COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

co.harrison.ms.us

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Co m m u n i t y Pla n for Ea s t e r n Ha r r ison Co u n t y

Harrison County, Mississippi


Left, Middle Cover Pictures

John Fitzhugh

Staff Photographer - Biloxi Sun Herald

Right Cover Picture

Erica Wicks

East Planning Team


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Community Plan for Eastern Harrison County

Harrison County, Mississippi

February 1, 2008

PREPARED BY

The Ohio State University, Knowlton School of Architecture

Jennifer Cowley, PhD, AICP, Project Manager

John Dahlgren, Team Leader

Joshua Anderson

Ian Beniston

Ma’ayan Citron

Nathan Leppo

Bridget Troy

Erica Wicks

Rickie Yeager

PREPARED FOR

The Harrison County Board of Supervisors and the citizens of

Eastern Harrison County.

This plan is made possible by funding from the US Department of Housing and Urban

Development.


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Contents

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY XVI CHAPTER 2. THE PLAN 16

Themes 16

INTRODUCTION XVIII Community Goals and Strategies 17

Purpose XVIII Implementation 18

Description of the Planning Process XIX Concept Plan and Sector Map 39

People

XXI

Acknowledgements

XXII

Organizations of the Document

XXIII

CHAPTER 1. PLANNING CONTEXT 1 APPENDIX A. BACKGROUND ASSESSMENT 53

Description of the Community 1 APPENDIX B. COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT 119

History 1 APPENDIX C. POTENTIAL GRANT SOURCES 157

Regional Connections 3 APPENDIX D. PRINCIPALS 165

Background and Current Trends 3 APPENDIX E. ACRONYMS AND GLOSSARY 173

Community Input 7

Observations 11


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List of Maps

Introduction

Page

Map I-1 The Eastern Planning Area XXIV

Chapter 1

Map 1-1 Regional Connections 4

Chapter 2

Map 2-1 Eastern Harrison County Concept Plan 42

Map 2-2 Eastern Harrison County Sector Map 45

Map 2-3

The map shows two possible locations for a future east-west connector road that could be constructed in Eastern Harrison

County. 48

Appendix A

Map A-1 Existing Land Use 70

Map A-2 Existing Zoning as of November 2006 73

Map A-3 Traffic Analysis Zones, 2030 79

Map A-4 Extent of Hurricane Katrina Storm Surge 82

Map A-5 1988 Flood Zones. The largest flood zones are found in the Biloxi River Watershed. 83

Map A-6 Forest Damage Map of the Eastern Planning Area 86

Map A-7 Wetlands of the Eastern Planning Area 88

Map A-8 Hyrdic, partially hydric, and non-hydric soils in the Eastern Planning Area. 91

Map A-9 Atmore and Smithton Soils can cause deterioration to concrete foundations. 92

Map A-10 Community Facilities in Eastern Harrison County 97

Map A-11 Eastern Planning Area Hurricane Evacuation Routes Map 100

Map A-12 Eastern Planning Area Functional Roadway Classifications and Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT) 102

Map A-13 Eastern Planning Area Water Service Districts 107


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Map A-14 Eastern Planning Area Sewer Service Districts 109

Map A-15 Mississippi Gulf Region Recommended Wastewater Projects 111

Appendix D

Map D-1

The Land Use Conflict Identification Strategy Map illustrates the areas within Eastern Harrison County most suitable for

development. 170


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List of Tables

Chapter 2

Page

Table 2-1 Implementation Timeline for Goal 1 22

Table 2-2 Implementation Timeline for Goal 2 27

Table 2-3 Implementation Timeline for Goal 3 30

Table 2-4 Implementation Timeline for Goal 4 33

Table 2-5 Implementation Timeline for Goal 5 35

Table 2-6 Implementation Timeline for Goal 6 37

Table 2-7 Implementation Timeline for Goal 7 38

Appendix A

Table A-1 Population Estimates 56

Table A-2 Eastern Planning Area Population and Housing Forecast 57

Table A-3 Age Composition Comparison of Surrounding Communities, 2007 58

Table A-4 Comparison of Household Income, 2007 59

Table A-5 Comparison of Household Income and Per Capita Income, 2007. 60

Table A-6 Educational Attainment for the Population 25 Years and Over 61

Table A-7 Eastern Planning Area Total School Enrollment Projections 62

Table A-8 Housing Types in 2000 63

Table A-9 Household Size 63

Table A-10 Year Housing Built Comparison 64

Table A-11 Housing Tenure in the Eastern Planning Area 65

Table A-12 Homeownership Affordability Analysis 67

Table A-13 Basic Housing Affordability Scenario 67

Table A-14 Coastal Cities Average Percentage Rent Increase 67

Table A-15 Land Use in the Eastern Planning Area 69

Table A-16 Zoning Classifications 74


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Table A-17 Labor Force, 2007 76

Table A-18 Employment by Industry, 2007 76

Table A-19 Employment by Occupation, 2007 76

Table A-20 Commuting Time of Residents to Work, 2000 77

Table A-21 Traffic Analysis Zone Employment Data, 2002 77

Table A-22 Traffic Analysis Zone Employment Data, 2030 Projections 78

Table A-23 Percent Change in Employment, 2002-2030 80

Table A-24 2006 Damaged Timber Resources in Harrison County 84

Table A-25 2006 Undamaged Timber Resources in Harrison County 84

Table A-26 Major Soil Types in Harrison County 90

Appendix B

Table B-1 Community Preference Survey Results 139

Table B-2 Results of Goal Voting 149

Table B-3 Results of Voting on a Woolmarket Village Center 150

Table B-4 Waterway Setback Voting Results 150

Table B-5 Policy Option Voting Results 151

Table B-6 Results of dot voting 152


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List of Figures

Executive

Summary

Page

Figure Ex-1 The rural character of the Eastern Planning Area is very important to local residents. XVI

Figure Ex-2 Place making is a central theme of this plan. The Woolmarket Community Center is located in the area of the proposed Village XVII

Center. The Village Center would utilize place making techniques to create a true focal point for the community.

Figure Ex-3 Preservation of natural resources including wetlands and forested areas is important to residents. XVII

Introduction

Figure I-1 Hurricane Katrina resulted in significant damage to forests and homes in Eastern Harrison County. XVIII

Figure I-2 Residents locate their homes on an aerial map. XIX

Figure I-3 Residents provide their input at the Eastern Planning Area’s September 2007 Town Hall Meeting. XX

Figure I-4 The Community Plan formed over eight months XX

Figure I-5 The planning team and steering committee members meet with Supervisor Rocko after the September 2007 Town Hall Meeting. XXI

Figure I-6 Residents want to provide more east-west roadways to increase connectivity throughout the planning area. XXIII

Chapter 1

Figure 1-1 While orange groves are no longer common in the Orange Grove area, one can still find these trees in resident’s yards. 2

Figure 1-2 The old post office in the community of Lyman. 2

Figure 1-3 Single-family homes on large lots are a common housing type in the community. 5

Figure 1-4 The majority of the planning area is forested land. 6

Figure 1-5 The Woolmarket Community Center walking track provides a source of recreation for residents. 6

Figure 1-6 A recently completed section of State Highway 67 crosses State Highway 15. 7

Figure 1-7 Residents sign in at the September 2007 Town Hall Meeting at the Woolmarket Community Center. 8

Figure 1-8 This home was found to be the most acceptable in the Community Preference Survey. 8

Figure 1-9 Citizens participated in small group discussions expressing what they would like to see for their community at the September

2007 Town Hall Meeting.

9


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Figure 1-10 At the Town Hall Meeting in September, participants expressed what they want to see for the future of Eastern Harrison

10

County.

Figure 1-11 Residents used green and red dots to voice support and concerns for the goals and strategies at the Town Hall Meeting in

10

December.

Figure 1-12 Preserving the rural character of Eastern Harrison County is a high priority for residents. 11

Figure 1-13 Many residents regard Live Oaks as an important component of community identity. 12

Figure 1-14 Both children and adults want to see more recreational opportunities. 13

Figure 1-15 The Love Shack is a small diner on Woolmarket Road. This type of commercial development would be considered appropriate 13

in the Eastern Planning Area.

Figure 1-16 Citizens want to maintain their scenic roadways. 14

Figure 1-17 Sidewalks are found in several developments throughout the planning area, but are not required. 14

Chapter 2

Figure 2-1

The citizens of Eastern Harrison County understand that new development is entering their community. Citizens input has

guided the creation of this plan. At the September town hall meeting, citizens reviewed proposals for development...

Figure 2-2 Citizens set the goals for the Community Plan through individual, small group, and large group discussions. 17

Figure 2-3 Citizens want to expand recreational opportunities. 18

Figure 2-4 The Concept Plan supports the preservation of natural areas along the Little Biloxi, Biloxi and Tchoutacabouffa rivers in Eastern 40

Harrison County such as this forested stretch along the Biloxi River.

Figure 2-5 This image is a conceptual plan of the Woolmarket Village Center. It includes the direct connection of Old Woolmarket Road 43

to State Highway 67, a library near the community center and retail buildings along Old Woolmarket Road

Figure 2-6 Eastern Harrison County Sector Map Legend 46

Figure 2-7 Eastern Harrison County residents want to see an additional east-west road to increase access throughout the community. 47

Figure 2-8 Conventional suburban development (left) is characterized by limited connectivity and a segregation of land uses, while a

50

modified grid system (right) increases connectivity and allows for integration of land uses.

Figure 2-9 The graphic on the left illustrates common access pattersn in Eastern Harrison County. Access management techniques... 52

Appendix A

Figure A-1 Woolmarket Consolidated School located in Eastern Harrison County. 54

Figure A-2 They Lyman railroad station served the lumber industry in Eastern Harrison County. 52

Figure A-3 Coalville is named for the time period when charcoal burning was common. 55

Figure A-4 Race Composition, Eastern Planning Area, 2007 58

17


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Figure A-5 Age Composition, Eastern Planning Area, 2007 58

Figure A-6 Harrison Central High School 60

Figure A-7 St. Patrick High School 60

Figure A-8 Single-family house in the Eastern Planning Area 62

Figure A-9 Household Size 64

Figure A-10 Median Value of All Owner Occupied Housing Units. 65

Figure A-11 Typical home in Eastern Harrison County. 64

Figure A-12 A single-family home in Eastern Harrison County. 67

Figure A-13 New affordable housing is available in the Quail Creek subdivision in the Eastern Planning Area. 67

Figure A-14 The majority of the planning area is used for forestry. 68

Figure A-15 Typical new home in the Swan Lake Subdivision. 69

Figure A-16 Quail Creek is one of a number of developments under construction in the Eastern Planning Area. 71

Figure A-17 A self-storage facility is under construction on State Highway 15. 71

Figure A-18 This gas station is typical of the small scale commercial development in the community. 72

Figure A-19 This cement plant is an example of an industrial use in the Eastern Planning Area. 72

Figure A-20 The Desoto National Forest comprises a majority of the Eastern Planning Area. 74

Figure A-21 Commercial development has been proposed adjacent and west of this new interchange under construction for State Highways

67 and 15. 75

Figure A-22 Allistons is one of a number of commercial uses found in the Eastern Planning Area. 77

Figure A-23 This auto repair shop is an example of a commercial use in Eastern Harrison County. 78

Figure A-24 Cogon Grass is an example of an invasive plant in the forested areas. 81

Figure A-25 The Desoto National Forest 85

Figure A-26 This wetland is typical of those found in Eastern Harrison County. 89

Figure A-27 A view of the Little Biloxi River. 93

Figure A-28 Live oaks thrive in the sandy soils found throughout Harrison County. 93

Figure A-29 Future site of the new D’Iberville High School 94

Figure A-30 Woolmarket Vocational School 94

Figure A-31 The Woolmarket Community Park provides multiple recreation opportunities for residents. 95

Figure A-32 Woolmarket Community Park 96

Figure A-33 Ramsey Creek Church 98

Figure A-34 White Plains United Methodist Church 98


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Figure A-35 Mississippi State Highway 15 runs through the De Soto National Forest in Eastern Harrison County. 101

Figure A-36 This stretch of Lamey Bridge Road illustrates the scenic character found throughout the planning area. 104

Figure A-37 Mississippi State Highway 67 is under construction and schedule for completion in 2009. 105

Figure A-38 Designated bicycle lanes run adjacent to vehicular travel lanes on Mississippi State Highway 605. 105

Figure A-39 Former landfill along Hudson-Krohn Road now operated as waste transfer facility by Allied Waste (formerly BFI). 112

Figure A-40 Coastal Recyclers operates a recycling facility in Eastern Harrison County along Hudson-Krohn Road. 113

Appendix B

Figure B-1 Approximately 200 people attended the September Town Hall Meeting for the Eastern Planning Area. 119

Figure B-2 Supervisor Rocko updated community members on important County initiatives. 120

Figure B-3 On December 13th, residents gathered to review the draft Community Plan for Eastern Harrison County. 120

Figure B-4 In September, residents from across Eastern Harrison County gathered to make their voices heard in the planning process. 119

Figure B-5 Citizens completed written surveys of their opinions on the future of their communities. 122

Figure B-6 Most residents identified themselves as being from Woolmarket. 123

Figure B-7 In the written survey citizens added comments about their preferences for a variety of types of development. 124

Figure B-8 Residents signing in at the September Town Hall Meeting. 126

Figure B-9 Residents locating their homes on an aerial map. 128

Figure B-10 Citizens participated in a community preference survey. 137

Figure B-11 Residents found this type of residential housing very acceptable. 138

Figure B-12 This above image was found to be much more acceptable than the one below. 138

Figure B-13 Citizens sat at tables based on community names at the September Town Hall Meetings. 145

Figure B-14. Students at Woolmarket Middle School requested increased recreation opportunities near their school. 146

Figure B-15. Citizens left phone and online messages requesting a fire station, improved roadways and preservation of rural character. 147

Figure B-16 Eastern Harrison County has a mix of features that the community values and wants to preserve as this plan is implemented. 148

Figure B-17 Residents used electronic voting devices to indicate support for the goals developed in the draft plan. 150

Figure B-18 Residents signed in at the December Town Hall Meeting and then found their homes on an aerial map. 151

Figure B-19 Residents used green and red dots to voice support and concern for the strategies of the draft plan. 152

Figure B-20

Hundreds of residents participated in the September and December 2007 Town Hall Meetings to help create a community plan

based on their input. 154

Figure B-21 Many residents participated in the dot voting exercise at the December Town Hall Meeting. 156


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Appendix D

Figure D-1 The sector mapping system identifies and allows communities to focus growth in appropriate areas while preserving rural land. 167


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Executive Summary

The Community Plan for Eastern Harrison County was created to guide growth

in the community over the next twenty years. This plan is a road map for

the community, created using citizen input and key planning principles.

Citizen input identified important issues facing the community. This

input was used to lay a foundation for the plan and create three themes

that guide this plan:

Connectivity - This theme is focused on improving connections and

mobility within Eastern Harrison County and connections to areas

adjacent to Eastern Harrison County. This includes creating sidewalks in

new neighborhoods, improving major roadway arterials, adding multiuse

paths, and ensuring residential subdivisions are connected to one another

throughout the planning area. An example includes creating an eastwest

connector road to increase access throughout Eastern Harrison

County.

These themes are broken down into goals, strategies, and actions

that will help guide the plan implementation process. The time frame for

executing actions is outlined in a plan timeline that organizes goals and

actions in order of their importance.

The plan contains a number of policies and examples of land

use outcomes for Eastern Harrison County. Text and pictures also show

how future development of the community could look. Policies, such as

Figure Ex-1. The rural character of the Eastern Planning Area is very

important to local residents.

Preservation - This theme is focused on ensuring that the unique rural

character of the community is preserved through maintaining open

space in new residential developments, providing natural views along

scenic roadways, conserving forest and water resources, and ensuring

that commercial development is of the size and type appropriate to the

community.

Place Making - This theme is focused on creating a sense of place

in the community. This includes expanding recreational opportunities

and creating neighborhoods and shopping opportunities in Eastern

Harrison County.

Source: Nathan Leppo


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protecting natural areas, would apply to the entire planning area, while

land use rules would apply to only certain places within the community.

Recommendations found in the plan support the citizens’ vision for the

community.

Public input from the September Town Hall Meeting shaped

the concept plan, strategies, and land use examples used in the plan. At

the December Town Hall Meeting, the community reviewed the plan,

identifying scenarios and policy strategies they found most important.

Policy decisions made at this meeting were incorporated into the content

of this plan.

The Harrison County Board of Supervisors is responsible for

many of the action steps due to its law-making power. To help carry out

the plan, citizens should consider forming a non-profit organization so

that they are able to apply for and receive grant money, organize local

efforts, and take on the non-regulatory action steps.

Figure Ex-2. Place making is a central theme of this plan. The

Woolmarket Community Center is located in the area of the proposed

Village Center. The Village Center would utilize place making techniques

to create a true focal point for the community.

Figure Ex-3. Preservation of natural resources including wetlands and

forested areas is important to residents.

Source: Joshua Anderson

“Citizen input was used to create

three guiding themes for the plan:

Connectivity, Preservation and

Place-making.”

Source: Joshua Anderson


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Introduction

Purpose

Residents across the Gulf Coast will never forget August 29, 2005,

when Hurricane Katrina came ashore, damaging homes and communities

throughout Harrison County. The hurricane did not, however, break the

resolve of its residents to ensure that their community reemerges and

changes in a way consistent with their values. Area citizens have come

together to make decisions about their collective future. The Community

Plan for Eastern Harrison County articulates this future.

Shortly after the hurricane, Mississippi Governor Haley Barbour

Figure I-1. Hurricane Katrina resulted in significant damage to forests

and homes in Eastern Harrison County.

Source: Dottie Machen

established the Governor’s Commission for Recovery, Rebuilding, and

Renewal. The Commission provided local leaders with information that

has helped guide decisions for the future of their communities. As part

of this effort, they hosted the Mississippi Renewal Forum in partnership

with the Congress for New Urbanism. The Renewal Forum focused on

planning and visioning for the incorporated areas of the coast. It did

not, however, provide the same level of planning for unincorporated

areas. The Community Plan for Eastern Harrison County incorporates many

of the ideas provided by the Governor’s Commission and integrates

them with what the citizens of Eastern Harrison County have stated

that they want for their community.

The Community Plan complements the County’s smart growth

planning process, which is based on the principles of smart growth, New

Urbanism, and green development, to guide the future development of

the county.

The Board of Supervisors for Harrison County recognized the

need for a plan for the rebuilding process. The plan has been funded

through grants and in-kind contributions. It is provided at no cost to

the citizens of Harrison County.

To assist the Eastern Harrison County planning team, Harrison

County Supervisors Larry Benefield, Bobby Eleuteris, Connie Rocko,

and Kim Savant appointed a five-person steering committee of local

residents. The steering committee acted as a liaison between the citizens

and the planning team. They provided input throughout the planning

process and made sure that the Eastern Harrison County planning team


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addressed citizen concerns and incorporated community goals into The

Community Plan. Plans prepared by the adjacent communities of Biloxi,

D’Iberville, and Gulfport were consulted during the preparation of this

plan to ensure compatibility between planning efforts. Plans prepared

by the State, Army Corp of Engineers, and FEMA long-term recovery

plans were also taken into account.

The Community Plan for Eastern Harrison County has a long-range

perspective. Its primary purpose is to aid in managing change in the

community by:

1)

2)

Formulating goals to fulfill the community’s vision, and

Developing a series of strategies to achieve those goals.

The plan serves as a policy guide for the community. It does

not create any laws or regulations; it only identifies methods that are

Figure I-2. Residents locate their homes on an aerial map.

Source: Chris Cunningham

appropriate for carrying out policies. Any recommendations for zoning

changes or new laws will require a separate public process. The citizens of

Eastern Harrison County and the Harrison County Board of Supervisors

are responsible for carrying the plan through to implementation.

Description of the Planning Process

The plan was created over an eight-month period of time,

as noted in Figure I-3. Following the development of the planning

process in collaboration with the County, the team began gathering data

and background information in the summer of 2007. The team next

traveled to Harrison County in September 2007 to gather information

and survey the community’s opportunities and challenges.

As part of that fieldwork, the team held a Town Hall Meeting

on September 6 th in the Woolmarket Community Center that was

attended by approximately 200 residents. During the meeting, citizens

completed a written survey seeking their opinions on development

issues in Eastern Harrison County. The attendees also participated

in a Community Preference Survey designed to reveal their opinions

regarding development options for housing, setbacks, walking trails,

streetscapes, and industrial and commercial development. Attendees

then participated in small group discussions on issues that they wanted

addressed in the Community Plan.

The planning team drafted community goals based on the vision

residents of Eastern Harrison County communicated during the Town

Hall Meeting and through the survey results and additional comments

gathered from a web-based discussion forum and a 1-800 number.

The planning team researched policies and strategies to enable Eastern

Harrison County citizens to implement these goals.

On December 13, 2007 approximately 125 residents gathered

at a second Town Hall Meeting to discuss the draft Community Plan for

Eastern Harrison County. Citizens assisted in revising the Sector Map,

prioritized strategies, and provided commentary. Results of the citizen

participation are outlined in Appendix B.


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Figure I-3. Residents provide their input at the Eastern Planning Area’s September 2007 Town Hall Meeting.

Source: Chris Cunningham

Figure I-4. The Community Plan formed over eight months

Summer 2007 September October November

Draft outline prepared and

data collection begun

Team fieldwork

December

Comment period—formal review by steering

committee, county leaders, and citizens

January 2008

February

September 6, 2007: Town Hall Meeting

Preparation of draft plan

Revisions to draft plan

December 13, 2007:

Town Hall Meeting

Preparation of final plan

February 2008:

Final Plan

submitted to

Harrison County


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Throughout the planning process, the team consulted with

individual citizens, local businesses, developers, and community facility

operators to understand the needs of the community.

People

The Planning Team

Professor Jennifer Cowley, PhD, AICP, served as Project

Manager. She worked in conjunction with the Harrison County Board of

Supervisors and Patrick Bonck, Harrison County Zoning Administrator.

Cowley, who teaches planning at The Ohio State University, assembled

the following team to work on the Community Plan for Eastern Harrison

County.

John Dahlgren, Senior Planner with DB Hartt in Ohio, volunteered

his time to serve as the Eastern Harrison County planning team leader.

Dahlgren has spent many years working for local governments and

consulting firms as a planner. Team members included the following

OSU City and Regional Planning graduate students: Joshua Anderson,

a graduate student in the City and Regional Planning program at The

Ohio State University, works for the City of Columbus Department

of Development, Neighborhood Services Division. Ian Beniston is

pursuing a Master degree in City and Regional Planning and works for

ACP-Visioning + Planning, Ltd. Ma’ayan Citron is in his final year of

a dual degree in planning and public administration and is an intern

with the Ohio Department of Development. Nathan Leppo is currently

a Teaching Assistant while pursuing a Master’s degree in City and

Regional Planning. Bridget Troy works for the Neighborhood Services

Division in the Department of Development at the City of Columbus

while pursuing her degree. Erica Wicks interns at a City of Columbus

Neighborhood Pride Center while pursuing a dual degree in planning

and public administration. Rickie Yeager works for the Department of

Planning and Development in the City of Gahanna and is pursuing dual

degrees in planning and geography.

The Steering Committee

Harrison County Supervisors Larry Benefield, Bobby Eleuteris,

and Connie Rocko appointed a Steering Committee comprised of area

representatives to assist the planning team in coordinating communication

within Eastern Harrison County and responding to questions and issues

during the planning process.

Sissy Andrews has been a resident of the Gulf Coast for 25

years. She is a Commercial Real-Estate Broker and owner of Maryann’s

Downtown Restaurant in D’Iberville. In addition to being involved in her

community and the local elementary/middle school, Sissy is a member

of the Kiwanis for kids and past President of the D’Iberville/St. Martin

Chamber of Commerce. Sissy is excited to be playing an active role in

the planning process, by serving on the steering committee.

Figure I-5. The planning team and steering committee members meet

with Supervisor Rocko after the September 2007 Town Hall Meeting.

Source: Chris Cunningham


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Dottie Machen is a native Mississippian. After graduating

from the University of Southern Mississippi, with an honors degree in

Criminal Justice, she worked for the Juvenile Court of Memphis and

Shelby County, Tennessee. Dottie was later employed by Interchecks Inc.

as a customer service and sales associate in Gulfport, until she moved

to Hattiesburg, where she managed several construction projects and

facilitated a support group. When her husband Tim was transferred back

to Gulfport in l997 as Postmaster, Dottie became very involved with

community and charitable organizations. Following Hurricane Katrina,

Dottie formed Synergy Consulting Inc. and managed her 250 home

subdivision in the Lyman area. When asked to serve on the Steering

Committee, she accepted the honor in the spirit that one person can

positively make a difference.

Julia Encalade is a native of Biloxi. Julia is married and the mother

of three daughters and the grandmother of two. Julia is a member of the

Slavic Ladies Auxiliary (SLA). She is also the Harrison County Veterans

Service Officer. Julia was excited about participating on the Steering

Committee and hopes that the Mississippi Gulf Coast will preserve its

history and heritage in the wake of Hurricane Katrina.

Walt Warren has lived in Harrison County for the last 15 years,

where he is employed in the insurance industry. Walt is married to

Tammy Warren and together they have three children. Walt and his

family currently reside in the Woolmarket community. As a resident of

the community for the last 12 years, Walt wants to ensure that growth in

Eastern Harrison County is properly planned for, so his participation on

this steering committee is greatly appreciated.

Rondell Young has been employed with the City of Biloxi for 31

years. During his tenure, Rondell was the Deputy Building Official for

seven years, and is now the current Code Enforcement Administrator

for the City of Biloxi. Since 2000, Rondell has served on the Harrison

County Planning Commission, representing residents in District One.

Rondell was appointed by County Supervisor Bobby Eleuterius to serve

in this capacity, and is excited to be serving the residents of Eastern

Harrison County on this planning effort. Rondell has a Bachelor of

Science in Education from the University of Southern Mississippi, and

an AS from Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College.

Acknowledgements

A warm thank you goes out to all the citizens of Eastern Harrison

County, who welcomed the planning team into their community and

took the time to share their community vision so willingly during a very

difficult time. It was truly this vision that guided the team and made this

plan possible.

All steering committee members, who provided crucial

information gathering and community feedback, were a valuable asset

for the planning team. A special thank you goes out to all those who

provided background information and data to the Eastern Planning

Team.

The Eastern Planning Team would like to extend

acknowledgements to the following people who assisted the planning

team. They include Patrick Bonck, Smokey Johnson, and Kelvin Jackson

of the Harrison County Zoning Administration Office, who answered

numerous questions and worked patiently with our many requests.

Paul Barnes with the Southern Mississippi Planning and Development

District provided much of the mapping information found in this

plan. Thanks to Harrison County Supervisors Larry Benefield, Bobby

Eleuteris, Connie Rocko, and Kim Savant, who coordinated with the

planning team and steering committee and acted as invaluable sources

of information about the communities of Eastern Harrison County.

The entire Harrison County Board of Supervisors deserves thanks for

the support during the planning efforts in Eastern Harrison County.

Community representatives from the Harrison County School

District, the Harrison County Development Commission, Harrison

County Utility Authority, the Gulf Regional Planning Commission,

the Land Trust for the Mississippi Coastal Plain, Mississippi Institute

of Forest Inventory, the State of Mississippi Department of Marine

Resources, Mississippi Development Authority, Tradition Properties

Inc., the City of Biloxi Planning Department, the City of D’Iberville


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Department of Planning, the Mississippi Home Corporation, and

community churches were also instrumental in compiling the plan.

The team must acknowledge the funding sources that made this

work possible, especially the US Department of Housing and Urban

Development.

The team would also like to thank the other members of The

Ohio State University planning team. Bob Cowell, AICP from College

Station, Texas, volunteered his time to assist with the planning process.

Ellen Cowell volunteered her time to assist with organizing and facilitating

the Town Hall Meetings.

Organization of the Document

Chapter 1. Planning Context

Planning Context summarizes Eastern Harrison County’s important

characteristics, key trends, and pressing planning issues.

Chapter 2. Plan

The Plan outlines overall goals and objectives to address the issues

identified in Chapter 1, and provides specific strategies and actions to

achieve these goals and objectives.

Appendix C. Potential Grant Funding Sources

The Potential Grant Sources identifies sources to assist in implementing

the community plan. Funding community projects is an essential element

of plan implementation.

Appendix D. Principles of New Urbanism, Leadership in Energy

and Environmental Design for Neighborhood Development, and

Land Use Conflict Identification Strategy

The principles of New Urbanism, the Leadership in Energy and

Environmental Design—Neighborhood Development standards, and

Land Use Conflict Identification Strategy (LUCIS) standards inform

the Community Plan for Eastern Harrison County. These principles and

standards emphasize smart growth, neighborhood development, and

growth management.

Appendix E. List of Acronyms and Glossary

The List of Acronyms and Glossary to assist readers in understanding

terms used throughout this plan.

Figure I-6. Residents want to provide more east - west roadways to

increase connectivity throughout the planning area.

Appendix A. Background Assessment

Background Assessment provides relevant information on community

history and trends and detailed analyses on the characteristics of

population, housing, land use, economy, natural resources, community

facilities, and infrastructure that have been reviewed and examined as

part of this planning process.

Appendix B. Community Involvement

Community Involvement describes the methods for engaging citizens

in the planning process, as well as the ideas and opinions of the

community.

Source: Nathan Leppo


XXIV

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Map I-1. The Eastern Planning Area

Source: Southern Mississippi Planning and Development District


1

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Chapter 1. Planning Context

Description of the Community

The Eastern Planning Area is located in northeastern Harrison

County. It is approximately 70 square miles and remains unincorporated.

The planning area boundaries are US Highway 49 to the west, De Soto

National Forest to the north, the Harrison County-Jackson County

border to the east, and the incorporated city limits of D’Iberville,

Biloxi, and Gulfport to the south (see Map 1-1). There are several small

communities found in the Eastern Planning Area, including Lyman,

Orange Grove, Ramsey, White Plains, and Woolmarket.

The Eastern Planning Area is a community consisting of

primarily forested areas and large lot, single-family homes. The residents

of the community are a mix of longtime and new residents and are from

varying educational backgrounds and income levels.

History

Each community in the Eastern Planning Area has had its

own unique and individual history. In recent years, however, many

communities have been reduced in size due to annexation by coastal

cities. Industry and improvements in transportation are significant to the

history of many communities in the Eastern Planning Area. Two of the

most important industries have been the wool industry and the lumber

industry. During the early nineteenth century, for example, Woolmarket

reached its status as a coastal metropolis due to its wool industry. 1 It

was said that up to 10,000 sheep could be seen grazing in Woolmarket

at one point in its history. 2 This industry’s decline, however, began in

the 1930s when the state passed a law banning open-range grazing. This

short-lived law spurred the selling of most of the sheep in the region,

damaging the once-thriving industry. 3 While sheep herding has long

since disappeared, the area known as Woolmarket still retains its heritage

in its namesake.

The lumber industry has been another historically important

part of the Eastern Planning Area economy. White Plains, which used

to have a sawmill located within its borders, depended on the railroad to

move its wood products to northern markets.

The creation of the community of Lyman is linked to the Gulf

and Ship Island Railroad. Lyman was established around 1895 and was

named after Lyman Reeves, who built the first house on the site of the

town. 4 After the creation of the Gulf and Ship Island Railroad, Reeves

and a partner named Taylor began a sawmill and a commissary store. 5

Orange Grove’s history is also closely tied to the Gulf and Ship

Island Railroad. The railroad serviced the lumber industry in the area.

After many trees had been cleared, orange orchards were planted in their

place. It is from these orchards that the community takes its name. It has

been said that a series of cold winters destroyed the area’s orange groves.

While the orchards may be gone, the community of Orange Grove still

proudly retains its namesake. 6

Ramsey, a small community in the northern portion of the

planning area, is named after the Ramsey family, who owned a plantation


2

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

at the intersection of State Highway 15 and Bethel Road. 7 Over time

the plantation has been split by divisions within the family. Today

only the original main house survives. 8 Ramsey has remained relatively

undeveloped due to the surrounding De Soto National Forest.

The De Soto National Forest has also played an integral part in

the planning area’s history. The De Soto National Forest was created

to combat the clear-cutting of vast stretches of southern pine in the

1930s. 9 Only a few seed trees remained to start the regeneration process.

The seedlings that did sprout soon succumbed to cattle, feral hogs, fire,

or pest infestations. 10 Today the De Soto National Forest, the largest

National Forest in Mississippi, contains approximately 378,538 acres

and protects vast tracts of natural habitat throughout Mississippi. 11

“The Eastern Planning Area is

composed of multiple communities,

including Lyman, Orange

Grove, Ramsey, White Plains,

and Woolmarket.”

Figure 1-1. While orange groves are no longer common in Orange

Grove, one can find orange trees in residents’ yards.

Figure 1-2. The old post office in the community of Lyman.

Source: Dottie Machen

Source: Nathan Leppo


3

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Regional Connections

The planning area is bounded by Jackson County to the east, US

Highway 49 to the west, the municipal boundaries of Gulfport, Biloxi,

and D’Iberville to the south, and a combination of State Highway 15,

State Highway 67, and the Saucier Planning Area to the north. Map 1-1

shows the boundaries of the planning area. Woolmarket is the largest

community in the Eastern Planning Area, comprising a majority of

the land area in the central portion of the planning area. The Eastern

Planning Area is adjacent to the incorporated communities of Gulfport,

Biloxi, and D’Iberville and the unincorporated community of Saucier.

Because the Eastern Planning Area is largely residential, there are strong

connections with Gulfport, Biloxi and D’Iberville for employment,

shopping, entertainment, recreation, government offices, and other

services. Residents also frequent the Success Community Center

located in the Saucier Planning Area. Access to Interstate Highway 10 is

provided via State Highway 15, US Highway 49, State Highway 67 and

State Highway 605. These roadways provide connections to surrounding

communities, including Gulfport, Biloxi, and D’Iberville, in addition

to regional destinations such as Mobile, Alabama and New Orleans,

Louisiana. Mobile and New Orleans are both within a 75-mile drive of

the planning area. The Gulfport-Biloxi International Airport in Gulfport

serves as a gateway, connecting the Gulf Coast to other parts of the

United States and beyond. Although located outside of the planning

area, the airport is easily accessible to residents in Eastern Harrison

County. In addition to these connections, the Mississippi Department of

Transportation (MDOT) released a new Hurricane Evacuation Guide in

the aftermath of Katrina to lessen traffic congestion during potential

future Mississippi Gulf Coast hurricane evacuations. US Highway 49,

State Highway 67, State Highway 15, and Interstate Highway 10 (south

of the planning area) are designated as the main evacuation routes for

residents of the Eastern Planning Area.

Background and Current Trends

Demographics

Eastern Harrison County had a population of 5,536 persons

according to 2007 estimates from the Mississippi Home Corporation,

up 14 percent from 2000. As of 2007, a majority of the residents in the

area were 35 to 54 years old. Homes within the community are located

in a rural environment surrounded by wetlands, rivers, and wooded

areas. The population is expected to increase to approximately 11,000

people by 2030 as a result of coastal residents moving further inland in

addition to other growth factors. Much of this development is expected

north of Interstate Highway 10 where multiple developments have been

proposed and are currently under construction.

Housing

In 2007, there were an estimated total of 2,097 housing units

in the planning area, according to the Mississippi Home Corporation.

These units were primarily single-family and manufactured homes.

Of those housing units, a large percentage were owner occupied. The

majority of housing in the area experienced wind and/or flood damage

from Hurricane Katrina in 2005. To a large extent, previously damaged

housing has been repaired or rebuilt. In addition, new homes and several

subdivisions are either under construction or have been proposed in the

area. The planning area is expected to add 1,990 housing units between

2007 and 2030. 12

Economics

Economic activity in the Eastern Planning Area is confined to a

handful of small businesses. With limited local employment, the average

commute time was 27 minutes in 2007. 13 Residents in the planning area

are currently employed in services, retail, and construction in major

commercial centers along and south of Interstate Highway 10.


4

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Map 1-1. Regional Connections

Source: Southern Mississippi Planning and Development District


5

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Current Land Use

Approximately 86 percent of the Eastern Planning Area is forest

or open space. Agricultural uses comprise nine percent of the land area.

Residential land makes up three percent of the planning area, while

commercial use accounts for only one percent of the total land area.

Residential land use has followed a large lot, single-family development

pattern. It is low-density and rural in character. Over the past two

decades, larger, single-family residential subdivisions have emerged in

the planning area. The majority of residential development has been

concentrated in the southern and central areas of the Eastern Planning

Area.

There are minimal commercial uses in the planning area.

Commercial uses that does exist is in the form of small restaurants,

automotive repair shops, and mini-storage unit facilities. Commercial

Figure 1-3. Single-family homes on large lots are a common housing

type in the community.

Source: Nathan Leppo

development is primarily located along the US Highway 49 corridor and

has begun to develop along State Highway 15 near State Highway 67.

Industrial uses in the Eastern Planning Area include a cement

mixing plant at Lamey Bridge Road and State Highway 15, and the Allied

Waste Transfer Station and Coastal Recyclers facility along Hudson-

Krohn Road. Additionally, there are several dirt excavation operations

in the planning area. These uses are scattered throughout the Eastern

Planning Area.

Natural Resources

The most prominent natural feature of the Eastern Planning Area

is the dense forest, which is an important resource for aesthetic reasons,

recreation, and potential commercial logging activities. Preservation of

forest ecology and opportunities for recreational activities can be found

in the De Soto National Forest, which is found across the northern

border of the planning area.

The most prominent water features of the region are the

Tchoutacabouffa River, the Biloxi River, and accompanying tributaries.

Freshwater wetlands are dispersed about the Tchoutacabouffa and

Biloxi River watersheds, helping to clean runoff and absorb floodwaters.

Hydric and partially hydric soils are generally contained in close proximity

to these waterways, overlapping with flood plains and wetlands. Nonhydric

soils are suitable for development and are appropriate for a wide

variety of native and agricultural plantings.

Community Facilities and Resources

Several community facilities are located throughout the Eastern

Planning Area. There are three public schools including Harrison

County High School on School Road, North Woolmarket Elementary

and Middle School on Old Woolmarket Road, and the D’Iberville High

School on Lamey Bridge Road. The Woolmarket Community Park and

the Woolmarket Community Center are the area’s main recreational

amenities. These facilities, found near the intersection of Old Woolmarket

Road and Lorraine Road, include four baseball fields, two tennis courts,


6

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

and a walking track. A senior center is currently under construction

next to the existing community center. Finally, there are two churches

within the boundaries of the planning area, including Heritage Baptist

and Cross Roads Baptist Churches near Lamey Bridge Road and State

Highway 67.

Figure 1-5. The Woolmarket Community Center walking track provides

a source of recreation for residents.

Figure 1-4. The majority of the planning area is forested land.

Source: Joshua Anderson

Source: Nathan Leppo

Infrastructure

Roads

The primary roadways traversing the Eastern Planning Area

include US Highway 49, State Highway 67, State Highway 605, and State

Highway 15. The planning area is primarily composed of collector and

local roadways.

The current roadway project of major importance in the planning

area is the completion of State Highway 67, which will provide increased

accessibility between US Highway 49 and Interstate Highway 10. The

project is scheduled for completion in 2009. The highway will connect

with Interstate 110 in D’Iberville and run through the central portion

of the planning area in a northwesterly direction. Another planned,

significant project in the planning area is the Mississippi Department

of Transportation’s (MDOT) 2007-2012 Statewide Transportation


7

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Improvement Program recommendation to improve US Highway 49.

MDOT plans to add two lanes to US Highway 49 from O’Neal Road to

north of School Road. Following right-of-way acquisition, construction

is scheduled to begin in 2009.

Utilities

Seven water companies and five sewer companies service the

Eastern Planning Area. Water and sewer service is only available to

portions of the planning area serviced by utility companies. Much of

the planning area does not have water and sewer service.

The Eastern Planning Area will be receiving improvements to

water and sewer infrastructure in the near future. The Mississippi Gulf

Region Water and Wastewater Plan has prioritized a number of projects that

will be funded and constructed. The projects have been prioritized as

emergency, near-term, and long-term projects. All projects are expected

to be completed by 2025. The projects recommended in the plan will

provide water and sewer service to many areas not previously served in

the Eastern Planning Area.

Figure 1-6. A recently completed section of State Highway 67 crosses

State Highway 15.

Surrounding Communities

In developing the Community Plan for Eastern Harrison County, the

planning team reviewed the existing growth strategies of neighboring

municipalities. The municipal plans of Biloxi, Gulfport and D’Iberville

call for the adjacent areas to retain their rural character.

Biloxi’s 2006 Reviving the Renaissance report does not address

potential land use in the Eastern Planning Area. One of the

recommendations of the plan is to complete infrastructure improvements

to the Woolmarket area. 14 The 2003 Gulfport Comprehensive Plan includes

sections of the Eastern Planning Area as part of a proposed growth area

for potential annexation. This plan indicates that Gulfport is currently at

58.6 percent build out and that the city should look at annexation when

build out reaches 60-65 percent. The portions of the Eastern Planning

Area targeted for annexation in the Gulfport future land use map are

designated as low density residential. 15 The regional plan section in the

2006 Citizen’s Master Plan for D’Iberville, notes that annexation into the

Eastern Planning Area is considered a growth option for D’Iberville. The

plan indicates that D’Iberville is considering locating a waste treatment

plant and a seafood processing plant in its proposed annexation area.

It is proposed that these uses be located near the intersection of State

Highway 15 and State Highway 67. 16

Community Input

Source: Nathan Leppo

The Community Plan for Eastern Harrison County is a reflection of

the desires of the residents for the future of their community. Citizens

were engaged throughout the planning process in a variety of ways.

Input was provided through a Community Preference Survey, small

group discussions, community surveys, a 1-800 number, an on-line

discussion board, responses to community newsletters, and steering

committee members. Much of the community input was gathered at

a Town Hall Meeting held at the Woolmarket Community Center on

September 6 th , 2007. A second Town Hall Meeting was held at the


8

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Woolmarket Community Center on December 13, 2007. A complete

summary of the information gathered and the methods used can be

found in Appendix B.

Community Preference Survey

A Community Preference Survey (CPS) was conducted at the

September 6 Town Hall Meeting. One hundred and eighty-seven people

participated. The survey is a tool used to determine community opinions

on several built environment alternatives. The participants were asked to

evaluate a series of images and rate them on a scale of one to five, with

one being very unacceptable and five being very acceptable.

The CPS used images to measure preferences for housing density,

single-family housing style, multi-family housing style, building distance

from the road, streetscape, walking/biking trails, commercial style, and

industrial style. Residents showed a strong preference for housing on

large lots with large setbacks from the road. A one and a half story

home, shown in Figure 1-9, was found to be the most acceptable type

of housing by residents in Eastern Harrison County, with another style

of a single-family home receiving acceptable ratings. When considering

multi-family homes, all were found to be unacceptable by a majority of

residents. Citizens also expressed a preference for walking/biking paths

with natural wooded landscapes.

Figure 1-7. Residents sign in at the September 2007 Town Hall

Meeting at the Woolmarket Community Center.

Figure 1-8. This home was found to be the most acceptable in the

Community Preference Survey.

Source: Chris Cunningham

Source: Chris Cunningham


9

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Small Group Discussions

Small group discussions held at the September 6 th Town Hall

Meeting revealed residents’ strong ties to their community. Citizens

were asked to identify what they liked best about Eastern Harrison

County, what they liked least, and what they would change to make their

community better.

Residents expressed appreciation for Eastern Harrison County’s

rural setting and their connection with the natural environment.

Preservation, of rural characteristics and forested areas, roadways,

traffic, and quality development, were the top concerns among residents.

Additional suggestions made by citizens included the enhancement and

expansion of parks, nature trails, athletic fields, biking/walking paths,

grocery stores, restaurants, and shopping centers.

Figure 1-9. Citizens participated in small group discussions expressing

what they would like to see for their community at the September 2007

Town Hall Meeting.

Citizen Surveys

At the September 6 th Town Hall Meeting, citizens of Eastern

Harrison County were asked to answer a written survey and surveys

were provided to citizens on request. A total of 100 citizens responded

to the survey. The purpose of the survey was to gather information

on residents’ current feelings about their community and to determine

those issues of the most importance concerning the area’s future. The

results, in addition to other informational resources, were used to guide

the formation of the plan.

The majority of residents in Eastern Harrison County responded

positively to environmental policies that preserve wooded areas, rivers,

and bayous, establish scenic corridors, and create public canoe launch

points. Policies encouraging construction of new office and industrial

parks were not favored. Most residents felt that the pace of development

in the Eastern Planning Area is either at an acceptable pace or too fast.

Residents commonly consider the center of Eastern Harrison

County to be located at the Woolmarket and Lorraine Road intersection

or at the Woolmarket Community Center.

Residents also answered questions concerning recreational

facilities and other community facilities they would like to see in their

community. Many residents expressed a desire to see parks, walking/

biking trails, and other recreational opportunities. The services that

residents would most like to see are grocery stores, restaurants, shopping

centers, gas stations, and auto repair facilities.

Scenario and Policy Voting

During the December Town Hall Meeting citizens were asked

to vote on a variety of development scenarios and policy options

for the community. Participants support the further development of

the Woolmarket Village Center on Old Woolmarket Road. They also

support a new east-west roadway either at Curry Road or at Allen Road.

Participants support a tree preservation policy and the establishment of

a scenic roadway ordinance.

Source: Chris Cunningham


10

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Dot Voting

Citizens prioritized strategies to be achieved as the Community

Plan for Eastern Harrison County is implemented at the December Town

Hall Meeting. Participants most strongly prioritized preserving the rural

character of the community.

Additional Community Input

Several additional methods were used to gather community

opinions during the formation of the plan. A 1-800 number was

available for residents to voice any questions, comments, or concerns

throughout the planning process. An on-line discussion board was also

Figure 1-10. At the Town Hall Meeting in September, participants

expressed what they want to see for the future of Eastern Harrison

County.

available and served a similar purpose. The forum based system had the

added benefit of facilitating dialogue between community members. All

residents received monthly newsletters, some of which contained articles

requesting feedback on different alternatives. The Eastern Harrison

County Steering Committee members were also a point of contact with

the community for feedback. Finally, input was gathered from students

at the North Woolmarket Middle School. Students provided their ideas

for what they would like to see around their school. Students requested

additional recreational opportunities, such as a skate park. A summary

of the responses received from these tools can be found in Appendix

B.

Figure 1-11. Residents used green and red dots to voice support and

concerns for the goals and strategies at the Town Hall Meeting in

December.

Source: Chris Cunningham

Source: Nathan Harber


11

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Observations

The following topics, which are the result of citizen input

and information about Eastern Harrison County’s past and current

conditions, include the major concerns and opportunities facing the

community today.

Hurricane Katrina

The areas along Eastern Harrison County’s bayous and rivers

were significantly impacted by Hurricane Katrina’s storm surge. The

forests received tree damage in much of the planning area. The largest

impact from Hurricane Katrina has been the rapid influx of new

residents in the planning area as coastal residents seek to establish new

homes on higher ground.

Rural Character

As the community rebuilds and changes, the ability of the area

to maintain its rural character is very important to residents. Residents

have expressed that they would like to see the pattern of development

remain the same as it had before Katrina, with rural residential and small

businesses. The citizens of the planning area understand that growth is

coming and want to make sure that it happens in a way that will preserve

the community’s rural character.

Development Activities

The Eastern Planning Area has historically been a rural community

with limited development. The effects of Hurricane Katrina, however,

have resulted in a change to this pattern. The planning area is growing

rapidly and is experiencing significant residential development. Growth

will need to be carefully planned and accommodated to ensure that the

community’s desires and needs are met. Approximately 53 percent of

the Eastern Planning Area is undeveloped, but much of this area may

not be suitable for development. In order to identify the undeveloped

land that is most suitable for development, a land suitability analysis was

conducted. The conclusions of the Land Use Conflict Identification

Strategy (LUCIS) analysis, which can be seen in Map D-1 on page 167

aided in the development of the Sector Map and the Concept Plan. The

areas most suitable for development were determined using the results

from the LUCIS analysis in conjunction with other considerations,

including community input and current development patterns.

There are two large-scale development projects planned in or

near the Eastern Planning Area that will impact current development

patterns. Tradition is a master-planned community currently under

construction in the area immediately north of the Eastern Planning

Area. At build-out, this development is planned to accommodate

between 30,000 to 40,000 new residents. Pinehaven is planned within the

planning area, located along State Highway 15 near State Highway 67. In

addition to these major developments, there are a number of residential

subdivisions and multifamily projects planned for the community.

Figure 1-12. Preserving the rural character of Eastern Harrison County

is a high priority for residents.

Source: Joshua Anderson


12

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Natural Resources

Natural resources in the Eastern Planning Area are an enormous

asset to the community. The existing dense forest, scenic waterways,

and open spaces are the natural foundations of the highly valued rural

character of the area. The aesthetics provided by dense stands of

trees are an essential part of the community’s visual identity. To many

residents, it is very important that this identity remains intact in the face

of future growth. As a result, many residents believe in the need for

active preservation of natural features.

Many people in the community believe that access to natural

areas is limited. This characterization applies to the De Soto National

Forest, the largest public source of recreation in the area. The De Soto

National Forest lacks recreational connections (i.e. trails) in the Eastern

Planning Area. Residents would like to see these connections improved.

A related issue is the desire of residents for increased access to the

Biloxi and Tchoutacabouffa Rivers for such recreational purposes as

fishing and boating. Currently, access is limited because of private land

ownership abutting the rivers.

Recreation

Community feedback indicates that citizens would like to see an

expansion of recreational opportunities offered in the Eastern Planning

Area. Several types of recreational activity were suggested. The most

common request was for additional community parks, followed closely

by a desire for more walking, biking and running trails.

Residents were also very interested in expanding access to natural

areas. The residents also indicated that there is uncertainty as to what

recreational opportunities are offered at the De Soto National Forest

and how they can take advantage of those recreational options. Students

at North Woolmarket Elementary and Middle School noted that they

want to see more active recreational opportunities, such as a skate park

in their community.

Figure 1-13. Many residents regard Live Oaks as an important

component of community identity.

Source: Joshua Anderson


13

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Commercial Convenience

Commercial activity is sparsely located throughout Eastern

Harrison County, primarily along US Highway 49 and in the southeastern

portion of the planning area. Most commercial conveniences are just

outside of the planning area. In terms of commercial development,

residents would like to see more grocery stores, restaurants, gas stations,

auto repair facilities, and shopping destinations. 17 New development,

however, should reflect the rural character of the community (see Figure

A-15). Residents also suggested that these new services be located along

State Highways 15 and 67, and US Highway 49 in the planning area for

more convenience. 18

Figure 1-14. Both children and adults want to see more recreational

opportunities.

Community Health and Welfare

Residents have expressed a desire to improve the community’s

health and welfare. The most important of these requests is improved

code enforcement and stricter zoning regulation. Many residents

indicated that they wished the community had more control over the

style and scope of new development and the ability to require a basic

level of maintenance on all properties. Residents also indicated a desire

for increased opportunities for passive recreation. Walking trails in

particular have been proposed by residents as features they would like

to see in their community. The community overwhelmingly responded

in favor of requiring sidewalks in new subdivisions. Additionally, many

residents indicated that they would like to see medical facilities located

in the Eastern Planning Area.

Figure 1-15. The Love Shack is a small diner on Woolmarket Road.

This type of commercial development would be considered appropriate

in the Eastern Planning Area.

Source: Bridget Troy

Source: Rickie Yeager


14

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Infrastructure

The infrastructure in the Eastern Planning Area is going through

a period of significant change. The recent completion of State Highway

605 and the construction of State Highway 67 provide increased options

of north-south travel for residents within the planning area. Local

roadways within the planning area are generally in good condition. The

major concern voiced by residents was the lack of east-west connectivity

in the area. The roadway system lacks sufficient east-west connectivity,

making it difficult for residents to travel east and west across the planning

area.

While sidewalks are found in several subdivisions within the

planning area, there is not a connected sidewalk network. Several

residents expressed that they would like to see more sidewalks, and

Figure 1-16. Citizens want to maintain their scenic roadways.

83.5 percent of residents said that they would be in favor of requiring

sidewalks in all new subdivisions.

Water and sewer service is not provided to the entire planning

area, and many homes utilize septic and well systems. A majority of

residents said that they would like to see water and sewer service extended

within the planning area, though there were also a number of residents

interested in limiting the extension of water and sewer service in order

to preserve the rural character of the planning area. The Mississippi Gulf

Region Water and Wastewater Plan recommends projects that will extend

water and sewer service into portions of the planning area in the near

future.

Endnotes

Figure 1-17. Sidewalks are found in several developments throughout

the planning area but are not required.

Source: Joshua Anderson

Source: Nathan Leppo


15

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

1 Thompson, Ray. 1962. Know Your Coast: Once Woolmarket Aspired To Be A Cotton Market. The Daily Herald. June 13.

2 Thompson, Ray. 1958. Know Your Coast: Woolmarket Was Well Named. The Daily Herald. July 7.

3 Prindiville, Alice B. 1952. Ramble Route: Woolmarket and Coalville. Down South Magazine. May-June.

4 Breiger, James 1998.. Hometown Mississippi. 2 nd Edition. Town Square Books.

5 Thompson, Ray M. 1961. Know Your Coast: The Founder of Lyman. The Daily Herald. April 27.

6 Ellis, Dan. 1998. Mississippi Gulf Coast: A panorama of history and culture.

7 O’Neal, Barney. 2007. Personal communication with Pastor, Ramsey Creek Church. September 5

8 Ibid.

9 Wilson, Bruce. 2007. Phone interview with De Soto National Forest Employee. September 13.

10 Ibid.

11 United States Department of Agriculture. n.d. De Soto District. Accessed on October 7, 2007 from http://www.fs.fed.us/r8/mississippi/desoto/

12 Population projection developed by Ohio State University, methodology and population figures are provided in Appendix A.

13 Estimates provided by the Mississippi Home Corporation based on methodology and analysis conducted by ESRI

14 Biloxi. 2006. Reviving the Renaissance. Accessed on November 19, 2007 from http://www.biloxi.ms.us/PDF/RTRfinance.pdf

15 Gulfport. 2003. Gulfport Comprehensive Plan. Accessed on November 19, 2007 from http://www.ci.gulfport.ms.us/URBANDEV/DRAFTGulfportCompPlan.pdf

16 Mississippi Renewal. 2005. 2005 Citizen’s Master Plan for D’Iberville, Mississippi. Accessed on November 19, 2007 from http://www.diberville.ms.us/html/docs/CMP06.

pdf

17 Ibid.

18 Ibid.


16

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Chapter 2. The Plan

The focus of this section of the plan is to establish goals and strategies

that will help guide the citizens’ vision for the planning area’s future.

The plan recommends strategies and specific action steps to accomplish

the goals and objectives.

Prior to defining goals, the planning team assessed the existing

conditions and trends in the planning area. The details of this study

are found in Appendix A, Background Assessment. Issues and

recommendations in this plan come from the results of the community

survey conducted during the Town Hall Meeting, discussions with the

Eastern Harrison County Steering Committee, and feedback from

community residents gathered from a 1-800 number and an online

community forum designed for this plan.

This Community Plan for Eastern Harrison County, in its broadest

form, is a statement of the community’s hopes and ambitions for

Eastern Harrison County’s future. The goals and strategies outlined in

this chapter are to be achieved over the next 20 years. Some may be

challenging to accomplish.

This plan documents the desires of the community, helps

prioritize public investments, and serves as a general framework for the

development of specific regulations and standards to guide public and

private developments.

Themes

This plan includes three key themes that provide a policy

framework that has helped shape each of the goals, strategies, and

implementation actions. The themes are:

Connectivity - This theme is focused on improving connections and

mobility within Eastern Harrison County and connections to areas

adjacent to Eastern Harrison County. This includes creating sidewalks

in new neighborhoods, improving major roadway arterials, adding

multiuse paths, and ensuring that residential subdivisions are connected

to one another throughout the planning area. An example includes

creating an east-west connector road to increase access throughout

Eastern Harrison County.

Preservation - This theme is focused on ensuring that the unique rural

character of the community is preserved through maintaining open

space in new residential developments, providing natural views along

scenic roadways, conserving forest and water resources, and ensuring

that commercial development is of the size and type appropriate to the

community.

Place Making - This theme is focused on creating a sense of place

in the community. This includes expanding recreational opportunities

and creating neighborhoods and shopping opportunities in Eastern

Harrison County.


17

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Community Goals and Strategies

The objective of the plan is to evaluate and suggest improvements

to aid citizens in managing change in their communities. The face of

Eastern Harrison County has and will continue to change as a result of

Hurricane Katrina. Community input, survey responses, and the Town

Hall Meetings were instrumental in drafting the goals, strategies, and

action items in this plan (see Appendix B for more details). Integral to

the planning process is the formulation of goals representative of the

community’s vision for the future.

Figure 2-1. The citizens of Eastern Harrison County understand

that new development is entering their community. Citizen input has

guided the creation of this plan. At the September Town Hall Meeting,

citizens reviewed proposals for development that could be built in their

communities.

The following goals work to achieve the community’s vision

through the application of sound planning principles that incorporate

a variety of issues and opportunities identified by Eastern Harrison

County community members. The community has stated that they would

like to:

• Ensure that Eastern Harrison County prepares for growth,

• Foster a sense of community through residential and economic

development,

• Improve mobility and roadway connectivity in Eastern Harrison

County,

• Preserve natural resources,

• Improve and expand recreational opportunities,

• Provide quality housing choices for all residents, and

• Promote principals of New Urbanism and Green

Development.

Figure 2-2. Citizens set the goals for the Community Plan through

individual, small-group, and large-group discussions.

Source: Chris Cunningham

Source: Chris Cunningham


18

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Implementation

In this section, each goal is supported by a series of strategies

intended to assist the community in focusing its resources. Under

each strategy there are detailed actions that serve as a checklist for the

community to achieve its goals. Many of the actions in this plan will

require significant financial investment. Appendix C describes a variety

of funding sources that are available to aid in the implementation of

this plan.

Since Eastern Harrison County is unincorporated, the entity

responsible for carrying out many action steps is the Harrison County

Board of Supervisors. The Board has the authority, for example, to

adopt any recommended regulatory measures. In order to assist in

the implementation of the plan, however, Eastern Harrison County

residents are encouraged to form a non-profit organization to be called

the Eastern Harrison County Community Organization (EHCCO). The

purpose of the EHCCO is to solicit and receive grant monies, coordinate

local citizen efforts, and undertake some action steps—especially those

that are non-regulatory.

The plan is designed as a living document. It should be consulted

regularly by the community and serve as a practical guide to decision

making. Responsible parties are identified for each action, such as the

Board of Supervisors, EHCCO, and other appropriate entities. These

parties are noted in the Implementation Timeline Table that follows at

the end of this chapter. Time frames for implementation are broken

down into four categories:

1. Immediate,

2. Short-term,

3. Medium-term, and

4. Long-term.

The immediate term follows the publication of this plan to the

end of the first year. In other words, the immediate term encompasses

Year One (2008). The short-term is the entirety of each of Years Two

through Five (2009-2012). The medium-term follows this four-year

period from Year Six to Ten (2013-2017). The long-term is the remainder

of the period that this plan covers through Year 20 (2018-2027).

These short- medium- and long-term implementation strategies

are intended to serve as general time frames, since opportunities for each

action are less clear at this point. Such time frames serve as a guide for

the community to prepare for development and other challenges. Often,

the pursuit of medium- and long-term components of the plan will be

dependent on the progress of short-term action items.

Figure 2-3. Citizens want to expand recreational opportunities.

Source: Joshua Anderson


19

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

GOAL 1. ENSURE THAT EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY PREPARES FOR GROWTH.

STRATEGY A. Promote awareness and implementation of the Community Plan for Eastern Harrison County.

Action 1. Encourage all Harrison County officials to review and base decisions on the policies and recommendations set forth in the

Community Plan for Eastern Harrison County.

Action 2. Make copies of the Community Plan for Eastern Harrison County available at the Woolmarket Branch of the Harrison County

Library and at strategic locations throughout the Eastern Planning Area.

Action 3. Establish the Eastern Harrison Community County Organization (EHCCO), an organized group of citizens in the

planning area that will monitor and implement recommendations as set forth in the Community Plan.

STRATEGY B. Protect scenic corridors.

Action 1. Support the implementation of the Harrison County Scenic Byway Corridor Management Plan for State Highway 67.

Action 2. Apply for a Scenic Byway designation for State Highway 605.

Action 3. Develop a scenic corridor ordinance to protect the rural integrity of designated scenic roadways in Eastern Harrison County.

The ordinance should be modeled after the scenic byway guidelines established by the Mississippi Department of Transportation

(MDOT).

Action 4. Encourage the EHCCO to work with MDOT to plant trees along the median of State Highways 67 and 605 to further

enhance their aesthetic appeal as Scenic Byway corridors.

Action 5. Develop a signage plan that identifies historic sites and sites of natural significance as identified in the Harrison County

Scenic Byway applications for State Highway 67 and State Highway 605.

STRATEGY C. Encourage growth at specific locations in Eastern Harrison County.

Action 1. Support the rezoning of properties to comply with the Sector Map as set forth in the Community Plan.

Action 2. Support the recommendations set forth in the Community Plan regarding future land use and appropriate areas to focus new

development.


20

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Action 3. Support commercial development in areas designated as G-2 and G-3 on the Sector Map.

Action 4. Support multi-family and large-scale commercial development in areas designated as G-3 on the Sector Map.

Action 5. Promote the Woolmarket Village Center as a location for community-scale development including civic and retail uses.

Action 6. Require subdivision and zoning approval be contingent upon water and sewer availability in the G-2 and G-3 sectors.

Action 7. Revoke rezoning approval if progress is not made on development in a timely manner.

STRATEGY D. Encourage the expansion of infrastructure to service existing and future designated development areas.

Action 1. Partner with the Regional Water and Wastewater Authority to extend water and sewer services in G-2 and G-3 sectors in

Eastern Harrison County.

Action 2. Concentrate development in G-2 and G-3 sectors where water and sewer service is available or planned to be available.

Action 3. Develop a Stormwater Master Plan, which will allow for comprehensive management of storm water and the mitigation of

its effects throughout the planning area.

Action 4. Encourage the Harrison County Utility Authority to work with private utility companies to ensure that G-2 and G-3 sectors

are serviced by water and sewer infrastructure.

Action 5. Identify where infrastructure improvements and upgrades are necessary, and make them a priority in future Capital

Improvement Plans.

Action 6. Collaborate with the Harrison County Utility Authority to develop utility plans that take into account County land use

plans.

Action 7. Encourage public and private utility agencies to place new utilities, including electric, underground.

Action 8. Collaborate with the Mississippi Department of Health to require the increased periodic inspection of septic systems

throughout the planning area.


21

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Action 9. Encourage the use of pervious surfaces to reduce storm water runoff within the planning area.

Action 10. Encourage the Soil and Water Conservation District and Mississippi State University Extension Service to educate those

involved with farms, schools, golf courses, and parks that use pesticides and fertilizers on best management practices.

Action 11. Encourage the use of environmentally friendly storm water management practices (i.e. pervious pavements, rain gardens,

rainwater cisterns, bioswales, and wetland retention) to mitigate the effects of storm water runoff such as pollution and erosion.

Action 12. Collaborate with the Harrison County Utility Authority, and Harrison County Beautification Commission, and waste

disposal providers to explore new options for reducing waste and increasing recycling.

Action 13. Increase efforts to enforce illegal dumping.

STRATEGY E. Increase public safety services.

Action 1. Provide adequate fire and police equipment, facilities, and personnel to enable quick and efficient response to public safety

needs of the growing population.

Action 2. Collaborate with the Fire and Sheriff ’s Departments to determine the resources required to function more efficiently and

effectively to meet demand created as a result of growth.

Action 3. Create a Fire Services Master Plan to ensure the adequate provision of fire and emergency services to protect life and

property as a result of growth.

Action 4. Encourage the creation of neighborhood watch programs in new and existing neighborhoods in Eastern Harrison

County.

Action 5. Ensure that new water infrastructure provides for sufficient fireflow capacity on site that meets current safety standards.

Action 6. Partner with the National Forest Service to identify ways to minimize the risk of forest fires on properties adjacent to the

forest for residents and their property.


22

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Table 2-1. Implementation Timeline for Goal 1

Strategy

Goal 1: Ensure that Eastern Harrison County

prepares for Growth.

Responsible Parties

Grant Funding

Immediate

Year 1

Short-term

Year 2-5

Mid-term

Year 6-10

Long-term

Year 11-20

1A Action 1

Action 2

Action 3

1B Action 1

Action 2

Action 3

Action 4

Encourage all Harrison County officials to

review and base decisions on the policies and

recommendations set forth in the Community Plan

for Eastern Harrison County.

Harrison County

Make copies of the Community Plan for Eastern

Harrison County available at the Woolmarket Branch

of Harrison County Library and at strategic

locations throughout the Eastern Planning Area. Harrison County

Establish the Eastern Harrison County

Community Organization (EHCCO), an organized

group of citizens in the planning area that will

monitor and implement recommendations as set

forth in the Community Plan.

Harrison County

Support the implementation of the Harrison

County Scenic Byway Corridor Management Plan

for State Highway 67.

Apply for a Scenic Byway designation for State

Highway 605.

Develop a scenic corridor ordinance to protect the

rural integrity of designated scenic roadways in

Eastern Harrison County. The ordinance should

be modeled after the scenic byway guidelines

established by the Mississippi Department of

Transportation (MDOT).

Harrison County

Eastern Harrison County

Community Organization

Harrison County Board of

Supervisors

Encourage the EHCCO to work with MDOT to

plant trees along the median of State Highway 67

and 605 to further enhance their aesthetic appeal as Eastern Harrison County

Scenic Byway corridor.

Community Organization

National Arbor

Day Tree Planting

Program OR Seeds

and Roots Grant


23

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Strategy

Goal 1: Ensure that Eastern Harrison County

prepares for Growth.

Responsible Parties

Grant Funding

Immediate

Year 1

Short-term

Year 2-5

Mid-term

Year 6-10

Long-term

Year 11-20

Action 5

1C Action 1

Action 2

Action 3

Action 4

Action 5

Action 6

Action 7

1D Action 1

Action 2

Develop a signage plan that identifies historic sites

of natural significance as identified in the Harrison

County Scenic Byway applications for State

Highway 67 and State Highway 605.

Harrison County

Support the rezoning of properties to comply with

the Sector Map as set forth in the Community Plan. Harrison County

Support the recommendations set forth in the

Community Plan regarding future land use and

appropriate areas to focus new development.

Support commercial development in areas

designated as G-2 and G-3 on the Sector Map.

Support multifamily and large-scale commercial

development in areas designated as G-3 on the

Sector Map.

Promote the Woolmarket Village Center as

a location for community-scale development

including civic and retail uses

Harrison County

Harrison County

Harrison County

Harrison County

Require subdivisions and zoning approval be

contingent upon water and sewer availability in the

G-2 and G-3 sectors. Harrison County

Revoke rezoning approval if progress is not made

on development in a timely manner.

Harrison County

Partner with the Regional Water and Wastewater

Authority to extend water and sewer services in

G-2 and G-3 sectors in Eastern Harrison County. Harrison County

Concentrate development in G-2 and G-3 sectors

where water and sewer service is available or

planned to be available.

Harrison County

Community

Heritage

Preservation

Public Works

and Economic

Adjustment

Program

Mississippi

Development

Authority


24

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Strategy

Goal 1: Ensure that Eastern Harrison County

prepares for Growth.

Responsible Parties

Grant Funding

Immediate

Year 1

Short-term

Year 2-5

Mid-term

Year 6-10

Long-term

Year 11-20

Action 3

Develop a Stormwater Master Plan, which will

allow for comprehensive management of storm

water and the mitigation of its effects throughout

the planning area.

Harrison County

Mississippi

Development

Authority

Action 4

Action 5

Action 6

Action 7

Action 8

Action 9

Action 10

Action 11

Encourage the Harrison County Utility Authority

to work with private utility companies to ensure

that G-2 and G-3 sectors are serviced by water and

sewer infrastructure.

Harrison County

Identify where infrastructure improvements and

upgrades are necessary, and make them a priority

in future Capital Improvement Plans.

Collaborate with the Harrison County Utility

Authority to develop utility plans to take into

account County land use plans.

Harrison County

Harrison County

Encourage public and private utility agencies to

place new utilities, including electric, underground. Harrison County

Collaborate with the Mississippi Department of

Health to require the increased periodic inspection

of septic systems throughout the planning area. Harrison County

Encourage the use of pervious surfaces to reduce

storm water runoff within the planning area.

Harrison County

Encourage the Soil and Water Conservation

District and Mississippi State University Extension

Service to educate those involved with farms,

schools, golf courses, and parks that use pesticides

and fertilizers on best management practices. Harrison County

Encourage the use of environmentally friendly

storm water management practices to mitigate the

effects of storm water.

Harrison County

Mississippi

Development

Authority

Mississippi

Development

Authority

Mississippi

Development

Authority


25

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Strategy

Goal 1: Ensure that Eastern Harrison County

prepares for Growth.

Responsible Parties

Grant Funding

Immediate

Year 1

Short-term

Year 2-5

Mid-term

Year 6-10

Long-term

Year 11-20

Action 12

Action 13

1E Action 1

Action 2

Action 3

Collaborate with Harrison County Utility

Authority, Harrison County Beautification

Commission, and waste disposal providers to

explore new options for reducing waste and

increase recycling.

Increase efforts to enforce illegal dumping.

Provide adequate fire and police equipment,

facilities, and personnel to enable quick and

efficient response to public safety needs of the

growing population.

Eastern Harrison County

Community Organization

Eastern Harrison County

Community Organization

Harrison County

Collaborate with the Fire and Sheriff ’s

Departments to determine the resources needed

to function more efficiently and effectively to meet

demand created as a result of growth.

Harrison County

Create a Fire Services Master Plan to ensure the

adequate provision of fire and emergency services

to protect life and property as a result of growth. Harrison County

Capital

Improvements

Revolving Loan

Program

Action 4

Action 5

Action 6

Encourage the creation of neighborhood watch

programs in new and existing neighborhoods in

Eastern Harrison County.

Ensure that new water infrastructure provides

for sufficient fireflow capacity that meets current

safety standards.

Harrison County

Partner with the National Forest Service to identify

ways to minimize the risk of forest fires on

properties adjacent to the forest for residents and Harrison County, De Soto

their property.

National Forest

Capital

Improvements

Revolving Loan

Program


26

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Goal 2. FOSTER A SENSE OF COMMUNITY THROUGH RESIDENTIAL AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT.

STRATEGY A. Require all new development be consistent with the Community Plan.

Action 1. Support the establishment of a Zoning Enforcement Officer for Harrison County, whose responsibility would be to

enforce current and future regulations outlined in the Community Plan.

Action 2. Provide developers with a brochure that provides information on the permitting process and educational information on

good building practices. The brochure should include requirements for a zoning or building application and educational information

on construction methodology such as providing protective measures to shield concrete from the adverse effects of acidic soils.

STRATEGY B. Rehabilitate residential housing to get the community to work together, increase property values, and improve the appearance

of the area.

Action 1. Support the Harrison County Community Development Block Grant Coordinator in assisting homeowners with rehabilitating

substandard housing.

Action 2. Establish partnerships with local businesses, residents, and organizations to volunteer and assist in rehabilitating housing

(i.e. service learning project for boy and girl scouts).

STRATEGY C. Maintain the rural character of the community.

Action 1. Support the retention of forested land and rural housing in the G-1 (Restricted Growth) sector.

Action 2. Support the rezoning of areas in the G-1 sector that are not currently zoned as either E-1 Very Low Density Residential or

A-1 General Agriculture.

Action 3. Amend the Zoning Ordinance to protect designated scenic rural roadways by requiring deep setbacks for buildings and

maintaining natural vegetation along the roadway.

Action 4. Create an “Adopt a Road” program to encourage businesses and local organizations to participate in roadway cleanups and

to donate funds for landscaping improvements and maintenance along designated roadways.

Action 5. Require a deep setback and vegetative buffer around industrial uses to preserve the rural character of the area.


27

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Action 6. Maintain and improve existing roadway conditions by discouraging abutting uses that are not consistent with the community’s

rural character in G-1 sectors.

Action 7. Adopt a sign code for commercial development to minimize visual clutter.

Table 2-2. Implementation Timeline for Goal 2

Strategy

Goal 2: Foster a sense of community through

residential and economic development

Responsible Parties

Grant Funding

Immediate

Year 1

Short-term

Year 2-5

Mid-term

Year 6-10

Long-term

Year 11-20

2A Action 1

Support the establishment of a Zoning

Enforcement Officer for Harrison County, whose

responsibility would be to enforce current and

future regulations outlined in the Community Plan.

Harrison County

Action 2

2B Action 1

Action 2

Provide developers with a brochure that provides

information on the permitting process and

educational information on good building practices.

The brochure should include requirements for a

zoning or building application and educational

information on construction methodology such as

providing protective measures to shield concrete

from the adverse effects of acidic soils.

Harrison County

Support the Harrison County Community

Development Block Grant Coordinator in assisting

homeowners with rehabilitating substandard

housing.

Harrison County

Establish partnerships with local businesses,

residents, and organizations to volunteer and assist

in rehabilitating housing (i.e. service learning project

for boy and girl scouts).

Harrison County

Mutual Self-

Help Loans OR

Housing Repair and

Rehabilitation Loan

OR Rural Housing

Guaranteed Loans

Housing Repair and

Rehabilitation Loan


28

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Strategy

Goal 2: Foster a sense of community through

residential and economic development

Responsible Parties

Grant Funding

Immediate

Year 1

Short-term

Year 2-5

Mid-term

Year 6-10

Long-term

Year 11-20

2C Action 1

Action 2

Action 3

Action 4

Action 5

Action 6

Action 7

Support the retention of forested land and rural

housing in the G-1 (Restricted Growth) sector.

Harrison County

Support the rezoning of areas in the G-1 sector

that are not currently zoned as either E-1 Very Low

Density Residential or A-1 General Agriculture. Harrison County

Amend the Zoning Ordinance to protect

designated scenic rural roadways by requiring deep

setbacks for buildings and maintaining natural

vegetation along the roadway.

Create an “Adopt a Road” program to encourage

businesses and local organizations to participate

in roadway cleanups and to donate funds for

landscaping improvements and maintenance along

designated roadways.

Require a deep setback and vegetative buffer

around industrial uses to preserve the rural

character of the area.

Harrison County

Harrison County

Harrison County

Maintain and improve existing roadway conditions

by discouraging abutting uses that are not

consistent with the community’s rural character in

G-1 sectors. Harrison County

Adopt a sign code for commercial development to

minimize visual clutter.

Harrison County


29

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Goal 3. IMPROVE MOBILITY AND ROADWAY CONNECTIVITY IN EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY.

STRATEGY A. Improve the design and functionality of the roadway network in Eastern Harrison County.

Action 1. Apply for the Mississippi Department of Transportation State Aid Program to create an east-west connector road, such as

a road that would connect Three Rivers Road to Lorraine Road.

Action 2. Promote the direct connection of Old Woolmarket Road and State Highway 67.

Action 3. Collaborate with the Gulf Regional Planning Commission and MDOT to address safety issues on highly traveled

roadways.

Action 4. Ensure that all roadways are easily identifiable with appropriate signage in the public right-of-way.

Action 5. Promote the installation of a Woolmarket Gateway at the intersection of Old Woolmarket Road and State Highway 67

through landscaping and other streetscape elements. (Remove this – intersection is being realigned.)

Action 6. Partner with MDOT to encourage the placement of a stop light at US Highway 49 and State Highway 53/North Swan Lake

Road.

STRATEGY B. Require new residential and commercial development to connect with existing and proposed development by including

future access points and shared parking easements.

Action 1. Develop access management strategies that encourage the use of shared parking agreements and limit the number of curb

cuts in a possible development.

Action 2. Promote walkable neighborhoods by revising subdivision regulations to require sidewalks, crosswalks, and other necessary

pedestrian facilities in G-2 and G-3 sectors.

Action 3. Amend subdivision regulations to encourage connections between subdivisions.

STRATEGY C. Improve opportunities for pedestrians and bicyclists.

Action 1. Update county regulations to encourage pedestrian facilities and sidewalks be constructed along new streets and that they


30

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

be considered during upgrades of existing streets in G-2 and G-3 sectors.

Action 2. Apply for funds to support the creation of a multiuse path system.

Action 3. Encourage the creation of a multiuse path system to connect existing and future neighborhoods and make connections to

natural amenities and neighborhood parks throughout the planning area.

STRATEGY D. Explore sources of funding to maintain and improve existing roadways.

Action 1. Pursue all possible MDOT funding in order to maintain existing roadways and fund planned improvements.

Action 2. Collaborate with Gulf Regional Planning Commission to identify funding mechanisms for the upgrade and enhancement

of principal arterial roadways within the Eastern Planning Area.

Table 2-3. Implementation Timeline for Goal 3

Strategy

Goal 3: Improve mobility and roadway

connectivity in Eastern Harrison County

Responsible Parties

Grant Funding

Immediate

Year 1

Short-term

Year 2-5

Mid-term

Year 6-10

Long-term

Year 11-20

3A Action 1

Apply for the Mississippi Department of

Transportation State Aid Program to create an

east-west connector road, such as a road that

would connect Three Rivers Road to Lorraine

Road.

Harrison County

Mississippi

Department of

Transportation

(MDOT) State Aid

Program

Action 2

Action 3

Action 4

Action 5

Promote the direct connection of Old

Woolmarket Road and State Highway 67.

Collaborate with the Gulf Regional Planning

Commission and MDOT to address safety issues

on highly traveled roadways.

Eastern Harrison County

Community Organization

Eastern Harrison County

Community Organization

Ensure that all roadways are easily identifiable with

appropriate signage in the public right-of-way. Harrison County

Promote the instillation of a Woolmarket Gateway

at the intersection of Old Woolmarket Road and

State Highway 67 through landscaping and other Eastern Harrison County

streetscape elements.

Community Organization

MDOT State Aid

Program

Safe Routes to

School Program

Public Works

and Economic

Adjustment

Program


31

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Strategy

Goal 3: Improve mobility and roadway

connectivity in Eastern Harrison County

Responsible Parties

Grant Funding

Immediate

Year 1

Short-term

Year 2-5

Mid-term

Year 6-10

Long-term

Year 11-20

Action 6

3B Action 1

Action 2

Action 3

3C Action 1

Action 2

Action 3

3D Action 1

Action 2

Partner with MDOT to encourage the placement

of a stop light at US Highway 49 and State

Highway 53/North Swan Lake Road.

Develop access management strategies that

encourage the use of shared parking agreements

and limit the number of curb cuts in a possible

development.

Promote walkable neighborhoods by revising

County subdivision regulations to require

sidewalks, crosswalks, and other necessary

pedestrian facilities in G-2 and G-3 sectors.

Amend the subdivision regulations to encourage

connections between subdivisions.

Harrison County

Harrison County

Harrison County

Harrison County

Update county regulations to encourage pedestrian

facilities and sidewalks be constructed along

new streets and that they be considered during

upgrades of existing streets in G-2 and G-3

sectors.

Harrison County

Apply for funds to support the creation of a multipath

system.

Harrison County

Encourage the creation of a multiuse path system

to connect existing and future neighborhoods

and make connections to natural amenities and

neighborhood parks throughout the planning area. Harrison County

Pursue all possible MDOT funding in order to

maintain existing roadways and fund planned

improvements.

Harrison County

Collaborate with Gulf Regional Planning

Commission to identify funding mechanisms for

the upgrade and enhancement of principal arterial

roadways within the Eastern Planning Area. Harrison County

Safe Routes to

School Program

Mississippi

Department of

Transportation


32

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

GOAL 4. PRESERVE NATURAL RESOURCES.

STRATEGY A. Retain and improve wooded areas.

Action 1. Develop a tree preservation ordinance to limit clear cutting of parcels.

Action 2. Encourage county regulations be amended to discourage the planting of invasive species that interfere with the growth and

health of native plants.

Action 3. Encourage the creation of a tree preservation committee composed of Eastern Harrison County residents responsible for

the creation and enforcement of tree preservation policies.

Action 4. Encourage the EHCCO and Harrison County to educate community members on the aesthetic, environmental, and

economic value of maintaining the Eastern Planning Area’s stock of trees.

STRATEGY B. Engage in measures to prevent deterioration of water resources from septic and other environmental contaminants.

Action 1. Discourage septic systems in G-2 and G-3 sectors where water and sewer infrastructure is available.

Action 2. Modify the existing river setback requirements along streams and rivers in the Biloxi and Tchoutacabouffa watersheds.

Action 3. Encourage the EHCCO and Harrison County to educate community members of the aesthetic, environmental, economic,

and recreational benefit of maintaining the Eastern Planning Area’s bayous, floodplains, lakes, rivers, streams, and wetlands.


33

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Table 2-4. Implementation Timeline for Goal 4

Strategy Goal 4: Preserve Natural Resources Responsible Parties Grant Funding

Immediate

Year 1

Short-term

Year 2-5

Mid-term

Year 6-10

Long-term

Year 11-20

4A Action 1.

Action 2

Action 3

Action 4

4B Action 1

Develop a tree preservation ordinance to limit clear

cutting of parcels.

Encourage county regulations be amended so as

to discourage the planting of invasive species that

interfere with the growth and health of native

plants.

Encourage the creation of a tree preservation

committee composed of Eastern Harrison

County residents responsible for the creation and

enforcement of tree preservation policies.

Encourage the EHCCO and Harrison County to

educate community members on the aesthetic,

environmental, and economic value of maintaining

the Eastern Planning Area’s stock of trees.

Discourage septic systems in G-2 and G-3 sectors

where water and sewer infrastructure is available.

Harrison County

Eastern Harrison

Harrison County

Harrison County

Eastern Harrison County

Board of Supervisors

Modify the existing river setback requirements along

streams and rivers in the Biloxi and Tchoutacabouffa

Action 2 watersheds.

Harrison County

Action 3

Encourage the EHCCO and Harrison County to

educate community members of the aesthetic,

environmental, economic, and recreational benefit

of maintaining the Eastern Planning Area’s bayous,

floodplains, lakes, rivers, streams, and wetlands.

Harrison County

Land and Water

Conservation Fund

Land and Water

Conservation Fund

Land and Water

Conservation Fund

Land and Water

Conservation Fund


34

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

GOAL 5. IMPROVE AND CREATE ADDITIONAL RECREATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES.

STRATEGY A. Improve access to natural features.

Action 1. Encourage private land owners to work with the Land Trust for the Mississippi Coastal Plain, Harrison County Parks and

Recreation, and other conservation and restoration groups that aim to acquire and preserve land along waterways in the Biloxi and

Tchoutacabouffa watersheds.

Action 2. Work with the De Soto National Forest in designated areas highlighted in the Concept Plan to identify and expand trail

access.

Action 3. Encourage the use of signage and wayfinding markers to identify recreational opportunities such as access to water features

and community parks throughout the Eastern Planning Area.

STRATEGY B. Increase awareness of recreational opportunities available in the De Soto National Forest for residents in the planning

area.

Action 1. Collaborate with the De Soto National Forest to expand marketing of recreational amenities to local residents.

Action 2. Encourage the use of signage and wayfinding markers to identify recreational sites and trailheads throughout the De Soto

National Forest.

Action 3. Encourage the EHCCO and other volunteer groups to volunteer to maintain trails in the De Soto National Forest.

STRATEGY C. Create new community parks and open-space areas.

Action 1. Continue to develop additional active recreational uses at the Woolmarket Community Park, such as beach volleyball courts,

skate parks, and basketball courts.

Action 2. Work with the Harrison County School District to expand shared use of recreational facilities at the new D’Iberville High

School.

Action 3. Amend the Zoning Ordinance to include open-space requirements for new residential developments in the G-2 and G-3

sectors.


35

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

STRATEGY D. Encourage increased recreational opportunities along the rivers of the Eastern Planning Area.

Action 1. Encourage the creation of a public access point to the Tuxachanie Creek, including boat and kayak launches at a potential

location along Old Highway 15, as designated on the Concept Map.

Action 2. Develop a map of navigable and public canoeing and kayaking routes and make it available to visitors and local residents at

convenient locations, such as visitors centers and libraries.

Action 3. Develop a plan to provide parking for the river access point.

Action 4. Create incentives for private property owners to provide public access to area rivers and beaches.

Action 5. Provide wayfinding signage for residents and visitors to identify the location of the Tuxachanie Creek river access point and

any future river access points in Eastern Harrison County.

Table 2-5. Implementation Timeline for Goal 5

Strategy

Goal 5: Improve mobility and roadway

connectivity in Eastern Harrison County

Responsible Parties

Grant Funding

Immediate Short-term

Year 1 Year 2-5

Mid-term

Year 6-10

Long-term

Year 11-20

5A Action 1

Action 2

Action 3

Encourage private land owners to work with

the Land Trust for the Mississippi Coastal Plain,

Harrison County Parks and Recreation, and other

conservation and restoration groups that aim to

acquire and preserve land along waterways in the

Biloxi and Tchoutacabouffa watersheds.

Work with the De Soto National Forest in

designated areas highlighted in the Concept Plan

to identify and expand trail access.

Eastern Harrison County

Community Organization

Harrison County, De Soto

National Forest

Encourage the use of signage and wayfinding

markers to identify recreational opportunities such

as access to water features and community parks

throughout the Eastern Planning Area. Harrison County

Collaborate with the De Soto National Forest to

expand marketing of recreational amenities to local

5B Action 1 residents.

Harrison County


36

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Strategy

Goal 5: Improve mobility and roadway

connectivity in Eastern Harrison County

Responsible Parties

Grant Funding

Immediate Short-term

Year 1 Year 2-5

Mid-term

Year 6-10

Long-term

Year 11-20

Action 2

Action 3

5C Action 1

Action 2

Action 3

Encourage the use of signage and wayfinding

markers to identify the recreational sites and

trailheads throughout the De Soto National Forest.De Soto National Forest

Encourage the EHCCO and other volunteer

groups to volunteer to maintain trails in the De

Soto National Forest.

Harrison County

Continue to develop additional active recreational

uses at the Woolmarket Community Park, such as

beach volleyball courts, skate parks, and basketball

courts.

Harrison County

Work with the Harrison County School District to

expand shared use of recreational facilities at the

new D’Iberville High School.

Amend the Zoning Ordinance to include

open-space requirements for new residential

developments in the G-2 and G-3 sectors.

Harrison County

Harrison County

Encourage the creation of a public access point

to the Tuxachanie Creek, including boat and kayak

launches at a potential location along Old Highway Eastern Harrison County

5D Action 1 15, as designated on the Concept Map. Community Organization

Action 2

Action 3

Action 4

Action 5

Develop a map of navigable and public canoeing

and kayaking routes and make it available to

visitors and local residents at convenient locations,

such as visitors centers and libraries.

Harrison County

Develop a plan to provide parking for the river

access point.

Create incentives for private property owners to

provide public access to area rivers and beaches.

Provide wayfinding signage for residents and

visitors to identify the location of the Tuxachanie

Creek river access point and future river access

points in Eastern Harrison County.

Harrison County

Harrison County

Harrison County

Land and Water

Conservation

Funds

Mississippi

Department of

Marine Resources

Tidelands Trust

Fund

Tidelands Trust

Fund


37

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

GOAL 6. PROVIDE QUALITY HOUSING CHOICES FOR ALL RESIDENTS.

STRATEGY A. Support multi-family residential housing in the G-3 sector in close proximity to employment centers and services.

Action 1. Establish Employer-Assisted Housing programs to help alleviate the Eastern Planning Area’s workforce housing shortage.

Action 2. Support the creation of higher density housing in G-3 sectors, located along State Highway 49 and at the interchange of

State Highway 67 and State Highway 15.

Table 2-6. Implementation Timeline for Goal 6

Strategy

Goal 6: Provide Quality Housing Choices for

all residents.

Responsible Parties

Grant Funding

Immediate

Year 1

Short-term

Year 2-5

Mid-term

Year 6-10

Long-term

Year 11-20

6A Action 1

Establish Employer-Assisted Housing programs

to help alleviate the Eastern Planning Area’s

workforce housing shortage problem.

Harrison County

Action 2

Support the creation of higher density housing in

G-3 sectors, located along State Highway 49 and

at the interchange of State Highway 67 and State

Highway 15.

Harrison County

Mississippi Home

Corporation


38

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

GOAL 7. PROMOTE PRINCIPALS OF NEW URBANISM AND GREEN DEVELOPMENT.

STRATEGY A. Advocate the creation of ordinances that incorporate the principles of New Urbanism (see Appendix D for descriptive

information).

Action 1. Support the application of SmartCode regulations in G-2 and G-3 sectors at the community or property owner’s request

(see Appendix D for descriptive information).

Action 2. Educate property owners and developers through educational materials and workshops about the principles of New

Urbanism, the SmartCode, and LEED-ND.

Action 3. Educate property owners and developers about the principals of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED-

ND) (see Appendix D for descriptive information) and other green building principles.

Table 2-7. Implementation Timeline for Goal 7

Strategy

Goal 7: Promote Principles of New

Urbanism and Green development.

Responsible Parties

Grant Funding

Immediate

Year 1

Short-term

Year 2-5

Mid-term

Year 6-10

Long-term

Year 11-20

7A Action 1

Support the application of SmartCode

regulations in G-2 and G-3 sectors at the

community or property owner’s request (see

Appendix D for descriptive information).

Harrison County

Action 2

Educate property owners and developers

through educational materials and workshops

about the principles of New Urbanism, the

SmartCode and LEED-ND.

Harrison County

Action 3

Educate property owners and developers

about the principals of Leadership in Energy

and Environmental Design (LEED-ND) (see

Appendix D for descriptive information) and

other green building principles.

Harrison County


39

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Concept Plan and Sector Map

The following section briefly explains the contents of the

Concept Plan as well as the basis for its recommendations. The land

use information contained in the Concept Plan will be further refined

and placed into the Sector Map which follows, and will then be included

in the final community plan. The Sector Map is a tool derived from the

Mississippi Renewal Forum and the SmartCode, discussed further in

Appendix D. The sectors provide for a range of development patterns,

from preserving open space and rural areas to allowing development

in appropriate areas. This Sector Map will establish a framework for

a future land use map for Eastern Harrison County. When combined

with the Concept Plan, it provides a clear vision for the use of land

and management of change in Eastern Harrison County. The two maps

provide a strong visual representation of land use policies established by

the community. The Sector Map and the Concept Plan should be used

together when undertaking any of the described strategies and actions.

Preservation Areas

The two most valued natural resources that citizens have

identified are the forested areas and the waterways. Rivers, streams, and

bayous provide for a wide variety of recreational pursuits, are important

ecosystems to native plants and animals, and are natural features in

which community members take great pride. Forests provide residents

with a wide variety of recreational resources and are symbolic of the

community’s rural feel. In the community survey, respondents expressed

strong support for preserving forested and wetland areas. Based on

citizens’ desires to protect the community’s natural resources, this plan

recommends several policies to preserve the natural resources of the

community.

The Concept Plan supports the preservation of natural areas

along the Little Biloxi, Biloxi, and Tchoutacabouffa rivers in Eastern

Harrison County. The preservation of adjoining tributaries, bayous,

wetlands, and floodplains is also strongly encouraged. The Concept

Map designates the areas for preservation and the Sector Map shows

these areas designated as O-1 and O-2, though preserved natural areas

are encouraged in all of the sectors. These recommendations are in

response to the community’s desire to maintain its rural character and to

protect its natural resources. Much of the area’s rural character is defined

by its rivers, bayous, associated wetlands, and forested areas. These

recommendations are in response to the stated desire of citizens to

increase recreational opportunities, especially those associated with the

bayous, rivers, and De Soto National Forest. Major rivers, their tributaries,

and bayous could support recreational opportunities, including public

canoe and kayak access, fishing, and swimming. The Concept Map

identifies a potential waterway access site along the Tuxachanie Creek

west of Old Highway 15. These recommendations would also aid in

reducing the impacts of localized flooding, as well as flooding associated

with hurricane storm surges, while improving wildlife habitats and

natural water cleaning functions.

Nodes of Commercial Activity

Increased access to commercial services was important to

residents in Eastern Harrison County. To accommodate this demand,

three locations for commercial development were identified in the

Concept Plan. These sites were chosen for commercial activity because

they are situated along or at the intersection of major roadways, are in

close proximity to existing development, and are currently or are likely

to be serviced by water and sewer infrastructure in the future. The scope

of commercial activity being planned also took into consideration the

development of a major region-serving commercial node at Tradition.

Two of the proposed nodes of activity are appropriate for largescale

commercial development. They are located along US Highway 49

and at the intersection of State Highway 67 and State Highway 15, where

a new interchange was recently completed. The third node of activity

is at the intersection of Old Woolmarket Road and State Highway 67.

Here, the construction of a village center is being proposed to provide

residents with commercial at an appropriate scale.


40

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Figure 2-4. The Concept Plan supports the preservation of natural areas along the Little Biloxi, Biloxi, and Tchoutacabouffa rivers in Eastern

Harrison County such as this forested stretch along the Little Biloxi River.

Source: Babe Buckley


41

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Regional Commercial Centers

Commercial activity along US Highway 49 is designated as G-3

on the Sector Map. This accounts for the addition of new businesses

along the roadway as well as new residential development east and

west of the highway. Presently, residents near US Highway 49 are in

need of additional services. Residents support a new grocery store,

restaurants, auto repair services, and opportunities for suburban retail

development (see Appendix B). Development at the new interchange

of State Highway 67 and 15 is suitable for a regional commercial

node because of existing roadway access, a location adjacent to new

residential development, and the availability of water and sewer lines.

Land adjacent to this intersection is currently zoned G-3 on the Sector

Map allowing for commercial development. Residents would support

large-scale development, such as a shopping center, as well as smaller

retailers, such as a hardware store. This type of development could exist

independently or be part of a mixed-use development.

Concentrating commercial activity in two locations would

minimize the impact on the rural landscape of Eastern Harrison County.

It would also create new employment opportunities for residents living

in the planning area and reduce the time needed to travel to major

shopping destinations.

Woolmarket Village Center

As previously mentioned, the plan calls for the creation of a

village center at the intersection of Old Woolmarket Road and State

Highway 67. Unlike the regional centers, commercial activity in the

village center is designated as G-2. No one building can be larger than

30,000 square feet. Currently, the North Woolmarket Elementary and

Middle School, Woolmarket Community and Senior Center, Woolmarket

Community Park, and Woolmarket Fire Station are clustered at this

location. These facilities are already important components of civic life.

Everything in the village center (building orientation, parking layout,

etc.) would be pedestrian friendly. It would allow, for example, students

at the North Woolmarket Elementary and Middle School to walk safely

to the proposed library after school.

Commercial activity in the Woolmarket Village Center will focus

on the services people need, but not currently located nearby. Residents

have voiced their desire to have a grocery store, restaurants, a gas station,

and a hair salon closer to home (see Appendix B). Such conveniences

could easily be accommodated at this location.

Citizens also emphasized their desire to preserve the scenic

character of State Highway 67. Commercial development in the

Woolmarket Village Center would be required to preserve existing

trees near the highway and provide a landscaped buffer to minimize

the view of buildings from the roadway. Additionally, businesses would

be required to follow signage standards to minimize the impact on the

scenic view.

Residential Areas

Eastern Harrison County contains a mix of rural residential and

subdivision developments. Plan recommendations for the residential

areas are in response to the additional housing required to accommodate

projected population increases. In order to accommodate population

growth, housing of all types will be needed, this includes large single

family homes, as well as multifamily housing. Targeting development in

areas where sewer and water is proposed or existing can limit the pressure

to spread residential development throughout the entire planning area.

Development in these areas will use the principles of New Urbanism

(see Appendix D for a discussion on New Urbanism).

Rural Residential

The Community Plan recommends that a majority of the planning

area remain rural residential, classified as G-1. These G-1 areas should

generally be limited to single-family residences on multiple-acre lots in

locations where sewer and water are not available. The Concept Plan

suggests that lot size in rural residential areas be based on the minimum

area necessary for septic treatment as determined by the State Health

Department. County zoning regulations could be amended to comply


42

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Map 2-1. Eastern Harrison County Concept Plan

Source: Ohio State University


43

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Figure 2-5. This image is a conceptual plan of the Woolmarket Village Center. It includes the direct connection of Old Woolmarket

Road to State Highway 67, a library near the community center, and retail buildings along Old Woolmarket Road.

Source:Nathan Leppo


44

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

with these standards. The plan also recognizes the need to accommodate

new residential development. In order to maximize the land area

dedicated to rural residential (G-1), it was necessary to cluster denser

development into specific development locations, shown as G-2 and G-3

on the Sector Map. These cluster developments would be appropriate

to avoid developing the most environmentally sensitive portions of the

area.

Neighborhood Residential

Neighborhood Residential areas are classified as G-2 on the

Sector Map. This sector would encourage the development of singlefamily

neighborhoods. These areas have access to major roadways,

commercial development, and proposed or existing water and sewer.

These developments would consist of one to three housing units per

acre.

Concentrated Residential

To provide housing that is affordable to all Eastern Harrison

County residents, G-3 sectors allow for both single-family and multifamily

housing. This sector allows for three or more housing units per

acre, and is recommended in areas served by sewer and water services,

adjacent to major roadways, and near regional commercial centers.

These areas may include small-lot single-family homes, townhouses,

condominiums, and apartments. G-3 areas may be located at commercial

centers along US Highway 49 and the US Highway 67 and State Highway

15 interchange.

Recreation

Residents in the Eastern Planning Area requested the expansion

of recreational opportunities within their community. Suggestions for

additional recreational facilities include, but are not limited to, a new

community park on the site of the new D’Iberville High School, a new

Senior Center and Community Center north of D’Iberville, a skate

park, a canoe launch, a multi-use trail system, and ATV and motorcycle

facilities. Residents have indicated, however, that they do not support

the levying of new taxes to offset the cost of creating new recreational

facilities or expanding existing ones. This represents a challenge that has

shaped the scope of proposals suggested in the Concept Plan.

Many residents indicated that there is a lack of information on

existing recreational facilities in the Eastern Planning Area. To address

this concern, Harrison County is encouraged to collaborate with the

De Soto National Forest and the Mississippi Gulf Coast Convention

and Visitors Bureau to promote existing recreational opportunities.

One possible solution is the joint development of wayfinding markers

to identify the recreational sites and trailheads throughout the De Soto

National Forest. Additionally, it is suggested that a study be conducted

to locate natural migration corridors for game species in the Eastern

Planning Area. Potential grant sources, which can be used to offset costs

associated with these initiatives, are identified in Appendix C.

Due to a lack of available funding to purchase property from

private land owners, the Concept Plan does not call for the creation of a

new community park adjacent to the new D’Iberville High School at this

time. The school, however, will develop its own athletic facilities. The

county is encouraged to reach a shared-use agreement with the Harrison

County School District that will allow the public to access the school

facilities off-hours.

Renovations to the Woolmarket Community Center, including

a new Senior Center on the site, will be completed by spring 2008. For

this reason, the Concept Plan does not call for the development of a

new Community Center/Senior Center north of D’Iberville. There

is insufficient population to support two community centers in the

planning area. The Eastern Harrison County Community Organization

is encouraged to promote community events, such as teen dance nights

and bingo, at existing facilities. It is suggested that the EHCCO seek out

grants and other funding sources that can be used to develop further

community programs.

Residents expressed an interest in all terrain vehicle (ATV), dirt

bike and motorcycle trails. These are currently available at the De Soto


45

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Map 2-2. Eastern Harrison County Sector Map

Source: Ohio State University


46

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Figure 2-6. Eastern Harrison County Sector Map Legend

Sector

Description

(O-1)

PRESERVED OPEN SECTOR

Sector consists of open space already protected from development in perpetuity. The Preserved Open

Sector includes undeveloped areas under environmental protection by law or standard, as well as land

acquired for conservation through purchase or land protected from development by easement. Areas

designated Preserved Open Sector (O-1) are mapped using the criteria listed below.

(O-2)

RESERVED OPEN SECTOR

Sector is composed of undeveloped parcels larger than 20 acres outside of incorporated cities and

wastewater service areas that are either vacant or in agricultural/forestry use. It includes open space that

should be but is not yet protected from development. The areas designated Reserved Open Sector (O-2)

are mapped using the criteria listed below.

(G-1) RESTRICTED GROWTH SECTOR

Sector consists of areas of low-density, rural development, such as is typical in Eastern Harrison County.

This sector includes hamlets and clustered residences with parcel sizes ranging from small lots within the

hamlet to lots of up to 20 acres surrounding the hamlet. Hamlets may also have a small amount of retail

and some community facilities located at main intersections. Areas within the G-1 may have value as

open space, but are they subject to development based on the existing zoning that enables such

development. This sector also includes conservation development, where 50 percent or more of a

development is reserved as open space. These areas may be outside the sewer service areas.

(G-2)

CONTROLLED GROWTH SECTOR

Sector consists of locations where development is encouraged, as it can support mixed-use by virtue of

proximity to a thoroughfare.

(G-3)

INTENDED GROWTH SECTOR

Sector consists of locations along high-capacity thoroughfares that can support substantial commercial

development.

(SD) SPECIAL DISTRICT Designation covers non-residentially developed areas that are isolated from residential neighborhoods.

Source: Ohio State University


47

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

National Forest. However, due to liability concerns the County Parks

Department is not able to support these activities at new sites.

A potential canoe launch has been identified in response

to request for expanded river access. This site can also be used for

swimming, fishing and other water activities. The site is located on Old

State Highway 15 approximately half a mile north of the intersection of

State Highway 15 and Old State Highway 15. The site is located on De

Soto National Forest land. Harrison County is encouraged to negotiate

access to this site and seek funding to develop a canoe launch there.

The proposed river access points are identified on the Concept Map.

Potential grant sources that can be used to develop these sites and are

identified in Appendix C.

Responses from local children collected during the Planners Day

in School event on September 6 th revealed demand for expanded active

recreational opportunities. Beach volleyball courts, basketball courts,

and a skate park were identified as facilities children want in the Eastern

Planning Area. Potential grant sources that can be used to offset the

cost of constructing any new facilities are identified in Appendix C.

This plan suggests the approval of new subdivisions in the G-2

and G-3 sections of Eastern Harrison County be contingent upon the

inclusion of open space dedications. This could include, but is not limited

to parks, playgrounds, and community spaces. This strategy would give

residents and children easy access to safe recreational opportunities

within their immediate neighborhoods.

Transportation Improvements

The Concept Plan acknowledges a need for increased roadway

connectivity in the Eastern Planning Area. Special consideration was

given to enhancing east-west connectivity. The majority of roadways

within the planning area run in a north-south direction, and opportunities

for east-west travel are limited. The development of one or several

additional east-west roadways would increase overall mobility in the

planning area. A road extending Allen Road from Three Rivers Road to

Lorraine Road had strong community support. Citizens also support

the concept of extending Curry Road to John Lee and Roberts Road,

connecting Three Rivers Road to Lorraine Road.

“A new East-West Connector

Roadway would increase

connectivity and reduce

travel time for residents.”

Figure 2-7. Eastern Harrison County residents want to see an additional

east-west road to increase access throughout the community.

Source: John Fitzhugh, Biloxi Sun Herald


48

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Map 2-3. The map shows two possible locations for a future east-west connector road that could be constructed in Eastern Harrison County.

Source: Ohio State University


49

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Residents have also expressed strong support for the designation

of State Highway 67 as a scenic corridor. The Concept Plan calls for

maintaining the scenic character of State Highway 67. This would be

achieved through the use of zoning regulations to require preservation

of landscaped areas adjacent to the roadway. Residents also expressed

support for allowing development along State Highway 605. After

careful consideration, State Highway 605 was found to be unsuitable

for development based on environmental conditions, lack of access

to water and sewer, and the community’s desire to maintain its rural

character. State Highway 605, however, has an opportunity to become a

State Scenic Highway. The scenic designations for both State Highway

67 and Highway 605 would help retain the planning area’s rural and

scenic character.

Multiuse Paths

The Community Plan proposes the creation of new multiuse

paths throughout Eastern Harrison County. The paths will increase

connectivity and create new recreational opportunities for citizens. New

multiuse paths are proposed along new State Highway 67, State Highway

15, and along the planned east-west connector road. The Community Plan

also recommends that the existing bike path along State Highway 605 be

extended north, across State Highway 67 to St. Patrick’s High School.

Once built, the proposed multiuse paths will connect

neighborhoods to civic and commercial spaces in the community. If a

new path were created along State Highway 67, from St. Patrick’s High

School to new commercial developments proposed at the interchange of

State Highway 67 and 15, it would cover nearly 11 miles. A route along

State Highway 15 would cover nearly 17 miles, providing residents in

the planning area with additional access to the De Soto National Forest.

Together, these new proposed routes would create over 36 miles of new

multiuse paths in the Eastern Planning Area, as seen in Map 2-1.

New paths should be constructed alongside, but separated from

the existing roadway and within the right of way. Building new multiuse

paths in the right of way saves money, because it does not require the

acquisition of additional land.

To build new multiuse paths in the planning area, the Community

Plan has identified several sources of funding, which include the Safe

Routes to School Program developed by MDOT (as seen in Appendix

C). Funding may also be available through the National Scenic Byway

Grants Program for State Highway 67. This program is meant to fund

projects that enhance the use and quality of scenic byways. Additional

resources Harrison County should investigate include the Surface

Transportation Program (STP) and Transportation Enhancement Funds

(TE). Under STP, the County may qualify for funding via SAFETEA-

LU. Community’s can apply for SAFETEA-LU funds for a variety of

projects, including bicycle and pedestrian trails.

Transportation Land Use Connections

Coordination of transportation and land use planning allows

rural communities facing growth pressure, such as Eastern Harrison

County, to establish a framework for how and where growth should

occur, improve connectivity and accessibility, and help to preserve the

rural character of Eastern Harrison County. This will allow Eastern

Harrison County to plan for the challenges of increasing traffic,

increasing connectivity and creating opportunities for pedestrians and

cyclists. Many strategies can be utilized by Harrison County to increase

the coordination of transportation and land use planning to achieve

tangible results.

Three key areas for greater success in transportation and land use

planning coordination in Eastern Harrison County include comprehensive

planning, corridor planning, and updating of the Harrison County Land

Development Regulations. Increased attention to these key areas will

provide for a more efficient and coordinated transportation and land use

pattern in future development.


50

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Corridor Planning

Harrison County should analyze the conditions of the major

corridors through the planning area and utilize appropriate planning

strategies to ensure compatibility of land use and transportation

infrastructure. A corridor management plan has been developed for

State Highway 67 and should serve as the baseline for the development

of corridor management plans for all the major corridors through the

planning area. The major corridors through Eastern Harrison County

include US Highway 49, Mississippi State Highway 605, Mississippi State

Highway 67 (under construction), and Mississippi State Highway 15. As

the planning area continues to grow these corridors will face continued

development pressure. Corridor planning should work to minimize the

impact of development on existing transportation infrastructure and

limit development in areas in need of transportation improvements.

Corridor planning should identify areas with appropriate

infrastructure capacity to support new development. The County should

collaborate with local jurisdictions to address issues along the length of

the corridors that traverse Eastern Harrison County, so as not to address

issues solely to the border of the planning area. Effective corridor

planning should also identify techniques that will help to mitigate the

impact of development. These techniques include the creation of access

management policies. Access management techniques allow for the

efficient movement of traffic along arterial roadways and the creation of

more pedestrian friendly environments. Access management techniques

include regulation of the number of curb cuts, spacing and design of

driveways, and shared parking techniques among others. Application of

access management techniques will ensure that State Highways 15, 67

and 605 do not become another US Highway 49.

Land Development Regulations

Improvement of the land development regulations will enhance

future connectivity, increase walkability, and ensure the creation of

adequate pedestrian and bicycle facilities. The land development

regulations should promote the connection of residential developments.

The connection of developments will increase connectivity, which

is beneficial in many ways. A grid street system does not have to be

Figure 2-8. Conventional suburban development (left) is characterized by limited connectivity and a segregation of land uses, while a modified grid

system (right) increases connectivity and allows for integration of land uses.

Source: Nathan Leppo


51

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

utilized to enhance connectivity; connectivity can be increased through

a modification of the existing curvilinear street network. The graphics

on the previous page illustrate conventional suburban development

and an alternative development with increased connectivity. The land

development regulations should also require the construction of

pedestrian facilities and/or alternative transportation options such as

bike paths. Other enhancements to the land development regulations

may include limiting residential development along major roadways,

requiring traffic impact studies for new development, creation of

walkable block lengths, and encouragement of mixed-use development

with multi-modal transportation opportunities.

The benefits of coordinating transportation and land use

planning utilizing these techniques include reducing congestion, multiple

transportation options, and reduction in the need for transportation

improvements. Transportation and land use should be considered and

planned for concurrently in all development projects.

Transportation Enhancements

The Sector Map provides a framework for the locations of

future development in Eastern Harrison County. The areas of future

development that will see the largest increases in traffic will be those

areas of new commercial development. The Sector Map identifies three

areas for significant commercial development. The three locations are

US Highway 49, the area adjacent to the State Highway 67 and State

Highway 15 interchange, and the area adjacent to the intersection of

Old Woolmarket Road and State Highway 67.

The intersections of US Highway 49 at State Highway 53 and

State Highway 67 at State Highway 15 have been designated as Intended

Growth Sectors (G-3) and may experience significant commercial

development. The intersection of Old Woolmarket Road and State

Highway 67 has been designated as a Controlled Growth Sector (G-2)

and will experience a mix of moderate-scale commercial development

and civic uses. The impact of new traffic generated by commercial

development should be determined in order to determine if existing

roadways have adequate capacity to handle the demand.

US Highway 49

US Highway 49 is a multi-lane (six to ten lanes) roadway moving

traffic north and south in central Harrison County. The Highway is a

major commercial corridor and is also traveled by tourists heading to the

Gulf Coast. The Mississippi Department of Transportation has plans

to add two lanes to Highway 49 from O’Neal Road to School Road.

The roadway would benefit from the utilization of access management

techniques such as limiting curb cuts, requiring shared parking easements

and directing traffic to signalized intersections. Utilization of these

techniques would increase traffic safety along the highway.

State Highway 67 and State Highway 15 Interchange

The State Highway 67 and State Highway 15 interchange location

is currently under construction and once it is complete will be a prime

location for commercial development. Currently development proposals

include plans for large-scale commercial development. State Highway 67

is a limited access four lane highway and should be able to accommodate

a significant increase in traffic with appropriate access management.

Traffic impact studies should be required for all large scale commercial

development proposals to ensure the State Highways can accommodate

the new traffic and that access to the developments are appropriately

sited. Figure 2-9 illustrates how effective access management techniques

could be utilized to maximize traffic flow and safety. As development

occurs it should also incorporate necessary pedestrian infrastructure to

create a walkable environment. Pedestrian infrastructure should include

the construction of sidewalks, multi-use paths, crosswalks, and traffic

calming measures that increase pedestrian safety.


52

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Old Woolmarket Road and State Highway 67 Intersection (Woolmarket Village

Center)

The Old Woolmarket Road and State Highway 67 intersection

is the location of the proposed Woolmarket Village Center. The Village

Center proposal includes the development of a small-scale commercial

node with not more than 50,000 square of commercial space. The

Village Center will also include addition civic uses including a possible

library in addition to the existing school, community center and senior

center. State Highway 67 should have sufficient capacity to handle traffic

generated from this development.

Pedestrian infrastructure should be constructed along Old

Woolmarket Road to create a walkable Village Center. Access management

techniques should be utilized as well. Old Woolmarket Road would

benefit from the introduction of traffic calming techniques. Traffic

calming techniques will ensure the Village Center is a safe walkable

environment for pedestrians. Traffic calming measures will also deter

the generation of increased traffic along Old Woolmarket Road and

will making traveling on State Highway 67 seem to be a more efficient

option for those destined for the Village Center. Limiting traffic along

Old Woolmarket Road will aid in preserving its rural character.

“Issues of Connectivity and

Mobility are a major concern

for residents living in the Eastern

Planning Area.”

Figure 2-9. The graphic on the left illustrates common access patterns in Eastern Harrison County. Access management techniques as illustrated

on the right help to improve safety and reduce congestion.

Source: Nathan Leppo


53

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Appendix A. Background Assessment

History

The Eastern Planning Area encompasses unincorporated

communities in Harrison County east of US Highway 49. The

communities of Lyman, Orange Grove, Ramsey, White Plains, and

Woolmarket have had their own unique and long-standing history. Due

to the annexation policies of the surrounding cities, however, many of

these communities have been fractured. With some communities, only

a portion falls within the boundaries of the Eastern Planning Area.

Despite the fractured situation, residents still consider their history to

include community borders pre-annexation.

Harrison County, named in honor of General William

Henry Harrison, was established on February 5, 1841. 1 The county

was reapportioned from Hancock County, in part, due to the rising

population found in the area. Harrison County was reapportioned

on June 5, 1916, creating Stone County to the North. Following the

alteration, the community of Ramsey marked the northernmost portion

of the county in the Eastern Planning Area. 2 Ramsey is named after

the Ramsey family, who owned a plantation at the intersection of State

Highway 15 and Bethel Road. 3

Industry and improvements in transportation have driven

historic development of the planning area. Two of the most important

industries in the history of Eastern Harrison County have been the

wool industry and, later, the lumber industry. The community of

Woolmarket, once considered a coastal metropolis, can trace its history

back to the wool industry. 4 The growth of Woolmarket had much to do

with its position as the chief buying and shipping point for wool. The

community began before the Civil War, when a failed railroad secured

and cleared a right of way that was then turned into a major caravan

route. The route served wagon trains that brought in charcoal, rosin,

beeswax, and wool. 5

The Biloxi River was also integral to the prosperity of

Woolmarket. Woolmarket became a large shipping point after Captain

Joseph Marion Stiglets established Stiglets Landing along the Biloxi

River. The landing served as a shelter for oxen and a fleet of schooners.

At that time, Stiglets’ operation employed 500 people and became the

center of wool trade in south Mississippi. 6

Open-range sheep grazing was convenient and economical. This

allowed for abundant high quality wool. Up to 10,000 sheep could be

seen grazing in the area at one point in Woolmarket’s history. 7 In spring,

a ritual called “Roundup Day” consisted of sheep owners driving all of

the sheep into the “Parting Pens,” where the sheep would be sorted and

carted off to auction. 8

The wool trade declined after the state legislature banned openrange

grazing in Woolmarket during the 1930s. Although the law was

short-lived, many traders sold entire flocks of sheep, permanently

damaging the once booming market. 9 The final blow to the wool trade

came at the turn of the century with the building of Louisville and

Nashville Railroad and, later, the Gulf and Ship Island Railroad. 10 These

railroads helped spur the lumber industry.

At the time of the boom in the wool industry, Woolmarket

became the location of the first consolidated school in the nation. It


54

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

was also the first school in the state to diverge from the one-room

schoolhouse. Founded by J.J. Bawsey in 1910, it educated approximately

125 students brought together from three one-room schoolhouses. 11

Today, Woolmarket is a growing community in Eastern Harrison

County. Although residents strongly identify with the Woolmarket

area, only half of the community boundary remains in unincorporated

Harrison County. In 1999, the southern most portion of Woolmarket

was annexed by the City of Biloxi. 12

Figure A-1. The Woolmarket Consolidated School located in Eastern

Harrison County.

Lyman is a small community with a special historical attachment

to the railroad and lumber industry. Lyman, which was established

around 1895, is named after Lyman Reeves, who built the first house

on the site. Lyman Reeves received a land grant to settle the heavily

forested area. 13

Lyman Reeves moved with his wife and four children in 1885

from his home town of Bendale, Mississippi. 14 He began his settlement

as a several hundred acre farm in which he raised cattle and sheep.

At the same time, he also took a position with Little and Leinhard of

Handsboro, supervising their timber holdings. West of his farm was

the open range and to the east lived a small group of other settlers,

including the Dedeaux, Saucier, and Quave families. 15

The Louisville and Nashville Railroad connected many coastal

communities, including Gulfport and Biloxi. 16 The Gulf and Ship Island

Figure A-2. The Lyman railroad station served the lumber industry in

Eastern Harrison County.

Source: CC Tex Hamill Collection, Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College

Source: CC Tex Hamill Collection, Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College


55

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Railroad ran in a north-south direction parallel to US Highway 49 west

of the planning area. These railroads played an important role in aiding

the many lumber companies that emerged along its lines. The Gulf and

Ship Island Railroad’s connection to the north enabled loggers to ship

lumber from the yellow pine forest of Eastern Harrison County to

northern states. 17

When the Gulf and Ship Island Railroad was created, Reeves

and his partner, Taylor, opened a sawmill and a commissary store. Due

to their location, the railroad created a stop named Reeves Crossing.

Reeves Crossing then applied for the building of a post office, which

was accepted with the provision of a change in the community

name. Northern Mississippi already had a town named Reeves and,

consequently, the townspeople decided to use their founder’s first name

instead of his last name, officially naming the town Lyman. 18

The Ingram-Day Lumber Company (located in the Western

Planning Area) was headed by former Wisconsin lumberman W.H.

Hatten. Hatten had moved to Mississippi to take advantage of its

seemingly limitless yellow pine forests. With Lyman as its center, the

company operated several mills on the Gulf and Ship Island Railroad.

The rail line served the four counties in which the company was milling

timber. 19 In 1917, the company employed 650 men in Lyman alone,

processing nearly 140,000 feet of lumber every day of the year. 20

The success of the company led to the creation of the company’s

“commissary,” which was the Coast’s first complete shopping center.

The small building was 65 feet wide by 300 feet long. 21 It offered

the most complete line of general merchandise in South Mississippi,

including items such as clothing, millinery, home furnishings, hardware,

automotive supplies, and agricultural supplies and feed. The store also

provided a drug store, soda fountain, library, and complete grocery and

fresh produce market. 22 Much of Lyman was concentrated west of the

planning area. As the town grew, however, its borders grew to include

portions of the Eastern Planning Area. As logging moved elsewhere

much of Lyman’s population followed. The closing of the last sawmill

in 1934 led to a 70 percent reduction in population. 23 Today, however,

Lyman is seeing increased residential and commercial development as a

suburb of Gulfport.

Orange Grove, which was developed from the consolidation

of smaller settlements, 24 also prospered from the lumber and railway

industries. James Dale and his wife, Agnes, were two of Orange Grove’s

first settlers. The couple purchased land that is now home to the Wilson

Farm Nurseries. 25 There is also a local legend that ship captain, Gaiyus

Kibbey, buried treasure in the area after taking refuge there. Kibbey

built a large waterway known as Kibbey’s Ditch to transport logs to

the bayou. Charcoal kilns were numerous in the area during the timber

industry’s boom. After the boom, many Satsuma and Orange orchards

were planted, leading to the name of Orange Grove. It has been said,

however, that the orange groves were killed off by a series of cold

winters. While large orchards of oranges are absent today, the name

Orange Grove still reminds residents of its citrus based past. 26 Most of

present day Orange Grove was annexed by Gulfport in 1993.

The De Soto National Forest is an important part of the history

Figure A-3. Coalville is named for the time period when charcoal

burning was common.

Source: CC Tex Hamill Collection, Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College


56

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

of the Eastern Planning Area. At one time a transitory community

named Turpentine was located within present day De Soto National

Forest. As the name suggests the temporary community specialized

in the making of turpentine which was extracted from the pine trees

found within the forest. 27 Intensive turpentine production and other

timber related industries were leading to the destruction of the forest.

To stop the destruction, the De Soto National Forest was created to

combat the devastation of vast stretches of southern pine in the 1930s.

In some areas, remaining trees produced seed for natural renewal, but

the seedlings that did sprout soon succumbed to cattle, feral hogs, fire,

or pest infestations. 28 Over time the forest has regenerated as trees have

been planted and the De Soto National Forest has grown to be the

largest forest in Mississippi. 29

Demographics

A demographic analysis of the Eastern Planning Area is

necessary to understand the current and changing conditions in the

community. Data from the 2000 U.S. Census Bureau and Mississippi

Home Corporation (MHC) was collected to conduct this analysis. 30

MHC uses Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) statistics,

which combines data recorded in the decennial Census of Population

and Housing, conducted by the United States Census Bureau, with

new sources of information gathered from disaster response agencies,

news reports, and fieldwork. 31 Data was gathered from portions of

Census Tracts 34.01 (Block Groups 1, 2, and 3), 34.02 (Block Groups

1 and 2), 32.06 (Block Group 1 and 2), and 33.02 (Block Group 1).

The demographic data was then compared to the surrounding cities

of Biloxi, D’Iberville, Gulfport, and Harrison County to further the

analysis.

Table A-1. Population Estimates

2000 2007

Total Population 4,856 5,536

Households 1,698 2,018

Average Household Size 2.85 2.73

Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, 2000 Census of Population and

Housing. Mississippi Housing Corporation estimates for 2007

Population

The population estimate for the Eastern Planning Area of

Harrison County was 4,890 persons according to the 2000 U.S. Census,

but it has since grown. The Mississippi Home Corporation estimated

the 2007 population at 5,536 persons.

Impact of Hurricane Katrina on Population

According to a Brookings Institute report released in June 2006,

the Mississippi Gulf Coast (Hancock, Harrison, and Jackson counties)

experienced a combined population loss of 13.6 percent following

Hurricane Katrina. 32 As of July 2007, much of the pre-Katrina population

level has returned. 33 The Eastern Planning Area suffered wind damage

and some flood damage along the area’s rivers and bayous. As a result,

the population has increased as people have relocated further inland and

north of Interstate Highway 10 to new housing being built in the area.

Following Hurricane Katrina many property owners and

developers have sought to develop their land for housing to meet the

demand of residents relocating after the storm and new residents

moving to the county. A total of 1,956 acres to house 7,278 housing units

have been approved through rezoning. Additional property owners are

contemplating potential development. Given the population forecast,

explained further in the population section, it is likely that not all of the

properties rezoned will ultimately build out by 2030. The market will

determine the extent to which existing proposals will be built and future

proposals will be needed.


57

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Population Forecast

Population forecasts for the Eastern Planning Area were

produced by the Ohio State University planning team. While some

data was available from various sources, including the Gulf Regional

Planning Commission and the Mississippi Home Corporation, rapidly

changing conditions required further analysis. Accurate projections are

important for planning the provision of housing, infrastructure, and

other services.

Between 2000 and 2007 the planning area grew an average of

two percent per year. The planning area currently has a number of

housing projects under construction and many more that are planned.

The expansion of water and wastewater capacity in the Eastern Planning

Area is currently in the engineering phase. These improvements

are anticipated to be completed by 2011. Once these infrastructure

improvements are in place, it is anticipated that this will result in

significant development in the next five years. Following this projected

growth, development would be expected to slow to historical growth

rates of one to three percent by the year 2017. Population growth and

the accompanying increase in housing units between 2007 and 2017

is not expected to be the result of natural population growth in the

region, but a reaction to the effects of Hurricane Katrina as populations

shift northwards. Population growth following 2017 is anticipated to be

associated with overall regional population growth.

Given the above considerations, the following methodology was

applied to produce the population forecast. A growth rate of two percent

was assigned to the period 2007 through 2011, followed by a six percent

growth rate for the years 2012 through 2017. Population growth is

then anticipated to level off at two percent per year. The results of this

method are summarized in Table A-2. These population forecasts are

based on reasonable expectations of Eastern Harrison County’s share

of regional growth. There have been numerous large scale development

projects approved. If one or more of these are built in the near future,

it may shift the timing and degree of population growth.

Race and Ethnicity

The Eastern Planning Area has a large population that identifies

itself as White, non-Hispanic (see Figure A-4). The other racial groups

are nearly equally distributed, with representation not exceeding five

percent. The Mississippi Home Corporation estimates that 2.4 percent

of residents are of Hispanic origin in 2007.

Age

The median age of residents in the Eastern Planning Area

was 37 in 2007, according to the Mississippi Home Corporation. This

Table A-2. Eastern Planning Area Population and Housing Forecast

Time Period

Population Period

End

Population

Increase from

Previous Period

Housing Units

Period End

Housing Units

Increase from

Previous Period

Avg. Annual Growth

Rate

2007 5,536 680 2,097 316

2008-2011 5,592 456 2,185 124 2%

2012-2017 8,500 1,767 3,099 914 6%

2018-2030 10,996 837 4,008 1,080 2%

Total Increase 5,460 1,990

Source: Ohio State University, Mississippi Home Corporation, US Bureau of the Census


58

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Figure A-4. Race Composition, Eastern Planning Area, 2007 Figure A-5. Age Composition, Eastern Planning Area, 2007

Source: Mississippi Home Corporation, 2007 Estimates

Source: Mississippi Home Corporation estimates for 2007

** Age groups differ slightly between the cities and the county.

Source: Mississippi Home Corporation, 2007 Estimates

Table A-3. Age Composition Comparison of Surrounding Communities, 2007 **

East Planning

Percent Biloxi Percent D’Iberville Percent Gulfport Percent

Area

0 to 9 years 792 14% 5,619 13% 984 14% 9,859 14%

10 to 24 years 775 14% 10,161 23% 1,473 21% 15,313 22%

25 to 34 years 688 12% 6,269 15% 1,099 15% 10,139 15%

35 to 54 years 1,856 33% 11,547 27% 2,199 31% 20,163 28%

55 to 74 years 998 18% 6,769 16% 1,193 17% 11,467 16%

75 and older 152 3% 2,620 6% 237 3% 3,916 6%

Total 5,598 100% 42,985 100% 7,186 100% 71,127 100%


59

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Table A-4. Comparison of Household Income, 2007

Less than

$15,000

$15,000 to

$24,999

$25,000 to

$34,999

$35,000 to

$49,999

$50,000 to

$74,999

$75,000 to

$99,999

$100,000

or more

East

Planning

Area

Percent

Harrison

County

241 12.0% 12,527 17.9%

249 12.4% 9,145 13.0%

median age is similar to the surrounding cities of Biloxi, D’Iberville,

and Gulfport; the median age of city residents was 34, 35, and 34

respectively.

Further examination reveals that the Eastern Planning Area

age composition is similar to the surrounding cities, in that all have the

comparable percentages of residents aged 35 to 74 years old, as shown

in Table A-3. The Eastern Planning Area has the highest percentage of

residents aged 35 to 54 and the lowest percentage of the population

aged 25 to 34 years old. Additionally, of the households in the planning

area, less than half (43.3 percent) have children under 18 years.

Percent Biloxi Percent D’Iberville Percent Gulfport Percent

3,018

2,200

18% 376 14.0% 5,654 20.9%

13% 385 13.8% 3,678 13.6%

315 15.6% 9,640 13.7% 2,389 13.9% 441 15.8% 3,765 13.9%

364 18.1% 12,427 17.7%

386 19.2% 12,809 18.3%

246 12.2% 6,751 10%

214 10.6% 6,843 9.8%

Source: Mississippi Home Corporation estimates for 2007

3,100

3,264

1,515

1,703

18.0% 696 25.0% 4,428 16.4%

19.0% 493 18.0% 4,693 17.3%

8.0% 251 9.0% 2,418 8.9%

9.9% 142 5.1% 2,425 9.0%

“The median household income for

the Eastern Planning Area was

$43,495 in 2007, which is considerbaly

higher than neighboring cities

and Harrison County.”


60

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Income

The median household income for the Eastern Planning Area

was $43,495 in 2007, according to the Mississippi Home Corporation.

This income figure is considerably higher than that of neighboring

cities and Harrison County, as exhibited in Table A-5. However, per

capita income in the Eastern Planning Area is similar to the surrounding

communities, these figures range from $17,845 in D’Iberville to $21,265

in Biloxi (See Table A-5).

Education

Educational attainment for the Eastern Planning Area and

comparison communities is displayed in Table A-7. Of the population

25 years and over, 30.1 percent graduated from high school or have an

equivalent education, which falls in the range of 27 to 35 percent for

comparison communities.

In the terms of post-secondary education, 25.2 percent of the

Eastern Planning Area has had some college experience, 7.5 percent

earned an Associate’s degree, and 13 percent earned a Bachelor’s

degree or higher. These percentages are similar to those observed in

comparison communities in Harrison County. The differences among

the areas in the attainment of a Master’s, Professional, or Doctorate

degree are relatively insignificant.

Table A-5. Comparison of Household Income and Per Capita

Income, 2007.

Eastern

Planning

Area

Biloxi

D’Iberville

Gulfport

Harrison

County

Per Capita

Income $20,842 $21,265 $17,845 $17,845 $20,372

Median

Household

Income

$43,495 $39,299 $36,236 $36,236 $39,312

Source: Mississippi Home Corporation estimates for 2007

Figure A-6. Harrison Central High School

Source: Ian Beniston

Figure A-7. St. Patrick High School

Source: Ian Beniston


61

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

The educational facilities within the planning area include

Harrison Central High School (see Figure A-6), Harrison Central

Vocational Education Center, and North Woolmarket Elementary and

Middle School. A new D’Iberville High School is planned to be built

near State Highway 15 in the unincorporated area between Biloxi and

D’Iberville. St. Patrick High School (see Figure A-7) is adjacent to the

planning area boundaries in Tradition and opened in August 2007. The

private school will serve 600 students in grades seven through twelve.

Table A-6. Educational Attainment for the Population 25 Years and Over

Eastern

Planning

Area

School Enrollment Projections

In 2006, the Harrison County School District contracted

McKibben Demographics to develop school enrollment projections for

all schools in the district over the next ten years. The study used historic

school enrollment data starting with the 2000-2001 school year to project

enrollment figures from the present to the 2016-17 school year. The

data indicates that over the next ten years, the Eastern Planning Area

will see a 17 percent increase in school enrollment. This translates into

739 additional students over the next ten years. The tables below and on

page 62 are reproduced from the McKibben Demographics study and

cover the schools located in the Eastern Planning Area.

Percent Biloxi Percent D’Iberville Percent Gulfport Percent

Harrison

County

Percent

No Diploma 754 24.2% 5,601 18% 1,061 21.9% 9,209 20.5% 23,476 19.7%

High School

Graduate (and

GED) 938 30.1% 8,277 26.6% 1,691 34.9% 12,578 28% 33,844 28.4%

Some College,

No degree 785 25.2% 8,463 27.2% 1,376 28.4% 11,455 25.5% 30,865 25.9%

Associate

degree 234 7.5% 2,769 8.9% 39 7% 3,010 6.7% 9,057 7.6%

Bachelor’s

degree 281 9.0% 3,766 12.1% 257 5.3% 5,615 12.5% 14,062 11.8%

Master’s/Prof/

Doctorate

degree

125 4.0% 2,240 7.2%

Source: Census of Population and Housing, US Census Bureau, 2000

121

2.5% 3,055 6.8%

7,865

6.6%


62

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Housing Characteristics

An analysis of the housing stock in the Eastern Planning Area

is important to classify the existing housing stock as well as to identify

the community’s future housing needs. This analysis assesses the quality

of housing units within the community. The assessment allows for

better decision-making in the overall planning process for the future

of the Eastern Planning Area. It provides an explanation of housing

in the planning area prior to Hurricane Katrina along with the current

conditions. Data on housing characteristics was obtained from the

U.S. Census Bureau and from the Mississippi Development Authority.

The data boundaries do not always coincide with the planning area

boundaries.

Housing Types

Homes within the Eastern Planning Area are located in a rural

environment surrounded by wetlands, rivers, and wooded areas. Based

on the 2000 Mississippi Home Corportation’s estimates, the majority

of the housing stock, 1,031 units, was classified as single-family units.

Mobile homes were the second largest type of housing unit in the area,

totaling 700 units. There were also 48 multi-family units in the Eastern

Planning Area. By 2007, the estimated number of housing units had

increased to 2,097 units.

By 2007, the estimated number of housing units had increased

to 2,097. The Eastern Planning Area has seen increases in single-family,

multi-family, and manufactured homes since 2000, see Table A-8 and

Figure A-8.

Figure A-8. Single-family house in the Eastern Planning Area

Source: Nathan Leppo

Table A-7. Eastern Planning Area Total School Enrollment Projections

School Year

2006-

2007

2007-

2008

2008-

2009

2009-

2010

2010-

2011

2011-

2012

2012-

2013

2013-

2014

2014-

2015

2015-

2016

2016-

2017

D’Iberville High School 953 984 1,060 1,021 1,023 1,028 994 1,019 1,043 1,106 1,159

Harrison Central High

School 2,540 2,642 2,601 2,583 2,526 2,555 2,568 2,567 2,638 2,766 2,842

North Woolmarket

Elementary School

834 924 928 946 950 985 1,010 1,050 1,083 1,084 1,065

Total 4,327 4,550 4,589 4,550 4,499 4,568 4,572 4,636 4,764 4,923 5,066

Source: US Census Bureau, Census 2000, Summary File 3


63

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Table A-8. Housing Types in 2000

Eastern

Planning

Biloxi D’Iberville Gulfport

Area

Table A-9. Household Size

Eastern Planning

Area

Household Sizes

Of the 1,698 households in the planning area, 33.7 percent had

two persons residing in them and 20.2 percent had three persons in 2000.

The sizes of these households are similar to those in neighboring cities

and Harrison County (see Table A-9). More than half (53 percent) of

the housing units had five to six rooms according to the 2000 Census.

Housing Construction

Housing construction grew slowly in the Eastern Planning Area

from the early 1900s to the late 1960s in comparison to neighboring

communities. New construction began to increase in the 1970s and

experienced steady growth in housing construction until it peaked

during the late 1990s. Since 2000, 316 units are estimated to have been

Biloxi D’Iberville Gulfport Harrison County

Household Size

Total 2,018 19,588 2,827 26,943 71,538

1-person

household 17.1% 30% 23% 28% 26%

2-person

household 33.7% 32% 31% 32% 32%

3-person

household 20.2% 17% 20% 18% 18%

4- person

household 17.5% 12% 14% 13% 14%

5-person

household 8.5% 5% 7% 6% 6%

6-person

household 2.1% 2% 3% 2% 2%

7 or more-person

household

0.9% 1% 2% 1% 1%

Source: Mississippi Home Corporation estimates for 2000

Harrison

County

Single

Unit 1,031 13,362 2,063 19,973 51,923

Multi-

Family 48 7,124 362 7,349 17,759

Mobile

Home 700 1,593 639 2,240 9,875

Source: Mississippi Home Corporation estimates for 2000


64

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Figure A-9. Household Size

Source: Mississippi Home Corporation, 2007 Estimates

Table A-10. Year Housing Built Comparison

Year

Eastern Planning

Area

Biloxi D’Iberville Gulfport

Harrison

County

1939 or earlier 2% 7% 2% 6% 5%

1940 to 1959 4% 24% 15% 17% 16%

1960 to 1969 7% 16% 12% 21% 18%

1970 to 1979 17% 21% 28% 25% 23%

1980 to 1989 22% 15% 13% 15% 16%

1990 to 1998 42% 15% 20% 14% 18%

1998 to Mar 2000 8% 3% 10% 2% 3%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000, Summary File 3

constructed, according to the Mississippi Home

Corporation. Based on expected population

increases, approximately 1,990 new housing

units could be constructed between 2007 and

2030.

Housing Occupancy Status and Tenure

According to the Mississippi Home

Corporation, homeowners occupied 79.2

percent of the housing units in the Eastern

Planning Area in 2007. The percentage of

owner-occupied housing units is larger than

those found in surrounding communities.

Therefore, renter-occupied housing accounts

for 17.1 percent of all housing units in the

Eastern Planning Area. The remaining housing

units (3.8 percent) were classified as vacant and

includes seasonal or occasional housing.

Housing Value

In 2007, the Eastern Planning Area

median value for owner-occupied housing was

$137,888, second highest to the city of Biloxi.

D’Iberville had the smallest median value of

owner-occupied housing, more than $30,000

lower than the Eastern Planning Area.

Status of Housing Post-Hurricane

Katrina

Harrison County was significantly

impacted by Hurricane Katrina, especially

coastal cities and towns. The Eastern Planning

Area experienced damage though it was less

severe due to its location further inland.


65

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Mississippi Governor, Haley Barbour, created a Comprehensive

Housing Plan to address the critical need for post-Katrina housing. The

purpose of the plan is to provide housing assistance to homeowners,

renters, low-income households, and local governments. 34 The federal

government has provided the State of Mississippi with recovery

assistance for programs to improve storm resistance of housing. The

State of Mississippi has received recovery assistance from the federal

government to form programs to help residents rebuild their homes.

These programs include the Federal Disaster Assistance Program and

the Small Rental Assistance Program, which provide funding assistance

to both homeowners and rental property owners, respectively. The

majority of homeowners, however, did not apply for assistance and

were able to rebuild through insurance claims. 35

Since Hurricane Katrina, new subdivisions have been developed

in the Eastern Planning Area to accommodate residents moving farther

inland. These subdivisions are developed within close proximity to one

another, as is the case with the Conventry, Indian Trails, and the future

Palm Ridge subdivisions. Other subdivisions are under construction,

such as Avondale and Rushing Oaks Drive, while additional residential

developments are proposed. Pinehaven’s residential and commercial

development was approved and is planned to be located in the

unincorporated area between Biloxi and D’Iberville. When developed,

this project will significantly impact the Eastern Planning Area, as it will

bring more residents, employment opportunities, and businesses to the

area.

Affordability of Housing

This plan considers housing that is affordable to the residents

of Eastern Harrison County to be any housing options that meet

minimum building codes and require no more than 30 percent of a

household’s income for rental or mortgage payments. Housing, so

defined, encompasses households of all income levels. The housing

may or may not be subsidized and it may be owner occupied or rental

units. Implicit in this broad definition is the assumption that the housing

is physically adequate and not overcrowded.

Figure A-10. Median Value of All Owner Occupied Housing Units

Source: Mississippi Home Corporation, 2007 Estimates

Table A-11. Housing Tenure in the Eastern Planning Area

Eastern Planning

D’Iberville Gulfport Biloxi Harrison County

Area

Owner occupied 79.2% 65.2% 53.8% 43.8% 57.3%

Renter occupied 17.1% 26.6% 37.8% 44% 33.14%

Vacant 3.8% 8.2% 8.4% 11.8% 9.5%

Source: Mississippi Home Corporation, 2007 Estimates


66

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

In general, housing is rendered unaffordable through a

combination of household income levels and external factors, such as

land and other development costs, insurance rates, taxes and maintenance.

The effects of Hurricane Katrina have further compounded the shortage

of rental housing by significantly changing the price-supply relationship

in the market.

Providing an adequate supply of quality housing that is

affordable for households of multiple income levels is a key component

of this plan. By committing to the goal of developing sufficient housing

options near employment opportunities, Eastern Harrison County will

help to minimize the burden on working families, lessen the potential

for lengthy commutes, ease traffic congestion on the road network

and reduce the environmental impacts of such commutes. This is in

line with the approach that at least 50 percent of workers should have

access to housing that they can afford within the community of their

workplace.

Eastern Harrison County is experiencing new development as a

result of the anticipation of casinos coming to the area and speculations

in a significant increase in population. Encouraging the long-term

development of housing that is affordable to those earning 80 percent

of the 2007 Area Median Income ($43,495) or below in close proximity

to employment centers, may also be referred to as Regional Fair Share

Housing. If every community with employment centers allows for

housing that is affordable for employees that work in the area, the region

as a whole can meet housing needs.

Fair Market Analysis

In May 2007, the average “asking price” for a two-bedroom

apartment in Harrison County was $767.69. For a household to be

able to “afford” such an apartment, assuming a maximum allowable

spending of 30 percent of monthly income, the household would need

to earn more than $30,000 annually. Using this figure, approximately

40 percent of the households within Eastern Harrison County could

not afford a two bedroom apartment (see Appendix A, Table A-12), let

Figure A-11. Typical home in Eastern Harrison County.

Source: Rickie Yeager

alone a larger unit or own a home.

The same analysis below applied to homeownership reveals

similar issues. Assuming that the cost burden of homeownership,

including principal and interest, taxes, and homeowner’s insurance

should not exceed 30 percent, many households again in the Eastern

Planning Area can not afford homeownership. Most importantly, the

initial investment needed for a home purchase substantially increases

the affordability gap. And this underscores the need for both a stable

and adequate supply of rental housing, single family homes, or other

housing options and the need for increased opportunities for affordable

homeownership.

Regional Housing Conditions

Although statistics are unavailable for the Eastern Planning

Area, Mississippi Coastal cities have experienced a consistent increase in

average monthly rents since 2004, as seen in Table A-14. As investment

in Eastern Harrison County intensifies, it is likely the value of quality


67

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

homes will increase as well, pricing more households out of the market.

Moreover more stringent building codes have increased housing costs,

while improving resistance from future hurricane damage. The shortage

of affordable housing will affect middle income and low income families

alike.

According to the Rand Corporation, Mississippi Coastal cities

are among the areas facing the largest challenges to the reconstruction

of affordable housing. Not only do residents have limited means to

invest in rebuilding, but these areas experienced the most damage and

property owners may find it more financially viable to reinvest elsewhere.

A significant number of developments have already been either

proposed or approved in the Eastern Harrison County, corroborating

these predictions.

Figure A-12. A single-family home in Eastern Harrison County.

Table A-13. Basic Housing Affordability Scenario

Average Monthly Rent (Two Bedroom) $767.69

Maximum Percent of Income Towards

Housing to Maintain Affordability

30.00%

Minimum Monthly Household Income

to Maintain Affordability

$2,558.97

Minimum Annual Household Income to

$30,707.64

Maintain Affordability

Source: Gulf Regional Planning Commission, The Ohio State University, 2007

Table A-14. Coastal Cities Average Percentage Rent Increase

One Bedroom Two Bedroom Three Bedroom

Biloxi 44.4 34.1 29.3

Gulfport 40.8 32.6 22.8

Pascagoula 29.1 32.7 16.8

Source: Gulf Regional Planning Commission, 2007

Figure A-13. New affordable housing is available in the Quail Creek

subdivision in the Eastern Planning Area.

Source: Rickie Yeager

Table A-12. Homeownership Affordability Analysis 1

Average Home Value for Eastern Harrison County $137,888.00

Minimum Down Payment $27,577.60

Loan Amount $110,310.40

Principal and Interest $679.20

Monthly Taxes (per year $857.29) $71.44

Home Owner’s Insurance (annually $2,000) $166.67

Monthly Mortgage Amount $917.31

Source: Gulf Regional Planning Commission, The Ohio State University, 2007

1

Assumes 6.25 percent interest on a 30 year conventional fixed mortgage.

Source: Rickie Yeager


68

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Land Use

Figure A-14. The majority of the planning area is forested.

Development History

The Eastern Planning Area is comprised of 44,963 acres in the

area located north of Biloxi and D’Iberville. 36 The area remains largely

rural but is experiencing significant growth pressures. Developers and

investors have found the area attractive due to its proximity to the Gulf

Coast, Biloxi, Gulfport, and many major roadways.

The Eastern Planning Area contains several small communities,

including Lyman, Orange Grove, Ramsey, White Plains, and

Woolmarket. The traditional growth pattern has been large-lot, singlefamily

development. 37 These developments are scattered throughout the

planning area and homes in these subdivisions range in price, square

footage, and age. 38 Much of this development has occurred in the years

since 1985.

Existing Land Use

The Eastern Planning Area of Harrison County is primarily rural

and contains a large section of the De Soto National Forest located in

the northern portion of the planning area.

The land use pattern in the Eastern Planning Area was

determined through the examination of aerial and zoning maps as well

as windshield surveys. The current land use map identifies five land

uses: vacant land, single family, service station, public forest, and other

industrial activity. Overall, nearly 86 percent of the land in the Eastern

Planning Area of Harrison County is forest, while only three percent is

being used for residential. 39 Residents in the area value the rural nature

of their community, but also enjoy the close proximity to stores and

highways and access to Biloxi and Gulfport. 40

By combining the undeveloped land use categories (agriculture,

forest, beach/sand, and surface water) the percentage of undeveloped

land in the Eastern Planning Area is 53 percent of the total land area.

Residential development makes up the largest portion of

developed land in the Eastern Planning Area. Historically, these

developments have been large-lot, single-family projects. Some of

Source: Nathan Leppo


69

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

the residential developments feature amenities like tennis courts

and community swimming pools and are part of a homeowners’

association. 41

The majority of residential development is located in the central

and south-central portion of the planning area. Subdivision development

is concentrated off of Lamey Bridge Road, Old State Highway 67,

and Three Rivers Road. A large number of these developments are

considered a part of the Woolmarket community.

The Lyman/Orange Grove community, identified as the

southwest corner of the planning area, contains the Swan Lake Estates

community. Swan Lake Estates is located near US Highway 49 and was

developed before 1997. 42

Woolmarket contains the largest number of residential

subdivisions. These developments are also typically large lot, singlefamily

communities. Woolmarket Village, which was built in 1986, 43 and

White Star Estates are found south of De Soto National Forest and

contain homes built on one- to two-acre lots. Woolmarket Village is

located off of State Highway 67, south of Lamey Bridge Road. The

homes in White Star Estates are older than others in the planning area.

The Shadow Creek subdivision, located at State Highway

67 and Rushing-Robins Road, is comprised of homes built around

2000. 44 The homes in this development are slightly smaller than those

Table A-15. Land Use in the Eastern Planning Area

Land Use Eastern Planning Area Percent

Forest 38,480 85.58%

Agricultural 4,239 9.43%

Residential 1,407 3.13%

Commercial 442 0.98%

Beach/Sand 293 0.65%

Surface Water 66 0.15%

Other 36 0.08%

Total (in acres) 44,963 100.00%

Source: Southern Mississippi Planning and Development District

Figure A-15. Typical new home in the Swan Lake Estate Subdivision.

Source: Dottie Machen

in other developments and were built at a higher density. The Cherry

Creek development, also recently built, is located at State Highway 67

and Lorraine Road. This development is similar to the Shadow Creek

subdivision.

The developments located south of De Soto National Forest are

also a part of the Woolmarket community. Developments like Dogwood

Hills, which was built in 1993 and is located in the northern section of

the Eastern Planning Area amidst the De Soto National Forest, have

larger lot sizes of between one and two acres. 45 The Indian Hills Estates

subdivision consists of homes that were built on one- to two-acre lots.

This development is located south of the De Soto National Forest

between US Highway 49 and State Highway 67. Homes in Woodland

Hills, off of Old Woolmarket Road, are newer and were built on lots

between two and five acres. 46

The area north of D’Iberville, near the intersection of State

Highway 15 and Lamey Bridge Road, has numerous residential


70

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Map A-1. Existing Land Use

Source: Southern Mississippi Planning and Development District


71

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

developments. Coventry Estates, north of the intersection off of

State Highway 15, contains single family homes and is connected to

the Quail Creek residential development. There are also multiple

developments currently under construction in this area. Quail Creek is

under development and has townhome-style residential units. Many of

the developments in this area are served by water and sewer. 47

The Eastern Planning Area also has pockets of multifamily and

manufactured home development. Many of the manufactured homes

are on individual lots. The Parkers Mobile Home Park is located off of

State Highway 15, north of the Lamey Bridge Road intersection. 48 At

the northwest corner of the intersection of Lamey Bridge Road and

State Highway 15, duplexes are under construction as part of the Quail

Creek project.

Commercial land uses make up less than one percent of the

acreage in the planning area. Commercial development is located along

Figure A-16. Quail Creek is one of a number of developments under

construction in the Eastern Planning Area.

the Eastern Planning Area highway corridors, with US Highway 49 and

State Highway 67 containing much of the commercial uses in the area.

Industrial use is more prevalent than commercial land use in

the Eastern Planning Area. Located along Hudson-Krohn Road, south

of State Highway 67, are Coastal Recycling Rubbish Disposal and the

Allied Waste Transfer Station. These two sites are located adjacent to

one another, and the Coastal Recycling site takes up 600 acres of the

planning area. This site is a Class II Rubbish site; it may accept limited

types of rubbish wastes, including natural vegetation, brick, mortar,

concrete, stone, and asphalt. 49 Both industrial uses are bounded by

residential development to the north and east.

The Eastern Planning Area also has a concrete mixing plant

located at the intersection of State Highway 15 and Lamey Bridge Road.

There is a strong industry based on dirt extraction operations in the

planning area, and dirt extraction operations are located throughout the

Figure A-17. A self-storage facility is under construction on State

Highway 15.

Source: Rickie Yeager

Source: Rickie Yeager


72

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Figure A-18. This gas station is typical of the small scale commercial

development in the community.

Source: Ian Beniston

Figure A-19. This cement plant is an example of an industrial use in the

Eastern Planning Area.

Source: Rickie Yeager

entire Eastern Planning Area. This form of industrial use is often found

in areas experiencing new development.

Future Development

Residential developments are continuously being proposed

and developed in the Eastern Planning Area. The future residential

developments are at a wide range of scales.

Aside from the several residential developments in the planning

stages, there are two large-scale, master-planned communities. The

Tradition development will be located north of the planning area

on State Highway 67. 50 The Pinehaven development located at State

Highway 15 and State Highway 67, is proposed as a 1,200-acre, masterplanned

community, and is expected to have a mix of commercial and

residential uses. 51 The size and type of this development is new in the

Eastern Planning Area of Harrison County.

Zoning Summary

The Harrison County Zoning Ordinance regulates land

development in the Eastern Planning Area. Zoning in Harrison County

was adopted in 2000 and is intended to bring “about coordinated

physical development in accordance with present and future needs.” 52

The Harrison County Zoning Map identifies ten zoning districts in the

Eastern Planning Area.

The majority of land in the Eastern Planning Area, 78.8 percent,

is zoned A-1. According to the Zoning Ordinance, this category signifies

a general agricultural district. This designation is intended primarily for

farming, timber, and agricultural uses. Multiple uses of a single parcel of

land are permitted as long as they are in accordance with permitted uses

in an A-1 district. Single-family residential development is permitted if

it is on at least one acre.

E-1, Very Low Density Residential, is the second largest zoning

designation in the Eastern Planning Area, representing almost eight

percent of the total land area. This district provides for low density

residential development on large lots while also permitting limited scale


73

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Map A-2. Existing Zoning as of November 2006

Source: Harrison County Zoning Office


74

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Table A-16. Zoning Classifications

Eastern Planning

Zoning District

Area (Acres)

Percentage of

Land Area

A-1 34,797 78.83%

C-1 74 0.17%

C-2 837 1.90%

E-1 3,493 7.90%

I-1 82 0.19%

I-2 240 0.54%

O-1 2 0.00%

R-1 1,937 4.39%

R-2 2,299 5.21%

R-3 383 0.87%

Total Acreage 44,144 100%

Source: Harrison County Zoning Office

agricultural adjacent to the residential uses. The primary use for this

district is for single-family residential development.

The R-1, R-2, and R-3 zoning categories make up the remainder

of residential zoning districts. Together they comprise approximately

10 percent of the land in the Eastern Planning Area. R-1 is a Low

Density Residential District. The principle use in this district is singlefamily

residential, but this zoning category also permits compatible uses

including religious and educational facilities.

The R-2 designation is a Medium Density Residential District.

This designation permits single-family and two-family residential unit

development on smaller lot sizes.

R-3 zoning makes up the smallest portion of residential zoning

districts in the Eastern Planning Area. This zoning category is a High

Density Residential District and permits multi-family residential

buildings on small lots.

O-1 is an Office District. It accounts for two acres of the 44,144

acres in the Eastern Planning Area. It provides for office areas that are

adjacent to related commercial and residential uses and that may act as

a transition between residential and commercial districts.

Commercial uses are permitted in the C-1 and C-2 districts. A C-1

zoning designation provides for a Neighborhood Commercial District.

It is meant to serve the needs of surrounding residential districts by

offering everyday retail and personal service needs. There are only 74

acres designated as C-1 in the Eastern Planning Area.

A C-2 zoning designation is a General Commercial District.

This category makes up 837 acres in the planning area. The C-2 district

is meant to serve high volume retail and service type trade. This district

typically generates a large traffic volume. The zoning map highlights the

commercial, C-2 district, which is located primarily at US Highway 49.

While there is a significant industrial presence in the Eastern

Planning Area, less than one percent of the land in this area is zoned for

industry. The I-1 category is a Light Industry District. This designation

has been placed on only 82 acres of the planning area, and it is intended

to provide suitable areas for light manufacturing and the storage and

distribution of goods.

The I-2 category is a General Industrial District, and it provides

suitable environments for general manufacturing and storage and

distribution of both raw and finished materials. It works to prevent

encroaching residential development and to create a continuance of

compatible uses. The Coastal Recycling Center and Allied Waste Transfer

Station are zoned I-2.

Figure A-20. The De Soto National Forest comprises a majority of the

Eastern Planning Area.

Source: Rickie Yeager


75

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Economics

The Eastern Planning Area is primarily a bedroom community

for major employment centers along the Gulf Coast in Harrison

County. This section documents economic activity and employment

characteristics of residents in the Eastern Planning Area, as well as

potential growth pressures facing the community.

Economic and demographic data was collected at the block

level for the Eastern Planning Area. This was accomplished by using the

remainder method; a feature on the U.S. Census American Fact Finder

database. This methodology provided the planning team with the most

accurate information regarding the planning area’s demographic make

up and economic situation 53 .

Data was collected for census tract 34.01, block group one, and

census tract 34.02, block group two; census tract 32.06, block group

one; census tract 34.01, block groups two and three; and census tracts

33.02 and 34.02, census block group one.

Growth Pressures

Currently, commercial and industrial development is located

throughout the Eastern Planning Area and is primarily small in scale.

A majority of residents commute outside of the planning area to their

places of employment.

In part, commercial development has been limited due to a

lack of the availability of water and sewer. The City of D’Ibverville has

extended water and sewer services into portions of Eastern Harrison

County. 54 Additional extensions will occur as a result of the Regional

Water and Wastewater Plan and will allow the potential for further

commercial development.

For example, development has been proposed along State

Highway 15 due to the extension of water and sewer. Pinehaven, at

State Highway 67 and State Highway 15, is a proposed development on

1,200 acres including commercial space (see Figure A-21). 55

Residents in the Eastern Planning Area shop in the surrounding

communities. Many shop in D’Iberville at Lakeview Village. This

development has expanded and could add an additional 200,000 square

feet 56 .

Just north of the Eastern Planning Area is a master planned

community known as Tradition. Over the next ten to fifteen years

Tradition is planned to grow to more than 30,000 people over 4,800

acres. At the center of this new community is a proposed 600-acre

Town Center, which is expected to create up to 5,000 new jobs 57 . The

relocation of William Carrey College and a new Biloxi Regional Medical

Facility to the Town Center is part of a concerted effort to build a

research and development park at Tradition. Should the Town Center

materialize, it would attract members of the Eastern Planning Area to

shop and work at Tradition.

Figure A-21. Commercial development has been proposed adjacent

and west of this new interchange under construction for State Highways

67 and 15.

Source: Rickie Yeager


76

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Employment Characteristics of Residents

According to the 2007 estimates from the Mississippi Home

Corporation, 66.2 percent of residents 16 years and older were actively

employed in the labor force; 0.8 percent of the population served in

the US armed forces. Of those able to participate in the labor force, 3.5

percent of residents were unemployed and actively seeking employment

opportunities in one of the many industries along the Gulf Coast.

The gaming and service industry is a prominent employer along

the Mississippi Gulf Coast. It is therefore not surprising that 48 percent

of the Eastern Planning Area are employed in services. Approximately

11.3 percent work in retail trade. Aside from the service and retail

sectors, 12.5 percent of residents work in construction, while 8.1 percent

is employed in manufacturing-related activities. The major occupations

in the planning area include construction, services, and professional,

as shown in Table A-17. Residents in a management or professional

capacity often work as business and financial associates; healthcare

practitioners and technicians; and educators, trainers, and librarians.

Although once a vital component of the local economy, today

only one percent of the population is employed in industries that rely

on natural resources, such as forestry.

Located north of three major employment centers on the

Mississippi Gulf Coast, a majority of residents must commute to work.

Table A-19 displays the average commute time for residents. In 2000,

Table A-17. Labor Force, 2007

Percent

In labor force: 66.2%

In Armed Forces 0.8%

Civilian: 65.4%

Employed 61.9%

Unemployed 3.5%

Not in labor force 33.8%

Source: Census of Population and Housing, US Census Bureau, 2000

Table A-18. Employment by Industry, 2007

Industry

Percent

Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting,mining: 1.77%

Construction 12.5%

Manufacturing 8.1%

Wholesale trade 2.9%

Retail trade 11.3%

Transportation and warehousing, and utilities: 85.7%

Information 1.52%

Finance, insurance, real estate and rental and leasing: 1.3%

Services (except public administration) 48.0%

Public administration 4.4%

Total 100.00%

Source: Census of Population and Housing, US Census Bureau, 2000

Table A-19. Employment by Occupation, 2007

Occupation

Percent

Management, business, and financial 10.1%

Professional 15.4%

Sales 10.8%

Administrative Support 9.9%

Services 20.1%

Farming, fishing, and forestry 0.7%

Construction, extraction, and maintenance 22.1%

Production, transportation, and material moving 10.9%

Total 100.0%

Source: Census of Population and Housing, US Census Bureau, 2000


77

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Table A-20. Commuting Time of Residents to Work, 2000

Work at home: 1.1%

Less than 5 minutes 1.2%

5 to 9 minutes 3.6%

10 to 19 minutes 27.9%

20 to 24 minutes 20.7%

25 to 34 minutes 25.9%

35 to 44 minutes 7.2%

45 to 59 minutes 7.5%

60 to 89 minutes 2.5%

90 minutes or more 2.3%

Source: Census of Population and Housing, US Census Bureau, 2000

Figure A-22. Allistons is one of a number of commercial uses found

in the Eastern Planning Area.

Source: Rickie Yeager

the estimated average travel time to work was 26.7 minutes with 85.5

percent of residents commuting to work in a city, while another 12.2

percent of residents worked outside of Harrison County, according

to the US Census. The commute outside of Harrison County can be

attributed to the population and employment centers in nearby Jackson

County.

Table A-21. Traffic Analysis Zone Employment Data, 2002

TAZ

Population

Retail

Employment

Non-Retail

Employment

Total

452* 1,324 6 38 44

455* 149 0 8 8

456* 773 1 22 23

457* 269 1 27 28

458* 299 3 11 14

464* 351 4 37 41

465* 485 29 11 40

469* 1,248 29 16 45

470* 491 0 115 115

471* 1,292 26 42 68

473* 1,203 18 194 212

474* 55 0 97 97

475 974 43 88 131

Total 8,913 160 706 866

Source: Gulf Regional Planning Commission

* Denotes areas that are partially outside the planning area


78

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Current and Future Employment

Data obtained from Traffic Analysis Zones (TAZ) were used to

study the economic development of the Eastern Planning Area in more

detail. 58 In 2002, 866 people worked in the Eastern Planning Area. Of

that population, 18.5 percent of the people were employed in retail while

the remaining 81.5 percent worked in non-retail related occupations (see

Table A-20). 59 As of 2000, most employment opportunities were located

in the south central portion of the planning area, primarily north of

Biloxi. As people continue to rebuild in the aftermath of Hurricane

Katrina, however, this is forecasted to change with new employment

opportunities just north of the planning area in Tradition and continued

growth along the northern municipal boundaries south of the planning

area. Such growth will also be facilitated, to an extent, by State Highways

15, 67, and 605. The relocation of State Highway 67 and improvements

to State Highways 605 and 15 will make the Eastern Planning Area

more accessible from the north and south, while Interstate Highway

10 will remain the major east-west corridor in the planning area. Such

improvements will create several growth corridors in the planning area. 60

Unless zoned and regulated accordingly, these growth corridors could

dramatically alter the rural character of the planning area.

According to the Gulf Regional Planning Commission, between

2002 and 2030 the Eastern Planning Area is likely to see a 115.7 percent

increase in employment. A majority of this increase is forecasted to be

in non-retail occupations (see Table A-21). 61 Much of this employment

is likely to be associated with Tradition, north of the planning area,

which is expected to experience a 127.4 percent employment growth

rate between 2000 and 2030. As a result, development pressures are

expected and forecasted to spill into the Eastern Planning Area. TAZ

452, for example, is projected to see an increase in job opportunities

and population (508.9 and 1,020.5 percent respectively). TAZ 452 is

located in the northwest portion of the planning area, adjacent to State

Highway 67 and immediately south of St. Patrick High School, as seen

in Map A-3.

Opportunities for employment are expected to more than double

Figure A-23. This auto repair shop is an example of a commercial use

in Eastern Harrison County.

Source: Rickie Yeager

Table A-22. Traffic Analysis Zone Employment Data, 2030

Projections

TAZ

Population

Retail

Employment

Non-Retail

Employment

Total

452* 8,062 133 360 493

455* 149 0 2 2

456* 1,016 0 24 24

457* 510 11 29 40

458* 299 0 5 5

464* 13,496 0 32 32

465* 800 8 41 49

469* 1,812 8 92 100

470* 491 18 13 31

471* 1,832 21 114 135

473* 2,650 44 276 320

474* 679 44 193 237

475 2,111 181 219 400

Total 33,907 468 1,400 1,868

Source: Gulf Regional Planning Commission

* Denotes areas that are partially outside the planning area


79

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Map A-3. Traffic Analysis Zones, 2030

Source: Gulf Regional Planning Commission


80

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Table A-23. Percent Change in Employment, 2002-2030

TAZ

2002 Total

Employment

2030 Projected

Total

Employment

Percent

Change

452* 44 493 1020.5%

455* 8 2 -70.3%

456* 23 24 4.3%

457* 28 40 42.9%

458* 14 5 -65.9%

464* 41 32 -22.0%

465* 40 49 22.5%

469* 45 100 122.2%

470* 115 31 -73.2%

471* 68 135 98.5%

473* 212 320 50.9%

474* 97 237 144.3%

475 131 400 205.3%

Total 866 1,868 115.7%

Source: Gulf Regional Planning Commission

* Denotes areas that are partially outside the planning area

along urban growth corridors in the Eastern Planning Area (TAZ 469,

473 and 474 respectively). As people continue to migrate north of

Interstate Highway 10, and as water and sewer services are extended

in the planning area, opportunities for development will increase. As

this happens, pressures to develop commercial retail centers along

State Highways 605 and 67 will increase in order to service the growing

population. Already, new commercial development is being proposed

at Tradition and in the southeastern most portion of the planning area,

along State Highways 67 and 15.

Jobs/Housing Balance

A jobs/housing balance is a method used to ascertain whether

a community is an employment center, residential community or

somewhere in between. 62 To find this measurement, one simply divides

the number of jobs by the number of housing units in that community.

A numerical ration for balance is obtained by dividing the number of

jobs by housing units in a defined geographic area. If the ratio is greater

than one, the community has more jobs than housing units. If the ratio

is less than one, the community is rich in housing. In a community where

people value living close to their place of employment, the ratio should

be close or equal to one.

The jobs/housing balance generally reflects a community’s overall

quality of life, as it relates to the time and distance people must travel to

their job and the environmental impacts related to transportation. 63 Since

Eastern Harrison County is primarily a rural residential community, a

housing ratio of one would not be appropriate. More appropriate for

the community is a ratio of 0.5, indicating that for every housing unit,

there are two workers.

Based on population and employment projections, the Eastern

Planning Area is expected to accommodate 1,868 jobs 64 and 4,008

housing units by 2030. 65 This equals a jobs/housing ratio of 0.466, where

a majority of the labor force is within 15 miles of major employment

centers. While the ratio of 0.466 is close to 0.5, more homes are

forecasted for the area than there are jobs. This is explained by major

employment centers developing outside and adjacent to the planning

area, as is the case at Tradition and in the City of D’Iberville.


81

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Natural Resources

Geography

The Eastern Planning Area ranges from approximately five to

twenty miles inland from the Mississippi Sound. The borders of the

Eastern Planning Area are US Highway 49 to the West; the municipal

borders of Gulfport, Biloxi, and D’Iberville to the South; the county

border between Harrison and Jackson to the East; and the De Soto

National Forest to the north. The Eastern Planning Area’s defining

natural features are its oak and pine forest and its array of rivers, streams,

and wetlands that wind their way to the Gulf of Mexico.

Climate

The climate in Harrison County, Mississippi is characteristic of

a moist subtropical region. The area is classified as being a part of the

Temperate Deciduous Forest Biome. Winters are short and mild, while

summers are long and hot. Precipitation is frequent and relatively uniform

throughout the year. 66 Rainfall is reported between 40 and 60 inches per

year. 67 Annual mean maximum temperatures range from approximately

74 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit. Average January temperatures range from

lows of 40 degrees to highs in the 50s. Although very rare, subfreezing

temperatures can occur during winter months. Average July temperatures

have highs in the upper 80s and lows in the 70s, although temperatures

can easily get much hotter. 68 High humidity is common during summer

months and, as such, temperatures feel much hotter.

Hurricanes

The area is most susceptible to hurricanes from June to October. 69

Although hurricanes can lose power passing over the State of Florida

and, to a lesser extent, the island of Cuba, the very warm waters of the

Gulf of Mexico are ideal for recharging a hurricane’s momentum. The

extent of destruction caused by 1969’s Hurricane Camille in Harrison

County alone amounted to 68 square miles of damage. 70 In 2005,

Hurricane Katrina devastated Harrison County and other coastal areas.

Figure A-24. Cogon Grass is an example of an invasive plant in the

forested areas.

Source: Babe Buckley

In Harrison County, storm surges of 22 feet caused severe flooding

along the coast and in many of the adjoining waterways. Category

Three hurricane winds of more than 125 miles per hour at landfall, and

sustained winds of more than 100 miles per hour after making landfall,

wreaked havoc on structures, trees, and infrastructure. 71 Flooding, wind,

and heavy rains damaged homes and businesses. Although buffered by

the coast, Katrina’s storm surge impacted the Eastern Planning Area

considerably far inland, as illustrated in Map A-4.

As reinforced by the Forest Damage Map, Map A-5, much of

the Eastern Planning Area is susceptible to strong hurricane winds.

Water damage, caused mainly as a result of flooding and storm surges,

is possible along all of the planning area’s major waterways. Again, as

exhibited by Map A-4, the storm surge of Category Three strength


82

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Map A-4. Extent of Hurricane Katrina Storm Surge

Source: Southern Mississippi Planning and Development District


83

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Map A-5. 1988 Flood Zones. The largest flood zones are found in the Biloxi River Watershed.

Source: Southern Mississippi Planning and Development District


84

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Katrina reached several miles inland. Heavy hurricane and conventional

storm rains pose a significant threat for flooding along the planning

area’s flood zones. The largest of these zones straddles the Biloxi River

and its tributaries, as shown in Map A-5.

Forest

Over 78 percent of Harrison County is forested. Of the 291,900

acres of forested land, 58 percent of trees are pine, 22 percent are oak,

and 20 percent are other types of hardwoods. Approximately 31 percent

(89,800 acres) of forested land in Harrison County is owned by the

public. The remaining forest is owned privately—24 percent by the

forest industry and 45 percent by private non-industry landowners. 72

The Eastern Planning Area shares the county’s high proportion of

forested land. Of the 44,963 acres in the Eastern Planning Area, 38,480

acres (85.6 percent) are forested.

Forest Invasives

With the exception of Cogan Grass, invasive species are not

substantially problematic in the Eastern Planning Area. Cogan grass has

been difficult to remove and continues to out compete native plants in

many forest areas. Chinese Talo, Privot, and Soda Apple, all invasive,

are found in the planning area and have the potential to become more

problematic. 73

De Soto National Forest

The De Soto National Forest is one of six national forests in

the State of Mississippi and is the largest at 378,538 acres. It contains a

wide variety of plant and animal types native to the southern Mississippi

region. The Southwest portion of the De Soto National Forest

comprises approximately one quarter of Harrison County’s land area.

De Soto also extends into Jackson, Stone, George, Pearl, Forrest, Perry,

and Greene counties. Of the 38,480 forested acres in the planning area,

approximately 20,000 acres are part of the national forest. Figure A-22

shows a section of the De Soto forest in the Eastern Planning Area.

The De Soto National Forest is currently the Eastern Planning

Area’s most valuable source of recreation. De Soto has trails for hikers,

mountain bikers, equestrian riders, and all terrain vehicle bikers. 74

Several rivers and streams flowing through the planning area

have their headwaters in the De Soto Forest. These waters are used

for canoes, kayaks, and recreational fishing. Hunting is permitted in the

surrounding forestland. The De Soto National Forest also supports

camping and has several permanent picnic and shelter facilities intended

for large group gatherings. Natural scenic features of the forest include

a variety of longleaf pines and oak trees common to the region in

addition to tupelo/bald cypress swamps and pitcher plant savanna. 75

Table A-24. 2006 Damaged Timber Resources in Harrison County

Damaged Pulpwood

Volume

(millions of cubic feet)

Damaged Saw-timber

Volume

(millions of cubic feet)

Pine 51.2 150.3

Mixed 4.0 12.5

Hardwood 3.7 8.8

Total: 58.9 171.7

Source: Mississippi Institute of Forest Inventory Southeast Mississippi Forest

Inventory

Table A-25. 2006 Undamaged Timber Resources in Harrison County

Pulpwood Volume

(thousands of cubic

feet)

Saw-timber Volume

(thousands of cubic

feet)

Pine

Mixed

14,300

29.3

65,500

43.5

Hardwood 99.3 393.4

Total: 14,500 65,935

Source: Mississippi Institute of Forest Inventory Southeast Mississippi Forest

Inventory


85

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Figure A-25. The De Soto National Forest

Source: Nathan Leppo


86

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Map A-6. Forest Damage Map of the Eastern Planning Area

Source: Southern Mississippi Planning and Development District


87

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Timber

Timber is an important industry in both Harrison County and

the State of Mississippi. Currently, however, there are no timber related

activities in the Eastern Planning Area. Across the state, between $11

and $14 billion is generated annually from the timber industry. In 2002,

243 million cubic feet of timber was produced in southern Mississippi. 76

Harrison County contributed 6.3 million cubic feet of softwood and

384 thousand cubic feet of hardwood in 2002. Also in 2002, Harrison

County’s output of roundwood (round sections of timber cut from a

tree) softwood ranged from 11 to 20 cubic feet per acre. Roundwood

hardwood output accounted for less than three cubic feet per acre

during the same year. 77

Hurricane Katrina dealt a significant blow to Harrison County’s

timber resources. Harrison County and other southeastern Mississippi

counties experienced the worst impact of the storm, and present timber

reserves reflect this damage. It is estimated that two years of forest

harvest were lost. Forest surveys in 2006 reported an approximate loss

of 58.9 million cubic feet of damaged pulpwood volume and 171.7

million cubic feet of damaged saw-timber volume. Countywide timber

damage is shown in Table A-21. Undamaged pulpwood volume totaled

14.5 million cubic feet and undamaged saw-timber volume totaled 65.9

million cubic feet. Countywide undamaged timber is shown in Table

A-22. 78 Eastern Planning Area timber resources were much less damaged

than other areas of the county. Much of the southeastern portion of

De Soto National Forest, a dense part of forest in the county, remained

undamaged. For comparison to the rest of the county, see Map A-6.

A 2006 forecast for the county places the annual growth rate of

pulpwood and saw-timber at 10.3 percent and 7.2 percent, respectively.

Five-year estimates project pine volume to increase to 61.5 million cubic

feet of pine pulpwood and 257.3 million cubic feet of saw-timber. 79

Hydrology

The Eastern Planning Area has several rivers, streams, and

wetlands. All tributaries within the Eastern Planning Area empty into

Biloxi Bay and then into the Mississippi Sound. The Biloxi River is one

of two primary watersheds in the Eastern Planning Area and is fed by

several streams, including Saucier Creek, Palmer Creek, Tiger Creek,

Loya Branch, Rudy Branch, Walker Creek, Mill Creek, and Fitz Creek.

These creeks and branches feeding the Biloxi River in the northwestern

section of the planning area are intertwined with wetlands. The Little

Biloxi River, the headwaters of which are in upper Harrison County

near the border of Stone County, is also a tributary of the Biloxi River

and enters the Eastern Planning Area just north of Woolmarket at US

Highway 49. An image of the Little Biloxi River can be seen in Figure

A-23. The Biloxi River watershed is sizable—in its entirety it is 114,657

acres. 80

The second major watershed is called the Tuxachanie Creek

Watershed, although the Tuxanchanie Creek is a tributary of the larger

Tchoutacabouffa River. The total land area of the Tuxachanie Creek

Watershed measures 41,970 acres. State Highway 67 roughly divides the

Tuxachanie Creek Watershed and the Biloxi River Watershed. 81

The Tchoutacabouffa River meets the Biloxi River at Big Lake in

the Biloxi Bay. The headwaters of the Tchoutacabouffa River are in the

De Soto National Forest. Several tributaries, including Cypress Creek,

Railroad Creek, Ramsey Creek, Hurricane Creek, Bud Branch, Bridge

Branch, Raymond Branch, Boggy Branch, Bigfoot Creek, Choctaw

Creek, Reed Branch, Long Branch, Hester Creek, Howard Creek,

Parker Creek, and Cypress Creek, feed the Tchoutacabouffa. Similar to

the Biloxi River tributaries, many of the creeks and branches that feed

the Tchoutacabouffa in the northeastern part of the planning area are

interconnected by a series of wetlands. 82

Public access to the rivers and streams of the Eastern Planning

Area is limited to De Soto forest areas. Other areas further south in the

planning area are confined by private land ownership.


88

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Map A-7. Wetlands of the Eastern Planning Area

Source: Southern Mississippi Planning and Development District


89

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

The Land Trust for the Mississippi Coastal Plain (LTMCP),

through its Building a Partnership for the Tchoutacabouffa River

Watershed Action Plan, proposes conservation and protection of open

spaces along the Tchoutacabouffa Watershed. LTMCP received funding

from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IV to

advance their efforts. Working with stakeholders in the Tchoutacabouffa

Watershed, LTMCP intends to protect the watershed from encroaching

development from the south. LTMCP efforts include working to

establish setbacks on the riverbank, restoration of riverbank plant life,

and improving education. Those guidelines were developed through

community forums held in the Tchoutacabouffa Watershed area. 83

Wetlands

Wetlands are an important feature in the Eastern Planning Area.

At more than five miles inland, all of the wetlands in the Eastern Planning

Area are Palustrine wetlands. Access to wetlands areas is currently

limited as abutting properties are predominately privately owned.

See Map A-7 for distribution of wetlands in the Eastern Planning

Area. Palustrine wetlands broadly encompass fresh water bogs, marshes,

swamps, and bottomland forest, all of which can be found in Southern

Mississippi. 84 They are commonly found in the flood plains of inland

streams and rivers. Tree species common to wetlands in the Eastern

Planning Area include Yellow Poplar, Red Bay, Sweet Bay, Cherry Bark

Oak, and Water Oak. 85 Figure A-26, below, pictures a wetland in the

Eastern Planning Area.

Palustrine wetlands improve water quality by filtering pollutants

such as fertilizers and pesticides, are central spawning points for fish, and

help control floodwaters. 86 The Palustrine wetlands of Harrison County

are an example of wetlands that help absorb water after heavy rainfalls

and hurricane storm surges from the south. Much of the planning area’s

largest wetlands overlap flood zones, as can be seen by comparing the

1988 flood zones shown in Map A-5 with the distribution of wetlands

shown in Map A-7.

Flood Zones

In the wake of Hurricane Katrina, extensive flood damage

prompted the Federal Government to revise both the National Flood

Insurance Program (NFIP) and the flood-elevation maps of Coastal

Mississippi. Charged with making these changes, the Mitigation Division

of FEMA revised the 1988 flood zone maps in November of 2007.

Conditions have changed since the publishing of the 1988 flood zones,

shown in Map A-7, due to man-made and natural hydrologic alterations

in the built and natural environment respectively. 87

Participation in the NFIP necessitates compliance and

enforcement of floodplain management ordinances in order to

participate in subsidized flood insurance. 88 The November 2007

flood elevation maps are preliminary, but should be finalized in 2008.

Communities must adopt the new flood elevations within six months of

their finalization to remain eligible for the NFIP. 89

Figure A-26. This wetland is typical of those found in Eastern Harrison

County.

Source: Joshua Anderson


90

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Table A-26. Major Soil Types in Harrison County

Acres in

Soil Type

County

Common Tree Types

Characteristics

Poarch 18,692 Loblolly Pine, Longleaf Pine, Slash Pine

‣ Drainage: Well

‣ Hydric: No

Ponzer 6,584

Ruston 5,420

Baldcypress, Loblolly Bay, Loblolly Pine, Pond Pine, Red

Maple, Redbay, Swamp Tupelo, Sweetbay, Sweetgum, Water

Tupelo

Hickory, Loblolly Pine, Longleaf Pine, Post Oak, Slash

Pine, Southern Red Oak, Sweetgum

‣ Drainage: Very poor

‣ Hydric: Partially

‣ Drainage: Well

‣ Hydric: No

Smithton 5,057

Cherrybark Oak, Loblolly Pine, Shortleaf Pine, Sweetgum,

Water Oak

Saucier 4,456 Loblolly Pine, Longleaf Pine, Slash Pine

Atmore 4,388 Loblolly Pine, Slash Pine, Sweetgum

Harleston 4,105 Loblolly Pine, Shortleaf Pine, Sweetgum

Nugent 2,874

Loblolly Pine, Slash Pine, Sweetgum, Water Oak, Willow

Oak

Smithdale 1,104 Loblolly Pine, Longleaf Pine, Slash Pine

‣ Drainage: Poor

‣ Hydric: Partially

‣ Drainage: Moderately well

‣ Hydric: Partially

‣ Drainage: Poor

‣ Hydric: Partially

‣ Drainage: Moderately well

‣ Hydric: Partially

‣ Drainage: Excessive

‣ Hydric: Yes

‣ Drainage: Well

‣ Hydric: Partially

‣ Drainage: Somewhat Excessive

Eutis 1,073 Loblolly Pine, Longleaf Pine, Slash Pine

‣ Hydric: No

Source: Common Tree Types and Drainage Adapted from the US Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service, Soil Data Mart, March 2007


91

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Map A-8. Hydric, partially hydric, and non-hydric soils in the Eastern Planning Area.

Source: Southern Mississippi Planning and Development District


92

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Map A-9. Atmore and Smithton Soils can cause deterioration to concrete foundations.

Source: Southern Mississippi Planning and Development District


93

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Figure A-27. A view of the Little Biloxi River.

upper soil layer. It is formed under conditions of saturation or flooding

that occur for substantially long periods during the growing season. The

hydric and partially hydric soils are found in areas of rivers, streams,

and wetlands, of which there are many in the Eastern Planning Area. 91

The largest continuous expanse of non-hydric soils is found north of

Biloxi.

There is a high risk of reaction with concrete in all major soils

except soils designated as Nugent, Ruston, or Smithdale, in which there

is a moderate risk of reaction. Uncoated steel has a much lower risk

of corrosion in Harrison County soils. Atmore, Ponzer, and Smithton

soils present a high risk of corrosion for uncoated steel, whereas the

remaining major soil types present a mostly low, or in some cases, a

moderate risk of corrosion. 92 The distribution of Atmore, Ponzer, and

Smithton soils can be found in Map A-9 (page 92).

Figure A-28. Live oaks thrive in the sandy soils found throughout

Harrison County.

Source: Rickie Yeager

Ground Water

Residents of Harrison County receive all of their drinking water

from underground aquifers. The Mississippi embayment aquifer system

covers most of Mississippi and Louisiana, half of Arkansas, and extends

into portions of Alabama, Missouri, Tennessee, Kentucky, Florida, and

Illinois. At it deepest point, the aquifer is more than 5,000 feet deep,

but the portion under the planning area is between 2,000 and 3,000 feet

deep. 90

Soils

As shown in Table A-23 and Map A-8, a significant portion of

the Eastern Planning Area is composed of hydric and partially hydric

soils. A hydric soil is defined as a soil with anaerobic conditions in the

Source: Rickie Yeager


94

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Community Facilities

Figure A-29. Future site of the new D’Iberville High School

The Eastern Planning Area offers community facilities to meet

the needs of its current residents. Presently three public schools, four

churches, one park, a community center, one emergency shelter, and

three golf courses are located within the Eastern Planning Area. In 2007,

a senior center and high school were under construction. An emergency

shelter and a fire station are proposed for the area.

Schools

Schools in the Eastern Planning Area are part of the Harrison

County School District. The Harrison County School District provides

a K-12 education to students and is comprised of 20 schools located

across the county. The three Harrison County schools located in the

Eastern Planning Area are North Woolmarket Elementary and Middle

School, Harrison Central High, and Harrison County Vocational-

Technical High School. The D’Iberville High School is scheduled to

open in August 2008.

North Woolmarket Elementary and Middle School is located

on Old Woolmarket Road. The school was constructed in 2000 and is

the newest of the three schools. It serves approximately 850 students in

grades K-8. 93 The building received only light damage during Hurricane

Katrina and was used as a shelter for the three weeks following the

storm. 94 Harrison Central High and Harrison County Vo-Tech are

located on the same property, just east of US Highway 49 on School

Road. Harrison Central High opened first in 1967. Harrison County

Vo-Tech was initially housed in Harrison Central High. It grew out of

the four initial vocational programs offered at Harrison Central High

to become a distinct school and was moved to a separate building that

opened in 1975. 95 Together the schools serve a combined 1,620 students

in grades 10-12. Harrison County Vo-Tech is open to students from

across the county, while Harrison Central High draws from an area that

includes Saucier, West Wortham, Lizana, Lyman, Orange Grove, Three

Rivers, North Gulfport, and Pineville Elementary Schools. The site

Source: Ian Beniston

Figure A-30. Woolmarket Vocational School

Source: Ian Beniston


95

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

was used as a shelter for five days after Hurricane Katrina, and then it

housed a Georgia National Guard unit for three weeks. 96

The Harrison County School District is constructing a new

D’Iberville High School in the Eastern Planning Area to address

overcrowding at Harrison Central High School. When completed, the

student body at Harrison Central High will be reduced and the school

will then serve Saucier, West Wortham, East Orange Grove, Three

Rivers, and Bel-Aire. The new high school, is located approximately 3.5

miles southeast of North Woolmarket Elementary and Middle School

at the intersection of Lamey Bridge Road and Big John Road. The high

school will serve students from D’Iberville and the easternmost portions

of the planning area. 97

Figure A-31. The Woolmarket Community Park provides multiple

recreation opportunities for residents.

Source: Joshua Anderson

Parks and Community Centers

The Woolmarket Community Park is the only public park located

in the Eastern Planning Area. It has served the residents of Harrison

County at its current location at the intersection of Old Woolmarket

Road and State Highway 67 since 1989. The facilities include four

baseball fields, one football field, a tennis court, and a walking track.

The park sustained damage to light poles, bleachers, nets, and the

concession stand during Hurricane Katrina. Woolmarket Community

Park is currently open for use, but repairs are still being conducted. 98

There are no current plans for the construction of an additional park in

the Eastern Planning Area.

The Woolmarket Civic Center is located on the grounds of the

Woolmarket Community Park. The Civic Center was built in 1991. Prior

to Hurricane Katrina, the Woolmarket Civic Center was an 8,000-squarefoot

facility, which included a reception hall and separate kitchenette

area. It was used to host weddings, social events, and public meetings. 99

The Woolmarket Civic Center suffered minor damage during Hurricane

Katrina and required roof repairs.

The Woolmarket Senior Center is currently being constructed

as an 8,000-square-foot addition to the Woolmarket Civic Center. The

Senior Center is expected to be complete by December 2007. 100

Emergency Shelters

There is currently one emergency shelter located in the Eastern

Planning Area. Two additional shelters are under construction. North

Woolmarket Elementary and Middle School is classified as a public

shelter and is suitable for providing temporary housing to up to 1,000

residents after a storm event.

The Woolmarket Community Center, as part of its renovations,

will be upgraded to provide post-storm shelter opportunities for up to

250 residents, including showers. 101

Both the North Woolmarket Elementary and Middle School

and Woolmarket Civic Center are considered “Shelters of Last Resort”

under the current FEMA rating system. This rating is based on the wind


96

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

resistance of the structures and indicates that they are not intended

to provide protection to residents during a hurricane. They are to be

used as emergency shelters after a storm event, as a staging ground

for emergency services, and as temporary housing for displaced

residents. 102

A new FEMA certification system has established the FEMA-361

level of certification. This certification indicates that a structure is stormproof

and can be activated as an emergency shelter during a hurricane.

The new D’Iberville High School, which is currently under construction,

will be able to function as a shelter during a storm event. 103

Figure A-32. Woolmarket Community Park

Source: Joshua Anderson

Public Safety

Harrison County provides fire service to the area through four

fire districts, including North Woolmarket, Saucier, Lizana and Orange

Grove. The North Woolmarket Fire District, including the East Harrison

sub district, lies completely within the Eastern Planning Area. Within

the North Woolmarket Fire District, there are two stations that cover

approximately 44 square miles with an estimated population of 4,640.

There are two part-time paid firefighters and 12 volunteer firefighters.

The North Woolmarket Station has four trucks. 104

A large portion of the Saucier fire district also lies within the

Eastern Planning Area. Within the Saucier fire district, there are two

stations, Saucier and Success, which cover approximately 151 square

miles with an estimated population of 5,778. There are two full-time

paid firefighters, one at each station, and 20 volunteer firefighters. The

Saucier station has five trucks and the Success station has two trucks. 105

A small portion of the Lizana Fire District lies within the

Eastern Planning Area along US Highway 49 between the Biloxi River

and Little Biloxi River. The Orange Grove Fire District also serves a

portion of the Eastern Planning Area. Within the Eastern Planning

Area, this fire district serves a rectangular-shaped area, which spans

from the intersection of the Little Biloxi River and US Highway 49 due

east to the banks of the Biloxi River and then south to the municipal

boundaries of Biloxi and Gulfport.

In response to increased demand for fire services as a result of

proposed development in the Eastern Planning Area, Harrison County

Fire Services is reviewing plans to build an additional station in the

North Woolmarket Fire District. The proposed new station would be

located approximately midway between the existing North Woolmarket

and East Harrison fire stations. 106

All of the existing and planned fire stations provide space for

Sheriff substations. 107


97

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Map A-10. Community Facilities in Eastern Harrison County

Source: Harrison County, Harrison County School District, Southern Mississippi Planning and Development District


98

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Private Facilities

A number of private facilities that serve a public purpose are

found within and in close proximity to the Eastern Planning Area.

Most prominently are four churches: the Ramsey Creek Church in

the far northeastern edge of the county, Heritage Baptist and Cross

Roads Baptist Churches, located in the central part of the county off

Lamey Bridge Road and State Highway 67, and the White Plains United

Methodist Church located at the intersection of White Plains Road and

Posey Bridge Road.

The Ramsey Creek Church has been located at its current

location at the intersection of Bethel Road and Ramsey Road since its

founding in 1971. The original Fellowship Hall was severely damaged

during Hurricane Katrina and was demolished as a result. Currently

services are being held in a new Fellowship Hall located on the same

property. A new Sanctuary is currently under construction, also at the

same location. 108

Figure A-33. Ramsey Creek Church

There are three golf courses located in the planning area. The

Dogwood Hills Golf Club is located near the center of the Eastern

Planning Area on Dogwood Hills Drive. It is the oldest golf course

in the area and was established in 1981. The Grand Bear Golf Course

is located towards the western edge of the Eastern Planning Area on

Grandway Boulevard. It is a Jack Nicklaus designed golf course which

opened in 1999 as a satellite operation for the Grand Biloxi hotel and

casino. The Fallen Oak Golf Club is located in the far north eastern

corner of the planning area on State Highway 15. It was opened in 1999

and is a satellite operation for the Beau Rivage Resort and Casino.

Figure A-34. White Plains United Methodist Church

Source: Rickie Yeager

Source: Rickie Yeager


99

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Infrastructure

This section describes the existing conditions of the Eastern

Planning Area of Harrison County, Mississippi in terms of infrastructure,

with a focus on roadways, railroads, pedestrian and bicycle facilities,

public transit, utilities, and energy. The existing conditions of and future

plans for infrastructure are detailed below.

Roads

The Eastern Planning Area of Harrison County, Mississippi

contains four general types of roadways. The Mississippi Department

of Transportation (MDOT) defines three types, and one type, local

roadways paved and unpaved, has been classified by the planning

team. 109 The primary types of roadways found within the planning area

are principal arterials and collectors. The other types are minor arterials

and local roadways (See Map A-10). The 2004 and 2006 Estimated

Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT), prepared by MDOT, illustrates

which roads are the most heavily traveled (See Map A-10). 110 Roadway

maintenance in the Eastern Planning Area is the responsibility of

Harrison County and MDOT, depending on the designation of the

roadway. US Highways and State Highways are maintained by MDOT,

while other public roadways within the planning area are maintained by

Harrison County. The integration of bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure

is minimal within the planning area and will be discussed further in the

pedestrian and bicycle facilities section.

Principal Arterials (Rural)

Principal arterials (rural) are connected rural networks of

important continuous routes that have trip length and travel density

characteristics indicative of substantial statewide or interstate travel. 111

The primary function of these roadways is to carry through-traffic. Two

principal arterials serve the Eastern Planning Area: new State Highway

67 and US Highway 49. There are approximately 3.2 miles of principal

arterial roadways in the Eastern Planning Area.

New State Highway 67 is currently in the final stages of construction.

This project will connect existing State Highway 67 with US Highway 49

and Interstate Highway 10. 112 It is scheduled to be totally completed in

2009.

Upon completion, State Highway 67 will be a divided four-lane

highway with a combination of at-grade and interchange access. The

Mississippi Department of Transportation recorded an annual average

of 8,200 daily trips along the existing State Highway 67 and an average

of 4,700 daily trips along old State Highway 67 in 2006. 113 The Gulf

Regional Planning Commission forecasts 37,962 annual average daily

trips at State Highway 67 and Three Rivers Road and 39,160 annual

average daily trips north of Old Woolmarket Road and State Highway

67.

State Highway 67 is characterized by its rural quality. The

Mississippi State legislature recently passed legislation dedicating State

Highway 67 a scenic byway from Interstate Highway 10 to US Highway

49. 114 The benefits provided by the scenic byway designation include

resource protection, community recognition, economic development,

community visioning and partnering. 115 This designation will also make

State Highway 67 eligible for additional funding designated from the

Mississippi Department of Transportation’s Scenic Byway Program and

the National Scenic Byways Discretionary Grants Program.

US Highway 49 is a four-lane divided highway with at-grade

crossings and an average speed limit of 65 miles per hour. 116 It runs north/

south through the western portion of the planning area connecting the

Mississippi coast to other northern locations throughout the state and

nation. US Highway 49 is a dedicated north/south evacuation route in

Harrison County (See Map A-12). 117 In 2004, the Mississippi Department

of Transportation recorded 33,000 daily automobile trips along the

highway to the south of the planning area and 17,000 daily trips north

of the planning area in Saucier. In 2006, the Mississippi Department of

Transportation recorded an annual average of 38,000 daily automobile


100

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Map A-11. Eastern Planning Area Hurricane Evacuation Routes

Source: Mississippi Department of Transportation and Gulf Regional Planning Commission


101

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

trips along US Highway 49 to the south of the planning area, while that

number decreased to annual average of 15,000 daily trips north of the

planning area in Saucier. The AADT increases along US Highway 49 in

a southerly direction towards Interstate Highway 10.

A traffic light is located at US 49 and North Swan Road. No

stop signs or sidewalks exist along the portion of US Highway 49

running through the planning area. Crossings are not marked on the

pavement nor indicated by flashing signals, although a limited number

of crosswalk signs exist.

Figure A-35. Mississippi State Highway 15 runs through the De Soto

National Forest in Eastern Harrison County.

Minor Arterials (Rural)

Minor arterials (rural) are an integrated network providing

interstate and intercounty service that links cities, larger towns, and/or

major resort areas. Minor arterials are capable of providing and attracting

long distance travel. 118 The primary function of these roadways is to carry

a combination of local and through traffic. There are approximately 18

miles of minor arterials in the Eastern Planning Area.

State Highway 15 forms the western boundary of the northern

portion of the Eastern Planning Area. The highway runs north/south,

connecting Biloxi with Tennessee. State Highway 15 also serves as a

designated evacuation route in Harrison County. 119 The highway, at

323.3 miles, is the longest highway in the Mississippi State Highway

System. The speed limit is 40 miles per hour. 120 In 2004, the Mississippi

Department of Transportation recorded an annual average of 1,300

trips north of the intersection with White Plains Road, and in 2006, an

annual average of 3,500 trips was recorded at the intersection, indicating

a significant increase in traffic since the storm. 121

State Highway 605 runs north/south, connecting Interstate

Highway 10 and State Highway 67. The new highway opened in 2006

and is approximately 12 miles in length with a speed limit of 65 miles

per hour. It was constructed by MDOT to serve the Tradition masterplanned

community located in Saucier. The roadway is surrounded by

Source: Bridget Troy


102

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Map A-12. Eastern Planning Area Functional Roadway Classifications and Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT)

Source: Mississippi Department of Transportation and Gulf Regional Planning Commission


103

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

areas with a combination of rural and suburban characteristics. The

roadway does not feature sidewalks, traffic lights, or stop signs. The

new roadway is expected to spur economic development along the 605

corridor from Gulfport to Tradition, as thousands of residents are

expected to move to the Tradition master-planned community. State

Highway 67 will provide residents with an alternative evacuation route.

Major Collectors (Rural)

Rural major collectors provide service to any county seat not on

an arterial route, larger towns not served by higher systems, and other

traffic generators of equivalent importance such as schools, shipping

points, county parks, and important agricultural area. 122 The primary

function of these roadways is for local traffic movement and land

access. Collectors are not typically used for through trips. Seven collector

roadways traversing 22.4 miles serve the Eastern Planning Area.

A rural and suburban landscape with single-family lots, forested

lands, and open space is characteristic of major collectors in the Eastern

Planning Area. Traffic control devices along these roadways are limited.

No marked crossing or sidewalks exist.

Existing State Highway 67 extends north from Interstate Highway

10, connecting to the new State Highway 67. The Mississippi Department

of Transportation recorded an annual average of 8,200 daily trips along

the roadway in 2006. 123 The speed limit ranges from 30 to 55 miles per

hour. 124 The existing State Highway 67 will provide a continued alternate

route heading north to the newly constructed portion of the highway.

White Plains Road extends from State Highway 15 southwest

to Lamey Bridge Road, which leads to the new State Highway 67. In

2004, Mississippi Department of Transportation recorded an annual

average of 230 daily trips along the roadway west of State Highway 15,

and in 2006, MDOT recorded an average of 360 daily trips. 125 White

Plains Road is the least traveled collector roadway in the planning area as

identified by the Mississippi Department of Transportation. The road is

3.4 miles long 126 and the speed limit is 20 miles per hour. 127

Lorraine Road extends north from Woolmarket to the existing

State Highway 67 and White Plains Road. In 2004, the Mississippi

Department of Transportation recorded an annual average of 1,000

daily trips south of Jim Byrd Road, and in 2006, MDOT recorded 5,200

trips farther south, near John Lee Road. 128 Lorraine Road moves traffic

from the Interstate Highway 10 to State Highway 67. The road is 4.2

miles long 129 and the speed limit is 45 miles per hour. 130

Three Rivers Road extends from the northern portions of the City

of Gulfport to State Highway 67. It intersects the newly constructed

State Highway 605 en route to State Highway 67. In 2004, an annual

daily average of 1,900 trips was recorded north of John Lee Road, and

in 2006, AADT data was not provided for this roadway. The road is 4.24

miles long 131 and the speed limit is 30 miles per hour. 132

North Swan Road provides access to US Highway 49 in the

southwest corner of the Eastern Planning Area. The Mississippi

Department of Transportation did not provide AADT data for this

roadway in 2006. The road is two miles long 133 and the speed limit is 30

miles per hour. 134

Lamey Bridge Road extends from the City of D’Iberville to State

Highway 67 and intersects with White Plains Road. In 2004, an annual

daily average of 1,600 trips was recorded east of Highway 15 and 940

daily trips north of Big John Road, and in 2006, an annual average of

3,000 daily trips was recorded along the southern portion of the roadway

north of Interstate Highway 10, but that number decreases to 1,500

traveling north on the roadway towards the intersection with White

Plains Road. 135 Lamey Bridge Road is three lanes near State Highway 15

and two lanes along the majority of the roadway. The road is 9.6 miles

long 136 and the speed limit is 30 miles per hour. 137


104

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Minor Collector (Rural)

Minor Collectors collect traffic from local roads and brings all

developed areas within a reasonable distance of a collector road. These

roads provide service to smaller communities and link important local

traffic generators. One minor collector roadway traversing one mile

serves the Eastern Planning Area.

Old State Highway 67 extends from State Highway 15 to the existing

State Highway 67. The Mississippi Department of Transportation

recorded an annual average of 4,700 daily trips along the roadway in

2006. 138 The road is 5.1 miles long 139 and the speed limit is 30 miles per

hour. 140

Figure A-36. This stretch of Lamey Bridge Road illustrates the scenic

character found throughout the planning area.

Source: Nathan Leppo

Local Roads (Rural)

Local roads (rural) provide access to adjacent land and provide

service to smaller communities. These roadways also carry travel from

low population areas to rural collectors. 141 Local streets are characterized

by a narrower right of way than the previously noted functional

classifications. Typically, local roads have a right-of-way between 20 and

60 feet and are able to accommodate two lanes of traffic. Stop signs

serve as traffic control devices on these roadways. No traffic lights or

marked crosswalks exist on these streets. Sidewalks are absent on most

streets, although some new developments may contain sidewalks, such as

the development off of Curry Road. The sidewalks that are constructed

are scattered and do not create a uniform sidewalk network throughout

the major residential areas of the planning area.

Future Plans

The current project of major importance in the Eastern

Planning Area is the completion of State Highway 67. As mentioned

previously, a large stretch of the highway is scheduled for pavement this

year (2007) and the project is scheduled for total completion in 2009. 142

The Mississippi Department of Transportation’s 2007-2012 Statewide

Transportation Improvement Program includes improvements to US

Highway 49. MDOT plans to add two lanes to US Highway 49 from

O’Neal Road to north of School Road. Right-of-way acquisition will

begin in 2007 and construction is scheduled to commence in 2009. The

US Highway 49 project is estimated to cost $16.7 million. 143 No other

major improvements to transportation infrastructure for the Eastern

Planning Area are noted in the Statewide Transportation Improvement

Program or the Gulf Regional Planning Council’s Transportation

Improvement Program.

The Gulf Coast Regional Planning Commission created the

Gulf Coast Area Transportation Study (GCATS), which provides a vision

for transportation projects to be constructed to the horizon year of

2030. One proposed project that could have a significant impact on the


105

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

planning area is the extension of State Highway 53 from US Highway Railroads

49 to the new State Highway 67. This project has only been proposed

as part of the GCATS report and no further work has been done thus

far.

The Mississippi Department of Transportation has begun

construction of a new transportation complex in the Eastern Planning

Area. It will be located on Section 16 land north of Old Woolmarket

Road on the west side of State Highway 67.

Other future planning efforts include the Draft Mississippi Gulf

Coast Corridor Study prepared for the Gulf Coast Business Council,

which provides methods for increasing aesthetics and efficiency of

major corridors in the Gulf Coast Region. The document provides

recommendations, including architectural standards, landscaping,

signage, and traffic management standards that can be adopted by local

governments to create more attractive corridors. The report suggests

that the following roadway corridors within the Eastern Planning Area

may benefit from increased aesthetics: State Highway 15, State Highway

67, State Highway 605, and US Highway 49. 144

Figure A-37. Mississippi State Highway 67 is under construction and

scheduled for completion in 2009.

The Kansas City Southern (KCS) Railroad runs just to the west

of the planning area’s western boundary. The railroad runs parallel to

US Highway 49 (western side) and does not stop in or adjacent to the

Eastern Planning Area. The KCS Railroad is a Class I freight railroad

with average annual freight revenue of at least $269.1 million dollars. 145

Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities

Pedestrian

Current pedestrian facilities within the planning area are minimal.

New development within the planning area may include sidewalks, but

there is not a sidewalk network within the planning area.

Figure A-38. Designated bicycle lanes run adjacent to vehicular travel

lanes on Mississippi State Highway 605.

Source: Ian Beniston

Source: Dottie Machen


106

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Bicycle

The Eastern Planning Area has limited existing bicycle facilities.

According to the Gulf Regional Planning Commission Pedestrian/Bicycle Plan,

existing bicycle routes are located along Lamey Bridge Road, Big John

Road, and in some areas of the De Soto National Forest. 146

Future Plans

The Gulf Regional Planning Commission produced a

Pedestrian/Bicycle Plan as a supplement to the 2030 Long Range Plan.

The plan aims to develop a well-balanced transportation system inclusive

of accessible bicycle and pedestrian facilities that allows residents and

visitors to safely walk or bicycle to school, work, stores, or adjacent

neighborhoods. The plan includes a list of locations in most need of

improvement, all of which are located in the more urbanized southern

sections of the county. The plan calls for the consideration of pedestrian

and bicycle facilities when building new streets throughout the county,

which may lead to potential benefits for the planning area in terms of

new pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure and the retrofitting of existing

infrastructure.

Public Transit

Fixed route bus service is provided by the Coast Transit Authority

(CTA) in the southern portion of Harrison County. To date, fixed route

bus service is not available within the Eastern Planning Area. The CTA

offers curb-to-curb service for senior residents throughout Harrison

County, including the Eastern Planning Area. This service is provided

Monday through Friday and is offered at no cost to senior residents. The

CTA also provides ADA Para-transit service to residents throughout

Harrison County, including the Eastern Planning Area. This curb-tocurb

service is offered seven days a week by appointment. 147

The Coast Transit Authority, in conjunction with the Gulf Regional

Planning Commission (GRPC) and Federal Transit Administration, has

initiated the Gulf Coast Transit Development Plan (TDP). The TDP aims

to research and develop a plan of future transit service and investment

needs. It will consider route alignments and other possibilities for public

transit, such as the streetcar or bus rapid transit. The expansion and

upgrade of public transit in Harrison County will increase mobility

for residents and tourists to the Gulf Coast. The TDP project is being

conducted in cooperation with the GRPC Supplement to the Gulf Coast

2030 Long Range Plan. 148

Utilities

Water

Seven water companies currently service the Eastern Planning

Area, see Map A-13. Homes not located within a water service area

depend on wells for water.

The City of D’Iberville Water District is managed by Eco Resources,

Inc. Eco Resources operates the municipal utility service district. 149 The

D’Iberville water service district within the Eastern Planning Area

serves 0.071 square miles and is located in the southeastern portion of

the planning area on the eastern side of State Highway 15. 150 The district

will be expanded to provide service to one of the new D’Iberville High

School.

The City of Gulfport Water District is also managed by Eco Resources,

Inc. 151 The water district provides water service to a 24.13-square-mile

(City of Gulfport portion included) area in the southwest portion of

the planning area from US Highway 49 to the Biloxi River. 152

Lyman Utilities, Inc. provides water to a 2.85-square-mile area in

the northern portion of the City of Gulfport and a small portion of

the Eastern Planning Area between the Biloxi River and Three Rivers

Road. 153

The Palmer Creek Utility Company, Inc. provides water to a

1.08-square-mile area east of US Highway 49 along Palmer Creek on


107

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Map A-13. Eastern Planning Area Water Service Districts

Source: Southern Mississippi Planning and Development District


108

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

the border of the far northwest corner of the planning area. 154 It covers

the area between East Wortham Road and the Biloxi River and serves

approximately 474 people.

Robinwood Forest Utility, Inc. provides water to a 4.5-square-mile

area west of US Highway 49 between the Biloxi and Little Biloxi Rivers.

It primarily serves the area known as the Robinwood neighborhood to

the western boundary of the Eastern Planning Area. 155

Superior Utilities, Inc. provides water service to a 0.74-square-mile

area south of White Plains Road between Lorraine Road and Lamey

Bridge Road in the central portion of the planning area. 156

Tradition is a master-planned community to the north of the

planning area, which will require water for the proposed 15,000 housing

units. Water and sewer service is operated by the East Central Harrison

County Public Utility District. 157

Sanitary Sewers

Sewer service within the Eastern Planning Area is limited, with

the majority of the planning area relying on septic systems with leeching

fields. Five companies provide sewer service to limited portions of the

planning area, see Map A-13.

The City of D’Iberville Sewer District is managed by Eco Resources,

Inc. The D’Iberville sewer service district within the Eastern Planning

Area serves 0.071 square miles and is located in the southeastern portion

of the planning area on the eastern side of State Highway 15. 158

The City of Gulfport Sewer District is managed by Eco Resources,

Inc. The sewer district provides sewer service to a 23.95-square-mile

(City of Gulfport portion included) area in the southwest portion of

the planning area from US Highway 49 to the Biloxi River. 159

Riverbend Utilities, Inc. provides sewer service to a 0.53-square-mile

area at the western edge of the planning area south of the Robinwood

Forest Utility, Inc district and north of the City of Gulfport district. 160

Robinwood Forest Utility, Inc. provides sewer service to a 4.5-milearea

west of US Highway 49 between the Biloxi and Little Biloxi

Rivers. 161 The Robinwood service area provides 1,098 people with water

and sewer service and will benefit from improvements as part the Gulf

Region Water/Wastewater Plan.

Superior Utilities, Inc. provides sewer service to a 0.30-square-mile

area south of White Plains Road between Lorraine Road and Lamey

Bridge Road in the central portion of the planning area. 162

Tradition is a master-planned community to the north of the

planning area, which will require water for the proposed 15,000 housing

units. Water and sewer service is operated by the East Central Harrison

County Public Utility District. The system has a maximum allowable

discharge of 100,000 gallons a day and will be increasing its capacity to

four million gallons per day. The system will have capacity to service

areas outside of the development, which may include portions of the

Eastern Planning Area. The system is receiving assistance as part of the

Mississippi Gulf Region Water and Wastewater Plan.

Future Plans

The Eastern Planning Area will be receiving improvements

to water and sewer infrastructure in the near future. Several major

upgrades have been proposed and one project is moving forward within

the planning area.

Harrison County Coastal Impact Assistance Plan Tier 1 Project

The Mississippi Department of Marine Resources, in conjunction

with the Harrison County Utility Authority, will be moving forward

with a project to upgrade sewer service within the Tuxachainie Creek


109

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Map A-14. Eastern Planning Area Sewer Service Districts

Source: Southern Mississippi Planning and Development District


110

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Watershed. The project aims to reduce the number of individual septic

tank treatment systems for residences and commercial establishments

in the area near Hudson and Khron Road. The project will include the

installation of a sewer collection system for the area and is estimated to

cost $1.05 million. The project is scheduled to begin this year (2007) and

be completed by December, 2009. 163

Mississippi Gulf Region Water and Wastewater Plan (2006)

The Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality

developed the Mississippi Gulf Region Water and Wastewater Plan in 2006

to determine and prioritize water and wastewater infrastructure needs

in the six coastal counties of Mississippi. The recommended projects

are intended to support existing and future growth patterns and also

support the location of facilities in areas that are less vulnerable to

hurricane impacts. The funding for these projects is a portion of the

long-term recovery assistance funds from the U.S. Department of

Housing and Urban Development. The State of Mississippi allocated

a portion of these funds for water, wastewater, and stormwater

infrastructure improvements. The plan recommends projects for the

near-term (to be completed by 2010) and long-term (to be completed

by 2025 or later, depending on the availability of funding). The funding

for the engineering plans of emergency projects has been released by

the State. Once the engineering plans are complete, it is expected that

the State will release the funding to construct the projects. Funding for

all other projects has not been released to the County Utility Authority.

The Harrison County Utility Authority estimates that completion of the

near-term projects will take longer than the projected horizon year of

2010. The construction of new water and sewer infrastructure within or

adjacent to the Eastern Planning Area will create locations, which will be

attractive for development within the planning area.

Six near-term projects have the potential to directly affect the

Eastern Planning Area or areas directly adjacent to it. The six near-term

projects include three water and three wastewater projects. The first

recommended water project is the Eastern Harrison County Regional

Water Supply project, which will provide a water supply system along

State Highway 67 beginning in the East Central Harrison County Utility

District through the Biloxi-Woolmarket area to the State Highway 67 and

Interstate Highway 110 interchange in the City of D’Iberville (see Map

A-14). The project is estimated to cost $29.2 million. Construction of

this project would provide water service through the Eastern Planning

Area along the State Highway 67 corridor (currently under construction).

The project will include the construction of six 1,000-gallon-perminute

water supply wells, 3,500,000 gallons of storage capacity, and

transmission lines.

The second near-term water project is the Central Harrison

County Regional water supply project, which will extend water supply

service to the US Highway 49 and State Highway 67 area around East

Wortham Road to the north of the planning area. This project is

estimated to cost $11.3 million and may potentially affect the northwest

portion of the planning area. The project will include the construction

of a 2,000-gallon-per-minute water supply well, 1,250,000 gallon storage

tanks, and transmission mains along US Highway 49.

The third near-term water project is the North Gulfport/

Lyman Regional Water Supply project, which will extend a water supply

system to the Cowan-Lorraine Road area in North Gulfport to County

Farm Road. This project is estimated to cost $20 million and may affect

the southern portion of the planning area. The project will include

the construction of a 2,000-gallon-per-minute water supply well water

storage capacity of 1,000,000 gallons, and transmission mains.

The first near-term wastewater project is the East Central

Harrison County Regional Wastewater Treatment Facility. The facility

will serve the area from North Woolmarket to Tradition and is estimated

to cost $19 million. Currently there is no centralized service facility in

the area. The project will include the construction of a two-milliongallon-per-day

wastewater treatment facility adjacent to the Tradition

development.

The second near-term wastewater project is the South

Woolmarket Wastewater Treatment Facility and Transmission System


111

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Map A-15. Mississippi Gulf Region Recommended Wastewater Projects

Source: Mississippi Gulf Region Water and Wastewater Plan


112

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

project, which will provide sewer service to the Woolmarket area. The

project is estimated to cost $32.2 million and may affect the southern

portion of the planning area north of Woolmarket. The project includes

the construction of a 0.2-million-gallon-per-day interim wastewater

treatment facility on the Biloxi River, a 1.5-million-gallon-per-day facility

to be constructed as the area grows, a transmission system, and pump

stations.

The third near-term wastewater project is the Saucier Wastewater

Treatment Facility and Riverbend and Robinwood Forest Transmission

System project, which will provide for the transport of wastewater from

Saucier and Riverbend/Robinwood Forest to the East Central Harrison

County Wastewater Treatment Facility. The Robinwood Forest and

Riverbend sewer service areas provide service to the far western portion

of the planning area. This project will include construction of two

0.2-million-gallon-per-day interim wastewater treatment facilities and

transmission and pump stations to provide transport to the East Central

Harrison facility. The project is estimated to cost $13.3 million and will

accommodate expected growth in the area.

The Mississippi Gulf Region Water and Wastewater Plan

includes one long-term water project and three long-term wastewater

projects that will affect the Eastern Planning Area. The long-term water

project is the Harrison County Regional Water System project, which

will overhaul and improve the capacity of the current water system to

meet the demands of projected growth within the county. The project

has an estimated cost of $197.5 million

The first long-term wastewater project is the East Central

Harrison County Regional Wastewater Treatment Facility, which would

serve the area along and between the US Highway 49 and State Highway

67 corridors. This project will include the construction of a 6.5-milliongallon-per-day

wastewater treatment facility at an estimated cost of

$52.6 million.

The second long-term wastewater project is the Gulfport North

Wastewater Treatment Facility, which would provide sewer service

to the areas in and around North Gulfport. The project will include

the construction of a 14-million-gallon-per-day wastewater treatment

facility and a transmission system. The project is estimated to cost $122

million.

The third long-term project with the potential to affect the

Eastern Planning Area is the South Woolmarket Regional Wastewater

Treatment Facility, which will provide sewer service to the Eagle

Point and Woolmarket area. The project will include the construction

of a 200,000-gallon-per-day interim wastewater treatment facility, a

permanent 3.5-million-gallon-per-day wastewater treatment facility, and

a transmission system. The project is estimated to cost $54.2 million. 164

Energy

Gas and Electric

Gas and electric service is available throughout the entire planning

area. The Coast Electric Power Association (A Touchstone Energy

Cooperative), Mississippi Power Company (A Southern Company), and

Singing River Electric Power Association provide electric power to the

Eastern Planning Area. The majority of the planning area is serviced

by the Coast Electric Power Association, while the Mississippi Power

Company services a small portion to the west of the planning area and

the Singing River Electric Power Association Services the northeastern

Figure A-39. Former landfill along Hudson-Krohn Road now operated

as a waste transfer facility by Allied Waste (formerly BFI).

Source: Rickie Yeager


113

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

portion of the planning area. It is possible that particular properties may

not have electric service, but service is otherwise provided throughout

the area, especially in areas with residential and commercial development.

Three sets of transmission lines pass through the planning area. 165

Gas service, where available within the planning area, is provided

by Reliant Energy Resources Corporation. There is an approximately

203-square-mile service area in the southern portion of the county,

but the service area within the Eastern Planning Area accounts for a

small portion of the overall service area and is located in the southwest

portion of the planning area. 166 Many areas of the planning area may

not have access to gas service.

Telecommunications

Bell South is the primary provider of land line telephone

service within the Eastern Planning Area. Bell South also offers other

telecommunications services within the planning area, including internet

service, wireless service, and digital television service. 167 Cable One

provides cable television service, high speed internet, and digital phone

service to the planning area. 168 Telecommunications service coverage is

not available to all portions of the planning area.

Waste Disposal

Solid Waste

The Harrison County Utility Authority is responsible for solid

waste management in the entire county, including the Eastern Planning

Area. Residential curbside waste removal is provided twice a week

for residents of the County, in addition to weekly curbside recycling

pickup. Presently, the Authority has contracted Allied Waste to collect

solid waste throughout the planning area. Allied Waste utilizes Waste

Management’s Pecan Grove Landfill and Recycling Center, which is

located on Firetower Road north of Menge Avenue and is the only

active Municipal Solid Waste Landfill in Harrison County. This landfill is

utilized to collect both commercial and residential solid waste and is 177

acres. Waste Management owns an additional 1,500 continuous acres,

which provides for the possibility of expansion to the current facility.

The Waste Management Facility and possibilities of expansion limits the

need for the creation of another facility elsewhere in the county. Allied

Waste owns a closed landfill located within the Eastern Planning Area

on Hudson-Krohn Road and now operates it as a waste transfer facility.

The facility has not been used as a landfill for over ten years because

it was never upgraded to meet the Environmental Protection Agency’s

503 requirements for such facilities. 169 As of October 1, 2007, Advanced

Waste Services began collecting waste within Harrison County and will

also utilize the Pecan Grove landfill located in the Western Planning

Area.

Recycling Facilities

The Harrison County Utility Authority provides weekly curbside

recycling for residents as well as drop off facilities for hazardous waste.

Harrison County operates a drop off facility at the Harrison County

Work Center on Lorraine Road. The facility provides residents with a

location to drop off products that can not be disposed of with other

residential waste, including refrigerators and batteries among other things.

Harrison County is also responsible for tire recycling and contracts with

private companies to provide tire disposal and recycling. 170

Figure A-40. Coastal Recyclers operates a recycling facility in Eastern

Harrison County along Hudson-Krohn Road.

Source: Rickie Yeager


114

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Endnotes

1 Lang, John H. (1980). History of Harrison County Mississippi. Gulfport, MS. The Dixie Press.

2 Ibid.

3 O’Neal, Barney (2007). Personal communication with Pastor, Ramsey Creek Church. September 5.

4 Thompson, Ray. (1962). Know Your Coast: Once Woolmarket Aspired To Be A Cotton Market. The Daily Herald. June 13.

5 Bozeman, Kelli. (2004). Where in Mississippi Is Woolmarket? Small-Town Spotlight. Mississippi Magazine. September/October.

6 Ibid.

7 Thompson, Ray. (1958). Know Your Coast: Woolmarket Was Well Named The Daily Herald. July 7.

8 Ibid.

9 Prindiville, Alice B. (1952). Ramble Route: Woolmarket and Coalville. Down South Magazine. May-June.

10 Thompson, Ray M. (1956). Know Your Coast: The Wild and Wooly Coast. The Daily Herald. August.

11 Bozeman, Kelli. (2004). Where in Mississippi Is Woolmarket? Small-Town Spotlight Mississippi Magazine. September/October.

12 744 So. 2d 270; 1999 Miss. LEXIS 237

13 Ibid.

14 Thompson, Ray M. (1961). Know Your Coast: The Founder of Lyman. The Daily Herald. April 27.

15 Thompson, Ray M. (1959). Know Your Coast: The A Flashback To Lyman. The Daily Herald. March 18.

16 Gulfport and The Country: Along The Gulf and Ship Island Railroad. (1905). Facts about The Gulf Coast: The Book of Harrison County, Mississippi, Gulfport, MS, W.A.

Cox and E.F. Martin Publishers.

17 Ibid.

18 Thompson, Ray M. (1961). Know Your Coast: The Founder of Lyman. The Daily Herald. April 27.

19 Thompson, Ray M. (1959). In the Hayday of Ingram-Day. The Daily Herald. December 28.

20 Breiger, James F. (1980). Hometown Mississippi. 2 nd Edition. Town Square Books.

21 Ibid.

22 Thompson, Ray M. (1959). In the Hayday of Ingram-Day. The Daily Herald. December 28.

23 Ibid.

24 Ellis, Dan (1998). Mississippi Gulf Coast: A panorama of history and culture.

25 Ibid.

26 Ibid.

27 Wilson, Bruce. (2007). Phone interview with De Soto Employee. September 13.

28 Ibid.

29 United States Department of Agriculture. n.d. De Soto District. Accessed on October 7, 2007 from http://www.fs.fed.us/r8/mississippi/desoto/

30 Mississippi Home Corporation MHC was created by the State of Mississippi as a public-purpose corporation separate and apart from the State to provide financing

for affordable housing in Mississippi. MHC receives no funds for its administrative operations from the State of Mississippi. MHC manages more than $450 million

in outstanding mortgage revenue bonds which are backed by mortgage loans originated using bond proceeds. http://www.mshomecorp.com

31 Environmental Systems Research Institute. 2006. ESRI Gulf Coast Updates Methodology: 2006/2011. August.

32 The Brookings Institution Metropolitan Policy Program. 2006. Katrina and Rita Impacts on Gulf Coast Populations: First Census Findings. Washington, DC: Brookings

Institution.

33 Mississippi Governor’s Office of Recovery and Renewal. 2007. Population July 2007. Accessed on August 20, 2007, from http://www.gulfcoast.org/static/index.

cfm?contentID=332

34 Governor Barbour’s Comprehensive Plan for Gulf Coast Housing. Accessed on August 17, 2007, from http://www.governorbarbour.com/news/2006/sep/

GHBcomprehensivehousingplan.htm


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

35 Eastern Harrison County Community Survey, September 2007.

36 Barnes, Paul. Personal Communication, July 26, 2007.

37 Realtor.com. Accessed on July 24, 2007, from http:// www.Realtor.com.

38 Realtor.com. Accessed on July 24, 2007, from http://www.Realtor.com

39 Barnes, Paul. 2007. Personal correspondence, Mapping Manager, Southern Mississippi Planning and Development District. Accessed on July 26, 2007.

40 Realtor.com. 2007. Realtor.com Accessed on July 24, 2007, from http://www.Realtor.com

41 Forsalebyowner.com. Accessed on August 20, 2007, from http://www.forsalebyowner.com.

42 Harrison County Land Records Online. Accessed on August 20, 2007, from http://www.harrisoncounty-ms.gov

43 Harrison County Land Records Index Search, Accessed August 20, 2007 from http://www.harrisoncounty-ms.gov/pro/landrecords/search_results.asp

44 Ibid.

45 Ibid.

46 http:// www.Realtor.com, Accessed July 24, 2007.

47 SCI Inc. (n.d.) General Contractor Mississippi Gulf Coast. Accessed on September 30, from http://scimsgulfcoast.com/services.html.

48 Manufactured and Mobile Home Marketplace. Accessed on August 20, 2007, from www.mhvillage.com.

49 Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality. 2000. State of Mississippi: Annual Summary Report for Class I and Class II Rubbish Sites. Calendar Year 2000. Accessed

July 30, 2007 from http://www.deq.state.ms.us/MDEQ.nsf/pdf/SW_Year2000StatusReportonRubbishSites/$File/2000_Rubbish_Site_Report.pdf?OpenElement.

50 Frulla, Priscilla. 2007. Tradition-al Homes. www.SunHearald.com, July 1.

51 N.A. 2007. Another Proposed Mega Development. Biloxi Sun Herald. June 9.

52 Harrison County. 2005. Harrison County Zoning Ordinance. Accessed on October 1, 2007, from http://co.harrison.ms.us/departments/zoning/Harrison%20

County%20Zoning%20Ordinance.pdf

53 The remainder method was used because of the planning area’s unique geography, and because it was less objective than identifying specific blocks. The remainder

is simply data left over in a census/block group that is not in an incorporated area. This was done after comparing the total population using census block data and

the remainder. It was found that the level of significance for either method was insignificant less than 10 percent

54 Taylor, Jeff. 2007. City Planner for the City of D’Iberville, personal communication, September 7.

55 Need source for information from Pat’s Office about new developer and intentions.

56 Rash, Dwayne. 2007. Personal communication, August 2007.

57 Gerald Blessey, President of Tradition Properties Inc, personal communication, September 7, 2007.

58 In the Eastern Planning Area thirteen Traffic Analysis Zones were identified. Of these zones twelve were partially in incorporated areas, such as Biloxi and

Gulfport. Although not part of the planning area, TAZ 453 was also included in the overall analysis, because the community of Tradition is planned to be

developed in this zone. Tradition and TAZ 453 are immediately north and adjacent to the Eastern Planning Area

59 Traffic Analysis Zone Data, Gulf Regional Planning Commission, 2002.

60 Carbo, George. Mississippi Gulf Coast Corridor Study. Gulf Cost Business Council. June, 2007.

61 Only one traffic analysis zone TAZ 475 is completely confined to the planning area. All other traffic analysis zones are subject to development projections beyond

the scope of the Eastern Planning Area. This may explain why future employment forecasts are relatively high.

62 Giuliano, Genevieve. Is Jobs Housing Balance a Transportation Issue. University of California Transportation Center. Accessed on November 19, 2007 from http://www.

uctc.net/papers/.

63 Ventura County Community Foundation. 2007. Accessed on November 9, 2007 from http://www.vccf.org.

64 US Bureau of the Census. 2000. Census of Population and Housing and Mississippi Home Corporation estimates for 2007.

65 Traffic Analysis Zone Data, Gulf Region Planning Commission, 2002.

66 Mississippi State University. Climate Divisions of Mississippi. Accessed on July 7, 2007, from http://www.msstate.edu/dept/GeoSciences/climate/

67 Jacobson, J. and Rees, S. 2006. Environmental Assessment for Restoration of Deer Island, Harrison County, Mississippi – Grand Bayou Marsh Southern


116

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Shoreline Restoration, and the Western Beach – A Restoration Project. Accessed on July 14, 2007, from http://www.sam.usace.army.mil/pd/Document/DRAFT-

EADeerIsENTIRE-RESTORATION.pdf

68 Louisiana State University. July 2006. NOAA Southern Regional Climate Center Climate Summaries Page. Accessed on July 7, 2007, from http://www.srcc.lsu.edu/

southernClimate/climatesummaries/

69 Mississippi. 2007. In Encyclopedia Britannica. Accessed on July 7, 2007: from Encyclopedia Britannica Online: http://www.britannica.com/eb/article-78473

70 Harrison County Library System. Hurricane Camille: Mississippi Gulf Coast – August 17-18, 1969. Accessed July 28, 2007: http://www.harrison.lib.ms.us/library_

services/camille.htm

71 Johnson, D. 2006. Hurricane Katrina – August 23-31, 2005. Accessed on July 7, 2007, from http://www.weather.gov/om/assessments/pdfs/Katrina.pdf

72 Mississippi State University Extension Service. Nov. 2002. Harrison County Forestry Profile. Accessed July 27, 2007: http://msucares.com/forestry/economics/

counties/harrison.html

73 Glass, Patrick. 2007. Personal Communication, September 6.

74 United States Department of Agriculture. De Soto District. Accessed on July 14, 2007, from http://www.fs.fed.us/r8/mississippi/desoto/

75 Ibid.

76 State of Mississippi. 2006. Southeast Mississippi Forest Inventory. Accessed on July 15, 2007, from http://www.mfc.state.ms.us/pdf/MIFI/MIFI_Southeast_Report.

pdf

77 Howell, M., Johnson, T., and Bentley, J. 2002. Mississippi’s Timber Industry – An Assessment of Timber Product Output and Use. Accessed on July 21, 2007, from

http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/9530

78 State of Mississippi. 2006. Southeast Mississippi Forest Inventory. Accessed on July 15, 2007, from http://www.mfc.state.ms.us/pdf/MIFI/MIFI_Southeast_Report.

pdf

79 Ibid.

80 Mississippi Department of Marine Resources. GeoData – Coastal Management and Planning. Accessed on July 28, 2007, from http://www.dmr.state.ms.us/ims/

mapper.htm

81 Ibid.

82 Ibid.

83 Land Trust for Mississippi Coastal Plain. 2007. Building a Partnership for the Tchoutacabouffa River Watershed Action Plan.

84 Association of State Wetland Managers. Mississippi State Wetlands Program. Accessed on July 14, 2007, from http://www.aswm.org/swp/mississippi9.htm

85 Ibid.

86 United States Environmental Protection Agency. Feb. 2006. Economic Benefits of Wetlands. Accessed on July 15, 2007, from http://www.epa.gov/owow/wetlands/

facts/ fact4.html

87 Federal Emergency Management Act. The National Flood Insurance Program. Accessed on November 19, 2007, from http://www.fema.gov/about/programs/nfip/

index.shtm.

88 Ibid.

89 Perez and Lee. 2007, November 16. Flood Maps In. The Sun Herald.

90 United States Geologic Survey. Jan. 2005. Mississippi Embayment Aquifer System. Accessed on July 15, 2007, from http://capp.water.usgs.gov/aquiferBasics/embay.

html

91 United States Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service. Feb. 2007. Hydric Soils. Accessed on July 28, 2007, from http://soils.usda.gov/

use/hydric/

92 United States Department of Agriculture Natural Resource Conservation Services (Mar. 2007). Soil Data Mart. Accessed on July 14, 2007, from http://soildatamart.

nrcs.usda.gov/Report.aspx?Survey=MS047&UseState=MS

93 Harrison County School District. 2007. HCSD Schools Information. Accessed on August 20, 2007, from http://www.harrison.k12.ms.us/

fontcolor000000SchoolInformationfont/tabid/135/Default.asp


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

94 Arledge, Henry. 2007. Harrison County School District Superintendent. Personal communication, July 24.

95 Harrison County School District. 2007. HCSD Schools Information. http://www.harrison.k12.ms.us/fontcolor000000SchoolInformationfont/tabid/135/Default.

96 Arledge, Henry. 2007. Personal communication, Harrison County School District Superintendent. July 24.

97 Ibid.

98 Harrison County Parks Department. 2007. Personal communication, July 23.

99 Cumberland, Dola. 2007. Personal communication, Woolmarket Civic Center. July 17.

100 Green, Janice. 2007. Email Correspondence, Senior Center Director for Harrison County, August 7.

101 Lacy, Rupert. 2007. Deputy Director, Harrison County Emergency Management. Personal communications, August 15.

102 Ibid.

103 Ibid.

104 Harrison County, 2007 Fire Services. Accessed August 20, 2007: http://co.harrison.ms.us/departments/fire/index.asp

105 Harrison County. 2007. Fire Services. Accessed August 20, 2007: http://co.harrison.ms.us/departments/fire/index.asp

106 Mixon, George. 2007. Personal communication with Fire Chief, Harrison County Fire Services, July 26.

107 Mixon, George. 2007. Personal communication with Fire Chief, Harrison County Fire Services, July 26.

108 O’Neal, Barney. 2007. Personal communication with Pastor, Ramsey Creek Church. August 6 th .

109 Mississippi Department of Transportation, Planning Division. Mississippi Public Roads Selected Statistics Extent, Travel, and Designation. 2005.

110 Gulf Coast Regional Planning Commission. 2004 Annual Average Daily Traffic. Accessed on August 19, 2007 from http://www.grpc.com/pdf/2004AADT.pdf.

111 Mississippi Department of Transportation, Planning Division. Mississippi Public Roads Selected Statistics Extent, Travel, and Designation. 2005.

112 Mississippi Department of Transportation. 2007-2012 Statewide Transportation Improvement Program. 2006.

113 Mississippi Department of Transportation, Planning Division. Estimated 2006 Annual Average Daily Traffic: Harrison County, Mississippi. 2006.

114 Mississippi Legislature. Senate Bill No.2826. 2007 Accessed on July 20, 2007 from http://billstatus.ls.state.ms.us/documents/2007/html/SB/2800-2899/SB2826PS.

htm.

115 Mississippi Department of Transportation. Scenic Byways Program Guidelines. 2005.

116 Gulf Coast Regional Planning Commission. Link Speed Limit Spreadsheet. 2007.

117 Mississippi Department of Transportation. Mississippi Hurricane Evacuation Guide. 2005.

118 Mississippi Department of Transportation, Planning Division. Mississippi Public Roads Selected Statistics Extent, Travel, and Designation. 2005.

119 Mississippi Department of Transportation. Mississippi Hurricane Evacuation Guide. 2005.

120 Gulf Coast Regional Planning Commission. Link Speed Limit Spreadsheet. 2007.

121 Mississippi Department of Transportation, Planning Division. Estimated 2006 Annual Average Daily Traffic: Harrison County, Mississippi. 2006.

122 Mississippi Department of Transportation, Planning Division. Mississippi Public Roads Selected Statistics Extent, Travel, and Designation. 2005.

123 Mississippi Department of Transportation, Planning Division. Estimated 2006 Annual Average Daily Traffic: Harrison County, Mississippi. 2006.

124 Gulf Coast Regional Planning Commission. Link Speed Limit Spreadsheet. 2007.

125 Mississippi Department of Transportation, Planning Division. Estimated 2006 Annual Average Daily Traffic: Harrison County, Mississippi. 2006

126 Harrison County, Mississippi. Harrison County Road List. 2006.

127 Gulf Coast Regional Planning Commission. Link Speed Limit Spreadsheet. 2007.

128 Mississippi Department of Transportation, Planning Division. Estimated 2006 Annual Average Daily Traffic: Harrison County, Mississippi. 2006.

129 Harrison County, Mississippi. Harrison County Road List. 2006.

130 Gulf Coast Regional Planning Commission. Link Speed Limit Spreadsheet. 2007.

131 Mississippi Department of Transportation, Planning Division. Estimated 2006 Annual Average Daily Traffic: Harrison County, Mississippi. 2006.

132 Gulf Coast Regional Planning Commission. Link Speed Limit Spreadsheet. 2007.

133 Mississippi Department of Transportation, Planning Division. Estimated 2006 Annual Average Daily Traffic: Harrison County, Mississippi. 2006.

134 Gulf Coast Regional Planning Commission. Link Speed Limit Spreadsheet. 2007.


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

135 Mississippi Department of Transportation, Planning Division. Estimated 2006 Annual Average Daily Traffic: Harrison County, Mississippi. 2006.

136 Harrison County, Mississippi. Harrison County Road List. 2006.

137 Gulf Coast Regional Planning Commission. Link Speed Limit Spreadsheet. 2007.

138 Mississippi Department of Transportation, Planning Division. Estimated 2006 Annual Average Daily Traffic: Harrison County, Mississippi. 2006.

139 Harrison County, Mississippi. Harrison County Road List. 2006.

140 Gulf Coast Regional Planning Commission. Link Speed Limit Spreadsheet. 2007.

141 Mississippi Department of Transportation, Planning Division. Mississippi Public Roads Selected Statistics Extent, Travel, and Designation. 2005.

142 Mississippi Department of Transportation. 2007-2012 Statewide Transportation Improvement Program. 2006.

143 Ibid.

144 Carbo, George, AICP. 2007. Mississippi Gulf Coast Corridor Study. Prepared for the Gulf Coast Business Council.

145 Mississippi Department of Transportation. Official Railroad Map of Mississippi. 2002.

146 Gulf Coast Regional Planning Commission. GCATS 2030 LRTP Supplement, Pedestrian/Bicycle Plan. 2006.

147 Coast Transit Authority. Coast Transit Authority. Accessed on July 25, 2007 from http://www.coasttransit.com.

148 Coast Transit Authority. Gulf Coast Transit Development Plan. Accessed on July 25, 2007 from http://www.coasttransit.com/gc_tdp_april-07.pdf.

149 Eco Resources Incorporated. Accessed on July 15 , 2007 from http://www.ecoresources.com/.

150 Mississippi Automated Resource Information System MARIS. n.d. MARIS. Accessed on July 20, 2007 from http://www.maris.state.ms.us/.

151 City of Gulfport Public Works Department. Accessed on July 20, 2007 from http://www.ci.gulfport.ms.us/publicworks/.

152 Mississippi Automated Resource Information System MARIS. n.d. MARIS. Accessed on July 20, 2007 from http://www.maris.state.ms.us/.

153 Ibid.

154 Ibid.

155 Ibid.

156 Ibid.

157 Tradition. 2006. Tradition The Hometown for the Good Life. Marketing Brochure from Tradition.

158 Mississippi Automated Resource Information System MARIS. n.d. MARIS. Accessed on July 20, 2007 from http://www.maris.state.ms.us/.

159 Ibid.

160 Ibid.

161 Ibid.

162 Ibid.

163 Mississippi Department of Marine Resources. Harrison County Coastal Impact Assistance Plan Tier 1 Project Description. 2006. Accessed on July X, 2007 from

http://www.dmr.state.ms.us/ciap/.

164 Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality. Mississippi Gulf Region Water and Wastewater Plan. 2006. Accessed on July X, 2007 from http://www.deq.state.

ms.us/MDEQ.nsf/page/About_MGRWaterWastewaterPlan2006?OpenDocument.

165 Mississippi Automated Resource Information System MARIS. n.d. MARIS. Accessed on July 20, 2007 from http://www.maris.state.ms.us/.

166 Mississippi Automated Resource Information System MARIS. n.d. MARIS. Accessed on July 20, 2007 from http://www.maris.state.ms.us/.

167 Bell South. 2007. Bell South. Accessed on July 11, 2007 from http://www.bellsouth.com/.

168 Cable One. 2007 Cable One. Accessed on July 11, 2007 from http://www.cableone.net/SystemPage.asp.

169 Pahlavan, Kamran. Executive Director. Harrison County Utility Authority. Personal Interview. September 5, 2007.

170 Pahlavan, Kamran. Executive Director. Harrison County Utility Authority. Personal Interview. September 5, 2007.


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Appendix B. Community Involvement

On the evening of September 6, 2007, the citizens in the Eastern

planning area were invited to share their vision for the community in

a two-hour Town Hall Meeting that included several activities designed

to obtain information from them. The meeting, which was held at the

Woolmarket Community Center, was attended by approximately 200

people. After signing in and locating their places of residence, property,

and/or place of employment on a map of Eastern Harrison County,

attendees filled out surveys about past and current development patterns

in the planning area and Harrison County. The meeting began with a

welcome from Harrison County Supervisor Connie Rocko, Harrison

County Zoning Administrator Patrick Bonck, and Ohio State University

Professor Jennifer Cowley.

John Dahlgren, the team leader for this plan, presented the

planning process to attendees. He explained the purpose of the

information being gathered and presented a timeline for completion.

Citizens were provided with a copy of the meeting agenda, which also

had contact information, including a phone number and an online

forum website, that allowed them to continue to contribute opinions

after the meeting concluded.

A written survey asked respondents for their current housing and

household characteristics. Opinions regarding the pace of development

in Eastern Harrison County were also requested. The majority of the

survey dealt with likes and dislikes in the planning area. Citizens were

asked to identify areas where their community could improve. Finally,

citizens were asked a series of open-ended questions about their ideas

for potential development and improvements in the planning area.

A Community Preference Survey (CPS) was conducted during which

Figure B-1. Approximately 200 people attended the September Town

Hall Meeting for the Eastern Planning Area.

Source: Chris Cunningham


120

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Figure B-2. Supervisor Rocko updated community members on

important County initiatives.

Figure B-3. On December 13 th , residents gathered to review the draft

Community Plan for Eastern Harrison County.

Source: Chris Cunningham

a series of images on which attendees could vote were projected on to

the wall. Votes were cast by selecting a number from one to five on an

electronic voting device. Citizens were asked to vote on the acceptability

of seeing the type of development somewhere in their communities

rather than specifically on their properties.

Citizen Survey

Introduction

At the Town Hall Meeting on September 6, 2007, community

members received an opinion survey focusing on the past and current

trends of development in Harrison County and their communities.

Copies of the survey were also made available online for those unable

to attend the Town Hall Meeting. The following is a synopsis of the

Source: Nathan Harber

results from the 100 surveys submitted as of October 15, 2007. The

results are part of several considerations in the formation of this plan.

Analysis

The tables are organized by question, and each question is listed

as it was presented in the survey. Two sets of results are provided for

Likert-type scale questions that warrant a response based on varying

degrees of opinion toward a topic. The first set of results is described

as “disaggregated,” meaning that averages were calculated for each of

the possible response opinions. The second set of results is described

as “aggregated,” meaning that the responses of opinions or similar

sentiment were added together to become one generalized, combined

group and then averaged as a whole. For example, disaggregated response

choices would include “strongly agree”, “agree”, “neutral”, “disagree”,


121

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Figure B-4. In September, residents from across Eastern Harrison County gathered to make their voices heard in the planning process.

Source: Chris Cunningham


122

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

and “strongly disagree”, while aggregated response choices for the same

question would include “agree” (the combination of “strongly agree”

and “agree”), “neutral”, and “disagree” (the combination of “disagree”

and “strongly disagree”). This aided in interpretation because it is

useful to understand the general sentiment of the respondents toward

a topic.

Majority opinions held the most weight when setting goals and

objectives and providing recommendations. For each question, the

response with the highest percentage of responses is bold-faced. It is

important to note that in some circumstances the highest percentage

does not indicate a majority opinion (greater than 50 percent of the total

number of responses). In such cases, the respondents’ opinions were

divided between the response choices, making it difficult to determine

the overall opinion of the community.

Figure B-5. Citizens completed written surveys of their opinions on

the future of their communities.

Results

1. How long have you lived in Harrison County?

Length of Time Percentage

Less than one year 2%

One to five years 9%

Six to ten years

Eleven to twenty years

7%

23%

More than twenty years 59%

2. Where did you live before Hurricane Katrina and

where do you live now?

Before Katrina:

Unincorporated Harrison Co. or Elsewhere (provide

name):

Success (3 responses)

North Biloxi (2 responses)

Creekwood Subdivision

Source: Chris Cunningham

Community/Location

Percentage Percentage After

Before Katrina

Katrina

Cedar Lake 0% 0%

Lyman 7.1% 7.6%

Orange Grove 2% 3.3%

North D’Iberville (unincorporated) 10.2% 9.8%

Woolmarket 49% 50%

Unincorporated Harrison County 20.4% 23.9%

Elsewhere 11.2% 5.4%


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Cincinnati, OH

Shadowcreek Subdivision (North Woolmarket)

Houston, TX

Dobson Road

St. Andrews/Jackson County

Beulah

Biloxi

College Park

Gulfport

Woolmarket (3 responses)

Lizana area

Victoria Lane

Gulfport, South of I-10

White Plains

Oxford, MS

Gulfport (Bayou View)

Live Currently:

Unincorporated Harrison County (provide name):

Elsewhere (provide name):

Success (4 responses)

North Biloxi (2 responses)

Creekwood Subdivision

Swan Lake (3 responses)

North Woolmarket

Shadowcreek Subdivision (North Woolmarket)

Dobson

Beulah

Woolmarket (3 responses)

Victoria Lane

White Plains

3. Do you work in a city/community that is different than the

Figure B-6. Most residents identified themselves as being from

Woolmarket.

Source: Chris Cunningham

city/community you live in?

3a. Name of community where work:

Yes No N/A

41.1% 28.9% 30%

Biloxi (13 responses)

Retired (10 responses)

Gulfport (10 responses)

Orange Grove (4 responses)

Kessler AFB (4 responses)

D’Iberville (3 responses)

Woolmarket (3 responses)

MS Power Company (3 responses)

Lyman

Pass Christian

Vancleve, MS

Ocean Springs

Pascagoula

Harrison, Jackson, and Hancock

Tradition

3b. Average number of miles to work: 12


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Figure B-7. In the written survey citizens added comments about

their preferences for a variety of types of development.

5. Was the home you lived in prior to Hurricane Katrina

completely destroyed, damaged, or not damaged?

Source: Chris Cunningham

4. What type of housing did you live in before Hurricane

Katrina and what type of housing do you live in today?

Housing

Housing Type

Before Katrina

(%)

Housing

After Katrina

(%)

Single-family home 92.9% 90.7%

Modular home 2% 1%

Manufactured home 3% 5.2%

Duplex or fourplex 0% 0%

Apartment 0% 0%

Condominium 0% 0%

With family or friends 2% 0%

FEMA camper trailer on my property 0% 2.1%

FEMA trailer on someone else’s property 0% 1%

FEMA trailer park 0% 0%

FEMA manufactured home park 0% 0%

Damage Level

Percentage

Completely Destroyed 6.5%

Damaged 71%

Not Damaged 22.6%

5a. If home was destroyed did you apply for assistance?

Yes No N/A

17.2% 51.7% 31%

5b. If you applied for assistance how long did it take to receive

assistance? Provide length of time:

Not Applicable (49 responses) 1 year

2 months (3 responses) 6 months

1 month (2 responses) Still waiting

2 years Never got any

Housing Before

Katrina

Housing After

Katrina

Owned 100% 100%

Rented 0% 0%


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

6. What major roads are considered the geographic boundaries? Gulfport city line

Road

Percentage

Highway 49 9.4%

Highway 53 3.1%

Highway 605 9.4%

Highway 15 (old/new) 13.1%

Highway 67 (old/new) 31.3%

U.S. Interstate 10 13.8%

Three Rivers Road 7.5%

Lamey Bridge Rd 6.9%

Lorraine Road 5.6%

Other (provide name):

Old Woolmarket Road (3 responses)

Curry Road (3 responses)

Woolmarket (3 responses)

Biloxi River (2 responses)

Lorraine Cowan Road (2 responses)

Oneal, North Swan

Vick Road

Shorecrest, West Oaklawn Road, Woolmarket Road

Byrnes Drive

Curry Rd, Lorraine-Cowan Rd

John Lee Road

Jackson County line, Gulfport

Carson Road

South Swan

New Lorraine interchange

New Lorraine

S.R. 26, Hwy 603

E. Gulfport, New Lorraine Rd

Posey Bridge Rd

Carson Rd, the Biloxi River

Interstate 110

Biloxi city limits north to Traditions, Biloxi River on the west, Hudson

Krohn Rd on the east

Bethel Rd or White Plains

Big John Rd, Hudson Krohn Rd

Jackson County line

Highway 90

North Swan Lake (2 responses)

Dedeaux, North Swan Lake

North Swan, Cowan

7. Where would you say the center of your community is located?

Location

Percentage

Woolmarket 20%

Success/Success Community Center 16%

Woolmarket and Lorraine Road 40%

Woolmarket Community Center 24%

Other (enter name if provided):

Don’t know/Unsure (2 responses)

Highway 67and Woolmarket Rd (2 responses)

Highway 49 and Highway 53 (2 responses)

Lorraine Road (2 responses)

Three Rivers Road (2 responses)

White Star Estates (2 responses)

Highway 15 and Old Highway 15 (2 responses)

Orange Grove Community Center

North Lyman

Swan Lake Estates, Highway 49 and Highway 53

Woolmarket Grocery-Dollar store area

St Patrick

Highway 15 and grocery store

Highway 15 and grocery/gas station

Woolmarket Elementary School

Highway 67 and Lamey Bridge Rd. /Lorraine Rd


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Highway 67

Old Woolmarket Rd and Lorraine and New Highway 67

Wal-Mart, Woolmarket

Woolmarket, Lorraine, Hwy 67, Lamey Bridge Rd

North, 5.5 miles in D’Iberville

Highway 67 Community Center

Beulah Church Rd

U.S. Interstate 10

Woolmarket or D’Iberville

Crossroads area Lorraine Rd and Old Woolmarket Rd to Highway 67

Don’t have a center but need one in Woolmarket

Old Woolmarket Rd

Janus Rd

Sangani Blvd

Voluntary fire station, Highway 15

Lamey Bridge Rd and Lorraine Rd

Orange Grove-North of I-10

North D’Iberville

D’Iberville

Sangani shopping center

Big John Rd

Crossroads shopping center

Community Center, Highway 49

Community Center at Swan Lake

Dedeaux

Highway 49

Club House

Woolmarket Village Estates

North Woolmarket Elementary School

8. What do you think about the pace of development?

Pace

Percentage

Too slow 10.9%

Just right 35.9%

Too fast 39.1%

I do not know 14.1%

Comments:

For the County the city is way behind (Biloxi)

More concerned about with the quality of growth than growth itself.

Quality needs to improve. After Katrina- this is our chance to do it

“right.” I have serious doubts.

Figure B-8. Residents signing in at the September Town Hall Meeting.

Source: Chris Cunningham


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

9. To what degree do you support or oppose the following:

Aggregated Results

Issue Support (%) Neutral (%) Oppose (%)

Development of affordable housing that is affordable for residents in my community 51% 28.1% 20.8%

Construction of new shopping centers 56.7% 19.6% 23.7%

Construction of new office and industrial parks 31.3% 25% 43.8%

Designation of Highway 67 as scenic corridor 65.9% 22% 12.1%

Placement of design standards on development occurring along scenic corridor 73.3% 12.8% 14%

Development along State Highway 605 54% 27.6% 18.4%

Development of community park near the new High School 84.2% 9.5% 6.3%

Creation of additional athletic parks 77.6% 21.4% 1%

Development of walking/biking trails 88.8% 8.2% 3.1%

Requiring sidewalks in new subdivisions 83.1% 14.6% 2.2%

Development of a senior/community center in North D’Iberville 81.1% 16.8% 2.2%

Preservation/Conservation of land along Biloxi and Tchoutacabouffa Rivers and Bayous 86.6% 12.4% 1%

Preservation/Conservation of forested areas 93.5% 6.5% 0%

Creation of public canoe launch points along the Biloxi, Tchoutacabouffa Rivers and Bayous 77.7% 14.9% 7.4%

Development in wetlands 13.1% 11.1% 75.8%

Expansion of water and sewer service in Eastern Harrison County 66.7% 15.6% 17.7%

Job creation in Eastern Harrison County 56.6% 34.3% 9.1%

Expansion of public transit into your community 38.5% 38.5% 23.1%

Annexation of portions of Eastern Harrison County 3.4% 14.6% 82%


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

10. What kinds of services do you need or want in your

community (list in order of importance, “a” is most important)?

A. Assisted living home

Variety of services

Grocery store/supermarket (18 responses)

Medical facilities/center/health (4 responses)

Restaurant (17 responses)

Water/sewer service (3 responses)

Farms (3 responses)

Professional

College/higher learning

Gas station (4 responses)

Banking branches (2 responses)

Post office (2 responses)

Police substation

Fire station

None (5 responses)

Shopping malls/centers

Mechanical shops

Any industry

Natural gas

Running Park

Residential only

Hospital

Hair salon

Café

Very upscale State Crime lab

Whole foods

Post Office

B. Multiple use commercial

Auto (5 responses)

Ambulance station

Community center

Figure B-9. Residents locating their homes on an aerial map.

Source: Chris Cunningham

Stores

Restaurant (9 responses)

Grocery stores (8 responses)

Ranches (2 responses)

Medical facility (2 responses)

Gas station (2 responses)

Hi-tech companies

Shopping (3 responses)

Athletic fields

Post office

Community park (2 responses)

Church

Library (2 responses)

Convenience store

Paint shops

Larger pharmacy (24 hours)

Fire

Aquatic center

Retail

Hair salons


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Major department store chains

States only and very modern premiere burn center

Target

Dry cleaning

Car Wash

Boutiques

Parks

C. Restaurants (6 responses)

Shopping (4 responses)

Medical facility (3 responses)

Library (2 responses)

Gas station (4 responses)

Senior center (2 responses)

Feed farm/supply stores (2 responses)

Grocery store (3 responses)

Arts (theater)

Banks (2 responses)

Hotels

Transit service

Community center

Hobby shops

Church

Post office

Security

Cellular phone store

Dry cleaner

Business

Building supplies (Lowes or Home Depot)

Car Wash

Middle/junior high school

Alternative department stores

D. More restrictive zoning

Clothing

Strip mall

Parks

Public transit service (2 responses)

Community center

Quick oil change

Restaurant (4 responses)

Gas stations

Movie Theater

Farmer’s market

Recreation area

Private business by design

Amusement parks

Service hospital or clinic for emergency

Cultural

Fitness center

Video store

Shopping centers

Healthcare clinic/medical center (2 responses)

Education

Grocery stores

Library

E. Wellness center

Parks w/children’s events and places to go like put-put golf,

batting ranges

Daycare centers

Auto repair

Medical center

Restaurants (4 responses)

Churches

Community center

Nice Park

Shopping mall/center with a community design


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Grocery store

Movie theaters

Bakery

F. Doctors offices/complexes

Assisted living facilities

Medical and dental offices

Retail

Entertainment facilities (skating, movies, bowling)

Daycares

Grocery store

New high school in Woolmarket

Book store

Movie rental

Many restaurants

Farmer’s market

G. Clinics (hospital)

Walking and bike trails

Ice cream shoppe

Grocery stores

Harrison County court house satellite services (ex. Tax

collecting, tags)

H. Veterinarians

Less miles 55 mi

Bowling alley

11. For the top three services where would you suggest locating

them?

1. South Swan

Highway 605 (6 responses)

Along Highway 49 (8 responses)

Highway 67 (16 responses)

Away from housing (2 responses)

On Highway 15 (6 responses)

Near U.S. Interstate 10 (2 responses)

Woolmarket (4 responses)

Near stores

Old Woolmarket Road

Bethel Rd

Major intersections

Lorraine and Highway 67 intersection

Along major roadways (2 responses)

New Lorraine

Traditions

North Gulfport

N/A

U.S. Interstate10/Highway 605 (restaurants)

In Biloxi

Cross Roads area

Within ½ mile of the 4 way stop

Downtown

2. North Swan

Between Gulfport and Traditions

Highway 605 (5 responses)

Lamey Bridge Road (4 responses)

Woolmarket Road

New Highway from I-10/I-110

Highway 67 (6 responses)

Near Traditions


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Dollar General at Woolmarket Road

Highway 15 (2 responses)

Highway 53 (4 responses)

Japascrine (amusement park)

U.S. Interstate 10

Parks near residential housing

In D’Iberville

North of Orange Grove

3. Highway 49 (2 responses)

Woolmarket exit intersection

Near new St Patrick’s

Lorraine Rd

New road from Highway 67 to Wal-Mart in D’Iberville

Lamey Bridge Rd

East of Lyman

North Swan Road

Comments:

Vacant wooded tracks of land

Running park could be attached to Highway 67 scenic. A safe distance

is required. I’m in the military and have seen nice parks

Put the State crime lab and State burn center right off Highway 49

where Mississippi Power is putting the future Coast Hurricane Center

and other facilities, it is the perfect location. It is located between

Highway 53 and Harrison Central High School entrance

Near but not necessarily on New Highway 67 or North 49

12. What kinds of jobs are most needed (list in order of

importance, “a” is most important)

a. Wellness center

Norton shopping mall

Law enforcement

Technical

Work at home

Professional

Fire prevention

Health care

Fire station

Medical/dental (4 responses)

None (5 responses)

Depends on type of employers

Steady jobs

County inspector for new development

Retirement

Industry

Litter control

Financial services

Farm hands

Office jobs

No opinion

See #10

College degree required

b. Assisted living help

Computer

Technical

Technology

Medical

Factory work

Police station

Recreational


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

More sheriff patrol

Not sure

Legal services

Farmers

Healthcare

Mid-management

c. Assisted living counselors

High paying

Computer

Law enforcement

Teachers

AMR

Beginner level

d. Service

Fire prevention

Hospital/clinic

e. Police protection

13. Are there any acceptable recreational amenities in your area?

Response Percentage

Yes 34.1%

No 46.3%

Not Sure 19.5%

13a. If not what recreational opportunities should be added?

Recreational Opportunity Percentage

Parks 38.5%

Bike/walking/running paths 46.2%

Ball/soccer fields 10.3%

Nature trails 5.1%

Other:

Youth sports fields

Playgrounds

Canoe launches

Water access

Boat launches

Picnic facilities

Skating rink

Athletic fields

Somewhere to ride ATV’s

Swimming pool

Tennis courts, craft facilities

Take advantage of Biloxi River area on Lorraine Rd and build

improved boat launch area, provide restrooms and fishing piers.

Woolmarket Community Center improved to provide senior and youth

services for recreation. Possibly skateboard (youth); bingo (seniors)

Cultural/senior assistance

Larger more developed parks

Refer to #11

Bowling, wall scaling and repelling

Somewhere to ride a dirt bike

Launch ramp on Biloxi River (i.e. by Three Rivers Rd)

Safe entertainment for teenagers

Playgrounds, especially along the waterways

Not sure

None

Small park comparable to Rudy Manor Park, areas for bicycle

Football stadium, baseball fields at site of new D’Iberville High School

14. Would you support an increase in yours taxes to support the

addition of recreational amenities in your community?

Response Percentage

Yes 31.5%

No 46.1%

Not Sure 22.5%


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Comments:

If managed and secured properly

If it would support a place to ride a dirt bike

No, take it from the supervisors pay, they get paid too much (and free

stuff)

Reasonable

15. What characteristics of your community are especially

important to you? Please explain.

Characteristic

Percentage

Country 26.9%

Peace and/or Quiet 26.9%

Low traffic 7.7%

Rural 15.4%

Woods/forests/greenery/wetlands/green 23.1%

Other/please explain:

Clean, green, clean, green

Natural country

Quality of life, beauty of community

Seclusion and convenience to main roads

Should be quiet

Peace and quiet, low traffic and congestion

Being rural

Rural feel (2 responses)

Country atmosphere surrounded by greenery, conservation

subdivisions

Small community, family oriented

Rural/undeveloped

Aesthetic (non-commercialization), rural look/feel

Woodlands, scenic view

Close knit community, serenity in woodlands

Privacy, serenity

Country living

Schools, family oriented, old farm places family is allowed to build on

and live together

Should be quiet no industrial equipment around homes

Keeping it clean, side walks

We like what we have had in the past-country lifestyle with freedom

to raise children, gardens, pets, livestock, etc with the convenience of

being near local shopping areas.

Small, quiet, peaceful, low crime, know most of everyone

Quiet, residential

Space

Rural country living

Very rural—not too far out from necessity, but just far enough. Less

crime. Green, rivers, woods.

Better drainage solution for homes in my area (South Fork subdivision)

Nature, homegrown, undistributed

Country atmosphere

Quiet old town country atmosphere

Woods/forests, rivers

Country living, property values, less traffic

Residential only

Clean country area w/o industrial parks and controlled areas for

business.

Old country not developed where there are trees to clean air.

Open space people know each other.

Rural type setting

Not quite rural not quite city

Quietness

Country living, quiet

Country living

Single family homes, low density, median price range, no low income

Peace and quiet. Before Cal Ark built those duplex there was peace and

quiet

Preservation of the environment

Quiet, non congested, low traffic

Over crowding


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Undeveloped spaces on Hwy 67, wetland/forested areas throughout

the community

Quiet and limited traffic flow through the s/d areas. Access to grocery

and drug stores.

Nice homes, big lots, good schools

Leaving it as a bedroom community

Friendly community

Closer shopping

None

Do not pile people up on one another. I suggest small individual

homes.

Large wooded lots with single family homes

Low density residential

Country, unincorporated, quiet

Quiet, wooded, low density, near shopping

Clean and well kept appearance of store fronts. Landscaping of

businesses. More decorative trees located throughout the community.

Everything!

Cleanliness, green space, maintained roads, controlled growth, policing

of highways. Harrison County “as a general statement” (Katrina

withstanding) is architectually inept, unkept, hodgepodge of signage,

and needs a serious change of direction. Even before Katrina---

Harrison County and the towns that make up Harrison County are

anything but pleasing to the eye. “Now” is our last chance to effect a

change.

Safe, clean, small town feel.

Maintain property values

Clean environment (not heavy industry/polluters), wetland

conservation, country style living. I support a community that

harmonizes with environment rather than depletes the environment

(e.g. limited tree removal)

Clean properties

Clean, safe

16. Do any hazards exist in your neighborhood that you are

concerned about?

Existence of Hazards Percentage

Yes

No

33.7%

47.7%

Not sure 18.6%

Comments:

Three Rivers Dump

Wetland water flow what down from uphill

Lots of sitting water after rain in culverts

Lamey Bridge Rd, Hudson-Krohn Rd Dump

People dumping raw sewage in the river.

Landfill (4 responses)

Old dump site, Holdens construction

Lift station on Hwy 15-Conventry development

Landfill areas and amount of trash on Lorraine Rd near river areas

Too many dump trucks that are speeding on Hwy 67.

Dirt and dust debris from Katrina, land fills along Hudson-Krohn Rd

The developer beside my property just demolished a house that had

asbestos siding and buried it on site.

Some landfills and BFI dump

Polluted water body

Concrete plant=water depletion, dust, high volume traffic with large

trucks

Concrete plant at corner of Lamey Bridge Rd and Hwy 15, dust,

excessive use of water, noise, etc

I am especially concerned about wetlands and build-up of low lying

property for improvements. This increases the chances of unnatural

flooding.

Wetlands filled and utilized for new construction


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

17. Is there a natural feature in your community you consider to

be of importance?

Response Percentage

Yes 57.5%

No 17.8%

Not Sure 24.7%

17a. If yes, what is this feature and where is it located?

Wetlands (3 responses)

Nearby creeks and rivers (2 responses)

Local rivers (2 responses)

Highway 49 flowing east

Down hill flow of hurricane waters, Lyman

Parks

Natural forest off Highway 15

Woods, country setting

Tuxacheney River

Woolmarket lakes, South of John Lee Rd

Rivers/waterways

Woodlands

Desoto National Forest should be left as is. (3 responses)

Wooded area on 2 sides of my property

Tchoutacabouffa and Biloxi River adjoining waterways.

Youth center

Country community

Rivers/wetlands

Rivers, Woolmarket athletic fields, hiking trails, National Forests/

Desoto National Forest

My community has very old homes and landowners have been here

Dragon mosquitoes, flooding

Outside the city limits

Trees and wildlife on Three Rivers Rd

Woods and river areas

No development on Hwy 67 and Hwy 605

The feature was tranquility until they built those duplex. Now people

are piled on top of one another paying outrageous rent. Why? So

someone can get rich.

N/A

Clean rivers

Drainages throughout the area (creeks)

Tchoutacabouffa River

Rivers and streams for fishing

Peace and quiet

Trees, forests- everywhere development hasn’t intruded

Wooded areas, green space, clean air

Forest

River

18. What other suggestions do you have for how Eastern

Harrison County can plan for the future? Please explain.

More modern innovative zoning codes for better land use and

planning!!!

Hold developers both county leader and land developer accountable

for there wrong doing for improper specification. Leadership needs

pushed!

Add parks.

Roads really need to be designed for the increase in traffic.

Leave much scenic view.

Think about and work traffic flow, smoother roads, not gravel topped.

Widen 15 and incorporate bike path, stop light at Lamey Bridge and

Hwy 15.

Zero low rent housing, single family homes only.

Let people vote on annexing!!

Hold public forums quarterly to discuss current development

possibilities.

None.

Do not want to be annexed!


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Old Woolmarket Elementary is a historic landmark. It is the 1st

consolidated school in MS, along the river behind Woolmarket

Elementary is the old loading docks where wool was shipped out. (this

is where Woolmarket got its name).

Residents need community water/sewer.

Something like Baytowne Warf in Destin, FL.

No annexation please!

Keep our history as a point of importance- Woolmarket and

surrounding areas.

Build a designated trail for dirt bikes, etc.

Another school, park.

Zoning for all new development; insurance rates (buildings); residential

areas (road repair/improvement).

Leave as much scenic as possible.

Amusement parks, asphalt track, old dumpsite (holders construction).

Leave it like it is.

Mobile homes and affordable modular homes be off the road and

out of view. No pink or purple houses (regulated) Hwy 605 and

Hwy 67 should be very scenic w/out traffic congestion, bars or ugly

depreciating homes.

If a homeowner has a home with one acre or more then they

should be able to use their land as was provided when originally

brought. The new subdivision should be kept to certain areas to be

developed and not allowed to expand everywhere. Return Lorraine

Rd to 45 mph speed limit except for river and wetland areas. Provide

CTA transportation to area especially for elderly to go to medical

appointments.

Theme park like more Knotts Berry farm or Siver Dollar city in MO.

Go slow.

Need to add cultural/senior activities as well as other recreational

activities so we don’t have to go to Biloxi.

Develop a Woolmarket Center where people can walk from shop to

shop.

I think more needs to focus on the quality of living instead of what

can we build to make money.

We do not want to be annexed by any city, they should have a vote.

No commercial developments in the unincorporated areas. Especially

near the Hwy 67 and Hwy 605 interchange. Keep commercial

areas near I-10. No low income housing, especially no government

subsidized housing.

Restricting business zoning.

Build houses not duplexes.

New High School.

Senior centers activities/opportunities, affordable senior housing.

Make developers have larger lots, like Village Circle and Village Rd.

Support development along State Hwy 605: south of Biloxi Rd,

oppose north of River. Expansion of water and sewer service in

Eastern Harrison Co.: not Biloxi water and sewer support a county run

water and sewer.

Preserve wetlands, plan wisely.

Create more jobs for business people. My son Sam McGaugh had to

leave this area to get a job that pays enough to live on.

Nothing.

We need roads or highways going east and west.

Oppose any further annexation of the county.

Reduction of traffic on Hwy 49. The creation of rails to trails biking

and walking facility around the county. More bike lanes for cyclists.

Harrison County can be the leader in this state but we have to be

willing to step out and make bold choices. 1. Bring in a national

recognized amusement park company (6 flags, Disney, or show other

legitimate organizations). The area is perfectly located for something

of this nature. With Jazzland shutdown in New Orleans, we should

offer incentives or manipulate any thing we can to bring them over

to Mississippi. 2. Build and develop the Premier State Crime lab. 3.

Build and develop the Premier State Burn Center. 4. Harrison County

needs to investigate and study the possibility of bringing Minor League

(AAA or AA) baseball team from the Major leagues.

1) Building code enforcement, 2) architectural integrity of


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

developments, 3) replacement of trees, 4) strict enforcement of

property maintenance and inacting new legislation requiring Real

Estate owners to maintain their property, 5) control signage.

Develop codes for all new development, especially businesses.

We should take the opportunity of destruction to increase our

communities appearance. New construction shoud be aesthetically

pleasing and fit into the community’s structure.

Road improvements.

Keep in mind what makes the area unique (Pinebelt) environmentally;

note its unique heritage and the contributions of all our ancestors

(Indian, African, European); develop the area in a way that reflects US,

not mimic other areas. (A visitor to our area recognize our area for its

uniqueness)

The zoning dept needs to keep their eyes wide open. We have blatant

zoning violations in the Woolmarket residential area.

I think if people want to live in rural areas, they should be aloud to.

I’m not at all happy with Biloxi’s land grab. If I wanted to live in the

city, I would have bought in the city.

Don’t anymore annexation by Biloxi!

If future subdivisions are developed pass wrong doing of past

subdivision need to be repaired/fixed. Developers and county leaders

are allowing BAD subdivisions (i.e. wetlands). Developer doing bad

work and county signing off. Wetland area nature is very pleasant.

by using an electronic voting device. Participants rated images on a scale

of one to five (one being very unacceptable, three being neutral, and five

being very acceptable).

The Eastern Harrison County CPS measured preference for

housing density, single-family housing style, multi-family housing style,

setbacks, streetscape, walking/bike paths, small and large commercial

style, and industrial style.

Results

Participants were asked to evaluate which of three images

would be the most acceptable for residential style in their community

(see Figure B-12). The image in the upper right corner was preferred

by 75 percent of the participants, and the image in the lower right was

preferred by 18 percent of participants.

Further emphasizing the community’s preference for rural

residential development, an aerial photo with low density was found

the most acceptable for Eastern Harrison County residents (see Figure

B-11).

Figure B-10. Citizens participated in a community preference survey.

Community Preference Survey

To understand Eastern Harrison County citizens’ vision for

their community, the planning team conducted a Community Preference

Survey (CPS) at the Town Hall meeting on September 6, 2007. The

number of votes submitted varied at times during the CPS, but the

maximum number of votes was 124.

A CPS consists of a series of different types of images of

development. Participants in the Town Hall Meeting voted on whether

the types of development depicted are acceptable for their community

Source: Chris Cunningham


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Figure B-12. This above image was found to be much more

acceptable than the one below.

Figure B-11. Residents found this type of residential housing very

acceptable.

Source: Brandon Mark

Source: Brandon Mark


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Table B-1. Community Preference Survey Results

Very

Unacceptable Unacceptable Neutral Acceptable Very

Acceptable

Housing Density

H1 0% 5% 9% 20% 66%

H2 10% 13% 28% 19% 30%

H3 42% 26% 11% 8% 13%

Single-Family

Housing Style

H4 3% 3% 8% 20% 65%

H5 9% 8% 22% 21% 40%

H6 48% 18% 17% 7% 11%


140

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Multi-Family

Housing Style

Very

Unacceptable Unacceptable Neutral Acceptable Very

Acceptable

M1 34% 21% 20% 11% 15%

M2 39% 17% 15% 18% 11%

M3 41% 16% 16% 13% 14%

M4 65% 9% 11% 9% 6%

Distance from the

Road (Setback)

D1 5% 4% 15% 12% 65%


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Very

Unacceptable Unacceptable Neutral Acceptable Very

Acceptable

D2 3% 10% 12% 26% 49%

D3 30% 24% 22% 11% 13%

D4 70% 9% 5% 4% 13%

Streetscape

ST1 54% 16% 13% 8% 8%

ST2 52% 15% 18% 5% 10%

ST3 37% 11% 19% 17% 15%


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Walking/Bike Paths

Very

Unacceptable Unacceptable Neutral Acceptable Very

Acceptable

WB1 6% 2% 6% 13% 73%

WB2 2% 2% 2% 7% 87%

WB3 39% 13% 9% 16% 23%

Small Commercial

SC1 13% 2% 15% 20% 49%

SC2 16% 13% 13% 22% 33%

SC3 18% 10% 8% 21% 44%


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Very

Unacceptable Unacceptable Neutral Acceptable Very

Acceptable

Large Commercial

LC1 13% 5% 10% 28% 44%

LC2 17% 11% 16% 15% 41%

LC3 21% 8% 13% 17% 40%

Industrial

Development

I1 38% 6% 12% 18% 26%

I2 36% 13% 10% 15% 26%


144

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Very

Unacceptable Unacceptable Neutral Acceptable Very

Acceptable

I3 74% 7% 7% 3% 8%

I4 86% 5% 5% 1% 4%


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Town Hall Meeting Small Group Discussions

Citizens of the Eastern Harrison County planning area were

invited to discuss planning issues facing their community and Harrison

County at the September Town Hall Meeting through small group

discussions. Participants envisioned what they wanted Eastern Harrison

County to look like in the future and what amenities they wanted to add

or expand on in the community.

Recurring themes included the need to maintain the rural

character of the communities, increase recreational opportunities,

provide more retail, aesthetically pleasing developments, fire protection,

law enforcement and implementation of needed infrastructure and

road improvements. Many groups emphasized a desire for low density,

large lot single family residential developments. Citizens also frequently

discussed the idea of a town center. Preservation of natural resources

was identified as an important issue for the planning area as well.

Figure B-13. Citizens sat at tables based on community names at the

September Town Hall Meeting.

Source: Chris Cunningham


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Planner’s Day In School

During the first week of September, members of The Ohio State

University planning team visited the 7 th graders of North Woolmarket

Middle School. The Planner’s Day in School allowed students to

learn about community planning. One way to understand community

planning is to talk about the fundamental questions planners seek to

answer when developing a community plan: what do people like best

about their community, what do they like least or would like to change

about their community, and what are new things the community would

like to have in the future?

When asked these questions, the children provided their own

vision of the community. Most children said they liked living in a rural

area, but didn’t like living so far from shopping areas and parks. The

most popular new amenity requested was a skate park.

The children also participated in a map exercise. The map

depicted the area surrounding their respective schools. During the

exercise the children learned about elements of a map and where and

why certain things are placed where in a community. The exercise

also allowed the children to use their imagination about how there

community could be. Students created imaginative neighborhoods that

include popular shopping destinations, recreational areas, and houses.

The ideas expressed in the classes were recorded by the team

members and have been used in the development of the Harrison

County community plans.

Figure B-14. Students at Woolmarket Middle School requested

increased recreation opportunities near their school.

Source: Bridget Troy


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Phone and Online Comments

Citizens were invited to use a toll free 1-800 number and an online

discussion forum to voice their input on this planning process. Many

citizens called to confirm interest in the planning process, while others

were more explicit in voicing their concerns. Common topics included

zoning changes, infrastructure improvements, and the preservation of

rural character.

Members of the Eastern planning area were invited to discuss

planning issues facing their community and Harrison County, Mississippi.

The discussion forum was opened to discussions on September 6, 2007.

Participants described how they wanted the Eastern planning area to

look like in the future and what amenities they wanted to add or expand

on in the community.

Participants generally made inquiries on how to get involved,

requested more information on future planning, and voiced concerns

about zoning changes. Participants also commented on what was

needed in the community and where each feature should be located.

The need for a fire department, post office, and improved roadways

were mentioned. These comments generally reflected those received in

the written surveys and heard at the Town Hall Meeting.

Other repeated responses were those that dealt with concerns

about annexation of the planning area. Numerous participants indicated

that they did not want the area to be annexed. A common reason for

opposition to annexation was that participants wanted to keep the

Eastern planning area rural.

Overall, the 1-800 number and the online discussion forum had

a positive response. Those who have posted comments have committed

to having an active role in the planning process for their community.

This has allowed the planning team to have a continued presence in

the community, albeit virtually. The information obtained through the

discussion community has been incorporated into this plan.

Figure B-15. Citizens left phone and online messages requesting a fire

station, improved roadways and preservation of rural character.

Source: Joshua Anderson


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Figure B-16. Eastern Harrison County has a mix of features that the community values and wants to preserve as this plan is implemented.

Source: Ohio State University


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

December Town Hall Meeting

On December 13, 2007 a Town Hall Meeting for Eastern

Harrison County residents was held at the Woolmarket Community

Center. This meeting provided an opportunity for the citizens of

Eastern Harrison County to provide feedback on the draft community

plan and assist in clarifying what the community wants for the future.

Approximately 100 residents attended this Town Hall Meeting. Citizens

participated in electronic voting and dot voting as described below.

Electronic Voting

Eastern Harrison County residents were asked practice questions

and questions about their participation in the planning process. The

opening practice question asked residents who would win the National

Championship on January 7 th , everyone enjoyed a good laugh and nearly

sixty percent of participants said Louisiana State University would win.

A significant number of participants at the Town Hall Meeting

have participated in the community planning process. Forty-five percent

also attended the September Town Hall Meeting. Almost a quarter

of participants had provided comments on the online forum, 1-800

comment line, or sent comments by mail.

Participants at the Town Hall Meeting were asked to indicate

whether they supported each of the goals in the draft plan developed

in response to citizen comments. Seven goals were developed to guide

future growth in Eastern Harrison County, as shown in Table B-2, all

the goals received overwhelming support.

Next, participants were asked whether they would support

the development of a Woolmarket Village Center. Each element and

potential facilities in the Village Center were described and after a full

description of the Center participants voted on whether they would

support or oppose the Woolmarket Village Center. The results of the

voting can be seen in Table B-3. Majority of participants supported the

Village Center.

Table B-2. Results of Goal Voting

Goals Percentage

Goal 1 Support 88

Oppose 7

Not sure/No opinion 5

Goal 2 Support 81

Oppose 6

Not sure/No opinion 13

Goal 3 Support 80

Oppose 13

Not sure/No opinion 7

Goal 4 Support 83

Oppose 10

Not sure/No opinion 7

Goal 5 Support 88

Oppose 9

Not sure/No opinion 3

Goal 6 Support 70

Oppose 23

Not sure/No opinion 7

Goal 7 Support 63

Oppose 23

Not sure/No opinion 14


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Participants were then asked to vote on a variety of waterway

setback options. After each waterway setback option was presented

participants voted on which option they preferred for their community.

Support was mixed but majority of participants supported maintaining

the existing setback or extending the setback, see Table B-4.

Policy options were voted on next at the Town Hall Meeting.

Participants were asked to vote on a tree preservation ordinance

as residents provided comments that trees were important to their

community. Majority of residents (sixty-one percent) voted in support

of a tree preservation ordinance, the results can be seen in Table B-5.

Next, participants voted on whether they would support a scenic roadway

ordinance, seventy-six percent of participants supported this policy

option. Then participants were asked to vote on two scenic roadway

options, the results can be seen in Table B-5, option one received more

support.

Figure B-17. Residents used electronic voting devices to indicate

support for the goals developed in the draft plan.

Table B-3. Results of Voting on a Woolmarket Village Center

Woolmarket Village Center?

Percentage

Support 69

Oppose 19

Not sure/No opinion 12

Table B-4. Waterway Setback Voting Results

Waterway Setback option you prefer?

Percentage

Maintain existing setback 37

Extend setback 33

100 Year floodplain 18

Not sure/No opinion 12

Source: Nathan Harber


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Table B-5. Policy option Voting Results

Policy Options Percentage

Figure B-18. Residents signed in at the December Town Hall Meeting

and then found their homes on an aerial map.

Policy 1: Tree Preservation

Ordinance Support 61

Oppose 29

Not sure/No opinion 10

Policy 2: Scenic Roadway

Ordinance Support 76

Oppose 15

Not sure/No opinion 9

Scenic Roadway Option 1 Support 59

Oppose 22

Not sure/No opinion 19

Scenic Roadway Option 2 Support 45

Oppose 32

Not sure/No opinion 23

“ Residents expressed strong

support for the development of a

Scenic Roadway Ordinance.”

Source: Nathan Harber


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Dot Voting

Once the community agreed on the goals for the plan, they were

asked to prioritize the strategies that they most support and indicate any

that they do not support. Participants were provided with six green dots

which they were asked to place next to the strategies that they believe

are the highest priority. They were also provided with six red dots which

they could use to vote for any strategies that they did not support. Some

participants placed multiple dots on particular strategies emphasizing

their strong support or opposition. This is not a scientific poll, but is

designed to identify issues the community views as especially critical.

The feedback from the dot voting was used to refine the strategies that

appear in the community plan. The dot voting results are shown in Table

B-6.

Figure B-19. Residents used green and red dots to voice support and

concern for the strategies of the draft plan.

Source: Nathan Harber

Table B-6. Results of dot voting.

Goal 1 Description Support

Support

(%)

Oppose

Oppose

(%)

Total

Votes

Strategy A

Promote awareness and implementation of the Community Plan for

Eastern Harrison County.

4 80% 1 20% 5

Strategy B Protect scenic corridors. 34 81% 8 19% 42

Strategy C Encourage growth at specific locations in Eastern Harrison County. 7 54% 6 46% 13

Strategy D

Encourage the expansion of infrastructure to service existing and

future designated development areas.

11 100% 0 0% 11

Strategy E Increase public safety services. 9 100% 0 0% 9


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Goal 2 Description Support

Support

(%)

Oppose

Oppose

(%)

Total

Votes

Strategy A Require all new development be consistent with the Community Plan. 10 100% 0 0% 10

Strategy B

Rehabilitate residential housing to get the community to work

together, increase property values, and improve the appearance of the

area.

12 100% 0 0% 12

Strategy C Maintain the rural character of the community. 43 91% 4 9% 47

Goal 3 Description Support

Strategy A

Support

(%)

Oppose

Oppose

(%)

Improve the design and functionality of the roadway network in

Eastern Harrison county. 24 89% 3 11% 27

Total

Votes

Strategy B

Require new residential and commercial development connect with

existing and proposed development by including future access points

and shared parking easements.

13 100% 0 0% 13

Strategy C Improve opportunities for pedestrians and bicyclists. 14 88% 2 13% 16

Strategy D

Strategy E

Provide transportation opportunities for all residents of the

community.

Explore sources of funding to maintain and improve existing

roadways.

12 48% 13 52% 25

6 60% 4 40% 10


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Figure B-20. Hundreds of residents participated in the September and December 2007 Town Hall Meetings to help create a community plan

based on their input.

Source: Ohio State University


155

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Goal 4 Description Support

Support

(%)

Oppose

Oppose

(%)

Total

Votes

Strategy A Retain and improve wooded areas. 31 100% 0 0% 31

Strategy B

Engage in measures to prevent deterioration of water resources from

septic and other environmental contaminants.

23 100% 0 0% 23

Goal 5 Description Support

Support

(%)

Oppose

Oppose

(%)

Strategy A Improve access to natural features. 11 92% 1 8% 12

Strategy B

Increase awareness of recreational opportunities available in the De

Soto National Forest for residents in the planning area.

Total

Votes

15 100% 0 0% 15

Strategy C Create new community parks and open-space areas. 36 100% 0 0% 36

Strategy D

Encourage increased recreational opportunities along the rivers of the

Eastern Planning Area.

14 93% 1 7% 15

Goal 6 Description Support

Support

(%)

Oppose

Oppose

(%)

Total

Votes

Strategy A

Strategy B

Enable all citizens in Eastern Harrison County to have access to

quality housing choices.

Support multi-family residential housing in the G-3 sector in close

proximity to employment centers and services.

18 49% 19 51% 37

17 46% 20 54% 37


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Goal 7 Description Support

Strategy A

Advocate the creation of ordinances that incorporate the principles

of New Urbanism.

Support

(%)

Oppose

Oppose

(%)

Total

Votes

41 79% 11 21% 52

Figure B-21. Many residents participated in the dot voting excercise at the December Town Hall Meeting.

Source: Nathan Harber


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Appendix C. Potential Funding Sources

Funding Agency

Economic Development

Name of Funding

Program

Description Website Grants

Foundation for the Mid

South

Various

Supports programs in the areas of education,

economic development, and families and children.

http://www.

fndmidsouth.org/

grants_funding.htm

1

US Dept of Agriculture

Rural Community

Development

Initiative

Provides grant funding for technical assistance in

the areas of housing, community facilities, and

community and economic development.

http://www.rurdev.

usda.gov/rhs/rcdi/

index.htm

2

US Economic Development

Administration

Public Works

and Economic

Adjustment Program

This program assists distressed areas with grants

to revitalize, expand, and upgrade physical

infrastructure to attract new industry, encourage

expansion and generate jobs and investment.

http://www.eda.gov 3

Community Development

United Way of South

Mississippi

Various

The United Way provides leadership in mobilizing

resources to advance the quality of life in south

Mississippi.

http://www.uw-sm.

org/index.php

4


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Funding Agency

Name of Funding

Program

Description Website Grants

Grantmakers in Aging

Hurricane Fund for

the Elderly

Grantmakers In Aging created the Hurricane

Fund for the Elderly (HFE) to support qualifying

nonprofit organizations working to re-establish the

older adult service system in areas affected by the

2005 hurricanes.

http://www.giaging.

org/programs/index.

asp?id=133

5

Weyerhaeuser Company

Foundation

Weyerhaeuser

Company Foundation

The mission of the Weyerhaeuser Company

Foundation is to improve the quality of life in

communities where it operates and to increase

understanding of the importance and sustainability

of forests and the products they provide to meet

people’s needs.

http://www.

weyerhaeuser.

com/citizenship/

philanthropy/

weyerfoundation.asp

6

Mississippi Home

Corporation

Various

MHC’s mission is to enhance Mississippi’s longterm

economic viability by financing safe, decent,

affordable housing and helping families build

wealth

http://www.

mshomecorp.com/

about%20mhc/

about%20mhc.htm

7

Historic Preservation

Mississippi Department of

Archives

Community Heritage

Preservation

Provide funding for a variety of historic

preservation activities.

http://www.mdah.

state.ms.us/

8

National Trust for Historic

Preservation

Various

The National Trust provides leadership, education,

advocacy, and resources to save America’s historic

places and revitalize our communities.

http://www.

nationaltrust.org/

funding/nonprofit.

html

9


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Funding Agency

Housing

Name of Funding

Program

Description Website Grants

FEMA

Flood Mitigation

Assistance Program

Provides funding to assist communities in

implementing measures to reduce or eliminate the

long-term risk of flood damage to buildings.

http://www.fema.

gov/about/divisions/

mitigation/mitigation.

shtm

10

FEMA

Increased Cost of

Compliance Program

This program helps homeowners cover the cost

of meeting flood hazard mitigation requirements

for all new and renewed Standard Flood Insurance

Policies. Flood insurance policyholders in Special

Flood Hazard Areas, can get up to $30,000 to help

pay the costs to bring their home or business into

compliance with their community’s floodplain

ordinance. The funds can cover costs related to

elevation, relocation, or demolition of flooddamaged

structures.

http://www.

fema.gov/news/

newsrelease.

fema?id=21304

11

US Dept of Agriculture

Mutual Self-Help

Loans

Housing Repair and

Rehabilitation Loan

Rural Housing

Guaranteed Loans

Provides loans for homeowners and for

communities to build and repair homes and

provide water and sewer service.

http://www.rurdev.

usda.gov/rhs/sfh/

brief_repairgrant.htm

12

US Treasury

Low Income

Housing Tax Credits

Provides tax credits for the development of

housing development.

http://www.

cdfifund.gov/

programs/programs.

asp?programID=5

13


160

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Funding Agency

Infrastructure

Improvements

Mississippi Development

Authority

Mississippi Department of

Environmental Quality

Name of Funding

Program

Various

Drinking

Water Systems

Improvements

Revolving Fund Loan

Program

Description Website Grants

Provides loans for the establishment and expansion

of capital improvements, such as water and sewer.

Provides loan funds to public agencies to improve

drinking water systems.

http://www.

mississippi.org/

content.aspx?url=/

page/3032&

http://www.deq.state.

ms.us

14

15

Mississippi Department of

Transportation

Safe Routes to

School Program

The Program makes funding available for a wide

variety of programs and projects, from building

safer street crossings to establishing programs that

encourage children and their parents to walk and

bicycle safely to school.

http://safety.fhwa.

dot.gov/saferoutes/

overview.htm

16

Natural Resources

Mississippi Audubon

Society

Birdhouse clinics

The Society sponsors free clinics to help families

build bird houses to help protect the bird

population.

http://www.

msaudubon.org/

17

Mississippi Department of

Marine Resources

Coastal Preserves

Program 1

This program provides funds for the acquisition,

protection, and management of coastal wetland

habitats.

http://www.dmr.state.

ms.us/

18

Mississippi Department of

Marine Resources

Aquatic Resources

Trust Fund

This fund allocates at least 15 percent of the

revenues collected from the taxes on the sale of

fishing equipment, pleasure boats, and motorboat

fuel sales to the creation and expansion of boating

access.

19


161

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Funding Agency

Name of Funding

Program

Description Website Grants

Mississippi Department of

Marine Resources

Tidelands Trust Fund

This program provides funds for tidelands

management, such as conservation, reclamation,

preservation, acquisition, education,

http://www.dmr.

state.ms.us/tidelands/

tidelands.htm

20

Mississippi Department

of Wildlife, Fisheries, and

Parks

Mississippi Scenic

Streams Stewardship

Program

This program promotes the voluntary conservation

efforts along Mississippi rivers and streams.

http://www.

mdwfp.com/level2/

scenicstreams/

introduction.asp

21

Mississippi Department

of Wildlife, Fisheries, and

Parks

Land and Water

Conservation Fund

This program provides funds for the development

of recreational sites and facilities. Funding for

the program is provided largely from Outer

Continental Shelf mineral receipts, with additional

income from the Motorboat Fuels Tax, recreation

user fees, and through the sales of federal surplus

property.

http://www.mdwfp.

com/level1/lwcf.asp

22

Mississippi Forestry

Commission

Urban and

Community Forestry

Assistance Challenge

Grant

Provides funds for the development of community

forestry programs.

http://www.mfc.state.

ms.us/urban/uf3.html

23

National Arbor Day

Foundation

National Arbor

Day Tree Planting

Program

This program provides ten flowering or oak trees

six to 12 inches tall for members.

http://www.

nationalarborday.org

24


162

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Funding Agency

National Tree Trust

Name of Funding

Program

Seeds and Roots

Grant Programs

Description Website Grants

Provides funding for the development and

operation of community forestry programs.

http://www.

nationaltreetrust.org

25

US Corp of Engineers

Aquatic Ecosystem

Restoration

This program provides funds to restore and protect

aquatic ecosystems if the project will improve the

environment.

http://www.usace.

army.mil/

26

Parks and Recreation

Conservation Fund

Land Trust Loan

Program, The Revolving

Fund

This program provides funds to plan greenways.

http://www.

conservationfund.

org/

27

FundingFactory

Funding Factory

This is a fundraising program that provides funds

for playground and other recreational equipment

through community recycling.

http://fundingfactory.

com/

28

Mississippi Department of

Marine Resources

Boat Access Program

Provides funds for the development of boat access

facilities.

http://www.dmr.state.

ms.us/sport-fish/

Boat_Access.htm

29

Mississippi Department of

Marine Resources

Tidelands Trust Fund

This program provides funds for enhancement of

public access to the public trust tidelands or public

improvement projects as they relate to those lands

http://www.dmr.

state.ms.us/tidelands/

tidelands.htm

30

Tony Hawk Foundation

The primary mission of the Tony Hawk

Foundation is to promote high-quality, public

skateparks in low-income areas throughout the

United States.

http://www.

tonyhawkfoundation.

org/grant_application.

asp

31


163

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Mississippi Department of

Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks

Outdoor

Land and Water Conservation

Fund

Funds the acquisition and development of land for

recreational development, such as sports fields and

picnic facilities.

http://www.mdwfp.

com/level1/lwcf.asp

32


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Endnotes

1 The Coastal Preserves Program is currently developing the Wolf River Marsh management plan. The management program includes identifying areas for acquisition

potential and underscores the need to establish intergovernmental and private cooperation to manage the unique ecosystem surrounding the Wolf River Marsh.


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Appendix D. Principles Of New Urbanism, LEED-ND and

Land Suitability Analysis

Principles of New Urbanism

The Charter of the New Urbanism forms the basis of the

recommendations from the Mississippi Renewal Forum. This plan

integrates many of the principles identified in the portion of the

Charter pertaining to the regional scale. 1 The following principles, from

the Charter, should guide public policy, development, and design in the

Eastern Planning Area:

1.

Metropolitan regions are finite places with geographic boundaries

derived from topography, watersheds, coastlines, farmlands,

regional parks, and river basins. The metropolis is made of

multiple centers that are cities, towns, and villages, each with its

own identifiable center and edges.

5.

the metropolis. Infill development within existing urban areas

conserves environmental resources, economic investment, and

social fabric while reclaiming marginal and abandoned areas.

Metropolitan regions should develop strategies to encourage

such infill development over peripheral expansion.

Where appropriate, new development contiguous to urban

boundaries should be organized as neighborhoods and districts

and integrated with the existing urban pattern. Noncontiguous

development should be organized as towns and villages with

their own urban edges and planned for a jobs/housing balance,

not as bedroom suburbs.

2.

3.

4.

The metropolitan region is a fundamental economic unit of the

contemporary world. Governmental cooperation, public policy,

physical planning, and economic strategies must reflect this new

reality.

The metropolis has a necessary and fragile relationship to its

agrarian hinterland and natural landscapes. The relationship is

environmental, economic, and cultural. Farmland and nature are

as important to the metropolis as the garden is to the house.

Development patterns should not blur or eradicate the edges of

6.

7.

8.

The development and redevelopment of towns and cities should

respect historical patterns, precedents, and boundaries.

Cities and towns should bring into proximity a broad spectrum

of public and private uses to support a regional economy that

benefits people of all incomes. Affordable housing should be

distributed throughout the region to match job opportunities

and to avoid concentrations of poverty.

The physical organization of the region should be supported by

a framework of transportation alternatives. Transit, pedestrian,


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

9.

and bicycle systems should maximize access and mobility throughout

the region while reducing dependence upon the automobile.

Revenues and resources should be shared more cooperatively among

the municipalities and centers within regions to avoid destructive

competition for tax base and to promote rational coordination of

transportation, recreation, public services, housing, and community

institutions.

SmartCode and Sector Map

The SmartCode is a model development code that uses progressive

planning techniques. As an outgrowth of the Mississippi Renewal Forum,

planners modified the SmartCode to meet the needs of the Mississippi Gulf

Coast. This plan builds on the work of the Renewal Forum, including the

SmartCode.

The SmartCode allows for planning at multiple scales, from the

regional context of the countryside down to the smaller scale of local

neighborhoods. At the broad countywide scale, the code recommends dividing

the landscape into different sectors. The sector map is a tool derived from

the Mississippi Renewal Forum and the SmartCode. These sectors provide

for a range of development patterns, from the preservation of open space

and rural areas deemed unsuitable for development to the encouragement

of growth in more appropriate areas (see Figure D-1). Each sector can

then be further subdivided into transects, which more specifically identify

the appropriate styles and densities of development for different locations

within the sector.

A Harrison County Sector Map is under development. When

complete, it will create a common language and vision for the future

development of all communities in the county. The County will ultimately

determine how best to implement the development regulations contained

within the SmartCode.

The sector map for the Eastern Planning Area (see Map 2-2 on page

45) identifies a desirable outcome for the future of the community in terms

of SmartCode principles and definitions. Application of the SmartCode

along these sectors can guide development in Eastern Harrison County.

The SmartCode identifies six sectors, ranging from preserved open

space to urban development, as shown in Figure D-1. For Eastern Harrison

County, five of the six sectors apply, along with Special Districts. Each of

the sector designations is explained in the following paragraphs. The model

Mississippi SmartCode provides a detailed explanation of how transects are

used within each sector.

The (O-1) PRESERVED OPEN SECTOR consists of open space

already protected from development in perpetuity. The Preserved Open

Sector includes undeveloped areas under environmental protection by law

or standard, as well as land acquired for conservation through purchase or

land protected from development by easement. Areas designated Preserved

Open Sector (O-1) are mapped using the criteria listed below.

a.

b.

c.

d.

e.

f.

g.

Surface Water Bodies

Protected Wetlands

Protected Habitat

Riparian Corridors

Purchased Open Space

Conservation Easements

Residual to Cluster Open Space

The (O-2) RESERVED OPEN SECTOR is composed of undeveloped

parcels larger than 20 acres outside of incorporated cities and wastewater

service areas that are either vacant or in agricultural/forestry use. It includes

open space that should be but is not yet protected from development. The

areas designated Reserved Open Sector (O-2) are mapped using the criteria

listed below.

a.

b.

c.

d.

Flood Plain

Steep Slopes

Open Space to be Acquired

Corridors to be Acquired


167

COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Figure D-1. The sector mapping system identifies and allows communities to focus growth in appropriate areas while preserving rural land.

Source: Placemakers


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

e.

f.

g.

h.

i.

Buffers to be Acquired

Legacy Woodland

Legacy Farmland

Legacy Viewsheds

Land outside the Eastern Harrison County Sewer Service District

The (G-1) RESTRICTED GROWTH SECTOR consists of areas of lowdensity,

rural development, such as is typical in Eastern Harrison County. This

sector includes hamlets and clustered residences with parcel sizes ranging

from small one-half-acre lots within the hamlet to lots of up to 20 acres

surrounding the hamlet. Hamlets may also have a small amount of retail

and some community facilities located at main intersections. Areas within

the Restricted Growth Sector (G-1) may have value as open space, but they

are subject to development based on the existing zoning that enables such

development. This sector also includes conservation development, where 50

percent or more of a development is reserved as open space. These areas

may be outside the sewer service areas.

The (G-2) CONTROLLED GROWTH SECTOR consists of locations

where development is encouraged, as it can support mixed-use by virtue of

proximity to a thoroughfare.

The (G-3) INTENDED GROWTH SECTOR consists of locations

along high-capacity thoroughfares that can support substantial commercial

development.

The (SD) SPECIAL DISTRICT designation covers non-residentially

developed areas that are isolated from residential neighborhoods.

Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for

Neighborhood Development (LEED-ND) Overview

The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), the Congress for the New

Urbanism (CNU), and the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) have

proposed the development of national set of standards for neighborhood

location and design. These standards are based on the principles of smart

growth, urbanism, and green building, are voluntary, and are designed to

acknowledge development that occurs consistent with the standards. 2

The U.S. Green Building Council’s core purpose is to transform the

way buildings and communities are designed, built and operated, enabling

an environmentally and socially responsible, healthy and prosperous

environment that improves the quality of life. 3 The majority of USGBC’s

work concentrates on green building practices. LEED-ND places an emphasis

on the elements that bring the buildings together into a neighborhood, and

relate the neighborhood to its larger region and landscape. This work will,

much like the Green Building movement, create standards that serve as an

incentive for better location, design, and construction of new development.

The LEED-ND standards are intended to positively impact new

development, encouraging developers to revitalize existing urban areas, reduce

land consumption, reduce automobile dependence, promote pedestrian

activity, improve air quality, decrease stormwater runoff, and build more

livable, sustainable, enduring communities. 4 The LEED-ND Committee

completed the first draft of the LEED-ND rating system in September of

2005 and began pilot projects in summer 2007.

The LEED-ND ranking system proposes to establish four “levels”

of compliance, (Certified, Silver, Gold, and Platinum). The specific level of

compliance achieved by a specific project is determined by an adopted point

system. The point system is divided into two classifications, prerequisites and

credits. For a project to achieve the “Certified” status all of the prerequisites

must be met. Rankings beyond the certified status require securing credits.

The more credits received the higher the level.


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

The point system is divided into four components as stated in the

following: 5

• Location Efficiency

• Environmental Preservation

• Compact, Complete, & Connected Neighborhoods

• Resource Efficiency

For each component there are identified prerequisites and optional

credits. Prerequisites include such items as: transportation efficiency; wetland

and water body protection; compact development, and energy efficiency in

buildings. 6 Credits include such items as: reduced automobile dependence;

restoration of habitat or wetlands; housing diversity, and on-site power

generation. 7 Each of the prerequisites and credits are explained in great

detail and are provided a description as to how a developer would certify

compliance with the prerequisite or credit to receive recognition.

In the case of other LEED programs developers have sought to make

their projects more attractive to investors that focuses their financing on

green building projects, to lure tenants that strive to be more environmentally

friendly, and to attract attention to their projects. For example it was recently

announced that the reconstructed World Trade Center will attempt to secure

a Gold Building Certification. 8 The USGBC and its partners hope that the

LEED-ND standards will stimulate the same competition for developers in

the selection of the sites where they will place their buildings.

The planning team identified several LEED-ND related policies that

have been applied in this plan. The plan focus on encouraging development

near water and sewer lines. One of the themes of this plan is connectivity:

LEED-ND promotes connectivity between communities. Citizens expressed

a strong desire to have active recreation areas and to maintain rural character,

which is also promoted in LEED-ND. Development is avoided in areas with

floodplains and areas with significant wetlands. This plan incorporates a

number of the policies promoted through LEED-ND. Individual property

owners and developers could choose to obtain credits for LEED-ND

Certification on their own property.

Land Suitability Analysis

As a part of the planning process, the team undertook a Land

Suitability Analysis for the Eastern Planning Area. The purpose of a

land suitability analysis is to identify the areas that are most suitable for

development. Using the Land Use Conflict Identification Strategy (LUCIS)

model, the team identified the areas that are most suitable for development. 9

The first step in the process is to come up with a list of factors to be taken

into consideration when determining the suitability of land for development.

Environmental-, infrastructure-, and development-related factors were

considered in conjunction with community input. The next step was to assign

numerical values for each factor, which are then totaled in order to produce

a ranking that can be used to determine the suitability of a certain area being

developed. The values assigned are based on a scale of zero to nine, with

0 representing most unsuitable for development and 9 representing most

suitable for development. It is important to note that LUCIS determines

the suitability of a land area for development, but it does not determine the

suitability of individual parcels. Determining the suitability of an individual

parcel for development requires an examination of actual conditions of the

property. These results are not site specific and should not be interpreted in

this way.

The results of the study can be seen in Map D-1. Below is a list of

the factors utilized in the LUCIS analysis.

Wetlands: Wetland areas were assigned a 0 while non-wetland areas

were assigned a 5.

Soils: Soils unsuitable for development based on drainage were

assigned the following values: Excessively drained 0, somewhat

excessively drained 5, moderately well drained 8, well drained 9, very

poorly drained 0, poorly drained 2, and somewhat poorly drained 5.


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Map D-1. The Land Use Conflict Identification Strategy Map illustrates the areas within Eastern Harrison County most suitable for development.

Source: Ohio State University


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Katrina Surge Inundation and Flood Zones: Areas that fall within the Katrina

surge and in the flood zones are less desirable for development.

Areas within the 100 year floodplain received a 0, within the 500 year

floodplain a 3, and outside the 100 and 500 floodplains a 5. Areas in

the Katrina surge received a 0.

Figure D-2. The LUCIS analysis determines the areas most suitable for

development and those areas most suitable for preservation such as

wetlands.

Forest: Forested areas are the conduits for forest fires. Development

within 100 feet of the forest line is discouraged. 10 Areas that fell

within the forest property or within 100 feet of the forested land

received a 0, areas that fell with a quarter of a mile of the forest

received a 3, and areas that fell outside of the quarter of a mile

zones, received a 5.

Sewer and Water: Development is encouraged in areas where there

is existing infrastructure. Areas with existing sewer and water

infrastructure received a 9, those areas that were determined to have

a good chance of receiving sewer or water in the near future received

a 7 (this mostly included areas that were adjacent to existing sewer

districts), and those with little prospect of getting sewer or water

service received a 4.

Distance to Major Roadways: To maintain the rural character of the

area, development is encouraged near major roadways. Those areas

within a half of a mile to a major roadway (including highways and

major local connectors) received a 9 and those that fell outside of a

half mile received a 4.

Proximity to Major Employment Centers: Providing housing for

employment centers is a priority. Areas that were within five miles

of a major employment center received a 9, those within ten miles

received a 7, and those outside of ten miles received a 4.

Source: Joshua Anderson


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Endnotes

1 Congress of the New Urbanism. 2006. Charter of the New Urbanism. Accessed October 16, 2007: http://www.cnu.org/aboutcnu/index.cfm?formAction=charter.

2 U.S Green Building Council. 2005. LEED for Neighborhood Developments Rating System – Preliminary Draft, September 6, 2005. page 3.

3 U.S Green Building Council Accessed October 16, 2007: http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CategoryID=1

4 U.S Green Building Council 2005. LEED for Neighborhood Developments Rating System – Preliminary Draft, Septmber 6, 2005. page 3.

5 U.S. Green Building Council. 2005. LEED for Neighborhood Development Ratings System – Preliminary Draft, September 6, 2005. pages 9 and 10.

6 Ibid.

7 Ibid.

8 U.S. Green Building Council Accessed October 16, 2007: http://www.usgbc.org/News/PressReleaseDetails.aspx?ID=2590

9 Carr, M.H., & Zwick, P.D, 2007. Smart Land-Use Analysis, The LUCIS Model, Land-Use Conflict Strategy. Redlands, CA: ESRI Press

10 Schwab, James and Stuart Meck. 2005. Planning for Wildfires. Planning Advisory Service Report Number 529/530. American Planning Association: Chicago.


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

Appendix E. Acronyms and Glossary

Acronyms

All Terrain Vehicle (ATV)

Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)

American Institute of Certified Planners (AICP)

Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT)

Browning-Ferris Industries (BFI)

Coast Transit Authority (CTA)

Community Preference Survey (CPS)

Congress for the New Urbanism (CNU)

Eastern Harrison County Community Organization (EHCCO)

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI)

Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)

Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

Gulf Coast Area Transportation Study (GCATS)

Gulf Coast Transit Development Plan (TDP)

Gulf Regional Planning Commission (GRPC)

Kansas City Southern Railroad (KCS)

Land Trust for the Mississippi Coastal Plain (LTMCP)

Land Use Conflict Identification Strategy (LUCIS)

Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for Neighborhood

Development (LEED-ND)

Mississippi Department of Transportation (MDOT)

Mississippi Home Corporation (MHC)

Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC)

Ohio State University (OSU)

Slavic Ladies Auxiliary (SLA)

Traffic Analysis Zone (TAZ)

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)

United States Green Building Council (USGBC)

Wastewater Treatment Facility (WWTF)

Glossary

AQUIFER: A layer of permeable rock, sand, or gravel through which ground water flows, possibly containing enough water to supply wells and

springs

BUFFER: The area of open land which serves to mitigate potential conflicts between different types of land uses. Buffer zones are most commonly

employed between different types of uses but, in certain circumstances, it may be appropriate to provide a buffer between a natural resource

and development.


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

CENSUS TRACT: A small, relatively permanent statistical subdivision of a county or statistically equivalent entity, delineated for data presentation purposes

by a local group of census data users or the geographic staff of a regional census center in accordance with U.S. Census Bureau guidelines. Designed

to be relatively homogeneous units with respect to population characteristics, economic status, and living conditions at the time they are established, census

tracts generally contain between 1,000 and 8,000 people, with an optimum size of 4,000 people.

CLUSTER DEVELOPMENT: Development in which individual lots may be smaller than the average lot authorized by the zoning ordinance. Buildable

lots are located on a portion of the entire site so that the remaining area may be preserved for recreation or environmental protection.

COLLECTOR STREET: A street that provides direct service to and from local areas, routing traffic to the arterial street system. A Collector Street provides

the primary means of circulation between adjacent neighborhoods and can serve as a local bus route. The Street provides for the dual purpose of

land access and local traffic movement. Generally, these roadways are not intended for through trips.

COMMUNITY PREFERENCE SURVEY- A survey which used images to measure preferences for housing density, single-family housing style, multifamily

housing style, distance from the road, streetscape, walking/biking trails, commercial style, and industrial style.

CONCEPT PLAN: A tool which allows broad designation of land uses derived from community input.

CONSERVATION EASEMENT: A legal mechanism whereby a landowner retains ownership of his/her land, but grants some right(s) to the land to a

“holder” that is defined as a charitable organization declared exempt from taxation pursuant to 26 U.S.C.A. § 501 (c) (3).

CORRIDOR: Property along major roads and thoroughfares.

DENSITY: The number of persons or dwelling units per acre.

FLOODPLAIN: Those land areas in and adjacent to streams and watercourses subject to periodic inundation from flood events. For instance, a 100-year

flood frequency event has a one percent chance of occurring in any given year.

FUNCTIONAL CLASSIFICATION: A system for classifying the transportation system in terms of the character of service that individual facilities are

providing or are intended to provide, ranging from travel mobility to land access. Roadway system functional classification elements include Freeways or

Expressways, other Principal (or Major) Arterials, Minor Arterials, Collector Streets, and Local Streets. Transit system elements include line haul, collection

and distribution, and specialized or community oriented transit services.

GATEWAY: Entrance into a community or specific areas of a community typically along major transportation corridors.


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

GREENWAY: Linear stretches of open space that are used as public or private spaces, usually in the form of parks or trails.

HARRISON COUNTY BUILDING OFFICIAL: The building official is responsible for overseeing the approval process for building permits in the unincorporated

areas of Harrison County.

HARRISON COUNTY COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT COORDINATOR: The grant coordinator is responsible for supervising

the expenditure of Community Development Block Grant funds for housing and community development in the unincorporated areas of Harrison

County.

HARRISON COUNTY PLANNER: The Harrison County Planner is a newsletter designed to keep the citizens of unincorporated Harrison County

informed about the planning process underway in their communities.

HOMEBUYER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM: The Home Buyer’s Assistance Program or HAP enables a qualified home buyer to obtain an affordable first

mortgage loan through a private lender such as banks, savings and loan, or mortgage companies. HAP provides a no interest second mortgage loan of

$10,000 that may be applied toward a down payment and/or closing costs. This loan is deferred (no payment required) for 20 years. At the end of 20 years,

the loan is repaid over and up to 10 years.

INFILL: Development on vacant or underutilized sites within an established development pattern.

INVASIVE SPECIES: Non-indigenous species (e.g. plants or animals) that adversely affect the habitats they invade economically, environmentally or ecologically.

LAND USE CONFLICT IDENTIFICATION STRATEGY (LUCIS): A method using geographic information systems (GIS) technology to identify

areas most suitable for development.

LEADERSHIP IN ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN FOR NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT (LEED-ND): The LEED-ND

standards are intended to positively impact new development, encouraging developers to revitalize existing urban areas, reduce land consumption, reduce

automobile dependence, promote pedestrian activity, improve air quality, decrease stormwater runoff, and build more livable, sustainable, and enduring

communities.

LOCAL STREET: A street which is primarily intended to provide direct access to properties abutting the roadway and within the immediate vicinity. A

Local Street offers the lowest level of mobility and usually does not serve a bus route. Overall operating speeds are low in order to permit frequent stops

or turning movements to be made with maximum safety. Service to through traffic movement is deliberately discouraged.


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

MASTER PLANNED COMMUNITY: Master Planned Communities typically feature community points of entry, parks, recreational areas, schools and

community shopping. Within a planned community there are smaller communities offering a variety of home styles and price levels to choose from.

MINOR ARTERIAL: A roadway that carries a mix of local and through traffic. It links Collectors, and sometimes Local Streets, with Principal Arterials.

Minor arterials may carry local bus routes, and are designed with greater emphasis on traffic movement than on providing access to abutting land.

MIXED-USE AREA: A specified area including two or more different types of uses within its boundaries.

MULTIFAMILY HOUSING: Structures designed to accommodate several unrelated households. Multifamily residences include duplexes, garden apartments,

mid rise apartment buildings, and residential condominiums.

OPEN SPACE: Land which is provided or preserved for park or recreation purposes, conservation of land or other natural resources, historic or scenic

purposes, and wetlands.

PRINCIPAL ARTERIAL: A highway that serves as a main travel corridor. Significant intra area travel and important intra urban and intercity bus services

are served by this class of street. Some access is provided to abutting land, but the primary function of a Principal Arterial roadway is to carry throughtraffic.

RIPARIAN CORRIDOR: A buffer situated along or near the banks of a river, stream, or other waterway established with the purpose of protecting natural

features within its boundaries.

SANITARY SEWER: A wastewater collection system that relies on gravity or pumps for the movement of the waste from its source to a treatment facility.

SCENIC BYWAY: A Scenic Byway designation includes resource protection, community recognition, economic development, community visioning and

partnering. This designation may allow additional funding designated from the Mississippi Department of Transportation’s Scenic Byway Program and the

National Scenic Byways Discretionary Grants Program.

SECTOR MAP: The sector map is a tool that identifies desirable land use outcomes for the future of the community framed by SmartCode principles

and definitions. Application of the SmartCode along these sectors can guide development in Eastern Harrison County.

SETBACK: A legally enforceable buffer zone between properties that requires a minimum space be maintained between the property line and any building

construction.

SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL: Units designed to house one family per unit; this includes detached single family homes.


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COMMUNITY PLAN for EASTERN HARRISON COUNTY

SMARTCODE: The SmartCode is a model development code that uses progressive planning techniques. The SmartCode allows for planning at multiple

scales, from the regional context of the countryside to the smaller scale of local neighborhoods. At the broad countywide scale, the code recommends

dividing the landscape into different sectors. Each sector can then be further subdivided into transects, which more specifically identify the appropriate styles

and densities of development for different locations within the sector.

STEERING COMMITTEE: A group of citizens which serves as a liaison between the citizens and the planning team. They provided input throughout

the planning process and ensured the planning team for Eastern Harrison County addressed citizen’s concerns and incorporated community goals into

The Community Plan.

TRAFFIC ANALYSIS ZONES (TAZ): An area generally defined by specific geographic features or edges (Road, Bayou, River etc.) and used in most

transportation planning applications to summarize socioeconomic characteristics and travel data for that particular area. TAZs vary in size depending on

density and homogeneity of land uses, and are defined by local transportation agencies.

TRAILS: A separated pathway used for non-motorized travel and recreation.

WASTEWATER: Water mixed with waste matter.

WETLANDS: Any land characterized by wetness for a portion of the growing season. Wetlands are generally delineated on the basis of physical characteristics

such as soil properties indicative of wetness, the presence of vegetation with an unusually strong affinity for water, and the presence or evidence

of surface wetness. Wetland environments provide water quality improvement benefits and, in most cases, are ecologically valuable.

ZONING: Designating parcels of land for certain types and intensities of development in a way that is compatible with surrounding land and in conformance

with the community plan.

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