February 2013 - Queensland Symphony Orchestra

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February 2013 - Queensland Symphony Orchestra

Contents

QSO WITH KUERTI & FRITZSCH

High Viennese Romantics

Maestro 1

2

BIOGRAPHIES 13

CONCERT HALL ETIQUETTE

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QSO ON THE RADIO

Selected performances are recorded by ABC Classic FM for future

broadcast. For further details visit abc.net.au/classic.

2013 | QSO FEBRUARY PROGRAM 1


MAESTRO 1

QSO WITH

KUERTI & FRITZSCH

High Viennese Romantics

8pm, Saturday 16 February 2013

QPAC Concert Hall

CONDUCTOR

PIANO

BEETHOVEN

BRUCKNER

Johannes Fritzsch

Anton Kuerti

Piano Concerto No.5 Emperor

Symphony No.4 Romantic

2013 | QSO FEBRUARY PROGRAM 3


Program Notes

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN

(1770-1827)

Piano Concerto No.5 in E flat Emperor,

Op.73

Allegro

Adagio un poco mosso –

Rondo (Allegro)

Anton Kuerti, Piano

In May 1809 Napoleon’s armies occupied

Vienna for the second time and with

considerable violence. Beethoven took shelter

with his brother Carl and his wife Johanna,

and to protect his failing hearing spent the

bombardment of 11 and 12 May with pillows

over his ears in the cellar.

Before, during and after the invasion,

Beethoven managed to work. He composed

the Op.70 piano trios and three piano sonatas;

the String Quartet Op.74, popularly known

as the Harp Quartet; and completed the

Fifth Piano Concerto (dedicated to his patron

Archduke Rudolf).

By this time Beethoven’s deafness made

it impossible for him to perform with an

orchestra, so the concerto’s first performance

in Leipzig in 1811 was given by a young

organist, Friedrich Schneider. At the Viennese

premiere in 1812, Carl Czerny was soloist.

Given the political circumstances, it is hardly

surprising that the concerto is, in Alfred

Einstein’s words, the ‘apotheosis of the military

concept’ in Beethoven’s music. Biographer

Maynard Solomon quotes Einstein as saying

that the audience ‘expected a first movement

in four-four time of a military character; and

they reacted with unmixed pleasure when

Beethoven not only fulfilled but far surpassed

their expectations.’

In the Fifth Concerto, Beethoven solved

the problem of how to exploit the soloist’s

virtuosity without downgrading the role of

the orchestra, while constructing the kind of

musical argument and drama which was so

crucial to the Classical style. This is achieved

partly through masterstrokes like the very

opening gesture: a single chord is sounded by

the orchestra, to which the piano responds

in such flamboyant style, creating a sense

of uncertainty about how and when the

orchestra will rejoin the music, and what form

the actual thematic material will take.

A standard practice in much Classical music

was to get louder and more agitated in the

lead-up to a point of structural significance,

but Beethoven made those moments even

more dramatic. The overwhelming impression

left by the first movement of the Fifth

Concerto is of ceremonial grandeur and

pomp – hence the nickname (not authorised

by Beethoven) of Emperor. But the massive

scale of the first movement is made possible

by the frequent contrast of the ‘military’

and the reflective. Beethoven prepares

the movement’s climactic moments with

what scholar William Kinderman calls ‘the

withdrawal of the music into a mysterious

stillness’. To prepare the moment of

recapitulation, Beethoven allows the music

to become rarefied and serene: a passage

of ever-quieter scales and trills gives way

to a pastoral dialogue between the winds and

the bell-tones of the piano.

The Adagio, rightly described as dreamlike

by one writer, is in the distant key of B major.

And its mood couldn’t be further from the

military episodes, despite its material being

dominated by the scales and trills that

featured in the first movement.

A justly celebrated instance of ‘the withdrawal

of the music into a mysterious stillness’ occurs

at the transition from the slow movement

into the finale. The transition is almost

imperceptible – Beethoven alters a note here

or there to subtly change the direction of

the music as it seems to fade, and the piano

begins ruminating on a common chord which

will ultimately flower as the final movement’s

bounding theme, which again is contrasted

with moments of deep calm. Whatever the

misery in which Beethoven wrote this work,

or its immediate political context, it turns out

to be another ode to joy.

Abridged from a note by Gordon Kerry © 2003

4 2013 | QSO FEBRUARY PROGRAM

2013 | QSO FEBRUARY PROGRAM 5


ANTON BRUCKNER

(1824-1896)

Symphony No.4 in E flat Romantic

(1878-80 version, Nowak edition)

Bewegt, nicht zu schnell [With movement,

not too fast]

Andante quasi allegretto

Scherzo (Bewegt) [With movement] – Trio

(Gemächlich) [Leisurely]

Finale (Bewegt, doch nicht zu schnell) [With

movement, but not too fast]

Bruckner’s Fourth Symphony is the only one

to which Bruckner himself gave a title, and

‘Romantic’ is an apt word for the moods and

atmospheres it evokes. When asked to explain

it, he invented an imaginary program in which

the first movement is supposed to represent a

medieval city at dawn, trumpet calls signalling

the opening of the city gates, knights riding

out into the countryside where they are

surrounded by the bird calls and magic of the

forest. Bruckner’s program is best ignored –

this unsophisticated man provided it to oblige

well-meaning friends, and the Fourth is no

more programmatic than any of his other

symphonies.

Bruckner reluctantly tried to explain his music

because its first audiences found it so hard

to understand. His symphonies demanded

a new way of listening. He is often tagged

‘the Wagnerian symphonist’, but his debt to

Wagner was very partial: the orchestral and

harmonic innovations in Bruckner which sound

so Wagnerian – the chromatic harmony, the

rich brass scoring, the expressive use of the

massed strings – are present in embryo in

Bruckner’s earliest orchestral music, before he

became familiar with Wagner.

The true sources of the musical craft of this

church-trained teacher and organist from

Upper Austria lie in that country’s musical

tradition – in Beethoven and even more in

Schubert. The spirit of Bruckner hidden behind

the ‘Wagnerian’ sound is entirely different

from Wagner’s. As Tovey says, he never

forgets the high altar of his Catholic church,

nor the magnificent organ of the Augustinian

monastery of St Florian, where he first learnt

music. The simple religious devotion of the

man can be heard in the developments of the

second subject of the Romantic Symphony’s

first movement, and in the magnificent brass

chorales which recur in the last movement.

Perhaps the popularity of Bruckner’s Fourth

Symphony is chiefly due to its memorable

opening. The mysterious beginning of

Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony fascinated

Bruckner, and it has been said that he couldn’t

get a symphony under way without a tremolo.

It is not a symphony which starts, but the

beginning of music itself: major and minor

horn calls sounding the interval of a fifth,

gradually rousing the woodwind to join in.

The string tremolos continue, after a climax,

as accompaniment to the second subject,

and the characteristic ‘Bruckner rhythm’ of a

duplet and a triplet is heard. The recapitulation

starts with the opening horn calls, now

surrounded by a flowing figure in muted

violins, and they also provide the material of

the elaborate coda.

The slow movement is an elegiac march in the

relative minor. Whereas the slow movement

of Beethoven’s Ninth, often invoked as

Bruckner’s model, consists of variations on

two themes, the returns of Bruckner’s main

theme are separated by an episode that

returns twice, a chant-like theme for the

violas heard against pizzicato notes from the

other strings. Each statement of the main

theme is more richly scored and displays more

movement than its predecessor, rising at last

to a great climax before a solemn coda.

The last two movements were subject to

the revisions so typical of Bruckner’s career

as a symphonist. Between 1878 and 1880,

Bruckner wrote a completely new Scherzo,

and revised the Finale extensively. The success

of the first performance in Vienna under

Hans Richter in 1881 protected the Fourth

Symphony from further major revision by the

composer.

Bruckner’s own description of the Scherzo as

a hunt with horn calls, and the Trio as a dance

melody played to the hunters during the

rest, is the only useful though obvious part

of his ‘program’. The scale of this sounding

of the horn, however, suggests King Mark’s

moonlight hunt in Tristan und Isolde, or

even the Ride of the Valkyries, more than

Bruckner’s bucolic ‘hunting of the hare’. The

Trio, by contrast, is an Austrian peasant dance

with which Haydn, Mozart and of course

Schubert would have felt at home.

The Finale is the longest movement, a feature

of the overall balance of the symphony again

suggested by Beethoven’s Ninth. A three-note

descending phrase is heard in the introduction,

recalling the opening of the symphony, while

the brass remember the Scherzo. Themes

from all the movements occur, combined

most artfully with the new thematic material,

as Bruckner works his way to a restatement

of the symphony’s opening theme in the home

key. The brass dominates the coda, with the

motto of the symphony’s first pages.

Abridged from a note by David Garrett © 2002

6 2013 | QSO FEBRUARY PROGRAM

2013 | QSO FEBRUARY PROGRAM 7


CONCERTI 1

ROMANTIC WHIMSY

7pm, Friday 8 March 2013 | QSO Studio, South Bank

Listen to Queensland Symphony Orchestra players take the lead as concerto soloists and

enjoy rarely heard works celebrating the uanique voice of unusual instruments.

BECKEL

In the Mind’s Eye, Images for Horns

and Orchestra

MATTHUS

Timpani Concerto Der Wald

TICKETS AVAILABLE NOW!

www.qso.com.au or qtix 136 246

qso.com.au/facebook

qso.com.au/twitter

qso.com.au/youtube

SAMUEL JONES

Tuba Concerto

STANHOPE

Jet Stream

Backstage Pass

WARWICK ADENEY, CONCERTMASTER

What did you do on your break before

the 2013 Season began?

I was camping on Stradbroke Island with

my family, and I practised scales in the tent

each day!

Which Maestro soloist are you most

looking forward to hearing in the 2013

Season?

Well, there are two: Ray Chen the fantastic

local violinist in Maestro 10 on 30

November, and earlier in the year Sergio

Tiempo in Maestro 4 on 15 June.

The first Maestro performance for

2013 features Beethoven’s Piano

Concerto No.5 Emperor. The Adagio

movement in this piece was used to

poignant effect in the award winning

film The King’s Speech. Why do you

think this piece was chosen to be used

in the film score?

I haven’t seen the film! What I remember

is the chilling effect this piece had on me

as an older child when it was used in Picnic

at Hanging Rock - I think the effect was

created by its almost unbearable beauty.

This concert also features Bruckner’s

Symphony No.4 Romantic. Why

do you think Bruckner’s Fourth

Symphony is so popular?

I’d say it’s the opening. Nowadays big

science-fiction epics try to create

the same feeling of a massive scene

setting by the spacious string sound

with a single French horn motif. Of

course, this is not the only good bit!

2013 | QSO FEBRUARY PROGRAM 9


Biographies

JOHANNES FRITZSCH

CHIEF CONDUCTOR

Johannes Fritzsch was born in Meissen,

Germany, in 1960. He received his first musical

tuition in piano and organ from his father, a

Cantor and Organist. He also studied violin and

trumpet. His higher education was received at

the Carl Maria von Weber Music Academy in

Dresden, majoring in conducting and piano.

In 1982, after completing his studies, Maestro

Fritzsch was appointed 2nd Kapellmeister

(Conductor) at the Volkstheater in Rostock. In

1987, Mo. Fritzsch accepted the position of

Kapellmeister with the Staatsoper Dresden,

Semperoper, where he conducted more than 350

opera and ballet performances within five years.

After the German reunification, Mo. Fritzsch

was able to accept engagements outside of

Eastern Europe. In 1992/3 he worked as 1 st

Kapellmeister at the Staatsoper Hannover.

During that time, Mo. Fritzsch was appointed

Chief Conductor and Artistic Director at the

Städtische Bühnen and the Philharmonisches

Orchester in Freiburg. There he remained until

1999 enjoying widespread acclaim.

The Verband Deutscher Musikverleger

(association of German music publishers)

honored his 1998/99 season with the

distinction of having the ‘Best Concert Program’.

Mo. Fritzsch has performed with many

orchestras, both within Germany and

internationally. These include: Hamburger

Sinfoniker, Düsseldorfer Sinfoniker,

Philharmonie Essen, Nationaltheater-Orchester

Mannheim, Staatskapelle Schwerin, Berliner

Sinfonie Orchester, Staatskapelle Dresden,

Norddeutsche Philharmonie Rostock,

Staatsorchester Halle, the Swedish Radio

Orchestra, the Norwegian Radio Orchestra,

the Danish Radio Symphony Orchestra, the

Orchestre Philharmonique Strassbourg,

the Orchestra National de Montpellier, the

Orchestra National du Capitole de Toulouse, the

Sydney, Melbourne, Tasmanian, Queensland

and West Australian Symphony Orchestras and

Orchestra Victoria.

Opera Companies with which he has worked

include: Sächsische Staatsoper Dresden,

Opernhaus Köln, Deutsche Oper Berlin,

Komische Oper Berlin, Opera Bastille Paris,

Grazer Oper, the Royal Opera Stockholm,

Malmö Operan and Opera Australia in Sydney

and Melbourne (including Wozzeck, Don

Giovanni, Carmen, Tosca, Rigoletto, Salome,

Der Rosenkavalier).

Mo. Fritzsch recently held the position of

Chief Conductor of the Grazer Oper and

Grazer Philharmonisches Orchester, Austria;

he is currently the Chief Conductor of the

Queensland Symphony Orchestra.

© Patrick Togher Artists’ Management 2013

ANTON KUERTI

PIANO

Pianist Anton Kuerti was born in Austria, grew

up in the U.S., and has lived in Canada for

most of his adult life. His teachers included

Arthur Loesser, Mieczyslaw Horszowski and

Rudolf Serkin. At the age of 11 he performed

the Grieg Concerto with Arthur Fiedler, and,

while still a student, he won the famous

Leventritt Award.

Anton Kuerti has toured 40 countries,

including Japan, Russia, and most European

countries, and has performed with most major

U.S. orchestras and conductors, such as the

New York Philharmonic, National Symphony

(Menuhin), Cleveland Orchestra (Szell), and

the orchestras of Honolulu, Seattle and San

Francisco. His vast repertoire includes some 50

concertos, including one he composed himself.

His Beethoven Emperor Concerto with the

Boston Symphony was hailed by the Boston

Globe: “Kuerti is one of the best interpreters

of Beethoven around….. His playing is strikingly

individual. … not a note had been taken for

granted, with even the most prosaic passages

refracted through a powerful intellectual

prism….. the piano positively detonated the

blazing coda…… showed how, with enough

intelligence and daring, even familiar music can

seem new.”

In Canada Kuerti has appeared in 140

communities and has played with every

professional orchestra, including 45 concerts

with the Toronto Symphony. He is an Officer

of the Order of Canada, and has received

numerous honorary doctorates and awards,

including the Schumann Prize of the Schumann

Gesellschaft and the Governor General’s

Performing Arts Award for Lifetime Artistic

Achievement.

After a recent recital at the Amsterdam

Concertgebouw, critics were in rapture: “Kuerti

played [the Diabelli Variations] so flawlessly

that you could have made it into a CD. And,

much more importantly, it was more poetically

refined than you will ever hear anywhere else.”

- de Volkskrant; the Noord-Hollands Dagblad

raved “ The great imagination Kuerti brought

to the works elevated the performance to an

absolutely top level. What perfection!”

Kuerti has participated in leading festivals,

and on many occasions has shown remarkable

stamina, performing all 5 Beethoven

Concertos plus the Choral Fantasy, or the last

5 Beethoven Piano Sonatas, in one extended

concert. As a chamber musician, he has

performed the major repertoire with such

artists as Gidon Kremer, Yo-Yo Ma, Janos

Starker, and the Cleveland, Guarneri, St.

Lawrence and Tokyo Quartets.

Anton Kuerti is one of today’s most recorded

artists, having put on disc all the Beethoven

Concertos and Sonatas, the Brahms and

Schumann concertos, the Schubert Sonatas

and works by many other composers. His

recordings are heard almost daily on the CBC.

Gramophone magazine called his recent CD

of the Schumann Piano Concerto, “a deeply

memorable contribution to this concerto’s

recorded history”.

10 2013 | QSO FEBRUARY PROGRAM

2013 | QSO FEBRUARY PROGRAM 11


MAESTRO 2

QSO WITH

LANE & FRITZSCH

8pm, Saturday 16 March 2013 | QPAC Concert Hall

THE SIEGE OF LENINGRAD

CONDUTOR

Johannes Fritzsch

PIANO

Piers Lane

MOZART

Piano Concerto No.21

SHOSTAKOVICH

Symphony No.7Leningrad

Mozart’s elegance and Shostakovich’s spirit of renewal.

MAESTRO 3

QSO WITH

WISPELWEY & AADLAND

ULTIMATE HEROES

8pm, Saturday 11 May 2013 | QPAC Concert Hall

CONDUTOR

Eivind Aadland

CELLO

Pieter Wispelwey

WAGNER

Rienzi: Overture

SHOSTAKOVICH

Cello Concerto

No.1

STRAUSS

Ein Heldenleben

Confessional poet, a refreshing vision and an orchestral spree.

TICKETS AVAILABLE NOW!

www.qso.com.au or qtix 136 246

Your State’s Orchestra

CONCERTMASTER

Warwick Adeney

ASSOCIATE

CONCERTMASTER

Alan Smith

VIOLIN 1

Glenn Christensen *

Linda Carello

Lynn Cole

Margaret Connolly

Priscilla Hocking

Ann Holtzapffel

Stephen Phillips

Rebecca Seymour

Joan Shih

Brenda Sullivan

Stephen Tooke

Brynley White

VIOLIN 2

Gail Aitken ~

Wayne Brennan ~

Jane Burroughs

Faina Dobrenko

Simon Dobrenko

Delia Kinmont

Tim Marchmont

Frances McLean

Paulene Smith

Helen Travers

Harold Wilson

VIOLA

Yoko Okayasu ~

Charlotte Burbrook de Vere

Bernard Hoey

Kirsten Hulin-Bobart

Jann Keir-Haantera

Helen Poggioli

Graham Simpson

Paula Stofman

Nicholas Tomkin

CELLO

David Lale ~

Simon Cobcroft >>

Kathryn Close

Andre Duthoit

Matthew Jones

Matthew Kinmont

Jenny Mikkelsen-Stokes

Kaja Skorka

Craig Allister Young

DOUBLE BASS

John Fardon ~

Dushan Walkowicz >>

Anne Buchanan

Justin Bullock

Paul O’Brien

Ken Poggioli

FLUTE

Alexis Kenny ~

Hayley Radke >>

Janine Grantham

PICCOLO

Michael Hallit *

OBOE

Huw Jones ~

Sarah Meagher >>

Alexa Murray

COR ANGLAIS

Liz Chee *

CLARINET

Irit Silver ~

Brian Catchlove +

Kate Travers

BASS CLARINET

Nicholas Harmsen *

BASSOON

Nicole Tait ~

David Mitchell >>

Evan Lewis

CONTRABASS OON

Claire Ramuscak *

FRENCH HORN

Malcolm Stewart ~

Peter Luff >>

Ian O’Brien *

Vivienne Collier-Vickers

Lauren Manuel

TRUMPET

Sarah Wilson ~

Richard Madden >>

John Gould

Paul Rawson

TROMBONE

Jason Redman ~

Dale Truscott >>

BASS TROMBONE

Tom Coyle *

TUBA

Thomas Allely *

HARP

Jill Atkinson *

TIMPANI

Tim Corkeron *

PERCUSSION

David Montgomery ~

Josh DeMarchi >>

~ Section Principal

= Acting Section Principal

* Principal

^ Acting Principal

>> Associate Principal

+ Acting Associate Principal

2013 | QSO FEBRUARY PROGRAM 13


Patrons’ List

Queensland Symphony Orchestra is proud to acknowledge the generosity and

support of our donors for our philanthropic programs.

Maestro ($50,000+)

Bank of Queensland

Tim Fairfax Family Foundation

Jellinbah Group

Harold Mitchell, AC

The Pidgeon Family

John B Reid, AO and Lynn Rainbow Reid

Trevor and Judith St Baker and ERM Power

Mr John and Mrs Georgina Story

Greg and Jan Wanchap

Arthur Waring

Anonymous (1)

Symphony ($20,000 – $49,999)

Dr Julie Beeby

Prof. Ian Frazer, AC and Mrs Caroline Frazer

Leonie Henry

Mrs Andrea Kriewaldt

Frances and Stephen Maitland, OAM RFD

Desmond B Misso Esq.

Margaret Mittelheuser, AM and Cathryn

Mittelheuser, AM

The John Villiers Trust

Rodney Wylie

Anonymous (1)

Concerto ($10,000 – $19,999)

Dr Philip Aitken and Dr Susan Urquhart

The English Family

Nola McCullagh

Dr Graham and Mrs Kate Row

Bruce and Sue Shepherd

Mrs Beverley J Smith

Anonymous (1)

Scherzo ($5,000 – $9,999)

Trudy Bennett

Dr John and Mrs Jan Blackford

Dr Ralph and Mrs Susan Cobcroft

Mrs Iris Dean

Mrs Elva Emmerson

Balena Tassa Pty Ltd

Peggy Allen Hayes

W.R. and L.M. Heaslop

Gwenda Heginbothom

Dr Alison Holloway

Ms Marie Isackson

The Helene Jones Charity Trust

Tony and Patricia Keane

John and Helen Keep

Mrs Pat Killoran

Dr Les and Ms Pam Masel

Mrs Rene Nicolaides, OAM and the late Dr Nicholas

Nicolaides, AM

Ian Paterson

Mr Jordan and Mrs Pat Pearl

Hans and Heidi Rademacher

Anne Shipton

Dr Damien Thomson and Dr Glenise Berry

Helen Zappala

Anonymous (2)

Rondo ($1,000 – $4,999)

Ms Lesley Angus

Mrs Valma Bird

Mrs Nancy Bonnin

Miss Cynthia Burnett

Mrs Georgina Byrom

Peter and Tricia Callaghan

Dr John H. Casey

Greg and Jacinta Chalmers

Cherrill and David Charlton

Mr Ian and Mrs Penny Charlton

In memory of the late John Czerwonka-Ledez

David Devine, Metro Property Development Pty Ltd

Justice James Douglas

Dr Bertram and Mrs Judith Frost

Alan Galwey

Mrs Patricia Gibson

Dr Joan E. Godfrey, OBE

In memory of Ruth Lechte

Ian and Ruth Gough

In memory of Deirdre Greatorex (Hall)

Lea and John Greenaway

David and Janet Ham

Fred and Maria Hansen

In memory of Muriel Fletcher

Miss Barbara Hawken

Patrick and Enid Hill

John L. Hughes

Brendon and Shelli Hulcombe

Bob and Joan James

Mr Ainslie Just

Dr Frank Leschhorn

Rachel Leung

Gaelle Lindrea

Prof. Andrew and Mrs Kate Lister

Mr Donald and Mrs Kate Magarey

Janette and David Marshall

Mr John Martin

Major Performers Pty Ltd

Mrs Daphne McKinnon

Annalisa and Tony Meikle

The Murray Family

Lois Murray

Ron and Marise Nilsson

Dr Henry and Mrs Kathleen Nowik

Mrs Leah Perry

Justice Anthe Philippides

Mr Robin Powell

Dr Phelim Reilly

Pat and Jude Riches

Mr Michael and Mrs Helen Sinclair

Benjamin, Susannah and Henry Skerman

Joy Sleigh

Bernard and Margaret Spilsbury

William Turnbull

Mrs Gwen Warhurst

Prof. Hans and Mrs Frederika Westerman

Mr Ian and Mrs Hannah Wilkey

Anonymous (27)

John Farnsworth-Hall Circle

Named in honour of the first Chief Conductor of QSO

(1947-1954).

Roberta Bourne Henry

Notify us of your intention to bequeath and we

will acknowledge your future gift now.

All enquiries: 3833 5050

Instruments on loan

QSO thanks the National Instrument Bank and

The Anthony Camden Fund for their generous loan

of fine instruments to the recitalists of our Young

Instrumentalist competition.

All donors to QSO are acknowledged on our website at www.qso.com.au.

To learn more about our Philanthropic Programs please contact Gaelle Lindrea

on (07) 3833 5050, or you can donate online at www.qso.com.au/donatenow.

Thank You

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6/02/13 2:35 PM

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6/02/13 2:35 PM


CHAMBER PLAYERS 1

QSO WIND

AND BRASS

3pm, Sunday 10 March 2013 | QSO Studio, South Bank

Maestro Series Chair Donors

Chair Donors support an individual musician’s role within the orchestra and gain

fulfillment through personal interactions with their chosen musician.

Join QSO’s woodwind and brass stars for a performance of virtuosic highlights of the

quintet repertoire.

LUTOLAWSKI

Mini Overture

MILLS

Sonata for Brass Quintet

HINDEMITH

Clarinet Quintet

TICKETS AVAILABLE NOW!

www.qso.com.au or qtix 136 246

qso.com.au/facebook

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qso.com.au/youtube

CARTER

Wind Quintet

HARBISON

Wind Quintet

Principal Guest Conductor

Chair

Eivind Aadland

Trevor and Judith St Baker and

ERM Power

Concertmaster Chair

Warwick Adeney

Prof. Ian Frazer, AC and Mrs

Caroline Frazer

Dr Cathryn Mittelheuser, AM

Mr John and Mrs Georgina Story

Associate Concertmaster

Chair

Alan Smith

Arthur Waring

Principal Chairs

Tim Corkeron, Timpani

Dr Philip Aitken and Dr Susan

Urquhart

Peggy Allen Hayes

Yoko Okayasu, Viola

Dr Ralph and Mrs Susan

Cobcroft

Gail Aitken, Second Violin

Leonie Henry

Sarah Wilson, Trumpet

Mrs Andrea Kriewaldt

Jason Redman, Trombone

Frances and Stephen Maitland,

OAM RFD

Alexis Kenny, Flute

Nola McCullagh

John Fardon, Double Bass

David Montgomery, Percussion

Dr Graham and Mrs Kate Row

Simon Cobcroft, Cello

Dr Damien Thomson and

Dr Glenise Berry

Thomas Allely, Tuba

Wayne Brennan, Second Violin

David Lale, Cello

Irit Silver, Clarinet

Malcolm Stewart, French Horn

Arthur Waring

Player Chairs

Matthew Kinmont, Cello

Kate Travers, Clarinet

Dr Julie Beeby

Graham Simpson, Viola

Alan Galwey

Kathy Close, Cello

Dr David and Mrs Janet Ham

Alexa Murray, Oboe

Dr Les and Ms Pam Masel

Janine Grantham, Flute

Desmond B Misso Esq

Helen Poggioli , Viola

Mrs Rene Nicolaides, OAM

and the late Dr Nicholas

Nicolaides, AM

Delia Kinmont, Violin

Jordan and Pat Pearl

Brenda Sullivan, Violin

Hans and Heidi Rademacher

Anonymous

Stephen Phillips, Violin

Dr Graham and Mrs Kate Row

Andre Duthoit, Cello

Anne Shipton

Richard Madden, Trumpet

Anonymous

Helen Travers, Second Violin

Anonymous

All donors to QSO are acknowledged on our website at www.qso.com.au.

To learn more about our Philanthropic Programs please contact Gaelle Lindrea

on (07) 3833 5050.

QSO_Philanthropy_Maestro Chair Donors_Feb_2013_V4_ART.indd 1

6/02/13 2:36 PM


GALA 1

RETURN TO CITY HALL

CONDUTOR

Nicholas Braithwaite

PRESENTER

Guy Noble

VIOLIN

Warwick Adeney

QSO BRASS ENSEMBLE

Program will include music from;

MUSSORGSKY ARR. HOWARTH

Pictures at an Exhibition

HARRISON

On Bredon Hill

ELGAR

Salut d’amour

ELGAR

The Kingdom

DELIUS

Sleigh Ride

DELIUS

Summer Evening

HOLST

The Planets

BUTTERWORTH

A Shropshire Lad

ARNOLD

Beckus the Dandipratt

TICKETS AVAILABLE NOW!

www.qso.com.au or qtix 136 246

qso.com.au/facebook

qso.com.au/twitter

qso.com.au/youtube

7pm, Monday 8 April 2013 | Brisbane City Hall

PATRON

Her Excellency the Governor of Queensland

Ms Penelope Wensley, AC

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Greg Wanchap Chairman

Marsha Cadman

Tony Denholder

Jenny Hodgson

Tony Keane

John Keep

Karen Murphy

Jason Redman

MANAGMENT

Libby Anstis Interim Chief Executive Officer

Ros Atkinson Executive Assistant to CEO

Alison Barclay Administration Officer

Richard Wenn Director - Artistic Planning

Nicola Manson Assistant Artistic Administrator

Kate Oliver Assistant Artistic Administrator

Pam Lowry Education Liaison Officer

Matthew Farrell Director - Orchestra

Management

Nina Logan Orchestra Manager

Jacinta Ewers Operations Assistant

Peter Laughton Production Manager

Vince Scuderi Production Assistant

Judy Wood Orchestra Librarian

Fiona Lale Assistant Librarian/Artist Liaison

Nadia Myers Libary & Operations Assistant

Rebecca Laughton Catering Coordinator

David Martin Director - Development & Sales

Katya Melendez Relationships and Sales

Coordinator

Rachael Wallis Director - Marketing &

Communications

Tegan Ward Marketing Coordinator

Kendal Alderman Marketing and Media Relations

Officer

Miranda Cass Media Relations Assistant

Gaelle Lindrea Director – Philanthropy

Birgit Willadsen Philanthropy Officer

Robert Miller Director – Human Resources

Judy Wood OH & S Coordinator

John Waight Chief Financial Officer

Sandy Johnston Accountant

Donna Barlow Accounts Payable Officer

QUEENSLAND PERFORMING ARTS CENTRE

PO Box 3567, South Bank, Queensland 4101

Tel: (07) 3840 7444

CHAIR

Henry Smerdon AM

DEPUTY CHAIR

Rachel Hunter

TRUSTEES

Simon Gallaher

Helene George

Bill Grant

Sophie Mitchell

Paul Piticco

Mick Power AM

Susan Street

Rhonda White

EXECUTIVE STAFF

John Kotzas Chief Executive

Leisa Bacon Director - Marketing

Ross Cunningham Director - Presenter Services

Kieron Roost Director - Corporate Services

Tony Smith Director - Patron Services

ACKNOWLEDGMENT

The Queensland Performing Arts Trust is a Statutory

Authority of the State of Queensland and is partially

funded by the Queensland Government.

The Honourable Ros Bates MP

Minister for Science, Information Technology,

Innovation and the Arts

Philip Reed

Director - General, Department of Science,

Information Technology and the Arts

Patrons are advised that the Performing Arts Centre

has EMERGENCY EVACUATION PROCEDURES, a FIRE

ALARM system and EXIT passageways. In case of an

alert, patrons should remain calm, look for the closest

EXIT sign in GREEN, listen to and comply with directions

given by the inhouse trained attendants and move in an

orderly fashion to the open spaces outside the Centre.

2013 | QSO FEBRUARY PROGRAM 19


Our Partners

GOVERNMENT PARTNERS

CORPORATE PARTNERS

MEDIA PARTNERS

CO-PRODUCTIONS

QSO thanks our partners for their support.

All rights reserved, no part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or in any means, electronic

or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage or retrieval system without permission in writing.

The opinions expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect the beliefs of the publication’s team, publisher or any

distributor of the publication. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of statements in this publication,

Queensland Symphony Orchestra cannot accept responsibility for any errors or omissions, or for matters arising from

clerical or printers’ errors. Every effort has been made to secure permission for copyright material prior to printing.

20 2013 | QSO FEBRUARY PROGRAM

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