Trade Adjustment Assistance 2011 Annual Report - Texas ...

twc.state.tx.us

Trade Adjustment Assistance 2011 Annual Report - Texas ...

Trade

Adjustment

Assistance

2011 Annual Report


Texas Workforce Commission Mission

To promote and support an effective workforce

system that offers employers, individuals,

and communities the opportunity

to achieve and sustain

economic prosperity.


Trade Adjustment Assistance

2011 Annual Report

Texas Workforce Commission

101 East 15th Street

Austin, TX 78778-0001

(512) 463-2222


Trade Adjustment Assistance 2011 Annual Report

Abstract

Texas Labor Code §302.007 requires the Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) to submit an annual report

to the Texas legislature on the effectiveness of the federally funded Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA)

program. The types of work that are covered and eligible for the TAA program have evolved across

the years, but broadly

speaking, TAA provides

reemployment services

to individuals who lose

their jobs because of

foreign imports or shifts

in employment to foreign

Broadly speaking, TAA provides reemployment services to

individuals who lose their jobs because of foreign imports

or shifts in employment to foreign countries.

countries. TAA offers a variety of benefits and services to support Trade-certified workers in their search

for reemployment. This includes job training, job search and relocation allowances, income support, and

assistance with health care premium costs.

TAA program activity significantly increased due to the 2009 amendments to the program as part of the

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Based on those modifications, the number of certified

trade-related layoffs increased significantly, as did the number of workers covered by those layoffs who

became eligible for TAA services. The 2009 amendments expired on February 12, 2011, and the level of

trade activity has begun to decrease based on fewer layoffs being certified by the U.S. Department of

Labor (DOL). With congressional passage of the General System of Preferences (GSP) and the Trade

Adjustment Assistance Extension Act of 2011 (H.R. 2832) in October 2011, many of the 2009 amendment

provisions have been restored on a retroactive basis. This will result in the reconsideration of previously

denied Trade petitions, as well as broader

coverage to additional sectors of the economy

experiencing Trade dislocations and closures.

Accordingly, trade activity likely will increase

again over the next two years.

This annual report focuses on TAA customers

completing their participation in the program,

mainly in 2009 and 2010. Although the number

of individuals covered by and receiving services

under the 2009 amendments increased

significantly, most of the analyses of TAA

participant characteristics and outcomes

reflected in the report represent customers

covered by the law in place prior to the 2009

amendments.

Trade-certified workers in Texas continue to possess more education and a higher level of job skills than

had been the norm in prior years. With more education and transferable job skills, coupled with the vibrant

economy that Texas experienced prior to 2009, Trade-certified workers had great success in returning to

employment without occupational or remedial training. As Texas began to feel the impact of the economic

downturn affecting most of the country and with the expansion of the TAA program eligibility, more

Trade-certified customers sought services through the Texas workforce system, including training for new

careers. The total number of Trade-certified workers participating in TAA-approved training has increased

63 percent over the past two years, from 2,547 in State Fiscal Year (SFY) 2009 to 4,144 in SFY’11.

2


Trade Adjustment Assistance 2011 Annual Report

Introduction

This report provides the services and outcomes for Trade-certified workers who completed participation

in the Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) program. These participants were covered under certifications

subject to the rules of either the Trade Act of 2002 or the Trade and Globalization Adjustment Assistance

Act (TGAAA) of 2009 (effective May 18, 2009). The 2009 amendments significantly expanded the types

of business layoffs eligible for certification by the

U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) as trade related. As

a result, the number of workers covered by certified

Trade petitions increased dramatically, as did the

number of participants beginning training.

Given that this report focuses on the characteristics

and outcomes for individuals completing participation

in the program, most of the workers reflected in this

report received services governed by the Trade Act

of 2002. The federally funded TAA program provides

reemployment services to individuals who lose jobs

because of foreign imports or shifts of employment to

foreign countries, with variations on the types of jobs

and the countries to which the employment is shifting

based on statutory provisions in place at the time of

layoff. The Texas Workforce Commission administers a

program of services for Trade-certified individuals that

is fully integrated with the Texas workforce system.

Texas Labor Code §302.007 requires TWC to submit an

annual report to the Texas legislature on the

effectiveness of the TAA program. Specifically, the

statute requires TWC to report:

1) The number of individuals entering employment (Table 4);

2) Whether an individual who enters employment after completion of a program retains that

employment for at least six months (Table 5);

3) The wages earned by individuals before and after participation in the program (Table 6);

4) The occupations in which the individuals are placed (Table 7);

5) The number of individuals participating in integrated vocational and language training programs

(see Services and Outcomes discussion below); and

6) Whether a participant has acquired basic skills to enhance employability in the participant’s local

labor market (see Table 2 and Services and Outcomes discussion below).

3


Trade Adjustment Assistance 2011 Annual Report

The Trade Adjustment Assistance Program in Texas

Services and Outcomes

TWC coordinates the TAA program with all programs offered across the state through Workforce

Solutions Offices, including the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) services for dislocated workers.

Trade-certified workers are eligible for services including job search assistance, skills assessments, and

advanced vocational skills training to meet the needs of Texas employers as well as other assistance, such

as transportation reimbursements and child care while in training provided through Workforce Solutions

Offices. A description of

Trade services, benefits,

and service delivery for

Trade-certified workers is

provided in the Appendix.

Over the past two

years, the number of

Trade-certified workers

participating in TAA

supported training has

increased by 63 percent.

Trade-certified workers are eligible for services including

job search assistance, skills assessments, and advanced

vocational skills training to meet the needs of Texas

employers as well as other assistance, such as

transportation reimbursements and child care while in

training provided through Workforce Solutions Offices.

In comparison to the 2010 results, this report reflects improved outcomes for TAA participants. Following

participation in TAA programs, customers have experienced increased employment and retention

rates, and higher wage levels during the time covered by this report. The following is a summary of the

outcomes of the services provided to Trade-certified workers who recently ended participation in the TAA

program. Additional detail about TAA program participants and the applicable time frames covered is

available in Tables 1–7.

• 75 percent of the individuals who ended participation

in the TAA program found employment by the end of

the quarter following participation (Table 4);

• 91 percent of individuals who entered employment by

the end of the first quarter after ending participation

in the TAA program retained that employment for at

least six months (Table 5);

• Individuals who ended participation in the TAA

program and entered employment earned average

wages of $22,258.30 during the second and third

quarters of employment following participation, or

77 percent ($44,805,957 compared to $58,373,190) of

their prior wages (Table 6);

4


• Of the 1,919 participants who ended participation

in the TAA program and for whom the employing

industry after ending participation is known, the top

five industries in which individuals obtained jobs are

(Table 7):

‣ 47 percent (or 905) in manufacturing;

‣ 10 percent (or 194) in administrative and

support services;

‣ 10 percent (or 191) in health care and social

assistance;

‣ 4 percent (or 86) in public administration; and

‣ 4 percent (or 82) in retail trade;

• Of the 1,710 individuals who ended participation in the

TAA program after being enrolled in TAA-approved

training:

Trade Adjustment Assistance 2011 Annual Report

‣ 89 percent (1,518 of 1,710) participated in vocational training that also may have included

other remedial programs (data does not specifically identify remedial training that has

been integrated with a vocational program);

‣ 22 percent (or 373) participated in a remedial education program that was delivered

separately from vocational training; and

‣ 11 percent (or 181) participated in both vocational training and a separate remedial

education program.

Changes to Service Delivery

As previously referenced, the TAA program has

evolved over the years, with the types of businesses

and industries covered and the range of services

available to workers changing based on statutory

requirements. Trade-certified workers reflected in this

report were served under the rules established by the

Trade Act of 1974, the Trade Act of 2002, or TGAAA of

2009, depending on which law was in place when the

affected company was certified by DOL.

TGAAA, effective May 18, 2009, amended the Trade

Act of 2002 and made significant changes to the TAA

program. Before this legislation, the TAA program

benefited only manufacturing workers and only shifts

in production to a country with which the United

States had a free trade agreement. The amendment

expanded coverage to business services workers laid

off because their jobs or the services they supplied

were relocated to a foreign country (not limited to

those with which the United States had a free trade

agreement).

5


Trade Adjustment Assistance 2011 Annual Report

Additionally, TAA program funding nearly tripled through December 31, 2010. Furthermore, the TGAAA

amendments required that training programs for Trade-certified workers not be limited to the training

programs available to individuals eligible for the WIA dislocated worker program. This expanded the

training choices for Trade-certified workers in Texas.

When the TGAAA amendments became effective, Texas saw an increase in the number of companies

Trade-certified and the number of workers covered by those certifications. With the expiration of the

TGAAA amendments, the number and nature of companies certified under the Trade Act changed, as

shown in the following chart:

1

2

140

120

100

80

60

40

20

0

Trade Certifications by Industry

Based on Date of Certification

SFY 2010 SFY 2011

6

Manufacturing

Services

Finance

Wholesale Trade

Transportation

Oil and Gas

By virtue of TGAAA amendments, in addition to manufacturing companies, the state saw companies in

the following service sectors become certified:

• Information technology;

• Financial/accounting services;

• Software publishing; and

• Information help centers.

In SFY’11, the most common types of training approved for Trade-certified individuals were the following:

• Heating, air conditioning, and refrigeration mechanics;

• Network and computer system administrators;

• Medical assistants;

• Accounting and auditing clerks; and

• Computer support specialists.

On July 1, 2004, delivery of TAA program services was integrated into the workforce service delivery system

maintained by Local Workforce Development Boards (Boards). DOL regulations that went into effect

December 15, 2010, require that any staff funded by TAA administrative funds be merit staff—i.e., they must

be State of Texas employees. DOL recognizes that TAA administrative funds will probably be insufficient to

support enough merit staff to meet TAA service delivery needs across the state. TAA administrative funds

provide for 23 merit staff that have been placed in the areas with the highest concentrations of

Trade-certified individuals. Staff from federal partner programs, such as WIA and Employment Service,

supplement the TAA-funded merit staff in some areas and provide Trade services in other areas as needed.


Trade Adjustment Assistance 2011 Annual Report

Trade Activity

After several years of decline, trade activity began to increase during SFY’08, peaked in SFY’09, and then

declined in SFY’10 and SFY’11. The number of affected workers increased from 5,823 separated in SFY’08,

to 15,228 separated in SFY’09, then declined to 6,883 separated in SFY’10, and to 1,842 in SFY’11. There

were 10 pending petitions on August 31, 2011, covering workers laid off during SFY’11 (a certification

period goes back one year before the petition is filed with DOL). Additionally, with the passage of the

Trade Adjustment Assistance Extension Act of 2011, DOL has indicated that it is reconsidering 11

additional Texas petitions that

were previously denied and may

be permissible under the

reauthorization legislation. Many

petitions for certification are not

filed until after the layoffs occur.

As these petitions are certified,

the number of SFY’11 layoffs

covered under certifications will

continue to rise.

Between 2004 and 2007, TAA

activity was centered in the heavy

manufacturing sector of East

Texas. While East Texas continues

to have notable trade activity,

with the expansion of the TAA

program through TGAAA so as

to include companies providing services as well as manufacturing, Trade-certified service provision is now

centered in the metropolitan areas such as Dallas, Fort Worth, El Paso, Austin, and Houston.

Fig. 1 Trade Activity State Fiscal Year 2007 – State Fiscal Year 2011

(Worker activity data is based on the workers’ date of separation.)

16000

14000

12000

10000

8000

6000

Trade Affected Workers

Trainees

1

2

4000

2000

0

19%

24%

22%

22%

16%

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

7


Trade Adjustment Assistance 2011 Annual Report

Demographic Characteristics of Trade-Certified Workers

Table 3 summarizes the race/ethnicity, gender, age,

and education of Trade-certified workers who ended

participation in the TAA program in SFY’11.

In SFY’11, participation in the TAA program was almost

evenly distributed between men and women, with the

service population comprising 56 percent male and 43

percent female. Only 17 percent of the Trade-certified

workers leaving the TAA program in SFY’11 had less than a

GED credential or high school diploma when they entered

the program, and an increased percentage of the workers

(approximately 8.2 percent) had education beyond a high

school diploma or GED as compared to the prior year’s

analysis. Higher education levels reduce the percentage

of affected workers needing academic remedial and basic

education. However, some of the affected workers with

higher education levels have limited English proficiency

and require remedial English language training.

Funding and Expenditures

States receive formula-allocated TAA funding from a

capped congressional appropriation from DOL for

training, job search allowances, and relocation allowances.

TWC then distributes the funds to local workforce development areas (LWDAs) and works closely with the

Boards to encourage the use of all available funding sources to avoid service interruptions.

Trade Readjustment Allowance (TRA) payments provide weekly support to eligible Trade-certified

workers while they are enrolled in TAA-approved training. An eligible Trade-certified worker also can

receive some TRA payments if the training requirement is waived (allowable reasons for waiver are

included in the Appendix). TRA and Alternative/Reemployment Trade Adjustment Assistance (ATAA/RTAA)

payments are made through the state unemployment insurance (UI) payment system from dedicated

federal funds allocated by DOL. These are not UI benefits, are not charged against employers’ accounts,

and do not affect employers’ UI tax rates. As with UI payments, TRA and ATAA/RTAA payments are made

by debit card and direct

deposit.

Trade Readjustment Allowance (TRA) payments provide

weekly support to eligible Trade-certified workers while

they are enrolled in TAA-approved training.

TRA payments are classified

as extended benefits.

During 2011, many Tradecertified

workers received

extended benefits in the

form of Extended Unemployment Compensation. These extended benefits replaced TRA benefits on a

week-for-week basis. As a result, the amount of TRA benefits expended has dropped over the past two

years compared with prior years, even though in most instances, Trade-certified workers were receiving

benefits to support them during TAA-approved training. TRA payments have remained substantially

constant from 2010 to 2011 even though the number of participants in training has increased.

8


Texas Trade Act Expenditures for Federal Fiscal Year 2010

(Expenditure data for FFY’11 will be available February 15, 2012.)

Trade Adjustment Assistance 2011 Annual Report

Conclusion

Type of Payment Amount

Job Search Allowances $3,901

Relocation Allowances $73,835

Training $19,467,838

Alternative/Reemployment Trade Adjustment Assistance $696,174

Trade Readjustment Allowances $2,861,154

Total $23,102,902

Despite higher educational levels of the average Trade-certified worker in Texas compared to past years,

requests for occupational training have increased in recent years due to expansion of TGAAA and the

economic downturn. Increasing numbers of Trade-certified workers are coming from the high technology

industries located in large metropolitan areas, semiconductor production, and the business service

industry.

While there has been a decrease in trade activity during State Fiscal Year 2011, with the expiration of the

TGAAA provisions on February 12, 2011, and the reversion to the Trade Act of 2002, the passage of the

Trade Adjustment Assistance Extension Act of 2011 will likely result in increased Trade certifications and

workers receiving services through the TAA program.

9


Trade Adjustment Assistance 2011 Annual Report

Tables

Table 1


Table 2

Table 3

Trade Participants Ending Participation in the Trade Adjustment Assistance

Program October 1, 2009 – September 30, 2010, by Local Workforce

Development Area (LWDA)

Services Provided to Trade Participants Ending Participation in the Trade

Adjustment Assistance Program October 1, 2009 – September 30, 2010

Characteristics at Intake of Participants in the Trade Adjustment Assistance

Program in State Fiscal Year 2011 (September 1, 2010 – August 31, 2011)

Table 4 Entered Employment by the End of the First Quarter after Ending

Participation in the Trade Adjustment Assistance Program October 1, 2009 –

September 30, 2010, by Local Workforce Development Area (LWDA)

Table 5



Table 6



Employment Retention of Workers Who Entered Employment by the End of

the First Quarter after Ending Participation in the Trade Adjustment

Assistance Program April 1, 2009 – March 31, 2010, by Local Workforce

Development Area (LWDA)

Earnings of Workers Who Ended Participation in the Trade Adjustment

Assistance Program April 1, 2009 – March 31, 2010, by Local Workforce

Development Area (LWDA)

Table 7 Industries for Participants Reemployed within Three Quarters of Ending

Participation in the Trade Adjustment Assistance Program April 1, 2009 –

March 31, 2010, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS)

10


Trade Adjustment Assistance 2011 Annual Report

Table 1. Trade Participants Ending Participation in the Trade Adjustment Assistance Program

October 1, 2009 – September 30, 2010, by Local Workforce Development Area (LWDA)

LWDA

Participants*

Participants Receiving

Training, Job Search,

Relocation, or ATAA

No. With

Only

No. LWDA Name No. % Waivers** No. %

20 Alamo 71 2.13% 16 39 2.23%

16 Brazos Valley 20 0.60% 7 13 0.74%

24 Cameron County 24 0.72% 19 5 0.29%

14 Capital Area 108 3.24% 45 44 2.51%

26 Central Texas 138 4.14% 109 20 1.14%

22 Coastal Bend 7 0.21% NA 6 0.34%

12 Concho Valley 10 0.30% NA 10 0.57%

6 Dallas County 337 10.10% 173 146 8.34%

17 Deep East Texas 132 3.96% 102 29 1.66%

8 East Texas 670 20.08% 283 357 20.39%

19 Golden Crescent NA NA NA NA NA

28 Gulf Coast 24 0.72% 16 8 0.46%

13 Heart of Texas 6 0.18% NA 6 0.34%

23 Lower Rio Grande 130 3.90% 32 84 4.80%

27 Middle Rio Grande 3 0.09% NA 3 0.17%

4 North Central 235 7.04% 165 56 3.20%

7 North East Texas 498 14.92% 313 166 9.48%

3 North Texas 218 6.53% 43 163 9.31%

1 Panhandle 1 0.03% NA 1 0.06%

11 Permian Basin 1 0.03% NA 1 0.06%

15 Rural Capital 142 4.26% 56 59 3.37%

2 South Plains NA NA NA NA NA

21 South Texas NA NA NA NA NA

18 Southeast Texas NA NA NA NA NA

5 Tarrant County 202 6.05% 49 135 7.71%

25 Texoma 13 0.39% 5 7 0.40%

10 Upper Rio Grande 314 9.41% 40 269 15.36%

9 West Central 3 0.09% 1 2 0.11%

99 State of Texas 172 5.15% 18 127 7.25%

Statewide (Unduplicated) 3,337 1,475 1,751

* Participants may have been served by more than one LWDA. Nine individuals who were reported as receiving TRA

payments but did not receive any TAA services are counted as participants.

** See Appendix on page 18 for details on waivers of the TRA training requirement.

11


Trade Adjustment Assistance 2011 Annual Report

Table 2. Training Services Provided to Trade Participants Ending Participation in the Trade Adjustment

Assistance Program October 1, 2009 – September 30, 2010

Vocational Services

TAA Exiters

1 - Occupational/Vocational Training

1,491

3 - On-the-Job Training 4

78 - Customized Training 15

179 - Training Non-TWC 17

Vocational Total (Unique Record) 1,518

Remedial Services

2 - Basic Educational Skills/ABE 37

44 - English as a Second Language 84

54 - GED 82

70 - Short -Term Prevocational Services 310

Remedial Total (Unique Record) 373

Vocational and Remedial Total 181

Statewide Total (Unique Record) 1,710

12


Trade Adjustment Assistance 2011 Annual Report

Table 3. Characteristics at Intake of Participants in the Trade Adjustment Assistance Program in State

Fiscal Year 2011 (September 1, 2010 – August 31, 2011)

Race/Ethnicity*

1.61%

2.31%

1.61%

11.96%

19.24%

Black

Hispanic

White

Age**

Asian

0.10%

0.14%

33.48%

34.51%

More Than One Race

Other

7.34%

7.05%

Not Reported

31.72%

21.84%

< 20

20 - 29

30 - 39

40 - 49

50 - 59

>= 60

Highest Grade Completed

31.82%

Not Reported

3.68%

0.04%

0.06%

11.70%

29.88%

16.64%

38 %

Less than High School

High School or GED

Some college / Associate degree

Bachelor's degree

Some graduate school

Other certificate or credential

Not Reported

0.54%

Gender

56.13%

43.32%

* If multiple racial categories, participant is counted in

each category.

** Age at beginning of participation.

Male

Female

Not Reported

13


Trade Adjustment Assistance 2011 Annual Report

Table 4. Entered Employment by the End of the First Quarter after Ending Participation in the Trade

Adjustment Assistance Program October 1, 2009 – September 30, 2010, by Local Workforce Development

Area (LWDA)

LWDA

No.

LWDA Name

Wages

No. of Participants

No

Wages Total Entered Employment Rate (%)

20 Alamo 46 13 59 77.97

16 Brazos Valley 10 1 11 90.91

24 Cameron County 13 6 19 68.42

14 Capital Area 73 23 96 76.04

26 Central Texas 82 33 115 71.30

22 Coastal Bend 6 1 7 85.71

12 Concho Valley 8 1 9 88.89

6 Dallas County 181 132 313 57.83

17 Deep East Texas 42 55 97 43.30

8 East Texas 424 117 541 78.37

19 Golden Crescent NA NA NA NA

28 Gulf Coast 13 8 21 61.90

13 Heart of Texas 2 3 5 40.00

23 Lower Rio Grande 80 14 94 85.11

27 Middle Rio Grande 2 1 3 66.67

4 North Central 131 78 209 62.68

7 North East Texas 398 21 419 94.99

3 North Texas 96 25 121 79.34

1 Panhandle NA 1 1 NA

11 Permian Basin 1 NA 1 100.00

15 Rural Capital 82 29 111 73.87

2 South Plains NA NA NA NA

21 South Texas NA NA NA NA

18 Southeast Texas NA NA NA NA

5 Tarrant County 108 84 192 56.25

25 Texoma 7 5 12 58.33

10 Upper Rio Grande 217 42 259 83.78

9 West Central 2 NA 2 100.00

99 State of Texas 426 169 595 71.06

Statewide (Unduplicated) 2,024 690 2,714 74.58

Note: Some individuals were participants in more than one LWDA. For the statewide total, individuals are counted

only once. Not all service exiters are included in the Entered Employment measures. Those who are institutionalized

and have health/medical or family care issues, the deceased, reservists called to active duty, and workers who were

employed at the time of program entry are all excluded from this measure.

14


Trade Adjustment Assistance 2011 Annual Report

Table 5. Employment Retention of Workers Who Entered Employment by the End of the First Quarter

after Ending Participation in the Trade Adjustment Assistance Program April 1, 2009 – March 31, 2010, by

Local Workforce Development Area (LWDA)

No. of Participants

LWDA

No. LWDA Name Wages No Wages Total

Retention Rate (%)

20 Alamo 45 3 48 93.75

16 Brazos Valley 8 NA 8 100.00

24 Cameron County 7 3 10 70.00

14 Capital Area 34 6 40 85.00

26 Central Texas 129 25 154 83.77

22 Coastal Bend 4 NA 4 100.00

12 Concho Valley 10 NA 10 100.00

6 Dallas County 100 7 107 93.46

17 Deep East Texas 76 7 83 91.57

8 East Texas 506 63 569 88.93

19 Golden Crescent NA NA NA NA

28 Gulf Coast 4 NA 4 100.00

13 Heart of Texas 6 1 7 85.71

23 Lower Rio Grande 82 13 95 86.32

27 Middle Rio Grande 5 NA 5 100.00

4 North Central 78 8 86 90.70

7 North East Texas 423 8 431 98.14

3 North Texas 133 15 148 89.86

1 Panhandle 1 NA 1 100.00

11 Permian Basin 1 NA 1 100.00

15 Rural Capital 82 5 87 94.25

2 South Plains NA NA NA NA

21 South Texas NA NA NA NA

18 Southeast Texas NA NA NA NA

5 Tarrant County 80 7 87 91.95

25 Texoma 7 3 10 70.00

10 Upper Rio Grande 167 15 182 91.76

9 West Central NA NA NA NA

99 State of Texas 436 38 474 91.98

Statewide (Unduplicated) 2,028 194 2,222 91.27

Methodology: Percentage of participants who had wages, as reflected in the UI wage record data, in all three

quarters after leaving the TAA program.

Note: The statutory requirement is to report at least six months of employment. Three quarters are used to meet

this requirement because the first quarter typically does not show three complete months of employment.

15


Trade Adjustment Assistance 2011 Annual Report

Table 6. Earnings Replacement of Workers Who Ended Participation in the Trade Adjustment Assistance

Program April 1, 2009 – March 31, 2010, by Local Workforce Development Area (LWDA)

Prior Wages: 2 nd

and 3 rd Quarters

Before

Participation*

Post Wages:

2 nd and 3 rd

Quarters After

Participation**

Average Post

Wages: 2 nd and

3 rd Quarters

after Exit ***

LWDA

No. LWDA Name Participants

20 Alamo 45 $679,168.95 $620,924.33 $13,798.32

16 Brazos Valley 8 $174,136.10 $106,618.48 $13,327.31

24 Cameron County 7 $101,025.43 $84,394.99 $12,056.43

14 Capital Area 33 $916,913.57 $585,345.20 $17,737.73

26 Central Texas 126 $4,092,298.93 $2,666,337.58 $21,161.41

22 Coastal Bend 3 $48,808.58 $41,079.62 $13,693.21

12 Concho Valley 10 $192,824.58 $104,830.71 $10,483.07

6 Dallas County 99 $2,583,196.36 $2,142,395.22 $21,640.36

17 Deep East Texas 76 $1,696,360.74 $1,286,367.39 $16,925.89

8 East Texas 502 $15,493,507.10 $11,916,555.61 $23,738.16

19 Golden Crescent

28 Gulf Coast 4 $62,608.23 $90,068.72 $22,517.18

13 Heart of Texas 6 $120,480.59 $66,896.51 $11,149.42

23 Lower Rio Grande 81 $926,005.20 $861,950.05 $10,641.36

27 Middle Rio Grande 5 $73,592.56 $45,110.99 $9,022.20

4 North Central 77 $2,872,327.62 $2,159,272.91 $28,042.51

7 North East Texas 423 $17,215,854.39 $14,212,294.57 $33,598.81

3 North Texas 131 $2,928,331.11 $1,873,672.04 $14,302.84

1 Panhandle 1 $25,521.80 $9,332.30 $9,332.30

11 Permian Basin 1 $0.00 $14,571.60 $14,571.60

15 Rural Capital 81 $2,065,350.67 $1,449,867.79 $17,899.60

2 South Plains

21 South Texas

18 Southeast Texas

5 Tarrant County 80 $1,890,113.93 $1,504,939.39 $18,811.74

25 Texoma 7 $166,066.56 $150,198.67 $21,456.95

10 Upper Rio Grande 167 $2,479,576.32 $1,894,076.66 $11,341.78

9 West Central NA

99 State of Texas 432 $9,683,135.35 $7,000,000.94 $16,203.71

Statewide (Unduplicated) 2,013 $58,373,190.24 $44,805,957.24 $22,258.30

* Total wages earned in the second and third quarters preceding participation.

** Total wages earned in the second and third quarters after exit quarter.

*** Average wages earned in the second and third quarter after exit quarter.

16


Trade Adjustment Assistance 2011 Annual Report

Table 7. Industries for Participants Reemployed within Three Quarters of Ending Participation in the Trade

Adjustment Assistance Program April 1, 2009 – March 31, 2010, by North American Industry Classification

System (NAICS)

1

50%

45%

47.16%

40%

35%

30%

25%

20%

15%

10%

5%

10.11% 9.95%

4.48% 4.27%

Manufacturing

Administrative and

Support

Health Care & Social

Assistance

Public Administration

Retail Trade

2

3

0%

NAICS Code NAICS Title

Participants

No. %

11 Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting 5 0.26%

21 Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction 44 2.29%

22 Utilities 17 0.89%

23 Construction 68 3.54%

31 - 33 Manufacturing 905 47.16%

42 Wholesale Trade 60 3.13%

44 - 45 Retail Trade 82 4.27%

48 - 49 Transportation and Warehousing 58 3.02%

51 Information 11 0.57%

52 Finance and Insurance 18 0.94%

53 Real Estate and Rental and Leasing 12 0.63%

54 Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services 51 2.66%

55 Management of Companies and Enterprises 11 0.57%

56

Total

Reported

Administrative and Support and Waste

Management and Remediation Services

194 10.11%

61 Educational Services 67 3.49%

62 Health Care and Social Assistance 191 9.95%

71 Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation 4 0.21%

72 Accommodation and Food Services 19 0.99%

81 Other Services (except Public Administration) 16 0.83%

92 Public Administration 86 4.48%

1,919

17


Trade Adjustment Assistance 2011 Annual Report

Appendix

Description of Trade Services and Benefits for Trade-Certified Workers

Training assistance can be provided to Trade-certified workers

when no suitable work is available within their local commuting

area. Training opportunities include on-the-job training (OJT),

vocational or technical training, customized training, and remedial

education as part of an occupational training program. Generally,

participants must complete training programs within 104, 130 or

156 weeks depending on petition number. The training provides

job skills that participants need to obtain employment.

Weekly income support benefits (Trade Readjustment

Allowances) may be paid to eligible participants after they

exhaust their state UI benefits. The income is intended to provide

financial support to participants and their families while the

participants are in a TAA-approved training program. The amount

of income support payments is typically the same as the

participant’s UI payments; however, these are not UI benefits, are

not charged against employers’ accounts, and do not affect

employers’ UI tax rates. Generally, the total length of time a

participant may receive weekly benefits, including UI and TRA,

cannot exceed 104 weeks or 130 weeks, depending on the law in

effect at the time the customer’s Trade petition was certified.

Benefit payments can be extended for participants who need

remedial or prerequisite training to enroll in occupational training

or to become job ready.

A waiver of the TRA training requirement can be issued in certain cases when it is not feasible to approve

training. The waiver, which permits an individual to be eligible for TRA without participating in training, can be

issued for any one of the following six reasons:

1. The participant has marketable skills sufficient to get a job in the occupation he or she has selected.*

2. Training is not feasible because of the participant’s health reasons.*

3. The participant is within two years of retirement.*

4. The participant is subject to recall to his or her laid off position within six months.

5. Enrollment in suitable training is available within 60 days and the participant is supported by TRA

until the start of training.

6. Suitable training is not available at a reasonable cost.

*Not available for certifications under the 2011 Trade Adjustment Assistance Extension Act

Unemployment rates, industry profiles, and the age, education, and skills of those who are laid off all

contribute to the waiver rate in a given LWDA.

18


Trade Adjustment Assistance 2011 Annual Report

Health Coverage Tax Credit (HCTC) pays a portion of the cost of health insurance premiums for health

coverage under the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act—COBRA—of 1985 and other qualified

health insurance plans. An individual must be eligible for

TRA payments to be eligible for HCTC.

Alternative Trade Adjustment Assistance/ Reemployment

Trade Adjustment Assistance (ATAA/RTAA) pays a 50

percent pay differential to older Trade-certified workers

who find employment within 26 weeks of being laid off.

Job search allowances cover the expenses participants

incur in seeking employment outside their normal

commuting area. Participants may receive up to 90 or 100

percent, depending on petition number, of necessary

transportation and living expenses (with a maximum of

$1,250 or $1,500) while searching for such employment.

Relocation allowances pay 90 or 100 percent

(depending on petition number) of the reasonable and

necessary expenses of moving participants, their families,

and their household goods to a new location, if participants

obtain employment outside their normal commuting area.

As part of the relocation allowance, participants may

receive a lump sum payment equal to three times their

former average weekly wage (with a maximum of $1,250 or

$1,500) to pay deposits and help them get settled.

19


Trade Adjustment Assistance 2011 Annual Report

Description of Service Delivery for Trade-Certified Workers

Service delivery begins when an employer provides notice of an impending layoff or plant closure, when

TWC staff receives notification of an event by other means, or when a Trade petition is filed. The Board in the

affected area provides Rapid Response services by meeting with the employer to arrange early intervention

reemployment services for affected workers. The Board and Workforce Solutions Office staff provides the

employer and employees with information about workforce services, including Trade services.

Rapid Response early intervention services provide immediate aid to potentially dislocated workers affected

by plant closings and large layoffs. The objective is to help these workers find reemployment as quickly as

possible, often before their

last day of work. During

the rapid response effort,

Workforce Solutions Office

staff conducts employee

orientations and seminars

concerning job search skills,

stress management, financial

management, and local labor

market information. Activities

such as local job fairs and job

referrals also occur.

If workers have been certified

under a Trade petition by

DOL, or if a certification will

likely occur, orientations

and assistance include

information about Trade

services and benefits.

Providing this information to employees during Rapid Response activities helps to ensure that Tradecertified

workers apply for services and file for benefits as early as possible to meet the TRA benefit eligibility

timelines. Following job separation, Trade-certified workers can access WorkInTexas.com to find jobs that

match their skills and experience, or they can receive staff-assisted job search services through a Texas

Workforce Solutions Office.

Through co-enrollment in WIA dislocated worker services, Trade-certified workers can receive thorough

assessment services. If a Trade-certified worker lacks the job skills required to secure suitable employment,

he or she can receive occupational training to be more competitive in the labor market. TAA occupational

training can be provided through Board-approved training providers, other accredited or licensed institutions,

or customized training or on-the-job (OJT) training with an employer. Workforce Solutions Office staff

continues to work with participants while they are in training. TWC continuously stresses the need for training

that integrates occupational job skills with the necessary basic education and language skills required for the

occupation. While in training, the participant can file claims for weekly support payments through TWC’s UI

system.

Not all workers eligible under a Trade certification take advantage of the available services. Many workers

who are potentially eligible for Trade services and benefits find reemployment quickly, take advantage of

retirement options or transfers within a company, or become self-employed.

20


Texas Workforce Commission

101 East 15th Street

Austin, Texas 78778-0001

(512) 463-2222

taa@twc.state.tx.us

http://www.texasworkforce.org

Equal Opportunity Employer/Programs

Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities.

Copies of this publication have been distributed in compliance with the State Depository Law,

and are available for public use through the Texas State Publications Depository

Program at the Texas State Library and other state depository libraries.


ALAMO • BRAZOS VALLEY •

CAMERON COUNTY • CAPITAL AREA •

CENTRAL TEXAS • COASTAL BEND • CONCHO

VALLEY • GREATER DALLAS • DEEP EAST

TEXAS • EAST TEXAS • GOLDEN CRESCENT

• GULF COAST • HEART OF TEXAS • LOWER

RIO GRANDE VALLEY • MIDDLE RIO GRANDE

• NORTH CENTRAL • NORTHEAST TEXAS •

NORTH TEXAS • PANHANDLE •

PERMIAN BASIN • RURAL CAPITAL AREA

• SOUTHEAST TEXAS • SOUTH PLAINS •

SOUTH TEXAS • TARRANT COUNTY • TEXOMA

• UPPER RIO GRANDE •

WEST CENTRAL

05640-002A (0112)

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines