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Financial systems and development

Financial systems and development

Financial systems and

~~~~/ , -. \-E:-: - :: 0 0 - PUB7682 June1989. 07 ; pri~~1d PD, /rdD lopnientReport1989 $ .... . f. . ~ ........................ ~ ~ ~ . .~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 1 X: .=I ; an. . ..i /. A I L~~~~~~~~~~~~~

  • Page 3 and 4: I World Development Report 1989 Pub
  • Page 5 and 6: Foreword This Report is the twelfth
  • Page 7 and 8: SS:0-~- Cotents Definitions and dat
  • Page 9 and 10: 4.3 Credit and income redistributio
  • Page 11 and 12: Definitions and data notes Financia
  • Page 13 and 14: ita was higher than that of some co
  • Page 15 and 16: Financial systems and development:
  • Page 17 and 18: and lowered their tariffs and other
  • Page 19 and 20: less comprehensive. Financial liber
  • Page 21 and 22: Figure 1.1 Growth of real GNP in de
  • Page 23 and 24: and developing country trade is eve
  • Page 25 and 26: They affect both economic activity
  • Page 27 and 28: workers-are on the payroll. An alte
  • Page 29 and 30: and Bangladesh. Africa's population
  • Page 31 and 32: in real interest rates and the decl
  • Page 33 and 34: Although the details of the new str
  • Page 35 and 36: age 3.2 percent a year through 1995
  • Page 37 and 38: Table 1.3 Selected capital flows to
  • Page 39 and 40: 2 Why does finance matter? Financia
  • Page 41 and 42: Table 2.1 Saving and growth in deve
  • Page 43 and 44: Table 2.2 Average sectoral surpluse
  • Page 45 and 46: They are also deeper in the most ra
  • Page 47 and 48: Box figure 2.3 Real interest rates,
  • Page 49 and 50: so by charging fees for specific se
  • Page 51 and 52: compromising market-based approach,
  • Page 53 and 54:

    Table 2.4 The institutional structu

  • Page 55 and 56:

    3 V/ The evolution of financial sys

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    Box 3.2 Trade financing in Renaissa

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    tury. They assisted in the formatio

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    continued. The big commercial banks

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    they stood to benefit and had a str

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    cause savers sought safety and liqu

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    of deposit institutions in the Unit

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    Chapter 2 stressed the roles of ris

  • Page 71 and 72:

    Governments often specified prefere

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    heavy industry that resulted in exc

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    limited extent, they also lacked up

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    Table 4.1 Average annual inflation

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    Figure 4.2 Real interest rates in d

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    Box 4.7 The curb market In many dev

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    The task of financial reform At the

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    assets. At the other would be count

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    etary and fiscal policy and in some

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    distress bv lowering interest rates

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    Box 5.3 How good bankers become bad

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    will not be necessary because defau

  • Page 95 and 96:

    that may be necessary. The authorit

  • Page 97 and 98:

    t Box 5.6 Restructuring a large cor

  • Page 99 and 100:

    Industrial countries introduced far

  • Page 101 and 102:

    economic development may require an

  • Page 103 and 104:

    were needed too, so that creditors

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    ecome the rule because historical c

  • Page 107 and 108:

    even before portfolio and other los

  • Page 109 and 110:

    to license securities intermediarie

  • Page 111 and 112:

    Box 7.1 The structure of investment

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    Box 7.2 Corporate finance in theory

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    other than collateral are of partic

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    ingly as universal banks, engaging

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    those speculating in real estate. I

  • Page 121 and 122:

    less demanding listing requirements

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    Table 7.1 Equity market indicators,

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    investment might grow substantially

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    less than 20 percent of informal ru

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    selling and then repurchasing the a

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    Box 8.3 The Grameen Bank: an altern

  • Page 133 and 134:

    which reduced their incentive to co

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    anks to reduce loan losses and esta

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    controls within a very short period

  • Page 139 and 140:

    Box 9.1 Financial liberalization in

  • Page 141 and 142:

    involve higher interest rates and s

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    educed the efficiency of investment

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    duce a greater flow of remittances

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    Bibliographical note This Report ha

  • Page 149 and 150:

    ackground papers by the Capital Mar

  • Page 151 and 152:

    Blejer, Mario I. 1983. "Liberalizat

  • Page 153 and 154:

    Policy." In Vittorio Corbo, Morris

  • Page 155 and 156:

    Relevance for Less Developed Countr

  • Page 157 and 158:

    wirtschaftliche Zusammenarbeit and

  • Page 159 and 160:

    Statistical appendix should refer t

  • Page 161 and 162:

    Table A.3 (continued) Country group

  • Page 163 and 164:

    Table A.7 Consumption, investment,

  • Page 165 and 166:

    Table A.9 Change in export prices a

  • Page 167 and 168:

    Table A.11 Investment, saving, and

  • Page 169 and 170:

    World Development Indicators

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    Key In each table, economies are li

  • Page 173 and 174:

    name indicates, now includes Intern

  • Page 175 and 176:

    y the United Nations or otherwise r

  • Page 177 and 178:

    Share of agriculture in GDP _ 0-9 p

  • Page 179 and 180:

    GNP per capital Life Area Average a

  • Page 181 and 182:

    Average annual grow,th rate (percen

  • Page 183 and 184:

    GDP' Distribution of gross domestic

  • Page 185 and 186:

    Value added Food aid Fertilizer con

  • Page 187 and 188:

    Energy consumption Average annual e

  • Page 189 and 190:

    Value added Distribution of manufac

  • Page 191 and 192:

    Earnings per employee Total earning

  • Page 193 and 194:

    General government consumption Aver

  • Page 195 and 196:

    Distribution of gross domnestic pro

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    Percentage share of total household

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    Percentage oftotal expenditure Hous

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    Percentage of total current revenue

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    Monetary holdings, broadly defined

  • Page 205 and 206:

    Merchandise trade Average annual gr

  • Page 207 and 208:

    Percentage share of merchandise imp

  • Page 209 and 210:

    Percentage share ofnserchandise exp

  • Page 211 and 212:

    Valtie of imports of Composition of

  • Page 213 and 214:

    Current account balance (millions o

  • Page 215 and 216:

    OPEC Amount 1976 1979 1980 /981 198

  • Page 217 and 218:

    Nei disbursement of ODA from all so

  • Page 219 and 220:

    Long-term debt (millions of dollars

  • Page 221 and 222:

    Disbursemeents (millions of dollars

  • Page 223 and 224:

    Total long-term debt Total interest

  • Page 225 and 226:

    External public debt outstanding an

  • Page 227 and 228:

    Public loans w,ith Average interest

  • Page 229 and 230:

    Hypothetical Assumed Average annual

  • Page 231 and 232:

    Crude birth Crutde deathi rate per

  • Page 233 and 234:

    Population per: Daily calorie suppl

  • Page 235 and 236:

    Percentage of age group enirolled i

  • Page 237 and 238:

    I'CP estimates of Percentage share

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    Urban population Number of As perce

  • Page 241 and 242:

    Health and welfare Population: Life

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    same value, without altering the tr

  • Page 245 and 246:

    demographic reporting systems, and

  • Page 247 and 248:

    Ii Angola Bulgaria Albania Mongolia

  • Page 249 and 250:

    tiles and clothing, division 32; ma

  • Page 251 and 252:

    shown in these tables may not be st

  • Page 253 and 254:

    cases. World Bank estimates are als

  • Page 255 and 256:

    operation and Development (OECD) an

  • Page 257 and 258:

    and Vital Statistics Report, World

  • Page 259 and 260:

    The summary measures in this table

  • Page 261 and 262:

    the number of females is much small

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    Human resources U.N. Department of

  • Page 265 and 266:

    Country classifications (continued)

  • Page 268:

    171F, z, 7 X -S7\ A1129 M 'r J, rMl

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