2013 Conference Brochure - American Society for Quality

asq.org

2013 Conference Brochure - American Society for Quality

2013 Conference on Quality in the Space and Defense Industries

Committee

Robert Bodemuller, Ball Aerospace

Chris Brust, DCMA

Tom Bulk (Co-chair), MDA

John Chino (Co-chair), Northrop Grumman

Paul Chiodo, UTRS Inc.

Ken Crane, NASA Safety Center

Buck Crenshaw, Honeywell Technology Solutions Inc.

Richard Day, Johns Hopkins University

Michael Dreikorn, The IPL Group, LLC

Debra Harrison, Debra Harrison Consulting

Brian Hughitt, NASA Headquarters

Lt. Col. Robert Jackson, U.S. Air Force

Eugene Jaramillo, Raytheon

Ed Jopson, Northrop Grumman

Kirk Ketterer (Co-chair), NASA Kennedy Space Center

Michael Kelly, NASA Godard Space Flight Center

Shelley Klopfenstein, Aerojet

Steve Kosloske, NASA Johnson Space Center

Arvin Llamzon, Honeywell Technology Solutions Inc.

Phil Montag, Honeywell Technology Solutions Inc.

Steven Meyer, UTC Aerospace Systems

Ryan Nowosielski, UTC Aerospace Systems

Jaye Omberg, Lockheed Martin Aeronautics

Amy Peters, Orbital Sciences

Gideon Roth, Cabiran

Marc Saperstein, US Army

Dennis Scott, Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne

Kevin Sheahan, MDA

Mike Shields (Co-chair), DCMA

Mike Swenson (Conference Chair), The Boeing Company

Lee Tait, Aerojet Corporation

Gary Wegrzynowicz, DCMA

James Wade, Raytheon

Radisson Resort at the Port

8701 Astronaut Boulevard

Cape Canaveral, FL

800-333-3333 or 321-784-0000

Sponsored by the ASQ

Aviation, Space & Defense Division

Supported by the National Aeronautics and

Space Administration, the Department of

Defense, the Missile Defense Agency, and the

Defense Contract Management Agency.

This conference will be your most important and

rewarding professional experience for 2013!

The conference includes keynote and featured

speakers, panel presentations, and in-depth

concurrent breakouts. Government and

industry leaders will discuss the latest policies

and practices that will directly affect your

organization.

Recertification Credits From ASQ

ASQ recertification units will be issued for this

event. Please save a copy of your attendee badge

as proof of attendance.

Page

Air Force Airman Dalvin Troublefield conducts a removal and

installation of the tailhook damper on an F-15 Eagle while

Airman Jonathan Sanchez reads step-by-step instructions on

Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, Aug. 1, 2012.


*Quality is Still Free

- Philip B. Crosby

This year’s CQSDI Conference

Planning committee discussed

many ideas for this year’s

theme. We kept coming back to

the constraints we live and work

under and felt that Quality Guru

Mr. Philip B. Crosby’s premise

that Quality is Still Free still

shines through in the 21st Century. Thanks to the Philip

Crosby Associates for so generously allowing us to use

it as our theme. The information below describes Mr.

Crosby’s many contributions to our quality world.

The distinguished career of Philip B. Crosby (1926-2001)

is eminent throughout the global quality community. For

over 35 years, Mr. Crosby was both a philosopher and

pragmatic practitioner of quality management. His early

book on the subject, Quality Is Free, has been credited

with beginning the quality revolution. His message

stimulated international interest and ultimately became a

catalyst for a global awakening and driver for a worldwide

movement.

Mr. Crosby’s innovative thinking and creative outlook

on quality have been an inspiration for thousands of

companies around the world. Because his messages were

simple, designed to be easily recognized and understood,

Philip Crosby continues to inspire us.

As a true testament of the man, the company Mr. Crosby

founded more than 30 years ago still thrives today. While

the approach has evolved, Philip Crosby Associates

continues to help organizations navigate the journey of

change. Their simple, yet powerful, Absolutes of Quality

Management have become the proven foundation for a

sustainable culture of quality.

The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise conducts maritime security operations,

theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation

Enduring Freedom in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility in the Suez

Canal, Oct. 12, 2012.

Mr. Crosby made many significant contributions to

the core body of quality knowledge. His Absolutes

of Quality Management remain the foundation for

how organizations continue to work everyday. So

much of the current language relating to quality was

introduced by Mr. Crosby. Straightforward ideas such

as conformance to requirements, zero defects and the

price of nonconformance were just a few of the quality

fundamentals he simplified for all to embrace.

In 1979, Mr. Crosby founded Philip Crosby Associates,

Inc. Through the Quality College, senior leaders learned

how to establish a culture of prevention to get things done

right the first time. His philosophies have been ingrained

into the fiber of those corporations, both large and small.

Mr. Crosby authored 13 books on the topic of quality.

Some of his most notable titles include:

o Quality Is Free: The Art of Making Quality

Certain, 1979

o Quality Without Tears: The Art of Hassle-Free

Management, 1984

o Let’s Talk Quality, 1989

o Completeness: Quality for the 21st Century, 1992

o Quality Is Still Free, 1996

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QUALITY IS STILL FREE...

Quality Innovations

Quality is Still Free.. When It’s Done Early

The aerospace industry is constantly changing and

evolving. Cost reduction, increasing regulations and

complex-manufacturing advances threaten supply chain

quality and demand an increasing focus on innovative

processes and tools. Innovation has become a global

necessity, and the United States passed an Innovation

Act in 2005 to promote innovation in manufacturing.

Quality professionals are well positioned to champion

their organizations, leveraging intellectual capital,

advancing skills, and knowledge management to generate

breakthrough procedures, practices, and products. New

approaches to quality offer a great opportunity for

organizations to shift from established paradigms and

offer innovative solutions for operations. This session

focuses on some exciting examples of innovation in quality

processes and tools to confront changes in requirements

and regulations, as well as to adapt to advances in

manufacturing.

As Philip Crosby said several decades ago, “Quality

is Free”. And in his 1980 book, by the same name, he

discusses how to transform quality from activities that

only occur on the manufacturing floor to efforts taking

place in management offices. Crosby’s philosophy was to

avoid costs associated with “unquality things” by taking

preventative steps toward “making quality certain.” And

through many success stories over the years the proverb

“an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” has

been readily applied to the Cost of Quality. Specifically,

early investments in prevention costs (such as quality

planning, supplier evaluation, capability studies, and

quality education) have been shown to provide positive

returns through significant reductions in both internal

and external failure costs. However, while this proverb

is recognized by most as fact it is often challenging for

managers to sufficiently program quality prevention

activities. And as the US Government continues to

look for cost savings measures, there is concern that

such investments will be further scrutinized across

all departments and agencies. More so than ever, it is

incumbent upon quality professionals to communicate

the value of quality prevention and to convince program

managers that such investment is necessary.

This panel will explore different ways that this can be

accomplished and how easily program managers both

within government and industry can be sold on early

quality involvement. Individual breakout sessions will be

held to have deeper discussions.

So just as Phillip Crosby said decades ago, Quality is Still

Free. This is a great selling point in this increasingly cost

constrained environment!

A formation of aircraft fly over the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower under way in the

Mediterranean Sea, July 10, 2012. The air crews are assigned to Carrier Air Wing 7.

The USS Dwight D. Eisenhower is on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime

security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th

Fleet areas of responsibility.

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Innovation and Success in a Cost-Constrained Environment

Current Topics in Industry

Managing Across Generations

Quality professionals have to confront issues ranging from

increasingly sophisticated counterfeit parts (…and the

liability that comes from escapes) to higher levels of ESD

and FOD sensitivity and the fallout from unique industry

concerns (e.g., budget Sequestration, ITAR restrictions).

On the other hand, with budget-driven emphasis on doing

more with less, and the prospects of losing valued talent

through the inevitable lay-offs, we also have opportunities

for greater cooperation horizontally among government

agencies and among contractors, as well as vertically

through the supply chain. Tailored requirements and risk

management, evolving standards… where should our

attention be to stay ahead of the curve?

Will these challenges and opportunities foster creative

solutions or will they be stymied by the old stovepipes,

turf wars, and cost and schedule concerns? Will fewer

suppliers want to play in the tougher-requirements arena

as the Aerospace and Defense market share of their

business dwindles? This panel will address some of these

topics from various viewpoints and offer insights into the

path ahead.

We are in an industry where talented employees are at a

premium and at a time in history when multiple generations

are interacting with each other in the workplace. In

this session, discussions will focus on how multiple

generations - from Baby Boomers to Gen Y- interact with

one another. These generational changes emphasize the

need to develop new ways of thinking and doing business

as Generations X and Y influence corporate culture

by introducing a diverse set of work ethics, means of

communication, interpretations of professional behavior,

and expectations into the work environment.

As industry faces challenges in recruiting, retaining,

and managing a new generation, it is paramount that

we examine how to improve the STEM pipeline with

outreach activities in order to increase the number of those

pursuing careers in engineering and other STEM fields.

The panel will also cover the effect Generational Shifts

have on socio-economic, geo-political, technological,

and human factors. The discussion will focus on the need

for adaptability in all aspects of the work environment in

order to successfully run a global airline.

An Air Force load master observes aboard a MC-130E aircraft as

a CH-47 Chinook helicopter receives an aerial refueling during

Emerald Warrior over Duke Field, Fla., March 6, 2012.

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Program Agenda

Monday, March 18

7:00-8:00 a.m. Registration/Continental Breakfast

8:00-8:15 a.m. Welcome and Opening Remarks

• Mike Swenson

Conference Chair and Chair Elect,

Aviation Space and Defense Division, ASQ

8:15-8:45 a.m. Keynote Speaker

• Christopher J. Scolese

Director, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

8:45-9:15 a.m. Featured Speaker

• Colonel Matthew Skeen

Commander, 45th Launch Group

United States Air Force

9:15-9:30 a.m. Break

9:30-10:30 a.m. Session One Panel

Quality Innovations

• Gareth Thomas

Project Quality Manager,

Champlain Oil & Gas Anadarko Mozambique Project

• Dan Berry

VP of Operations, Newfield Network

• Martin Vantrieste

VP of QA, Amgen, Inc.

10:30-10:45 a.m. Transition to Panel Breakouts

10:45-11:45 a.m. Session One Panel Breakouts

11:45 a.m.-1:00 p.m. Lunch

1:00-1:30 p.m. Luncheon Keynote Speaker

• Michael Joyce

Senior VP of Global Supply Chain Operations,

Lockheed Martin Corp.

1:30-1:45 p.m. Transition to General Session

1:45-2:15 p.m. Featured Speaker

• TBA

2:15-2:30 p.m. Break

2:30-3:30 p.m. Session Two Panel

Quality is Still Free..When It’s Done Early

• Dennis Owens

Manager, Defense Systems Quality Engineering Dept.,

Sandia National Laboratories

• John Varley

VP of Quality and Mission Success, Lockheed Martin

• Mike Wadzinski

QS Director (Acting)

Missile Defense Agency

3:30-3:45 p.m. Transition to Panel Breakouts

3:45-4:45 p.m. Session Two Panel Breakout

5:00-6:00 p.m. Attendee Social

Tuesday, March 19

7:00-8:00 a.m. Registration/Continental Breakfast

8:00-8:15 a.m. Opening Remarks

• Ed Jopson

Mission & Supplier Assurance Manager,

Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems

8:15-8:45 a.m. Keynote Speaker

• TBA

8:45-9:15 a.m. Featured Speaker

• Russell Romanella

SMA Director, KSC

9:15-9:30 a.m. Break

9:30-10:30 a.m. Session Three Panel

Current Topics in the Industry

• Dave Pinkley

Chief Engineer, Mission Assurance

Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation

• Jeannette Plante

NASA Workmanship Standards Program Manager,

NASA GSFC

• Barry Birdsong

Division Chief Parts & Materials Engineering,

Missile Defense Agency

• Clifton J. “Jerry” Charlow

VP of Program Management Excellence,

Raytheon Missile Systems

10:30-10:45 a.m. Transition to Panel Breakouts

10:45-11:45 a.m. Session Three Panel Breakouts

11:45 a.m.-1:00 p.m. Lunch

1:00-1:30 p.m. Keynote Speaker

• Michael Bright

VP, Aerojet Missile Defense & Strategic Systems

1:30-3:00 p.m. Special Topics Session

Managing Across Generations

• JJ DeGiovanni

Managing Director of Ground Safety, United Airlines

• Dr. Timothy Rosio, MD

Board Certified Dermatologist – El Dorado Hills, CA

• Michael Benton

Quality Analyst, Aerojet

• David Butler

CEO, Next Ed

A reminder to all that the NASA Quality Leadership Forum

(QLF) will be held in this same location on Wednesday and

Thursday. It is open to all wishing to attend with no charge.

Agenda is available at CQSDI registration.

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Keynote Speaker (8:15 a.m.)

Featured Speaker (8:45 a.m.)

Christopher J. Scolese

Director

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Colonel Matthew Skeen

Commander

45th Launch Group

United States Air Force

Mr. Christopher J. Scolese was named the director of

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center March 5, 2012. At

Goddard, Mr. Scolese leads a major U.S. laboratory for

developing and operating unmanned scientific spacecraft.

Goddard manages many of NASA’s Earth observation,

astronomy, and space physics missions.

Previously, Mr. Scolese served as the Associate

Administrator of NASA Headquarters, the agency’s

highest-ranking civil servant position. As Associate

Administrator, he was responsible for the oversight and

integration of NASA’s programmatic and technical efforts

to ensure the successful accomplishment of the agency’s

overall mission. From January 20, 2009, until July 2009,

he served as the Acting Administrator of NASA. As the

Acting Administrator, he was responsible for leading the

development, design, and implementation of the nation’s

civil space program. As such, he provided overall leadership

for NASA’s multiple field installations, worked closely

with the executive and legislative branches to ensure that

NASA was supporting appropriate national policy, and

led an international collaboration in carrying out highprofile

space missions including the Space Shuttle, the

International Space Station, the Hubble Space Telescope,

and a multitude of other scientific and technological

efforts.

Mr. Scolese also served as NASA’s Chief Engineer. As

Chief Engineer, he was responsible for ensuring that

development efforts and mission operations within the

agency were planned and conducted on a sound engineering

basis, as well as for the long-term health of the NASA

engineering workforce.

Colonel Matthew E. Skeen is commander, 45th Launch

Group, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. The

launch group is the space wing focal point for Department

of Defense (DoD), civil and commercial space launchrelated

activities. The group provides vital operations,

engineering and maintenance support for launch vehicles

and government satellites prepared and launched on the

Eastern Range.

Colonel Skeen entered the Air Force in 1990 after

graduating from the Air Force Academy. In his first

assignment, he served as a payload manager participating

in 13 Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite launches

and one MILSTAR satellite launch at Cape Canaveral

Air Station, Florida. He then attended the Air Force Test

Pilot School at Edwards Air Force Base, California. After

graduation, he served as an F-16 flight test engineer and

later as a flight commander, assistant operations officer

and test squadron commander.

Following these assignments, Colonel Skeen attended Air

Command and Staff College at Maxwell Air Force Base,

Alabama. He then worked as the Director of Systems

Engineering and as Deputy Program Manager for satellite

acquisition programs at the National Reconnaissance

Office in Chantilly, Virginia before attending the National

War College at Fort McNair in Washington, D.C. Prior

to his current assignment, Colonel Skeen was the Deputy

Director of Manned Airborne Intelligence Surveillance

and Reconnaissance (ISR) Programs in the Office of the

Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence helping to

provide oversight to Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine

Corps ISR programs.

Formerly, Mr. Scolese was the Deputy Director of the

Goddard Space Flight Center where he assisted the director

in overseeing all activities. He also served as the Deputy

Associate Administrator in the Office of Space Science at

NASA Headquarters. In this position, he was responsible

for the management, direction, and oversight of NASA’s

Space Science Flight Program, mission studies, technology

development, and overall contract management of the Jet

Propulsion Laboratory.

Page


SESSION ONE

Session Manager/Panel Moderator

Phil Montag

Director, Sustaining Engineering and

Assurance Services ,

Honeywell Technology Solutions Inc.

Mr. Philip Montag is the Director of Sustaining

Engineering and Assurance Services for Honeywell.

Honeywell’s programs and contracts under Mr. Montag’s

responsibility provide technical support in the form

of personnel and materials for NASA, USGS, DTRA,

FAA, Honeywell, Academia, and over 60 commercial

customers. Support under his programs includes software

and hardware quality assurance, calibration of IM&TE,

test resource management, workmanship training and

inspection to NASA and Industry Standards, QMS audits

and Safety audits of suppliers in Aerospace, Academia

and Energy companies, counterfeit parts activities, global

asset management to Government DCMA compliance

requirements, and installation and maintenance of

measurement equipment of seismic activity and global

threat activities. Resources are provided both nationally

and internationally.

Prior to joining Honeywell, Mr. Montag held positions

with Supplier Management Innovations Inc. as CEO,

with Ciena as director of Supplier Technologies &

Quality Assurance, and with AT&T Submarine Systems

as supplier quality manager.

Mr. Montag began his career in supplier quality and

technology management at AT&T in Reading, PA. For

14 years, he supported AT&T Submarine Systems in

various roles, including supporting technology transfer

of manufacturing processes from Bell Laboratories

into manufacturing technical support for assembly and

test of lasers for the first fiber optic long-haul undersea

communication cables, and supplier quality manager for

all high-cost/high-reliability/high-risk components for

the undersea and terminal equipment. He has extensive

background in the areas of laser/optical component

manufacturing and qualification, supplier management,

and supplier auditing.

Monday, March 18

Quality Innovations

As Director of Supplier Technologies and Quality

Assurance, he managed a group of commodity engineers

and incoming inspection operations for all components

and sub-assemblies purchased by the company. In this

role, he created and implemented corporate processes

for component/supplier qualification, supplier auditing,

supplier selection, and supplier ratings. In 2003 he joined

Honeywell and prior to his role as Director he held

positions as program manager for the NASA Supplier

Assurance Contract, the NASA Workmanship Training

Center, the NASA Contractor Assurance Services contract,

the NASA Six-Sigma Support Contract, and MIT Lincoln

Labs Technical Support Contract.

During Mr. Montag’s career of more than 30 years in

supplier and business management, he has managed a

business portfolio of over $50M/year with over 400 staff,

audited more than 300 suppliers throughout the world. He

holds a Bachelor’s Degree in computer science, Associate

Degree in specialized electronics technology, and is a

member of the Optical Society of America and Institute

of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and the ASQ

Aviation, Space & Defense Division.

Abstract: The aerospace industry is constantly changing

and evolving. Cost reduction, increasing regulations and

complex-manufacturing advances threaten supply chain

quality and demand an increasing focus on innovative

processes and tools. Innovation has become a global

necessity, and the United States passed an Innovation

Act in 2005 to promote innovation in manufacturing.

Quality professionals are well positioned to champion

their organizations, leveraging intellectual capital,

advancing skills, and knowledge management to generate

breakthrough procedures, practices, and products. New

approaches to quality offer a great opportunity for

organizations to shift from established paradigms and

offer innovative solutions for operations. This session

focuses on some exciting examples of innovation in quality

processes and tools to confront changes in requirements

and regulations, as well as to adapt to advances in

manufacturing.

Following his AT&T career, Mr. Montag joined CIENA,

a newly formed telecommunications equipment provider.

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SESSION ONE PANELISTS

Gareth Thomas

Project Quality Manager

Champlain Oil & Gas Anadarko Mozambique Project

Mr. Gareth Thomas is the Project Quality Manager for

Champlain Oil & Gas Anadarko Mozambique Project.

Mr. Gareth has been working in the field of Quality for

over forty-three years. His career in Quality Assurance

began as a metallurgist in a steel company, manufacturing

steel billets for the automotive and construction industries.

In the early 80’s, he took a position in the oil and gas

industry, beginning his role in that industry working as

an inspector, an NDE technician, a welding engineer and

for the last twenty years as a Quality Manager. He has

held the responsibility for maintaining quality during all

aspects of Front End Engineering Development (FEED),

detailed design, procurement, execution, commissioning

and start-up.

Mr. Gareth’s quality roles in the oil and gas industry have

provided him with extensive experience on static platforms

offshore in California, floating platforms offshore in the

Gulf of Mexico, and Floating Production, and Storage

and Offloading (FPSO) ships offshore in Angola and

Nigeria. His career has taken him to the Middle East (2

years), Korea (12 years), Singapore (2 years) and US (10

years). At this point in his career, he decided to further his

education by obtaining an MBA in Project Management

from the American Intercontinental University, Chicago,

Illinois.

Mr. Gareth is currently the Project Quality Manager for

Anadarko Mozambique Area 1 LNG Development Project

that is offshore in Mozambique. It is approximately a $20B

project that will entail an onshore LNG (Liquid Natural

Gas) liquefaction plant and an infrastructure including

an airport capable of landing 747 aircraft, sub-sea gas

gathering manifolds & pipeline system (approximately

200 miles of pipeline) , LNG carriers (approximately 15),

tugs, pilot boats, and coast guard cutters.

Mr. Gareth is supported by his wife of 38 years, Frances.

They have two children. His son Rhodri is in the oil

and gas business as well and is a delivery manager for

assets managed offshore projects in the North Sea. His

daughter Lowri is an in-house counsel for a British based

recruitment firm in Houston that supplies oil and gas

personnel to clients in the US. Mr. Gareth holds a degree

in metallurgy from Swansea College of Higher Education,

Wales, U.K.

Breakout 1: The Relationship Between Quality and

Safety in the Oil and Gas Industry

Facilitator: Gareth Thomas

Abstract: The oil and gas industry is a dynamic moving

target that is constantly changing due to the nature of the

business. Geo-political concerns include locations of the

facilities (security issues dealing with Somali Pirates),

depth of the ocean floor (5000 feet +), remoteness of the

site (self-sustaining), counterfeit products, manufacturing

carried out by 1000+ different contractors, sub-contractors

and suppliers, funding for $10-20B, etc. These are just

some of the issues we deal with on an ongoing basis.

The oil and gas industry is highly regulated in regards

to quality and safety due to the historical failures that

have appeared over the years such as the BP ‘Macondo’

Prospect, BP Texas City, Exxon Valdez, and Occidental

Piper Alpha. This session will explain what the relationship

is between quality and safety and how the two co-mingle

throughout the design, procurement, execution, testing,

and lifetime operation of the facility.

This quality forum will highlight to the audience what is

currently being carried out on a $20B project destined for

Mozambique, East Africa bringing natural gas onshore

then liquefying it so that it can be exported to India, Japan,

and China and bring needed revenue to the country.

Transocean’s Deepwater Millennium is performing an

accelerated well testing program that includes installing

observation gauges and conducting several drill stem tests

for Anadarko’s natural gas wells offshore Mozambique.

Page


SESSION ONE PANELISTS

Dan Berry

Vice President of Operations

Newfield Network

Mr. Dan Berry has been building and empowering

teams and leaders to increase their influence and impact

in organizations for over three decades. Mr. Berry has

conducted workshops and has been a repeat guest speaker

at the NASA Supply Chain Conference, Aerospace

Corporation’s Supplier Quality Improvement Council and

the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics.

Mr. Berry is the Vice President of Operations at Newfield

Network. He is the retired Director of Quality at Ball

Aerospace & Technologies Corp. concluding nearly 25

years with Ball Aerospace. Prior to joining Newfield, he

founded Quintessence Transformational Coaching LLC

and serves as President.

Mr. Berry is a Newfield Certified Coach, an International

Coach Federation Associate Certified Coach and a

graduate of the Body and Movement Program at Newfield.

He grew up on the front range of Colorado and panhandle

of Nebraska, earning his Mechanical Engineering Degree

from the University of Nebraska.

Aviation is Mr. Berry’s avocation, receiving his glider,

private pilot, instrument and seaplane ratings starting at

age 15. He applies his mechanical aptitude by building

experimental aircraft. He has completed and test flown

both of his award winning planes, an RV6 and Piper Cub

replica.

Mr. Berry has served over 25 space flight projects with an

emphasis on leadership, optical mounting techniques and

Cryogenic Cooler mechanisms. He coauthored the Opto-

Mechanical Design Handbook for Ball Aerospace and has

published 3 Cryogenic Cooler conference presentation

papers as well as co-authored a paper about the Kepler

photometer and mission.

Breakout 2: Reducing Waste in Broken

Communications: Achieving Impressive Measurable

Results

Facilitator: Dan Berry

Abstract: Today’s Aerospace and Defense industry is

vastly different from the 1970’s and has significantly

changed in the past ten years. University and college

education cannot prepare us for the manic pace and frenetic

shifting sands of the modern business world. Stress is at

an all-time high. Most companies are under pressure with

budget cuts and an eye on their bottom line. Skills are

becoming obsolete faster than ever, while new attitudes

and tools are being thrust upon all levels of an organization.

Communicating in today’s environment is more critical

than ever for coordinating action. Traditionally, being a

good communicator has meant that we “know the right

words to say when the moment arrives.” Unfortunately,

this definition of communication has been outdated for

several decades. A new interpretation is available as “The

total understanding that develops out of any encounter

between human beings.”

Thus, communication includes the emotions produced,

what is heard and understood, not just what is said, the

visceral responses of both people’s bodies, and countless

other nuances. As you can imagine, communication on

this level has to do not just with what you say, but with the

tone of your voice, the look in your eye and, your posture;

it is “full contact communication” and cannot be faked.

This panel will expand on the article co-authored by Mr.

Berry and published by Aerospace Corporations August

2012 “Getting in Right” newsletter. Mr. Berry will reveal

the fundamentals that demonstrated a measurable 57%

reduction of repeating issues. This experiential session,

accomplished in an environment of “serious lightness”,

will provide participants with key takeaways that can be

applied immediately at the start of your next conversation

and business day.

Community service is also important to Mr. Berry where

he has been the past president of the Boulder Evening

Optimist Club, local Experimental Aircraft Association,

Airport Board Chairman and Newfield Front Range

Alumni Group facilitator.

Page

Kepler is a NASA Discovery mission designed to search for

extrasolar planets. The spacecraft’s 84-megapixel camera will

focus on a single region of the sky and snap repeated images

of 100,000 stars looking for those that dim periodically.


SESSION ONE PANELISTS

Martin VanTrieste

Vice President of Quality

Amgen, Inc.

Mr. Martin VanTrieste is the senior vice president of

Quality at Amgen. Mr. VanTrieste is responsible for all

aspects of quality assurance, quality control, compliance,

operational excellence, environment, health and safety,

and training at Amgen.

Prior to joining Amgen, Mr. VanTrieste was with Bayer

HealthCare’s Biological Products Division as Vice

President of Worldwide Quality and Abbott Laboratories

as the Vice President of Quality Assurance for the

Hospital Products Division. While at Abbott, he held

various positions in quality, operations, and research and

development. He started his career at Abbott in 1983 after

obtaining his Pharmacy Degree from Temple University

School of Pharmacy.

Mr. VanTrieste has been actively involved with various

professional and trade organizations, including United

States Pharmacopeia (USP), Pharmaceutical Quality

Research Institute (PQRI), Pharmaceutical Research and

Manufacturers of America (PhRMA), and AdvaMed, and

he is a member of the Board of Directors of the Parenteral

Drug Associations (PDA). He is the founder and first

Chairman of Rx-360 and is currently on their Board of

Directors. Rx-360 is a nonprofit international supply chain

organization that will enhance patient safety by increasing

the security and quality of all parts of the supply chain.

PharmaVoice in 2012 named Mr. VanTrieste as one of the

100 most inspiring people in the pharmaceutical industry

and call him “a man with a mission”.

Breakout 3: Quality Management System Application

in the Pharmaceutical Industry: Driving Prevention

Rather Than Intervention

Facilitator: Martin VanTrieste

Abstract: The pharmaceutical Quality Management

System is being transformed into a modern Quality

Management System. Historically the Quality Management

System was heavily influenced by a “test and inspect

in quality” philosophy that was the result of a history

of past tragedies. Over the generations of legislatures,

regulators and industry professionals, this philosophy has

been engrained into the Quality Management System.

Until recently, there has not been a need or a focus to

make improvements in the Quality Management System.

However, increased globalization, greater competition and

growing pressure to reduce health care cost is forcing us to

improve the pharmaceutical Quality Management System

and manufacturing processes.

Through benchmarking both inside and outside of the

pharmaceutical industry with others such as defense,

aerospace, automotive and electronics, Amgen has

established a modern Quality Management System that

drives prevention rather than intervention, improves

product quality, increases the robustness of the supply

chain and improves speed to market all while remaining

cost competitive. At the end of the two presentations,

hopefully you are convinced that doing it right the first

time is best for patients and the cost of medicines!

A U.S. Army explosive ordnance disposal

unit safely detonates an improvised explosive

device on the side of Route Crowbar in Khowst

province, Afghanistan, March 24, 2012.

Page 10


Luncheon Keynote Speaker (1:00 p.m.)

Michael Joyce

Senior Vice President

of Global Supply Chain Operations

Lockheed Martin Corporation

NASA’s Juno spacecraft is readied for lifting out of a thermal vacuum

chamber following testing to simulate the environment of space over

the range of conditions the probe will encounter during its mission.

When Juno reaches Jupiter in 2016, it will be farther from the sun

than any previous solar-powered spacecraft. This image was taken on

March 13, 2011, at Lockheed Martin Space Systems in Denver.

Mr. Michael Joyce is Senior Vice President of Global

Supply Chain Operations. Mr. Joyce’s responsibilities

include developing, documenting, and executing a

comprehensive Supply Chain Management strategic plan

which will drive optimal customer value and affordability.

In addition he is responsible for corporate wide Earned

Value Management Systems and compliance.

Previously, Mr. Joyce held the position of Senior Vice

President, Operations and Program Management. His

responsibilities included program management, production

operations, subcontractor management, quality, operating

excellence and global supply chain management. He

was formerly the Vice President of Operations for the

Aeronautical Systems Business Unit responsible for

overall operations and supply chain management across

the business unit. He joined Lockheed Martin in August

1997. He brings over 30 years’ experience in world-class

processes that have resulted in significant cost reductions

and quality improvements when applied to a broad variety

of aerospace systems.

Before joining Lockheed Martin, Mr. Joyce was Vice

President of Manufacturing for AlliedSignal Aerospace in

Torrance, California where he implemented the six sigma

program and introduced the lean-manufacturing methods

into the mechanical and electronic aerospace product

lines.

From 1978 to 1996, Mr. Joyce served in a variety

of increasingly responsible program management,

engineering, and manufacturing positions with the Pratt &

Whitney Aircraft unit of United Technologies Corporation

in East Hartford, Connecticut. Joyce was Director of

Pratt & Whitney’s Turbine Airfoils Product Center, where

he implemented advanced processes that rapidly reduced

costs and improved quality. He also served as a program

manager for the PW/Boeing 777 program.

Mr. Joyce holds Bachelor’s Degrees in mathematics and

engineering from Columbia University in New York City

and a Master’s Degree in mechanical engineering from

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York.

Page 11


SESSION TWO

Monday, March 18

Quality is Still Free.. When It’s Done Early

Session Manager/Panel Moderator

Debra Harrison

President

Debra Harrison Consulting

Ms. Debra Harrison has been in the Quality Assurance and

Quality Management Profession for the majority of her

career. When Ms. Harrison retired, she was responsible for

policy and training for the Defense Contract Management

Agency’s (DCMA) QA workforce. In her broad career

she was on the AF Contract Management Division staff,

she worked with the AF Systems Command Inspector

General, she was a QA Division Chief in AF and Defense

Plant Representative Offices, she was DCMA Liaison to

NASA based out of Marshall Space Flight Center, and she

was the DoD representative to the International Aerospace

Quality Group (IAQG). Her staff held various positions

on committees such as the QA Chair on the Defense

Federal Acquisition Regulation Committee. They were

responsible for the Host Nation Process for DCMA with

NATO and NASA review team activities.

Ms. Harrison has a Master of Science Degree in National

Resource Strategy from the Industrial College of the

Armed Forces. She is currently an independent consultant

and an active volunteer with ASQ which includes being

the Society Bylaws Committee Chair as well as Past Chair

of the Aviation Space and Defense Division.

Abstract: As Philip Crosby said several decades ago,

Quality is Free”. And in his 1980 book, by the same

name, he discusses how to transform quality from

activities that only occur on the manufacturing floor to

efforts taking place in management offices. Crosby’s

philosophy was to avoid costs associated with “unquality

things” by taking preventative steps toward “making

quality certain.” And through many success stories over

the years the proverb “an ounce of prevention is worth

a pound of cure” has been readily applied to the Cost of

Quality. Specifically, early investments in prevention costs

(such as quality planning, supplier evaluation, capability

studies, and quality education) have been shown to

provide positive returns through significant reductions

in both internal and external failure costs. However,

while this proverb is recognized by most as fact it is

often challenging for managers to sufficiently program

quality prevention activities. And as the US Government

continues to look for cost savings measures, there is

concern that such investments will be further scrutinized

across all departments and agencies. More so than ever, it

is incumbent upon quality professionals to communicate

the value of quality prevention and to convince program

managers that such investment is necessary.

This panel will explore different ways that this can be

accomplished and how easily program managers both

within Government and Industry can be sold on early

quality involvement. Individual breakout sessions will be

held to have deeper discussions.

So just as Phillip Crosby said decades ago, Quality is Still

Free. This is a great selling point in this increasingly cost

constrained environment!

An Alaska Air National Guard HC-130 aircraft and

HH-60 Pave Hawk helicopter practice helicopter

aerial refueling over Joint Base Elmendorf-

Richardson, Alaska, March 14, 2012.

Page 12


SESSION TWO PANELISTS

Dennis Owens

Manager, Defense Systems Quality Engineering Department

Sandia National Laboratories

Breakout 1: Quality is Free: When it’s done early: A

practitioner’s approach to “getting in the game”

Facilitator: Dennis Owens

Mr. Dennis Owens manages the Defense Systems Quality

Engineering Department at Sandia National Laboratories

(SNL) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Mr. Owen’s

organization provides R&D Systems Engineering, Quality

Engineering, and Quality Assurance support to Sandia’s

Work for Others (WFO) Department of Defense projects

and programs. His career began at GE Aircraft Engines in

1988 in advanced composite fabrication and later turbine

component manufacturing. In 1995 he joined Silmax, Inc.,

a semi-conductor and wafer reclamation company, as a

Quality Engineer. At Silmax, Mr. Owens was responsible

for designing and implementing the quality management

system and supplier quality program.

In 1999, Mr. Owens joined Allied Signal Power Systems

(ASPS) as a Supplier Quality Engineer. At ASPS he was

responsible for designing the quality management system

and supplier quality programs. In 2001, Mr. Owens joined

SNL as a Senior Quality Engineer. At Sandia his career

has spanned from generator technology and software

tester qualification to Advanced Concept and Technology

Development (ACTD) programs for Sandia’s Integrated

Military Development Center (IMSDC) now Integrated

Military Systems (IMS).

Abstract: The key points of focus of this breakout will be:

• Making quality certain and,

• The value of prevention through a process for

predictability

The investment made in our vocation is a well thought out

and strategic process. As quality professionals we have the

opportunity to embrace and teach that our value proposition

rests in our reputation for predictability. Therefore, quality

can be sold “early”… if we know how to find it, design it,

and sell it. This discussion will focus on four cases studies,

from Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque New

Mexico. At the end of this session, participants will be able

to understand how to build a reputation of predictability

which leads to trust, which leads to getting in the game.

F-16 Fighting Falcons demonstrate an “Elephant Walk” as they taxi down a

runway during an exercise on Kunsan Air Base, South Korea, March 2, 2012.

Mr. Owens holds certifications in internal auditing

(RABQSA), and LM21 Lean Six Sigma. From 2005-

2007 he authored several articles in the American

Society for Quality (ASQ) Quality Progress magazine

on quality management, defect analysis, and continuous

improvement. He has been invited to speak at NASA and

ASQ conferences and is a 2013 BEYA Trailblazer award

recipient. Mr. Owens received his Bachelor’s Degree in

Mechanical Engineering Technology from New Mexico

State University and a Master’s of Arts Degree in

Organizational Management and Leadership.

Page 13


SESSION TWO PANELISTS

John Varley

Vice President of Quality and Mission Success

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Breakout 2: Supply Chain Quality Is Also Free: When

It’s Done Early!

Facilitator: John Varley

Mr. John J. Varley is Vice President of Quality and

Mission Success for Lockheed Martin Missiles and

Fire Control (LMMFC) business area, a world leader

in providing superior weapons systems and advanced

technologies that protect US and allied forces. Mr. Varley

holds the responsibility for the strategic direction of

LMMFC’s Quality and Mission Success (QMS) for the

business area. As the QMS Vice President, the business

has been recognized with state quality awards, several

‘Top 10 Plant’ awards, The Shingo Quality Award, and

culminated in being recognized with the 2012 Malcolm

Baldrige National Quality Award.

Mr. Varley began his career as a machinist and has held

numerous key positions, progressing into leadership roles

at several LM business units and locations. Since joining

the MFC team, he has held various Director positions

supporting Ocala, Dallas, Orlando, and UK locations.

Active in the community, Mr. Varley serves on the Board

for the Florida Sterling Council, the Board for the Central

Florida YMCA, and is an advocate for the STEM program

(Science Technology Engineering & Mathematic) focusing

on after school programs. At Lockheed Martin, Mr. Varley

is a member of the LMMFC Diversity Council, and has

served as President of the LMMFC Management Club.

Mr. Varley will earn the honor as a Malcolm Baldrige

Fellow in 2013.

Abstract: Comprising approximately 70% of the costs

associated with hardware based government programs;

the supply chain represents both the largest challenge and

the largest opportunity for Quality professionals. Due to

increasing financial stress, the supply chain is arguably

the most vulnerable area for financially driven changes

in performance. Making an upfront investment to qualify

and categorize sources of supply, educate the supply chain

on customer requirements, and team with suppliers to

share our best practices has resulted in increased Quality

performance and immeasurable cost avoidances.

We will review some of the tools and best practices that

Lockheed Martin’s Missiles and Fire Control Business Unit

utilizes to proactively perform supplier and sub-tier risk

characterization, evaluate realized supplier performance,

drive objective supplier selections, share operations best

practices, and perform ongoing supplier education. These

approaches have resulted in the improved and sustained

performance of our supply chain in this increasingly cost

competitive environment.

Mr. Varley is a native of Philadelphia, PA where he

received his Bachelor of Science Degree in Manufacturing

Engineering from Spring Garden College. He also holds

a Master’s Degree in Project Management from Keller

Business School at DeVry University.

Mr. Varley and his wife, Gina, reside in Central Florida

where their son and daughter attended the University

of Central Florida. Their daughter and son-in-law have

recently blessed the Varley’s with their first grandchild.

Lockheed Martin’s Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile (JASSM) recently

completed F-15E platform integration with a successful all-up round (AUR)

flight test at White Sands Missile Range, N.M.

Page 14


SESSION TWO PANELISTS

Michael Wadzinski

QS Director (Acting)

Missile Defense Agency

Mr. Michael Wadzinski is the MDA/QS Director (Acting)

for the Ballistic Missile Defense System and the QS

Chief Engineer, responsible for ensuring and providing

independent assessments and oversight for Safety,

Quality, and Mission Assurance (SQMA) for the BMDS

programs. Mr. Wadzinski is responsible for developing

SQMA policy and requirements, as well as SQMA for

BMDS level tests.

Breakout 3

Facilitator: Mike Wadzinski

Abstract: TBA

Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) is the sea-based component of the Missile

Defense Agency’s Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS).

Mr. Wadzinski served as the QS Functional Manager for

Safety Quality and Mission Assurance for the Ground

Missile Defense (GMD) Program from 2007–10,

providing independent assessments and oversight for

SQMA. He served as the first MDA Deputy Director

for Safety from 2003–07, responsible for ensuring the

safety of MDA personnel and resources at all locations.

He led the development of MDA safety requirements and

policies, ensured residual safety risks were accepted at the

proper level of management, and provided independent

safety assessments and oversight of the BMDS and each

of the MDA programs.

From 1985 until 2003, Mr. Wadzinski worked for the 45th

Space Wing Range Safety Office at Cape Canaveral Air

Force Station/Patrick Air Force Base (the Eastern Range)

in various positions overseeing numerous payloads and

launch vehicle programs as well as undertaking the task

of combining the range safety requirements of the Eastern

Range and Western Range into a common document

known as Eastern and Western Range (EWR 127-1)

Range Safety Requirements. EWR 127-1 became the

basis for Range Safety requirements and law developed

by the Federal Aviation Authority Office of Commercial

Space Transportation and other domestic and foreign

launch ranges.

Mr. Wadzinski earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Chemical

Engineering from the Ohio State University, a Master’s

Degree in Systems Management from the Florida Institute

of Technology, and a Master’s Degree in Management as a

Sloan Fellow from The Leland Stanford Junior University.

He is a graduate of Air Command and Staff College and is

a member of the Defense Acquisition Corps.

Page 15


Featured Speaker (8:45 a.m.)

Russell Romanella

SMA Director

NASA Kennedy Space Center

Mr. Russell R. Romanella is the Director of Safety and

Mission Assurance (S&MA) at NASA’s Kennedy Space

Center. The S&MA Directorate is Kennedy’s focal

point for planning and execution of center and program

S&MA activities at Kennedy. The directorate provides

the primary interface function with the S&MA offices

of NASA Headquarters, other centers, other government

agencies, international governments and private industry.

The primary purpose of Kennedy’s S&MA is to ensure

operations at Kennedy-responsible sites are conducted in

a manner which will achieve mission safety and success.

S&MA consists of the safety, reliability, maintainability,

software assurance and quality disciplines which are

applied to reduce the probability of mishaps, failures,

maintenance burden, and product flaws.

After Mr. Romanella graduated from Florida State

University in 1984, where he received a Bachelor of

Science in Mathematics and Computer Science, he joined

NASA as an operations engineer in the Space Shuttle

Processing Directorate. He became Project Manager

for the Payload Data Management System in 1990,

responsible for the design, development, management and

operations of this information system, which supported

all payload processing including space station, shuttle and

expendable launch vehicle payloads.

A mockup of the Launch Abort System, or LAS, is positioned atop a

boilerplate Orion capsule and replica service module during test stacking

operations inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy

Space Center in Florida. The Orion spacecraft is being designed to carry

astronauts on missions beyond Earth orbit. It will have the LAS during

the first part of launch in case an emergency develops that requires the

spacecraft to be pulled away from the rocket to save the crew. NASA’s

Ground Services Development and Operations Program, or GSDO,

performed the test operations.

In 1996, Mr. Romanella moved to the Space Station

Hardware Integration Office as Chief of the Integration

Operations Office. In 1997, he became Element Manager

for International Space Station (ISS), missions including

those flying the multi-purpose logistics modules and the

Canadian robotic arm. In September 2003, he became

Deputy Director of the ISS and Spacecraft Processing

Directorate, and in November 2005, he became Director

of the same directorate. In this position, he was responsible

for all ground processing of space station elements from

around the world getting ready to fly in the space shuttle.

In addition, he was responsible for preparing the Kennedy

Space Center for final assembly of a future human space

launch vehicle: the Orion crew exploration vehicle.

Page 16


SESSION THREE

Tuesday, March 19

Current Topics in the Industry

Session Manager/Panel Moderator

Ed Jopson

Manager, Mission and Supplier Assurance,

Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems

Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance

Mr. Ed Jopson has been in the space and defense, quality,

and mission assurance profession for most of his more

than 35-year career. Mr. Jopson is the Manager for the

Mission and Supplier Assurance at Northrop Grumman

Electronic Systems’ (NGES) Intelligence Surveillance &

Reconnaissance Division. Prior to NGES, he served as

the field site integration chief of the safety and mission

assurance directorate at the Missile Defense Agency

(MDA), where he was responsible for system-wide safety,

quality, and mission assurance at all MDA/QS field sites as

well as supervision of mission assurance representatives

at MDA contractor sites, the JNIC, and range, launch, and

test sites.

Mr. Jopson’s early career encompassed several years in

aerospace design and manufacturing environments. He

worked in the design, development, and manufacture of

spacecraft thermal control systems through the 1980’s.

He was awarded a U.S. patent for a heat exchanger

design he developed while at Dynatherm Corporation.

His career continued at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight

Center (GSFC). As a quality engineer with Unisys

Corporation under NASA contract, he was promoted

through three engineering levels while on the highly

successful International Solar Terrestrial Physics/Global

Geospace Science (ISTP/GGS) Project. Later, he served

as quality engineering section head, managing 47 quality

engineers at the GSFC and sites across the United States.

He coordinated all phases of NASA Mission Assurance

support simultaneously on eight concurrent space flight

projects.

Abstract: Quality professionals have to confront issues

ranging from increasingly sophisticated counterfeit parts

(…and the liability that comes from escapes) to higher

levels of ESD and FOD sensitivity and the fallout from

unique industry concerns (e.g., budget Sequestration,

ITAR restrictions). On the other hand, with budget-driven

emphasis on doing more with less, and the prospects of

losing valued talent through the inevitable lay-offs, we also

have opportunities for greater cooperation horizontally

among government agencies and among contractors,

as well as vertically through the supply chain. Tailored

requirements and risk management, evolving standards…

where should our attention be to stay ahead of the curve?

Will these challenges and opportunities foster creative

solutions or will they be stymied by the old stovepipes,

turf wars, and cost and schedule concerns? Will fewer

suppliers want to play in the tougher-requirements arena

as the Aerospace and Defense market share of their

business dwindles? This panel will address some of these

topics from various viewpoints and offer insights into the

path ahead.

An E-2C Hawkeye sits on the flight deck of the USS Enterprise while under way

in the Gulf of Aden, Oct. 8, 2012.

Mr. Jopson holds a master’s degree in technology

management from U of MD and is a Certified Level III

Acquisition Professional and ASQ Senior member.

Page 17


SESSION THREE PANELISTS

Dave Pinkley

Chief Engineer, Mission Assurance

Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation

Breakout 1: Life Cycle Risk Management in a Product

Tailoring Environment

Facilitator: Dave Pinkley

Mr. David Pinkley is the Mission Assurance (MA) Chief

Engineer for Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. The

Mission Assurance function ensures the highest standards

of quality and reliability for all Ball Aerospace processes

and products.

Mr. Pinkley is responsible for, developing industry leading

MA processes for execution across all Ball Aerospace

process and product architectures; assuring that MA is a

discriminator across Ball Aerospace programs ensuring

efficacy of their execution; assuring the application of

consistent Risk Based MA through mentoring, independent

risk assessments, and review teams; and partnering with

the National Space Enterprise in development of best in

class practices for mission success.

Mr. Pinkley has more than 34 years of MA experience

across a wide range of space applications including over

28 years at a manager/staff consultant/senior-scientist

level. He has a broad background in all aspects of MA

and Reliability, Maintainability, Supportability (RMS)

engineering supporting product development from the

conceptual stage to warranty service.

Mr. Pinkley earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Electrical

Engineering at the University of Tennessee, a Masters

of Engineering Degree in Engineering Management at

the University of Colorado and is a university accredited

Six-Sigma Master Black Belt. He is a published author,

presenting at several international conferences. He has

been recognized with several Ball Aerospace excellence

awards, including the Follett Award for excellence in

system engineering, for professional achievements, which

enhance the company’s marketplace competitiveness.

Mr. Pinkley’s responsibilities for MA process and product

architecture efficacy and risk based MA provide the

foundation for this breakout session on “Life Cycle Risk

Management in a Product Tailoring Environment”.

Abstract: At the 2012 CSQDI, Sherri Fike of Ball

Aerospace presented Ball Aerospace’s approach to the

industry challenge of reduce risks and increase compliance

to new requirements while increasing efficiency. Ball

Aerospace’s response to this challenge is comprehensive

process tailoring, centered on a set of five process and

product architecture types. Essential to this product

type methodology is risk efficacy from an operational

system’s low risk tolerance to the higher risk tolerance of

demonstrator and experimental acquisitions.

Ball’s risk management approach ensuring robust lifecycle

management of risk contributors across these product

types include the elements (1) development architecture

optimization, (2) heritage reuse, (3) programmatic,

technical, and residual risk tracking, (4) next step

integration readiness, (5) anomaly risk rating, and (6)

cumulative risk management.

The first two planning elements establish the risk profile

for the program with development architecture optimized

for mission success and a heritage baseline brought into

resource, schedule, technical, and risk compliance. The

third execution element performs risk tracking and control

of baseline and realized risks retiring or accepting residual

risk bounding the “unknowns” on the program. The fourth

element establishes discrete manufacturing gates, ensuring

next step integration readiness, evaluating and controlling

risks at progressive levels of integration, and establishing

burn down plans for identified product constraints and/

or idiosyncrasies. The fifth non-conformance element,

anomaly risk rating, captures the “severity” and “cause

and corrective action” knowledge about an anomaly at

any given point in its investigation life cycle, serving

to prioritize resources for risk resolution. The final risk

element, cumulative risk tracking captures residual risk

from the previous 5 elements and evaluates the in-phase

burn-down of risks, assesses cumulative mission success

impact, and risk management process effectiveness.

Page 18


SESSION THREE PANELISTS

Jeannette Plante

NASA Workmanship Standards Program Manager

NASA GSFC

Breakout 2: The Value of Workmanship Standards:

What We Want vs. What We Ask For vs. What We Get

Facilitator: Jeannette Plante

Ms. Jeannette Plante’s professional background is in

electronic parts and package engineering for NASA

missions and coordinating technical policy at the agency

level. The NASA Workmanship Program maintains

the NASA Workmanship Standards for polymeric

applications and electrical and fiber optic cable harnesses.

It also provides NASA representation within the industry

body committees which maintain NASA-adopted

Workmanship standards for soldering and ESD control.

The program also provides a forum for researching

new technical Workmanship issues and for outreach.

Ms. Plante provides policy direction for NASA’s four

Workmanship training centers and provides policy and

technical guidance on Workmanship to the NASA Safety

Center’s auditing group and STEP educational program.

She is simultaneously the Manager of the GSFC ESD

Control Program and the GSFC Workmanship Program.

She holds a Bachelor’s of Electrical Engineering Degree

from The Catholic University of America in Washington,

DC.

NASA’s rover Curiosity will analyze

dozens of samples drilled from rocks or

scooped from the ground as it explores

with greater range than any previous

Mars rover.

Abstract: The NASA Workmanship Standards are a

quality assurance tool at a number of steps along the project

life timeline. At the beginning, a “call out” of the document

on the mission assurance requirements document ensures

traceability to the agency baseline quality assurance

requirements. When including them in a prime contract, the

project can be sure they have imposed all critical quality

requirements on the producer of electronic assemblies and

cable harnesses to be used in a NASA mission. So why do

we regularly discover non-standard processes and material

are being used without prior approval? Why is it common

that subcontractors do not ensure their procedures are

fully traceable to the Workmanship requirements and

their operators are certified? Why do suppliers request to

use “alternate procedures” instead of the Workmanship

Standards? Why do projects rated as Class D impose

Workmanship Standards on suppliers with no prior history

of procedural or training traceability? This break-out

session will encourage active discussion around:

-The benefit the Workmanship Standards intend to

achieve

-The types of requirements the Workmanship Standards

use to achieve benefit

-The variety of capability in the NASA supply chain to

receive Workmanship Standards requirements

-The difficulty of modernizing Workmanship

requirements

-Risks associated with partial compliance to the

Workmanship Standards

-Impact of the above on the requirements

Page 19


SESSION THREE PANELISTS

Clifton J. “Jerry” Charlow

VP of Program Management Excellence (PMX)

Raytheon Missile Systems (RMS)

Breakout 3: Intersection of Quality and Program

Management Execution

Facilitator: Clifton J. “Jerry” Charlow

Mr. Clifton J. “Jerry” Charlow is Vice President of the

Program Management Excellence (PMX) Organization

at Raytheon Missile Systems (RMS) in Tucson, Arizona.

In this role, Mr. Charlow leads the efforts to improve

performance by producing effective, affordable and timely

program management solutions critical to executing,

measuring and growing the business.

Before joining PMX, Mr. Charlow was Senior Director of

RMS Global Security Services where he helped strengthen

program security relationships with customers. He was

instrumental in achieving and maintaining back-to-back

Superior ratings for RMS Tucson by the Defense Security

Service. Before that, Mr. Charlow held deputy roles with

Quality & Mission Assurance, Advanced Security and

Directed Energy Systems product line, and Engineering

for RMS. He also served as Engineering Supply Chain

Director at Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems (IDS)

in Portsmouth, R.I.

Abstract: Quality professionals and program managers

need to form a closer bond now more than ever as we

approach a period of decreasing budgets. The word

“affordability” is in nearly every government to contractor

discussion today; it is simply unavoidable. Program

execution encompasses the entire life cycle of a program,

as does quality. Focusing on quality throughout all phases

of the program life cycle can reveal ways to cut costs and

be more efficient. Quality defects are costly to a business,

and quality escapes are not only more costly, they

negatively impact customer relationships. By putting a

sharp focus on engineering quality, operations quality, and

supplier quality throughout all program phases provides

the program manager with the necessary facts and data

to eliminate the ultimate escapes to our customers, and

remain affordable.

Mr. Charlow joined Hughes Electronic Systems in 1985,

where he rose from a technical staff member to Department

Manager before moving on to manager of a 200-member

classified program, as well as the sensors and electronics

systems cycle-time program manager. In 2001, he was

named Director of Engineering for Raytheon’s Naval and

Maritime Integrated Systems business in Portsmouth.

In 2002, he was appointed Capability Maturity Model

Integration (CMMI) Program Manager for IDS. In this

role, he led process improvement efforts that resulted in

a Level 3 systems engineering and software certification

in June 2003.

Mr. Charlow received his Bachelor’s Degree in Mechanical

Engineering from the University of California, San Diego,

in 1985. In 1991, he earned a Master’s Degree in Electrical

Engineering from the University of Southern California

as a Hughes Fellowship Program member.

24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year, Raytheon’s Exoatmospheric

Kill Vehicle (EKV) stands ready to defend the United States against

intercontinental ballistic missiles as a mission-critical component of the

Ground-based Midcourse Defense system (GMD).

Page 20


SESSION THREE PANELISTS

Barry Birdsong

Division Chief Parts & Materials Engineering

Missile Defense Agency

Mr. Barry Birdsong is the Parts, Materials & Processes

(PMP) Division Manager for the Missile Defense Agency.

Mr. Birdsong has served in this position since April 2006.

In this role, he is responsible for MDA Requirements and

Policy regarding Counterfeit Parts, Parts Procurement,

Radiation Effects, Part Selection, Screening, and

Qualification Criteria, Failure Analysis, DMSMS, COTS

Strategies, Lead Free prohibitions, Materials Engineering

and implementation of DoD Corrosion Prevention Policy.

He is also the Chairman of the MDA PMP Review Board,

the Manager of the MDA Parts and Materials Advisory

Group (PMAG), the MDA Advisory Program, and a

member of the Agency Supply Chain Risk Management

Committee. In addition, he is the Program Manager for

Quality and Mission Assurance initiatives with Small

Business Innovative Research (SBIR) and the Manager

of the Failure Analysis Laboratories in Materials and

Electronic devices. He is responsible for development of

MDA Policies on counterfeit risk reduction. These policies

were brought forward by the Director of the Missile

Defense Agency to the Senate Armed Services Committee

in 2011. The MDA counterfeit part risk reduction polices

were contributing factors to the specific laws on counterfeit

parts documented in The National Defense Authorization

Act of 2012. He is a recipient of the MDA Quality, Safety,

and Mission Assurance award for 2012. As the Program

Manager for the MDA Advisory Program, his Division

has published over 90 Technical Advisories documenting

critical failures and lessons learned and recommended

corrective action to mitigate the identified issue. His PMP

Division manages over $22M annually in SBIR contracts

related to leading edge research in PMP technologies.

Prior to joining the MDA, he worked for the US ARMY

as the PMP Board Chairman for the THAAD Program

Office and as a Senior Reliability Engineer for Dynetics

and Teledyne Brown Engineering.

Mr. Birdsong has over 25 years’ experience in Systems

Engineering, Mission Assurance and Reliability

Engineering. He received a Bachelor’s of Science Degree

in Electronics Engineering from DeVry University in

Dupage, IL in 1986. He is an ASQ Certified Reliability

Engineer. He has presented several papers on the use

of COTS Equipment in Military Systems, Counterfeit

Part Risk Mitigation, Part Selection and Standardization

Criteria and Supply Chain Management at various

conferences.

Breakout 4: Evolving Component Risks

Facilitator: Barry Birdsong

Abstract: This session presents evolving reliability

risks in the PMP area that are resulting from continued

commercialization of the electronic parts industry.

Electronic parts continue to move with the commercial

industry. Commercialization sometimes reduces service

life reliability for military applications. Copper Wire

Bonds, GaN transistors, BME Capacitors, Non-traditional

& 3D Packaging are examples of challenges for high

reliability Defense and Space Programs. Expensive

products (Au, Pd, Tantalum) are being removed

from commercial parts to increase profit. In addition,

counterfeiters continue to evolve, making it difficult to

detect counterfeit parts using existing methods. Lowertier

contractors still do not understand the counterfeit risk

and do not appropriately staff or train personnel.

The Missile Defense Agency and U.S. Army soldiers of the 6th Air Defense

Artillery Brigade from Fort Bliss, Texas, successfully conducted an intercept

test for the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense missile defense element of the

nation’s Ballistic Missile Defense System, June 28, 2010


Keynote Speaker (1:00 p.m.)

Michael Bright

Vice President

Aerojet

Missile Defense & Strategic Systems

Paratroopers walk from the Alzey drop zone after jumping from a U.S. Air Force

C-130 Hercules aircraft during the U.S. Army 5th Quartermaster Detachment’s

fourth annual Operation Toy Drop in Alzey, Germany, Dec. 13, 2012.

Mr. Michael Bright joined Aerojet in April 2011 as the

Vice President of the Missile Defense & Strategic Systems

(MDSS) Business Unit. The MDSS Business Unit has

development and production facilities in Sacramento,

California; Salt Lake City, Utah and Orange, Virginia. It

produces propulsion and booster systems for all missile

defense programs and strategic deterrence systems.

Mr. Bright has more than 30 years’ experience in Missile

Defense. He joined the Martin Marietta Corporation in

1984. Over his diverse career, he led the development

of the first “Brilliant Pebbles” and was the Chief Test

Engineer for Space Based Lasers. He also was the Chief

Systems Engineer for the Mars Global Surveyor as well as

the Launch Site Manager at the Kwajalein Missile Range.

Additionally, he was the Director of the Payload Launch

Vehicle program and Director of Advanced Directed

Energy programs.

From 2000 to 2010, Mr. Bright held several executive

leadership roles at Lockheed Martin.

Mr. Bright has a Bachelor of Science Degree in Physics

from Fort Lewis College along with graduate course work

in Aerospace Engineering and Systems Management. He

is a member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and

the Directed Energy Professional Society.

(Left) Soldiers traverse a winding dirt

road toward a mock Afghan village during

exercise Warrior Spear on Schofield Barrack

in Wahiawa, Hawaii, Feb. 5, 2013. The

soldiers are assigned to the 25th Infantry

Division’s Company C, 1st Battalion, 14th

Infantry Regiment, 2nd Stryker Brigade

Combat Team.

Page 22


FEATURED TOPIC

Tuesday, March 19

Managing Across Generations:

• Gen X and Y

• STEM

• Generational Shifts

• Next Generation Workforce

Session Manager/Panel Moderator

Lee Tait

VP, Quality & Mission Assurance

Aerojet

Mr. Lee Tait has an extensive background in all areas

of quality, mission assurance, and compliance and

governance. Ms. Tait was the former President of

International Association of Quality Groups (IAQG).

She has successfully implemented common systems

and processes across multiple business units using lean

methodology. She has a wealth of knowledge in the areas

of lean manufacturing, quality management systems, Six

Sigma (DMAIC), continuous improvement, quality of

design, and the development and planning for improved

first pass yield in supply chain and the internal factory.

Ms. Tait’s educational background includes a Master of

Business Administration (MBA) Degree from Embry

Riddle Aeronautical University, a Juris Doctor (JD) from

the King Hall School of Law, University of California,

Davis, and a Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree from Brandeis

University.

Abstract: We are in an industry where talented

employees are at a premium and at a time in history when

multiple generations are interacting with each other in

the workplace. In this session, discussions will focus on

how multiple generations - from Baby Boomers to Gen

Y- interact with one another. These generational changes

emphasize the need to develop new ways of thinking and

doing business as Generations X and Y influence corporate

culture by introducing a diverse set of work ethics,

means of communication, interpretations of professional

behavior, and expectations into the work environment.

As industry faces challenges in recruiting, retaining,

and managing a new generation, it is paramount that

we examine how to improve the STEM pipeline with

outreach activities in order to increase the number of those

pursuing careers in engineering and other STEM fields.

The panel will also cover the effect Generational Shifts

have on socio-economic, geo-political, technological,

and human factors. The discussion will focus on the need

for adaptability in all aspects of the work environment in

order to successfully run a global airline.

Ms. Tait’s professional association affiliations include:

board member, Aviation, Space and Defense (ASD)

Division of American Society of Quality (ASQ); member

of quality, Texas Foundation Board of Directors (State

Quality Organization); past President, International

Aerospace Quality Group (IAQG); previous committee

member, Conference on Quality in the Space and Defense

Industry (CQSDI); and the advisory board, Master of

Science, Quality Assurance, Southern Polytechnic State

University.

Page 23

NASA’s Orion Launch Abort System consists

of three solid rocket motors. Aerojet’s Jettison

motor is responsible for separating the entire

Launch Abort System from the Crew Module .


FEATURED TOPIC PANELISTS

First Panelist:

JJ DeGiovanni

Managing Director of Ground Safety

United Airlines

Mr. JJ DeGiovanni attended Arizona State University,

receiving a BS in Aeronautical Industrial Technology

and his MBA from Pepperdine University. At United

Airlines, Mr. DeGiovanni is leading the Ground Safety

program that includes designing a corporate wide safety

strategy for 85,000 people, developing the plans and

tools for improving worker safety, and decreasing aircraft

damage across the airline. Responsibilities further include

overseeing United’s Industrial Hygiene, Safety Training

as well as operational safety systems while instilling a

safety culture.

Prior to joining United, Mr. DeGiovanni was the Division

Director for Safety and Mission Assurance for Pratt &

Whitney Rocketdyne. In this role, he was responsible for

the success of programs, such as the Space Shuttle Main

Engine, Delta IV rocket program, ISS, X-33 and RL-10

programs. JJ’s background includes fabrication, assembly,

test, procurement, quality, design and development, and

launch operations.

Second Panelist:

Dr. Timothy Rosio, MD

Board Certified Dermatologist

El Dorado Hills, CA

Dr. Tim Rosio obtained his Medical Degree from the

University of Arizona and completed advanced studies in

England and Sweden. He completed his specialty training

at Stanford University Medical Center at Stanford,

California. He is board certified in Dermatology, and a

diplomat in Cosmetic Surgery. He has been a member and

contributing faculty to many organizations, including:

Academy of Facial, Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery,

and American Academy of Dermatology. He was selected

as one of few Dermatologic Surgeons worldwide and

designated an “International Travelling Mentor” by

the American Society of Dermatologic Surgery, to

teach surgical techniques and bring expertise to other

countries.

Dr. Rosio was involved with the clinical development of

lasers, and has taught laser physics, safety and advanced

laser techniques to physicians in the U.S. and many other

countries. He has authored 20 book chapters and articles

on dermatology, scar removal, and laser, and has appeared

on numerous network news and interviews on new

technologies, Dermatology, the skin, and skin cancer. He

is currently on the forefront with the clinical development

of Radiofrequency energy applied to stimulate, remodel

and maintain skin.

Early diagnosis and differentiation of common skin

problems from bioterrorism agent infections requires

Dermatology specialists. Dr. Rosio took the lead in

assisting educational materials development, gave

seminars, and made his office an emergency response

center for suspected cases and possible immunization

complications.

Space Shuttle Main Engine

Dr. Rosio is known for teaching graduate specialists in

practice, residents in training, and the lay public about

topics in Dermatology. He developed a program for teens

called “High School Healthy Skin” to help them make

informed choices based on knowledge and vicarious

learning including skin infections, tattooing, piercing,

artificial tanning and sun protection. He has been a Scout

leader for many years assisting youth develop skills

and values needed by our communities now and for the

future. His “Health Careers Mentoring” provides youth

an opportunity to see medicine practiced. He is interested

in ‘how people learn’ and what motivates them.


FEATURED TOPIC PANELISTS

Third Panelist:

Michael Benton

Quality Analyst

Aerojet

Fourth Panelist:

David Butler

CEO

Next Ed – Education for the Next Economy

Mr. Michael Benton serves as a Quality Analyst for the

Quality Assurance organization at Aerojet, a worldrecognized

aerospace and defense leader principally

serving the missile and space propulsion, defense and

armaments markets since 1942. Long recognized as a

developer of new technology, Aerojet continues to meet

emerging defense and aerospace propulsion needs.

Mr. Benton joined Aerojet in September 2011 and is

responsible for quality analysis and reporting of Aerojet

products and processes, and the maintenance of the

Quality Management System databases.

Mr. Benton graduated from San Francisco State

University with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Business

Administration, with a concentration in Decision

Sciences.

Marines approach the well deck of amphibious dock landing ship USS

Tortuga after conducting open ocean operations using combat rubber

crafts in Okinawa, Japan, Aug. 25, 2012. The Tortuga is apart of the only

forward-deployed amphibious ready group. The Marines are assigned to

the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit.

Mr. David Butler is the CEO of NextEd, in Sacramento,

CA. NextEd is a non-profit organization serving the

Sacramento region. An affiliate of the Sacramento Metro

Chamber, NextEd is the region’s premiere employer/

education partnership and works to “advance programs

and policies that prepare students for success in the next

economy.” NextEd, in partnership with the UC Davis

School of Education, is a member of the California STEM

Learning Network, an alliance of regional organizations

to promote STEM education in school and out of school.

Prior to NextEd, Mr. Butler was also the Senior Vice

President of Public Policy and Advocacy for the

Sacramento Metro Chamber and as legislative staff for

State Senators Tim Leslie and Cathie Wright.

Mr. Butler was raised in Sacramento, CA and graduated

from UCLA with a BA in Political Science. He is a

graduate of the US Chamber of Commerce Institute

for Organizational Management program, served as a

member of the Rocklin Area Chamber of Commerce

board of directors and is a volunteer with the UCLA

Alumni Association. He was elected to the Rocklin City

Council in November, 2012.

A U.S. Marine Corps amphibious assault vehicle launches into the Pacific Ocean

during the Rim of the Pacific 2012 exercise, July 12, 2012. Twenty-two nations and

more than 25,000 personnel are participating in the biennial RIMPAC exercise.

Page 25


Page 26


(Front Cover) A U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster III aircraft taxis to its

parking spot on Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan. The Globemaster III is a

regular visitor to Bagram Airfield, transporting troops, equipment and

supplies in and out of the country.

(Back Cover) The aircraft carrier the USS John C. Stennis operates during

sunset in the Arabian Sea in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility, Jan. 5,

2012 The Stennis is conducting maritime security operations, theater security

cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom.

2013 Conference on Quality in the Space and Defense Industries

SPONSORS:

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