003-04 has been exceeded by 13. Support groups and workshops have been

established to support providers through the process and staff in the Partnership

have received training to enable them to provider mentoring support.

14. As of February 2004 there will be a team of 3.5 Early Years Advisory Teachers,

working alongside the LEA Early Years Adviser, to support the development of

quality within early education provision in all sectors catering for the education of

children between the ages of three and five years. This development is supported

through in-setting support, pre and post OfSTED inspection support and

dissemination of good practice through twinning schools and non-maintained

providers, arranging visits to settings with recognised good practice, good practice

guidelines and newsletters.

15. During the autumn term of 2003 the Early Years Team provided support to

ninety-nine settings to develop a wide range of aspects of Foundation Stage

education. The twinning initiative now twins a total of ten schools and thirty settings

and with the implementation of the visits initiative it is hoped that the dissemination of

good practice and partnership working will continue to be enhanced.

Special Educational Needs and Equal Opportunities

16. With the recruitment of two Inclusion Facilitators, to work in partnership with the

Inclusion Advisers recruited in 2003, the target of providing practitioner and SENCO

support to all non-maintained Foundation Stage settings on a ratio of one to twenty,

has been achieved. The Inclusion Team provides support to practitioners to enable

them to cater for children’s individual and significant needs. They also support

providers to develop inclusive practice and effective policies including those

regarding children with special educational needs and those learning English as an

additional language.

17. During the autumn term of 2003 the Inclusion Team supported thirty settings in

developing practice to cater for individual children’s needs alongside supporting eight

children transferring from non-maintained settings to school provision. The Inclusion

Team are also in the process of developing a “Behaviour Pack” that will support

practitioners in developing positive behaviour strategies that will ensure children’s

positive self-image is maintained

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18. The Children’s Information Service has expanded its outreach programme and

attended 32 outreach events, of which 14 were targeted at hard to reach groups.

19. A Directory of Children’s Services is currently being compiled in collaboration

with the Hillingdon Association of Voluntary Services, Social Services, Education and

Health. Funding of just under £8,000 for the next 2 years for the continuation of this

project has been obtained from the Children’s Fund.

FINANCE

20. The plan is mainly concerned about the priorities for spending secured levels of

funding, whether that be base budget or external grant. In two regards, however,

additional budget will be required for 2004/05 and this is being considered as part of

the EYL budget overall and the Schools Budget in particular.

21. The policy of providing free early education for 3 Year Olds will have a cost in

2004/05 which is calculated to be £85k more than the rolled forward budget. Also,

the operation of the 3 Early Years Centres may cause budget pressures of up to

£173k. Both of items fall within the Schools Budget and are included in the

calculation for passporting the increase in the Formula Spending Share for Schools.

22. The funding for this is to be considered as part of the report to Cabinet on Fair

Funding arrangements for schools in 2004/05.

LEGAL

23. There are no legal implications arising from this Report.

EXTERNAL CONSULTATIONS CARRIED OUT

Employment Service

Children’s Fund

Sure Start

Neighbourhood Nursery

Parents

Providers of early education and childcare

BACKGROUND DOCUMENTS

Nil

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REVENUE BUDGET 2003/04 MONTHLY

MONITORING REPORT MONTH 9 (DECEMBER

2003)

ITEM 11

Contact Officer: Paul Whaymand

Telephone: 01895 556074

INTRODUCTION

This report sets out the overall financial position of the authority as forecast at the

end of month 9 of 2003/04 (December 2003). It shows separately the forecast yearend

position on Directorates’ Budgets, centrally managed Corporate Budgets and

the overall position in relation to the General Fund and surplus balances. The report

also includes reports of Corporate Directors commenting on the forecast year-end

position on their budgets and on any significant budget pressures during the year

and actions taken to mitigate their effect. The previous report to Cabinet in February

covered the forecast position as at month 8 (November).

This report provides a strategic summary of financial performance to date. It reflects

the budget monitoring and management within Directorates. More detailed

information for individual Directorates is available from Heads of Finance.

SUMMARY

This report on revenue monitoring as at Month 9, December 2003, shows that

forecast net expenditure for the year is £829k lower than the budget, leading to

£1.829m being added to balances as opposed to the £1m budgeted. This is an

improvement of £101k compared to the month 8 projected underspend of £728k.

This change has been generated by a £101k improvement in the forecasts across

Directorates. The main factor in the improved position within the Directorate spend is

an improvement of £173k in the projected overspend for Housing Benefits.

The current forecast assumes that the Development Contingency is fully utilised. At

present £703k is uncommitted – of this, it is anticipated that up to £120k could be

required to support the HIP programme, leaving a balance of £583k which could be

added to balances.

The forecasts for month 9 exclude £1.25m of additional costs relating to the Asylum

Judicial Review. It has been assumed that this sum will be recoverable from central

government, as have £1.9m of overhead costs relating to the Asylum Seeker Service

in the year.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That Cabinet notes the improved position of the revenue budget and agrees to

officers continuing to take appropriate actions to ensure the budgeted revenue

surplus for the current year is achieved.

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REASONS FOR OFFICER RECOMMENDATION

To achieve the Council’s expected surplus in line with the approved budget.

EXPENDITURE FORECASTS

Directorates’ Forecast Expenditure

1. Table 1 shows Budget, Forecast and Variance at Directorate level now reported

and the total position on the Directorates’ budgets

Table 1

2003/04

Original

Budget

Budget

changes

(Note 1)

2003/04

Current

Budget

(as at

Month 9)

Directorate 2003/04

Forecast

(as at

Month 9)

Variances (+=Extra spend or

Less Income )/() indicate less

costs or greater income

Variance

(As at

Month 9)

Variance Variance

(as at (as at

Month 8) Month

6)

£000 £000 £000 £000 £000 £000 £000

Education Youth &

141,134 6,055 147,189 Leisure 147,189 0 0 0

68,211 3,442 71,653 Social Services 71,668 +15 (23) (2)

27,835 1,413 29,248 Environment 29,360 +112 +106 +140

8,219 635 8,854 Housing 8,272 (582) (456) (148)

11,855 290 12,145 Central Services 10,931 (1,214) (1,195) (62)

32,632 -

Capital charges (all

32,632 Services – Note 2) 32,632 0 0 0

Directorates'

289,886 11,835 301,721 Expenditure 300,052 (1,669) (1,568) (72)

Note 1

“Budget Changes” incorporates allocations from the inflation provision and the

Development and Risk Contingency which are further detailed in paragraphs 64 and

65 respectively.

The changes also reflect budget transfers between Directorates to accommodate:

• Allocation of £300k savings target agreed at council budget meeting, Pro-rata

across all services.

• Central services charges allocation of £806k directly to relevant units.

• Centralising of payment staff from Directorates - £75k (EYL & ESG)

• Allocation of £400k of corporate provision for increased employer’s pension

contributions.

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• £5k virement to Education from Central Services for town twinning.

Note 2

In Table 1 above, capital charges have been removed from Directorate budgets and

shown separately to focus on the budget quantum which is within each Directorate’s

control.

2. The budgetary position for each Directorate is as follows:

Education Youth & Leisure (EYL):

3. EYL is projecting a £120k overspend on a number of budget heads as

summarised below, with an expectation that they will be contained within the

approved budget. This represents a £14k net improvement on the month 8 position

before compensating savings:

Forecast

month 9

£’000

Change from

month 8

£’000

Finance & Resources +228 +143

Standards and Inclusion (245) (123)

Lifelong learning +30 (30)

Cultural Services +107 (4)

Compensating Savings (120) +14

Overall 0 0

Finance and Resources: - £228k Overspend

4. There are three areas of pressure in this budget. The first is in Premature

Retirement Compensation, where current known commitments will result in an

overspend of £162k (£137k worsening on £25k reported in month 8). The additional

costs appear to be in the Teachers Pension Agency liability and some improvements

need to be made to the way in which this aspect of the budget is forecasted in future.

The second is in the Finance Team where recruitment difficulties have required the

use of agency staff, currently estimated to cost in the region of £45k (£15k increase

from £30k reported in month 8). The third relates to bills for legal costs, where LBH

has either lost cases or has settled out of court (c£21k). This represents an

improvement of £9k on the month 8 position.

5. In the event of vacancy management across the group not producing savings to

cover these pressures, the fall-back position would be to assess the scope to use or

re-phase spending on asset management planning reports and the next stage of

consultancy work for Ruislip High School PFI. In the event of these not being

achievable, an overspend would result.

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Standards and Inclusion :- £245k Underspend

6. After virements from central Standards Fund budgets to support SEN budgets

and finalisation of prior year inter-authority liabilities for SEN, the SEN position is

now forecasting an underspend of £111k (£11k worsening on the £122k reported in

month 8). These forecasts include assumptions about new SEN placements. A

review of SEN support services budgets has identified underspends of £133k in

staffing budgets that were not forecast in previous months. These underspends arise

due to failure to fill posts, where previously it was assumed that they would be filled,

for Pupil & Family Support (£73) and Learning and Support Services (£60).

Lifelong Learning: £30k Overspend

7. The Early Years and Childcare team has identified budget pressures (£130k), due

to underachievement of income targets (principally) in the three Early Years Centres,

which transferred from Social Services on 1st April 2003 . These budgets are

regarded as high risk and are being considered each month. There are some

offsetting savings within the Early Years Team and these will reduce the overspend

for the team to between £50k and £100k. Overall projected position is a £30k

improvement on that forecast on month 8.

8. EYL officers are looking to identify strategies for ensuring that, in the longer term,

these facilities operate within their approved budget. This is unlikely to produce a

balance in 2003/04. Officers have sought some support from the Council's

Contingency Budget, which earmarked up to £40k of funding in the event of the Early

Years Centres being unable to meet income targets. Other opportunities for savings

in this area are modest and an overspend may be inevitable.

Cultural Services: £107k Overspend

9. Cost pressures and income shortfall at Hayes Pool (£90k) and a mixture of

pressures and savings elsewhere in the Leisure budget (ie projected income shortfall

of £11k at Cwm Pennant offset by a forecast increase in rent income on golf courses

(£42k), under-achievement of income at Queensmead Sports Centre (£25k), cost

pressures at Minet Country Park (£25K), and a range of modest ups and downs for

the remainder). There are some offsetting pressures and savings within the Library

Service.

10. These pressures are expected to be managed within Cultural Services. The

scope for doing this is in uncommitted funding for an Asset Management Review

Manager and some opportunities for vacancy management. Savings have been

identified by Cultural Services managers.

Compensating Savings (Provisions): - (£120k) Underspend

11. The latest assessment of potential compensating savings suggests that the

following would appear to be achievable:

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AMR project director:

Schools asset management:

Vacancy management:

Total:

£’000

70

15

35

120

Social Services:

12. The Social Services overall projection indicates a slight worsening of £38k since

the underspend of £23k projected at Month 8. As Social Services continue to

examine and confirm management information through the commitments review

exercise they are producing more reliable data on which to forecast commitments.

The main changes this month are increase in the pressure on Children and families

Service (£14k), Older People’s Services (£67k), mental health services (£25k),

support services(£21k) and a reduction in the pressure on Physical and Sensory

Disability Services by £47k, and in learning difficulties £38k. The forecast excludes

the expected costs in this year of Asylum Seeker Judicial Review cases (£1.25m)

and continues to assume full recovery of £1.9m of overhead costs regarding the

Asylum Seeker service. The pressures are detailed in the table below:

Forecast

Variance

Month 9

£’000

Change from

Month 8

£’000

Children and Families +1,498 +14

Asylum Seeker Service (1,114) 0

Older People's Services (190) +67

Physical & Sensory Disabilities +909 (47)

Learning Disabilities +620 (38)

Mental Health Services +401 +25

Other Adult Services (36) (4)

Support Services (434) +21

Unallocated Growth (realignment) (1,639) 0

+15 +38

13. The extent of fluctuation in variances is reducing as the work on analysing all

Private & Voluntary placement commitments nears completion. The forecast

methodology has been significantly improved and is now more reliable. This has

resulted in a revised projection of a £15k overspend for the department overall,

excluding the developing impact of judicial review asylum cases. This compares with

a £23k underspend projected in Month 8.

14. Care Package authorisations procedures have been tightened to provide senior

management scrutiny to all future higher cost placements for the foreseeable future.

Heads of Service are continuing to review all proposals over £25k per year before a

placement is made. The findings from the Budget Realignment exercise are helping

budget managers to manage costs more effectively. The policy for the rest of this

year is to contain costs overall within a departmental cash limit, since the current

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service limits are unrealistic. The realignment exercise has informed the 2004/05

budget building.

Children & Families: - £1,498k overspend

15. The projected overspend has increased by £14k due to clearer forecasting. All

high cost care package proposals are referred to the Head of Service for review

before a placement can be made.

Asylum Seeker Service: - (£1,114k) underspend

16. No change on Month 8. The underspend is additional grant income which has

been claimed to cover management, support and overheads costs which have been

the subject of challenge by the Audit Commission. This projection assumes full

recovery of the claim. All claimable costs will be budgeted under the Asylum service

cost centre for 2004/05, to show the real impact of the service and the extent to

which it is reimbursed by grants.

Older people’s Services: - (£190k) underspend

17. An increase of £67k in spend since Month 8, due to continued efforts to reduce

the waiting list. Commitments are being monitored in the context of the overall

departmental financial position.

Physical & Sensory Disabilities: - £909k overspend

18. This has reduced by £47k since Month 8 due to firmer forecasting as the year

progresses. All high cost care package proposals are to be referred to the Head of

Service for review before a placement can be made.

Learning Disabilities: - £620k overspend

19. A reduction £38k since Month 8 due to firmer forecasting. All high cost care

package proposals are to be referred to the Head of Service for review before a

placement can be made.

Mental Health: - £401k overspend

20. This has increased by £25k due mainly to clarification of the impact of staff

harmonisation costs. All high cost care package proposals are to be referred to the

Head of Service for review before a placement can be made.

Support Services: - (£434k) underspend

21. The underspend has reduced by £21k since Month 8 due to a £21k reduction in

projected CareFirst costs offset by an overspend of £42k on a shortfall in PCT

contribution to the Equipment Service. The projected underspending on these

services is being used to manage the department's budgets overall within the total

cash limit.

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Unallocated Growth (Realignment): - (£1,639k) underspend

22. There is no change since the last report. This is a reserve of £1,639k of

budgetary growth and inflation in the current year which has been with held from

budgets pending a realignment of budgets for 2004/05 to reflect actual patterns of

spend. The budget will be dispersed to service budgets as part of 2004/05 budget

build. This will not address the structural budget issues within services in the current

year. Group budgets will continue to be managed by the department to aim to

deliver an outturn on target overall. The realignment analysis will now form the basis

for re-shaped budgets for 2004/05.

Environmental Services:

23. A projected overspend of £112k is reported. This is a worsening of £6k on the

£106k reported in month 8. This is due to a new pressure in the CCTV service in

relation to maintenance and cable line rental. The position is summarised below:

Forecast

month 9

£’000

Change from

month 8

£’000

Public Health & Environmental

6 6

Services

Highways & Transport 50 0

Support Services 56 0

Total 112 6

Public Health & Environmental Services: - £6k overspend

24. £6k CCTV Service. Pressure from increased maintenance and cable line rental

costs. The CCTV manager is reviewing the current arrangements for the internal

recharges of costs and also looking at opportunities to attract external funding to

support this important 24-hour service.

Highways & Transport: - £50k overspend

25. Income from contract parking in multi storey car parks has not yet been

achieved, hence there is an income shortfall. Officers continue to seek negotiated

agreements with potential contract users.

Support Services: - £56k overspend

26. Demand for the Customer Contact Centre has been higher than expected, and

the success of the service has generated yet more calls. The existing over-spend

has arisen because of the need to employ additional staff to deal with the increased

number of calls taken to meet performance indicators and deal with peaks and

troughs in demand. The Council intends to extend the present CCC to all Council

services, and the costs and budgetary position of the larger CCC will depend upon

the detailed arrangements for the new service.

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27. The budget pressure has recently been reduced due to a contribution from

'green waste'. The Corporate Director is actively seeking ways in which to make

compensatory savings to reduce this pressure further. Officers from ESG and

Corporate Finance are seeking to capitalise some of the staff salaries within the

Contact Centre who are working on the introduction of the new Contact Centre

software. A significant reduction in the total overspend is expected in the next

reporting period. The Contact Centre is due to transfer to Corporate IT in early

March.

Housing Services:

28. Housing Services are now showing a projected underspend of £582k a £126k

improvement on the month 8 projected underspend of £456k. This is due to an

decrease in the forecast overspend on benefits, offset by an increase in the forecast

overspend on Housing development, as detailed in the table below:

Forecast

month 9

£’000

Changes from

month 8

£’000

Benefits 320 (173)

Homelessness (859) (21)

Caravan Site (8) (2)

Housing Advice Centre (52) (7)

Housing Private Sector (59) (3)

Housing Development 34 68

Housing Careline Services 24 2

Other Housing Services 18 10

(582) (126)

Benefits: - £320k overspend

29. Benefits is made up of three key services - Benefit Admin, Benefits Payments

and Fraud Prevention and Overpayment Recoveries; further details of these items

are provided below. The net overspend has reduced from £493k in period 8 to £320k

in period 9 and this is mainly due to movements in the cost of payments and

administration. Net cost of payment is down by £174k and Admin costs are up by

£170k. The total £320k projected net overspend to year-end is made up of £220k

overspend on admin costs; £341k overspend on payments to claimants; and £241k

underspend as a result of increased overpayment collections. The gross expenditure

for Benefit is £53m+, £320k is less than 1% of the gross expenditure.

30. There is a monthly review of the service to monitor both service and financial

performance. All the actions listed for each aspect of the service are reviewed and

updated each month.

31. Admin: - The projected overspend on admin has moved from £55k overspend

in period 8 to £220k overspend in period 9. This is mainly due to increased support

costs allocations and the need to increase staffing levels in order to maintain

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performance and implement i-world. The overall overspend of £220k for HB Admin

due to general staffing costs, however the projected cost is very sensitive to the

number of new claimants and HB review caseloads. Managers are recruiting more

benefit assessment officer trainees and also implementing an action plan to improve

HB admin services. The combination of these actions should reduce the current

projected overspend.

32. Payments: The latest projected overspend has reduced from £688k to £341k

between period 8 and 9, this is mainly due to a small reduction in payment levels and

corrections to budget allocation. Latest projected payments spend variance of £341k

to year-end is based on actual payments to week 36. The current weighted average

subsidy of 92.3% is one of the highest in London and the net expenditure on

Housing Benefit and Council Tax Benefit is very sensitive to the subsidy percentage,

0.01% change is about £50k impact on the budget. Managers are working on

proposals to reduce the level of subsidy losses and we will be using some of the

underspend in Homelessness budget to support this overspend.

33. Overpayments: No significant change between period 8 and period 9. The total

additional income of £250k from overpayment recoveries is mostly the direct result of

increased overpaid HB payments. Overpayment recovery performance is on a

monthly review.

Homelessness: - (£859k) underspend

34. No significant changes between period 8 and period 9. The overall projected net

underspend of £859k is mainly due to the use of new Private Sector Leasing

accommodation. The gross budget for Homelessness is over £13m and the

projected variance is about 6%. There are issues on how to sustain the current

homelessness spend levels in future, there are a number of government proposals to

review Homelessness services funding and subsidies. The cost of this service is very

sensitive to HB subsidies payments and direct grants from government to support

new homelessness prevention schemes. There is a monthly review between all

service providers to ensure service plans and savings are delivered. Underspend is

being used to support overspend elsewhere within the Housing General Fund.

Caravan Sites: - (£8k) underspend

35. There are no significant changes between period 8 and 9. The total projected

£8k net underspend is mainly due to reduced costs on salaries and utilities (new

electricity and water contracts at lower prices, and improved meter securities to

control theft of electricity and water supplies). Underspend is being used to support

overspend elsewhere within the Housing General Fund.

Housing Advice Centre: - (£52k) underspend

36. The improvement in projected spend between period 6 and 8 is due to

correction of support cost recharges from the HRA. The overall projected £52k net

underspend is mainly due to 1 fte post being funded from Community Safety

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esources and another 1 fte vacancy caused by a recent secondment. Underspend

is being used to support overspend elsewhere within the Housing General Fund.

Housing Private Sector: - (£59k) underspend

37. No significant improvement in projected spend between period 8 and 9. The

overall projected £59k net underspend is mainly due to reduced projected overtime

payments on Noise Services and reduction in HRA support services recharges. The

Noise Service is currently being reviewed. Underspend is being used to support

overspend elsewhere within the Housing General Fund.

Housing Development Section: - £34k overspend

38. The £68k movement from underspend to overspend between period 8 and

period 9 is due to increased projected salary costs, consultancy costs to review the

new PSL contracts and homelessness strategy. The total projected £34k net

overspend is mainly due to projected expenditure on a number of housing

development and procurement strategies. This overspend will be funded out of the

homelessness underspend.

Housing Careline Services: - £24k overspend

39. No significant change between period 8 and 9. The projected total £24k net

overspend is due to increased operational costs as a result of health and safety

issues in the Careline Services’ current location at the Civic. This overspend is being

funded out of the savings elsewhere in the budget.

Housing Support Services & Management: - £18k overspend

40. The increase of £10k in projected overspend is due to a number of cost

reallocation between the HRA and Housing General Fund. The projected £18k net

overspend is due to projected variance on a number of small support services

recharges between HRA and Housing General Fund. This overspend is being

funded out of the savings elsewhere in the budget.

Central Services:

41. This report sets out the financial forecast for Central Services based on the

Month 9 (December 2003) actual figures. The projected variance will result in a net

underspend of £1,214k, which is an increase of £19k over the £1,195k underspend

declared in month 8. This improvement is primarily down to a reduction in the

projected staffing costs in the Personnel and Best Value Services. A full summary of

the changes from month 8 is shown in Table 1 – Central Services Financial Forecast

2003/2004:

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Table 1 – Central Services Financial Forecast 2003/2004

Service Area

Forecast

Month 9

£’000

Change from

Month 8

£’000

Local Tax/NNDR (20) 13

Corporate and Democratic Core (25) 0

Estates and Property Services (54) 0

Other Corporate Services (1,620) 0

Chief Executive’s Office 0 (32)

Finance Services 299 0

Facilities Management 106 0

Constitutional Services (70) 0

Legal Services 170 0

Total Forecast for Central Services (1,214) (19)

Local Tax/NNDR (£20k underspend)

42. The projected variance is due to the predicted savings on salaries within the

Recovery Section amounting to £70k, which is offset by £50k due to costs of

employing agency staff to cover staff vacancies and the additional cost of

implementing the I-World project within the income collection teams. The £13k

decrease in the underspend from month 8 is due to the increase in agency staffing

costs to assist with the implementation of the I-World project.

Corporate and Democratic Core (£25k underspend)

43. As last month it is anticipated that the one-off set up costs for the Hillingdon

Community Trust will be lower than expected by £25k.

Estates (£60k underspend) and Property Services (£6k overspend), net

underspend of £54k

44. As reported last month it is anticipated that the projected variance will be an

underspend of £54k. This is due to a number of projected savings totalling £84k, a

£10k saving from rent income received for the Uxbridge Industrial Estate, which has

been sold, a saving of £49k from the property at 192 High Street, which has been

sub-let to a private tenant, who will be responsible for the day to day running costs

and a £25k underspend on external consultants in the Property Disposal budget.

This is offset by an overspend of £24k due to the fall in the number of units let at the

Warnford Industrial Estate and a slight overspend of £6k which is projected in

Estates and Valuation due to increased staffing costs.

Other Corporate Services (£1,620k underspend)

45. Most of the Rates bills for the Authority have now been finalised following

challenges mounted by the authority on the current rating list. Indications are that

rate refunds flowing from these challenges will generate savings of £1,570k over

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and above the £224k assumed in the base budget. A further £50k saving is due to

the London Residual Body balances redistributed to the Authority for prior year

County Hall rate refunds dating back to 1995.

46. The significant improvement of £720k in the variation is due to the outcomes of

the challenges to the rateable value on the Civic Centre. The final rebates due to the

Authority are significantly better than those predicted and relate to rebates dating

back to the 2000/2001 financial year.

Chief Executive’s Office (nil variance)

47. The change in the variation from month 8 by £32k is due to an underspend of

£10k within the Best Value Team on staff salaries and a reduction in the agency staff

costs within the Personnel Service of £22k.

Finance Services (£299k overspend)

48. As reported last month the projected overspend is made up of a number of items

across the service. The pressures identified are essential, so as to enable the

Authority to improve its financial management systems and processes, which would

lead to service efficiencies.

49. The Central Services Finance Team is expected to overspend by £50k, due

mainly to agency staff covering a maternity leave and the role of the Head of Finance

– Central Services. The position for Head of Finance – Central Services was filled

with a permanent employee with effect from 1 September 2003.

50. The Financial Systems Support Team is projected to overspend by £40k, due to

costs involved in setting up a help desk and recruiting agency staff to manage the

first year of live implementation of the Oracle Financial Management System, which

is a recognised priority for this Authority.

51. Insurance Services is anticipated to overspend by £28k, due to temporarily

recruiting two additional staff to set up a risk register and to undertake work designed

to help improve our CPA rating in this area. CPA rating has as a result increased

from a score of 1 to a score of 3.

52. Treasury Services is anticipated to overspend by £20k, due to additional Brokers

Commissions in year incurred as a result of debt restructuring designed to reduce

interest costs in the current year and next.

53. The Corporate Accountancy Team is expected to overspend by £194k. This

comes at a time of the greatest change in Local Government Finance, with

significant change in the department and greater support being required by the

Authority. The overspend is due to, in particular, difficulties in recruiting to the Head

of Financial Planning and the resulting additional recruitment costs and covering

sickness for the role of the Capital Accountant. The Team is also having to cope with

an additional workload as a result of providing financial input into the HIP program

and detailed financial support to 3 HIP projects. The position for the Head of

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Financial Planning was filled with a permanent employee with effect from

20 October 2003.

54. The Finance Directorate is anticipated to overspend by £30k due to additional

costs arising as a consequence of covering for the Borough Treasurer’s post which

became vacant in November and the recruitment costs of appointing new staff. A

further overspend of £65k will result from the redundancy payments arising following

the restructuring of the Payroll Section. These additional costs will, to some part, be

offset by projected savings arising from the continuing vacancies within the Audit

Team (£50k) and by an agreed reduction in the Authority audit fees (£78k).

Facilities Management (£106k overspend)

55. A number of pressures have been identified within this service. The cost of the

security contract is £42k above the budget provision, staffing costs within the Office

Services are projected to be £25k overspent, Civic Centre utility bills are higher than

expected by £35k and a further net pressure of £4k on other Civic Centre budgets.

56. Due to the restructuring of the Facilities Management service and the

refurbishment of the Café, it has been very difficult to predict with any certainty how

the three Trading Accounts (Catering, Cleaning and Printing) have been performing.

This work will be carried out and completed in February 2004 and the outcomes

reported within the next monitoring report.

57. Although not included in the projected year end figures, the Building Cleaning

and Catering Services will be affected by the Harmonisation process. A bid has been

submitted to the Contingency Fund for a gross £42k to cover the additional costs.

Constitutional Services (£70k underspend)

58. As reported last month the underspend has arisen due to a slippage in the

implementation of the Community Safety Initiative resulting in a saving of £20k and

not being able to fill a number of vacant posts within the service resulting in an

anticipated saving of £50k.

Legal Services (£170k overspend)

59. As reported last month the projected overspend is due to continuing pressure on

the service especially from Social Services and Environmental Services. Increased

workloads and the high staff vacancy within the service have resulted in a significant

cost being paid for agency staff to enable the service to function. A further pressure

on the service is the appointment of the Data Protection Officer to an unfunded post.

Corporate Budgets’ Forecasts

60. Table 2 shows Budget, Forecast and Variance now reported on corporate

budgets i.e. inflation provision/ Interest Income etc and the total position on

corporate budgets.

PART I – MEMBERS & PUBLIC (INCLUDING THE PRESS)

Cabinet Reports - 4 th March 2003 Page 169


Table 2

2003/04

Original

Budget

Budget

changes

(para’s 17

to 19)

2003/04 Corporate Budgets

Current

Budget

(as at

Month 9)

2003/04

Forecast

(as at

Month 9)

Variances (+=Extra spend or

Less Income )/() indicate less

costs or greater income

Variance

(As at

Month 9)

£000 £000 £000 £000 £000

Variance Variance

(As at (As at

Month 8) Month 6)

11,238 (11,238) 0 Inflation Provision 0 0 0 0

2,100 (597) 1,503 Developments Contingency 1,503 0 0 0

(800) - (800) Interest on Balances (80) +720 +720 0

(500) - (500) BPR / HIP Savings (500) 0 0 0

(500) - (500) External Contribution (500) 0 0 0

(32,632) - (32,632) Asset Mgt A/c (32,512) +120 +120 0

(21,094) (11,835) (32,929) Corporate Budgets (32,089) +840 +840 0

Corporate budget Variance: - £840k overspend

61. This significant pressure has not changed since month 8 and has been

generated for two main reasons. The government has frozen the payment of Asylum

seekers Grant in the current year due to unresolved issues in the 2002-3 claim. This

has therefore resulted in a worsened cash-flow position and a resultant loss of

potential income to be earned of approximately £500k. There has also been a

significant increase in the sale of council houses, due the future reduction of

discounts available to tenants. The result of these increased HRA capital receipts is

that the HRA is charged with a reduced proportion of the Council’s debt financing

costs which instead falls on the General Fund. This has resulted in a fall of

approximately £300k in the amount that the HRA owes the General Fund in debt

financing costs. The reduction in debt financing costs charged to the HRA is an

exaggerated reflection of the capital receipts in the year due to the way the

apportionment statutorily has to be calculated.

62. Officers have taken action to prevent the position from getting worse by

undertaking a debt restructure, which has resulted in reduced interest costs in the

current year.

63. There has been a transfer of £11.238m of inflation provision to Directorates’

budgets to date. The following allocations have utilised the whole balance in the

inflation provision. The following table shows how the inflation has been allocated;

PART I – MEMBERS & PUBLIC (INCLUDING THE PRESS)

Cabinet Reports - 4 th March 2003 Page 170


£000

Pay awards 7,688

Contractual arrangements 1,919

Levies 1,234

Other* 397

Total 11,238

* Note: major components of this figure include:

£’000

Members allowances 30

Grants 45

Special Schools 114

Homelessness 19

Building maintenance

Social Services Transport

IT Contract Costs

School Quantum

4

47

61

10

Other 67

Total 397

64. Table 2 assumes that the Development and Risk Contingency will be fully

utilised in 2003/04. Allocations of £557k have been made from the contingency this

year - including those reflecting members’ approval in 2002/03 of funding for £144k

expenditure which did not take place until 2003/04. Bids for harmonisation costs total

£540k (Social Services £450k, Environmental Services £40k and Central Services

£50k) and whilst a corporate review of these bids is underway, it is assumed that the

figure of £540k will be justified. There is £300k earmarked in the Contingency to

support the revenue budget provision of £300k for self-insured claims. Current

projections based on settlements up to the end of December suggest that the £300k

contingency will be required in full. The harmonisation and Insurance commitments

are incorporated into the table overleaf which also sets out the items provided for

within the contingency:

PART I – MEMBERS & PUBLIC (INCLUDING THE PRESS)

Cabinet Reports - 4 th March 2003 Page 171


2003/04 Allocated

Budget or

committed

£’000 £’000

Harmonisation 500 540

Business Rates – Civic Centre 400 Not needed

Residential Care Allowances 450 Not needed

Uninsured Claims 300 300

Early Years Centres’ budget shortfall 40 0

HIP / Procurement savings 300 180

Pensions for Councillors 94 Not needed

Allocations brought forward from 2002/03:

Sec 106 temporary staff (ESG) 20

Planning appeal Ruislip Community School (ESG) 33

Challenge Consulting (Central) 31

Cranford Women’s project (Central) 60

2003/04 allocations:

Challenge Consulting / other specific HIP

82

allocations (Central)

NOTRAG & Decideum (Central) 10

Hillingdon Youth Offending Service (SocServices) 62

Bellfarm Advice Centre (Central) 15

Campaign against 3 rd Runway (Central) 25

Festive Decorations (ESG) 24

Litter Campaign design and publicity 15

Reduction at Council Budget meeting -484

Total: 2,100 1,397

65. Taking allocations and commitments to date into account, the unallocated

balance on the Contingency currently stands at £703k. Further issues to be

considered in this perspective are:

• HIP/Procurement savings: £300k – provision made to cover start-up costs and

recognising an ambitious income target. £180k has already been allocated from

Contingency so far this year. Shortfall currently identified at £300k but some of

these costs may be chargeable to the HRA. It is therefore possible that the full

£300k will not be required.

• Pensions for Councillors: £94k – this will not be required in the current financial

year.

66. Taking these issues into account the uncommitted balance of the Contingency

would reduce to £583k.

PART I – MEMBERS & PUBLIC (INCLUDING THE PRESS)

Cabinet Reports - 4 th March 2003 Page 172


OVERALL FINANCIAL POSITION

67. Table 3 indicates the overall impact of the expenditure forecasts now reported

on the approved budget and the resulting balances position.

Table 3

2003/04

Original

Budget

2003/04

(As at Month 9)

Current

Budget

Forecast

(as at Month

9)

Variances (+=Extra spend or Less

Income )/() indicate less costs or

greater income

Variance (As

at Month 9)

Variance

(As at

Month 8)

Variance

(As at

Month6)

£000 £000 £000 £000 £000 £000

Directorates’

289,886 Expenditure 301,721 300,052 (1,669) (1,568) (72)

(21,094) Corporate Budgets (32,929) (32,089) +840 +840 0

268,792 Total Net Expenditure 268,792 267,963 (829) (728) (72)

(269,792) Budget Requirement (269,792) (269,792) 0 0 0

(1,000) (Surplus)/Deficit (1,000) (1,829) (829) (728) (72)

(2,800) Balances b/f 1/4/03 (3,376) (3,376) 0 0 0

(3,800) Balances c/f 31/3/04 (4,376) (5,205) (829) (728) (72)

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

a B c = b-a

68. This is a report of the Director of Finance and the financial implications are

included throughout.

LEGAL IMPLICATIONS

69. There are no specific legal implications arising from this report.

BACKGROUND DOCUMENTS

Monitoring reports

PART I – MEMBERS & PUBLIC (INCLUDING THE PRESS)

Cabinet Reports - 4 th March 2003 Page 173


OPENING OF THE PRIVATE EQUITY TENDER OFF

SITE

ITEM 12

Contact Officer: Louise Branford-White

Telephone: 01895 250818

SUMMARY

The response to the Private Equity open OJEC tender will be opened off site in the

presence of an officer from Democratic or Legal Services. Opening the tender off

site is because a large number of proposals and quantity of supporting documents

are expected. This report is required under standing orders to note to Cabinet the

unopened tenders not being sent to the civic centre and not being accompanied off

site by 2 officers, following this approval being authorised by an appropriate officer.

RECOMMENDATION

The report be noted

INFORMATION

1. The pension fund is undertaking an open OJEC tender for Private Equity. The

amount to be invested would be in the region of £18 million, approximately 5% of the

total value of the pension fund.

2. Due to the specialist nature of Private Equity, BFINANCE have been appointed to

analyse and review the information returned from the tender process. It is expected

that a large quantity of responses will be received and that the volume of information

supplied will be great.

3. It would therefore be sensible to have the completed tender documents sent

straight to BFINANCE offices. The tender documents will then be opened in the

presence of an officer from Democratic or Legal Services.

LEGAL IMPLICATIONS

4. Section 16 (a) of Procurement and Contract Standing Order number requires

tenders to be returned to the Civic Centre. Section 3 of the same standing order

provides that the Standing Order must be complied with at all times but there are

some exceptions.

5. Section 3 (b) states an exception can be “by direction of the Appropriate

Delegated Officer where such direction is justified by special exceptional

circumstances and will be subject to a report to the cabinet”.

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

6. The proposal is the most practical in the circumstances.

PART I – MEMBERS & PUBLIC (INCLUDING THE PRESS)

Cabinet Reports - 4 th March 2003 Page 174


Conclusion

7. The response to the Private Equity tender will be opened off site in the presence

of an officer from Democratic or Legal Services due to the expectation that a large

number of tenders will be received and the documentation will be great. The

appropriate Delegated Officer who has authorised this is the Director of Finance.

BACKGROUND DOCUMENTS

Procurement and Contract Standing Orders

PART I – MEMBERS & PUBLIC (INCLUDING THE PRESS)

Cabinet Reports - 4 th March 2003 Page 175

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