notebook - Southwest Florida Water Management District

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notebook - Southwest Florida Water Management District

WUP No. 20011400.025 Page 7 of 19 October 30, 2012

1. District ID No. and Permittee ID No.;

2. Estimated annual average daily and peak month quantities;

3. Latitude and longitude;

4. Well(s) shall be located on a legible map which clearly identifies the well location(s). Acceptable

maps include a GIS-generated or aerial map, United States Geological Survey quad map, or copy

of same with a reference to the nearest property boundaries; Well completion report copy; and

5. Pump capacity in gallons per minute.

E.

All sealing water and mitigation wells shall be required to have the flow monitored by a flow meter or other

monitoring device approved by the Water Use Permit Bureau Chief. Total flow from each sealing water

and mitigation well in use shall be recorded on a monthly basis and submitted by the 10 th day of the

following month to the Water Use Permit Bureau (using District forms).


10.


The Permittee shall maintain the monitor well(s) / piezometer(s) and staff gauges listed as “Existing” in the Water

Level Monitoring – Monitor Wells/Piezometers and Staff Gauges Table attached hereto and incorporated herein

as Exhibit "D", measure water levels using either a continuous or manual recorder, and report them to the District

at the frequency listed in the EMP. Water levels shall be recorded relative to the appropriate vertical datum, and

to the maximum extent possible, recorded on a regular schedule as identified in the EMP. The readings shall be

reported online via the WUP Portal at the District website (www.watermatters.org) or emailed to the Water Use

Permit Bureau on or before July 15 th and November 15 th for semi-annual reports (per EMP Section 10.0), and the

tenth day of the month following data collection for monthly reports. The frequency of recording may be modified

by the Water Use Permit Bureau Chief as necessary to ensure the protection of the resource.

11.


Piezometers shall be properly constructed with sufficient surface casing diameter, depth, slotted casing/screen

interval, and sand filter pack to ensure that SAS water levels can be accurately measured. Piezometer casing

materials shall be resistant to degradation due to interaction with groundwater and shall extend at least 18 inches

above land surface. Piezometer tips / ends are to be drilled or slotted so as to eliminate pooling in the

piezometers, resulting in a false reading. Within 30 days of completion, piezometer locations shall be submitted

on a location map which includes the DID numbers. A table indicating the well construction permit number, well

diameter, total depth, and slotted interval for each well shall also be provided.

Within 90 days of completion of the new monitor well(s) / piezometer(s) and staff gauges listed as "Proposed" in

the Water Level Monitoring – Monitor Wells/Piezometers and Staff Gauges (Exhibit "D"), the Permittee shall

record water levels using either a continuous or manual recorder and report them to the District. All data reported

shall be accompanied by the appropriate vertical datum, at the frequency listed in Water Level Monitoring –

Monitor Wells/Piezometers and Staff Gauges Table (Exhibit “D”). To the maximum extent possible, water levels

shall be recorded on a regular schedule: same time each day, same day each week, same week each month as

appropriate to the frequency noted. The readings shall be reported as described in Special Condition 10 above.

The frequency of recording may be modified by the Water Use Permit Bureau Chief, as necessary to ensure the

protection of the resource.


12.

By June 1, 2013, the Permittee shall design and install a limited network of Surficial Aquifer System (SAS) longterm

monitoring wells at all future mine areas where a complete SAS monitoring network has not been installed.

These long-term monitoring wells shall be strategically located so as to provide spatially limited, but

representative SAS data to generally characterize long-term (greater than four years) seasonal water table

fluctuation patterns and ranges within each mine area. Monitoring data obtained from this long-term monitoring

10

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